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                                                 Union Calendar No. 718
                                                 
114th Congress   }                                      {   Report   
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES       
2d Session       }                                      {   114-907
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     


             REPORT ON LEGISLATIVE AND OVERSIGHT ACTIVITIES

                                 of the

                      HOUSE COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND
                                SECURITY

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                    ONE HUNDRED FOURTEENTH CONGRESS

                             second session

                   (Pursuant to House Rule XI, 1(d))
                   
                   

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]






January 3, 2017.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed
              
              


                  LEGISLATIVE AND OVERSIGHT ACTIVITIES

                 OF THE COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY

                             114th Congress
                                     

  

                                     

                                     

                                                 Union Calendar No. 718
                                                 
114th Congress  }                                           {   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES                 
 2d Session     }                                           {   114-907
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     


             REPORT ON LEGISLATIVE AND OVERSIGHT ACTIVITIES

                                 of the

                      HOUSE COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND

                                SECURITY

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                    ONE HUNDRED FOURTEENTH CONGRESS

                             second session

                   (Pursuant to House Rule XI, 1(d))
                   

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]


January 3, 2017.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed
              
              
              
              
                                  _________ 
                             
                     U.S. GOVERNMENT PUBLISHING OFFICE
23-222                       WASHINGTON : 2017       

              
              
              
              
              
              
                     COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY

                   MICHAEL T. McCAUL, Texas, Chairman
LAMAR SMITH, Texas                   BENNIE G. THOMPSON, Mississippi
PETER T. KING, New York              LORETTA SANCHEZ, California
MIKE ROGERS, Alabama                 SHEILA JACKSON LEE, Texas
CANDICE S. MILLER, Michigan, Vice    JAMES R. LANGEVIN, Rhode Island
    Chair                            BRIAN HIGGINS, New York
JEFF DUNCAN, South Carolina          CEDRIC L. RICHMOND, Louisiana
TOM MARINO, Pennsylvania             WILLIAM R. KEATING, Massachusetts
LOU BARLETTA, Pennsylvania           DONALD M. PAYNE, Jr., New Jersey
SCOTT PERRY, Pennsylvania            FILEMON VELA, Texas
CURT CLAWSON, Florida                BONNIE WATSON COLEMAN, New Jersey
JOHN KATKO, New York                 KATHLEEN M. RICE, New York
WILL HURD, Texas                     NORMA J. TORRES, California
EARL L. ``BUDDY'' CARTER, Georgia
MARK WALKER, North Carolina
BARRY LOUDERMILK, Georgia
MARTHA McSALLY, Arizona
JOHN RATCLIFFE, Texas
DANIEL M. DONOVAN, Jr., New York

                   Brendan P. Shields, Staff Director
                    Joan V. O'Hara,  General Counsel
                    Michael S. Twinchek, Chief Clerk
                I. Lanier Avant, Minority Staff Director
                
                         LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

                              ----------                              

                          House of Representatives,
                            Committee on Homeland Security,
                                   Washington, DC, January 3, 2017.
Hon. Karen L. Haas,
Clerk of the House of Representatives,
The Capitol, Washington, DC.
    Dear Ms. Haas: Pursuant to Rule X and clause 1(d)(1) of 
Rule XI of the Rules of the House of Representatives, attached, 
please find the report of the legislative and oversight 
activities of the Committee on Homeland Security during the 
114th Congress.
            Sincerely,
                                         Michael T. McCaul,
                                                          Chairman.
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          



                                                 Union Calendar No. 718
                                                 
114th Congress     }                                        {   Report
                          HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session        }                                        {  114-907

======================================================================



 
LEGISLATIVE AND OVERSIGHT ACTIVITIES OF THE COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND 
                                SECURITY



                             114TH CONGRESS

                                _______
                                

January 3, 2017.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

  Mr. McCaul, from the Committee on Homeland Security, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                                Overview

    The Committee on Homeland Security met on January 21, 2015, 
for an organizational meeting for the 114th Congress under the 
direction of Chairman Michael T. McCaul of Texas. The Committee 
Membership, was set at 30 Members; with 18 Republicans, and 12 
Democrats.
    The Committee established six Subcommittees: The 
Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence; the 
Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security; the Subcommittee 
on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection and Security 
Technologies; the Subcommittee on Oversight and Management 
Efficiency; the Subcommittee on Transportation Security; and 
the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
Jurisdiction and Legislative History.............................     3
Membership and Organization......................................     9
History of the Committee on Homeland Security....................    13
Full Committee
    Legislative Activities.......................................    26
    Oversight Activities.........................................   147
Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence
    Legislative Activities.......................................   165
    Oversight Activities.........................................   172
Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency
    Legislative Activities.......................................   185
    Oversight Activities.........................................   193
Subcommittee on Transportation Security
    Legislative Activities.......................................   215
    Oversight Activities.........................................   235
Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security
    Legislative Activities.......................................   247
    Oversight Activities.........................................   265
Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and 
    Security Technologies
    Legislative Activities.......................................   277
    Oversight Activities.........................................   292
Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
    Communications
    Legislative Activities.......................................   301
    Oversight Activities.........................................   318
Committee Oversight Plan
    Part A, Oversight Plan As Agreed to..........................   337
    Part B, Implementation of the Oversight Plan.................   350
Appendices
    Appendix I--Committee Rules..................................   365
    Appendix II--Membership Changes to the Committee.............   375
    Appendix III--List of Public Laws............................   383
    Appendix IV--Committee Legislative Reports...................   387
    Appendix V--Status of Legislation Referred to the Committee..   397
    Appendix VI--Executive Communications, Memorials, and 
      Presidential Messages......................................   413
    Appendix VII--Committee Staff................................   417
    Appendix VIII--Witnesses.....................................   421
    Appendix IX--Printed Hearings................................   445
    Appendix X--Committee Prints.................................   453
    Appendix XI--Summary of Committee Activities.................   455
Additional Views.................................................   457

                  Jurisdiction and Legislative History

    A provision for the establishment of a Committee on 
Homeland Security was included in H. Res. 5, the Rules of the 
House of Representatives for the 114th Congress, agreed to on 
January 3, 2015. The jurisdiction of the Committee is as 
follows:

                              HOUSE RULE X

                       ORGANIZATION OF COMMITTEES
Committees and their legislative jurisdictions
    1. There shall be in the House the following standing committees, 
each of which shall have the jurisdiction and related functions 
assigned by this clause and clauses 2, 3, and 4. All bills, 
resolutions, and other matters relating to subjects within the 
jurisdiction of the standing committees listed in this clause shall be 
referred to those committees, in accordance with clause 2 of rule XII, 
as follows:
    (I) Committee on Homeland Security
     (1)  Overall homeland security policy.
     (2)  Organization, administration, and general management of the 
Department of Homeland Security.
     (3)  Functions of the Department of Homeland Security relating to 
the following:
      (A)  Border and port security (except immigration policy and non-
border enforcement).
      (B) Customs (except customs revenue).
      (C)  Integration, analysis, and dissemination of homeland 
security information.
      (D)  Domestic preparedness for and collective response to 
terrorism.
      (E)  Research and development.
      (F)  Transportation security.
General oversight responsibilities
    2. (a)  The various standing committees shall have general 
oversight responsibilities as provided in paragraph (b) in order to 
assist the House in--
     (1)  its analysis, appraisal, and evaluation of--
      (A)  the application, administration, execution, and 
effectiveness of Federal laws; and
      (B)  conditions and circumstances that may indicate the necessity 
or desirability of enacting new or additional legislation; and
     (2)  its formulation, consideration, and enactment of changes in 
Federal laws, and of such additional legislation as may be necessary or 
appropriate.
     (b)(1)  In order to determine whether laws and programs addressing 
subjects within the jurisdiction of a committee are being implemented 
and carried out in accordance with the intent of Congress and whether 
they should be continued, curtailed, or eliminated, each standing 
committee (other than the Committee on Appropriations) shall review and 
study on a continuing basis--
      (A)  the application, administration, execution, and 
effectiveness of laws and programs addressing subjects within its 
jurisdiction;
      (B)  the organization and operation of Federal agencies and 
entities having responsibilities for the administration and execution 
of laws and programs addressing subjects within its jurisdiction;
      (C)  any conditions or circumstances that may indicate the 
necessity or desirability of enacting new or additional legislation 
addressing subjects within its jurisdiction (whether or not a bill or 
resolution has been introduced with respect thereto); and
      (D)  future research and forecasting on subjects within its 
jurisdiction.
     (2)  Each committee to which subparagraph (1) applies having more 
than 20 members shall establish an oversight subcommittee, or require 
its subcommittees to conduct oversight in their respective 
jurisdictions, to assist in carrying out its responsibilities under 
this clause. The establishment of an oversight subcommittee does not 
limit the responsibility of a subcommittee with legislative 
jurisdiction in carrying out its oversight responsibilities.
    (c)  Each standing committee shall review and study on a continuing 
basis the impact or probable impact of tax policies affecting subjects 
within its jurisdiction as described in clauses 1 and 3.
    (d)(1)  Not later than February 15 of the first session of a 
Congress, each standing committee shall, in a meeting that is open to 
the public and with a quorum present, adopt its oversight plan for that 
Congress. Such plan shall be submitted simultaneously to the Committee 
on Oversight and Government Reform and to the Committee on House 
Administration. In developing its plan each committee shall, to the 
maximum extent feasible--
      (A)  consult with other committees that have jurisdiction over 
the same or related laws, programs, or agencies within its jurisdiction 
with the objective of ensuring maximum coordination and cooperation 
among committees when conducting reviews of such laws, programs, or 
agencies and include in its plan an explanation of steps that have been 
or will be taken to ensure such coordination and cooperation;
      (B)  review specific problems with Federal rules, regulations, 
statutes, and court decisions that are ambiguous, arbitrary, or 
nonsensical, or that impose severe financial burdens on individuals;
      (C)  give priority consideration to including in its plan the 
review of those laws, programs, or agencies operating under permanent 
budget authority or permanent statutory authority;
      (D)  have a view toward ensuring that all significant laws, 
programs, or agencies within its jurisdiction are subject to review 
every 10 years;
      (E)  have a view toward insuring against duplication of Federal 
programs; and
      (F)  include proposals to cut or eliminate programs, including 
mandatory spending programs, that are inefficient, duplicative, 
outdated, or more appropriately administered by State or local 
governments.
     (2)  Not later than March 31 in the first session of a Congress, 
after consultation with the Speaker, the Majority Leader, and the 
Minority Leader, the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform shall 
report to the House the oversight plans submitted by committees 
together with any recommendations that it, or the House leadership 
group described above, may make to ensure the most effective 
coordination of oversight plans and otherwise to achieve the objectives 
of this clause.
    (e)  The Speaker, with the approval of the House, may appoint 
special ad hoc oversight committees for the purpose of reviewing 
specific matters within the jurisdiction of two or more standing 
committees.
Special oversight functions
    3. (g)(1)  The Committee on Homeland Security shall review and 
study on a continuing basis all Government activities relating to 
homeland security, including the interaction of all departments and 
agencies with the Department of Homeland Security.
     (2)  In addition, the committee shall review and study on a 
primary and continuing basis all Government activities, programs and 
organizations related to homeland security that fall within its primary 
legislative jurisdiction.

                               __________

           Legislative History to Accompany Changes to Rule X

           [Congressional Record, January 4, 2005, Page H25]

             Rule X and the Committee on Homeland Security

Legislative History
    Overall homeland security policy--The jurisdiction of the Committee 
on Homeland Security over ``overall homeland security policy'' is to be 
interpreted on a government-wide or multi-agency basis similar to the 
Committee on Government Reform's jurisdiction over ``overall economy, 
efficiency, and management of government operations and activities. . . 
.'' Surgical addresses of homeland security policy in sundry areas of 
jurisdiction occupied by other committees would not be referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security on the basis of ``overall'' homeland 
security policy jurisdiction.
    For example, the Committee on Homeland Security shall have 
jurisdiction over a bill coordinating the homeland security efforts by 
all of the critical infrastructure protection sectors. Jurisdiction 
over a bill addressing the protection of a particular sector would lie 
with the committee otherwise having jurisdiction over that sector.
    Organization and administration of the Department of Homeland 
Security--The jurisdiction of the Committee on Homeland Security would 
apply only to organizational or administrative aspects of the 
Department where another committee's jurisdiction did not clearly 
apply. The Committee's jurisdiction is to be confined to organizational 
and administrative efforts and would not apply to programmatic efforts 
within the Department of Homeland Security within the jurisdiction of 
other committees.
    Homeland Security Oversight--This would vest the Committee on 
Homeland Security with oversight jurisdiction over the homeland 
security community of the United States. Nothing in this clause shall 
be construed as prohibiting or otherwise restricting the authority of 
any other committee to study and review homeland security activities to 
the extent that such activity directly affects a matter otherwise 
within the jurisdiction of that committee.
Individual Committee Concerns
    Agriculture--The jurisdiction of the Committee on Homeland Security 
over ``border and port security'' shall be limited to agricultural 
importation and entry inspection activities of the Department of 
Homeland Security under section 421 of the Homeland Security Act of 
2002. The Committee on Agriculture shall retain jurisdiction over 
animal and plant disease policy including the authority reserved to the 
Department of Agriculture to regulate policy under section 421 of the 
Homeland Security Act of 2002, and the Animal Health Protection Act, 
the Plant Protection Act, the Plant Quarantine Act, and the Agriculture 
Quarantine Inspection User Fee Account. The Committee on Agriculture 
shall retain jurisdiction over the agricultural research and diagnosis 
mission at the Plum Island Animal Disease Center.
    Armed Services--The Committee on Armed Services shall retain 
jurisdiction over warfighting, the military defense of the United 
States, and other military activities, including any military response 
to terrorism, pursuant to section 876 of the Homeland Security Act of 
2002.
    Energy and Commerce--The Committee on Homeland Security shall have 
jurisdiction over measures that address the Department of Homeland 
Security's activities for domestic preparedness and collective response 
to terrorism. The words ``to terrorism'' require a direct relation to 
terrorism. The Committee on Homeland Security's jurisdiction over 
``collective response to terrorism'' means that it shall receive 
referrals of bills addressing the Department of Homeland Security's 
responsibilities for, and assistance to, first responders as a whole. 
The Committee on Energy and Commerce (and other relevant committees) 
shall retain their jurisdiction over bills addressing the separate 
entities that comprise the first responders. For example, the Committee 
on Energy and Commerce shall retain its jurisdiction over a bill 
directing the Department of Health and Human Services to train 
emergency medical personnel.
    Financial Services--The Committee on Financial Services shall 
retain jurisdiction over the National Flood Insurance Program and 
Emergency Food and Shelter Program of FEMA, and the Defense Production 
Act. The Committee on Financial Services shall retain its jurisdiction 
over the anti-money laundering, terrorist financing, and anti-
counterfeiting activities within the Department of the Treasury and the 
financial regulators.
    Government Reform--The Committee on Homeland Security shall have 
jurisdiction over ``the organization and administration of the 
Department of Homeland Security.'' The Committee on Government Reform 
shall retain jurisdiction over federal civil service, the overall 
economy, efficiency, and management of government operations and 
activities, including Federal procurement, and federal paperwork 
reduction. The Committee on Government Reform shall retain jurisdiction 
over government-wide information management efforts including the 
Federal Information Security Management Act. The Committee on Homeland 
Security shall have jurisdiction over integration, analysis, and 
dissemination of homeland security information by the Department of 
Homeland Security, and the Committee on Government Reform shall retain 
jurisdiction over measures addressing public information and records 
generally including the Privacy Act and the Freedom of Information Act. 
The Committee on Government Reform shall have jurisdiction over the 
policy coordination responsibilities of the Office of Counternarcotics 
Enforcement.
    Intelligence--The Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence shall 
retain jurisdiction over the intelligence and intelligence-related 
activities of all departments and agencies of the Federal Government, 
including the Office of the Director of National Intelligence and the 
National Counterterrorism Center as defined in the Intelligence Reform 
and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004.
    Judiciary--The Committee on the Judiciary shall retain jurisdiction 
over immigration policy and non-border enforcement of the immigration 
laws. Its jurisdiction over immigration policy shall include matters 
such as the immigration and naturalization process, numbers of aliens 
(including immigrants and non-immigrants) allowed, classifications and 
lengths of allowable stay, the adjudication of immigration petitions 
and the requirements for the same, the domestic adjudication of 
immigration petitions and applications submitted to the Department of 
Labor or the Department of Homeland Security and setting policy with 
regard to visa issuance and acceptance. Its jurisdiction over non-
border enforcement shall be limited to those aspects of immigration 
enforcement not associated with the immediate entry of individuals into 
the country, including those aspects of the Bureau of Immigration and 
Customs Enforcement. The Committee on Homeland Security shall have 
jurisdiction over border and port security including the immigration 
responsibilities of inspectors at ports of entry and the border patrol. 
As used in the new Rule X(1)(l)(9) and this legislative history, the 
word ``immigration'' shall be construed to include ``naturalization'' 
and no substantive change is intended by the new rule's not containing 
the word ``naturalization.''
    Science--The Committee on Science shall retain some jurisdiction 
over the research and development activities of the Department of 
Homeland Security as such matters are incidental to the Committee on 
Science's existing jurisdiction (except where those activities are in 
the jurisdiction of another committee).
    Transportation and Infrastructure--The Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure shall retain jurisdiction over the Coast Guard. 
However, the Committee on Homeland Security has jurisdiction over port 
security, and some Coast Guard responsibilities in that area will fall 
within the jurisdiction of both committees. Jurisdiction over emergency 
preparedness will be split between the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure and the Committee on Homeland Security. The Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure shall retain its jurisdiction under 
clause 1(r)(2) over ``federal management of emergencies and natural 
disasters.'' This means that the committee retains its general 
jurisdiction over the emergency preparedness and response operations of 
the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Bills addressing FEMA's 
general preparation for disaster from any cause shall be referred to 
the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. The Committee on 
Homeland Security shall have jurisdiction over the Department of 
Homeland Security's responsibilities with regard to emergency 
preparedness only as they relate to acts of terrorism. Thus, the 
Committee on Homeland Security shall have jurisdiction over the 
responsibilities of the Office for Domestic Preparedness, in accordance 
with section 430 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002.
    As indicated earlier, the Committee on Homeland Security's 
jurisdiction over ``collective response to terrorism'' means that it 
would receive referrals of bills addressing the Department of Homeland 
Security's responsibilities for, and assistance to, first responders as 
a whole and not over measures addressing first responder communities 
individually.
    The Committee on Homeland Security shall have jurisdiction over the 
functions of the Department of Homeland Security relating to 
transportation security, while the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure shall retain its jurisdiction over transportation 
safety. In general, the Committee on Homeland Security would have 
jurisdiction over bills addressing the Transportation Security 
Administration and the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure 
would have jurisdiction over bills addressing the various entities 
within the Department of Transportation having responsibility for 
transportation safety, such as the Federal Aviation Administration and 
the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. The jurisdiction of 
the Committee on Homeland Security does not include expenditures from 
trust funds under the jurisdiction of other committees, including but 
not limited to the Highway Trust Fund, the Airport and Airway Trust 
Fund, the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund, the Federal Buildings Fund, 
and the Inland Waterways Trust Fund.
    Ways and Means--The jurisdiction of the Committee on Ways and Means 
over ``customs revenue'' is intended to include those functions 
contemplated in section 412(b)(2) of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
and includes those functions as carried out in collection districts and 
ports of entry and delivery.

                               __________

Memorandum of Understanding Between the Committee on Transportation and 
         Infrastructure and the Committee on Homeland Security

              [Congressional Record, H15, January 4, 2007]

    On January 4, 2005, the U.S. House of Representatives adopted H. 
Res. 5, establishing the Rules of the House for the 109th Congress. 
Section 2(a) established the Committee on Homeland Security as a 
standing committee of the House of Representatives with specific 
legislative jurisdiction under House Rule X. A legislative history to 
accompany the changes to House Rule X was inserted in the Congressional 
Record on January 4, 2005.
    The Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and the 
Committee on Homeland Security (hereinafter ``Committees'') jointly 
agree to the January 4, 2005 legislative history as the authoritative 
source of legislative history of section 2(a) of H. Res. 5 with the 
following two clarifications.
    First, with regard to the Federal Emergency Management Agency's, 
FEMA, emergency preparedness and response programs, the Committee on 
Homeland Security has jurisdiction over the Department of Homeland 
Security's responsibilities with regard to emergency preparedness and 
collective response only as they relate to terrorism. However, in light 
of the federal emergency management reforms that were enacted as title 
VI of Public Law 109(295, a bill amending FEMA's all-hazards emergency 
preparedness programs that necessarily addresses FEMA's terrorism 
preparedness programs would be referred to the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure; in addition, the Committee on 
Homeland Security would have a jurisdictional interest in such bill. 
Nothing in this Memorandum of Understanding affects the jurisdiction of 
the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure of the Robert T. 
Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act and the Federal 
Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974.
    Second, with regard to port security, the Committee on Homeland 
Security has jurisdiction over port security, and some Coast Guard 
responsibilities in that area fall within the jurisdiction of both 
Committees. A bill addressing the activities, programs, assets, and 
personnel of the Coast Guard as they relate to port security and non-
port security missions would be referred to the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure; in addition, the Committee on 
Homeland Security would have a jurisdictional interest in such bill.
    This Memorandum of Understanding between the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure and the Committee on Homeland 
Security provides further clarification to the January 4, 2005 
legislative history of the jurisdiction of the Committees only with 
regard to these two specific issues. The Memorandum does not address 
any other issues and does not affect the jurisdiction of other 
committees.
                                          James L. Oberstar
                                                Chairman-designate,
                       Committee on Transportation & Infrastructure
                                         Bennie G. Thompson
                                                Chairman-designate,
                                     Committee on Homeland Security

                               __________

                     Changes to the Standing Rules

                      Section-By-Section Analysis

                             113th Congress

              [Congressional Record, H12 January 3, 2013]

    Clarifications in Rule X. Subsection (c) makes two clarifications 
with respect to clause 1 of rule X. Paragraph (1) clarifies that the 
Committee on Homeland Security's jurisdiction includes the general 
management of the Department of Homeland Security. This change is 
intended to clarify the Committee's existing jurisdiction over the 
organization and administration of the department, and is not intended 
to alter the pattern of bill referrals to the Committee on Homeland 
Security, nor is it intended to alter the existing oversight 
jurisdiction of the Committee on Homeland Security. Paragraph (2) 
conforms terminology used in the Committee on Natural Resources 
jurisdiction to terminology recognized by the Departments of State and 
Interior.

   Membership and Organization of the Committee on Homeland Security

                                (18-12)

                     COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY

                   Michael T. McCaul, Texas, Chairman

Lamar Smith, Texas
Peter T. King, New York
Mike Rogers, Alabama
Candice S. Miller, Michigan
Jeff Duncan, South Carolina
Tom Marino, Pennsylvania
Lou Barletta, Pennsylvania
Scott Perry, Pennsylvania
Curt Clawson, Florida
John Katko, New York
Will Hurd, Texas
Earl L. ``Buddy'' Carter, Georgia
Mark Walker, North Carolina
Barry Loudermilk, Georgia
Martha McSally, Arizona
John Ratcliffe, Texas
Daniel M. Donovan, Jr., New York    Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi
                                    Loretta Sanchez, California
                                    Sheila Jackson Lee, Texas
                                    James R. Langevin, Rhode Island
                                    Brian Higgins, New York
                                    Cedric L. Richmond, Louisiana
                                    William R. Keating, Massachusetts
                                    Donald M. Payne, Jr., New Jersey
                                    Filemon Vela, Texas
                                    Bonnie Watson Coleman, New Jersey
                                    Kathleen M. Rice, New York
                                    Norma J. Torres, California
                               __________

    Appointment of Mr. Michael T. McCaul as Chair, and Mr. 
Bennie G. Thompson of Mississippi as Ranking Minority Member on 
January 6, 2015, pursuant to H. Res. 6 and H. Res. 7, 
respectively.
    Appointment of Majority and Minority Members to the 
Committee on January 13, 2015, pursuant to H. Res. 29 and H. 
Res. 30, respectively.
    Mr. Steven M. Palazzo of Mississippi resigned as a Member 
of the Committee on Homeland Security on March 24, 2015. (Cong. 
Rec. H1855).
    Mr. Patrick Meehan of Pennsylvania was elected to the 
Committee on April 14, 2015, pursuant to H. Res. 199.
    Mr. Patrick Meehan of Pennsylvania resigned as a Member of 
the Committee on May 19, 2015. (Cong. Rec. H3318).
    Mr. Daniel M. Donovan, Jr. of New York was elected to the 
Committee on May 19, 2015, pursuant to H. Res. 272.

                              ----------                              


           SUBCOMMITTEE ON COUNTERTERRORISM AND INTELLIGENCE

                   Peter T. King, New York, Chairman

Candice S. Miller, Michigan
Lou Barletta, Pennsylvania
John Katko, New York
Will Hurd, Texas
Michael T. McCaul, Texas
                  (ex officio)      Brian Higgins, New York
                                    William R. Keating, Massachusetts
                                    Filemon Vela, Texas
                                    Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi
                                                      (ex officio)
                                 ______
                                 

          SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND MANAGEMENT EFFICIENCY

                  Scott Perry, Pennsulvania, Chairman

Jeff Duncan, South Carolina
Curt Clawson, Florida
Earl L. ``Buddy'' Carter, Georgia
Barry Loudermilk, Georgia
Michael T. McCaul, Texas
                  (ex officio)      Bonnie Watson Coleman, New Jersey
                                    Cedric L. Richmond, Louisiana
                                    Norma J. Torres, California
                                    Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi
                                                      (ex officio)
                                 ______
                                 

                SUBCOMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION SECURITY

                     John Katko, New York, Chairman

Mike Rogers, Alabama
Earl L. ``Buddy'' Carter, Georgia
Mark Walker, North Carolina
John Ratcliffe, Texas
Michael T. McCaul, Texas
                  (ex officio)      Kathleen M. Rice, New York
                                    William R. Keating, Massachusetts
                                    Donald M. Payne, Jr., New Jersey
                                    Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi
                                                      (ex officio)
                                 ______
                                 

              SUBCOMMITTEE ON BORDER AND MARITIME SECURITY

                   Martha McSally, Arizona, Chairman

Lamar Smith, Texas
Mike Rogers, Alabama
Candice S. Miller, Michgan
Jeff Duncan, South Carolina
Lou Barletta, Pennsylvania
Will Hurd, Texas
Michael T. McCaul, Texas
                  (ex officio)      Filemon Vela, Texas
                                    Loretta Sanchez, California
                                    Sheila Jackson Lee, Texas
                                    Brian Higgins, New York
                                    Norma J. Torres, California
                                    Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi
                                                      (ex officio)
                                 ______
                                 

SUBCOMMITTEE ON CYBERSECURITY, INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION, AND SECURITY 
                              TECHNOLOGIES

                    John Ratcliffe, Texas, Chairman

Peter T. King, New York
Tom Marino, Pennsylvania
Scott Perry, Pennsylvania
Curt Clawson, Florida
Daniel M. Donovan, Jr., New York
Michael T. McCaul, Texas
                  (ex officio)      Cedric L. Richmond, Louisiana
                                    Loretta Sanchez, California
                                    Sheila Jackson Lee, Texas
                                    James R. Langevin, Rhode Island
                                    Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi
                                                      (ex officio)
                                 ______
                                 

  SUBCOMMITTEE ON EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND COMMUNICATIONS

               Daniel M. Donovan, Jr., New York, Chairman

Tom Marino, Pennsylvania
Mark Walker, North Carolina
Barry Loudermilk, Georgia
Martha McSally, Arizona
Michael T. McCaul, Texas
                  (ex officio)      Donald M. Payne, Jr., New Jersey
                                    Bonnie Watson Coleman, New Jersey
                                    Kathleen M. Rice, New York
                                    Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi
                                                      (ex officio)
                                 ______
                                 

                             Task Force on
             Combating Terrorist and Foreign Fighter Travel

                      (March 2--September 2, 2015)

John Katko, New York,
    Republican Lead
Will Hurd, Texas
Barry Loudermilk, Georgia
Martha McSally, Arizona
John Ratcliffe, Texas               Loretta Sanchez, California,
                                        Democratic Lead
                                    Donald M. Payne, Jr., New Jersey
                                    Filemon Vela, Texas


             HISTORY OF THE COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY

                 Select Committees on Homeland Security

107th Congress
    In the 107th Congress, the House Select Committee on 
Homeland Security was established on June 19, 2002, pursuant to 
H. Res.449 (adopted by voice vote).
    The Committee was composed of nine Members of the House: 
Mr. Richard ``Dick'' Armey of Texas, Chairman; Mr. Thomas DeLay 
of Texas; Mr. Julius Caesar ``J.C.'' Watts of Oklahoma; 
Ms.Deborah Pryce of Ohio; Mr. Robert Portman of Ohio; Ms.Nancy 
Pelosi of California; Mr. Jonas Martin Frost of Texas; Mr. 
Robert Menendez of New Jersey; and Ms.Rosa L. DeLauro of 
Connecticut.
    The mandate of the Select Committee in the 107th Congress 
was to ``develop recommendations and report to the House on 
such matters that relate to the establishment of a department 
of homeland security.'' The Select Committee accomplished its 
mandate on November 22, 2002, when the House concurred in the 
Senate amendment to H.R.5005, a bill establishing the 
Department of Homeland Security, by unanimous consent, and 
cleared H.R.5005 for the President. The bill was presented to 
the President on November 22, 2002, and was signed on November 
25, 2002, becoming Public Law 107-296.
    The termination date of the House Select Committee on 
Homeland Security was ``after final disposition of a bill [ . . 
. ] including final disposition of any veto message on such 
bill,'' which occurred on November 25, 2002.


------------------------------------------------------------------------
               Law                       Title               Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pub. L. 107-296.................  The Homeland        H.R.5005
                                   Security Act of
                                   2002..
------------------------------------------------------------------------


108th Congress
    The second House Select Committee on Homeland Security was 
established in the 108th Congress on January 7, 2003, pursuant 
to provisions of H. Res.5 (adopted by a recorded vote of 221 
yeas and 203 nays).
    The Membership of the Select Committee was established on 
February 12, 2003, as: Mr. Christopher Cox of California, 
Chairman; Ms.Jennifer Dunn of Washington; Mr. William ``Bill'' 
Young of Florida; Mr. Donald ``Don'' Young of Alaska; Mr. F. 
James Sensenbrenner, Jr. of Wisconsin; Mr. Wilbert Joseph 
``Billy'' Tauzin of Louisiana; Mr. David Dreier of California; 
Mr. Duncan Hunter of California; Mr.Harold Rogers of Kentucky; 
Mr. Sherwood Boehlert of New York; Mr. Lamar Smith of Texas; 
Mr.Wayne Curtis ``Curt'' Weldon of Pennsylvania; Mr. 
Christopher Shays of Connecticut; Mr. Porter J. Goss of 
Florida; Mr. David Camp of Michigan; Mr.Lincoln Diaz-Balart of 
Florida; Mr. Robert W. Goodlatte of Virginia; Mr. Ernest James 
Istook, Jr. of Oklahoma; Mr. Peter T. King of New York; Mr. 
John E. Linder of Georgia; Mr. John B. Shadegg of Arizona; Mr. 
Mark E. Souder of Indiana; Mr. William McClellan ``Mac'' 
Thornberry of Texas; Mr. James A. Gibbons of Nevada; Ms.Kay 
Granger of Texas; Mr. Pete Sessions of Texas; Mr. John E. 
Sweeney of New York; Mr. Jim Turner of Texas; Mr. Bennie G. 
Thompson of Mississippi; Ms.Loretta Sanchez of California; Mr. 
Edward J. Markey of Massachusetts; Mr. Norman D. Dicks of 
Washington; Mr. Barney Frank of Massachusetts; Ms.Jane Harman 
of California; Mr. Benjamin L. Cardin of Maryland; Ms.Louise M. 
Slaughter of New York; Mr. Peter A. DeFazio of Oregon; Mrs.Nita 
M. Lowey of New York; Mr. Robert E. Andrews of New Jersey; 
Ms.Eleanor Holmes Norton, a Delegate from the District of 
Columbia; Ms.Zoe Lofgren of California; Ms.Karen McCarthy of 
Missouri; Ms.Shiela Jackson Lee of Texas; Mr.William ``Bill'' 
Pascrell, Jr. of New Jersey; Mrs.Donna M. Christensen, a 
Delegate from the U.S.Virgin Islands; Mr. Bobby ``Bob'' 
Etheridge of North Carolina; Mr.Charles Gonzalez of Texas; Mr. 
Ken Lucas of Kentucky; Mr. James R. Langevin of Rhode Island; 
and Mr. Kendrick B. Meek of Florida.
    The Select Committee was authorized to develop 
recommendations and report to the House by bill or otherwise on 
such matters that relate to the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Public Law 107-296) as may be referred to it by the Speaker, 
and was charged with reviewing and studying on a continuing 
basis laws, programs, and Government activities relating to 
homeland security. In addition, the Select Committee was 
directed to conduct a thorough and complete study of the 
operation and implementation of the Rules of the House, 
including Rule X, with respect to the issue of homeland 
security, and submit its recommendations regarding any changes 
in the Rules of the House to the Committee on Rules not later 
than September 30, 2004.
    On September 30, 2004, the Select Committee on Homeland 
Security submitted its recommendations on jurisdictional 
changes to the Rules of the House of Representatives to the 
Committee on Rules.
    The Committee had six measures signed into law during the 
108th Congress:


------------------------------------------------------------------------
               Law                       Title               Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pub. L. 108-136.................  National Defense    H.R.1588\1\
                                   Authorization Act
                                   for Fiscal Year
                                   2004..
 
Pub. L. 108-268.................  To provide for the  H.R.4332
                                   transfer of the
                                   Nebraska Avenue
                                   Naval Complex in
                                   the District of
                                   Columbia to
                                   facilitate the
                                   establishment of
                                   the headquarters
                                   for the
                                   Department of
                                   Homeland
                                   Security, to
                                   provide for the
                                   acquisition by
                                   the Department of
                                   the Navy of
                                   suitable
                                   replacement
                                   facilities..
 
Pub. L. 108-276.................  Project BioShield   S.15
                                   Act of 2004..      (H.R.2122)
 
Pub. L. 108-293.................  Coast Guard and     H.R.2443
                                   Maritime
                                   Transportation
                                   Act of 2004..
 
Pub. L. 108-330.................  Department of       H.R.4259
                                   Homeland Security
                                   Financial
                                   Accountability
                                   Act..
 
Pub. L. 108-458.................  Intelligence        S.2845
                                   Reform and         (H.R.5223)
                                   Terrorism
                                   Prevention Act of
                                   2004..
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ Indicates measures which were not referred directly to the Committee
  on Homeland Security.

    Pursuant to H.Res. 5, the Select Committee terminated on 
January 2, 2005, with the expiration of the 108th Congress.

                     Committee on Homeland Security

109th Congress
    The 109th Congress marked the first Congress for the 
standing Committee on Homeland Security. During the two 
previous Congresses, the House of Representatives established 
separate Select Committees on Homeland Security: the first - to 
establish the Department of Homeland Security, the second - to 
monitor the initial activities of the Department and to examine 
the need for a standing committee in the House with 
jurisdictional authority over matters relating to the issue of 
homeland security.
    The Committee on Homeland Security was established as a 
standing Committee of the House with the passage of H.Res. 5, 
on January 4, 2005. The resolution was adopted by a recorded 
vote of 220 yeas and 195 nays.
    The Committee Membership was set at 34 Members with 19 
Republicans and 15 Democrats. The following Members were 
appointed to the Committee on Homeland Security for all or part 
of the Congress: Mr.Christopher Cox of California; Mr.Peter T. 
King of New York; Mr.Don Young of Alaska; Mr.Lamar S.Smith of 
Texas; Mr.Curt Weldon of Pennsylvania; Mr.Christopher Shays of 
Connecticut; Mr.John Linder of Georgia; Mr.Mark E. Souder of 
Indiana; Mr.Tom Davis of Virginia; Mr.Daniel E. Lungren of 
California; Mr.Jim Gibbons of Nevada; Mr.Rob Simmons of 
Connecticut; Mr.Mike Rogers of Alabama; Mr.Stevan Pearce of New 
Mexico; Ms.Katherine Harris of Florida; Mr.Bobby Jindal of 
Louisiana; Mr.David G. Reichert of Washington; Mr.Michael T. 
McCaul of Texas; Mr.Charles W. Dent of Pennsylvania; Ms.Ginny 
Brown-Waite of Florida; Mr.Bennie G. Thompson of Mississippi; 
Ms.Loretta Sanchez of California; Mr.Edward J. Markey of 
Massachusetts; Mr.Norman D. Dicks of Washington; Ms.Jane Harman 
of California; Mr.Peter A. DeFazio of Oregon; Ms.Nita M. Lowey 
of New York; Ms.Eleanor Holmes Norton of District of Columbia; 
Ms.Zoe Lofgren of California; Ms.Sheila Jackson Lee of Texas; 
Mr.Bill Pascrell of Jr., New Jersey; Ms.Donna M. Christensen of 
U.S.Virgin Islands; Mr.Bob Etheridge of North Carolina; 
Mr.James R. Langevin of Rhode Island; and Mr.Kendrick B. Meek 
of Florida.
    On February 9, 2005, the Committee on Homeland Security 
adopted its Rules, which provided for the establishment of five 
Subcommittees. The Subcommittee on Prevention of Nuclear and 
Biological Attack; the Subcommittee on Intelligence, 
Information Sharing, and Terrorism Risk Assessment; the 
Subcommittee on Economic Security, Infrastructure Protection, 
and Cybersecurity; the Subcommittee on Management, Integration, 
and Oversight; and the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, 
Science, and Technology.
    On October 7, 2005, the Committee revised its Rules to 
establish a Subcommittee on Investigations.
    The Committee had eight measures signed into law during the 
109th Congress:


------------------------------------------------------------------------
               Law                       Title               Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pub. L. 109-13..................  Emergency           H.R.1268\2\
                                   Supplemental       (H.R.418)
                                   Appropriations
                                   Act for Defense,
                                   the Global War on
                                   Terror, and
                                   Tsunami Relief,
                                   2005..
 
Pub. L. 109-59..................  Safe, Accountable,  H.R.3
                                   Flexible,
                                   Efficient
                                   Transportation
                                   Equity Act: A
                                   Legacy for Users..
 
Pub. L. 109-163.................  National Defense    H.R.1815
                                   Authorization Act
                                   for Fiscal Year
                                   2006..
 
Pub. L. 109-241.................  Coast Guard and     H.R.889
                                   Maritime
                                   Transportation
                                   Act of 2006..
 
Pub. L. 109-295.................  Department of       H.R.5441
                                   Homeland Security
                                   Appropriations
                                   Act, 2007..
                                  (Title VI - Post
                                   Katrina Emergency
                                   Management Reform
                                   Act).
 
Pub. L. 109-347.................  ``Security and      H.R.4954
                                   Accountability
                                   For Every Port
                                   Act of 2006'' or
                                   the ``SAFE Port
                                   Act''..
 
Pub. L. 109-364.................  John Warner         H.R.5122
                                   National Defense
                                   Authorization Act
                                   for Fiscal Year
                                   2007..
 
Pub. L. 109-367.................  Secure Fence Act    H.R.6061
                                   of 2006..
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\2\ Indicates measures which were not referred directly to the Committee
  on Homeland Security.


110th Congress
    The Committee on Homeland Security continued as a standing 
Committee pursuant to the provisions of H. Res.5, agreed to in 
the House on January 4, 2007, by a record vote of 235 yeas and 
195 nays.
    The Committee on Homeland Security met on January 23, 2007, 
for an organizational meeting for the 110th Congress under the 
direction of Chairman Bennie G. Thompson of Mississippi. The 
Committee Membership was set at 34 Members with 19 Democrats 
and 15 Republicans. The following Members were appointed to the 
Committee on Homeland Security for all or part of the Congress: 
Mr.Bennie G. Thompson of Mississippi; Ms.Loretta Sanchez of 
California; Mr.Edward J. Markey of Massachusetts; Mr.Norman D. 
Dicks of Washington; Ms.Jane Harman of California; Mr.Peter A. 
DeFazio of Oregon; Mrs.Nita M. Lowey of New York; Ms.Eleanor 
Holmes Norton a Delegate from the District of Columbia; Ms.Zoe 
Lofgren of California; Ms.Sheila Jackson-Lee of Texas; 
Mrs.Donna M. Christensen a Delegate from the U.S.Virgin 
Islands; Mr.Bob Etheridge of North Carolina; Mr.James R. 
Langevin of Rhode Island; Mr.Henry Cuellar of Texas; 
Mr.Christopher P. Carney of Pennsylvania; Ms.Yvette D. Clarke 
of New York; Mr.Al Green of Texas; Mr.Ed Perlmutter of 
Colorado; Mr.Bill Pascrell, Jr. of New Jersey; Mr.Peter T. King 
of New York; Mr.Lamar Smith of Texas; Mr.Christopher Shays of 
Connecticut; Mr.Mark E. Souder of Indiana; Mr.Tom Davis of 
Virginia; Mr.Daniel E. Lungren of California; Mr.Mike Rogers of 
Alabama; Mr.David G. Reichert of Washington; Mr.Michael T. 
McCaul of Texas; Mr.Charles W. Dent of Pennsylvania; Ms.Ginny 
Brown-Waite of Florida; Mr.Gus M. Bilirakis of Florida; 
Mr.David Davis of Tennessee; Mr.Paul C. Broun of Georgia; 
Mrs.Candice S.Miller of Michigan; Ms.Marsha Blackburn of 
Tennessee; Mr.Kevin McCarthy of California; and Mr.Bobby Jindal 
of Louisiana.
    The Committee established six Subcommittees: the 
Subcommittee on Border, Maritime, and Global Counterterrorism; 
the Subcommittee on Intelligence, Information Sharing, and 
Terrorism Risk Assessment; the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security and Infrastructure Protection; the Subcommittee on 
Emerging Threats, Cybersecurity, and Science and Technology; 
the Subcommittee on Emergency Communications, Preparedness, and 
Response; and the Subcommittee on Management, Investigations, 
and Oversight.
    The Committee had four measures signed into law during the 
110th Congress:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
               Law                       Title               Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pub. L. 110-53..................  Implementing        H.R.1
                                   Recommendations
                                   of the 9/11
                                   Commission Act of
                                   2007..
 
Pub. L. 110-181.................  National Defense    H.R.4986\3\
                                   Authorization Act  (H.R.1585)
                                   for Fiscal Year
                                   2008..
 
Pub. L. 110-388.................  A bill to provide   S.2816
                                   for the
                                   appointment of
                                   the Chief Human
                                   Capital Officer
                                   of the Department
                                   of Homeland
                                   Security by the
                                   Secretary of
                                   Homeland
                                   Security..
 
Pub. L. 110-412.................  Personnel           H.R.6098
                                   Reimbursement for
                                   Intelligence
                                   Cooperation and
                                   Enhancement of
                                   Homeland Security
                                   Act of 2008..
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\3\ Indicates measures which were not referred directly to the Committee
  on Homeland Security.


111th Congress

    The Committee on Homeland Security continued as a standing 
Committee pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 5, agreed to in 
the House on January 6, 2009, by a record vote of 235 yeas and 
195 nays.
    The Committee on Homeland Security met on February 4, 2009, 
for an organizational meeting for the 111th Congress under the 
direction of Chairman Bennie G. Thompson of Mississippi. The 
Committee Membership, was set at 34 Members with 21 Democrats 
and 13 Republicans. The following Members were appointed to the 
Committee on Homeland Security for all or part of the Congress: 
Mr.Bennie G. Thompson of Mississippi; Ms.Loretta Sanchez, of 
California; Ms.Jane Harman of California; Mr.Peter A. DeFazio 
of Oregon; Ms.Eleanor Holmes Norton a Delegate from the 
District of Columbia; Ms.Zoe Lofgren of California; Ms.Sheila 
Jackson-Lee of Texas; Mr.Henry Cuellar of Texas; Mr.Christopher 
P. Carney of Pennsylvania; Ms.Yvette D. Clarke of New York; 
Ms.Laura Richardson of California; Mrs.Ann Kirkpatrick of 
Arizona; Mr.Ben Ray Lujan of New Mexico; Mr.Bill Pascrell, Jr. 
of New Jersey; Mr.Emmanuel Cleaver of Missouri; Mr.Al Green of 
Texas; Mr.James A. Himes of Connecticut; Ms.Mary Jo Kilroy of 
Ohio; Mr.Eric J.J. Massa of New York; Ms.Dina Titus of Nevada; 
Mr.William L. Owens of New York; Mr.Peter T. King of New York; 
Mr.Lamar Smith of Texas; Mr.Mark E. Souder of Indiana; 
Mr.Daniel E. Lungren of California; Mr.Mike Rogers of Alabama; 
Mr.Michael T. McCaul of Texas; Mr.Charles W. Dent of 
Pennsylvania; Mr.Gus M. Bilirakis of Florida; Mr.Paul C. Broun 
of Georgia; Mrs.Candice S.Miller of Michigan; Mr.Pete Olson of 
Texas; Mr.Anh ``Joseph'' Cao of Louisiana; Mr.Steve Austria of 
Ohio; and Mr.Tom Graves of Georgia.
    The Committee established six Subcommittees: the 
Subcommittee on Border, Maritime, and Global Counterterrorism; 
the Subcommittee on Intelligence, Information Sharing, and 
Terrorism Risk Assessment; the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security and Infrastructure Protection; the Subcommittee on 
Emerging Threats, Cybersecurity, and Science and Technology; 
the Subcommittee on Emergency Communications, Preparedness, and 
Response; and the Subcommittee on Management, Investigations, 
and Oversight.
    The Committee had 14 measures signed into law during the 
111th Congress:

                             111th Congress

------------------------------------------------------------------------
               Law                       Title               Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pub. L. 111--84.................  National Defense    H.R.2647\4\
                                   Authorization Act
                                   for Fiscal Year
                                   2010..
 
Pub. L. 111--140................  Nuclear Forensics   H.R.730
                                   and Attribution
                                   Act..
 
Pub. L. 111--145................  United States       H.R.1299 \5\
                                   Capitol Police     (H.R.2935)
                                   Administrative
                                   Technical
                                   Correction Act of
                                   2009..
 
Pub. L. 111--198................  Homebuyer           H.R.5623
                                   Assistance and
                                   Improvement Act..
 
Pub. L. 111--207................  Cruise Vessel       H.R.3360
                                   Security and
                                   Safety Act of
                                   2009..
 
Pub. L. 111--245................  First Responder     H.R.3978
                                   Anti-Terrorism
                                   Training
                                   Resources Act..
 
Pub. L. 111--252................  To allow certain    H.R.1517
                                   U.S.Customs and
                                   Border Protection
                                   employees who
                                   serve under an
                                   overseas limited
                                   appointment for
                                   at least 2 years,
                                   and whose service
                                   is rated fully
                                   successful or
                                   higher throughout
                                   that time, to be
                                   converted to a
                                   permanent
                                   appointment in
                                   the competitive
                                   service..
 
Pub. L. 111--258................  Reducing Over-      H.R.553
                                   Classification
                                   Act..
 
Pub. L. 111--259................  Intelligence        H.R.2701
                                   Authorization Act
                                   for Fiscal Year
                                   2011..
 
Pub. L. 111--271................  Redundancy          H.R.3980
                                   Elimination and
                                   Enhanced
                                   Performance for
                                   Preparedness
                                   Grants Act..
 
Pub. L. 111--281................  Coast Guard         H.R.3619
                                   Authorization Act
                                   of 2010..
 
Pub. L. 111--356................  Northern Border     H.R.4748
                                   Counternarcotics
                                   Strategy Act of
                                   2010..
 
Pub. L. 111--376................  Anti-Border         S.3243
                                   Corruption Act of
                                   2010..
 
Pub. L. 111--383................  Ike Skelton         H.R.6523 
                                   National Defense
                                   Authorization Act
                                   for Fiscal Year
                                   2011..
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\4\ Indicates measures which were not referred directly to the Committee
  on Homeland Security.
\5\  Indicates measures which were not referred to the Committee, but to
  which measures were included during Congressional action.


112th Congress
    The Committee on Homeland Security continued as a standing 
Committee pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 5, agreed to in 
the House on January 5, 2011, by a record vote of 238 yeas and 
191 nays.
    The Committee on Homeland Security met on January 26, 2011, 
for an organizational meeting for the 112th Congress under the 
direction of Chairman Peter T. King of New York.
    The Committee Membership, was set at 33 Members with 19 
Republicans and 14 Democrats. The following Members were 
appointed to the Committee on Homeland Security for all or part 
of the Congress: Mr.Peter T. King of New York; Mr.Lamar Smith 
of Texas; Mr.Daniel E. Lungren of California; Mr.Mike Rogers of 
Alabama; Mr.Michael T. McCaul of Texas; Mr.Gus M. Bilirakis of 
Florida; Mr.Paul C. Broun of Georgia; Mrs.Candice S.Miller of 
Michigan; Mr.Tim Walberg of Michigan; Mr.Chip Cravaack of 
Minnesota; Mr.Joe Walsh of Illinois; Mr.Patrick Meehan of 
Pennsylvania; Mr.Benjamin Quayle of Arizona; Mr.Scott Rigell of 
Virginia; Mr.Billy Long of Missouri; Mr.Jeff Duncan of South 
Carolina; Mr.Tom Marino of Pennsylvania; Mr.Blake Farenthold of 
Texas; Mr.Mo Brooks of Alabama; and Mr.Robert L. Turner of New 
York.Mr.Bennie G. Thompson of Mississippi; Ms.Loretta Sanchez, 
of California; Ms.Jane Harman of California; Ms.Sheila Jackson 
Lee of Texas; Mr.Henry Cuellar of Texas; Ms.Yvette D. Clarke of 
New York; Ms.Laura Richardson of California;Mrs.Donna M. 
Christensen a Delegate from the U.S.Virgin Islands; Mr.Danny K. 
Davis of Illinois; Mr.Brian Higgins of New York; Ms.Jackie 
Speier of California; Mr.Cedric L. Richmond of Louisiana; 
Mr.Hansen Clarke of Michigan; Mr.William R. Keating of 
Massachusetts; Ms.Kathleen C. Hochul of New York; Ms.Janice 
Hahn of California; and Mr.Ron Barber of Arizona.
    The Committee established six Subcommittees: The 
Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and 
Security Technologies; the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security; the Subcommittee on Oversight, Investigations, and 
Management; the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, 
Response, and Communications; the Subcommittee on Border and 
Maritime Security; and the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and 
Intelligence.
    The Committee had 10 measures signed into law during the 
112th Congress:

                             112th Congress

------------------------------------------------------------------------
               Law                       Title               Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pub. L. 112--54.................  Asia-Pacific        S.1487
                                   Economic           (H.R.2042)
                                   Cooperation
                                   Business Travel
                                   Cards Act of
                                   2011..
 
Pub. L. 112--81.................  National Defense    H.R.1540 
                                   Authorization Act
                                   for Fiscal Year
                                   2012..
 
Pub. L. 112--86.................  Risk-Based          H.R.1801
                                   Security
                                   Screening for
                                   Members of the
                                   Armed Forces Act.
 
Pub. L. 112--127................  Border Tunnel       H.R.4119
                                   Prevention Act of
                                   2012.
 
Pub. L. 112--171................  To require the      H.R.3670
                                   Transportation
                                   Security
                                   Administration to
                                   comply with the
                                   Uniformed
                                   Services
                                   Employment and
                                   Reemployment
                                   Rights Act..
 
Pub. L. 112--199................  Whistleblower       S.743
                                   Protection         (H.R.3289)
                                   Enhancement Act
                                   of 2012..
 
Pub. L. 112--205................  Jaime Zapata        H.R.915
                                   Border
                                   Enforcement
                                   Security Task
                                   Force Act..
 
Pub. L. 112--213................  Coast Guard and     H.R.2838
                                   Maritime
                                   Transportation
                                   Act of 2012 ..
 
Pub. L. 112--217................  DHS Audit           S.1998
                                   Requirement        (H.R.5941)
                                   Target Act of
                                   2012..
 
Pub. L. 112--218................  No-Hassle Flying    S.3542
                                   Act of 2012..      (H.R.6028)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\6\ Indicates measures which were not referred directly to the Committee
  on Homeland Security.
\7\  Indicates measures which were not referred to the Committee, but to
  which Members were appointed as Conferees.


113th Congress

    The Committee on Homeland Security continued as a standing 
Committee pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 5, agreed to in 
the House on January 3, 2013, by a record vote of 228 yeas and 
196 nays.
    The Committee on Homeland Security met on January 23, 2013, 
for an organizational meeting for the 113th Congress under the 
direction of Chairman Michael T. McCaul of Texas.
    The Committee Membership, was set at 32 Members with 18 
Republicans and 14 Democrats. The following Members were 
appointed to the Committee on Homeland Security for all or part 
of the Congress: Mr. Michael T. McCaul of Texas; Mr. Lamar 
Smith of Texas; Mr. Peter T. King of New York; Mr. Mike Rogers 
of Alabama; Mr. Paul C. Broun of Georgia; Mrs. Candice S. 
Miller of Michigan; Mr. Patrick Meehan of Pennsylvania; Mr. 
Jeff Duncan of South Carolina; Mr. Tom Marino of Pennsylvania; 
Mr. Jason Chaffetz of Utah; Mr. Steven M. Palazzo of 
Mississippi; Mr. Lou Barletta of Pennsylvania; Mr. Chris 
Stewart of Utah; Mr. Keith J. Rothfus of Pennsylvania; Mr. 
Richard Hudson of North Carolina; Mr. Steve Daines of Montana; 
Mrs. Susan W. Brooks of Indiana; Mr. Scott Perry of 
Pennsylvania; Mr. Mark Sanford of South Carolina; Mr. Curtis 
Clawson of Florida; Mr. Bennie G. Thompson of Mississippi; Ms. 
Loretta Sanchez of California; Ms. Sheila Jackson Lee of Texas; 
Ms. Yvette D. Clarke of New York; Mr. Brian Higgins of New 
York; Mr. Cedric L. Richmond of Louisiana; Mr. William R. 
Keating of Massachusetts; Mr. Ron Barber of Arizona; Mr. Donald 
M. Payne, Jr. of New Jersey; Mr. Beto O'Rourke of Texas; Ms. 
Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii; Mr. Filemon Vela of Texas; Mr. Steven 
A. Horsford of Nevada; and Mr. Eric Swalwell of California.
    The Committee established six Subcommittees: the 
Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence; the 
Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security; the Subcommittee 
no Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
Technologies; the Subcommittee on Oversight and Management 
Efficiency; the Subcommittee on Transportation Security; and 
the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications.
    The Committee had 11 measures signed into law during the 
113th Congress:

                             113th Congress

------------------------------------------------------------------------
               Law                       Title               Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pub. L. 113--27.................  Helping Heroes Fly  H.R. 1344
                                   Act..              (S. 1367)
                                                      (S. 1403)
 
Pub. L. 113--221................  Honor Flight Act..  H.R. 4812
                                                      (S. 2659)
                                                      (S. 2671)
 
Pub. L. 113--238................  Aviation Security   H.R. 1204
                                   Stakeholder        (S. 1804)
                                   Participation Act
                                   of 2014..
 
Pub. L. 113--245................  Transportation      H.R. 2719
                                   Security           (S. 1893)
                                   Acquisition
                                   Reform Act..
 
Pub. L. 113--246................  Cybersecurity       H.R.2952
                                   Workforce
                                   Assessment Act..
 
Pub. L. 113--254................  Protecting and      H.R. 4007
                                   Securing Chemical
                                   Facilities from
                                   Terrorist Attacks
                                   Act of 2014..
 
Pub. L. 113--277................  Patrol Agent Pay    S. 1691
                                   Reform Act of
                                   2014..
 
Pub. L. 113--282................  National            S. 2519
                                   Cybersecurity      (H.R. 3696)
                                   Protection Act of
                                   2014..
 
Pub. L. 113--283................  Federal             S. 2521
                                   Information        (H.R. 1163)
                                   Security
                                   Modernization Act
                                   of 2014 ..
 
Pub. L. 113--284................  DHS OIG Mandates    S. 2651
                                   Revision Act of
                                   2014 ..
 
Pub. L. 113--294................  To amend title 49,  H.R. 5462
                                   United States
                                   Code, to provide
                                   for limitations
                                   on the fees
                                   charged to
                                   passengers of air
                                   carriers..
------------------------------------------------------------------------


114th Congress

    The Committee on Homeland Security continued as a standing 
Committee pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 5, agreed to in 
the House on January 6, 2015, by a record vote of 234 yeas, 172 
nays, and 1 voting `present' (Roll no. 6).
    The Committee on Homeland Security met on January 21, 2015, 
for an organizational meeting for the 114th Congress under the 
direction of Chairman Michael T. McCaul of Texas.
    The Committee Membership, was set at 32 Members with 18 
Republicans and 12 Democrats. The following Members were 
appointed to the Committee on Homeland Security for all or part 
of the Congress: Mr. Michael T. McCaul of Texas; Mr. Lamar 
Smith of Texas; Mr. Peter T. King of New York; Mr. Mike Rogers 
of Alabama; Mrs. Candice S. Miller of Michigan; Mr. Jeff Duncan 
of South Carolina; Mr. Tom Marino of Pennsylvania; Mr. Steven 
M. Palazzo ofMississippi; Mr. Lou Barletta of Pennsylvania; Mr. 
Scott Perry of Pennsylvania; Mr., Curt Clawson of Florida; Mr. 
John Katko of New York; Mr. Will Hurd of Texas; Mr. Earl L. 
``Buddy'' Carter of Georgia; Mr. Mark Walker of North Carolina; 
Mr. Barry Loudermilk of Georgia; Ms. Martha McSally of Arizona; 
Mr. John Ratcliffe of Texas; Mr. Patrick Meehan of 
Pennsylvania;; Mr. Daniel M. Donovan, Jr. of New York; Mr. 
Bennie G. Thompson of Mississippi; Ms. Loretta Sanchez of 
California; Ms. Sheila Jackson Lee of Texas; Mr. James R. 
Langevin of Rhode Island; Mr. Brian Higgins of New York; Mr. 
Cedric L. Richmond of Louisiana; Mr. William R. Keating of 
Massachusetts; Mr. Donald M. Payne, Jr. of New Jersey; Mr. 
Filemon Vela of Texas; Mrs. Bonnie Watson Coleman of New 
Jersey; Miss Kathleen M. Rice of New York; and Ms. Norma J. 
Torres of California.
    The Committee established six Subcommittees: the 
Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence; the 
Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security; the Subcommittee 
no Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
Technologies; the Subcommittee on Oversight and Management 
Efficiency; the Subcommittee on Transportation Security; and 
the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications.
    The Committee had 24 measures signed into law during the 
114th Congress, consisting of provisions of 40 measures 
referred to the Committee:

                             114th Congress

------------------------------------------------------------------------
               Law                       Title               Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pub. L. 114--22.................  Justice for         S. 178
                                   Victims of         (H.R. 460)
                                   Trafficking Act
                                   of 2015.
Pub. L. 114--29.................  Department of       H.R. 615
                                   Homeland Security
                                   Interoperable
                                   Communications
                                   Act.
Pub. L. 114--41.................  Surface             H.R. 3236
                                   Transportation
                                   and Veterans
                                   Health Care
                                   Choice
                                   Improvement Act
                                   of 2015.
Pub. L. 114--43.................  DHS IT Duplication  H.R. 1626
                                   Reduction Act of
                                   2015.
Pub. L. 114--50.................  Gerardo Hernandez   H.R. 720
                                   Airport Security
                                   Act of 2015.
Pub. L. 114--53.................  TSA Office of       H.R. 719
                                   Inspection
                                   Accountability
                                   Act of 2015.
                                   Continuing
                                   Appropriations
                                   Act, 2016.
Pub. L. 114--68.................  Border Jobs for     H.R. 2835
                                   Veterans Act of
                                   2015.
Pub. L. 114--80.................  DHS Social Media    H.R. 623
                                   Improvement Act
                                   of 2015.
Pub. L. 114--92.................  National Defense    S. 1356 
                                   Authorization Act  (H.R. 1735)
                                   for Fiscal Year
                                   2016.
Pub. L. 114--113................  Consolidated        H.R. 2029
                                   Appropriations     (H.R. 158)
                                   Act, 2016.         (H.R. 1731)
                                                      (H.R. 3305)
                                                      (H.R. 3313)
Pub. L. 114--125................  Trade Facilitation  H.R. 644
                                   and Trade          (H.R. 998)
                                   Enforcement Act    (H.R. 878)
                                   of 2015.
Pub. L. 114--136................  Edward `Ted'        S. 1172
                                   Kaufman and
                                   Michael Leavitt
                                   Presidential
                                   Transitions
                                   Improvements Act
                                   of 2015.
Pub. L. 114--143................  Integrated Public   S. 1180
                                   Alert and Warning  (H.R. 1738)
                                   System             (H.R. 1472)
                                   Modernization Act
                                   of 2015.
Pub. L. 114--150................  DHS Headquarters    S. 1638
                                   Consolidation      (H.R. 1640)
                                   Accountability
                                   Act of 2015.
Pub. L. 114--190................  Federal Aviation    H.R. 636
                                   Administration     (H.R. 2843)
                                   Reauthorization    (H.R. 4698)
                                   Act of 2016.       (H.R. 5388)
Pub. L. 114--267................  Northern Border     S. 1808
                                   Security Review    H.R. 455
                                   Act.
Pub. L. 114--268................  First Responder     S. 1915
                                   Anthrax            H.R. 1300
                                   Preparedness Act.
Pub. L. 114--278................  Essential           H.R. 710
                                   Transportation
                                   Worker
                                   Identification
                                   Credential
                                   Assessment Act.
Pub. L. 114--279................  Cross-Border Trade  H.R. 875
                                   Enhancement Act
                                   of 2016.
Pub. L. 114--285................  Federal Law         H.R. 3842
                                   Enforcement
                                   Training Centers
                                   Reform and
                                   Improvement Act.
Pub. L. 114--293................  Bottles and         H.R. 5065
                                   Breastfeeding
                                   Equipment
                                   Screening Act.
Pub. L. 114--301................  GAO Mandates        H.R. 5687
                                   Revision Act of
                                   2016.
Pub. L. 114--304................  United States-      H.R. 5877
                                   Israel Advanced
                                   Research
                                   Partnership Act
                                   of 2016.
Pub. L. 114-- ..................  National Defense    S. 2943 
                                   Authorization Act  (H.R. 399)
                                   for Fiscal Year    (H.R. 1073)
                                   2017.              (H.R. 3510)
                                                      (H.R. 3572)
                                                      (H.R. 3586)
                                                      (H.R. 4402)
                                                      (H.R. 4408)
                                                      (H.R. 4509)
                                                      (H.R. 4780)
                                                      (H.R. 5064)
                                                      (S. 2976)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\8\  Indicates measures which were not referred to the Committee, but to
  which Members were appointed as Conferees.
\9\ Indicates measures which were not referred directly to the Committee
  on Homeland Security.
\10\ Indicates measures which were signed into law, but a Public Law
  number was not assigned at the time of filing of this report.

        

                             Full Committee

                   Michael T. McCaul, Texas, Chairman

Lamar Smith, Texas
Peter T. King, New York
Mike Rogers, Alabama
Candice S. Miller, Michigan
Jeff Duncan, South Carolina
Tom Marino, Pennsylvania
Lou Barletta, Pennsylvania
Scott Perry, Pennsylvania
Curt Clawson, Florida
John Katko, New York
Will Hurd, Texas
Earl L. ``Buddy'' Carter, Georgia
Mark Walker, North Carolina
Barry Loudermilk, Georgia
Martha McSally, Arizona
John Ratcliffe, Texas
Daniel M. Donovan, Jr, New York     Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi
                                    Loretta Sanchez, California
                                    Sheila Jackson Lee, Texas
                                    James R. Langevin, Rhode Island
                                    Brian Higgins, New York
                                    Cedric L. Richmond, Louisiana
                                    William R. Keating, Massachusetts
                                    Donald M. Payne, Jr, New Jersey
                                    Filemon Vela, Texas
                                    Bonnie Watson Coleman, New Jersey
                                    Kathleen M. Rice, New York
                                    Norma J. Torres, California

                              ----------                              


    During the 114th Congress, the Committee on Homeland 
Security held 19 hearings, receiving testimony from 51 
witnesses, and considered 79 measures, resulting in 24 measures 
signed into law during the 114th Congress, consisting of the 
provisions of 40 measures referred to the Committee.

                              ----------                              


                Organizational Meeting of the Committee

    The Committee on Homeland Security met on January 21, 2015, 
for an organizational meeting for the 114th Congress under the 
direction of Chairman Michael T. McCaul of Texas.
    The Full Committee met, pursuant to notice, and adopted the 
Committee Rules for the 114th Congress by voice vote. The 
Committee also approved the Committee on Homeland Security's 
Oversight Plan for the 114th Congress and Committee Resolution 
No. 1, relating to staff hiring, both adopted by voice vote.

                  AMENDING THE RULES OF THE COMMITTEE

    The Committee met on March 26, 2015, to consider Committee 
Resolution No. 2, modifying Rule V of the Rules of the 
Committee on Homeland Security, as adopted on January 21, 2015. 
The Committee adopted the resolution by voice vote.

                              ----------                              


                Legislative Activities of the Committee


                HUMAN TRAFFICKING DETECTION ACT OF 2015

            Public Law 114-22    H.R. 460 (S. 178 / S. 623)

To direct the Secretary of Homeland Security to train 
Department of Homeland Security personnel how to effectively 
deter, detect, disrupt, and prevent human trafficking during 
the course of their primary roles and responsibilities, and for 
other purposes.
Summary
    An estimated 17,500 individuals are trafficked into the 
United States each year. Victims include both U.S. citizens and 
noncitizens and trafficking occurs in every State in the 
nation. H.R. 460 requires the Secretary of Homeland Security to 
implement a human trafficking awareness program to train and 
periodically retrain relevant Departmental personnel. The 
training must be given to personnel within the Transportation 
Security Administration, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, 
and other Departmental offices. Additionally, the legislation 
requires the Secretary to annually reassess the training 
program to ensure it is consistent with current techniques, 
patterns, and trends associated with human trafficking and 
authorizes the Secretary to provide training curricula to any 
State, local, or Tribal Government or private organization 
seeking to establish a human trafficking awareness training 
program.
Legislative History
H.R. 460
    H.R. 460 was introduced in the House on January 21, 2015, 
by Mr. Walker and nine original cosponsors, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security, and in addition to the 
Committee on the Judiciary. Within the Committee, H.R. 460 was 
referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security, 
and the Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    On January 22, 2015, the Chair of the Committee on the 
Judiciary sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on the 
Judiciary would waive further consideration of H.R. 406; on 
that same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the 
Committee on the Judiciary, and the agreement to not waive 
further consideration.
    The House considered H.R. 460 under Suspension the Rules on 
January 27, 2015, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 460 was received in the Senate on January 28, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered H.R. 460 on March 4, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate, favorably. The Senate 
Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs 
reported H.R.460 to the Senate on May 15, 2015, as S. Rpt. 114-
46.
    The text of H.R. 460, as passed by the House was added to 
Title IX of S. 178, as passed by the Senate.

S. 178
    S. 178, the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act of 2015, 
was introduced in the Senate on January 13, 2015, by Mr. Cornyn 
and referred to the Senate Committee on the Judiciary.
    The Senate Committee on the Judiciary considered S. 178 on 
February 26, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the Senate, favorably, with an Amendment in the Nature of a 
Substitute.
    On March 2, 2015, the Senate Committee on the Judiciary 
reported S. 178 to the Senate with no written report.
    The Senate considered S. 178 on March 10, 11, 12, 16, 17, 
18, 19; April 14, 16, 20, 21, and 22, 2015. On April 22, 2015, 
the Senate passed S. 178 by a recorded vote of 99 yeas and 0 
nays, (Roll No. 163).
    S. 178 was received in the House on April 23, 2015, and 
held at the Desk.
    The House considered S. 178 under Suspension of the Rules 
on May 18, 2015, and on May 19, 2015, passed the measure, by a 
\2/3\ recorded vote of 420 yeas and 3 nays, (Roll No. 244).
    Subsequently, pursuant to H. Con. Res. 47, the enrollment 
of S. 178 was corrected.
    S. 178 was presented to the President on May 21, 2015. The 
President signed S. 178 into law on May 29, 2015, as Public Law 
114-22.

S. 623
    S. 623, the Human Trafficking Detection Act of 2015, the 
Senate companion measure of H.R. 460, was introduced in the 
Senate on March 3, 2015, by Mr. Johnson, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



    DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTEROPERABLE COMMUNICATIONS ACT

                     Public Law 114-29    H.R. 615

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to require the Under 
Secretary for Management of the Department of Homeland Security 
to take administrative action to achieve and maintain 
interoperable communications capabilities among the components 
of the Department of Homeland Security, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This bill amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 
107-295) to include, among the responsibilities of the Under 
Secretary for Management (USM) of the Department of Homeland 
Security, achieving and maintaining interoperable 
communications among the Department's components. The law 
requires the USM to develop, and submit to the Committee on 
Homeland Security of the House of Representatives and the 
Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs of the 
Senate, a strategy for achieving and maintaining interoperable 
communications among the Department's components. The law 
further requires the USM to report to the Committees on the 
status of efforts to achieve the milestones detailed in the 
strategy.
    H.R. 615 advances the Committee's oversight of 
interoperable communications by ensuring that the Department 
will continue to keep the Committee informed of its efforts to 
address the Department's Inspector General recommendations in 
its November 2012 report DHS' Oversight of Interoperable 
Communications [OIG-13-06] and develop and maintain 
interoperable communications among the components.
Legislative History
113th Congress
    In the 113th Congress, H.R. 4450 was introduced in the 
House on March 24, 2014, by Mr. Payne and Mrs. Brooks of 
Indiana and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 4289 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications.
    On March 27, 2014, the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response, and Communications considered H.R. 
4289, and forwarded the measure to the Full Committee for 
consideration, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 4289 on June 11, 2014, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment by voice vote.
    H.R. 4289 was reported to the House on June 19, 2014, as H. 
Rpt. 113-484.
    The House considered H.R. 4289 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 8, 2014, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 393 yeas and 0 nays, (Roll No. 370).
    H.R. 4289 was received in the Senate, on July 9, 2014, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

114th Congress
    H.R. 615 was introduced in the House on January 28, 2015, 
by Mr. Payne, Mrs. Brooks of Indiana, Mr. Thompson of 
Mississippi, and Mr. McCaul, and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 615 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications.
    The House considered H.R. 615 under Suspension of the Rules 
on February 2, 2015, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ recorded 
vote of 379 yeas and 0 nays, (Roll No. 52).
    H.R. 615 was received in the Senate on February 3, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered H.R. 615 on March 4, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate favorably, with an 
Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute.
    On May 21, 2015, the Senate Committee on Homeland Security 
and Governmental Affairs reported H.R. 615 to the Senate as S. 
Rpt. 114-53.
    The Senate passed H.R. 615 with an amendment by unanimous 
consent on June 11, 2015.
    The House concurred in the Senate amendment to H.R. 615 
under Suspension of the Rules on June 23, 2015, and passed the 
measure by voice vote. Clearing the measure for the President.
    H.R. 615 was presented to the President on June 24, 2015. 
The President signed H.R. 615 into law on July 6, 2015, as 
Public Law 114-29.

                                ------                                



SURFACE TRANSPORTATION AND VETERANS HEALTH CARE CHOICE IMPROVEMENT ACT 
                                OF 2015

                     Public Law 114-41    H.R. 3236

To provide an extension of Federal-aid highway, highway safety, 
motor carrier safety, transit, and other programs funded out of 
the Highway Trust Fund, to provide resource flexibility to the 
Department of Veterans Affairs for health care services, and 
for other purposes.
Summary
    Public Law 114-41 authorizes appropriations for various 
surface transportation programs, including revisions to the 
aviation security service passenger fee requirements, among 
other things. Aviation security services are authorized for 
Fiscal Years 2024 and 2025,
Legislative History
    H.R. 3236 was introduced in the House on July 28, 2015, by 
Mr. Shuster, Mr. Miller of Florida, and Mr. Ryan of Wisconsin, 
and referred to the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure, and in addition to the Committee on Ways and 
Means, the Committee on Energy and Commerce, the Committee on 
Science, Space and Technology, the Committee on Natural 
Resources, the Committee on Veterans' Affairs, the Committee on 
Education and the Workforce, the Committee on the Budget, and 
the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 
3236 was referred to the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security.
    The Committee on Rules met on July 28, 2015, and granted a 
Rule providing for the consideration of H.R. 3236, the Rule was 
filed in the House as H.Res. 388 (H. Rpt. 114-234). The House 
agreed to the Rule on July 29, 2015, by a recorded vote of 243 
yeas and 183 nays, (Roll No. 484).
    The House considered H.R. 3236 on July 29, 2015, under the 
provisions of H.Res. 388, and passed the measure by a recorded 
vote of 385 yeas, 34 nays, and 1 voting present, (Roll No. 
486).
    H.R. 3236 was received in the Senate on July 30, 2015, read 
twice, considered, read the third time, and passed under the 
order of July 29, 2015, without amendment, by a recorded vote 
of 91 yeas and 4 nays, (Record Vote No. 261).
    H.R. 3236 was presented to the President on July 31, 2015. 
The President signed H.R. 3236 into law on July 31, 2015, as 
Public Law 114-41.

                                ------                                



                DHS IT DUPLICATION REDUCTION ACT OF 2015

                     Public Law 114-43    H.R. 1626

To reduce duplication of information technology at the 
Department of Homeland Security, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This law requires the Chief Information Officer of the 
Department of Homeland Security to identify duplicative 
information technology systems within the Department and 
develop a strategy to reduce such duplications.
Legislative History
    H.R. 1626 was introduced in the House on March 25, 2015, by 
Mr. Hurd of Texas and seven original cosponsors and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 
1626 was referred to the Subcommittee on Oversight and 
Management Efficiency.
    The Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency 
considered H.R. 1626 on May 13, 2015, and ordered the measure 
reported to the Full Committee for consideration, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 1626 on May 20, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1626 to the House on June 17, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-162.
    The House considered H.R. 1626 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 23, 2015, and passed the measure, amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 1626 was received in the Senate on June 24, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs was discharged from further consideration of H.R. 1626 
on July 23, 2015, and the measure was passed, without 
amendment, by unanimous consent. Clearing the measure for the 
President.
    H.R. 1626 was presented to the President on July 27, 2015. 
The President signed H.R. 1626 into law on August 6, 2015, as 
Public Law 114-43.

                                ------                                



             GERARDO HERNANDEZ AIRPORT SECURITY ACT OF 2015

                     Public Law 114-50    H.R. 720

To improve intergovernmental planning for and communication 
during security incidents at domestic airports, and for other 
purposes.
Summary
    Public Law 114-50 improves security incident preparedness 
by directing the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) 
to verify that airports across the United States have 
incorporated procedures for responding to active shooters 
targeting security checkpoints into existing incident plans. 
Additionally, the Administrator of the TSA is directed to 
report to the appropriate Congressional committees on the 
Administration's findings regarding the levels of preparedness 
at airports. Further, the law mandates that TSA establish a 
mechanism by which best practices in security incident 
mitigation can be shared with airports across the country and 
requires that the agency certify to the appropriate 
Congressional committees that all screening personnel have 
participated in training for active shooter scenarios. 
Additionally, TSA is required to provide an analysis to the 
appropriate Congressional committees on how cost savings can be 
used to increase funding for reimbursable agreements for 
airport law enforcement over the next five years. Finally, the 
legislation requires TSA to conduct a review of the 
interoperable communications capabilities of the law 
enforcement, fire, and medical personnel responsible for 
responding to a security incident at airports in the United 
States.
Legislative History
113th Congress
    In the 113th Congress, H.R. 4802 was introduced in the 
House on June 5, 2014, by Mr. Hudson and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 4802 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    The Chair discharged the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security from further consideration of H.R. 4802 on June 11, 
2014. The Full Committee considered H.R. 4802 on June 11, 2014, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 4802 to 
the House on July 3, 2014, as H. Rpt. 113-512.
    The House considered H.R. 4802 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 22, 2014, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 4802 was received in the Senate on July 23, 2014, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.

114th Congress
    H.R. 720 was introduced in the House on February 4, 2015, 
by Mr. Katko and seven original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 720 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    The House considered H.R. 720 under Suspension of the Rules 
on February 10, 2015, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 411 yeas and 1 nay, (Roll No. 70).
    H.R. 720 was received in the Senate on February 11, 2015, 
and on February 12, 2015, was referred to the Senate Committee 
on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.
    The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation considered H.R. 720 on February 26, 2015, and 
reported the measure to the Senate, favorably, as amended. 
Senate Committee report filed on July 23, 2015, as S. Rpt. 114-
92.
    The Senate considered H.R. 720 on August 5, 2015, and 
passed the measure, amended, by unanimous consent.
    The House agreed on September 16, 2015, to Suspend the 
Rules and concur in the Senate amendment to H.R. 720, by voice 
vote.
    Presented to the President on September 17, 2015. The 
President signed H.R. 720 into law on September 24, 2015, as 
Public Law 114-50.

                                ------                                



          TSA OFFICE OF INSPECTION ACCOUNTABILITY ACT OF 2015

                     Public Law 114-53    H.R. 719

To require the Transportation Security Administration to 
conform to existing Federal law and regulations regarding 
criminal investigator positions, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This law requires the Transportation Security 
Administration (TSA) to certify to the Congress, and the 
Department of Homeland Security Office of the Inspector General 
(DHS OIG) to validate that only TSA employees who meet the 
relevant legal and regulatory requirements are classified as 
criminal investigators and receive premium pay. If the 
Inspector General finds that TSA is using inadequate or invalid 
data and methods to classify criminal investigators; the TSA 
may not hire any new employees to work in the Office of 
Inspection (OOI) until TSA makes a new certification, and the 
DHS OIG submits to Congress a finding that TSA utilized 
adequate and valid data and methods to make its certification. 
The bill also requires TSA to reclassify any criminal 
investigators who don't meet the legal requirements and report 
to Congress on any associated cost savings.
    In addition, this law requires TSA to submit to Congress 
any materials associated with OOI's review of instances in 
which Federal Air Marshal Service (FAMS) officials obtained 
discounted or free firearms for personal use. Furthermore, it 
requires the TSA to submit information on specific actions that 
will be taken to prevent FAMS officials from using their 
official positions, or exploiting in any way, the Service's 
relationships with private vendors to obtain discounted or free 
firearms for personal use.
Legislative History
113th Congress
    In the 113th Congress, H.R. 4803 was introduced in the 
House on June 5, 2014, by Mr. Sanford and Mr. Hudson and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 4802 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security.
    The Chair discharged the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security from further consideration of H.R. 4803 on June 11, 
2014. The Full Committee considered H.R. 4803 on June 11, 2014, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 4803 to 
the House on July 3, 2014, as H. Rpt. 113-513.
    The House considered H.R. 4803 under Suspension of the 
Rules and passed the measure on July 22, 2014, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 4803 was received in the Senate on July 23, 2014, and 
referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation.

114th Congress
    H.R. 719 was introduced in the House on February 4, 2015, 
by Mr. Katko, Miss Rice of New York, Mr. McCaul, Mr. Thompson 
of Mississippi, and Mr. Sanford and referred to the Committee 
on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 719 was 
referred to the Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    The House considered H.R. 719 under Suspension of the Rules 
on February 10, 2015, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 414 yeas and 0 nays, (Roll No. 69).
    H.R. 719 was received in the Senate on February 11, 2015, 
and on February 24, 2015, was referred to the Senate Committee 
on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.
    The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation considered H.R. 719 on February 26, 2015, and 
reported the measure to the Senate, favorably, amended.
    The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation reported H.R. 719 to the Senate on August 4, 
2015, as S. Rpt. 114-111.
    The Senate considered H.R. 719 on September 17, 2015, and 
passed the measure, amended, by unanimous consent.
    The House agreed to Suspend the Rules and passed H.Res. 
434, by voice vote on September 24, 2015. H.Res. 434 provided 
for the concurrence of the House to the Senate amendment to 
H.R. 719, with an amendment.
    H.R. 719 was laid before the Senate by unanimous consent on 
September 24, 2015. A motion was made in the Senate to concur 
in the House amendment to the Senate amendment with an 
amendment (Senate amendment SA 2689, which inserted at the end 
the ``Continuing Appropriations Act, 2016''). A second motion 
was made in the Senate to refer to the Senate Committee on 
Appropriations the House message, with instructions to report 
back with the Senate amendment (SA 2691). A cloture motion on 
the motion to concur in the House amendment to the Senate 
amendment with an amendment (SA 2689) was presented in the 
Senate. On September 24, 2015, a unanimous consent agreement 
was reached providing that, on Monday, September 28, 2015, the 
Senate resume consideration of the amendment of the House of 
Representatives to the amendment of the Senate to H.R. 719, 
with the time until the vote on the motion to invoke cloture on 
the motion to concur in the amendment of the House of 
Representatives to the amendment of the Senate to the bill, 
with Senate Amendment No. 2689.
    The Senate continued consideration of H.R. 719 on September 
28, 29, and 30, 2015. On September 30, 2015, the Senate 
concurred in the House amendment to the Senate amendment to 
H.R. 719 with an amendment (SA 2689) by a recorded vote of 78 
yeas and 20 nays, (Record Vote No. 272).
    The Committee on Rules met on September 30, 2015, and 
granted a Rule providing for the consideration of H. Con. Res. 
79. Rule filed in the House as H.Res. 448. (H. Rpt. 114-272). 
The House considered H.Res. 448 as a privileged matter, and 
agreed to the Rule by a recorded vote of 239 yeas and 187 nays, 
(Roll No. 525). On September 30, 3015, the House agreed to the 
Senate amendment to the House amendment to the Senate amendment 
by a recorded vote 277 yeas and 151 nays, (Roll No. 528). 
Clearing the measure for the President.
    H.R. 719 was presented to the President on September 30, 
2015. The President signed H.R. 719 into law on September 30, 
2015, as Public Law 114-53.

                                ------                                



                  BORDER JOBS FOR VETERANS ACT OF 2015

                Public Law 114-68    H.R. 2835 (S. 1603)

To actively recruit members of the Armed Forces who are 
separating from military service to serve as Customs and Border 
Protection Officers.
Summary
    The purpose this law is to connect veterans of the Armed 
Forces in need of employment with U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection (CBP), a component in need of qualified applicants 
to fill vacancies at understaffed U.S. ports of entry. The 
legislation requires the Department of Defense (DoD) and the 
Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to cooperate on efforts 
to recruit and expedite the hiring of outgoing U.S. military 
service members and report back to Congress on the progress 
made.
Legislative History
H.R. 2835
    H.R. 2835 was introduced in the House on June 18, 2015, by 
Ms. McSally and nine original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security, and the Committee on Armed 
Services. Within the Committee, H.R. 2835 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security and the 
Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency.
    The Chair of the Committee on Armed Services sent a letter 
to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on September 
25, 2015, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration on 
the House Floor, the Committee on Armed Services would not seek 
a sequential referral of H.R. 2835. On that same date, the 
Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded, agreeing 
to the jurisdictional interests of the Committee on Armed 
Services, and support for the appointment of Conferees, should 
a House-Senate Conference be called.
    The House agreed to Suspend the Rules and passed H.R. 2835 
on September 28, 2015, as amended, by a \2/3\ record vote of 
410 yeas and 0 nays, (Roll No. 519).
    H.R. 2835 was received in the Senate and read twice on 
September 29, 2015.
    The Senate passed H.R. 2835, without amendment, by 
unanimous consent on October 1, 2015. Clearing the measure for 
the President.
    H.R. 2835 was presented to the President on October 7, 
2015. The President signed H.R. 2835 into law on October 16, 
2015, as Public Law 114-68.

S. 1603
    S. 1603, the Senate companion measure, was introduced in 
the Senate on June 17, 2015, by Mr. Flake, Mr. Johnson, Mr. 
McCain, and Mr. Schumer, and referred to the Senate Committee 
on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 1603 on June 24, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported with an Amendment in the Nature of a 
Substitute, favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs filed a report on August 5, 2015, as (S. Rpt. 114-116).
    The Senate passed S. 1603 on September 9, 2015, as amended, 
by unanimous consent.
    S. 1603 was received in the House on September 10, 2015, 
and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security, and the 
Committee on Armed Services. Within the Committee, S. 1603 was 
referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security.
    The Committee on Rules met on September 16, 2015, and filed 
a Rule providing for the consideration of H.R. 3134 and H.R. 
3504. Rule filed in the House as H.Res. 421 (H. Rpt. 114-262). 
Section 4 of H.Res. 421 provided that upon passage of H.R. 3504 
the House shall be considered to have: (1) stricken all after 
the enacting clause of S. 1603 and inserted in lieu thereof the 
provisions of H.R. 3504, the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors 
Protection Act, as passed by the House; and (2) passed the 
Senate bill as so amended.
    The House considered H.Res. 421 as a privileged matter on 
September 17, 2015, and agreed to the Rule by a recorded vote 
of 246 yeas and 179 nays, (Roll No. 503). Pursuant to the 
provisions of H.Res. 421, S. 1603, as amended with the text of 
H.R. 3504, as adopted by the House, was passed by the House. 
The legislative text within the jurisdiction of the Committee 
on Homeland Security was thereby removed.
    On September 21, 2015, the message on the House action was 
received in Senate and at held at the desk.

                                ------                                



                 SOCIAL MEDIA WORKING GROUP ACT OF 2015

                     Public Law 114-80    H.R. 623

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to authorize the 
Department of Homeland Security to establish a social media 
working group, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This law amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 
107-296) to authorize and enhance the Department of Homeland 
Security's Virtual Social Media Working Group (the Group), a 
group existing within the Department's Science and Technology 
Directorate. During two hearings in the 113th Congress, the 
Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications heard from numerous stakeholders, including the 
private sector, on this new reality and the vital role social 
media plays in the response efforts after a disaster. One of 
the key takeaways from the hearings was that during and after a 
disaster there needs to be better communication between the 
public and private sectors, specifically in the use of social 
media and other emerging technologies.
    H.R. 623 considered the lessons learned from those hearings 
and amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to authorize and 
enhance the Group to ensure information sharing between the 
Department and appropriate stakeholders regarding the use of 
social media before, during, and after a terrorist attack or 
other emergency. It expands the membership of the Group to 
include representatives from state, local, and tribal law 
enforcement, the fire service, emergency management, and public 
health; along with universities and academia, non-profit 
disaster relief organizations, and no fewer than three private 
sector organizations. The bill appoints the Secretary, or a 
designee, as the Chair of the working group and requires the 
Secretary, or designee, to appoint a co-chair from among the 
group's state or local representatives.
    The law requires the Group to meet within 90 days of 
enactment and biannually thereafter, or at the call of the 
Chair. The bill also requires the Group to submit an annual 
report to Congress on its activities, including a review of 
current and emerging technologies; best practices and lessons 
learned; available training on the use of social media in the 
aftermath of a disaster; and recommendations to improve the 
Department's use of social media for emergency management 
purposes.
Legislative History
113th Congress
    In the 113th Congress, H.R. 4263 was introduced in the 
House on March 14, 2013, by Mrs. Brooks of Indiana, Mr. Payne, 
Mr. Palazzo, and Mr. Swalwell of California, and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 
4263 was referred to the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response, and Communications.
    On March 27, 2014, the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response, and Communications considered H.R. 
4263, and forwarded the measure to the Full Committee for 
consideration, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 4263 on June 11, 2014, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    H.R. 4263 was reported to the House on June 19, 2014, as H. 
Rpt. 113-480.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on July 7, 2014, agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration of H.R. 4263, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 4263. The letter further requested the 
appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be 
called. On that same date, the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security responded acknowledging the jurisdictional 
interests of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure 
and the agreement to not seek a sequential referral.
    The House considered H.R. 4263 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 8, 2014, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 375 yeas and 19 nays, (Roll No. 369).
    H.R. 4263 was received in the Senate, on July 9, 2014, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

114th Congress
    H.R. 623 was introduced in the House on January 30, 2015, 
by Mrs. Brooks of Indiana, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. Payne and 
referred to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, 
and the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, 
H.R. 623 was referred to the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response, and Communications.
    The House considered H.R. 623 under Suspension of the Rules 
on February 2, 2015, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ recorded 
vote of 328 yeas and 51 nays, (Roll No. 53).
    H.R. 623 was received in the Senate on February 3, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered H.R. 623 on May 6, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate, with an amendment, 
favorably.
    Senate considered H.R. 623 on October 7, 2015, and passed 
the measure with an Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute.
    On October 28, 2015, the House agreed to Suspend the Rules 
and concurred in the Senate amendment to H.R. 623. Clearing the 
measure for the President.
    H.R. 623 was presented to the President on November 2, 
2015. The President signed H.R.623 into law on November 5, 
2015, as Public Law 114-80.

                                ------                                



        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2016

          Public Law 114-92    S. 1356 (H.R. 1735 / H.R. 399)

To clarify that certain provisions of the Border Patrol Agent 
Pay Reform Act of 2014 will not take effect until after the 
Director of the Office of Personnel Management promulgates and 
makes effective regulations relating to such provisions.
(To authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2016 for military 
activities of the Department of Defense, for military 
construction, and for defense activities of the Department of 
Energy, to prescribe military personnel strengths for such 
fiscal year, and for other purposes.)
Summary
    The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 
authorizes Fiscal Year 2016 appropriations and policies for the 
Department of Defense, military construction, and the national 
security programs of the Department of Energy. As signed into 
law, provisions of S.399 were included.
    H.R. 399, the Secure Our Borders First Act, includes a 
capability deployment through a sector-by-sector analysis of 
threats and needs and attaches to that the resources necessary 
to gain operational control of the border. The measure requires 
fencing where fencing is needed and technology where technology 
is needed to provide for a smart, safe, and cost effective 
border security policy. This bill also requires the Department 
of Homeland Security to conduct a similar analysis of the 
threats and needs associated with the Northern border. Further 
discussion of H.R.399 is listed below.
Legislative History
H.R. 1735
    H.R. 1735 was introduced in the House on April 13, 2015, by 
Mr. Thornberry, and Mr. Smith of Washington and referred to the 
Committee on Armed Services.
    The Committee on Armed Services considered H.R. 1735 on 
April 29 and 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported 
to the House, as amended, by a recorded vote of 60 yeas and 2 
nays.
    The Committee on Armed Serviced reported H.R. 1735 to the 
House on May 5, 2015, H. Rpt. 114-102. On May 12, 2015, a 
unanimous consent request was made in the House that the 
Committee on Armed Services be authorized to file a 
supplemental report on the bill, H.R. 1735. Agreed to without 
objection. Subsequently, the Committee on Armed Services filed 
a supplemental report as H. Rpt. 114-102, Part II.
    The House considered H.R. 1735 on May 13, 14, and 15, and 
passed the bill on May 15, 2015 by a recorded vote of 269 yeas 
and 151 nays, (Roll No. 239). The title of the measure was 
amended so as to read ``To authorize appropriations for fiscal 
year 2016 for military activities of the Department of Defense, 
for military construction, and for defense activities of the 
Department of Energy, to prescribe military personnel strengths 
for such fiscal year, and for other purposes.''
    H.R. 1735 was received in the Senate on May 21, 2015, read 
twice, and placed on the Senate Legislative Calendar.
    The Senate considered H.R. 1735 on June 4, 8, 9, 10, 11, 
16, 17, and 18, 2015. The Senate passed H.R. 1735 on June 18, 
2015, with an amendment by a recorded vote of 71 yeas and 25 
nays, (Record Vote No. 215).
    The House agreed to H.Res. 340 on June 25, 2015. H.Res. 340 
authorized returning to the Senate H.R. 1735, with the Senate 
amendment thereto. Subsequently, the Senate passed version of 
H.R. 1735 was returned to the Senate on June 25, 2015.
    The Senate considered H.R. 1735, as returned by the House, 
and struck Section 636 by unanimous consent.
    The message on the Senate action to H.R. 1735 was received 
in the House on June 25, 2015.
    The House disagreed to the Senate amendment to H.R. 1735 on 
June 25, 2015, and requested a Conference with the Senate 
thereon by voice vote. The Speaker appointed Conferees from the 
Committee on Armed Services for consideration of the House bill 
and the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference on June 25, 2015.
    The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security sent a 
letter to the Speaker of the House on June 29, 2015, requesting 
the appointment of Members of the Committee on Homeland 
Security to serve as Conferees to the House-Senate Conference 
on H.R. 1735. The letter further requested appointment of 
Conferees to the following sections: Of the House passed bill: 
Section 514; Sec. 532; Sec. 526; Sec. 591; Sec. 1060b; Sec. 
1267; and Sec. 1269; Of the Senate passed bill: Section 589; 
Sec. 1041; Sec. 1065; Sec. 1272; and Sec. 1637.
    The Senate insisted upon its amendment on July 9, 2015, and 
requested a Conference with the House thereon. The Senate then 
appointed Conferees on the part of the Senate: Senators McCain, 
Inhofe, Sessions, Wicker, Ayotte, Fischer, Cotton, Rounds, 
Graham, Reed, Nelson, Manchin, Gillibrand, Donnelly, Hirono, 
and Kaine.
    The Speaker appointed additional Conferees on the part of 
the House: from the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence; 
the Committee on Energy and Commerce; the Committee on Foreign 
Affairs; the Committee on Homeland Security; the Committee on 
the Judiciary; the Committee on Natural Resources; the 
Committee on Oversight and Government Reform; the Committee on 
Rules; the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology; the 
Committee on Small Business; the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure; and the Committee on Veterans' Affairs. 
Members from the Committee on Homeland Security were appointed 
for consideration of secs. 589 and 1041 of the Senate 
amendment, and modifications committed to conference: 
Representatives Mr. McCaul, Mrs. Miller of Michigan, and Mr. 
Thompson of Mississippi.
Senate Amendment: Sec. 589. Priority processing of applications 
for Transportation Worker Identification Credentials for 
members undergoing discharge or release from the Armed Forces; 
and Sec. 1041. Assistance to secure the southern land border of 
the United States.
    The Conferees agreed on September 29, 2015, to file a 
Conference Report to accompany H.R. 1735. Conference Report 
filed in the House as H. Rpt. 114-270. The Conference Papers, 
the Senate report and the managers statement were held at the 
Desk in the Senate on September 30, 2015.
    The House considered the Conference Report to accompany 
H.R. 1735 on October 1, 2015. After rejecting a motion to 
recommit with instructions to the Committee of Conference, by a 
recorded vote of 186 yeas and 241 nays, the House passed the 
Conference Report to accompany H.R. 1735 by a recorded vote of 
270 yeas and 156 nays, (Roll No. 532). The House further agreed 
by unanimous consent to H. Con. Res. 81, providing for 
corrections to the enrollment of H.R. 1735.
    The Senate began consideration of the Conference Report to 
accompany H.R. 1735 on October 1, 2015. A cloture motion on the 
Conference Report to accompany H.R. 1735 was made in the Senate 
on October 1, 2015.
    On October 6, 2015, the Senate invoked cloture on the 
Conference Report to accompany H.R. 1735 by a recorded vote of 
73 yeas and 26 nays, (Record Vote No. 275). The Senate then 
proceeded to the consideration of the Conference Report to 
accompany H.R. 1735.
    The Senate agreed to the Conference Report to accompany 
H.R. 1735 on October 7, 2015, by a recorded vote of 70 yeas and 
27 nays (Vote No. 277). The Senate then agreed to H. Con. Res. 
81, providing for corrections to the enrollment of H.R. 1735. 
Clearing the measure for the President.
    The House agreed by unanimous consent that if a veto 
message on H.R. 1735 is laid before the House, then after the 
message is read and the objections of the President are spread 
at large upon the Journal, further consideration of the veto 
message and the bill shall be postponed until the legislative 
day of November 5, 2015, and that on that legislative day, the 
House shall proceed to the constitutional question of 
reconsideration and dispose of such question without 
intervening motion.
    H.R. 1735 was presented to the President on October 21, 
2015. On October 22, 2015, the President vetoed H.R. 1735.
    The House read the Message of Disapproval of H.R. 1735 (H. 
Doc. 114-70). Pursuant to the order of the House of October 21, 
2015, further consideration of the veto message and the bill 
are postponed until the legislative day of November 5, 2015, 
and that on that legislative day, the House shall proceed to 
the constitutional question of reconsideration and dispose of 
such question without intervening motion.

S. 1356
    S. 1356 was introduced in the Senate, read twice, 
considered, read the third time, and passed without amendment 
by unanimous consent on April 14, 2014. As introduced, S. 1356, 
to clarify that certain provisions of the Border Patrol Agent 
Pay Reform Act of 2014 will not take effect until after the 
Director of the Office of Personnel Management promulgates and 
makes effective regulations relating to such provisions.
    S. 1356 was received in the House and held at the Desk on 
April 14, 2015.
    After the Message of Disapproval of H.R.1735 (listed 
above), the House proceeded to the consideration of the Senate 
companion measure. On November 5, 2015, the House agreed to 
Suspend the Rules and passed S. 1356, with an amendment by a 
\2/3\ recorded vote of 370 yeas and 58 nays, (Roll No. 618).
    On that same date, the House agreed consider H. Con. Res. 
90, directing the Secretary of the Senate to make a technical 
correction in the enrollment of S. 1356, and agreed to the 
resolution without objection.
    The Senate agreed to H. Con. Res. 90, correcting the 
enrollment of S. 1356 on November 5, 2015.
    The Senate considered S. 1356 by unanimous consent and 
concurred in the House amendment to the Senate bill on November 
10, 2015, and agreed to the measure by a recorded vote of 91 
yeas and 3 nays, (Roll No. 301). Clearing the Measure for the 
President.
    S. 1356 was presented to the President on November 17, 
2015. The President signed S. 1356 into law on November 25, 
2015, as Public Law 114-92.

H.R. 399
    H.R. 399, the Secure Our Borders First Act, was included 
within S. 1356 as signed into law. (See discussion of H.R. 399, 
listed below).

                                ------                                



                 CONSOLIDATED APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2016
   (MILITARY CONSTRUCTION AND VETERANS AFFAIRS AND RELATED AGENCIES 
                       APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2016)

     Public Law 114-113    H.R. 2029 (H.R. 158 / H.R. 1731 / H.R. 
                           3305 / H.R. 3313)

Making appropriations for military construction, the Department 
of Veterans Affairs, and related agencies for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2016, and for other purposes.
Summary
    The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016 provides for 
Fiscal Year 2016 appropriations; extends expiring tax 
provisions; and affects policies in areas including oil 
exports, intelligence, cybersecurity, health care, financial 
services, visa waivers, and conservation.
    As signed into law, the Consolidated Appropriations bill 
contains provisions of the following measures:
    H.R. 158 which seeks to deny entry into the United States 
to individuals who have connections to terrorist hotspots.
    H.R.1731, improve the sharing of information regarding 
cybersecurity risks and facilitating cooperation between the 
Federal Government and the private sector and to strengthen 
privacy and civil liberties protections.
    H.R. 3305, the Einstein Act of 2015, authorizes the 
Department of Homeland Security to deploy and operate 
capabilities to protect Federal Agency information and Federal 
civilian information systems, including technologies to 
diagnose, detect, prevent and mitigate against cybersecurity 
risks to that information or those information systems. The 
goal of the bill is to codify the Department's EINSTEIN 3A 
program that provides a perimeter defense snapshot in an effort 
to prevent cyber breaches.
    Further discussion of these measures is listed below.
Legislative History
H.R. 2029
    H.R. 2029 was reported to the House as an original measure 
by the Committee on Appropriations on April 24, 2015, as H. 
Rpt. 114-92.
    The House considered H.R. 2029 on April 29 and 30, 2015, 
under the provisions of H.Res. 223, and passed the measure by a 
recorded vote of 255 yeas and 163 nays, (Roll No. 193).
    H.R. 2029 was received in the Senate on May 5, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Appropriations.
    The Senate Committee on Appropriations reported H.R. 2029 
to the Senate on May 21, 2015, amended, as S. Rpt. 114-57.
    A motion to proceed to the consideration of H.R. 2029 was 
made in the Senate on September 30, 2015. A cloture on the 
motion to proceed to the consideration of H.R. 2029 was 
presented in the Senate. A motion to proceed to the 
consideration of H.R. 2029 was made in the Senate on October 1, 
2015, cloture on the motion to proceed was not invoked by a 
recorded vote of 50 yeas and 44 nays, (Record Vote No. 273). On 
November 5, 2015, a motion to proceed to the consideration of 
H.R. 2029 was made in the Senate and agreed to by a recorded 
vote of 93 yeas and 0 nays, (Record vote no. 299). The Senate 
considered H.R. 2029 on November 9 and 10, 2015, and passed the 
measure, amended by a recorded vote of 93 yeas and 0 nays, 
(Record Vote No. 302).
    On December 16, 2015, the House Committee on Rules met and 
granted a Rule providing for the consideration of H.R. 2029. 
The Rule was filed in the House as H.Res. 566 (H. Rpt. 114-382) 
and provides for the consideration of the Senate amendment to 
H.R. 2029. The Rule makes in order a motion that the House 
concur in the Senate amendment with two House amendments and 
provides that the question shall be divided between the two 
House amendments. If only House amendment #2 is adopted, that 
amendment shall be engrossed as an amendment in the nature of a 
substitute to the Senate amendment to H.R. 2029. Amendment #1 
is the text of the ``Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016''. 
As introduced, Amendment #1 includes the text of H.R. 158; and 
provisions of H.R. 1731, H.R. 3305, and H.R. 3333. Amendment #2 
is the text of the ``Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 
2015''
    The House considered H.Res. 566, the Rule providing for the 
consideration of H.R. 2029 on December 17, 2015and agreed to 
the Rule by a record vote of 240 yeas and 185 nays, (Roll No. 
702). Pursuant to the Rule, the House divided the question on 
the amendments to the Senate amendment; and on December 17, 
2015, agreed to amendment #2 by a recorded vote of 318 yeas and 
109 nays, (Roll No. 703). The House agreed on December 18, 
2015, to concur in the Senate amendment to the House amendment 
to H.R. 2029 with an amendment #1 by a recorded vote of 316 
yeas and 113 nays, (Roll No. 705).
    The Senate considered H.R. 2029 on December 18, 2015, by 
unanimous consent. A motion to concur in the House amendments 
to the Senate amendment was made in the Senate on December 18, 
2015. A cloture motion on the motion to concur in the House 
amendments to the Senate amendment was on December 18, 2016, 
and was invoked in the Senate by a recorded vote of 72 yeas and 
26 nays, (Record Vote No. 336). A motion to table the first 
House amendment to the Senate amendment was rejected by a 
recorded vote of 31 yeas and 67 nays, (Record Vote No. 336). 
The Senate then agreed to the House amendments to the Senate 
amendment to H.R. 2029 by a recorded vote of 65 yeas and 33 
nays, (Record Vote No. 339)
    H.R. 2029 was presented to the President on December 18, 
2015. The President signed H.R.2029 into law on December 18, 
2015, as Public Law 114-113.
    (See also action on H.R. 158, H.R. 1731, H.R. 3305 listed 
below).

H.R. 3305
    H.R. 3305, the EINSTEIN Act of 2015, was introduced in the 
House on July 29, 2015, by Mr. Hurd of Texas, Mr. McCaul, and 
Mr. Ratcliffe, and referred to the Committee on Oversight and 
Government Reform, and the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 3305 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and 
Security Technologies. Provisions of H.R.3305 were included in 
Sec. 223 of Pub. L. 114-113.

H.R. 3313
    H.R. 3313, the Cyber Defense of Federal Networks Act of 
2015, was introduced in the House by Mr. McCaul and Mr. 
Ratcliffe on July 29, 2015, and referred to the Committee on 
Oversight and Government Reform, and in addition to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 3313 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, 
Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies. 
Provisions of H.R.3313 were included in Sec. 223 of Pub. L. 
114-113.

                                ------                                



                 CONSOLIDATED APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2016
         (TRADE FACILITATION AND TRADE ENFORCEMENT ACT OF 2015
     UNITED STATES CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION AUTHORIZATION ACT)

    Public Law 114-125    H.R. 644 (H.R. 1907 / S. 1269 / H.R. 878 
                              / H.R. 998)

To reauthorize trade facilitation and trade enforcement 
functions and activities, and for other purposes.
Summary
    Public Law 114-125 authorizes the U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection (CBP), which had been operating without 
authorization since it was established. As a result, this 
provided the first time since the passage of the Homeland 
Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 107-296), that a major 
operational component of the Department of Homeland Security 
was been formally authorized.
    This law includes authorization for several of CBP 
subcomponents, including: The U.S. Border Patrol, the Office of 
Field Operations, Air and Marine Operations, the Office of 
Intelligence, and the Office of Professional Responsibility.
Legislative History

H.R. 644
    H.R. 644 was introduced in the House on February 2, 2015, 
by Mr. Reed, and referred to the Committee on Ways and Means.
    The Committee on Ways and Means considered H.R. 644 on 
February 4, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to the 
House, as amended, by a recorded vote of 22 yeas and 14 nays. 
The Committee on Ways and Means reported H.R. 644 to the House 
on February 9, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-18.
    The Committee on Rules met on February 10, 2015, and 
granted a Rule providing for the consideration of H.R. 644. 
Rule filed in the House as H.Res. 101 (H. Rpt. 114-23).
    The House considered H.Res. 101 on February 12, 2015, and 
agreed to the Rule by a recorded vote of 233 yeas and 163 nays, 
(Roll No. 78).
    The House considered H.R. 644 under the provisions of 
H.Res. 101 on February 12, 2015, and passed the measure by a 
recorded vote of 279 yeas and 137 nays, (Roll No. 80)
    H.R. 644 was received in the Senate on February 23, 2015. 
H.R. 644 was read a first and second time on April 16 and 20, 
respectively.
    The Senate considered H.R. 644 by unanimous consent on May 
14, 2015, and passed the measure, amended, by a recorded vote 
of 78 yeas and 20 nays, (Record Vote No. 179). During 
consideration of H.R. 644 in the Senate, provisions of H.R. 878 
were included in Title VIII.
    On June 10, 2015, the Committee on Rules met and granted a 
Rule providing for the consideration of the Senate amendments 
to H.R. 644. Rule filed in the House as H.Res. 305 (H. Rpt. 
114-146).
    The House considered H.R. 644 on June 12, 2016, under the 
provisions of H.Res. 305. The House agreed to H.R. 644 with an 
amendment to the Senate amendments by a recorded vote of 240 
yeas and 190 nays, (Roll No. 363).
    The Senate considered H.R. 644 on June 23, 2015, by 
unanimous consent. A motion was made in the Senate to insist on 
the Senate amendment to the House amendment; agree to a request 
for Conference; and authorize the Presiding Officer to appoint 
Conferees made in Senate. A cloture motion on the motion was 
presented in the Senate; the motion was amended to request a 
Conference with the House by Unanimous Consent.
    The Senate considered H.R. 644 on June 24, 2015. The 
cloture motion on the motion to insist on the Senate amendment 
to the House amendment; request a Conference; and authorize the 
Presiding Officer to appoint conferees was withdrawn by 
unanimous consent in Senate. The motion to insist on the Senate 
amendment to the House amendment; request a Conference with the 
House thereon; and authorize the Presiding Officer to appoint 
Conferees, was agreed to by voice vote.
    The Senate on June 24, 2015, insisted upon its amendment; 
requested a Conference the House thereon, and appointed 
Conferees on the part of the Senate: Hatch; Cornyn; Thune; 
Isakson; Wyden; Schumer; Stabenow.
    A motion that the House insist on its amendment to the 
Senate amendment, and to agree to the Conference with the 
Senate thereon was made in the House on December 1, 2015, and 
agree to by a recorded vote of 252 yeas and 170 nays, (Roll No. 
652).
    A motion to instruct House Conferees was made in the House 
on December 1, 2016, and not agreed to by a recorded vote of 
193 yeas and 232 nays, (Roll No. 655).
    The Speaker appointed Conferees on December 2, 2015: Brady 
of Texas, Reichert, Tiberi, Levin, and Linda T. Sanchez of 
California.
    Conference Committee held on December 7, 2015; and on 
December 9, 2015, the Conferees agreed to file a Conference 
Report to accompany H.R. 644. The Conference papers were held 
at the Desk in the Senate.
    The Committee of Conference reported the Conference Report 
to Accompany H.R. 644 to the House on December 9, 2015, as H. 
Rpt. 114-376.
    The House considered the Conference Report to accompany 
H.R. 644 on December 11, 2015. A motion to recommit the 
Conference Report to the Committee of Conference failed by a 
recorded vote of 172 yeas and 239 nays, (Roll No. 692). The 
House then agreed to the Conference Report to accompany H.R. 
644 by a recorded vote of 256 yeas and 158 nays, (Roll No. 
693).
    The Senate considered the Conference Report to accompany 
H.R. 644 on February 9, 2016; a cloture motion on the 
Conference Report to accompany H.R. 644 was presented in the 
Senate. The Senate continued consideration of the Conference 
Report on February 11, 2016; the cloture motion was invoked in 
the Senate by a recorded vote of 73 yeas and 22 nays, (Record 
Vote No. 21). Subsequently, the Senate agreed to the Conference 
Report to accompany H.R. 644 by a recorded vote of 75 yeas and 
20 nays, (Record Vote No. 22).
    H.R. 644 was presented to the President on February 23, 
2016. The President signed H.R.644 into law on February 24, 
2016, as Public Law 114-125.

    H.R. 878
    H.R. 878, the United States Customs and Border Protection 
Authorization Act, was introduced in the House February 11, 
2015, by Mrs. Miller of Michigan, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. Vela and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security, and in addition 
to the Committee on Ways and Means. Within the Committee, H.R. 
878 was referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime 
Security.
    During consideration of H.R. 644 in the Senate, provisions 
of H.R. 878 were included in Title VIII.

    H.R. 998
    H.R. 998, the United States Customs and Border Protection 
Authorization Act, was introduced in the House on February 13, 
2015, by Mr. Meehan and five original cosponsors, and referred 
to the Committee on Homeland Security, and in addition to the 
Committee on Ways and Means. Within the Committee, H.R. 998 was 
referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security 
and the Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    On June 25, 2015, the Chair discharged the Subcommittee on 
Border and Maritime Security and the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security from further consideration of H.R. 998.
    The Committee considered H.R. 998 on June 25, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Ways and Means sent a letter 
to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on July 16, 
2015, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration on the 
House Floor, the Committee on Ways and Means would forgo 
further consideration of H.R. 998.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 998 to the 
House on July 22, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-219, Pt. I. 
Subsequently, the Committee on Ways and Means was discharged 
from further consideration of H.R. 998.
    The House considered H.R. 998 under Suspension of the Rules 
on July 27, 2015, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 998 was received in the Senate on July 28, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs 
considered H.R. 998 on October 7, 2015, and ordered the measure 
to be reported to the Senate, with an Amendment in the Nature 
of a Substitute.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported H.R. 998 to the Senate on December 15, 2015, 
as S. Rpt. 114-180.
    H.R. 998 was included as section 811 of H.R. 644 as 
reported by the Committee of Conference. (See also action on 
H.R.998 listed above).

    H.R. 1907
    H.R. 1907, the Trade Facilitation and Trade Enforcement Act 
of 2015, was introduced in the House on April 21, 2015, by Mr. 
Tiberi and referred to the Committee on Ways and Means, and in 
addition to the Committee on Homeland Security, the Committee 
on Foreign Affairs, the Committee on Financial Services, and 
the Committee on the Judiciary. Within the Committee, H.R. 1907 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime 
Security.
    The Committee on Ways and Means considered H.R. 1907 on 
April 23, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to the 
House, as amended.
    The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security sent a 
letter to the Chair of the Committee on Ways and Means on May 
14, 2015, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration of 
H.R. 1907 on the House Floor, the Committee on Homeland 
Security would forego further consideration of H.R. 1907. The 
letter further requested the appointment of Conferees should a 
House-Senate Conference be called. On that same date, the Chair 
of the Committee on Ways and Means sent a letter to the Chair 
of the Committee on Homeland Security acknowledging the 
jurisdictional interests of the Committee on Homeland Security 
and the agreement to forego consideration of H.R. 1907. The 
letter further agreed to support the appointment of Conferees 
should a House-Senate Conference be called.
    On May 14, 2015, the Committee on Ways and Means reported 
H.R. 1907 to the House as H. Rpt. 114-114, Pt. I. Subsequently, 
the Committee on Homeland Security, the Committee on Foreign 
Affairs, the Committee on Financial Services, and the Committee 
on the Judiciary were discharged from further consideration of 
H.R. 1907.

    S. 1269
    The Senate Committee on Finance considered an original 
measure, the Trade Facilitation and Trade Enforcement Act of 
2015, on May 11, 2015, and reported the measure to the Senate, 
with no written report. Measure introduced in the Senate as S. 
1269, and placed on the Senate Legislative Calendar under 
General Orders. Calendar No. 76.
    Senate Committee on Finance report filed on May 12, 2015, 
as S. Rpt. 114-45.

                                ------                                



   EDWARD `TED' KAUFMAN AND MICHAEL LEAVITT PRESIDENTIAL TRANSITIONS 
                        IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 2015

                     Public Law 114-136    S. 1172

To improve the process of presidential transition.
Summary
    S. 1172 amends the Presidential Transition Act of 1963 
(Pub. L. 88-277) to provided for enhanced coordination in the 
transfer of power for the 2016 Presidential Election.
    Section 6 of this law directs the Department of Homeland 
Security to report to Congressional committees, not later than 
February 15, 2016, on threats and vulnerabilities during 
Presidential transitions. The report shall identify and discuss 
vulnerabilities related to border security and threats related 
to terrorism, including from weapons of mass destruction; shall 
identify steps being taken to address the threats and 
vulnerabilities during a presidential transition; and may 
include recommendations for actions by components and agencies 
within the Department of Homeland Security.
Legislative History
    S. 1172 was introduced in the Senate by Mr. Carper and Mr. 
Johnson on April 30, 2015, and referred to the Senate Committee 
on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 1172 on May 6, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported with amendments favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 1172 to the Senate on July 27, 2015, as S. 
Rpt. 114-94.
    The Senate considered S. 1172 on July 30, 2015, and passed 
the measure, amended, by unanimous consent.
    S. 1172 was received in the House on July 31, 2016, and 
referred to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, 
and in addition to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within 
the Committee, S. 1172 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Oversight and Management Efficiency.
    The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform considered 
S. 1172 on October 9, 2015, and ordered the measure to be 
reported to the House with an Amendment in the Nature of a 
Substitute, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform reported 
S. 1172 to the House on December 18, 2015 as H. Rpt. 114-384, 
Part I. Subsequently, the Committee on Homeland Security was 
discharged from further consideration.
    The House agreed to Suspend the Rules and passed S. 1172 on 
February 29, 2016, as amended, by voice vote.
    On March 8, 2016, the Senate concurred in the House 
amendment to S. 1172 by unanimous consent, clearing the measure 
for the President.
    S. 1172 was presented to the President on March 15, 2016. 
The President signed S. 1172 into law on March 18, 2016, as 
Public Law 114-136.

                                ------                                



  INTEGRATED PUBLIC ALERT AND WARNING SYSTEM MODERNIZATION ACT OF 2015

         Public Law 114-143    S. 1180 (H.R. 1738 / H.R. 1472)

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to direct the 
Secretary of Homeland Security to modernize and implement the 
national integrated public alert and warning system to 
disseminate homeland security information and other 
information, and for other purposes.
Summary
    Since its establishment in April 2007, the Department of 
Homeland Security (DHS) Integrated Public Alert and Warning 
System (IPAWS) Program Management Office (PMO) has been 
operating without Congressional authorization. Given the 
significant progress that the PMO has accomplished since its 
establishment, the time has come for Congress to provide the 
necessary support and direction to ensure that IPAWS reaches 
its goals. This legislation provides the Secretary with 
direction on the necessary system requirements that IPAWS must 
achieve, such as the ability to provide timely alerts and 
warnings to the largest segment of the population possible.
    This legislation is the product of a number of hearings and 
briefing held by the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, 
Response, and Communications in the 112th and 113th Congresses, 
including a July 8, 2011, hearing entitled, ``Communicating 
With the Public During Emergencies: An Update on Federal Alerts 
and Warnings,'' which focused specifically on IPAWS and at 
which Members of the Subcommittee received testimony from 
Federal witnesses and stakeholders. The Subcommittee continued 
its oversight of IPAWS at a November 17, 2011, hearing, which 
explored the various emergency communications offices and 
programs at the Department of Homeland Security. The director 
of the IPAWS PMO testified at that hearing and provided Members 
of the Subcommittee with an update on the national test of the 
Emergency Alert System and implementation of the Commercial 
Mobile Alert System (CMAS) now known as Wireless Emergency 
Alert (WEA). The Subcommittee also held a Member briefing on 
May 7, 2013, to receive an update on the system and its use. 
The Assistant Administrator for National Continuity Programs 
from the Federal Emergency Management Administration provided 
the briefing.
    The need for, and benefit of, a robust integrated public 
alert and warning system has been repeatedly demonstrated in 
recent events. Alerts through the IPAWS system were sent after 
the Boston Marathon bombings and wireless emergency alerts have 
been credited with helping to save lives during natural 
disasters, including Hurricane Sandy and the severe tornadoes 
hit the South and Midwest in Spring 2014. This legislation will 
help to ensure that as much information as possible is made 
available and accessible to the public before, during, and 
after terrorist attacks, natural disasters, and other 
emergencies to get them out of harm's way.
Legislative History
112th Congress
    In the 112th Congress, H.R. 3563 was introduced in the 
House on December 6, 2011, by Mr. Bilirakis and Ms. Richardson, 
and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security, and the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 3563 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications.
    The Subcommittee considered H.R. 3563 on December 8, 2011, 
and reported the measure to the Full Committee with a favorable 
recommendation, amended, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 3563 on March 28, 2012, 
and ordered the measure to be favorably reported to the House, 
amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 3563 to 
the House on September 20, 2012, as H. Rpt. 112-685, Pt. I. 
Subsequently, the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure was discharged from further consideration.
    A provision similar to H.R. 3563 was included in section 
102 of the FEMA Reauthorization Act of 2012 (H.R. 2903), which 
passed the House of Representatives on September 19, 2012.

113th Congress
    In the 113th Congress, H.R. 3283 was introduced in the 
House on October 10, 2013, by Mr. Bilirakis and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security, and in addition to the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 3283 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications.
    On March 27, 2014, the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response, and Communications considered H.R. 
3283, and forwarded the measure to the Full Committee for 
consideration, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 3283 on April 30, 2014, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, by voice vote.

114th Congress
S. 1180
    S. 1180 was introduced in the Senate on May 4, 2015, by Mr. 
Johnson and Ms. McCaskill and referred to the Senate Committee 
on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 1180 on June 6, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate with an amendment, 
favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 1180 to the Senate on June 25, 2015, as S. 
Rpt. 114-73.
    The Senate considered S. 1180 on July 9, 2015, and passed 
the measure, with amendments, by unanimous consent.
    S. 1180 was received in the House on July 13, 2015, and 
held at the Desk.
    The House considered S. 1180 under Suspension of the Rules 
on March 21, 2016, and passed the measure by voice vote. 
Clearing the measure for the President.
    S. 1180 was presented to the President on March 31, 2016, 
and signed into law on April 11, 2016, as Public Law 114-143.

H.R. 1738
    H.R. 1738 was introduced in the House on April 13, 2015, by 
Mr. Bilirakis, Mr. McCaul, and Mrs. Brooks of Indiana and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 1738 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications.
    The Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications was discharged from further consideration of 
H.R. 1738 on May 20, 2015.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 1738 on May 20, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1738 to the House on December 
8, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-854, Pt. I.

H.R. 1472
    H.R. 1472 was introduced in the House on March 19, 2015, by 
Mr. Barletta, Mr. Carson of Indiana, Mr. Shuster, and Mr. 
DeFazio and referred to the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure.
    The Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure 
considered H.R. 1472 on April 15, 2015 and ordered the measure 
to be reported to the House by voice vote.

                                ------                                



      DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HEADQUARTERS CONSOLIDATION 
                       ACCOUNTABILITY ACT OF 2015

               Public Law 114-150    S. 1638 (H.R. 1640)

To direct the Secretary of Homeland Security to submit to 
Congress a report on the Department of Homeland Security 
headquarters consolidation project in the National Capital 
Region, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation requires the Secretary of Homeland 
Security to submit to Congress a report on the Department of 
Homeland Security's headquarters consolidation project in the 
National Capital Region.
Legislative History
H.R. 1640
    H.R. 1640 was introduced in the House on March 25, 2015, by 
Mr. Walker and seven original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 1640 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Oversight and Management 
Efficiency.
    The Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency 
considered H.R. 1640 on May 13, 2015, and ordered the measure 
reported to the Full Committee for consideration, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 1640 on May 20, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter on June 15, 2015, agreeing to 
forgo further consideration of H.R. 1640. The letter further 
requested the appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called. The Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure on June 17, 2015, 
acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure and the agreement to not seek 
a sequential referral of H.R. 1640, and supporting the request 
for Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be called.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1640 to the House on June 17, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-166.
    The House considered H.R. 1640 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 23, 2015, and passed the measure, amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 1640 was received in the Senate on June 24, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

S. 1638
    S. 1638, the Senate companion measure, was introduced in 
the Senate on June 18, 2015, by Mr. Johnson and Mr. Carper, and 
referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 1638 on June 24, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate, without amendment, 
favorably.
    Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs 
reported S. 1638 to the Senate on March 14, 2016, as S. Rpt. 
114-227.
    The Senate considered S. 1638 on April 6, 2016, and passed 
the measure by unanimous consent.
    S. 1638 was received in the House on April 11, 2016, and 
held at the Desk.
    The House considered S. 1638 on April 18, 2016, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure by voice vote.
    S. 1638 was presented to the President on April 20, 2016. 
The President signed S. 1638 into law on April 29, 2016, as 
Public Law 114-150.

                                ------                                



      FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION REAUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2016 
           (AMERICA'S SMALL BUSINESS TAX RELIEF ACT OF 2015)

      Public Law 114-190    H.R. 636 (H.R. 2843, H.R. 4698, H.R. 
                                 5338)

To amend title 49, United States Code, to authorize 
appropriations for the Federal Aviation Administration for 
fiscal years 2016 through 2017, and for other purposes. 
(To combat terrorist recruitment in the United States, and for 
other purposes.)
Summary
    This law requires an assessment of the staffing model of 
the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to determine 
whether those positions are necessary, including canine 
explosives detection technology and teams, for all airports in 
the U.S. where TSA controls passenger checkpoints. 
Additionally, this law requires TSA to utilize Behavior 
Detection Officers for baggage and passenger screening areas, 
including PreCheck lanes. This law increases efforts to ensure 
the public understands the TSA PreCheck program, and requests 
the Aviation Security Advisory Committee submit recommendations 
on best practices for checkpoint operations optimization.
Legislative History
H.R. 636
    H.R. 636 was introduced in the House on February 2, 2015, 
by Mr. Tiberi and seven original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Ways and Means, and the Committee on the Budget.
    The Committee on Ways and Means met on February 4, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, amended, 
by a recorded vote of 24 yeas and 14 nays.
    The Committee on Ways and Means reported H.R. 636 to the 
House on February 9, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-21, Part I. 
Subsequently, the Committee on the Budget was discharged from 
further consideration of H.R. 636.
    The Committee on Rules met and granted a Rule providing for 
the consideration of H.R. 636. The Rule was filed in the House 
as H.Res. 101 (H. Rpt. 114-23) and provides for the 
consideration of H.R. 644 and H.R. 636 under closed rules.
    The House considered H.Res. 101 and passed the Rule by a 
recorded vote of 233 yeas and 163 nays, (Roll No. 78).
    The House considered H.R. 636 under the provisions of 
H.Res. 101 on February 13, 2015. A motion to recommit to the 
Committee on Ways and Means with instructions was not agreed to 
by a recorded vote of 173 yeas and 241 nays, (Roll No. 81). The 
House passed H.R. 636 by a recorded vote of 272 yeas and 142 
nays, (Roll No. 82).
    H.R. 636 was received in the Senate on February 23, 2015. 
H.R. 636 was read the first time on April 16, 2015, and the 
second time on April 20, 2015.
    A motion to proceed to the consideration of H.R. 636 was 
made in Senate on April 4, 2016. A cloture motion on the motion 
to proceed was presented in the Senate on April 4, 2016. A 
second motion to proceed to the consideration of H.R. 636 was 
made in the Senate on April 6, 2016.
    A motion to proceed to the consideration of H.R. 636 was 
considered in Senate on April 6, 2016. During consideration, 
cloture on the motion to proceed was invoked in the Senate by a 
recorded vote of 98 yeas and 0 nays, (Record Vote No. 40). The 
motion to proceed to the consideration of H.R. 636 was agreed 
to by voice vote, and the measure laid before the Senate on 
April 6, 2016.
    The Senate considered H.R. 636 on April 7, 11, and 12, 
2016. A cloture motion on H.R. 636 was presented in the Senate 
on April 12, 2016.
    The Senate continued consideration of H.R. 636 on April 13, 
12, and 18, 2016. The cloture motion on H.R. 636 was invoked in 
the Senate on April 18, 2016, by a recorded vote of 89 yeas and 
5 nays, (Record Vote No. 46).
    The Senate continued consideration of H.R. 636 on April 19, 
2016, and passed the measure, with an amendment, and an 
amendment to the Title by a recorded vote of 95 yeas and 3 
nays, (Record Vote No. 47).
    The Senate agreed to House amendments to Senate amendments 
on July 13, 2016, by a record vote of 89 yeas and 4 nays, (Roll 
No. 127). Clearing the measure for the President.
    H.R. 636 was presented to the President on July 14, 2016. 
The President signed H.R. 636 into law on July 15, 2016, as 
Public Law 114-190.
    H.R. 4698, the Securing Aviation from Foreign Entry Points 
and Guarding Airports Through Enhanced Security Act of 2016, 
was included in Part B of H.R. 636, as passed by the Senate. 
Provisions of H.R. 2843, the TSA PreCheck Expansion Act, and 
H.R. 5338, the Checkpoint Optimization and Efficiency Act of 
2016, were included in Subtitle A of Title II of H.R. 636 as 
passed by the House amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 
636. (See action taken on H.R. 4698, H.R. 2843, and H.R. 5338 
listed below).

                                ------                                



                  NORTHERN BORDER SECURITY REVIEW ACT

                 Public Law 114-267 S. 1808 (H.R. 455)

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to conduct a 
northern border threat analysis, and for other purposes.
Summary
    The Department of Homeland Security had never conducted a 
threat analysis for the Northern border. Such an analysis would 
help inform future homeland security resourcing needs. Due to 
the vast expanse along the 4,000 miles of the Northern border, 
it would be cost prohibitive to allocate enforcement resources 
using a brute force model of additional agents, technology, and 
infrastructure in an ad hoc fashion. A more cost-effective 
approach to resource allocation on the Northern border would be 
to first analyze the security gaps and most pressing needs to 
inform the location and type of solutions required to secure 
the Northern border.
    H.R. 455 would require the Secretary of Homeland Security 
to submit to the appropriate Congressional committees, within 
six months from the date of enactment, a northern border threat 
analysis. The threat analysis must include an analysis of 
current and potential terrorist threats posed by individuals 
seeking to enter the United States through the northern border; 
an analysis of improvements needed at ports of entry along the 
northern border to prevent terrorists and instruments of terror 
from crossing the border; an analysis of gaps in law, policy, 
international agreements, or tribal agreements that hinder 
border security efforts along the northern border; an analysis 
of unlawful cross border activity between ports of entry, 
including the maritime border of the Great Lakes; an analysis 
of the terrain, population density, and climate; and an 
analysis of adding new preclearance and pre-inspection 
locations.
Legislative History
H.R. 455
    H.R. 455 was introduced in the House on January 21, 2015, 
by Mr. Katko, Mr. King of New York, Mrs. Miller of Michigan and 
Mr. Higgins, and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 455 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security.
    On June 25, 2015, the Chair discharged the Subcommittee on 
Border and Maritime Security from further consideration of H.R. 
455.
    The Committee considered H.R. 455 on June 25, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 455 to the 
House on July 28, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-232. Placed on the Union 
Calendar, Calendar No. 175.
    On October 28, 2015, the House agreed to Suspend the Rules 
and passed H.R. 455, amended, by voice vote.
    H.R. 455 was received in the Senate on October 29, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

S. 1808
    S. 1808, the Senate companion measure, was introduced in 
the Senate on July 21, 2015, by Ms. Heitkamp, Ms. Ayotte, Mr. 
Peters, and Mr. Johnson and referred to the Senate Committee on 
Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 1808 on July 29, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate, with an Amendment in the 
Nature of a Substitute, favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 1808 to the Senate on October 19, 2015, as 
S. Rpt. 114-155. S. 1808 was placed on the Senate Legislative 
Calendar, Calendar No. 269.
    The Senate passed S. 1808 on November 16, 2016, by 
unanimous consent.
    S. 1808 was received in the House on November 17, 2016, and 
held at the Desk.
    The House agreed to take from the Speakers table and passed 
S. 1808 on November 29, 2016, clearing the measure for the 
President.
    S. 1808 was presented to the President on December 2, 2016. 
The President signed S. 1808 into Law on December 14, 2016, as 
Pub. L. 114-267.

                                ------                                



                FIRST RESPONDER ANTHRAX PREPAREDNESS ACT

                 Public Law 114-268S. 1915 (H.R. 1300)

To direct the Secretary of Homeland Security to make anthrax 
vaccines and antimicrobials available to emergency response 
providers, and for other purposes.
Summary
    An anthrax attack is a serious mass casualty threat. The 
National response capability to a wide-area anthrax attack 
would be greatly enhanced by having pre-vaccinated responders, 
able to deploy immediately and confidently, knowing that they 
have been afforded as much protection as possible. Pre-event 
vaccination is a safe, effective way to protect these 
responders so they can respond in an anthrax attack without 
fear of contracting disease. The first responder community has 
been requesting this capability and the Committee has worked 
with the Department to establish an effective program.
    The Department of Homeland Security Office of Health 
Affairs has been working with the Centers for Disease Control 
and Prevention on a pilot program to provide surplus pre-event 
anthrax vaccine from the Strategic National Stockpile to 
emergency response providers on a voluntary basis and free of 
charge. This legislation authorizes that program.
Legislative History
113th Congress
    In the 113th Congress, H.R. 5620 was introduced in the 
House on September 18, 2015, by Mr. King of New York and Mr. 
Pascrell and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and 
the Committee on Energy and Commerce. Within the Committee, 
H.R. 5620 was Referred to the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response and Communications.

114th Congress
H.R. 1300
    H.R. 1300 was introduced in the House on March 4, 2015, by 
Mr. King of New York, Mr. Pascrell, Mr. Rooney of Florida, and 
Mr. Katko and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security 
and the Committee on Energy and Commerce. Within the Committee, 
H.R. 1300 was referred to the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response, and Communications.
    The Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications considered H.R. 1300 on May 14, 2015, and 
forwarded the measure to the Full Committee for consideration, 
as amended, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 1300 on May 20, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Energy and Commerce sent a 
letter to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on 
July 22, 2015, agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the Floor of the House, the Committee on 
Energy and Commerce would waive further consideration of H.R. 
1300. On July 21, 2015, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security responded, acknowledging the jurisdictional interests 
of the Committee on Energy and Commerce and the agreement to 
waive further consideration of H.R. 1300.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 1300 to 
the House on July 22, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-222, Pt. I. 
Subsequently, the Committee on Energy and Commerce was 
discharged from further consideration of H.R. 1300.
    The House considered H.R. 1300 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 27, 2015, and passed the measure on July 29, 
2015, by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 424 yeas and 0 nays, (Roll 
No. 485).
    H.R. 1300 was received in the Senate on July 30, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

S. 1915
    S. 1915, the Senate companion measure to Sec. 301 of H.R. 
3583 as passed by the House, was introduced in the Senate by 
Ms. Ayotte, Mr. Booker, and Mr. Coons on August 3, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 1915 on December 9, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate, with an amendment.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 1915 to the Senate on May 9, 2016, as S. 
Rpt. 114-251.
    The Senate passed S. 1915 on November 16, 2016, by 
unanimous consent with an amendment and an amendment to the 
title.
    S. 1915 was received in the House on November 17, 2016, and 
held at the Desk.
    The House agreed to take from the Speakers table and passed 
S. 1915 on November 29, 2016, clearing the measure for the 
President.
    S. 1915 was presented to the President on December 2, 2016. 
The President signed S. 1915 into Law on December 14, 2016, as 
Pub. L. 114-268.

                                ------                                



 ESSENTIAL TRANSPORTATION WORKER IDENTIFICATION CREDENTIAL ASSESSMENT 
                                  ACT

                     Public Law 114-278    H.R. 710

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to prepare a 
comprehensive security assessment of the transportation 
security card program, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This measure responds to a key recommendation made by the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO), to conduct a security 
assessment of the effectiveness of the Transportation Worker 
Identification Credential (TWIC).
    The TWIC program is run jointly within the Department of 
Homeland Security by the U.S. Coast Guard and the 
Transportation Security Administration. The program uses 
biometric credentials to limit access to secure areas of 
maritime facilities and vessels to only those vetted 
individuals who have a legitimate need access the ports or 
vessels.
    The TWIC program remains incomplete, as biometric readers 
have not yet been fully deployed, as a result there remains 
uncertainty for our Nation's transportation and maritime 
industry. While regulations were in place beginning in 2007 for 
maritime workers to purchase the biometric credentials, 
regulations requiring the issuance of card readers remained 
incomplete.
    A scathing report by the Government Accountability Office 
Transportation Worker Identification Credential:Card Reader 
Pilot Results Are Unreliable; Security Benefits Need to Be 
Reassessed [GAO-13-198] called into question the underlying 
security value of the TWIC program and raised very serious 
questions about the future of this program. This legislation 
was responsive to the GAO's most recent recommendation on the 
program--conducting an independent security assessment of the 
TWIC program.
Legislative History

113th Congress
    In the 113th Congress, H.R. 3202 was introduced in the 
House on September 27, 2013, by Ms. Jackson Lee, Mr. Thompson 
of Mississippi, and Mrs. Miller of Michigan, and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 
3202 was referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime 
Security, and the Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    On May 20, 2014, the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime 
Security considered H.R. 3202 and forwarded the measure to the 
Full Committee for consideration, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 3202 on June 11, 2014, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter on July 8, 2014, to the Chair of 
the Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 3202. The letter further requested the 
appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be 
called. On that same date, the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security responded, agreeing to the jurisdictional 
interests of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure 
and the agreement to not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 
3202.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3202 to the House on July 18, 
2014, as H. Rpt. 113-528.
    The House considered H.R. 3202 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 28, 2014, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 400 yeas and 0 nays, (Roll No. 456).
    H.R. 3202 was received in the Senate on July 29, 2014, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation considered H.R. 3202 on May 20, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the Senate with an 
Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute, favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation reported H.R. 3202 to the Senate on April 25, 
2016 as S. Rpt. 114-244.

114th Congress
    H.R. 710 was introduced in the House on February 4, 2015, 
by Ms. Jackson Lee, Mrs. Miller of Michigan, and Mr. Thompson 
of Mississippi, and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 710 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security and the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on February 5, 2015, agreeing that, in order 
to expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would forego action on H.R. 
710. The letter further requested support for the appointment 
of Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be called. On 
that same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded acknowledging the jurisdictional concerns of the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and the 
agreement to forgo consideration.
    The House considered H.R. 710 under Suspension of the Rules 
on February 10, 2015, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 710 was received in the Senate on February 11, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs. On April 22, 2015, a 
unanimous-consent agreement was reached providing that H.R. 710 
be discharged from the Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs and be referred to the Senate Committee on 
Commerce, Science and Transportation.
    The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation considered H.R. 710 on May 20, 2015, and 
reported the measure to the Senate, with an amendment.
    The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation reported H.R. 710 to the Senate on April 25, 
2016, as S. Rpt. 114-244.
    The Senate considered H.R. 710 on December 9, 2016, and 
passed the measure, amended.
    The House concurred in the Senate amendments to H.R. 710 on 
December 14, 2016. Clearing the measure for the President.
    H.R. 710 was presented to the President on December 15, 
2016. The President signed H.R. 710 into law on December 16, 
2016, as Public Law 114-278.

                                ------                                



                                ------                                


               CROSS-BORDER TRADE ENHANCEMENT ACT OF 2015

                Public Law 114-279     H.R. 875 (S. 461)

To provide for alternative financing arrangements for the 
provision of certain services and the construction and 
maintenance of infrastructure at land border ports of entry, 
and for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation reauthorizes and expands the pilot 
programs that permit United States Customs and Border 
Protection (CBP) to enter into agreements with private or State 
or local government entities for reimbursable services or 
property donations at CBP ports of entry. The authorization of 
public-private partnerships under this bill will allow private 
sector and State and local government entities to fund 
improvements at CBP ports of entry that will increase trade and 
travel efficiencies at no cost to the taxpayer.
Legislative History
H.R. 875
    H.R. 875was introduced in the House on February 11, 2015, 
by Mr. Cuellar and referred to the Committee on Ways and Means, 
and in addition to the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure, the Committee on the Judiciary, the Committee 
on Homeland Security, and the Committee on Agriculture. Within 
the Committee, H.R. 875 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Border and Maritime Security.
    The House considered H.R. 875 on December 6, 2016, and 
agreed to Suspend the Rules and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    The Senate considered H.R. 875 on December 9 and 10, 2016, 
and passed the measure without amendment, on legislative day of 
December 9, 2016. Clearing the measure for the President.
    H.R. 875 was presented to the President on December 15, 
2016. The President signed H.R. 875 into law on December 16, 
2016, as Public Law 114-279.
S. 461
    S. 461, the Senate companion measure, was introduced in the 
Senate on February 11, 2015, by Mr. Cornyn and Ms. Klobuchar) 
and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 461 on May 25, 2016, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate with an Amendment in the 
Nature of a Substitute, favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 461 to the Senate on July 12, 2016 with no 
written report. The Senate Committee on Homeland Security 
report filed in the Senate on August 30, 2016, as S. Rpt. 114-
303.
    The Senate considered S. 461 on November 29, 2016, and 
withdrew the Committee Substitute by unanimous consent and 
subsequently passed the measure.

                                ------                                



FEDERAL LAW ENFORCEMENT TRAINING CENTERS REFORM AND IMPROVEMENT ACT OF 
                                  2015

               Public Law 114-285     H.R. 3842 (S. 3781)

To improve homeland security, including domestic preparedness 
and response to terrorism, by reforming Federal Law Enforcement 
Training Centers to provide training to first responders, and 
for other purposes.
Summary
    The purpose of H.R. 3842, the FLETC Reform and Improvement 
Act of 2015, is to reform and improve the Federal Law 
Enforcement Training Centers in the Department of Homeland 
Security. H.R. 3842 strengthens the role of the Director of 
FLETC and improves training practices.
Legislative History
H.R. 3842
    H.R. 3842 was introduced in the House on October 28, 2015, 
by Mr. Carter of Georgia and Mrs. Torres and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security and in addition to the Committee 
on the Judiciary.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 3842 on November 4, 
2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on the Judiciary sent a letter 
to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on November 
19, 2015, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration on 
the House Floor, the Committee on the Judiciary would not seek 
a sequential referral of H.R. 3842. The letter further 
requested the support for the request of Conferees should a 
House-Senate Conference be called. On that same date, the Chair 
of the Committee on Homeland Security sent a letter to the 
Chair of the Committee on the Judiciary acknowledging the 
jurisdictional interests of the Committee on the Judiciary and 
the agreement to not seek a sequential referral, and support 
for the request to seek Conferees.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3842 to the House on November 
19, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-434, Pt. I.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on December 8, 2015, agreeing that, in order 
to expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 3425. The letter further requested the 
appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be 
called. On that same date, the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security responded acknowledging the cooperation of 
the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure with respect 
to the consideration of H.R. 3842.
    The House considered H.R. 3842 under Suspension of the 
Rules on December 8, 2016, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 420 yeas and 2 nays, (Roll No. 
680).
    H.R. 3842 was received in the Senate on December 9, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on the 
Judiciary.
    The Senate considered H.R. 3842 on December 8, 2016, and 
passed the measure, amended.
    The House concurred in the Senate amendments to H.R. 3842 
on December 1, 2016. Clearing the measure for the President.
    H.R. 3842 was presented to the President on December 15, 
2016. The President signed H.R. 3842 into law on December 16, 
2016, as Public Law 114-285.

S. 2781
    S. 2781 was introduced in the Senate on April 12, 2016, by 
Mr. Perdue, Mr. Isakson, Mr. Udall, and Mr. Heinrich, and 
referred to the Senate Committee on the Judiciary.

                                ------                                



           BOTTLES AND BREASTFEEDING EQUIPMENT SCREENING ACT

               Public Law 114-293     H.R. 5065 (S. 3299)

To direct the Administrator of the Transportation Security 
Administration to notify air carriers and security screening 
personnel of the Transportation Security Administration of such 
Administration's guidelines regarding permitting baby formula, 
breast milk, purified deionized water, and juice on airplanes, 
and for other purposes
To direct the Secretary of Homeland Security to notify air 
carriers and security screening personnel of the Transportation 
Security Administration of such Administration's guidelines 
regarding permitting baby formula, breast milk, and juice on 
airplanes, and for other purposes.
Summary
    Although travelers are explicitly permitted by the 
Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to bring formula 
and breast milk that exceed the 3-1-1 Liquids Rule for carry-on 
baggage, there have been reports of passengers experiencing 
inconsistent implementation of these procedures during airport 
security screening. As a result some travelers were forced to 
dump expressed breast milk; leave behind ice packs or coolers 
needed for proper milk storage; or miss their flights. This 
measure requires the TSA to provide ongoing training to ensure 
its officers consistently enforce TSA Special Procedures 
related to breast milk, formula, and infant feeding equipment 
across all airport security checkpoints.
Legislative History
H.R. 5065
    H.R. 5065 was introduced in the House on April 26, 2016, by 
Ms. Herrera Beutler, Mr. Katko, and Miss Rice of New York; and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 5065 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security.
    The Subcommittee on Transportation Security was discharged 
from further consideration of H.R. 5065 on September 14, 2016.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5065 on September 14, 
2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5065 to the House on September 
20, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-775.
    The House considered H.R. 5065 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 27, 2016, and passed the measure by voice 
vote. During consideration, the title was amended so as to read 
``To direct the Administrator of the Transportation Security 
Administration to notify air carriers and security screening 
personnel of the Transportation Security Administration of such 
Administration's guidelines regarding permitting baby formula, 
breast milk, purified deionized water, and juice on airplanes, 
and for other purposes.''
    The Senate considered H.R. 5065 on December 9 and 10, 2016, 
and passed the measure on legislative day of December 9, 2016. 
Clearing the measure for the President.
    H.R. 5065 was presented to the President on December 14, 
2016. The President signed H.R. 5065 into law on December 16, 
2016, as Public Law 114-293.

S. 3299
    S. 3299, the Senate companion measure, was introduced in 
the Senate on September 9, 2016, by Ms. Ayotte and referred to 
the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.

                                ------                                



                   GAO MANDATES REVISION ACT OF 2016

                    Public Law 114-301     H.R. 5687

To eliminate or modify certain mandates of the Government 
Accountability Office.
Summary
    The purpose of H.R. 5687 is to eliminate provisions 
mandating certain reviews by the Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) related to a variety of topics, such as Federal 
Emergency Management Agency's pilot program under the Sandy 
Recovery Improvement Act of 2015 (Pub. L. 113-2) and Department 
of Homeland Security transportation security information 
sharing plan. The bill also makes changes to other existing GAO 
mandated reviews.
Legislative History
    H.R. 5687 was introduced in the House on July 8, 2016, by 
Mr. Jody B. Hice and referred to the Committee on Oversight and 
Government Reform, and in addition to the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure, the Committee on Financial 
Services, the Committee on Energy and Commerce, the Committee 
on Ways and Means, and the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform considered 
H.R. 5687 on July 12, 2015, and ordered the measure to be 
reported to the House, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Oversight and Government 
reform sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security requesting that the Committee on Homeland Security 
agree to be discharged from further consideration of H.R. 5687. 
The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded on 
August 12, 2016, agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on Homeland 
Security would waive its right to consider H.R. 5687.
    The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform reported 
H.R. 5687 to the House on September 19, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-
760, Pt. I. Subsequently, the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure, the Committee on Financial Services, the 
Committee on Energy and Commerce, the Committee on Ways and 
Means, and the Committee on Homeland Security were discharged 
from further consideration of H.R. 5687.
    The House considered H.R. 5687 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 20, 2016, and passed the measure by voice 
vote.
    H.R. 5687 was received in the Senate on September 21, 2016, 
and on September 22, 2016, read twice and placed on the Senate 
Legislative Calendar.
    The Senate considered H.R. 5687 on December 9 and 10, 2016, 
and passed the measure, without amendment by unanimous consent 
on legislative day of December 9, 2016. Clearing the measure 
for the President.
    H.R. 5867 was presented to the President on December 14, 
2016. The President signed H.R. 5867 into law on December 16, 
2016, as Public Law 114-301.

                                ------                                



          UNITED STATES-ISRAEL ADVANCED RESEARCH PARTNERSHIP 
                              ACT OF 2016

                    Public Law 114-304     H.R. 5877

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 and the United 
States-Israel Strategic Partnership Act of 2014 to promote 
cooperative homeland security research and antiterrorism 
programs relating to cybersecurity, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-296) and the United States-Israel Strategic 
Partnership Act of 2014 (Pub. L. 113-296) to allow the 
Department of Homeland Security and the Department of State to 
enter into cooperative programs with Israel for the purposes of 
enhancing cybersecurity capabilities. These programs include 
both the Homeland Security Advanced Research Projects Agency 
and the program for establishing cooperative research 
activities with foreign partner governments that are United 
States' allies in the global war on terrorism, a program 
established by the Department's Under Secretary for Science and 
Technology (S&T;).
Legislative History
    H.R. 5877 was introduced in the House on July 14, 2016, by 
Mr. Ratcliffe and Mr. Langevin and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security and the Committee on Foreign Affairs. Within 
the Committee, H.R. 5877 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
Technologies.
    The Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies. was discharged from 
further consideration of H.R. 5877 on September 14, 2016.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5877 on September 14, 
2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Foreign Affairs sent a letter 
to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on November 
14, 2016, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration on 
the House Floor, the Committee on Foreign Affairs would forego 
further consideration of H.R. 5877. On the following day, the 
Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded 
acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the Committee on 
Foreign Affairs and the agreement to forego consideration.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 5877 to 
the House on November 15, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-827, Pt. I. 
Subsequently, the Committee on Foreign Affairs was discharged 
from further consideration of H.R. 5877.
    The House considered H.R. 5877 on November 29, 2016, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 5877 was received in the Senate on November 30, 2016.
    The Senate considered H.R. 5877 on December 9 and 10, 2016, 
and passed the measure without amendment on legislative day of 
December 9, 2016. Clearing the measure for the President.
    H.R. 5877 was presented to the President on December 14, 
2016. The President signed H.R. 5877 into law on December 16, 
2016, as Public Law 114-304.

                                ------                                



        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2017

     Public Law 114-_\1\     S. 2943 (H.R. 4909 / H.R. 399 / H.R. 
      1073 / H.R. 3510 / H.R. 3572 / H.R. 3586 / H.R. 4402 / H.R. 
          4408 / H.R. 4509 / H.R. 4780 / H.R. 5064 / S. 2976)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \1\This measure was signed into law, but no Public Law number was 
assigned by the filing of this report.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
To authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2017 for military 
activities of the Department of Defense, for military 
construction, and for defense activities of the Department of 
Energy, to prescribe military personnel strengths for such 
fiscal year, and for other purposes.
Summary
    S. 2943, provides for the authorization of appropriations 
for the military activities of the Departments of Defense and 
Energy for Fiscal Year 2017.
Legislative History
H.R. 4909
    H.R. 4909 was introduced in the House on April 12, 2016, by 
Mr. Thornberry and Mr. Smith of Washington and referred to the 
Committee on Armed Services.
    The Committee on Armed Services considered H.R. 4909 on 
April 27 and 28, 2016, and ordered the measure to be reported 
to the House by a recorded vote of 60 yeas and 2 nays.
    The Committee on Armed Services reported H.R. 4909 to the 
House on May 4, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-537.
    On May 12, 2016, the Chair of the Committee on Armed 
Services asked unanimous consent that the Committee on Armed 
Services be permitted to file a supplemental report on H.R. 
4909. Subsequently, a supplemental report was filed as H. Rpt. 
114-537, Part II.
    The Committee on Rules met on May 16, 2016, and granted a 
Rule providing for the consideration of H.R. 4909. Rule filed 
in the House as H.Res. 732, H. Rpt. 114-569.
    The House considered H.Res. 732 as a privileged matter on 
May 17, 2016, and agreed to the Rule by a recorded vote of 234 
yeas and 181 nays, (Roll No. 197).
    The House considered H.R. 4909 under the provisions of 
H.Res. 732 on May 17, 2016, and rose, leaving H.R. 4909 as 
unfinished business.
    The Committee on Rules met on May 17, 2016, and granted a 
Rule providing for the continued consideration of H.R. 4909. 
Rule filed in the House as H.Res. 735, H. Rpt. 114-571.
    The House considered H.Res. 735 as a privileged matter on 
May 18, 2016, and agreed to the Rule by a recorded vote of 230 
yeas and 175 nays, (Roll No. 200).
    On May 18, 2016, the House continued consideration of H.R. 
4909 under the provisions of H.Res. 735.
    A motion to recommit with instructions to the Committee on 
Armed Services failed on May 18, 2016, by a recorded vote of 
181 yeas and 243 nays, (Roll No. 215).
    The House then passed H.R. 4909 on May 18, 2016, by a 
recorded vote of 277 yeas and 147 nays, (Roll No. 216). During 
consideration, the title of the measure was amended so as to 
read ``To authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2017 for 
military activities of the Department of Defense, for military 
construction, and for defense activities of the Department of 
Energy, to prescribe military personnel strengths for such 
fiscal year, and for other purposes.''
    H.R. 4909 was received in the Senate on May 26, 2016, read 
twice, and placed on the Senate Legislative Calendar under 
General Orders. Calendar No. 502.

S. 2943
    The Senate Committee on Armed Services reported an original 
measure to the Senate on May 18, 2016, as S. Rpt. 114-255.
    A motion to proceed to the consideration of S. 2943 was 
made in the Senate on May 23, 2016. Subsequently, a cloture 
motion on the motion to proceed to the consideration of S. 2943 
was presented in the Senate.
    Cloture on the motion to proceed to the consideration of S. 
2943 was invoked in the Senate on May 25, 2016, by a recorded 
vote of 98 yeas and 0 nays, (Record Vote No. 87).
    Motions to proceed to the consideration of S. 2943 were 
made in the Senate on May 25 and 26. On June 6, 2016, a motion 
to proceed to the consideration of S. 2943 was agreed to in 
Senate by unanimous consent. Subsequently, the Senate 
considered S. 2943 on June 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, and 14, 2016. 
During consideration, on June 8, 2016, a cloture motion on the 
measure was presented in the Senate; the Senate invoked cloture 
on June 10, 2016, by a recorded vote of 68 yeas and 23 nays, 
(Record Vote No. 97)
    The Senate passed S. 2943 on June 14, 2016 by a recorded 
vote of 85 yeas and 13 nays, (Record Vote No. 98).
    S. 2943 was received in the House on June 16, 2016, and 
held at the Desk.
    The Committee on Rules met on July 7, 2016, and granted a 
Rule providing for the consideration of S. 2943. Rule filed in 
the House as H.Res. 809, H. Rpt. 114-670. The Rule provides 
that upon adoption of the resolution, the House shall be 
considered to have taken S. 2943 from the Speaker's table, 
stricken all after the enacting clause and inserted the 
provisions of H.R. 4909 as passed by the House. S. 2943 shall 
be considered as passed as amended. It shall also be in order 
for the Chair of the Committee on Armed services to move that 
the House insist on its amendment to S. 2943 and request a 
conference with the Senate thereon.
    The House considered H.Res. 809 on July 7, 2016, as a 
privileged matter, and agreed to the Rule by a recorded vote of 
243 yeas and 177 nays, (Roll No. 388).
    The House considered S. 2943 on July 7, 2016, under the 
provisions of H.Res. 809. Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 
809; The House struck all after the enacting clause and 
inserted in lieu thereof H.R. 4909 and the measure was agreed 
to.
    On July 8, 2016, pursuant to H.Res. 809, the House insisted 
to its amendment to S. 2943 and requested a Conference with the 
Senate thereon by voice vote. A motion to close portions of the 
Conference, was agreed to by voice vote.
    The Speaker appointed Conferees on the part of the House 
from: The Committee on Armed Services; the House Permanent 
Select Committee on Intelligence; the Committee on Education 
and the Workforce; the Committee on Energy and Commerce; the 
Committee on Foreign Affairs; the Committee on Homeland 
Security; the Committee on the Judiciary; the Committee on 
Natural Resources; the Committee on Oversight and Government 
Reform; the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology; the 
Committee on Small Business, the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure; the Committee on Veterans' Affairs; and the 
Committee on Ways and Means. From the Committee on Homeland 
Security for consideration of secs. 564 and 1091 of the Senate 
bill, and secs. 1097, 1869, 1869A, and 3510 of the House 
amendment, and modifications committed to conference: Mr. 
McCaul, Mr. Donovan, and Mr. Thompson of Mississippi.
Senate Bill: Sec. 564. Priority processing of applications for 
Transportation Worker Identification Credentials for members 
undergoing discharge or release from the Armed Forces; and Sec. 
1091. Border security metrics.
House Amendment: Sec. 1097. Waiver of certain polygraph 
examination requirements; Sec. 1869. Additional cyber security 
assistance for small business development centers; Sec. 1869A. 
Cybersecurity outreach for small business development centers; 
and Sec. 3510. Expedited processing of applications for 
transportation security cards for separating members of the 
Armed Forces and veterans.
    The message on House action was received in the Senate on 
July 11, 2016, and held at the Desk.
    The Senate considered the House amendment to S. 2943 on 
July 14, 2016. A motion that the Senate disagree to the House 
amendment to S. 2943 and agreed to the request for a Conference 
thereon was made in the Senate. Cloture on the motion to 
disagree to the House amendment to the Senate bill and agree to 
the request for Conference, and appoint Conferees was presented 
in Senate. The cloture motion was subsequently agreed to by a 
recorded vote of 90 yeas and 7 nays, (Record Vote No. 130).
    The Senate disagreed to the House amendment to S. 2943 on 
July 14, 2016; agreed to request for a Conference Committee, 
and appointed Conferees: Senators McCain, Inhofe, Sessions, 
Wicker, Ayotte, Fischer, Cotton, Rounds, Ernst, Tillis, 
Sullivan, Lee, Graham, Cruz, Reed, Nelson, McCaskill, Manchin, 
Shaheen, Gillibrand, Blumenthal, Donnelly, Hirono, Kaine, King, 
and Heinrich.
    The Conferees agreed to file a Conference Report to 
accompany S. 2943 on November 30, 2016.
    The Conference Report to accompany S. 2943 was filed in the 
House on November 30, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-840. The Conference 
Papers, Senate report and the managers statement were held at 
the Desk in the Senate.
    The Committee on Rules met on November 30, 2016, and agreed 
to file a Rule providing for the consideration of the 
Conference Report to accompany S. 2943. Rule filed in the House 
as H. Res. 937 (H. Rpt. 114-844).
    The House agreed to H. Res. 937 on December 1, 2016, by a 
recorded vote of 277 ayes to 139 noes, (Roll No. 597).
    The House considered the Conference Report to accompany S. 
2943 on December 2, 2016, and agreed to the Conference Report 
by a recorded vote of 375 yeas and 34 nays, (Roll No. 600). The 
House agreed on December 5, 2016, to H. Con. Res. 179, 
correcting the enrollment of S. 2943.
    The Senate considered of the Conference Report to accompany 
S. 2943 on December 5, 7, and 8, 2016. On December 8, 2016, the 
Senate agreed to the Conference Report to accompany S. 2943 by 
a recorded vote of 92 yeas and 7 nays (Vote No. 159). Clearing 
the measure for the President.
    S. 2943 was presented to the President. The President 
signed S. 2943 into law on December 23, 2016.

    Provisions of H.R. 399, the Secure Our Border First Act of 
2015, were included in Sec. 1092 of the Conference Report to 
accompany S. 2943.
    Provisions of H.R. 5064, the Improving Small Business Cyber 
Security Act of 2016, were included in Secs. 1841 and 1843 of 
the Conference Report to accompany S. 2943.
    Provisions of H.R. 3586, the Border and Maritime 
Coordination Improvement Act, were included in Section 1901 of 
the Conference Report to accompany S. 2943.
    Provisions of H.R. 3572 as passed by the House, the DHS 
Headquarters Reform and Improvement Act of 2015, were included 
in Secs. 1902-04 of the Conference Report to accompany S. 2943.
    Provisions relating to H.R. 1637, the Federally Funded 
Research and Development Sunshine Act of 2015, were included in 
Sec. 1906 of the Conference Report to accompany S. 2943.
    Provisions of H.R. 4402, the Foreign Fighter Review Act of 
2016, were included in Sec. 1907 of the Conference Report to 
accompany S. 2943.
    Provisions of H.R. 4408, the National Strategy to Combat 
Terrorist Travel Act of 2016, were included in Sec. 1908 of the 
Conference Report to accompany S. 2943.
    Provisions of S. 2976, the DHS Accountability Act of 2016 , 
were included in Sec. 1906 and 1909 of the Conference Report to 
accompany S. 2943.
    Provisions of H.R. 4780, the Department of Homeland 
Security Strategy for International Programs Act, were included 
in Sec. 1910 of the Conference Report to accompany S. 2943.
    Provisions of H.R. 4509, the State and High-Risk Urban Area 
Working Group Act, were included in Sec. 1911 of the Conference 
Report to accompany S. 2943.
    Provisions of H.R. 3510, the Department of Homeland 
Security Cybersecurity Strategy Act of 2015, were included in 
Sec. 1912 of the Conference Report to accompany S. 2943.
    Provisions of Sec. 2 of H.R. 1073, the Critical 
Infrastructure Protection Act, were included in Sec. 1913 of 
the Conference Report to accompany S. 2943.
    (See also action on H.R. 399, H.R. 1073, H.R. 1637, H.R. 
3510, H.R. 3572, H.R. 3586, H.R. 4402, H.R. 4408, H.R. 4509, 
H.R. 4780, H.R. 5064, S. 2976, listed below).

                                ------                                



              VISA WAIVER PROGRAM IMPROVEMENT ACT OF 2015

                                H.R. 158

To amend the Immigration and Nationality Act to provide 
enhanced security measures for the visa waiver program, and for 
other purposes.
[To clarify the grounds for ineligibility for travel to the 
United States regarding terrorism risk, to expand the criteria 
by which a country may be removed from the Visa Waiver Program, 
to require the Secretary of Homeland Security to submit a 
report on strengthening the Electronic System for Travel 
Authorization to better secure the international borders of the 
United States and prevent terrorists and instruments of 
terrorism from entering the United States, and for other 
purposes.]
Summary
    H.R. 158 sought to strengthen the Visa Waiver Program (VWP) 
and deny individuals who have connections to terrorist hotspots 
entry into the United States. VWP country citizens with ties to 
high-risk countries such as Iraq and Syria may pose an 
increased security risk if allowed to enter the United States. 
H.R. 158 denies VWP travel to travelers who are dual nationals 
of--or have visited during the past five years--Iraq, Syria, 
and other countries with significant terrorist activity. 
Instead, these travelers are required to seek a visa for entry 
into the United States.
    The measure also demanded strong intelligence and law 
enforcement information sharing from our VWP partners. When VWP 
countries fail to share counterterrorism information with the 
United States, it puts our security at risk. H.R. 158 
authorized the Secretary of Homeland Security to terminate a 
country from the program if the country does not share such 
data-and doesn't allow the country back into the VWP until it 
complies with the program requirements. Such authority improved 
information sharing and help the U.S. better identify potential 
terrorists and foreign fighters.
    H.R. 158 requires all VWP countries to check travelers 
against INTERPOL databases, in order to determine whether the 
traveler is wanted by law enforcement agencies based on ties to 
terrorism or criminal activity. Better screening against 
INTERPOL databases closes a glaring gap in the global travel 
system.
    The bill was aimed at preventing extremists from using 
fraudulent documents to evade detection Secure documents make 
it harder for extremists to falsify their identities. H.R. 158 
required all VWP countries to issue to their citizens fraud-
resistant ``e-passports,'' containing biometric information and 
requires countries to be able to confirm that such documents 
are legitimate when they are scanned.
    The threat environment can change quickly, which is why 
regular reviews of security in VWP countries must be conducted. 
H.R. 158 required top U.S. security agencies to conduct more 
frequent intelligence and threat assessments of VWP countries 
to determine whether they pose a high risk to the national 
security of United States. If a VWP country is designated as 
``high risk,'' they can be suspended from the program.
    Additionally, background checks on VWP travelers are 
important, which is the bill ensured that the information they 
provide is accurate. H.R. 158 requires the Department of 
Homeland Security to take steps to better detect false 
information, improve the validation of data supplied by 
travelers, and add new data fields to enhance checks on each 
traveler.
Legislative History
    H.R. 158 was introduced in the House on January 6, 2015, by 
Mrs. Miller of Michigan and Mr. McCaul, and referred to the 
Committee on the Judiciary and in addition to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 158 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security.
    On June 25, 2015, the Chair discharged the Subcommittee on 
Border and Maritime Security from further consideration of H.R. 
158.
    The Committee considered H.R. 158 on June 25, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 158 to the House on December 7, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-369, Pt. I.
    The House considered H.R. 158 under Suspension of the Rules 
on December 8, 2015, and passed the measure, as amended, by a 
\2/3\ recorded vote of 407 yeas and 19 nays, (Roll No. 679). 
The title of the measure was amended so as to read: ``A bill to 
amend the Immigration and Nationality Act to provide enhanced 
security measures for the visa waiver program, and for other 
purposes''.
    Provisions of H.R. 158 were included in H.R. 2029, Public 
Law 114-113. (For further action see H.R. 2029, listed above.)

                                ------                                



                 MEDICAL PREPAREDNESS ALLOWABLE USE ACT

                                H.R. 361

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to codify authority 
under existing grant guidance authorizing use of Urban Area 
Security Initiative and State Homeland Security Grant Program 
funding for enhancing medical preparedness, medical surge 
capacity, and mass prophylaxis capabilities.
Summary
    H.R. 361 amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 
107-296) to clarify that State Homeland Security Grant Program 
(SHSGP) and Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) funds may be 
used to enhance medical preparedness, medical surge capacity, 
and mass prophylaxis capabilities. Through hearings and 
briefings held in the Subcommittee in the 112th and 113th 
Congresses, the Committee received information from 
stakeholders at the Federal, State, and local level about the 
importance of medical preparedness. This legislation, and the 
need to ensure that SHSGP and UASI funds remain available for 
medical preparedness, was informed by these events.
Legislative History
112th Congress
    In the 112th Congress, H.R. 5997 was introduced in the 
House on June 21, 2012, by Mr. Bilirakis, Mr. Clarke of 
Michigan, Mr. Turner of New York, and Mr. Rogers of Alabama; 
and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 5997 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications.
    The House considered H.R. 5997 under Suspension of the 
Rules on November 27, 2012, and passed the bill, amended, by a 
\2/3\ recorded vote of 397 yeas and 1 nay, (Roll No. 609).

113th Congress
    In the 113th Congress, H.R. 1791 was introduced in the 
House on April 26, 2013, by Mr. Bilirakis, Mrs. Brooks of 
Indiana, and Mr. King of New York; and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 1791 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, 
Response, and Communications.
    On October 29, 2013, the Chair discharged the Subcommittee 
on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications from 
further consideration of H.R. 1791.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 1791 on October 29, 
2013, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1791 to the House on November 
21, 2013, as H. Rpt. 113-273.
    The House considered H.R. 1791 under Suspension of the 
Rules on February 3, 2014, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 391 yeas and 2 nays, (Roll No. 32).
    H.R. 1791 was received in the Senate on February 4, 2014, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

114th Congress
    H.R. 361 was introduced in the House on January 14, 2015, 
by Mr. Bilirakis, Mrs. Brooks of Indiana, and Mr. King of New 
York and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within 
the Committee, H.R. 361 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications.
    The House considered H.R. 361 under Suspension of the Rules 
on February 2, 2015, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ recorded 
vote of 377 yeas and 2 nays, (Roll No. 51).
    H.R. 361 was received in the Senate on February 3, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



                  SECURE OUR BORDERS FIRST ACT OF 2015

                      H.R. 399 (H.R. 229 / S. 208)

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to gain and 
maintain operational control of the international borders of 
the United States, and for other purposes.
Summary
    H.R. 399 is the result of many hearings, meetings and 
discussions with border security stakeholders and is based on 
the Chair of the Full Committee border security blueprint 
released in October 2014.
    The bill includes capability deployment through a sector-
by-sector analysis of threats and needs and attaches to that 
the resources necessary to gain operational control. The bill 
requires fencing where fencing is needed and technology where 
technology is needed to provide for a smart, safe, and cost 
effective border security policy. This bill also required the 
Department to conduct an analysis of the threats and needs 
associated with both the southern and northern borders.
    The Secure our Borders First Act also established an 
independent commission to verify that the border is secure. 
Members of the commission are to be border security experts--
people who know the border best.
Legislative History
H.R. 399
    H.R. 399 was introduced in the House on January 16, 2015, 
by Mr. McCaul and 13 original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security, and addition to the Committee 
on Armed Services, the Committee on Natural Resources, and the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    On January 21, 2015, the Committee met and ordered H.R. 399 
to be reported to the House with a favorable recommendation, 
amended, by a recorded vote of 18 yeas and 12 nays, (Roll Call 
Vote No. 11).
    On January 22, 2015, the Chair of the Committee on the 
Judiciary sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on the 
Judiciary would not request a sequential referral of H.R. 399; 
on that same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security responded acknowledging the jurisdictional interests 
of the Committee on the Judiciary, and the agreement to not 
seek a sequential referral. On January 22, 2015, the Chair of 
the Committee on Natural Resources sent a letter to the Chair 
of the Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order 
to expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Natural Resources would waive further consideration of H.R. 
399; on that same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security responded acknowledging the jurisdictional interests 
of the Committee on Natural Resources and the agreement to 
waive further consideration of H.R. 399.
    On January 22, 2015, the Chair of the Committee on 
Agriculture sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on Agriculture 
would waive further consideration of H.R. 399; on that same 
date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded 
acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the Committee on 
Agriculture and the agreement to waive further consideration of 
H.R. 399. On January 23, 2015, the Chair of the Committee on 
Armed Services sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on Armed 
Services would waive further consideration of H.R. 399; on that 
same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the 
Committee on Armed Services and the agreement to waive further 
consideration of H.R. 399.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 399 to the 
House on January 27, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-10, Pt. I. 
Subsequently, the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on 
Natural Resources, and the Committee on Agriculture were 
discharged from further consideration of H.R. 399. (See action 
taken on S.1356, listed above).
    Provisions of H.R. 399 were included in Sec. 1092 of the 
Conference Report to accompany S. 2943. (See action taken on S. 
2943, listed above).

H.R. 229
    H.R. 229, the Biometric Exit Improvement Act of 2015, was 
introduced in the House on January 8, 2015, by Mrs. Miller of 
Michigan and Mr. McCaul and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 229 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security.
    The text of H.R. 229 was included in Section 14 of H.R. 
399, as reported by the Committee.

S. 208
    S. 208, the Senate companion measure of H.R. 399, was 
introduced in the Senate on January 21, 2015, by Mr. Johnson, 
Mr. Cornyn, Mr. Flake, and Mr. Cain, and referred to the Senate 
Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



                HUMAN TRAFFICKING DETECTION ACT OF 2015

                       H.R. 460 (S. 178 / S. 623)

To direct the Secretary of Homeland Security to train 
Department of Homeland Security personnel how to effectively 
deter, detect, disrupt, and prevent human trafficking during 
the course of their primary roles and responsibilities, and for 
other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation requires the Department of Homeland 
Security (DHS) to train Transportation Security Administration, 
U.S. Customs and Border Protection, and other relevant DHS 
personnel to counter human trafficking in a manner specific to 
their professional roles and responsibilities. The bill also 
ensures that such training will be assessed by the Secretary on 
an annual basis so that it is based on the most current human 
trafficking trends and intelligence and directs the Secretary 
to report to Congress on the number of suspected cases reported 
by the DHS officials.
    Finally, this legislation recognizes the critical role that 
State and local authorities play in preventing human 
trafficking by authorizing the Department of Homeland Security 
to make training curricula available to State, local, Tribal, 
and private sector partners.
Legislative History
H.R. 460
    H.R. 460 was introduced in the House on January 21, 2015, 
by Mr. Walker and nine original cosponsors, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security, and in addition to the 
Committee on the Judiciary. Within the Committee, H.R. 460 was 
referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security.
    On January 22, 2015, the Chair of the Committee on the 
Judiciary sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on the 
Judiciary would waive further consideration of H.R. 460; on 
that same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the 
Committee on the Judiciary, and the agreement to waive further 
consideration.
    The House considered H.R. 460 under Suspension the Rules on 
January 27, 2015, and passed H.R. 460 by voice vote.
    H.R. 460 was received in the Senate, read twice, and 
referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered H.R. 460 on March 4, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs report filed in the Senate on May 14, 2015, as S. Rpt. 
114-46.
    The text of H.R. 460, as passed by the House was added to 
Title IX of S. 178, as passed by the Senate.

S. 178
    S. 178, the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act of 2015, 
was introduced in the Senate on January 13, 2015, by Mr. Cornyn 
and referred to the Senate Committee on the Judiciary.
    The Senate Committee on the Judiciary considered S. 178 on 
February 26, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the Senate, favorably, with an Amendment in the Nature of a 
Substitute.
    On March 2, 2015, the Senate Committee on the Judiciary 
reported S. 178 to the Senate with no written report.
    The Senate considered S. 178 on March 10, 11, 12, 16, 17, 
18, 19; April 14, 16, 16, 20, 21, and 22, 2015. On April 22, 
2015, the Senate passed S. 178 by a recorded vote of 99 yeas 
and 0 nays, (Roll No. 163).
    S. 178 was received in the House on April 23, 2015, and 
held at the Desk.
    The House considered S. 178 under Suspension of the Rules 
on May 18, 2015, and on May 19, 2015, passed the measure, by a 
\2/3\ recorded vote of 420 yeas and 3 nays, (Roll No. 244).
    Subsequently, pursuant to H. Con. Res. 47, the enrollment 
of S. 178 was corrected.
    S. 178 was presented to the President on May 21, 2015. The 
President signed S. 178 into law on May 29, 2015, as Public Law 
114-22.

S. 623
    S. 623, the Senate companion measure to H.R. 460 was 
introduced in the Senate on March 3, 2016, by Mr. Johnson and 
referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



                 PRECLEARANCE AUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2015

                                H.R. 998

To establish the conditions under which the Secretary of 
Homeland Security may establish preclearance facilities, 
conduct preclearance operations, and provide customs services 
outside the United States, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation authorized the operation and expansion of 
U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) preclearance 
operations abroad. Preclearance operations, a program under 
which passengers and their luggage undergo screening by CBP 
officers prior to boarding a U.S.-bound flight, have been in 
place in some foreign airports for years and DHS sought to 
expand the program. This act established certain guidelines for 
the program to help capture the benefits of the program without 
jeopardizing security or negatively impacting screening at U.S. 
ports of entry and provide for enhanced congressional 
oversight.
    H.R. 998 creates conditions for the Secretary of Homeland 
Security to establish preclearance facilities, conduct 
preclearance operations, and provide customs services outside 
the United States. Specifically the bill authorizes DHS to 
establish preclearance operations in a foreign country. It 
further required the Secretary of Homeland Security to notify 
Congress 180 days before entering into an agreement with a 
foreign government to establish a preclearance operation and 
provide Congress with a copy of the proposed agreement, any 
proposed terms and conditions for CBP officers operating at the 
location, an impact assessment on trade and travel, a threat 
assessment of the proposed location, an impact assessment for 
CBP staffing at domestic ports of entry, potential economic and 
competitive impacts on U.S. air carriers, any anticipated 
homeland security details, security vulnerabilities, and 
mitigation plans. The bill also requires the Secretary report 
to Congress 90 days before entering into an agreement and 
provide Congress with a remediation plan to reduce customs 
processing times at the 25 domestic airports with the highest 
volume of international travel. In addition, aviation security 
screening standards at a preclearance location must be 
comparable to those required by the Transportation Security 
Administration and if they are not, rescreening can occur when 
the passenger or goods are in the United States. Finally, the 
bill mandates that a foreign country with a preclearance 
facility routinely submit information concerning stolen and 
lost travel documents to INTERPOL and the U.S. Government.
Legislative History
    H.R. 998 was introduced in the House on February 13, 2015, 
by Mr. Meehan and five original cosponsors, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security, and in addition to the 
Committee on Ways and Means. Within the Committee, H.R. 998 was 
referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security 
and the Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    On June 25, 2015, the Chair discharged the Subcommittee on 
Border and Maritime Security and the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security from further consideration of H.R. 998.
    The Committee considered H.R. 998 on June 25, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Ways and Means sent a letter 
to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on July 16, 
2015, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration on the 
House Floor, the Committee on Ways and Means would forgo 
further consideration of H.R. 998.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 998 to the 
House on July 22, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-219, Pt. I. 
Subsequently, the Committee on Ways and Means was discharged 
from further consideration of H.R. 998.
    The House considered H.R. 998 under Suspension of the Rules 
on July 27, 2015, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 998 was received in the Senate on July 28, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs 
considered H.R. 998 on October 7, 2015, and ordered the measure 
to be reported to the Senate, with an Amendment in the Nature 
of a Substitute.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported H.R. 998 to the Senate on December 15, 2015, 
as S. Rpt. 114-180.
    H.R. 988 was included in Section 811 of H.R. 644, as 
reported by the Committee of Conference. (See also action on 
H.R.644 listed above).

                                ------                                



                 CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION ACT

                          H.R. 1073 (S. 1846)

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to secure critical 
infrastructure against electromagnetic threats, and for other 
purposes.
Summary
    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-296) to secure critical infrastructure against 
electromagnetic threats. The Department of Homeland Security 
(DHS) has a responsibility to assess critical infrastructure 
resilience to both man-made and natural threats. The mission of 
DHS is to ensure ``a homeland that is safe, secure, and 
resilient against terrorism and other hazards.' The threat of 
electromagnetic pulses (EMP), whether due to a nuclear weapon 
or solar flares, represents another high-consequence, low-
probability threat.
    This legislation requires the Secretary to assess both EMP 
threats in the context of other threats to determine the 
research and development needs to mitigate the threat and 
consequences of EMP events. It also requires the development of 
strategic guidance for the Department, and conduct outreach to 
educate owners and operators of the critical infrastructure, 
emergency planners, and emergency response providers regarding 
the threat of EMP events.
Legislative History
113th Congress
    In the 113th Congress, H.R. 3410 was introduced in the 
House on October 30, 2013, by Mr. Franks of Arizona and Mr. 
Sessions, and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 3410 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and 
Security Technologies.
    On December 1, 2014, the Chair of the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology sent a letter to the Chair of the 
Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 3410. On that same date, the Chair of the 
Committee on Homeland Security responded, acknowledging the 
jurisdictional interests of the Committee on Science, Space, 
and Technology and the agreement to not seek a sequential 
referral.
    The House considered H.R. 3410 under Suspension of the 
Rules on December 1, 2014, and passed the measure, amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 3410 was received in the Senate on December 2, 2014, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

114th Congress
H.R. 1073
    H.R. 1073 was introduced in the House on February 25, 2015, 
by Mr. Franks of Arizona and Mr. Sessions, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 1073 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, 
Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies.
    On June 25, 2015, the Chair discharged the Subcommittee on 
Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
Technologies from further consideration of H.R. 1073.
    The Committee considered H.R. 1073 on June 25, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 1073 to 
the House on August 4, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-240.
    The House considered H.R. 1073 under Suspension of the 
Rules on November 16, 2015, and passed the measure by voice 
vote, as amended.
    H.R. 1073 was received in the Senate on November 17, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of Sec. 2 of H.R. 1073 were included in Section 
1913 of the Conference Report to accompany S. 2943, the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017. (See 
action taken on S. 2943, listed above).

S. 1846
    S. 1846, the Senate companion measure, was introduced in 
the Senate on July 23, 2015, by Mr. Johnson and Mr. Cruz and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 1846 on July 29, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate, with an Amendment in the 
Nature of a Substitute, favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 1846 to the Senate on May 9, 2016, as S. 
Rpt. 114-250.

                                ------                                



                    DHS FOIA EFFICIENCY ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 1615

To direct the Chief FOIA Officer of the Department of Homeland 
Security to make certain improvements in the implementation of 
section 552 of title 5, United States Code (commonly known as 
the Freedom of Information Act), and for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation directs the Chief Freedom of Information 
Act Officer of the Department of Homeland Security to make 
certain improvements in the implementation of section 552 of 
title 5, United States Code (commonly known as the Freedom of 
Information Act).
Legislative History
    H.R. 1615 was introduced in the House on March 25, 2015, by 
Mr. Carter of Georgia and seven original cosponsors and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 1615 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Oversight and Management Efficiency.
    The Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency 
considered H.R. 1615 on May 13, 2015, reported the measure to 
the Full Committee for consideration, with a favorable 
recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 1615 on May 20, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1615 to the House on June 11, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-148.
    The House considered H.R. 1615 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 23, 2015, and passed the measure on June 25, 
2015, amended, by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 423 yeas and 0 nays, 
(Roll No. 387).
    H.R. 1615 was received in the Senate on July 7, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on the Judiciary.

                                ------                                



        DHS PAID ADMINISTRATIVE LEAVE ACCOUNTABILITY ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 1633

To provide for certain improvements relating to the tracking 
and reporting of employees of the Department of Homeland 
Security placed on administrative leave, or any other type of 
paid non-duty status without charge to leave, for personnel 
matters, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation requires the Department of Homeland 
Security to track and report on employees placed on 
administrative leave for personnel matters. The head of each 
component within the Department is directed to report to Chief 
Human Capital Office on a quarterly basis on staff who are 
placed on administrative leave.
Legislative History
    H.R. 1633 was introduced in the House on March 25, 2015, by 
Mr. Loudermilk and seven original cosponsors and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 
1633 was referred to the Subcommittee on Oversight and 
Management Efficiency.
    The Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency 
considered H.R. 1633 on May 13, 2015, and ordered the measure 
reported to the Full Committee for consideration, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 1633 on May 20, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1633 to the House on June 17, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-163.
    The House considered H.R. 1633 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 23, 2015, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 1633 was received in the Senate on June 24, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



         BORDER SECURITY TECHNOLOGY ACCOUNTABILITY ACT OF 2015

                          H.R. 1634 (S. 1873)

To strengthen accountability for deployment of border security 
technology at the Department of Homeland Security, and for 
other purposes.
Summary
    Since 2005, Acquisition Management Activities of the 
Department of Homeland Security (DHS) have been on the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) ``High-Risk List'' 
because of their high susceptibility to waste and 
mismanagement. In 2012, GAO found that less than one-third of 
major DHS acquisition programs have Acquisition Program 
Baselines in place, important measurements for performance and 
cost-control.
    H.R. 1634 required the Secretary to ensure that each border 
security technology acquisition program with an expected 
lifecycle cost of at least $300 million have an acquisition 
program baseline approved by the relevant acquisition decision 
authority. The Secretary is required to document that each such 
program is meeting cost, schedule, and performance thresholds 
as specified in its baseline and complies with departmental 
acquisition policies and the Federal Acquisition Regulation, 
and have a plan for meeting program implementation objectives 
by managing contractor performance.
    H.R. 1634 further required the DHS Under Secretary for 
Management should to work with the Commissioner of the U.S. 
Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to implement internal 
control standards and best practices for such programs as 
identified by the Comptroller General. The DHS Under Secretary 
for Management and the Commissioner of the CBP are required to 
develop and submit to Congress a plan for the testing and 
evaluation of border security technologies, as well as for the 
use of independent verification and validation resources.
Legislative History
H.R. 1634
    H.R. 1634 was introduced in the House on March 25, 2015, by 
Ms. McSally and six original cosponsors, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 1634 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime 
Security.
    On June 25, 2015, the Chair discharged the Subcommittee on 
Border and Maritime Security from further consideration of H.R. 
1634.
    The Committee considered H.R. 1634 on June 25, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 1634 to 
the House on July 27, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-226.
    The House considered H.R. 1634 on July 27, 2015, under 
Suspension of the Rules, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 1634 was received in the Senate on July 28, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

S. 1873
    S. 1873, the Senate companion measure, was introduced in 
the Senate on July 28, 2015, by Mr. McCain and referred to the 
Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 1873 on October 7, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate with an Amendment in the 
Nature of a Substitute.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 1873 to the Senate on April 4, 2016, as S. 
Rpt. 114-234.

                                ------                                



          FEDERALLY FUNDED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT SUNSHINE 
                              ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 1637

To require annual reports on the activities and accomplishments 
of federally funded research and development centers within the 
Department of Homeland Security, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation requires the Secretary of Homeland 
Security to annually submit to Congress a list of the ongoing 
and completed projects that Federally Funded Research and 
Development Centers within the Department have been tasked.
Legislative History
    H.R. 1637 was introduced in the House on March 25, 2015, by 
Mr. Ratcliffe and seven original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 1637 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, 
Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies and the 
Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency.
    On May 20, 2015, the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, 
Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies and the 
Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency were 
discharged from further consideration of H.R. 1637.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 1637 on 
May 20, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to the 
House, with a favorable recommendation, without amendment, by 
voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1637 to the House on June 11, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-149.
    The Chair of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on June 23, 2015, agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee would 
not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 1637. The letter further 
requested support for the appointment of Conferees should a 
House-Senate Conference be called. On that same date, the Chair 
of the Committee on Homeland Security sent a letter to the 
Chair of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology 
acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology and the agreement to not seek a 
sequential referral of H.R. 1637.
    The House considered H.R. 1637 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 23, 2015, and passed the measure, amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 1637 was received in the Senate on June 24, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions relating to H.R. 1637 were included in Sec. 1906 
of the Conference Report to accompany S. 2943. (See action 
taken on S. 2943, listed above).

                                ------                                



          HOMELAND SECURITY DRONE ASSESSMENT AND ANALYSIS ACT

                               H.R. 1646

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to research how 
certain commercially available small and medium sized unmanned 
aircraft systems could be used in an attack, how to prevent or 
mitigate the risk of such an attack, and for other purposes.
[To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to research how 
small and medium sized unmanned aerial systems could be used in 
an attack, how to prevent or mitigate the effects of such an 
attack, and for other purposes.]
Summary
    This legislation requires the Department of Homeland 
Security, in coordination with the Departments of Defense, 
Transportation, and Energy, and the Nuclear Regulatory 
Commission to research how commercially available small and 
medium sized drones could be used to perpetuate an attack, 
conduct a risk assessment of small or medium-sized unmanned 
aircraft systems (UAS) attacks, develop policies regarding the 
mitigation of risk of small or medium sized UAS attacks, and 
disseminate information to law enforcement regarding how to 
respond to potential UAS threats.
Legislative History
    H.R. 1646 was introduced in the House on March 26, 2015, by 
Mrs. Watson Coleman and Mr. Thompson and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security, and in addition to the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 1646 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Oversight and Management Efficiency and the Subcommittee on 
Counterterrorism and Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency 
considered H.R. 1646 on May 13, 2015, and ordered the measure 
reported to the Full Committee for consideration, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence was 
discharged from further consideration of H.R. 1646 on May 20, 
2015.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 1646 on May 20, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on June 9, 2015, agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration of H.R. 1646 on the House Floor, the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure would waive 
further consideration of H.R. 1646. The letter further 
requested the appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called. The Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security responded on June 10, 2015, acknowledging the 
agreement of Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure to 
waive further consideration of H.R. 1646.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported to the House on 
June 18, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-169, Pt. I. Subsequently, the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure was discharged 
from further consideration of H.R. 1646.
    The House considered H.R. 1646 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 23, 2015, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote. During consideration, the title was amended so as 
to read ``To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to 
research how certain commercially available small and medium 
sized unmanned aircraft systems could be used in an attack, how 
to prevent or mitigate the risk of such an attack, and for 
other purposes.''
    H.R. 1646 was received in the Senate on June 24, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



       NATIONAL CYBERSECURITY PROTECTION ADVANCEMENT ACT OF 2015

                     PROTECTING CYBER NETWORKS ACT

                     H.R. 1731 (H.R. 1560, S. 754)

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to enhance multi-
directional sharing of information related to cybersecurity 
risks and strengthen privacy and civil liberties protections, 
and for other purposes.
Summary
    To secure the Nation's cyber networks and protect critical 
infrastructure from attacks, this legislation amends the 
Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 107-296) to improve the 
sharing of information regarding cybersecurity risks and 
facilitating cooperation between the Federal Government and the 
private sector and to strengthen privacy and civil liberties 
protections.
Legislative History
H.R. 1731
    H.R. 1731 was introduced in the House on April 13, 2015, by 
Mr. McCaul and Mr. Ratcliffe, and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 1731 on April 14, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1731 to the House on April 17, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-83.
    The Committee on Rules met and granted a Rule providing for 
the consideration of H.R. 1731. Rule filed in the House as 
H.Res. 212 (H. Rpt. 144-88). Among other things, the Rule 
provided that in the engrossment of H.R. 1560, the Clerk shall 
add the text of H.R. 1731, as passed by the House, as a new 
matter at the end of H.R. 1560 and make conforming 
modifications in the engrossment.
    The House considered H.R. 1731 on April 23, 2015, under the 
provisions of H.Res. 212, and passed the measure, amended, by a 
recorded vote of 355 yeas and 63 nays, (Roll No. 173). Pursuant 
to the provisions of H.Res. 212, in the engrossment of H.R. 
1560, the text of H.R. 1731 as passed by the House is appended 
to the end of H.R. 1560 as new matter. Subsequently, H.R. 1731 
was laid on the table.
    Provisions of H.R. 1731 were included in Division N of 
Title II of H.R. 2029. (See also action on H.R. 2029 listed 
above.)

H.R. 1560
    H.R. 1560, was introduced in the House on March 24, 2015, 
by Mr. Nunes, Mr. Schiff, Mr. Westmoreland, and Mr. Himes and 
referred to the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.
    The Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence considered 
H.R. 1560 on March 26, 2015, and ordered the measure to be 
reported to the House, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence reported 
H.R. 1560 to the House on April 13, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-63.
    The Committee on Rules met and granted a Rule providing for 
the consideration of H.R. 1560. Rule filed in the House as 
H.Res. 212 (H. Rpt. 144-88). Among other things, the Rule 
provides that in the engrossment of H.R. 1560, the Clerk shall 
add the text of H.R. 1731, as passed by the House, as a new 
matter at the end of H.R. 1560 and make conforming 
modifications in the engrossment.
    The House agreed to H.Res. 212 on April 22, 2015, by a 
recorded vote of 238 yeas and 182 nays, (Roll No. 164). The 
House then agreed to H.R. 1560 by a recorded vote of 307 yeas 
and 116 nays, (Roll No. 170).
    Pursuant to H.Res. 212, the text of H.R. 1731 was added to 
the end of H.R. 1560, as passed by the House.
    H.R. 1560 was received in the Senate on April 27, 2015, and 
referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs.

S. 754
    The Senate Select Committee on Intelligence reported an 
original measure, the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act of 
2015, to the Senate on March 17, 2015, as S. 754, and placed on 
the Senate Legislative Calendar.
    The Senate Select Committee on Intelligence filed a written 
report on April 15, 2015, as S. Rpt. 114-32.
    A motion to proceed to the consideration of S. 754 was made 
in the Senate on August 3, 2015. A cloture motion on the motion 
to proceed was made in the Senate on that same day. A second 
motion to proceed to the consideration of S. 754 was made in 
the Senate on August 4, 2015. A third motion to proceed to the 
consideration of S. 754 was made in the Senate on August 5, 
2015.
    On August 5, 2015, the cloture motion on the motion to 
proceed to the consideration of H. 754 was withdrawn in the 
Senate.
    S. 754 was laid before the Senate by unanimous consent on 
October 20, 2015. A cloture motion on S. 754 was presented in 
the Senate.
    The Senate considered S. 754 on October 21, 22, and 27, 
2015. On October 27, 2015, the cloture motion on S. 754 was 
withdrawn by unanimous consent. The Senate then passed S. 754, 
with an amendment by a recorded vote of 74 yeas and 21 nays, 
(Record Vote No. 291).
    S. 754 was received in the House on October 28, 2015, and 
held at the Desk.

                                ------                                



                   PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER

                               H.R. 1887

To amend certain appropriation Acts to repeal the requirement 
directing the Administrator of General Services to sell Federal 
property and assets that support the operations of the Plum 
Island Animal Disease Center in Plum Island, New York, and for 
other purposes.
[To authorize the Comptroller General of the United States to 
assess a study on the alternatives for the disposition of Plum 
Island Animal Disease Center, and for other purposes.]
Summary
    In 2005, the Department of Homeland Security announced that 
the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC) in New York, 
managed by the Science and Technology Directorate, would be 
moved to a new Federal facility in Kansas. PIADC has served as 
a form of defense against accidental or intentional 
introduction of transboundary animal diseases since 1954. The 
traditional interagency consultation process regarding the 
disposal of Federal property was bypassed, putting the 
potential sale of this island on the fast track without 
consulting the local community or other Federal agencies. 
Locally, the Town of Southold, New York passed ordinances 
preventing any private development of Plum Island.
    This legislation requires the Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) to assess the study by the Department to address 
options for the disposition of Plum Island. The legislation 
requires GAO to assess the methodologies used by the Department 
in the study, to determine whether these methodologies 
adequately support the study's findings. Additionally, the 
legislation suspends the requirement to sell Plum Island until 
a further review of the analysis of alternatives is conducted 
by the Department and the GAO.
Legislative History
113th Congress
    In the 113th Congress, H.R. 2691 was introduced in the 
House by Mr. Bishop of New York, Mr. Courtney, and Mr. Grimm, 
and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.

114th Congress
    H.R. 1887 was introduced in the House on April 16, 2015, by 
Mr. Zeldin and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 1887 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and 
Security Technologies.
    The Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies was discharged from 
further consideration of H.R. 1887 on April 28, 2016. The Full 
Committee considered H.R. 1887 on April 28, 2016, and ordered 
the measure to be reported to the House with a favorable 
recommendation, as amended, by unanimous consent.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter on May 12, 2016, to the Chair of 
the Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 1887. The letter further requested support for 
the appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate Conference 
be called. The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded on May 16, 2016, agreeing to the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure waiving its right to seek a 
sequential referral of H.R. 1887.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 1887 to 
the House on May 16, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-568.
    The House considered H.R. 1887 under Suspension of the 
Rules on May 16, 2016, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote. During consideration the title of the bill was 
amended so as to read ``To authorize the Comptroller General of 
the United States to assess a study on the alternatives for the 
disposition of Plum Island Animal Disease Center, and for other 
purposes.''
    H.R. 1887 was received in the Senate on May 26, 2016, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



                    SECURING EXPEDITED SCREENING ACT

                               H.R. 2127

To direct the Administrator of the Transportation Security 
Administration to limit access to expedited airport security 
screening at an airport security checkpoint to participants of 
the PreCheck program and other known low-risk passengers, and 
for other purposes.
Summary
    H.R. 2127 directs the Transportation Security 
Administration to suspend the use of alternate methods for 
granting passengers access to PreCheck expedited screening, 
unless the agency can prove the security effectiveness of such 
methods. Specifically, this bill requires that expedited 
screening be limited to passengers who have successfully 
enrolled in the PreCheck program or who are eligible for 
PreCheck by being part of an already identified low-risk 
population. This bill helps ensure that expedited screening is 
both deliberate and secure, and that the population of known 
travelers is expanded so that resources can be directed towards 
unknown travelers.
Legislative History
    H.R. 2127 was introduced in the House on April 30, 2015, by 
Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, Mr. Katko, and Miss Rice of New 
York, and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 2127 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    On June 25, 2015, the Chair discharged the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security from further consideration of H.R. 
2127.
    The Committee considered H.R. 2127 on June 25, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 2127 to 
the House on July 22, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-220.
    The House considered H.R. 2127 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 27, 2015, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 2127 was received in the Senate on July 28, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.

                                ------                                



         CBRN INTELLIGENCE AND INFORMATION SHARING ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 2200

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish 
chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear intelligence 
and information sharing functions of the Office of Intelligence 
and Analysis of the Department of Homeland Security and to 
require dissemination of information analyzed by the Department 
to entities with responsibilities relating to homeland 
security, and for other purposes.
Summary
    Terrorist groups have long strived to employ chemical, 
biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) materials in their 
attacks. Furthermore, events such as the Boston Marathon 
bombing in 2013 illustrate the need for better information 
sharing between Federal and local officials. This legislation 
requires that the Office of Intelligence and Analysis within 
the Department of Homeland Security enhance intelligence 
analysis and information sharing on CBRN threats and work to 
ensure that State and local officials get the actionable 
intelligence information necessary to stop an attack.
Legislative History
    H.R. 2200 was introduced in the House on May 1, 2015, by 
Ms. McSally, Mr. McCaul, Mr. King of New York, Mr. Meehan, Mr. 
Thompson of Mississippi, and Mr. Payne and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 2200 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and 
Intelligence and the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, 
Response, and Communications.
    The Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications considered H.R. 2200 on May 14, 2015, and 
forwarded the measure to the Full Committee for consideration, 
as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair discharged the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism 
and Intelligence from further consideration of H.R. 2200 on May 
20, 2015.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 2200 on May 20, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 2200 to the House on June 17, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-164.
    The House considered H.R. 2200 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 23, 2015, and passed the measure, on June 25, 
2015, amended, by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 420 yeas and 2 nays, 
(Roll No. 389).
    H.R. 2200 was received in the Senate on July 7, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



        STATE WIDE INTEROPERABLE COMMUNICATIONS ENHANCEMENT ACT

                               H.R. 2206

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to require 
recipients of State Homeland Security Grant Program funding to 
preserve and strengthen interoperable emergency communications 
capabilities, and for other purposes.
Summary
    Despite an investment of more than $5 billion in grant 
funding to enhance communications capabilities over the past 10 
years, interoperability remains a challenge, particularly 
during disaster scenarios. H.R. 2206 recognizes the important 
role played by Statewide Interoperability Coordinators (SWICs), 
be it through the development of Statewide Communications 
Interoperability Plans, coordinating interoperable 
communications projects and grant requests, or engaging with 
the First Responder Network Authority as it works to design and 
build the Nation-wide public safety broadband network. The bill 
requires a governor to certify, as part of the application for 
State Homeland Security Grant Program (SHSGP) funds, that the 
State has designated a SWIC, or, if a SWIC has not been 
designated, that the State is performing in another manner the 
functions of a SWIC.
Legislative History
    H.R. 2206 was introduced in the House on May 1, 2015, by 
Mr. Payne, Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, Mr. McCaul, and Ms. 
McSally, and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 2206 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications.
    The Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications considered H.R. 2206 on May 14, 2015, and 
forwarded the measure to the Full Committee for consideration, 
without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 2206 on May 20, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 2206 to the House on June 17, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-165.
    The House considered H.R. 2206 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 27, 2015, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 2206 was received in the Senate on July 28, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



              PREVENT TRAFFICKING IN CULTURAL PROPERTY ACT

                               H.R. 2285

To improve enforcement against trafficking in cultural property 
and prevent stolen or illicit cultural property from financing 
terrorist and criminal networks, and for other purposes.
Summary
    Terrorists and terrorist organizations have used proceeds 
from the smuggling of antiquity and cultural property to fund 
their activities and bolster their financial networks.
    H.R. 2285 strengthened the enforcement efforts of U.S. 
Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and U.S. Immigration and 
Customs Enforcement (ICE) to interdict, detain, seize, and 
investigate cultural property illegally imported into the 
United States. Additionally, it required CBP and ICE to disrupt 
and dismantle smuggling and trafficking networks engaged in the 
illegal trade of cultural property.
Legislative History
    H.R. 2285 was introduced in the House on May 13, 2015, by 
Mr. Keating, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. Engel, and referred to the 
Committee on Ways and Means and in addition to the Committee on 
Homeland Security and the Committee on the Judiciary. Within 
the Committee, H.R. 2285 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Border and Maritime Security.
    On November 4, 2015, the Subcommittee on Border and 
Maritime Security was discharged from further consideration of 
H.R. 2285.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 2285 on November 4, 
2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 2285 to 
the House on December 15, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-380, Pt. I.
    The Committee on Ways and Means reported H.R. 2285 to the 
House on September 19, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-380, Pt. II. 
Subsequently, the Committee on the Judiciary was discharged 
from further consideration of H.R. 2285.
    The House considered H.R. 2285 under Suspension of the 
Rules and passed the measure on September 22, 2016, by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 415 yeas and 0 nays, (Roll No. 547).
    H.R. 2285 was received in the Senate on September 26, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Finance.

                                ------                                



         HOMELAND SECURITY UNIVERSITY-BASED CENTERS REVIEW ACT

                               H.R. 2390

To require a review of university-based centers for homeland 
security, and for other purposes.
Summary
    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Centers of 
Excellence (COE) are charged with performing basic and applied 
research in areas of emerging threats. These research projects 
are typically long-term, support a technology development 
program some years later, and are typically tasked with 
addressing the `over the horizon' threats.
    This legislation requires the Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) to initiate a study assessing the university-based 
centers for homeland security program and provide 
recommendations to Congress for appropriate improvements. This 
study includes a review of the Department of Homeland 
Security's efforts to identify areas of study needed to support 
its missions, along with a review of selection criteria for 
designating university-based centers, an examination of best 
practices to organize and use university-based research, a 
review of criteria and metrics DHS uses to measure progress of 
university based centers, an examination of the means by which 
other academic institutions can contribute to the research 
mission of the Science and Technology Directorate, an 
assessment of the interrelationship between the different COEs, 
and a review of any other essential elements of the programs.
    The Committee believes key areas of needed study to support 
the homeland security missions will be identified by this 
review, and the review will also provide insight into the 
method by which university based centers, which are federally 
funded research and develop centers, receive tasking from the 
Department.
Legislative History
    H.R. 2390 was introduced in the House on May 18, 2015, by 
Mr. Bennie Thompson of Mississippi and Mr. Richmond and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and the 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 2390 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
Technologies.
    The Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies was discharged from 
further consideration of H.R. 2390 on May 20, 2015.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 2390 on May 20, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on June 17, 2015, agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee would 
forego further consideration of H.R. 2390. On that same date, 
the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded 
acknowledging the agreement to forego further consideration and 
supporting the request for Conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called.
    Committee on Homeland Security reported to the House on 
June 18, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-168, Pt. I. Subsequently, the 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology was discharged from 
further consideration of H.R. 2390.
    The House considered H.R. 2390 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 23, 2015, and passed the measure, amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 2390 was received in the Senate on June 24, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



       IMPROVED SECURITY VETTING FOR AVIATION WORKERS ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 2750

To reform programs of the Transportation Security 
Administration, streamline transportation security regulations, 
and for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation addresses findings outlined by the 
Department of Homeland Security Office of the Inspector General 
(DHS-OIG) report TSA Can Improve Aviation Worker Vetting [OIG-
15-98] highlighting the Transportation Security Administration 
(TSA) and airport's inability to properly vet aviation workers 
who have access to sensitive areas of the Nation's airports. 
H.R. 2750 would ensure that the TSA coordinates with 
interagency watch-listing partners to determine needed 
Terrorist Identity Datamart Environment (TIDE) category codes 
to properly vet aviation workers and requires TSA issue new 
guidance for its Inspectors to annually conduct a comprehensive 
review of airport badging office procedures. Also, the bill 
would ensure that TSA works with the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation to determine feasibility of implementing the Rap-
Back system for recurrent criminal vetting and requires TSA 
issue new guidance mandating expiration dates on airport 
credentials of workers with temporary U.S. work authorizations. 
Finally, it requires TSA to review, identify, and address 
airports that have systematic issues in determining an 
applicant's lawful work status and ensures TSA brief Congress 
on the status of the change, once completed.
Legislative History
    H.R. 2750 was introduced in the House on June 12, 2015, by 
Mr. Katko, Mr. McCaul, Miss Rice of New York, and Mr. Payne, 
and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 2750 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security.
    The Subcommittee on Transportation Security considered H.R. 
2750 on June 16, 2015, and reported the measure to the Full 
Committee with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    The Committee considered H.R. 2750 on June 25, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 2750 to the House on July 27, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-227.
    The House considered H.R. 2750 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 27, 2015, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 2750 was received in the Senate on July 28, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.

                                ------                                



               KEEPING OUR TRAVELERS SAFE AND SECURE ACT

                               H.R. 2770

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to require certain 
maintenance of security-related technology at airports, and for 
other purposes.
Summary
    H.R. 2770 requires the Administrator of the Transportation 
Security Administration (TSA) to develop and implement a 
preventive maintenance validation process for security-related 
technology deployed to airports. The process must include 
specific maintenance schedules, guidance for TSA personnel and 
contractors on how to conduct and document maintenance actions, 
mechanisms to ensure compliance, and penalties for 
noncompliance.
Legislative History
    H.R. 2770 was introduced in the House on June 15, 2015, by 
Miss Rice of New York, Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, Mr. Katko, 
and Mr. Payne and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 2770 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    The Subcommittee on Transportation Security considered H.R. 
2770 on June 16, 2015, and reported the measure to the Full 
Committee with a favorable recommendation, without amendment, 
by voice vote.
    The Committee considered H.R. 2770 on June 25, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committed on Homeland Security reported H.R. 2770 to 
the House on July 22, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-218.
    The House considered H.R. 2770 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 27, 2015, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 380 yeas and 0 nays, (Roll No. 469).
    H.R. 2770 was received in the Senate on July 28, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.

                                ------                                



                 CROSS-BORDER RAIL SECURITY ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 2786

To require the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection to submit a report on cross-border rail security, 
and for other purposes.
Summary
    The U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Office of 
Field Operations is principally responsible for facilitating 
trade and travel entering the United States and ensuring 
adequate security measures. CBP attempts to prevent terrorist 
and terrorist instruments from entering the United States and 
works to enforce trade, agriculture, and immigration 
regulations across all transportation domains. This bill 
fulfills the recommendations from a DHS Office of Inspector 
General report U.S. Customs and Border Protection Did Not 
Effectively Target and Examine Rail Shipments From Canada and 
Mexico [OIG-15-39] which detailed how high-risk rail shipments 
arriving into the U.S. from Canada and Mexico were not being 
properly targeted and screened.
    This bill would require the Commissioner of CBP to submit a 
report on cross-border rail security to the House and Senate 
Homeland Security Committees. The report would include: The 
number of shipments entering the U.S. annually that are 
determined to be high-risk; details on the status of radiation 
detection units on the northern and southern land borders; and 
whether additional radiation detection equipment is needed. The 
report must also include a plan for ensuring all CBP personnel 
receive proper training and guidance on the use of CBP's 
Automated Targeting System.
    H.R. 2786 also requires the Government Accountability 
Office to periodically audit CBP operations at rail crossings 
on the northern and southern international borders.
Legislative History
    H.R. 2786 was introduced in the House on June 15, 2015, by 
Mr. Vela and Mrs. Miller of Michigan and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 2786 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Transportation Security and 
the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security.
    On June 25, 2015, the Chair discharged the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security and the Subcommittee on Border and 
Maritime Security from further consideration of H.R. 2786.
    The Committee considered H.R. 2786 on June 25, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 2786 to the House on July 28, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-233.
    The House considered H.R. 278 under Suspension of the Rules 
on September 28, 2015, and passed the measure, with an 
amendment by a recorded vote of 412 yeas and 0 nays, (Roll No. 
520).
    H.R. 2786 was received in the Senate on September 29, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



     FIRST RESPONDER IDENTIFICATION OF EMERGENCY NEEDS IN DISASTER 
                               SITUATIONS

                               H.R. 2795

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to submit a study 
on the circumstances which may impact the effectiveness and 
availability of first responders before, during, or after a 
terrorist threat or event.
Summary
    H.R. 2795 was introduced as the Nation neared the tenth 
anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. Catastrophic emergencies like 
Hurricane Katrina and the 2014 Ebola scare in Texas impact 
entire communities that State and local first responders are 
responsible for protecting. These first responders are also 
responsible for protecting their own families impacted by 
emergencies. This bill analyzes how much is being done to 
support the needs of first responders--particularly with 
respect to concerns about their families--so that they can 
continue to do their job successfully. This measure provides 
Congress with relevant information about policies and programs 
at both the State and local levels that support the protection 
and preparedness of first responders and their families during 
emergencies.
Legislative History
    H.R. 2795 was introduced in the House on June 16, 2015, by 
Ms. Jackson Lee and 14 original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 2795 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, 
Response, and Communications.
    On November 4, 2015, the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response and Communications was discharged from 
further consideration of H.R. 2795.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 2795 on November 4, 
2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 2795 to the House on December 
7, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-370.
    The House considered H.R. 2795 under Suspension of the 
Rules on December 10, 2015, and passed the bill, as amended, by 
a \2/3\ recorded vote of 396 yeas and 12 nays, (Roll No. 689).
    H.R. 2795 was received in the Senate on December 14, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



                       TSA PRECHECK EXPANSION ACT

                               H.R. 2843

To require certain improvements in the Transportation Security 
Administration's PreCheck expedited screening program, and for 
other purposes.
Summary
    H.R. 2843 requires the Administrator of the Transportation 
Security Administration (TSA) to publish PreCheck application 
enrollment standards to allow private-sector entities to 
provide services to support increased enrollment in the 
program. The standards must allow for the use of secure 
technologies including: Online enrollment; kiosks; tablets; or 
staffed laptop stations at which people can apply for entry 
into the program. The bill requires the Administrator to 
coordinate with interested parties to deploy TSA-approved, 
ready-to-market private sector technology that meets new 
enrollment standards. The bill also requires the Administrator 
to develop and implement a process for approving private-sector 
marketing of the PreCheck program and a strategy for partnering 
with the private sector to encourage program enrollment. The 
bill further requires the Administrator to leverage Department 
of Homeland Security data and technology to verify the 
citizenship of individuals enrolling in the program and assess 
security vulnerabilities in the application vetting process 
that includes an evaluation of whether subjecting program 
participants to recurring fingerprint-based criminal history 
record checks and checks against terrorist watchlists could 
strengthen program security in a cost-effective manner.
Legislative History
    H.R. 2843 was introduced in the House on June 15, 2015, by 
Mr. Katko, Mr. McCaul and Mr. Rogers of Alabama and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 
2843 was referred to the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security.
    On June 25, 2015, the Chair discharged the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security from further consideration of H.R. 
2843.
    The Committee considered H.R. 2843 on June 25, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 2843 to 
the House on July 22, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-221.
    The House considered H.R. 2843 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 27, 2015, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 2843 was received in the Senate on July 28, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation considered H.R. 2843 on December 9, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the Senate with an 
Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute, favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation reported to the Senate on March 7, 2016, as S. 
Rpt. 114-223.
    Provisions of H.R. 2843 were included in the Title II 
Subtitle A of H.R. 636. (See also action on H.R. 636 listed 
above.)

                                ------                                



                COUNTERING VIOLENT EXTREMISM ACT OF 2015

                          H.R. 2899 (S. 2976)

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to authorize the 
Office for Countering Violent Extremism.
Summary
    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-296) to fight the spread of violent extremist 
propaganda online and via social media by authorizing an Office 
for Countering Violent Extremism (OCVE) within the Department 
of Homeland Security. The legislation authorizes an Assistant 
Secretary to run the OCVE and requires the Department to 
establish a program to counter the narrative of extremist 
groups which are working to recruit and radicalize people 
within the United States.
Legislative History
H.R. 2899
    H.R. 2899 was introduced in the House on June 25, 2015, by 
Mr. McCaul and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 2899 on July 15, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House of 
Representatives with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 2899 to the House on November 
19, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-344.
    Section 2 of H.R. 5611, as introduced, contains provisions 
relating to H.R. 2899. (See also action on H.R. 5611 listed 
below.)

S. 2976
    S. 2976 was introduced in the Senate on February 9, 2016, 
by Mr. Carper and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs Considered S. 2976 on February 11, 2016, and ordered 
the measure to be reported with an amendment, favorably
    Provisions of S. 2976 were included in Sec. 1906 and 1090 
of the Conference Report to accompany S. 2943, the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017. (See action 
taken on S. 2943, listed above).

                                ------                                



        HIGHWAY AND TRANSPORTATION FUNDING ACT OF 2015, PART II

                               H.R. 3038

To provide an extension of Federal-aid highway, highway safety, 
motor carrier safety, transit, and other programs funded out of 
the Highway Trust Fund, and for other purposes.
Summary
    H.R. 3038 extends the programmatic and expenditure 
authority of the Highway Trust Fund (HTF) through December 18, 
2015. The bill also authorizes appropriations for Federal-aid 
highway, highway safety, and public transportation programs. 
The bill subjects funding for these programs generally to the 
same manner of distribution, administration, limitation, and 
availability for obligation, but at a specified pro rata of the 
total amount as funds authorized for appropriation out of the 
HTF for such programs and activities for the current fiscal 
year. The bill also transfers approximately $6.1 billion from 
Treasury's General Fund to the HTF's Highway Account and $2 
billion to its Mass Transit Account. Included within this 
measure were increase in fees fro Fiscal Years 2024 and 2025 
for the Aviation Security Capital Fund.
Legislative History
    H.R. 3038 was introduced in the House on July 13, 2015, by 
Mr. Ryan of Wisconsin and Mr. Shuster, and referred to the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and in addition 
to the Committee on Ways and Means, the Committee on Natural 
Resources, the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, the 
Committee on Energy and Commerce, the Committee on Homeland 
Security, and the Committee on Education and the Workforce. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 3038 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    The Committee on Rules met on July 14, 2015, and granted a 
Rule providing for the consideration of H.R. 3038, the Rule was 
filed in the House as H.Res. 362 (H. Rpt. 114-204). The House 
agreed to the Rule on July 15, 2015, by a recorded vote of 245 
yeas and 183 nays, (Roll No. 439).
    The House considered H.R. 3038 on July 15, 2015, under the 
provisions of H.Res. 362, and passed the measure by a recorded 
vote of 312 yeas and 119 nays, (Roll No. 441).
    H.R. 3038 was received in the Senate on July 16, 2015, and 
read a first time. The measure was read a second time on July 
21, 2015, and placed on the Senate Legislative Calendar.

                                ------                                



        AIRPORT ACCESS CONTROL SECURITY IMPROVEMENT ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 3102

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to reform programs 
of the Transportation Security Administration, streamline 
transportation security regulations, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-296) by requiring the Administrator of the 
Transportation Security Administration to establish a risk-
based screening model for employees at airports to ensure: That 
only individuals authorized to have access to secure areas of 
airports are granted such access; that individuals are denied 
access to secure areas of airports if such authorization has 
been withdrawn; and a means of restricting access among 
employees to particular portions of secure areas.
Legislative History
    H.R. 3102 was introduced in the House on July 16, 2015, by 
Mr. Katko and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 3102 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    On July 23, 2015, the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security considered H.R. 3102 and reported the measure to the 
Full Committee for consideration with a favorable 
recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3102 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3012 to the House on October 6, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-283.
    The House considered H.R. 3102 under Suspension of the 
Rules on October 6, 2015, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 3102 was received in the Senate on October 7, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.

                                ------                                



                   PARTNERS FOR AVIATION SECURITY ACT

                               H.R. 3144

To require consultation with the Aviation Security Advisory 
Committee regarding modifications to the prohibited item list, 
require a report on the Transportation Security Oversight 
Board, and for other purposes.
Summary
    H.R. 3144 requires that the Administrator of the 
Transportation Security Administration (TSA) consult with the 
Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) regarding 
modifications to the prohibited items list, prior to making a 
final determination. Additionally, the bill requires TSA to 
submit a report to Congress providing general information 
concerning the activities and composition of the Transportation 
Security Oversight Board. Finally, the bill makes a technical 
correction to existing statute establishing the ASAC, to 
authorize members of the Advisory Committee to remain in their 
position after their term has expired, until either a successor 
begins serving or they are reappointed.
Legislative History
    H.R. 3144 was introduced in the House on July 21, 2015, by 
Mr. Payne and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 3144 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    On July 23, 2015, the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security considered a H.R. 3144, and reported the measure to 
the Full Committee for consideration with a favorable 
recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3144 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3144 to the House on November 
2, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-320.
    The House considered H.R. 3144 under Suspension of the 
Rules on November 16, 2015, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 3144 was received in the Senate on November 17, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.

                                ------                                



         KNOW THE CBRN TERRORISM THREATS TO TRANSPORTATION ACT

                               H.R. 3350

To require a terrorism threat assessment regarding the 
transportation of chemical, biological, nuclear, and 
radiological materials through United States land borders and 
within the United States, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation requires the Department of Homeland 
Security to conduct a terrorism threat assessment on the 
transportation of chemical, biological, nuclear, and 
radiological materials through United States land borders and 
within the United States. The bill requires the Office of 
Intelligence and Analysis within the Department to conduct the 
assessment and directs that the results of the assessment be 
shared with relevant Federal, State and local agencies, 
including the Department of Energy.
Legislative History
    H.R. 3350 was introduced in the House on July 29, 2015, by 
Mr. Higgins, Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, and Mr. King of New 
York and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within 
the Committee, H.R. 3350 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Counterterrorism and Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence 
considered H.R. 3350 on September 17, 2015, and reported the 
measure to the Full Committee with a favorable recommendation, 
without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3350 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, without amendment, 
by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3350 to the House on October 
20, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-296.
    The House considered H.R. 3350 under Suspension of the 
Rules on October 20, 2015, and passed the measure, without 
amendment, by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 416 yeas and 0 nays, 
(Roll No. 551).
    H.R. 3350 was received in the Senate on October 21, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



 DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INSIDER THREAT AND MITIGATION ACT OF 
                                  2015

                               H.R. 3361

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish the 
Insider Threat Program, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-296) to establish an Insider Threat program within 
the Department of Homeland Security. The bill mandates employee 
education and training programs, and establishes an internal 
steering committee to manage and coordinate insider threat 
activities across the Department.
Legislative History
    H.R. 3361 was introduced in the House on July 29, 2015, by 
Mr. King of New York, Mr. Higgins, Mr. Barletta, Mr. Katko, and 
Mr. Donovan and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 3361 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence 
considered H.R. 3361 on September 17, 2015, and reported the 
measure to the Full Committee with a favorable recommendation, 
as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3361 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 3361 to 
the House on November 2, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-321.
    The House considered H.R. 3361 on November 2, 2015, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure, amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 3361 was received in the Senate on November 3, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security 
and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered H.R. 3361 on February 10, 2016, and ordered 
the measure to be reported to the Senate, with an Amendment in 
the Nature of a Substitute, favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported H.R. 3361 to the Senate on July 12, 2016, as 
S. Rpt. 114-297.

                                ------                                



         STRENGTHENING STATE AND LOCAL CYBER CRIME FIGHTING ACT

                               H.R. 3490

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to authorize the 
National Computer Forensics Institute, and for other purposes.
Summary
    It is imperative that the Nation provide tools and training 
to address challenges by cyber criminals to law enforcement to 
protect against being exploited through computers, mobile 
devices and the internet. Since 2008, the United States Secret 
Service (USSS) has operated the National Computer Forensics 
Institute (NCFI), which has garnered a reputation as the 
premier cybercrime training center in the Nation providing 
support to State and local law enforcement investigators, 
prosecutors, and judicial officials. Since its existence, it 
has not yet been authorized. This legislation amends the 
Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 107-296) to codify the 
NCFI and facilitate the expansion of the USSS network of 
Electronic Crimes Task Forces throughout the Nation.
Legislative History
    H.R. 3490 was introduced in the House on September 11, 
2015, by Mr. Ratcliffe, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. Palmer and referred 
to the Committee on the Judiciary, and in addition to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 3490 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, 
Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies.
    The Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies considered H.R. 3490 on 
September 17, 2015, and reported the measure to the Full 
Committee with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    The Committee on the Judiciary considered H.R. 3490 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House, amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3490 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    The Committee on the Judiciary reported H.R. 3490 to the 
House on November 19, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-345, Pt. I.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 3490 to 
the House on November 30, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-345, Pt. II.
    The House considered H.R. 3490 under Suspension of the 
Rules on November 30, 2015, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 3490 was received in the Senate on December 1, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on the 
Judiciary.

                                ------                                



                    SECURING THE CITIES ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 3493

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish the 
Securing the Cities program to enhance the ability of the 
United States to detect and prevent terrorist attacks and other 
high consequence events utilizing nuclear or other radiological 
materials that pose a high risk to homeland security in high-
risk urban areas, and for other purposes.
Summary
    With terrorists and rogue nation states continuing to show 
interest in developing `crude' nuclear weapons, it is 
imperative that the U.S. remain vigilant in preventing and 
deterring nuclear smuggling and terrorism. This legislation 
amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 107-296) to 
establish the Securing the Cities Program within the Domestic 
Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO). It would require the Director 
of DNDO to assist state and local governments by designing, 
implementing, and enhancing capabilities for coordinating 
detection and interdiction of nuclear or other radiological 
materials. The legislation would provide resources to enhance 
detection, analysis, communication and coordination and 
increased oversight and accountability by requiring the 
Government Accountability Office to conduct a review on the 
effectiveness of the program.
Legislative History
    H.R. 3493 was introduced in the House on September 11, 
2015, by Mr. Donovan, Mr. King of New York, and Mr. McCaul and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 3493 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
Technologies.
    The Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies considered H.R. 3493 on 
September 17, 2015, and reported the measure to the Full 
Committee with a favorable recommendation, without amendment, 
by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3490 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3493 to the House on October 
20, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-295.
    The House considered H.R. 3493 under Suspension of the 
Rules on October 20, 2015, and passed the measure, amended, by 
a \2/3\ recorded vote of 411 yeas and 4 nays, (Roll No. 550).
    H.R. 3493 was received in the Senate on October 21, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



 DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY SUPPORT TO FUSION CENTERS ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 3503

To require an assessment of fusion center personnel needs, and 
for other purposes; to the Committee on Homeland Security.
Summary
    This legislation requires an assessment of Department of 
Homeland Security support to fusion centers, including 
Departmental personnel assigned to fusion centers and whether 
such assignments are sufficient. Additionally, the bill 
supports ongoing efforts by the Office of Intelligence and 
Analysis to sponsor Top Secret / Sensitive Compartmented 
Information (TS/SCI) clearances for appropriate State and local 
analysts at fusion centers and report on whether a higher 
clearance level improves threat awareness and information 
sharing.
Legislative History
    H.R. 3503 was introduced in the House on September 11, 
2015, by Ms. McSally, Mr. McCaul, Mr. King of New York, Mr. 
Loudermilk, and Mr. Barletta and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 3503 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence 
considered H.R. 3503 on September 17, 2015, and reported the 
measure to the Full Committee with a favorable recommendation, 
without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3503 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    On October 28, 2015, the Chair of the House Permanent 
Select Committee on Intelligence sent a letter to the Chair of 
the Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration of H.R. 3503, the Committee on 
Intelligence would not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 3503. 
The letter further requested the support for Conferees should a 
House-Senate Conference be called. On the following day, the 
Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded, 
acknowledging the jurisdictional interest of the Committee on 
Intelligence and the support for the request to appoint 
Conferees.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3503 to the House on November 
2, 2014 as H. Rpt. 114-322.
    The House considered H.R. 3503 under Suspension of the 
Rules on November 2, 2015, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 3503 was received in the Senate on November 3, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security 
and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CLEARANCE MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 
                                  ACT

                               H.R. 3505

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to improve the 
management and administration of the security clearance 
processes throughout the Department of Homeland Security, and 
for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-296) to require the Secretary of Homeland Security 
to conduct a review of the sensitivity level designations of 
national security positions within the Department to ensure 
employees with security clearances continue to need access to 
such sensitive information. The bill requires the Department 
conduct an accounting of workforce needs to better manage the 
costs of unnecessary background investigations and limit the 
number of positions that may be vulnerable to insider threats 
and targeting by foreign intelligence services.
Legislative History
    H.R. 3505 was introduced in the House on September 15, 
2015, by Mr. Thompson of Mississippi and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 3505 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and 
Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence 
considered H.R. 3505 on September 17, 2015, and reported the 
measure to the Full Committee with a favorable recommendation, 
without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3505 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, without amendment, 
by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 3503 to 
the House on November 2, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-323.
    The House considered H.R. 3503 on November 2, 2015, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure, amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 3505 was received in the Senate on November 3, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security 
and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



         DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CYBERSECURITY STRATEGY
                              ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 3510

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to require the 
Secretary of Homeland Security to develop a cybersecurity 
strategy for the Department of Homeland Security, and for other 
purposes.
Summary
    Increasingly, sophisticated cyber threats have underscored 
the need to manage and strengthen the cybersecurity of the 
Nation's critical infrastructure. In a report entitled 
Cybersecurity: A Better Defined and Implemented National 
Strategy is Needed to Address Persistent Challenges [GAO-13-
462T], the Government Accountability Office recommended that an 
overarching Federal cybersecurity strategy be implemented and 
that such strategy should define key elements of a national 
strategy including roles and responsibilities.
    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-296) to instruct the Secretary of Homeland 
Security to develop such a Departmental cybersecurity strategy 
and implementation plan. The legislation further prohibits the 
Department from reorganizing or realigning offices within the 
National Protection and Programs Directorate without 
Congressional approval.
Legislative History
    H.R. 3510 was introduced in the House on September 15, 
2015, by Mr. Richmond and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 3510 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and 
Security Technologies.
    The Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies considered H.R. 3510 on 
September 17, 2015, and reported the measure to the Full 
Committee with a favorable recommendation, without amendment, 
by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3510 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3510 to the House on October 6, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-284.
    The House considered H.R. 3510 on October 6, 2015, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 3510 was received in the Senate on October 7, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 3510 were included in Section 1912 of 
the Conference Report to accompany S. 2943, the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017. (See action 
taken on S. 2943, listed above).

                                ------                                



          DHS HEADQUARTERS REFORM AND IMPROVEMENT ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 3572

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to reform, 
streamline, and make improvements to the Department of Homeland 
Security and support the Department's efforts to implement 
better policy, planning, management, and performance, and for 
other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation streamlines the Department of Homeland 
Security Office of Policy by: Consolidating the offices of 
State and Local Law Enforcement, Private Sector, and 
Intergovernmental Affairs into an office of Partnership and 
Engagement; eliminating five Assistant Secretary positions 
within the Office of Policy; authorizing key management 
functions within headquarters; and strengthening the 
Department's role in effectively overseeing its major 
acquisition programs. Specifically, this bill consolidates the 
functions of the Office of State and Local Law Enforcement, the 
Private Sector Office, and Intergovernmental affairs under the 
Office of Policy's Partnership and Engagement Office, and 
eliminates authorization for those offices to be led by an 
Assistant Secretary. Further, the bill authorizes the Office of 
Policy's Office of International Affairs and Office of Strategy 
and Planning to be led by Directors rather than Assistant 
Secretaries. Additionally, this bill provides guidance to 
ensure that the structure and focus of the Department are 
directly linked to securing the homeland.
Legislative History
    H.R. 3572 was introduced in the House on September 18, 
2015, by Mr. McCaul and Mr. Thompson of Mississippi and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3572 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5372 to the House on October 
20, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-297.
    The House considered H.R. 3572 under Suspension of the 
Rules on October 20, 2015, and passed the measure, amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 3572 was received in the Senate on October 21, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on October 22, 2015, agreeing that, in order 
to expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 3572. The letter further requested support for 
the appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate Conference 
be called. On that same date, the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security responded acknowledging the agreement to not 
seek a sequential referral and the support for Conferees.
    Provisions of Sec. 111 of H.R. 3572 as passed by the House 
were included in Section 1902-4 of the Conference Report to 
accompany S. 2943, the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017. (See action taken on S. 2943, listed above).

                                ------                                



           DHS SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY REFORM AND IMPROVEMENTS
                              ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 3578

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to strengthen and 
make improvements to the Directorate of Science and Technology 
of the Department of Homeland Security, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-296) to strengthen and make improvements to the 
Direc*torate of Science and Technology within the Department of 
Home*land Security. The legislation would improve the Science 
and Tech*nology Directorate's ability to carry out its 
responsibility to conduct re*search and development by, among 
other things, modifying the criteria for the designation of 
colleges or universities centers for homeland security to 
require expertise in nuclear explosives countermeasures or 
detection.
Legislative History
    Prior to introduction, the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, 
Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies considered 
a Committee Print entitled ``DHS Science and Technology Reform 
and Improvements Act of 2015'' on September 17, 2015, and 
reported the measure to the Full Committee with a favorable 
recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    H.R. 3578 was introduced in the House on September 18, 
2015, by Mr. Ratcliffe and Mr. Richmond and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3578 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on October 22, 2015, agreeing that, in order 
to expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 3578. The letter further requested the 
appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be 
called. On that same day, the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee 
on Transportation and Infrastructure acknowledging the 
agreement to not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 3578 and 
the agreement to support the request for Conferees should a 
House-Senate Conference be called.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3578 to the House on December 
8, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-372.
    The House considered H.R. 3578 under Suspension of the 
Rules on December 10, 2015, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 416 yeas and 0 nays, (Roll No. 687).
    H.R. 3578 was received in the Senate on December 14, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



   PROMOTING RESILIENCE AND EFFICIENCY IN PREPARING FOR ATTACKS AND 
                     RESPONDING TO EMERGENCIES ACT

                          H.R. 3583 (S. 1915)

To reform and improve the Federal Emergency Management Agency, 
the Office of Emergency Communications, and the Office of 
Health Affairs of the Department of Homeland Security, and for 
other purposes.
Summary
    The Promoting Resilience and Efficiency in Preparing for 
Attacks and Responding to Emergencies (PREPARE) Act seeks to 
enhance accountability at the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency, Office of Emergency Communications, and Office of 
Health Affairs at the Department of Homeland Security. As a 
part of the Committee's authorization process, the PREPARE Act 
builds efficiencies and increases coordination for preparedness 
improvements, while providing greater accountability for 
taxpayers.
Legislative History
H.R. 3583
    The Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications considered a Committee Print entitled 
``Promoting Resilience and Efficiency in Preparing for Attacks 
and Responding to Emergencies Act'' on September 10, 2015, and 
reported the measure to the Full Committee for consideration, 
with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    H.R. 3583 was introduced in the House on September 22, 
2015, by Ms. McSally, Mr. McCaul, Mr. Donovan, and Mr. Payne 
and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security, the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, and the 
Committee on Energy and Commerce.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3583 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    On March 9, 2016, the Chair of the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of 
the Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would waive further 
consideration of H.R. 3583. The letter further requested 
support for the appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called. On March 10, the Chair of the Committee 
on Homeland Security responded acknowledging the jurisdictional 
interests of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure, and the agreement to not waive further 
consideration.
    On March 11, 2016, the Chair of the Committee on Energy and 
Commerce sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on Energy and 
Commerce would waive further consideration of H.R. 3583. The 
letter further requested support for the appointment of 
Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be called. On that 
same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the 
Committee on Energy and Commerce, and the agreement to not 
waive further consideration.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 3583 to 
the House on March 16, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-455, Pt. I. 
Subsequently, the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure and the Committee on Energy and Commerce were 
discharged from further consideration of H.R. 3583.
    On March 22, 2016, the Chair of the Committee on Financial 
Services sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on Financial 
Services would not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 3583. The 
letter further requested support for the appointment of 
Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be called. The Chair 
of the Committee on Homeland Security responded on April 6, 
2016, acknowledging the jurisdictional letter of the Committee 
on Financial Services, and the agreement to not seek a 
sequential referral.
    The House agreed to Suspend the Rules on April 26, 2016, 
and passed the measure, as amended, by voice vote.
    H.R. 3583 was received in the Senate on April 27, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

S. 1915
    S. 1915, the Senate companion measure, was introduced in 
the Senate on August 3, 2015, by Ms. Ayotte, Mr. Booker, and 
Mr. Coons and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security 
and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 1915 on May 9, 2016, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate, with an Amendment in the 
Nature of a Substitute.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 1915 to the Senate on May 9, 2016, as S. 
Rpt. 114-251.

                                ------                                



 TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION REFORM AND IMPROVEMENT ACT OF 
                                  2015

                               H.R. 3584

To reform programs of the Transportation Security 
Administration, streamline transportation security regulations, 
and for other purposes.
Summary
    This bill provides for streamlining and reforming certain 
programs within the Transportation Security Administration 
(TSA). This measure provides for an authorization of TSA's 
PreCheck program, and for the TSA to implement a pilot project 
to establish a secure, automated, biometric-based system at 
airports to verify the identity of individuals enrolled in 
PreCheck. Additionally, TSA is required to develop and 
implement technology solutions to verify travel and identity 
documents for standard screening lane passengers at large hub 
airports. Both of these initiatives are focused on reducing the 
number of TSA screening personnel needed to perform these 
duties, reduce wait times, reduce operating expenses, and 
integrate with watchlist matching programs and other checkpoint 
technologies.
Legislative History
    On July 23, 2015, the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security considered a Committee Print entitled the 
``Transportation Security Administration Reform and Improvement 
Act of 2015'' and reported the measure to the Full Committee 
for consideration with a favorable recommendation, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 3584 was introduced in the House on September 22, 
2015, by Mr. Katko and Mr. McCaul and referred to the Committee 
on Homeland Security.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3584 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3584 to the House on January 
12, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-396.
    The House considered H.R. 3584 under Suspension of the 
Rules on February 23, 2016, and passed the measure by voice 
vote.
    H.R. 3584 was received in the Senate on February 24, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.

                                ------                                



            BORDER AND MARITIME COORDINATION IMPROVEMENT ACT

                               H.R. 3586

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to improve border 
and maritime security coordination in the Department of 
Homeland Security, and for other purposes.
Summary
    The U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) within the 
Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is tasked with securing 
America's borders and promoting legitimate trade and travel. 
More than 12 years after the Department of Homeland Security, 
stovepipes remain among the 22 different component agencies, 
especially with respect to border and maritime security 
efforts.
    H.R. 3586 seeks to provide DHS with the necessary tools and 
authorities to better streamline operations amongst relevant 
components while enhancing security. The Department has already 
established three Joint Task Forces (JTF), including JTF-East, 
JTF-West, and JTF-Investigations. In addition, the Office of 
Biometric Identity Management currently exists and is 
collecting biometric information on most foreign travelers, 
refugees, and visa holders, which are screened against 
criminal, defense, and immigration databases.
    Greater efficiency in CBP and U.S. Coast Guard efforts 
would be beneficial to maritime security, and improvements to 
the Transportation Worker Identification Credential and Custom-
Trade Partnership Against Terrorism programs are essential. 
Moreover, key programs like the Air Cargo Advance Screening 
pilot program and the Immigration Advisory Program help ``push 
the borders out'' and prevent dangerous people from entering 
the United States in the first place.
    H.R. 3586 identified and implemented efficiencies within 
the border and maritime security components of the Department. 
Specifically, this bill improved CBP coordination by: 
Establishing an immigration cooperation program with foreign 
governments to better identify individuals who pose a security 
risk and may be inadmissible to the United States; directing 
the CBP Commissioner to establish a program to collect 
electronic information for the advance screening of air cargo; 
requiring CBP Air and Marine Operations to deploy assets with a 
risk-based assessment that considers mission needs; and 
establishing integrated border enforcement teams with Canada to 
strengthen security of ports of entry and the northern border.
    Additionally, H.R. 3586 required the Commissioner of CBP to 
establish a three-year strategic plan for the deployment of CBP 
personnel to locations outside the United States; improved the 
Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism; required a 
strategic plan every three years to enhance the security of 
international supply chains; and directed the Secretary to 
strengthen the security of Transportation Worker Identification 
Credentials.
Legislative History
    H.R. 3586 was introduced in the House on September 22, 
2015, by Mrs. Miller of Michigan, and Mr. McCaul, and referred 
to the Committee on Homeland Security and in addition to the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3586 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Ways and Means sent a letter 
to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security agreeing 
that, in order to expedite consideration on the House Floor, 
the Committee on Ways and Means would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 3586. The letter further requested support for 
the appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate Conference 
be called. The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded on October 5, 2015, acknowledging the agreement to 
not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 3586.
    On February 25, 2016, the Chair of the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of 
the Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would waive further 
consideration of H.R. 3586. The letter further requested 
support for the appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called. On that same date, the Chair of the 
Committee on Homeland Security responded acknowledging the 
jurisdictional interests of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure, and the agreement to not waive further 
consideration.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 3586 to 
the House on April 12, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-488, Pt. I.
    The House considered H.R. 3586 on April 13, 2016, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 3586 was received in the Senate on April 14, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The text of section 4 of H.R. 3586 were included in S. 461. 
(See action taken on S. 461, listed above).
    Provisions of H.R. 3586 were included in Section 1901 of 
the Conference Report to accompany S. 2943, the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017. (See action 
taken on S. 2943, listed above).

                                ------                                



                 FUSION CENTER ENHANCEMENT ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 3598

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to enhance the 
partnership between the Department of Homeland Security and the 
National Network of Fusion Centers, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation updates the existing language in Section 
210A of the Homeland Security Act (Pub. L. 107-296) to enhance 
State and local partners access to homeland security 
information and coordination with the Department of Homeland 
Security's Components. The bill reflects the evolution of the 
National Network of Fusion Centers, as well as the Office of 
Intelligence and Analysis relationship with fusion centers in 
the Network. The bill adds several new responsibilities for the 
Under Secretary of Intelligence and Analysis to reflect the 
current role of fusion centers in detecting and preventing a 
terrorist attack or other emergency. Additionally, this 
legislation requires the Under Secretary to submit a report on 
the efforts of the Office of Intelligence and Analysis and 
departmental components to support the National Network of 
Fusion Centers.
Legislative History
    Prior to introduction, the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism 
and Intelligence considered a Committee Print entitled the 
``Fusion Center Enhancement Act of 2015'' on September 17, 
2015, and reported the measure to the Full Committee with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    H.R. 3598 was introduced in the House on September 24, 
2015, by Mr. Barletta, and Mr. King of New York and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3598 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House, as amended, by voice vote.
    On October 28, 2015, the Chair of the House Permanent 
Select Committee on Intelligence sent a letter to the Chair of 
the Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration of H.R. 3598, the Committee on 
Intelligence would not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 3598. 
The letter further requested the support for Conferees should a 
House-Senate Conference be called. On the following day, the 
Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded, 
acknowledging the jurisdictional interest of the Committee on 
Intelligence and the support for the request to appoint 
Conferees.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3598 to the House on November 
2, 2014 as H. Rpt. 114-324.
    On November 2, 2015, the Chair of the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of 
the Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 3598. The letter further requested the support 
for Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be called. The 
Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded on 
November 2, 2015, acknowledging the jurisdictional interest of 
the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and the 
support for the request to appoint Conferees.
    The House considered H.R. 3598 under Suspension of the 
Rules on November 2, 2015, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 3598 was received in the Senate on November 3, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security 
and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



                     HSA TECHNICAL CORRECTIONS ACT

                               H.R. 3859

To make technical corrections to the Homeland Security Act of 
2002.
Summary
    The purpose of H.R. 3859 is to make technical corrections 
to the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 107-296) by 
updating obsolete language and eliminating outdated offices and 
reporting requirements.
Legislative History
    H.R. 3859 was introduced in the House on October 29, 2015, 
by Mr. Perry and Mr. McCaul and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 3859 on November 4, 
2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, 
without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3859 to the House on November 
16, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-333.
    The House considered H.R. 3859 under Suspension of the 
Rules on December 8, 2015, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 3859 was received in the Senate on December 9, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



              STATE AND LOCAL CYBER PROTECTION ACT OF 2015

                          H.R. 3869 (S. 2665)

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to assist State and 
local coordination on cybersecurity with the national 
cybersecurity and communications integration center, and for 
other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-296) to codify ongoing efforts to coordinate State 
and local cybersecurity efforts with the Department of Homeland 
Security's (DHS) National Cybersecurity and Communications 
Integration Center (NCCIC). The NCCIC would, to the extent 
practicable, provide assistance to State and local governments 
in securing their information systems upon request.
Legislative History
H.R. 3869
    H.R. 3869 was introduced in the House on November 2, 2015, 
by Mr. Hurd of Texas and Mr. Ratcliffe and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 3869 on November 4, 
2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, 
without amendment, by voice vote.
    The reported H.R. 3869 to the House on December 3, 2015, as 
H. Rpt. 114-363.
    The House considered H.R. 3869 under Suspension of the 
Rules on December 10, 2015, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote. During consideration, the title was amended so 
as to read ``To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to 
assist State and local coordination on cybersecurity with the 
national cybersecurity and communications integration center, 
and for other purposes.''
    H.R. 3869 was received in the Senate on December 14, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

S. 2665
    S. 2665, the Senate companion measure, was introduced in 
the Senate on March 10, 2016, by Mr. Peters and Mr. Perdue and 
referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



       DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CBRNE DEFENSE ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 3875

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish within 
the Department of Homeland Security a Chemical, Biological, 
Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives Office, and for other 
purposes.
Summary
    Departments and agencies across the U.S. Government have 
centralized their weapons of mass destruction (WMD) defense 
programs to provide clear focal points for dealing with this 
threat. However, The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) 
responsibilities in the chemical, biological, radiological, 
nuclear, and explosives (CBRNE) areas continue to be spread 
across many offices in the Department with varying authorities 
and functions, affecting strategic direction as well as 
interdepartmental and interagency coordination.
    To address this disparate effort, this legislation 
authorizes a Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and 
Explosives Office within the Department of Homeland Security, 
led by a Presidentially-appointed Assistant Secretary. The bill 
directs the Secretary to include within the new CBRNE Office: 
the Office of Health Affairs, the Domestic Nuclear Detection 
Office, risk assessment activities and personnel of the Science 
and Technology Directorate, CBRNE activities and personnel of 
the Office of Policy and Operations Coordination and Planning, 
and the Office for Bombing Prevention. The bill provides 
specific responsibilities of the Assistant Secretary and needed 
structure for the management of CBRNE activities.
Legislative History
    H.R. 3875 was introduced in the House on November 2, 2015, 
by Mr. McCaul, Ms. McSally, Mr. Ratcliffe, and Ms. Jackson Lee 
and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 3875 on November 4, 
2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House 
favorable, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3875 to the House on November 
16, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-334.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on December 8, 2015, agreeing that, in order 
to expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 3875. The letter further requested the 
appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be 
called. On that same date, the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security responded acknowledging the cooperation of 
the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure with respect 
to the consideration of H.R. 3875.
    The House considered H.R. 3875 under Suspension of the 
Rules on December 10, 2015, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 3785 was received in the Senate on December 14, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



STRENGTHENING CYBERSECURITY INFORMATION SHARING AND COORDINATION IN OUR 
                           PORTS ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 3878

To enhance cybersecurity information sharing and coordination 
at ports in the United States, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation dispels the ambiguity surrounding the U.S. 
Coast Guard's responsibility for cybersecurity at ports by 
requiring the Secretary of Homeland Security to develop and 
implement a model for maritime risk assessment with a focus on 
cybersecurity vulnerabilities at the Nation's ports. 
Additionally, in the process of analyzing the cybersecurity 
risks the legislation requires the Secretary to seek the 
participation of information sharing and analysis organizations 
along with the National and Area Maritime Security Advisory 
Committees.
Legislative History
    H.R. 3878 was introduced in the House on November 2, 2015, 
by Mrs. Torres and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security, and in addition to the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 3787 on November 4, 
2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3878 to the House on December 
15, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-379, Pt. I.
    The House considered H.R. 3878 under Suspension of the 
Rules on December 16, 2015, and passed the measure by voice 
vote.
    H.R. 3878 was received in the Senate on December 17, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.

                                ------                                



         COUNTERTERRORISM SCREENING AND ASSISTANCE ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 4314

To require a plan to combat international travel by terrorists 
and foreign fighters, accelerate the transfer of certain border 
security systems to foreign partner governments, establish 
minimum international border security standards, authorize the 
suspension of foreign assistance to countries not making 
significant efforts to comply with such minimum standards, and 
for other purposes.
Summary
    Since the attacks of September 11, 2001, the U.S. has spent 
billions of dollars to help our allies close security gaps that 
may allow terrorists and foreign fighters to travel 
internationally and avoid detection. However, the lack of a 
risk-based approach has increased the chances that gaps may 
still exist. Improving foreign-partner engagement to combat 
travel by terrorists and foreign fighters would help improve 
security beyond national borders to mitigate threats before 
they reach the U.S. and reduce overlap, waste and unnecessary 
duplication.
    H.R. 4314 requires the President to submit a plan to 
Congress to coordinate with foreign partners, catalogue 
existing border security capacity, and identify areas for 
improvement. The bill accelerated the transfer of certain 
nonlethal equipment and two border security systems--U.S. 
Customs and Border Protection's Automated Targeting System-
Global and the Department of State's Personal Identification 
Secure Comparison and Evaluation System--to foreign partner 
governments. Finally, the bill established minimum 
international border security standards, and authorized the 
suspension of non-humanitarian and nontrade-related foreign aid 
to countries which do not make significant efforts to comply 
with the minimum standards.
Legislative History
    H.R. 4314 was introduced in the House on January 5, 2016, 
by Mr. Zeldin, Mr. Katko, Ms. McSally, Mr. Loudermilk, Mr. Hurd 
of Texas, and Mr. Ratcliffe, and referred to the Committee on 
Foreign Affairs, and in addition to the Committee Homeland 
Security and the Committee on the Judiciary. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 4314 was referred to the Subcommittee on Border 
and Maritime Security.
    The Committee on Foreign Affairs considered H.R. 4314 on 
January 7, 2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the 
House, amended, by unanimous consent.
    The House agreed to Suspend the Rules on March 21, 2016, 
and passed H.R. 4314 as amended, by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 
371 yeas and 2 nays, (Roll No. 130).
    H.R. 4314 was received in the Senate on April 4, 2016, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Foreign 
Relations.

                                ------                                



              DHS HUMAN TRAFFICKING PREVENTION ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 4383

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to enhance 
Department of Homeland Security coordination on how to identify 
and record information regarding individuals suspected or 
convicted of human trafficking, and for other purposes.
Summary
    On January 4, 2016 the Department of Homeland Security 
(DHS) Office of the Inspector General released a report titled 
ICE and USCIS Could Improve Data Quality and Exchange to Help 
Identify Potential Human Trafficking Cases [OIG-16-17]. The 
report found that known human traffickers utilized work and 
fiance visas to bring victims into the United States legally, 
and discovered that data quality and exchange issues hindered 
efforts to combat human trafficking.
    Specifically, the OIG matched the Immigration and Custom 
Enforcement (ICE) database of information on known human 
traffickers against all available data on visa petitions 
submitted to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). 
While cooperation exists between USCIS and ICE in some human 
trafficking cases, more consistent data sharing and 
coordination could improve their ability to identify instances 
of human trafficking. Without concerted DHS efforts to collect 
and share information, substantial risk exists that human 
traffickers can continue to abuse other individuals.
    This legislation implements recommendations by the 
Inspector General for DHS components to establish procedures 
for identifying and recording information on individuals 
suspected or convicted of human trafficking, and procedures to 
routinely share such information on suspected or convicted of 
human trafficking with other components within the Department 
of Homeland Security.
Legislative History
    H.R. 4383 was introduced in the House on January 13, 2016, 
by Ms. Loretta Sanchez of California and Ms. McSally, and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and in addition 
to the Committee on the Judiciary. Within the Committee, H.R. 
4383 was referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime 
Security.
    On February 2, 2016, the Subcommittee on Border and 
Maritime was discharged from further consideration of H.R. 
4383.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4383 on February 2, 2016, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4383 to the House on December 
8, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-855, Pt. I. Subsequently, the Committee 
on the Judiciary was discharged from further consideration of 
H.R. 4383.

                                ------                                



          DHS ACQUISITION DOCUMENTATION INTEGRITY ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 4398

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to provide for 
requirements relating to documentation for major acquisition 
programs, and for other purposes.
Summary
    The purpose of H.R. 4398, the DHS Acquisition Documentation 
Integrity Act of 2016, requires the Secretary, acting through 
the Under Secretary for Management, to require relevant 
components to maintain specific types of acquisition 
documentation. This bill codifies a narrow set of authorities 
for the Secretary to waive those requirements in limited 
circumstances, which is a similar approach that exists in the 
Department of Defense.
Legislative History
    H.R. 4398 was introduced in the House on February 1, 2016, 
by Ms. Watson Coleman, and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4398 on February 3, 2016, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4398 to the House on February 
23, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-425.
    The House considered H.R. 4398 under Suspension of the 
Rules on February 23, 2016, and passed the measure by voice 
vote.
    H.R. 4398 was received in the Senate on February 24, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



        AMPLIFYING LOCAL EFFORTS TO ROOT OUT TERROR ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 4401

To authorize the Secretary of Homeland Security to provide 
countering violent extremism training to Department of Homeland 
Security representatives at State and local fusion centers, and 
for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation authorizes the Secretary of Homeland 
Security to provide representatives at State and local fusion 
centers with training on countering violent extremism in an 
effort to raise community awareness to stop individuals from 
being recruited to join overseas terrorist groups.
Legislative History
    H.R. 4401 was introduced in the House on February 1, 2016, 
by Mr. Loudermilk and 10 original cosponsors, and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4401 on February 2, 2016, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The House considered H.R. 4401 under Suspension of the 
Rules on February 29, 2016, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 4401 was received in the Senate on March 1, 2016, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The text of H.R. 4401, as passed by the House was included 
in Title I of H.R. 5471, as introduced. See also action taken 
on H.R. 5471 listed below).

                                ------                                



                   FOREIGN FIGHTER REVIEW ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 4402

To require a review of information regarding persons who have 
traveled or attempted to travel from the United States to 
support terrorist organizations in Syria and Iraq, and for 
other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation requires a review of information by 
individuals who have either traveled or attempted to travel to 
the support terrorist organizations in Syria or Iraq, with the 
goal of preventing further travel of U.S. persons to terror 
safe havens. This legislation further requires the President, 
through the Secretary of Homeland Security and other 
appropriate Federal Agencies, to review vulnerabilities in the 
system that have previously allowed for inspiring jihadist 
travel.
Legislative History
    H.R. 4402 was introduced in the House on February 1, 2016, 
by Mr. Hurd of Texas and eight original cosponsors, and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4402 on February 2, 2016, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4402 to the House on February 
23, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-423.
    The House considered H.R. 4402 under Suspension of the 
Rules on February 23, 2016, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 397 yeas and 0 nays, (Roll No. 84).
    H.R. 4402 was received in the Senate on February 24, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 4402, were included in Section 1907 of 
the Conference Report to accompany S. 2943, the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017. (See action 
taken on S. 2943, listed above).

                                ------                                



                ENHANCING OVERSEAS TRAVELER VETTING ACT

                               H.R. 4403

To authorize the development of open-source software based on 
certain systems of the Department of Homeland Security and the 
Department of State to facilitate the vetting of travelers 
against terrorist watchlists and law enforcement databases, 
enhance border management, and improve targeting and analysis, 
and for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation authorizes the development of open-source 
software based on certain systems of the Department of Homeland 
Security and the Department of State to facilitate the vetting 
of travelers against Federal law enforcement databases and 
terrorist watchlists, as well as enhancing border management 
targeting and analysis.
Legislative History
    H.R. 4403 was introduced in the House on February 1, 2016, 
by Mr. Hurd of Texas and eight original cosponsors, and 
referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs, and in addition 
to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4403 on February 2, 2016, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Foreign Affairs considered H.R. 4403 on 
February 24, and ordered the measure to be reported to the 
House with a favorable recommendation, without amendment.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 4403 to 
the House on April 11, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-480, Pt. I.
    The House considered H.R. 4403 on April 13, 2016, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 4403 was received in the Senate on April 14, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Foreign 
Relations.

                                ------                                



       TERRORIST AND FOREIGN FIGHTER TRAVEL EXERCISE ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 4404

To require an exercise related to terrorist and foreign fighter 
travel, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation requires the Secretary of Homeland 
Security to coordinate an exercise designed around the foreign 
fighter threat by testing all phases of extremist planning and 
travel with the purpose of determining how government partners 
and partners abroad respond to scenarios surrounding threat of 
the foreign fighter. The Secretary is to coordinate this 
exercise with the appropriate Federal Agencies to identify 
weaknesses at home and broad which may be exploited by foreign 
fighters and terrorists.
Legislative History
    H.R. 4404 was introduced in the House on February 1, 2016, 
by Ms. McSally and eight original cosponsors, and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4404 on February 2, 2016, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on March 9, 2016, agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 4404. The letter further requested the 
appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be 
called. The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded on March 11, 2016, acknowledging the cooperation of 
the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure with respect 
to the consideration of H.R. 4404.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4404 to the House on March 16, 
2016, as H. Rpt. 114-456.
    The House considered H.R. 4404 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 11, 2016, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    (See also action taken on H.R. 5611, listed below).

                                ------                                



              COUNTERTERRORISM ADVISORY BOARD ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 4407

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish in the 
Department of Homeland Security a board to coordinate and 
integrate departmental intelligence, activities, and policy 
related to counterterrorism, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-296) to establish a Counterterrorism Advisory 
Board (CTAB) within the Department of Homeland Security to both 
coordinate and integrate Departmental intelligence, activities, 
and policies related to counterterrorism within the Department. 
Upon completion of the final report of the Committee on 
Homeland Security's Task Force on Combating Terrorist and 
Foreign Fighter Travel in September 2015, the task force found 
that Congress should authorize the CTAB and ensure it is 
aligned with the current threat environment related to 
counterterrorism issues.
Legislative History
    H.R. 4407 was introduced in the House on February 1, 2016, 
by Mr. Loudermilk and 10 original cosponsors, and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4407 on February 2, 2016, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 4407 to 
the House on April 11, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-481.
    The House considered H.R. 4407 under Suspension of the 
Rules on May 16, 2016, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 389 yeas and 5 nays, (Roll No. 195).
    H.R. 4407 was received in the Senate on May 17, 2016, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The text of H.R. 4407, as passed by the House, was included 
in Title III of H.R. 5471, as introduced. For further action, 
see H.R. 5471.

                                ------                                



        NATIONAL STRATEGY TO COMBAT TERRORIST TRAVEL ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 4408

To require the development of a national strategy to combat 
terrorist travel, and for other purposes.
Summary
    The final report of the Committee on Homeland Security's 
Task Force on Combating Terrorist and Foreign Fighter Travel, 
published in September 2015, concluded that the United States 
Government lacks a comprehensive strategy for combating 
terrorist and foreign fighter travel. This legislation requires 
the President to submit a strategy to Congress that is focused 
on intercepting terrorists and foreign fighters in an effort to 
make their travel more difficult. The strategy is required to 
be reassessed in the first year of each Presidential term.
Legislative History
    H.R. 4408 was introduced in the House on February 1, 2016, 
by Mr. Katko and nine original cosponsors, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 4408 on February 2, 
2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4408 to the House on February 
23, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-424.
    The House considered H.R. 4408 under Suspension of the 
Rules on February 23, 2016, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 392 yeas and 0 nays, (Roll No. 83).
    H.R. 4408 was received in the Senate on February 24, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 4408 were included in Sec. 1908 of the 
Conference Report to accompany S. 2943, the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017. (See action taken on S. 
2943, listed above).

                                ------                                



        SOUTHWEST BORDER SECURITY THREAT ASSESSMENT ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 4482

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to prepare a 
southwest border threat analysis, and for other purposes.
Summary
    In May 2012, the U.S. Border Patrol released an updated 
five-year strategic plan, marking the first time the strategy 
had been updated since 2004 2014-2016 Border Patrol Strategic 
Plan The Mission: Protect America. According to the Border 
Patrol leadership, the updated Plan marked a shift in focus 
from being ``resource-based'' to ``risk-based.'' However, 
because of the evolving challenges and threats from drug 
cartels, large populations of migrants and child migrants 
looking to cross the border, and international terrorist 
organizations taking advantage of border security 
vulnerabilities, the Committee felt the updated strategy lacked 
critical elements for the Border Patrol to gauge its successes.
    H.R. 4482 directed the Secretary of the Department of 
Homeland Security to submit a threat analysis of the southwest 
border to Congress 180 days after enactment. The analysis shall 
include: An assessment of current and potential terrorism and 
criminal threats posed by individuals and organizations seeking 
to exploit border security vulnerabilities; an assessment of 
improvements needed between ports of entry to prevent 
terrorists and instruments of terror from entering the United 
States; an assessment of gaps in law, policy, and cooperation 
between State, local, or Tribal law enforcement, international 
agreements, or tribal agreements that hinder effective and 
efficient border security; an assessment of the current 
percentage of situational awareness achieved by the Department 
of Homeland Security of the international land and maritime 
borders of the United States; and an assessment of the current 
percentage of operational control achieved by the Department.
    In addition, H.R. 4482 directed the Chief of the Border 
Patrol to issue a Border Patrol Strategic Plan, updated every 
five years. The plan must include a threat assessment of the 
southwest border, efforts to increase situational awareness, 
and efforts to detect, prevent, and interdict terrorists, 
aliens, and illicit drugs.
Legislative History
    H.R. 4482 was introduced in the House on February 4, 2016, 
by Ms. McSally and 10 original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 4482 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime 
Security.
    The Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security was 
discharged from further consideration on March 23, 2016. The 
Full Committee considered H.R. 4482 on March 23, 2016, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 4482 to 
the House on April 13, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-492.
    The House considered H.R. 4482 on April 13, 2016, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 4482 was received in the Senate on April 14, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



            STATE AND HIGH-RISK URBAN AREA WORKING GROUP ACT

                               H.R. 4509

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to clarify 
membership of State planning committees or urban area working 
groups for the Homeland Security Grant Program, and for other 
purposes.
Summary
     The Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 107-296) 
requires States and urban areas that receive State Homeland 
Security Grant Program and Urban Areas Security Initiative 
funds to have planning committees to determine how to 
efficiently and effectively expend these funds. H.R. 4509 
expands the stakeholders required to be involved in these 
committees to include representatives from public health, 
educational institutions, fusion centers, and interoperability 
coordinators, where appropriate.
Legislative History
    H.R. 4509 was introduced in the House on February 9, 2016, 
by Mr. Payne and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 4509 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications.
    The Subcommittee on Emergency Response and Communications 
was discharged from further consideration on March 23, 2016. 
The Full Committee considered H.R. 4509 on March 23, 2016, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 4509 to 
the House on April 13, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-491.
    The House considered H.R. 4509 on April 13, 2016, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 4509 was received in the Senate on April 14, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 4509 were included in Section 1911 of 
the Conference Report to accompany S. 2943, the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017. (See action 
taken on S. 2943, listed above).

                                ------                                



           TREATING SMALL AIRPORTS WITH FAIRNESS ACT OF 2016

                          H.R. 4549 (S. 2549)

To require the Transportation Security Administration to 
conduct security screening at certain airports, and for other 
purposes.
Summary
    This bill returns security screening and personnel to 
airports that have had been denied by the Transportation 
Security Administration (TSA) after temporary gaps in 
commercial air service. The TSA has stated they have no 
requirement under law to return this needed service, and 
instead has directed the airports to allow passengers to fly 
unscreened to their next destination, and undergo reverse 
security screening there. This poses serious security issues, 
and would increase travel time and costs for passengers. 
According to local officials and the commercial airlines hoping 
to return service to these small airports, this is not a 
feasible option due to the security concerns of 30 passengers 
flying unscreened to a major metropolitan area, the added 
travel time caused by using a shuttle bus to reach the front of 
the airport for screening, and other logistical challenges.
    H.R. 4549 requires the TSA to provide the necessary staff 
and screening equipment to any airport that lost commercial air 
service on or after January 1, 2013, if the operator submits a 
request for security screening to the Administrator and a 
written confirmation of a commitment from a commercial air 
carrier that such carrier intends to resume commercial air 
service at such airport not later than one year after the date 
that the operator submitted a request for security screening to 
the Administrator. This bill also requires the Administrator to 
ensure that security screening is implemented by the TSA at an 
airport not later than the later of 90 days after the airport 
operator submits a request for such screening or the date which 
the commercial air carrier that is the subject of such request 
intends to resume commercial air service at such airport.
Legislative History
H.R. 4549
    H.R. 4549 was introduced in the House on February 11, 2016, 
by Mr. Walden, Mr. Hurd of Texas, Mrs. Lummis, Mr. DeFazio, and 
Mr. Kilmer and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 4549 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    The Subcommittee on Transportation Security was discharged 
from further consideration on March 23, 2016. The Full 
Committee considered H.R. 4549 on March 23, 2016, and ordered 
the measure to be reported to the House with a favorable 
recommendation, as amended, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 4549 to 
the House on April 13, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-493.
    The House considered H.R. 4549 on April 13, 2016, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 4549 was received in the Senate on April 14, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.

S. 2549
    S. 2549, the Senate companion measure, was introduced in 
the Senate on February 11, 2016, by Mr. Merkley, Mr. Barrasso, 
Mr. Enzi, Mr. Wyden, and Mr. Hatch and referred to the 
Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.

                                ------                                



   SECURING AVIATION FROM FOREIGN ENTRY POINTS AND GUARDING AIRPORTS 
                 THROUGH ENHANCED SECURITY ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 4698

To enhance aviation by requiring airport security assessments 
and a security coordination enhancement plan, and for other 
purposes.
Summary
    This bill directs the Transportation Security 
Administration (TSA) of the Department of Homeland Security to 
conduct a comprehensive security risk assessment of all last 
point of departure airports with nonstop flights to the United 
States. This legislation also allows TSA to donate security 
screening equipment to a foreign last point of departure 
airport operator and will require TSA submit to the Government 
Accountability Office and Congress a plan that assesses TSA's 
ability to work with foreign government entities to allow TSA 
representatives conduct inspections of foreign airports without 
advance notice; and enhances collaboration and information-
sharing about international inbound-aviation between the U.S. 
and foreign and domestic partners to enhance security 
capabilities at foreign airports.
Legislative History
    H.R. 4698 was introduced in the House on March 3, 2016, by 
Mr. Katko, Mr. McCaul, Mr. Keating, Mr. Donovan, and Mr. King 
of New York and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 4698 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    The Chair discharged the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security from further consideration of H.R. 4698 on March 23, 
2016.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 4698 on March 23, 2016, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4698 to the House on April 21, 
2016, as H. Rpt. 114-513.
    The House considered H.R. 4698 under Suspension of the 
Rules on April 26, 2016, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 4698 was received in the Senate on April 27, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    Provisions of H.R. 4698 were included in the Title II, 
Subtitle B of H.R. 636. (See also, action on H.R. 636, listed 
above.)

                                ------                                



       NATIONAL CYBERSECURITY PREPAREDNESS CONSORTIUM ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 4743

To authorize the Secretary of Homeland Security to work with 
cybersecurity consortia for training, and for other purposes.
[To authorize the Secretary of Homeland Security to establish a 
National Cybersecurity Preparedness Consortium, and for other 
purposes.]
Summary
    To support efforts to address cybersecurity risks and 
incidents, this legislation authorizes the Department of 
Homeland Security to work with consortia including the National 
Cybersecurity Preparedness Consortium (NCPC or the Consortium), 
which currently provides State and local communities with tools 
to prevent, detect, respond to, and recover from cyber attacks 
as they would any other disaster or emergency situation. The 
Consortium also evaluates communities' cybersecurity posture 
and provides them with a roadmap to correct deficiencies in the 
security of their information systems. Based out of the 
University of Texas San Antonio's Center for Infrastructure 
Assurance and Security, the NCPC has members located throughout 
the Nation, including: The Criminal Justice Institute at the 
University of Arkansas; the University of Memphis Center for 
Information Assurance; the Norwich University Applied Research 
Institutes; and the Texas A&M; Engineering Extension Service.
    The Department may also engage consortia to assist the 
National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center 
(NCCIC) in providing training to State and local first 
responders in preparing for and responding to cybersecurity 
risks and incidents. The NCCIC is the central location within 
the Department where cyber operations are conducted.
Legislative History
    H.R. 4743 was introduced in the House on March 15, 2016, by 
Mr. Castro of Texas, Mr. Richmond, Mr. Hurd of Texas, Mr. 
Doggett, Mr. Cuellar, Mr. Smith of Texas, and Mr. Welch and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 4743 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
Technologies.
    The Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies was discharged from 
further consideration of H.R. 4743 on April 28, 2016. Full 
Committee considered H.R. 4743 on April 28, 2016, and ordered 
the measure to be reported to the House with a favorable 
recommendation, as amended, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4743 to the House on May 13, 
2016, as H. Rpt. 114-565.
    The House considered H.R. 4743 under Suspension of the 
Rules on May 16, 2016, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 394 yeas and 3 nays, (Roll No. 194).
    H.R. 4743 was received in the Senate on May 17, 2016, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY STRATEGY FOR INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS ACT

                               H.R. 4780

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to develop a 
comprehensive strategy for Department of Homeland Security 
operations abroad, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation requires the Secretary of Homeland 
Security to create a comprehensive three-year strategy for 
international programs related to vetting and screening persons 
seeking to enter the United States. The strategy is required to 
include: specific Departmental risk-based goals for 
international programs; a risk-based method for determining 
whether to establish new international programs in new 
locations; and an alignment with the highest DHS-wide and 
government-wide strategic priorities of resource allocations. 
When considering the strategy, the Secretary must consider 
information on existing Departmental operations and an analysis 
of the impact of each such international program on domestic 
activities.
Legislative History
    H.R. 4780 was introduced in the House on March 17, 2016, by 
Mr. Thompson of Mississippi and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 4780 on March 23, 2016, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4780 to the House on May 13, 
2016, as H. Rpt. 114-566.
    The House considered H.R. 4780 under Suspension of the 
Rules on May 16, 2016, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 4780 was received in the Senate on May 17, 2016, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 4780 were included in Sec. 1910 of the 
Conference Report to accompany S. 2943. (See action taken on S. 
2943, listed above).

                                ------                                



                 DHS STOP ASSET AND VEHICLE EXCESS ACT

                               H.R. 4785

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to direct the Under 
Secretary for Management of the Department of Homeland Security 
to make certain improvements in managing the Department's 
vehicle fleet, and for other purposes.
Summary
    The purpose of H.R. 4785 is to improve the management of 
the Department of Homeland Security's vehicle fleet. H.R. 4785 
contains four specific elements that address significant 
challenges the Department faces with managing the second 
largest civilian vehicle fleet in the Federal Government. 
Specifically, this bill establishes: Authority at the 
headquarters level over component vehicle fleets; requirements 
for components to more rigorously evaluate their fleets on an 
ongoing basis; penalties if components do not spend taxpayer 
dollars prudently; and a requirement for the Department to 
identify alternative methods for managing component vehicle 
fleets.
Legislative History
    H.R. 4785 was introduced in the House on March 17, 2016, by 
Mr. Perry, Mr. McCaul, and Mrs. Watson Coleman and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 4785 on March 23, 2016, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 4785 to 
the House on April 14, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-494.
    The House considered H.R. 4785 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 11, 2016, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 4785 was received in the Senate, read twice, and 
referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



              COMBATING TERRORIST RECRUITMENT ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 4820

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to use the 
testimonials of former or estranged violent extremists or their 
associates in order to counter terrorist recruitment, and for 
other purposes.
[To authorize the Secretary of Homeland Security to provide 
countering violent extremism training to Department of Homeland 
Security representatives at State and local fusion centers, and 
for other purposes.]
Summary
    In an effort to create a comprehensive response to the 
propaganda of terrorist organizations, H.R.4820 attempts to 
counter terrorist recruitment and dissuade citizens from 
joining extremist groups. This legislation requires the 
Secretary of Homeland Security to utilize the testimonials of 
former and estranged violent extremists or their associates to 
counter the statements made by terrorists. The legislation 
provides the Secretary of Homeland Security with flexibility to 
combat that varying terrorist groups threatening the United 
States both in America and abroad.
Legislative History
    H.R. 4280 was introduced in the House on March 21, 2016, by 
Mr. Fleischmann and seven original cosponsors and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 4820 on March 23, 2016, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4820 to the House, as amended, 
on April 26, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-525.
    The House considered H.R. 4820 under Suspension of the 
Rules on April 26, 2016, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 322 yeas and 79 nays, (Roll No. 164). The 
title of the measure was amended so as to read ``To authorize 
the Secretary of Homeland Security to provide countering 
violent extremism training to Department of Homeland Security 
representatives at State and local fusion centers, and for 
other purposes.''
    H.R. 4820 was received in the Senate on April 27, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The text of H.R. 4820, as passed by the House was included 
in Title II of H.R. 5471, as introduced. (See action taken on 
H.R. 5471, listed below).

                                ------                                



       AIRPORT PERIMETER AND ACCESS CONTROL SECURITY ACT OF 2016

                                H.R. 5056

To modernize and enhance airport perimeter and access control 
security by requiring updated risk assessments and the 
development of security strategies, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This measure requires the Administrator of the 
Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to update both the 
Transportation Sector Security Risk Assessment (TSSRA) and the 
Comprehensive Risk Assessment of Perimeter and Access Control 
Security. The bill directs the Administrator to develop 
timeframes for additional updates and complete a sector-wide 
assessment of airport access controls and perimeter security. 
This assessment is required to incorporate the updates to the 
TSSRA, as well as findings from the Joint Vulnerability 
Assessment. Additionally, the Administrator is required to 
include consideration of the overall airport risk environment, 
specific security even data, trend analysis, and existing best 
practices utilized by airports to mitigate security risks.
    In addition to the comprehensive assessment and report 
updates, the legislation requires the Administrator to update 
the National Strategy for Airport Perimeter and Access Control 
Security to include the results of the comprehensive risk 
assessments, as well as information on airport security 
activities, the status of TSA's own security initiatives, 
stakeholder input, and outcome-based performance goals and 
objectives.
Legislative History
    H.R. 5056 was introduced in the House on April 26, 2015, by 
Mr. Keating and six original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5056 on April 28, 2016, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by unanimous 
consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5056 to the House on July 1, 
2016, as H. Rpt. 114-653.
    The House considered H.R. 5056 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 11, 2016, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 5056 was received in the Senate on July 12, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.

                                ------                                



          IMPROVING SMALL BUSINESS CYBER SECURITY ACT OF 2016

                          H.R. 5064 (S. 3024)

To amend the Small Business Act to allow small business 
development centers to assist and advise small business 
concerns on relevant cyber security matters, and for other 
purposes.
Summary
    This legislation amends the Small Business Act and provides 
Small Business Development Centers (SBDC) with tools, 
resources, and expert guidance to enable these SBDCs to utilize 
and leverage existing Federal cyber resources in order to more 
effectively meet the information security needs of small 
businesses and the National and economic security needs of the 
United States.
    The legislation improves small business cybersecurity by 
leveraging existing Federal programs, as well as the expertise 
of nearly 1,000 SBDCs around the country to streamline cyber 
support for small businesses. It specifically amends the Small 
Business Act (15 U.S.C. 631 et seq.; 72 Stat. 384 et seq.) and 
the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 107-296) to allow 
the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and any other 
Federal Department or agency coordinating with DHS, to provide 
information on cybersecurity risks and other cyber-related 
assistance to SBDCs as they help small businesses develop or 
enhance cybersecurity infrastructure, threat awareness, and 
training programs. Further, the Small Business Administration 
(SBA) and the Department are required to jointly develop a 
strategy to provide guidance to SBDCs on how they can leverage 
existing Federal resources to provide better access to much-
needed cyber support services. To the extent practicable, SBDCs 
must offer cybersecurity specialists to counsel, assist, and 
inform small business clients, and the SBA Administrator is 
authorized to award SBDC grants in furtherance of the cyber 
strategy.
    Further, the legislation requires the Government 
Accountability Office to review current cybersecurity programs 
at the Federal level aimed at providing assistance to small 
businesses. The review will include an assessment of the wide 
utilization of existing resources by small businesses, whether 
they are duplicative of other resources, and whether they could 
be better structured to improve accessibility and 
effectiveness.
Legislative History
H.R. 5064
    H.R. 5064 was introduced in the House on April 26, 2016, by 
Mr. Hanna and 12 original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Small Business and in addition to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 5064 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5064 on June 8, 2016, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5064 to the House on July 1, 
2016, as H. Rpt. 114-654, Pt. I.
    Provisions of H.R. 5064, were included in Secs. 1841 and 
1843 of the Conference Report to accompany S. 2943, the 
National Defense Authorization Act of 2017. (See also action on 
S. 2943 listed above).

S. 3024
    S. 3024, the Senate companion measure, was introduced in 
the Senate on June 6, 2016, by Mr. Vitter and Mr. Peters and 
referred to the Senate Committee on Small Business and 
Entrepreneurship.
    The Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship 
considered S. 2034 on June 9, 2016, and ordered the measure to 
be reported to the Senate without amendment.

                                ------                                



               STRONG VISA INTEGRITY SECURES AMERICA ACT

                               H.R. 5253

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 and the Immigration 
and Nationality Act to improve visa security, visa applicant 
vetting, and for other purposes.
Summary
    H.R. 5253 takes the necessary steps to address potential 
security gaps to strengthen counterterror vetting and screening 
of individuals applying for entry into the United States. This 
bill increases the number of Immigration and Custom Enforcement 
(ICE) Visa Security Units (VSU) from 26 to no fewer than 50. 
This allows specially trained investigators to conduct in-depth 
reviews of high-risk visa applicants.
    While there are more than 220 visa issuing posts around the 
world, each VSU costs an estimated $2.7 million, making it 
nearly impossible to place one at each consular post. 
Therefore, the bill also expanded the Pre-Adjudicated Threat 
Recognition Intelligence Operations Team (PATRIOT) program, 
which conducts security checks remotely, to an additional 50 
locations. This allowed visa issuing posts with limited space 
or insufficient workload the benefits of certain visa security 
vetting activities in the absence of a VSU.
Legislative History
    H.R. 5253 was introduced in the House on May 16, 2016, by 
Mr. Hurd of Texas, Mr. McCaul, Mrs. Miller of Michigan, Mr. 
King of New York, Mr. Katko, and Ms. McSally and referred to 
the Committee on the Judiciary and in addition to the Committee 
on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 5253 was 
referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security.
    The Chair discharged the Subcommittee on Border and 
Maritime Security from further consideration of H.R. 5253 on 
June 8, 2016.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5253 on June 8, 2016, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5253 to the House on December 
8, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-851.

                                ------                                



           CHECKPOINT OPTIMIZATION AND EFFICIENCY ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 5338

To reduce passenger wait times at airports, and for other 
purposes.
Summary
    This bill allows for the assessment of staffing model of 
the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to determine 
whether those staffing positions that are necessary, including 
canine explosives detection technology and teams, for all 
airports in the U.S. where TSA controls passenger checkpoints. 
In addition, this legislation requires: TSA Behavior Detection 
Officers be present at baggage and passenger screening areas, 
including PreCheck lanes; increases efforts to ensure the 
public understands the TSA PreCheck program; and requests the 
Aviation Security Advisory Committee submit recommendations on 
best practices for checkpoint operations optimization.
Legislative History
    H.R. 5338 was introduced in the House on May 26, 2016, by 
Mr. Katko and nine original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 5338 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    The House agreed to Suspend the Rules on June 7, 2016, and 
passed H.R. 5338, as amended, by voice vote.
    H.R. 5338 was received in the Senate on June 8, 2016, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    Provisions of H.R. 5338 were included in Subtitle A of 
Title II of H.R. 636 as passed by the House amendment to the 
Senate amendment to H.R. 636. (See action taken on H.R. 636, 
listed above).

                                ------                                



                 SECURING OUR AGRICULTURE AND FOOD ACT

                               H.R. 5346

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to make the 
Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security for Health Affairs 
responsible for coordinating the efforts of the Department of 
Homeland Security related to food, agriculture, and veterinary 
defense against terrorism, and for other purposes.
Summary
    H.R. 5346 amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to 
authorize a program to coordinate the Department of Homeland 
Security's efforts related to food, agriculture, and veterinary 
defense from acts of terrorism and other high-consequence 
events that pose a high risk to homeland security.
Legislative History
    H.R. 5346 was introduced in the House on May 26, 2016, by 
Mr, Young of Iowa and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security, and in addition to the Committee on Energy and 
Commerce and the Committee on Agriculture. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 5346 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications.
    On June 16, 2016, the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Communications, Preparedness, and Response considered H.R. 5346 
and reported the measure to the Full Committee, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Agriculture sent a letter to 
the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on September 6, 
2016, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration on the 
House Floor, the Committee on Agriculture would waive its right 
to consider H.R. 5346.
    The Chair of the Committee on Energy and Commerce sent a 
letter to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on 
September 14, 2016, agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on Energy and 
Commerce would waive its right to consider H.R. 5346. On that 
same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded acknowledging the agreement by the Committee on 
Energy and Commerce to forgo consideration of H.R. 5346, and 
the agreement to support the appointment of Conferees should a 
House-Senate Conference be called.
    The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded 
to the Chair of the Committee on Agriculture on September 14, 
2016, acknowledging an agreement by the Committee on 
Agriculture to forgo consideration of H.R. 5346, and the 
agreement to support the appointment of Conferees should a 
House-Senate Conference be called.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5346 on September 15, 
2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 5346 to 
the House on September 19, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-755, Pt. I. 
Subsequently, the Committee on Energy and Commerce and the 
Committee on Agriculture were discharged from further 
consideration of H.R. 5346.
    The House considered H.R. 5346 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 26, 2016, and passed the measure by voice 
vote.
    H.R. 5346 was received in the Senate on September 27, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



 QUADRENNIAL HOMELAND SECURITY REVIEW TECHNICAL CORRECTION ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 5385

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to make technical 
corrections to the requirement that the Secretary of Homeland 
Security submit quadrennial homeland security reviews, and for 
other purposes.
Summary
    The purpose of H.R. 5385 is to make changes to the 
requirements outlined in the production of the Quadrennial 
Homeland Security Review (QHSR). Namely, this bill requires the 
Department of Homeland Security to conduct a risk assessment to 
inform the QHSR, and to maintain all documentation regarding 
the QHSR, including, but not limited to: All written 
communications sent out by the Secretary and feedback submitted 
to the Secretary; information on how feedback received by the 
Secretary informed the QHSR; and information regarding the risk 
assessment. The elements in this bill will better allow 
Congress to conduct oversight over the Department.
Legislative History
    H.R. 5385 was introduced in the House on June 7, 2016, by 
Mrs. Watson Coleman and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5385 on June 8, 2016, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5385 to the House on July 5, 
2016, as H. Rpt. 114-662.
    The House considered H.R. 4785 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 11, 2016, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 4785 was received in the Senate on July 12, 2016, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



                SUPPORT FOR RAPID INNOVATION ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 5388

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to provide for 
innovative research and development, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-296) to provide for innovative research and 
development by requiring the Under Secretary for Science and 
Technology (S&T;) to support cybersecurity research, 
development, testing, evaluation and transition and to 
coordinate those activities with other Federal agencies, 
industry, and academia. In service to the components of the 
Department of Homeland Security, the Under Secretary is 
required to: advance the development and deployment of secure 
information systems; improve and create technologies to detect 
attacks or intrusions; improve and create mitigation and 
recovery methodologies; support the review of source code that 
underpins critical infrastructure information systems in 
coordination with the private sector; develop and support tools 
to support cybersecurity research and development efforts; 
assist the development of technologies to reduce 
vulnerabilities in industrial control systems; and develop and 
support forensics and attack attribution capabilities.
    The legislation also requires the Under Secretary to 
support the full life cycle of cyber research and development 
projects, identify mature technologies that address existing or 
imminent cybersecurity gaps, and introduce new cybersecurity 
technologies throughout the homeland security enterprise 
through partnerships and commercialization. The Under Secretary 
is directed to target Federally funded cybersecurity research 
that demonstrates a high probability of successful transition 
to the commercial market within two years.
    This bill also extends the timeframe for the Secretary to 
exercise Other Transaction Authority (OTA) until 2020. If the 
head of a component seeks to have funds expended under OTA, the 
Secretary must provide prior approval after evaluating the 
component's proposal which must include the rationale, funds to 
be spent, and expected outcomes of the project. The Secretary 
is required to submit an annual report to Congress detailing 
those projects for which OTA was authorized.
    Ensuring there are mechanisms in place like S&T;'s 
cybersecurity research and development programs and OTA to 
support the dynamic nature of cybersecurity research and 
development is essential for addressing homeland security 
capability gaps.
Legislative History
    H.R. 5388 was introduced in the House on June 7, 2016, by 
Mr. Ratcliffe and Mr. McCaul, and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5388 on June 8, 2016, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on June 20, 2016, agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 5388. The letter further requested the support 
for Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be called. On 
that same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded, concurring in the agreement to not seek a sequential 
referral and the request for the appointment of Conferees 
should a House-Senate Conference be called.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5388 to the House on June 21, 
2016, as H. Rpt. 114-629.
    The House considered H.R. 5388 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 21, 2016, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 351 yeas and 4 nays, (Roll No. 335).
    Provisions of H.R. 5388 were included in the Title II 
Subtitle C of H.R. 636. (See action taken on H.R. 636, listed 
above.)

                                ------                                



              LEVERAGING EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 5389

To encourage engagement between the Department of Homeland 
Security and technology innovators, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation encourages engagement between the 
Department of Homeland Security and technology innovators. The 
bill requires the Secretary of Homeland Security to engage with 
innovative and emerging technology developers and firms, 
including technology-based small businesses and startup 
ventures, to address homeland security needs. The Secretary may 
also identify geographic areas in the United States where high 
concentrations of innovative and emerging technology developers 
and firms exist. H.R. 5389 allows the Secretary to establish 
personnel and office space in these areas, as appropriate. 
Finally, the bill requires the Secretary to develop, implement, 
and submit a strategy to proactively engage innovative and 
emerging technology developers and firms with guidance on 
building and sustaining relationships with such innovator.
    The Department's ability to engage regional and national 
thought leaders across the country and establish a presence in 
a similar manner that has been done via its establishment of an 
office in Silicon Valley will help it target investments and 
promote proven technologies that address homeland security 
needs. Requiring the Department to strategically consider how 
to engage these technology developers across the country will 
strengthen the Department's ability to access innovative and 
emerging technologies in order to combat evolving threats. This 
legislation is intended to ensure that DHS fosters sustainable 
systems, policies and procedures to maintain strong engagement 
with innovative and emerging technology developers and firms 
that continue over time
Legislative History
    H.R. 5389 was introduced in the House on June 7, 2016, by 
Mr. Ratcliffe, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. Thompson of Mississippi and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5389 on June 8, 2016, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology would not seek a sequential referral of 
H.R. 5389. The letter further requested the support for 
Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be called. On that 
same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded, concurring in the agreement to not seek a sequential 
referral and the request for the appointment of Conferees 
should a House-Senate Conference be called.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5389 to the House on June 21, 
2016, as H. Rpt. 114-630.
    The House considered H.R. 5389 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 21, 2016, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 347 yeas and 8 nays, (Roll No. 336).
    H.R. 5389 was received in the Senate on June 22, 2016, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



          CYBERSECURITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION AGENCY 
                              ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 5390

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to authorize the 
Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Protection Agency of the 
Department of Homeland Security, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-295) to redesignate the Department of Homeland 
Security's (DHS's) National Protection and Programs Directorate 
as the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Protection Agency 
(CIPA) to be headed by a Director of National Cybersecurity, 
which will be appointed by the President with the Senate's 
consent. The Director of National Cybersecurity will lead 
National efforts to protect and enhance the security and 
resilience of U.S. cyber and critical infrastructure.
    H.R. 5390 reorganizes DHS components and subcomponents into 
the following divisions: The Cybersecurity Division; the 
Infrastructure Protection Division; the Emergency 
Communications Division; and the Federal Protective Service. 
The Agency would carry out DHS' responsibility to secure high 
risk chemical facilities against the threat of terrorism under 
6 U.S.C 621, title XXI of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 and 
regulate the sale and transfer of ammonium nitrate, pursuant to 
6 U.S.C. 488, title J of title VIII of the Homeland Security 
Act of 2002. This legislation also establishes an Office of 
Biometric Identity Managementis within the Department.
Legislative History
    H.R. 5390 was introduced in the House on June 7, 2016, by 
Mr. McCaul, Mr. Ratcliffe, and Ms. Jackson Lee and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security, and in addition to the 
Committee on Energy and Commerce, the Committee on Oversight 
and Government Reform, and the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5390 on June 8, 2016, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.

                                ------                                



           GAINS IN GLOBAL NUCLEAR DETECTION ARCHITECTURE ACT

                               H.R. 5391

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to enhance certain 
duties of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, and for other 
purposes.
Summary
    Preventing terrorists from smuggling nuclear or 
radiological material to carry out an attack in the United 
States is a top national priority. The Department of Homeland 
Security's Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) mission is 
to improve capabilities to deter, detect, respond to, and 
attribute responsibility for nuclear terrorist attacks, in 
coordination with domestic and international partners. As part 
of this mission, DNDO conducts research and development on 
radiation and nuclear detection devices.
    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-295), to direct the DNDO to develop and maintain 
documentation that provides information on how the Office's 
research investments align with gaps in the Global Nuclear 
Detection Architecture (GNDA) and the research challenges 
identified by the DNDO Director. It further directs DNDO to 
document the rationale for selecting research topics and to 
develop a systematic approach for evaluating how the outcomes 
of the Office's individual research projects collectively 
contribute to addressing the research challenges.
Legislative History
    H.R. 5391 was introduced in the House on June 8, 2016, by 
Mr. Richmond and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5391 on June 8, 2016, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5391 to the House on July 1, 
2016, as H. Rpt. 114-652.
    The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security sent a 
letter to the Speaker of the House on September 8, 2016, 
expressing disagreement to a jurisdictional claim by the 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology over H.R. 5391.
    The House considered H.R. 5391 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 27, 2016, and passed the measure, as 
amended, by voice vote.
    H.R. 5391 was received in the Senate on September 28, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



                     CYBER PREPAREDNESS ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 5459

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to enhance 
preparedness and response capabilities for cyber attacks, 
bolster the dissemination of homeland security information 
related to cyber threats, and for other purposes.
Summary
    H.R. 5459 seeks to enhance preparedness and response 
capabilities for cyber attacks and bolster the sharing of 
information related to cyber threats. The bill includes, as a 
function of the National Cybersecurity and Communications 
Integration Center (NCCIC), sharing information about cyber 
best practices, in addition to the sharing of cyber threat 
indicators and defensive measures currently required by law. 
The bill also authorizes representatives from State and major 
urban area fusion centers, as defined in the bill, to be 
assigned to the NCCIC, similar to the assignment of 
representatives from information sharing and analysis centers 
(ISACs) permitted under current law.
    H.R. 5459 authorizes the use of State Homeland Security 
Grant Program and Urban Area Security Initiative funds for 
cybersecurity enhancements. Cyber expenditures are currently 
allowable under yearly grant guidance for these programs and 
this section will codify the authorization to highlight the 
importance of these expenditures and ensure they continue to be 
allowable.
    Finally, H.R. 5459 expresses the sense of Congress that the 
Department of Homeland Security should work to lessen the 
classification level or provide information in an unclassified 
form, as practicable, to enable greater sharing of actionable 
intelligence related to cyber threats.
Legislative History
    H.R. 5459 was introduced in the House on June 13, 2016, by 
Mr. Donovan, Mr. McCaul, Mr. Ratcliffe, and Mr. Payne, and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 5459 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
Technologies and the Subcommittee on Emergency Preapredness, 
Response, and Communications.
    The Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications considered H.R. 5459 on June 14, 2016, and 
passed the measure, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies was discharged from 
further consideration of H.R. 5459 on September 14, 2016.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5459 on September 14, 
2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5459 to the House on September 
19, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-756.
    The House considered H.R. 5459 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 26, 2016, and passed the measure by voice 
vote.
    H.R. 5459 was received in the Senate on September 27, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


         FIRST RESPONDER ACCESS TO INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES ACT

                               H.R. 5460

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish a 
review process to review applications for certain grants to 
purchase equipment or systems that do not meet or exceed any 
applicable national voluntary consensus standards, and for 
other purposes.
Summary
    This measure amends Subsection (f) of section 2008 of the 
Home*land Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 609) by adding at the 
end a re*view process for applications seeking to purchase 
equipment or sys*tems that do not meet or exceed applicable 
national voluntary con*sensus standards using funds from the 
Urban Area Security Initia*tive or the State Homeland Security 
Grant Program. This bill addresses complaints raised by 
stakeholder groups that Federal Emergency Management Agency 
lacks a uniform, predictable, and transparent process to review 
grantee requests to use grant funding to purchase equipment 
that does not meet or exceed voluntary consensus standards or 
for which no voluntary consensus standard exists.
Legislative History
    H.R. 5460 was introduced in the House on June 13, 2016, by 
Mr. Payne and Mr. Donovan, and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 5460 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications.
    On June 16, 2016, the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Communications, Preparedness, and Response considered H.R. 5460 
and reported the measure to the Full Committee, without 
amendment, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5460 on September 16, 
2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5460 to the House on September 
26, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-788.
    The House considered H.R. 5460 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 26, 2016, and passed the measure by voice 
vote.
    H.R. 5460 was received in the Senate on September 27, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



                COUNTERING TERRORIST RADICALIZATION ACT

            H.R. 5471 (H.R. 4401, H.R. 4407, and H.R. 4820)

To combat terrorist recruitment in the United States, and for 
other purposes.
Summary
    This bill authorizes the Department of Homeland Security 
(DHS) to provide training at State and major urban area fusion 
centers to increase awareness of and more quickly identify 
terrorism threats--including the travel or attempted travel of 
individuals from the United States to support a foreign 
terrorist organization abroad--and counter violent extremism. 
It also authorizes DHS incorporate the public testimonials of 
former extremists into its efforts to combat terrorist 
recruitment, and authorizes the Department's Counterterrorism 
Advisory Board.
Legislative History
    H.R. 5471 was introduced in the House on June 14, 2016, by 
Mr. McCaul, Mr. Loudermilk, Mr. Fleischmann, and Mr. Katko and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    As introduced, H.R. 5471 contains provisions of the 
following measures as passed by the House: H.R. 4001, H.R. 
4407, and H.R. 4820. For prior action see the action on those 
measures, listed above
    The House considered H.R. 5471 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 16, 2016, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 402 yeas and 15 nays, (Roll No. 333).
    H.R. 5471 was received in the Senate on June 20, 2016, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



                    HOMELAND SAFETY AND SECURITY ACT

                               H.R. 5611

To prevent terrorists from launching attacks and obtaining 
passports, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This bill authorizes and Office for Partnerships to Prevent 
Terrorism within the Department of Homeland Security to counter 
radical Islamist terrorism and recruitment, and outlines the 
responsibilities of that office, to include the creation of a 
Department-wide strategy. This bill also amends the federal 
criminal code to authorize the Department of Justice to notify 
and authorize law enforcement agencies or intelligence services 
to delay for up to three business days the transfer of a 
firearm or explosive to a person being investigated, or who 
during the past five years has been investigated, as a known or 
suspected terrorist.
    This bill also refines the national exercise program 
outlined in the Post-Katrina Emergency Management Reform Act of 
2006 (Title VI of Pub. L. 109-295, the Department of Homeland 
Security Appropriations Act, 2007).
Legislative History
    H.R. 5611 was introduced in the House on July 1, 2016, by 
Mr. McCarthy and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security, and in addition to the Committee on the Judiciary and 
the Committee on Foreign Affairs.
    As introduced, Section 2 of H.R. 5611 contains provisions 
related to H.R. 2899; Sec. 3 and 4 contains the text of H.R. 
4404. (See also action on H.R. 2899 and H.R. 4404, listed 
above).

                                ------                                



                   CUBAN AIRPORT SECURITY ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 5728

To prohibit scheduled passenger air transportation between the 
United States and Cuba until a study has been completed 
regarding security measures and equipment at Cuba's airports, 
to amend title 49, United States Code, to clarify the role of 
the Secretary of Homeland Security regarding security standards 
at foreign airports, and for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation requires the Administrator of the 
Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to submit to the 
relevant Congressional committees a report detailing the 
following security measures at each of Cuba's ten international 
airports: Information about the type of equipment used at 
screening checkpoints and an analysis of such equipment's 
capability and weaknesses; information about each airport's 
canine program; the frequency of training for screening and 
security personnel; access controls in place to ensure only 
credentialed personnel have access to the secure and sterile 
areas of such airports; an assessment of the ability of known 
or suspected terrorists to use Cuba as a gateway to enter the 
United States; airport perimeter security; a mitigation 
assessment regarding Man Portable Air Defense Systems; the 
vetting practices and procedures for airport employees; and any 
other information determined relevant to the security 
practices, procedures and equipment in place at such airports.
Legislative History
    H.R. 5728 was introduced in the House on July 14, 2016, by 
Mr. Katko, Mr. McCaul, Mr. Hudson, and Mr. Cuellar and referred 
to the Committee on Homeland Security and the Committee on 
Foreign Affairs. Within the Committee, H.R. 5728 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    The Subcommittee on Transportation Security was discharged 
from further consideration of H.R. 5728 on September 14, 2016.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5728 on September 14, 
2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.

                                ------                                



 UNITED STATES-ISRAEL CYBERSECURITY COOPERATION ENHANCEMENT ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 5843

To establish a grant program at the Department of Homeland 
Security to promote cooperative research and development 
between the United States and Israel on cybersecurity.
Summary
    In accordance with the Agreement between the Government of 
the United States of America and the Government of the State of 
Israel on Cooperation in Science and Technology for Homeland 
Security Matters signed on May 29, 2008, this legislation 
requires the Department of Homeland Security to establish a 
grant program to support cybersecurity research, development, 
demonstration, and commercializion of cybersecurity technology.
Legislative History
    H.R. 5843 was introduced in the House on July 14, 2016, by 
Mr. Langevin and Mr. Ratcliffe and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 5843 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies.
    The Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies was discharged from 
further consideration of H.R. 5843 on September 14, 2016.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5843 on September 14, 
2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 5843 to 
the House on November 15, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-826.
    The House considered H.R. 5843 on November 29, 2016, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 5843 was received in the Senate on November 30, 2016.

                                ------                                



              COMMUNITY COUNTERTERRORISM PREPAREDNESS ACT

                               H.R. 5859

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish the 
major metropolitan area counterterrorism training and exercise 
grant program, and for other purposes.
Summary
    H.R. 5859 authorizes $39 million for emergency response 
providers in major metropolitan areas to conduct training and 
exercises to prevent, prepare for, and respond to the most 
likely terrorist attack scenarios, including active shooters.
Legislative History
    H.R. 5859 was introduced in the House on July 14, 2016, by 
Mr. McCaul and 25 original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 5859 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, 
Response, and Communications.
    The Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications was discharged from further consideration of 
H.R. 5859 on September 14, 2016.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5859 on September 14, 
2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committed reported H.R. 5859 to the House on September 
19, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-754.
    The House considered H.R. 5859 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 21, 2016, and passed the measure, as 
amended, by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 395 yeas and 30 nays, 
(Roll No. 537).
    H.R. 5859 was received in the Senate on September 22, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



             TRANSIT SECURITY GRANT PROGRAM FLEXIBILITY ACT

                               H.R. 5943

To amend the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 
Commission Act of 2007 to clarify certain allowable uses of 
funds for public transportation security assistance grants and 
establish periods of performance for such grants, and for other 
purposes.
Summary
    This measure amends the Implementing Recommendation of the 
9/11 Commission Act of 2007 (Pub. L. 110-53) to permit 
transportation security grants to be used for security training 
and improvements to stations and infrastructure.
Legislative History
    H.R. 5943 was introduced in the House on September 7, 2016, 
by Mr. Donovan, Mr. Katko, Mr. king of New York, Miss Rice of 
New York, Mr. Payne, and Mr. McCaul and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5943 on September 14, 
2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5943 to the House, on September 
20, 2016, with an amendment, as H. Rpt. 114-776.
    The House considered H.R. 5943 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 26, 2016, and passed the measure by voice 
vote.
    H.R. 5943 was received in the Senate on September 27, 2016.

                                ------                                



             RESOLUTION CONDEMNING TERRORIST ATTACK ON THE 
                        PULSE ORLANDO NIGHTCLUB

                               H.Res. 827

Condemning the terrorist attack on the Pulse Orlando nightclub, 
honoring the memory of the victims of the attack, offering 
condolences to and expressing support for their families and 
friends and all those affected, and applauding the dedication 
and bravery of law enforcement, emergency response, and 
counterterrorism officials in responding to the attack.
Summary
    On June 12, 2016, the deadliest mass terrorist attack in 
the United States occurred at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, 
Florida. In the incident 49 people were killed and 53 injured. 
The attacker, Omar Mateen, self identified and pledged 
allegiance to the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL).
    This resolution honors the memory of the victims of this 
attack and commemorates the heroism of law enforcement, first 
responders, and counterterrorism officials.
Legislative History
    H.Res. 827 was introduced in the House on July 13, 2016, by 
Ms. Ros-Lehtinen and 33 original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, and in addition 
to the Committee on Foreign Affairs, and the Committee on 
Homeland Security.
    The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, the 
Committee on Foreign Affairs, and the Committee on Homeland 
Security were discharged from further consideration on July 13, 
2016, the House proceeded to the consideration of H.Res. 827 
under Suspension of the Rules and agreed to the Resolution, by 
voice vote.

           SENSE OF CONGRESS ON THE 15TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE 
                  SEPTEMBER 11, 2001 TERRORIST ATTACKS

                               H.Res. 842

Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives regarding 
the terrorist attacks launched against the United States on 
September 11, 2001, on the 15th anniversary of that date.
Summary
    This resolution commemorated the memory of victims of the 
September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States. The 
terrorist attacks, consisting of four incidents in New York 
City, New York, Arlington, Virginia, and Shanksville, 
Pennsylvania resulted in the deaths of 2,996 people and over 
6,000 injured.
Legislative History
    H.Res. 842 was introduced in the House on September 6, 
2016, by Mr. McCarthy and referred to Committee on Oversight 
and Government Reform, the Committee on Foreign Affairs, the 
Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure, the Committee on the Judiciary, the 
Committee on Homeland Security, and the House Permanent Select 
Committee on Intelligence.
    The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, the 
Committee on Foreign Affairs, the Committee on Armed Services, 
the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, the 
Committee on the Judiciary, the Committee on Homeland Security, 
and the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence were 
discharged from further consideration of H.Res. 842 on 
September 9, 2016. The House proceeded to the consideration of 
H.Res. 842 under Suspension of the Rules and agreed to the 
Resolution, by voice vote.

                                ------                                



               CROSS-BORDER TRADE ENHANCEMENT ACT OF 2015

                           S. 461 (H.R. 875)

To provide for alternative financing arrangements for the 
provision of certain services and the construction and 
maintenance of infrastructure at land border ports of entry, 
and for other purposes.
Summary
    This legislation reauthorizes and expands the pilot 
programs that permit United States Customs and Border 
Protection (CBP) to enter into agreements with private or State 
or local government entities for reimbursable services or 
property donations at CBP ports of entry. The authorization of 
public-private partnerships under this bill will allow private 
sector and State and local government entities to fund 
improvements at CBP ports of entry that will increase trade and 
travel efficiencies at no cost to the taxpayer.
Legislative History
S. 461
    S. 461 was introduced in the Senate on February 11, 2015, 
by Mr. Cornyn and Ms. Klobuchar) and referred to the Committee 
on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 461 on May 25, 2016, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate with an Amendment in the 
Nature of a Substitute, favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 461 to the Senate on July 12, 2016 with no 
written report. The Senate Committee on Homeland Security 
report filed in the Senate on August 30, 2016, as S. Rpt. 114-
303.
    The Senate considered S. 461 on November 29, 2016, and 
withdrew the Committee Substitute by unanimous consent and 
subsequently passed the measure.
    S. 461 was received in the House on November 30, 2016, and 
held at the Desk.
H.R. 875
    H.R. 875, the House companion measure, was introduced in 
the House on February 11, 2015, by Mr. Cuellar and referred to 
the Committee on Ways and Means, and in addition to the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, the Committee 
on the Judiciary, the Committee on Homeland Security, and the 
Committee on Agriculture. Within the Committee, H.R. 875 was 
referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security.
    The House considered H.R. 875 on December 6, 2016, and 
agreed to Suspend the Rules and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    The Senate considered H.R. 875 on December 9, 2016, and 
passed the measure without amendment. Clearing the measure for 
the President.

                              ----------                              


                 Oversight Activities of the Committee

                      SOUTHWEST BORDER SITE VISITS

    From January 22 though 26, 2015, Members of the Committee 
conducted a site visit along the Southwest border of the United 
States. Members examined: The evolving national security 
threats to the Homeland; security at our southwest border; best 
practices to secure land and sea borders; technology currently 
deployed at the border; and analyze and assess inter-
governmental integration and cooperation to secure the Nation's 
border with critical components including the Department of 
Homeland Security and the Department of Defense. Members 
traveled to San Diego, California; Tucson and Sierra Vista, 
Arizona; and McAllen, Texas.
    From October 23 through 25, 2016, the Chair of the 
Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security and Majority staff 
of the Committee participated in a series of classified and 
unclassified briefings in Tucson, Arizona regarding border-
related issues and local counterterrorism efforts with the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), U.S. Immigration and 
Customs Enforcement (ICE), and U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection (CBP).

                   WORLD-WIDE THREATS TO THE HOMELAND

    On February 4, 2015, the Members of the Committee received 
a classified briefing on current world-wide threats to the 
Homeland and U.S. interests. Representatives from the 
Department of Homeland Security, the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, and the National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC) 
were present to respond to Member questions.
    The Chair of the Full Committee and Majority staff of the 
Committee visited the NCTC an April 19, 2016, and met with 
Federal employees conducting critical analytical and targeting 
duties in defense of the United States.

                            FOREIGN FIGHTERS

    On February 11, 2015, the Full Committee held a hearing 
entitled ``Countering Violent Islamist Extremism: The Urgent 
Threat of Foreign Fighters and Homegrown Terror.'' The 
Committee received testimony from Hon. Francis X. Taylor, Under 
Secretary, Intelligence and Analysis, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Hon. Nicholas J. Rasmussen, Director, 
National Counterterrorism Center, Office of the Director of 
National Intelligence; and Mr. Michael B. Steinbach, Assistant 
Director, Counterterrorism Division, Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, U.S. Department of Justice.
    This hearing focused on the nature of the threat and how 
our approach to the War against homegrown Islamist Terror must 
evolve to rise to the challenge of this generational and global 
struggle.

                             CYBERSECURITY

    On February 25, 2015, the Members of the Committee received 
a briefing from the Special Assistant to the President and 
Cybersecurity Coordinator to explain the Administration's 
legislative proposal on cybersecurity.
    Additionally, the Committee held a hearing on February 25, 
2015, entitled ``Examining the President's Cybersecurity 
Information Sharing Proposal.'' The Committee received 
testimony from Hon. Suzanne Spaulding, Under Secretary, 
National Protection and Programs Directorate, U.S. Department 
of Homeland Security; Dr. Phyllis Schneck, Deputy Under 
Secretary, Cybersecurity and Communications, National 
Protection and Programs Directorate, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; and Dr. Eric Fischer, Senior Specialist, 
Science and Technology, Congressional Research Service, Library 
of Congress.
    The Members of the Committee conducted a site visit on 
March 4, 2015, to the National Cybersecurity Counterterrorism 
and Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) in Arlington, 
Virginia.

                   BOSTON MARATHON BOMBING FOLLOW UP

    Continuing oversight into the Committee's review of the 
Federal, State and local information sharing relationships 
leading up to the 2013 Boston Marathon Bombing, Committee staff 
held multiple meetings with Federal, State and local agencies, 
as well as other stakeholders.
    On March 17, 2015, Committee staff met with representatives 
from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) regarding the 
status of information sharing agreements between the Joint 
Terrorism Task Forces (JTTFs) and local law enforcement 
agencies.
    The Chair of the Committee released a report entitled 
Preventing Another Boston Marathon Bombing: Reviewing the 
Lessons Learned from the 2013 Terror Attack on April 14, 2015. 
The report reviewed the implementation of the recommendations 
by the Committee from its 2014 Boston Marathon Bombings 
investigative report.

                            FOREIGN FIGHTERS

    On March 18, 2015, the Members of the Committee received a 
classified briefing on the threat posed by foreign fighters 
joining the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) and related 
issues. Members were briefed by representatives from the U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security and the National 
Counterterrorism Center.
    On March 24, 2015, the Full Committee held a hearing 
entitled ``A Global Battleground: The Fight Against Islamist 
Extremism at Home and Abroad.'' The Committee received 
testimony from Hon. Newt Gingrich, Former Speaker of the U.S. 
House of Representatives; General Michael Hayden (USAF-Ret.), 
Former Director, Central Intelligence Agency and Former 
Director, National Security Agency; Mr. Philip Mudd, Senior 
Fellow, New America Foundation; and Mr. Brian Michael Jenkins, 
Senior Adviser to the RAND President, The RAND Corporation.

               DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY LEADERSHIP

    On March 26, 2015, the Full Committee held a hearing 
entitled ``Leadership Challenges at the Department of Homeland 
Security.'' The Committee received testimony from Hon. John 
Roth, Inspector General, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; 
and Ms. Maria M. Odom, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration 
Services Ombudsman, U.S. Department of Homeland Security.
    The Committee continued its oversight into improper 
activities within the Department with a hearing on April 30, 
2015, entitled ``Allegations of Special Access and Political 
Influence at the Department of Homeland Security.'' The 
Committee received testimony from Hon. Alejandro Mayorkas, 
Deputy Secretary, U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

                    CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL SECURITY

    On April 16, 2015, the Members of the Committee received a 
briefing by representatives from the National Counterterrorism 
Center, and the Department of Homeland Security's Office of 
Intelligence and Analysis, and the Office of Health Affairs on 
the threat from chemical and biological attacks.

                       CONGRESSIONAL DELEGATIONS

CODEL McCAUL
    From May 1 through 11, 2015, Chairman McCaul led a 
Congressional Delegation to the State of Israel, the Republic 
of Turkey, the Republic of Iraq, the Federal Republic of 
Germany, the Kingdom of Belgium, and the French Republic. The 
Members of the Committee conducted the CODEL to assess evolving 
security threats to the homeland and our allies, including the 
flow of foreign fighters to and from the West and the Syrian 
Arab Republic and the Republic of Iraq. The critical focus was 
the U.S. Government's efforts, working with our allies, to 
identify and obstruct the travel of individuals who pose a 
threat to the homeland. Additionally, the Delegation examined 
border security and threats in the Middle East; 
counterterrorism programs including programs to counter violent 
extremism; and the U.S./Coalition strategy to counter the 
threat of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant in Iraq.

CODEL McCAUL
    From June 24 through 27, 2015, Chairman McCaul led a 
Congressional Delegation to the Detention Center at the U.S. 
Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The Delegation examined the 
Secretary of Homeland Security's role as a member of the 
President's Guantanamo Detention Task Force, as outlined in 
Executive Order 13492, and reviewed the potential risk of 
holding high-value detainees.

CODEL RATCLIFFE
    From May 1 through May 6, 2016, Subcommittee Chairman 
Ratcliffe and Committee Member Langevin conducted a 
Congressional Delegation to the State of Israel to examine 
emerging cyber threats and threats to critical infrastructure. 
The delegation discussed efforts to increase cybersecurity 
capabilities, protect critical infrastructure and find areas 
where the U.S. and Israel can increase collaboration. 
Additionally, consequences from the Joint Comprehensive Plan of 
Action (JCPOA) and increasing cybersecurity and kinetic threats 
from Iran were discussed. The delegation also met with Prime 
Minister Netanyahu to discuss key national security issues, 
cybersecurity and United States-Israel collaboration.

CODEL McCAUL
    From May 1 through 9, 2016, Chairman McCaul conducted a 
Congressional Delegation to the Arab Republic of Egypt, the 
Kingdom of Bahrain, the Republic of Tunisia, and the United 
Kingdom. This delegation examined the spread of Islamist terror 
and threats to the United States and its allies; and the threat 
from foreign fighters, returnees, and homegrown radicals.

                            VIRAL TERRORISM

    On June 3, 2015, the Full Committee held a hearing entitled 
``Terrorism Gone Viral: The Attack in Garland, Texas and 
Beyond.'' The Committee received testimony from Mr. John J. 
Mulligan, Deputy Director, National Counterterrorism Center; 
Hon. Francis X. Taylor, Under Secretary, Intelligence and 
Analysis, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and Mr. Michael 
B. Steinbach, Assistant Director, Counterterrorism Division, 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, U.S. Department of Justice.
    The Members of the Committee continued their inquiry into 
terrorist use of social media with a classified briefing by the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, Counterterrorism Internet 
Operations Section on June 11, 2015,. The Members discussed the 
FBI's abilities to manage and target counterterrorism 
investigations online, including tracking terrorists' social 
media use for investigative purposes.
     Members further examined this issue with a classified 
briefing on June 17, 2015, receiving an update on the technical 
and policy challenges associated with tracking extremists who 
``go dark'' on social media to recruit, radicalize, and plot 
attacks. The Members were briefed by representatives from the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation Operational Technology 
Division.

                 TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION

    On June 11, 2015, the Members of the Committee received a 
classified briefing from officials from the Department of 
Homeland Security's Office of Inspector General and the 
Transportation Security Administration on recent airport 
screening checkpoint test results, as well as related actions 
directed by the Secretary of Homeland Security.
    On July 29, 2015, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``Aviation Security Challenges: Is TSA ready for the threats of 
today?'' The Committee received testimony from Hon. Peter V. 
Neffenger, Administrator, Transportation Security 
Administration, U.S. Department Homeland Security.
    May 25, 2016, the Committee held a hearing entitled ``Long 
Lines, Short Patience: The TSA Airport Screening Experience.'' 
The Committee recieved testimony from Hon. Peter V. Neffenger, 
Administrator, Transportation Security Administration, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security.

                      COUNTERING VIOLENT EXTREMISM

    On July 9, 2015, the Members of the Committee received a 
briefing from officials from the Department of Homeland 
Security on the Department's programs and efforts to counter 
violent extremism. As a follow up to this meeting, on July 10, 
2015, the Chair of the Committee sent a letter to the Secretary 
of Homeland Security requesting information on the Department's 
countering violent extremism ``CVE'' programs and policies.
    The Committee held a hearing on July 15, 2015, entitled 
``The Rise of Radicalization: Is the U.S. Government Failing to 
Counter International and Domestic Terrorism?'' The Committee 
received testimony from Ms. Farah Pandith, Adjunct Senior 
Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations; Mr. Seamus Hughes, Deputy 
Director, Program on Extremism, Center for Cyber and Homeland 
Security, George Washington University; and Mr. J. Richard 
Cohen, President and CEO, Southern Poverty Law Center.
    On April 5, 2016, the Chair of the Committee sent a letter 
to the Secretary of Homeland Security outlining the Committee's 
support for efforts to counter the propaganda, radicalization 
and recruitment of violent Islamist extremist networks such as 
al Qaeda and ISIS, and requesting detailed information on the 
Department's plans to provide a counter message to this 
ideology.
    The Chair of the Committee sent a letter to the Secretary 
of Homeland Security on July 7, 2016, expressing concerns over 
the Department's failure to clearly prioritize countering 
violent Islamist extremist propaganda, radicalization and 
recruitment in the guidance issued for the CVE grants 
appropriated in Pub. L. 114-113.
    On August 29, 2016, the Chair of the Committee sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security expressing concern 
over weaknesses in the Departments plans to vet CVE grant 
applicants.
    On September 8, 2016, the Chair of the Committee sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security thanking him for 
the Department's responsiveness to questions around the vetting 
of CVE grant applicants, but noted that the Committee remains 
extremely concerned that the Department's vetting plans are 
insufficient.
    On September 28, 2016, The Chair of the Full Committee sent 
a letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security on September 28, 
2016, regarding the Department's understanding of the status of 
foreign counter radicalization programs. Information was 
requested regarding related efforts of the United Kingdom of 
Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the French Republic, the 
Kingdom of Belgium, the Kingdom of Denmark, the Republic of 
Indonesia, the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, Bosnia and 
Herzegovina, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the Islamic Republic 
of Pakistan, the Tunisian Republic, and other countries with 
successful counter radicalization programs as identified by the 
Department. Written responses to listed questions were 
requested by October 14, 2016. To date, no response has been 
received by the Committee. On November 3, 2016, the Director of 
the Office for Community Partnerships at the Department of 
Homeland Security responded, noting the determination that 
parts of the inquiry fall outside of the Department's 
jurisdiction, while contributing answers regarding benefits to 
domestic efforts that aim to prevent violent extremism as well 
as lessons learned from international programs.

                    CHALLENGES IN A POST-9/11 WORLD

    On September 8, 2015, the Committee held a field hearing in 
New York City, New York entitled ``Beyond Bin Laden's Caves and 
Couriers to A New Generation of Terrorists: Confronting the 
Challenges in a Post 9/11 World.'' The Committee received 
testimony from Hon. Rudolph ``Rudy'' W. Giuliani, Former Mayor, 
City of New York, New York; Mr. William J. Bratton, 
Commissioner, Police Department, City of New York, New York; 
Mr. Daniel A. Nigro, Commissioner, Fire Department, City of New 
York, New York; Mr. Lee A. Ielpi, President, September 11th 
Families Association; and Mr. Gregory A. Thomas, National 
President, National Organization of Black Law Enforcement 
Executives.
    On October 21, 2015, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``Worldwide Threats and Homeland Security Challenges.'' The 
Committee received testimony from Hon. Jeh C. Johnson, 
Secretary, Department of Homeland Security; Hon. Nicholas J. 
Rasmussen, Director, The National Counterterrorism Center, 
Office of the Director of National Intelligence; and Hon. James 
B. Comey, Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation, U.S. 
Department of Justice.
    On July 14, 2016, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``Worldwide Threats to the Homeland: ISIS and the New Wave of 
Terror.'' The Committee received testimony from Hon. Jeh C. 
Johnson, Secretary, Department of Homeland Security; Hon. 
Nicholas J. Rasmussen, Director, The National Counterterrorism 
Center, Office of the Director of National Intelligence; and 
Hon. James B. Comey, Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation, 
U.S. Department of Justice.

                              BIOTERRORISM

    On November 3, 2015, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``Defending Against Bioterrorism: How Vulnerable is America?'' 
The Committee received testimony from Hon. Thomas J. Ridge, Co-
Chair, Blue Ribbon Study Panel on Biodefense; Hon. Joseph I. 
Lieberman, Co-Chair, Blue Ribbon Study Panel on Biodefense; and 
Leonard A. Cole, PhD, Director, Terror Medicine and Security 
Program, Department of Emergency Medicine, Rutgers New Jersey 
Medical School.

                         TERRORIST SANCTUARIES

    On November 18, 2015, the Committee on Homeland Security 
and the Committee on Foreign Affairs held a joint hearing 
entitled ``The Rise of Radicalism: Growing Terrorist 
Sanctuaries and the Threat to the U.S. Homeland.'' The 
Committees received testimony from Hon. Matthew G. Olsen, Co-
Founder and President, Business Development and Strategy, 
IronNet Cybersecurity; Gen. John M. Keane (Ret. U.S. Army), 
Chairman of the Board, Institute for the Study of War; and Mr. 
Peter Bergen, Vice President, Director International Security 
and Fellows Programs, New America.

                             VISA SECURITY

    On December 17, 2015, the Members of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a classified Member-only briefing on 
visa security. Representatives from the Department of Homeland 
Security respond to Member questions.
    The Members of the Committee received a classified briefing 
on February 2, 2016, by representatives from the Department of 
Homeland Security's, Office of Intelligence and Analysis, the 
United States Citizenship and Immigration Services, and the 
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement on the Department of 
Homeland Security's use of social media to vet Visa applicants.
    On December 11, 2015, the Chair of the Full Committee sent 
a letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security requesting 
additional information the refugee program and visa security 
screening. Committee staff were briefed on this issue on 
December 17, 2015, by representatives from the Departments of 
Homeland Security and State.
    The Committee held a hearing on February 3, 2016, entitled 
``Crisis of Confidence: Preventing Terrorist Infiltration 
through U.S. Refugee and Visa Programs''. Testimony was 
received from Hon. Francis X. Taylor, Under Secretary for 
Intelligence and Analysis, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security; Hon. Leon Rodriguez, Director, U.S. Citizenship and 
Immigrations Services, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; 
and Mr. Lev J. Kubiak, Assistant Director, U.S. Immigration and 
Customs Enforcement, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and 
Hon. Michele Thoren Bond, Assistant Secretary, Bureau of 
Consular Affairs, Department of State.
    The Secretary of Homeland Security responded to the initial 
letter on April 26, 2016, following up on questions which were 
not addressed during the previous briefing or the February 2016 
hearing.
    On February 10, 2016, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``National Security and Law Enforcement: Breaking the New Visa 
Waiver Law to Appease Iran.'' The Committee received testimony 
from Hon. R. Gil Kerlikowske, Commissioner, U.S. Customs and 
Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and 
Ms. Hillary Batjer Johnson, Deputy Coordinator, Homeland 
Security, Screening, and Designations, Bureau of 
Counterterrorism, U.S. Department of State.
    The Chair of the Committee sent a letter to the President 
of the United States on April 11, 2016, amidst concerns of the 
lack of real-time screening of individuals by foreign 
governments against International Criminal Police Organization 
(INTERPOL) databases, specifically at borders, airports or 
during traffic stops. This letter followed up on concerns 
discussed at the February 10th hearing. The letter further 
urged the Administration to ensure that countries involved in 
the Visa Waiver Program are aware of the obligation of the 
mandate instituted by the Visa Waiver Program Improvement and 
Terrorist Travel Prevention Act of 2015 in which they are to 
certify to the Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security 
that each individual entering or departing that country that is 
not a citizen or national is screened using relevant databases 
and notices maintained by Interpol.

                HOMELAND SECURITY FY2017 BUDGET REQUEST

    On March 16, 2016, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``DHS in Today's Dangerous World: Examining the Department's 
Budget and Readiness to Counter Homeland Threats.'' The 
Committee received testimony from Hon. Jeh C. Johnson, 
Secretary, U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

                  PREVENTING ONLINE RADICATIONLIZATION

    Members of the Committee received a Member-only briefing on 
April 13, 2016, on efforts by technology companies to develop 
programs and initiatives to prevent online radicalization. The 
Members met with technology companies including Facebook, 
Google, and Twitter.

                     TERRORIST PATHWAYS TO AMERICA

    On September 14, 2016, the Committee held a hearing 
entitled ``Shutting Down Terrorist Pathways into America.'' The 
Committee received testimony from Hon. Francis X. Taylor, Under 
Secretary, Office of Intelligence and Analysis, U.S. Department 
of Homeland Security; Hon. Leon Rodriguez, Director, U.S. 
Citizenship and Immigration Services, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Dr. Huban Gowadia, Deputy Director, 
Transportation Security Administration, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Mr. Kevin McAleenan, Deputy Commissioner, 
U.S. Customs and Border Protection , U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; and Mr. Daniel D. Ragsdale, Deputy Director, 
U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security.

                        STOPPING THE NEXT ATTACK

    The Committee held a hearing on September 14, 2016, 
entitled ``Stopping the Next Attack: How to Keep Our City 
Streets from Becoming the Battleground.'' The Committee 
received testimony from Mr. John Miller, Deputy Commissioner, 
Intelligence and Counterterrorism, New York City Police 
Department, New York City, New York; Chief Art Acevedo, Chief 
of Police, Austin, Texas, testifying on behalf of the Major 
Cities Chiefs Association; Sheriff Michael J. Bouchard, Oakland 
County Sheriff's Office, Oakland County, Michigan, testifying 
on behalf of the Major County Sheriffs Association; and Sheriff 
Jerry L. Demings, Orange County Sheriff's Office, Orange 
County, Florida.

        DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTELLIGENCE ENTERPRISE

    On December 8, 2015, the Chairs of the Full Committee and 
the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security requesting 
cooperation from the Department in a review of the Department's 
Intelligence Enterprise (IE) and to request cooperation from 
the Department throughout the review. The Secretary of the 
Department of Homeland Security sent separate, but identical 
responses, on January 21, 2016, and ensured the Department's 
support of the review of its Intelligence Enterprise.
    On December 11, 2015, the Chair of the Full Committee sent 
a letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security to request 
details on issues of refugee and visa security screening. On 
April 25, 2016, the Secretary sent a response to the questions 
that were not covered during a previous briefing by the 
Department of Homeland Security and the Department of State 
regarding the visa and refugee security screening process on 
December 17, 2015, and a hearing on February 3, 2016 at which 
senior Department officials testified.
    Committee staff met with the Department of Homeland 
Security's Under Secretary for Intelligence and Analysis on 
December 14, 2015, to initiate the conversation regarding the 
Committee's review of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) 
Intelligence Enterprise (IE).
    On April 11, 2016, the Chair of the Full Committee sent a 
letter to the President of the United States amidst concerns of 
the lack of real-time screening of individuals by foreign 
governments against International Criminal Police Organization 
(INTERPOL) databases, specifically at borders, airports or 
during traffic stops. The letter urged the Administration to 
ensure that countries involved in the Visa Waiver Program are 
aware of the obligation of the mandate instituted by H.R. 158 
in which they are to certify to the Secretary of the Department 
of Homeland Security that each individual entering or departing 
that country that is not a citizen or national is screened 
using relevant databases and notices maintained by Interpol.
    The Chair of the Full Committee sent a letter to the 
Secretary of State on April 11, 2016, requesting that the 
Committee staff be provided access to the available information 
regarding an interview with consular officers of Tashfeen 
Malik, one of the perpetrators of the December 2, 2015 
terrorist attack in San Bernardino, California.
    On June 1, 2016, the Chair of the Full Committee along with 
Mr. Katko, sent a letter to the Department's Under Secretary 
for Intelligence and Analysis pertaining to unanswered 
questions previously sent to the Transportation Security 
Administration which would support the review of the 
Department's Intelligence Enterprise. The letter requested the 
Under Secretary's assistance in obtaining a response from the 
Transportation Security Administration to these questions.
    The Chair of the Full Committee and the Chairman of the 
Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence sent a letter 
to the Secretary of Homeland Security on September 14, 2016, 
providing a draft copy of the report resulting from the 
Committee's review of the Department of Homeland Security with 
a request, if chosen, for comments to be considered in the 
final report.

            SYRIAN REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT IN THE UNITED STATES

    On January 28, 2015, the Chair of the Full Committee, the 
Chair of the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence, 
and the Chair of the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime 
Security sent a letter to the Assistant to the President for 
National Security Affairs regarding the planned efforts of the 
State Department to accelerate efforts to admit Syrian refugees 
into the United States based on concern that groups such as the 
Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) may be able to exploit 
the refugee resettlement process in the United States. The 
letter asked that the Committee be provided with information 
regarding the Syrian refugee resettlement process, including 
the number of Syrian refugees the United States expects to 
resettle, a two-year timeline for resettlement, and an overview 
of the ways in which the interagency will enhance the security 
measures used in the process of vetting Syrian refugees. To 
date, no response has been received by the Committee.
    The Chair of the Full Committee sent a letter to the 
Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation on February 19, 
2015,requesting both classified and unclassified responses to 
concerns regarding previous and current security gaps in the 
United States' refugee resettlement programs. To date, no 
response has been received by the Committee.
    On February 19, 2015, the Chair of the Full Committee sent 
a letter to the Director of National Intelligence requesting 
further classified and unclassified information on the vetting 
of refugees from Iraq and Syria. To date, no response has been 
received by the Committee.
    On that same date, the Chair of the Full Committee sent a 
letter to the Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security 
requesting both classified and unclassified responses to 
concerns regarding previous and current security gaps in the 
United States' refugee resettlement programs and details 
regarding the vetting of refugees from Iraq and Syria. To date, 
no response has been received by the Committee.
    The Chair of the Full Committee sent a letter to the 
Secretary of State on February 19, 2015, requesting both 
classified and unclassified responses to concerns regarding 
previous and current security gaps in the United States' 
refugee resettlement programs and details regarding the vetting 
of refugees from Iraq and Syria as well as details regarding 
the vetting of refugees from these countries. To date, no 
response has been received by the Committee.
    On June 11, 2015, the Chair of the Full Committee sent a 
letter to the President of the United States regarding an 
outstanding request for information on the country's refugee 
screening process of refugees from Iraq and Syria. The letter 
requested the Administration provide Members on the Committee 
with a classified interagency briefing on the issues of 
terrorists abilities to exploit the United States' refugee 
resettlement program by July 7, 2015. To date, no response has 
been received by the Committee.

                            U.S. COAST GUARD

    From April 6 through 9, 2015, Majority staff of the 
Committee visited Miami and Key West, Florida to examine U.S. 
Coast Guard (USCG) and U.S. Navy (USN) efforts to counter 
various homeland security threats in southern Florida and the 
Caribbean region.
    On June 13, 2016, Majority staff of the Committee visited 
the USGC headquarters in order to examine its Insider Threat 
program. The unauthorized disclosure of sensitive information 
could adversely affect the security of USCG's information 
systems, assets, resources, employees, and the general public. 
As a result, the USCG must be constantly aware of adversaries, 
especially those with the expertise and means to create 
opportunities for insider attacks.

                         SAN BERNARDINO ATTACK

    On December 2, 2015, Syed Rizwan Farook and his wife 
Tashfeen Malik carried out a terrorist attack killing 14 people 
in San Bernardino, California. Following the attack, the 
Committee was given access to Tashfeen Malik's immigration file 
with the exception of Malik's interview with consular officers, 
which was part of her visa application. On April 11, 2016, the 
Chair of the Full Committee sent a letter to the Secretary of 
State requesting that the Committee staff be provided access to 
the available information regarding this interview.
    On April 11, 2016, the Chair of Committee sent a letter to 
the Secretary of State requesting that Committee staff be 
provided access to the available information regarding an 
interview with consular officers of Tashfeen Malik, one of the 
perpetrators of the December 2, 2015 terrorist attack in San 
Bernardino, California.

           NATIONAL DOMESTIC COMMUNICATIONS ASSISTANCE CENTER

    On December 10, 2015, Majority staff of the Committee 
visited the National Domestic Communications Assistance Center 
in Fredericksburg, Virginia. The National Domestic 
Communications Assistance Center (NDCAC) is a National center, 
organized under the Department of Justice, designed as a hub 
for technical knowledge management that will facilitate the 
sharing of solutions and know-how among law enforcement 
agencies, and strengthen law enforcement's relationships with 
the communications industry. Members of the Committee's 
Majority staff visited the NDCAC to examine how it was coping 
with the ``going dark'' phenomenon, in part a result of 
increasingly ubiquitous encryption technologies.

                        THREATS TO NEW YORK CITY

    On October 27, 2016 Majority staff of the Committee 
traveled to New York City, New York and met with 
representatives from New York City Police Department (NYPD), 
New York County District Attorney's Office (DANY), and 
Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Office of Homeland 
Security Investigations (HSI) to examine Local, State, and 
Federal Government efforts to counter security threats either 
in or with a nexus to New York City.

              WASHINGTON REGIONAL THREAT ASSESSMENT CENTER

    Majority staff of the Committee visited the Washington 
Regional Threat Analysis Center (WRTAC), Washington, D.C. on 
May 31, 2016, to better understand how the WRTAC helps to 
integrate Federal, State, and local homeland security efforts. 
The WRTAC is an ``all-threats, all hazards'' fusion center 
serving the District and the National Capital Region (NCR). The 
WRTAC helps to protect District residents by facilitating 
information integration between dozens of federal and local 
partners throughout the NCR and the United States to detect, 
prevent, and respond to terrorist and other criminal activity, 
as well as any catastrophic event.

                  CHAIRMAN AND MAJORITY STAFF REPORTS

    The Chair of the Committee directed staff to investigate 
and report on numerous National security related aspects. As a 
result, the Chair released the following reports:
    On November 18, 2015, the Majority staff of the House 
Committee on Homeland Security released a report entitled 
Syrian Refugee Flows: Security Risks and Counterterrorism 
Challenges. The report investigated the counterterrorism 
challenges associated with Syrian refugee flows into the United 
States and Europe and presents recommendations for enhancing 
U.S. and international security.
    The Chair released the report on March 3, 2016, entitled 
#Terror Gone Viral: Overview of the 75 ISIS-Linked Plots 
against the West. The report examined the terror plots linked 
to the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) up to March 3, 
2016.
    On June 29, 2016, the Majority staff of the House Homeland 
Security Committee released a report entitled Going Dark Going 
Forward: A Primer on the Encryption Debate. The report is an 
analysis based on more than 100 meetings and briefings with key 
stakeholders and provides insight into arguments on all sides 
of the encryption debate. The report also laid the groundwork 
for legislation to establish a National Commission on Security 
and Technology Challenges proposed by Mr. McCaul and Senator 
Warner.
    The Committee released a report on September 14, 2016, 
entitled Misconduct at TSA Threatens the Security of the Flying 
Public regarding a six-month joint investigation conducted by 
the Chairs of the Subcommittee on Oversight and Management 
Efficiency and the Chair of the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security regarding misconduct within the Transportation 
Security Administration.
    On July 20, 2016, the Chair of the Committee released the 
report entitled Terror Gone Viral: Overview of the 100+ ISIS-
Linked Plots against the West. The report made key findings 
based on trends in the terror plotting of the Islamic State of 
Iraq and Syria (ISIS).
    The Majority staff of the Committee released a report on 
August 2, 2016, entitled Streamlining the Department of 
Homeland Security's Overhead Will Make the Homeland Safer. The 
report detailed an investigation into the field efficiencies 
and real property portfolio of the Department of Homeland 
Security. As part of the investigation, Committee staff 
reviewed relevant DHS testimony and real property data, 
examined more than twenty reports from the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) and Office of the Inspector General 
(OIG), and met with former government officials, industry 
executives, and various other stakeholder groups. The Committee 
received regular briefings from the Department and met with 
other Federal stakeholders, including the General Services 
Administration (GSA), GAO and the OIG. As part of the 
investigation, in December of 2014, Committee staff conducted 
site visits to both Philadelphia and New York City to view the 
Department's estate holdings in these cities. Field 
efficiencies examinations were also incorporated into its other 
visits to the Department's components in the field.
    The Chair of the Committee released a report on September 
20, 2016, A National Strategy to Win the War Against Islamist 
Terror, a non-partisan counterterrorism strategy with policy 
ideas, recommendations, and principles for the fight against 
terrorism.
    On September 27, 2016, the Chair of the Committee released 
Version 2.0: Going Dark, Going Forward: A Primer on the 
Encryption Debate
    , which was an update to the original report entitled Going 
Dark Going Forward: A Primer on the Encryption Debate produced 
by the Majority staff in June 2016.
    On October 6, 2016, the Chair of the Committee released a 
report entitled Cash to Chaos: Dismantling ISIS' Financial 
Infrastructure. The report displayed the growth of the Islamic 
State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS), its ability to control 
territory and generate revenue flows stemming from diverse 
sources.
    Throughout the 114th Congress, the Chair of the Committee 
released a Monthly Terror Threat Snapshot prepared by the 
Committee staff on the growing threat the United States, the 
West, and the world face from the Islamic State of Iraq and 
Syria and other Islamist terrorists. Additionally, on April 12, 
2016, the Chair released an European Terror Threat Snapshot 
(international) providing an assessment by the Committee of the 
Islamist terror threat environment across Europe. It acts as a 
supplement to the Committee's monthly Terror Threat Snapshot, 
examining the broader terror threat the United States, the 
West, and the world face from Islamist extremists.
                              ----------                              


                        Committee Hearings Held


``Countering Violent Islamist Extremism: The Urgent Threat of 
        Foreign Fighters and Homegrown Terror.'' February 11, 
        2015. (Serial No. 114-2)
``Examining the President's Cybersecurity Information Sharing 
        Proposal.'' February 25, 2015. (Serial No. 114-4)
``A Global Battle Ground: The Fight Against Islamist Extremism 
        at Home and Abroad.'' March 24, 2015. (Serial No. 114-
        11)
``Leadership Challenges at the Department of Homeland 
        Security.'' March 26, 2015. (Serial No. 114-13)
``Allegations of Special Access and Political influence at the 
        Department of Homeland Security.'' April 30, 2015. 
        (Serial No. 114-13)
``Terrorism Gone Viral: The Attack in Garland, Texas and 
        Beyond.'' June 3, 2015. (Serial No. 114-19)
``The Rise of Radicalization: Is the U.S. Government Failing to 
        Counter International and Domestic Terrorism?'' July 
        15, 2015. (Serial No. 114-27)
``Aviation Security Challenges: Is TSA ready for the threats of 
        today?'' July 29, 2015. (Serial No. 114-30)
Field hearing in New York City, New York. ``Beyond Bin Laden's 
        Caves and Couriers to a New Generation of Terrorists: 
        Confronting the Challenges in a post 9/11 World.'' 
        September 8, 2015. (Serial No. 114-31)
``Worldwide Threats and Homeland Security Challenges'' October 
        21, 2015. (Serial No. 114-37)
``Defending Against Bioterrorism: How Vulnerable is America?'' 
        November 3, 2015. (Serial No. 114-41)
Joint hearing with the Committee on Foreign Affairs. ``The Rise 
        of Radicalism: Growing Terrorist Sanctuaries and the 
        Threat to the U.S. Homeland.'' November 18, 2015. 
        (Serial No. 114-45)
``Crisis of Confidence: Preventing Terrorist Infiltration 
        through U.S. Refugee and Visa Programs.''  February 3, 
        2016. (Serial No. 114-50)
``National Security and Law Enforcement: Breaking the New Visa 
        Waiver Law to Appease Iran.'' February 10, 2016. 
        (Serial No. 114-51)
``DHS in Today's Dangerous World: Examining the Department's 
        Budget and Readiness to Counter Homeland Threats.''  
        March 16, 2016. (Serial No. 114-60)
``Long Lines, Short Patience: The TSA Airport Screening 
        Experience.'' May 25, 2016. (Serial No. 114-73)
``Worldwide Threats to the Homeland: ISIS and the New Wave of 
        Terror.'' July 14, 2016. (Serial No. 114-83)

                   Task Force on Combating Terrorist 
                       and Foreign Fighter Travel

    During the 114th Congress, the Committee established a Task 
Force on Combating Terrorist and Foreign Fighter Travel. The 
Chair and Ranking Member announced the members of the Task 
Force on February 23, 2015. The Task Force existed from March 2 
through September 2, 2015, Membership of the Task Force was as 
follows:

John Katko, New York,
  Republican Lead
Will Hurd, Texas
Barry Loudermilk, Georgia
Martha McSally, Arizona
John Ratcliffe, Texas               Loretta Sanchez, California,
                                      Democratic Lead
                                    Donald M. Payne, Jr, New Jersey
                                    Filemon Vela, Texas

                         ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING

    The Task Force met on March 17, 2015, to organize and set 
priorities for the task force.

                         TERRORIST WATCHLISTING

    On March 26, 2015, the Members of the Task Force received a 
classified briefing by representatives from the National 
Counterterrorism Center (NCTC) on terrorist watchlisting and 
foreign fighters.
    Members of the Task Force received as classified briefing 
on April 14, 2015, by representatives from the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation Terrorist Screening Center on terrorist 
watchlisting, watchlist enhancements, and information sharing 
with foreign partners on terrorists and foreign fighters.

                    NATIONAL COUNTERTERRORISM CENTER

    On April 15, 2015, the Members of the Task Force conducted 
a site visit to the National Counterterrorism Center in 
Virginia to receive a classified threat briefing, discuss 
NCTC's operations, and tour the facility.

                        DOMESTIC RADICALIZATION

    Members of the Task Force on Combating Terrorist and 
Foreign Fighter Travel received a classified briefing on the 
Department of Homeland Security's programs to counter domestic 
radicalization on April 22, 2015.

              WASHINGTON REGIONAL THREAT ASSESSMENT CENTER

    On April 23, 2015, the Members of Task Force conducted a 
site visit to the Washington Regional Threat Assessment Center 
(WRTAC). The Members examined the D.C. ``fusion center'' where 
the Federal Government shares and coordinates terrorism 
information with State and local partners.

                          INTERAGENCY PROGRAMS

    On April 29, 2015,the Members of the Task Force received a 
briefing on interagency programs to counter domestic 
radicalization. Representatives from the Department of Homeland 
Security, the Department of Justice, the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, and the National Counterterrorism Center 
discussed broader Countering Violent Extremism efforts, 
including counter-radicalization program; the Administration's 
programs; and cooperative efforts with State and local partners 
to prevent more Americans from radicalizing or being recruited 
by overseas terrorist groups.

                       JOINT TERRORISM TASK FORCE

    On May 20, 2015, the Members of Task Force conducted a site 
visit to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Joint Terrorism 
Task Force (JTTF) in Washington, DC. The Members received a 
classified briefing on JTTF operations; its role in deterring, 
detecting, and disrupting terrorist and foreign fighter travel; 
and related counterterrorism issues in light of the heightened 
terrorist threat to the U.S. Homeland.

                            INTERPOL EFFORTS

    Members of the Task Force received a classified briefing on 
June 3, 2015, on efforts by the International Criminal Police 
Organization (INTERPOL) to counter terrorist and foreign 
fighter travel within the United States and abroad.

                   HOMELAND SECURITY ADVISORY COUNCIL

    On July 8, 2015, the Members of the Task Force received a 
classified briefing from the Homeland Security Advisory Council 
(HSAC) on recommendations for strengthening the Department of 
Homeland Security approach to obstructing terrorist travel. The 
briefing provided Members an opportunity to have open 
discussions on the report released by the HSAC in Spring 2015, 
``Foreign Fighter Task Force-Interim Report'' on how the 
Department can improve efforts to combat the foreign fighter 
threat.

                      DEPARTMENT OF STATE EFFORTS

    On July 22, 2015, the Members of the Task Force received a 
classified briefing from Department of State on efforts to 
obstruct foreign fighter travel from the Syrian Arab Republic 
and the Republic of Iraq.

                     DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EFFORTS

    On July 28, 2015, the Members of the Task Force received a 
classified briefing from Department of Justice on efforts to 
prosecute individuals who have traveled to the Syrian Arab 
Republic to fight with terrorist organizations.

                        REPORT OF THE TASK FORCE

    On July 29, 2015, the Members of the Task Force met to 
conclude the Task Force and work to finalize a report on their 
findings. The Task Force completed its report and provided it 
to the Members as Committee Print 114-B.

           Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence

                   Peter T. King, New York, Chairman

Candice S. Miller, Michigan
Lou Barletta, Pennsylvania
John Katko, New York
Will Hurd, Texas
Michael T. McCaul, Texas
                  (ex officio)      Brian Higgins, New York
                                    William R. Keating, Massachusetts
                                    Filemon Vela, Texas
                                    Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi
                                                      (ex officio)

                              ----------                              


    During the 114th Congress, the Subcommittee on 
Counterterrorism and Intelligence held 10 hearings, receiving 
testimony from 29 witnesses; and considered 5 measures.

                              ----------                              


               Legislative Activities of the Subcommittee



          HOMELAND SECURITY DRONE ASSESSMENT AND ANALYSIS ACT

                               H.R. 1646

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to research how 
certain commercially available small and medium sized unmanned 
aircraft systems could be used in an attack, how to prevent or 
mitigate the risk of such an attack, and for other purposes.
[To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to research how 
small and medium sized unmanned aerial systems could be used in 
an attack, how to prevent or mitigate the effects of such an 
attack, and for other purposes.]

Summary

    This legislation requires the Department of Homeland 
Security, in coordination with the Departments of Defense, 
Transportation, and Energy, and the Nuclear Regulatory 
Commission to research how commercially available small and 
medium sized drones could be used to perpetuate an attack, 
conduct a risk assessment of small or medium-sized unmanned 
aircraft systems (UAS) attacks, develop policies regarding the 
mitigation of risk of small or medium sized UAS attacks, and 
disseminate information to law enforcement regarding how to 
respond to potential UAS threats.

Legislative History

    H.R. 1646 was introduced in the House on March 26, 2015, by 
Mrs. Watson Coleman and Mr. Thompson and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security, and in addition to the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 1646 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Oversight and Management Efficiency and the Subcommittee on 
Counterterrorism and Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency 
considered H.R. 1646 on May 13, 2015, and ordered the measure 
reported to the Full Committee for consideration, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence was 
discharged from further consideration of H.R. 1646 on May 20, 
2015.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 1646 on May 20, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on June 9, 2015, agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration of H.R. 1646 on the House Floor, the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure would waive 
further consideration of H.R. 1646. The letter further 
requested the appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called. The Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security responded on June 10, 2015, acknowledging the 
agreement of Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure to 
waive further consideration of H.R. 1646.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported to the House on 
June 18, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-169, Pt. I. Subsequently, the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure was discharged 
from further consideration of H.R. 1646.
    The House considered H.R. 1646 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 23, 2015, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote. During consideration, the title was amended so as 
to read ``To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to 
research how certain commercially available small and medium 
sized unmanned aircraft systems could be used in an attack, how 
to prevent or mitigate the risk of such an attack, and for 
other purposes.''
    H.R. 1646 was received in the Senate on June 24, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



         CBRN INTELLIGENCE AND INFORMATION SHARING ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 2200

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish 
chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear intelligence 
and information sharing functions of the Office of Intelligence 
and Analysis of the Department of Homeland Security and to 
require dissemination of information analyzed by the Department 
to entities with responsibilities relating to homeland 
security, and for other purposes.

Summary

    Terrorist groups have long strived to employ chemical, 
biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) materials in their 
attacks. Furthermore, events such as the Boston Marathon 
bombing in 2013 illustrate the need for better information 
sharing between Federal and local officials. This legislation 
requires that the Office of Intelligence and Analysis within 
the Department of Homeland Security enhance intelligence 
analysis and information sharing on CBRN threats and work to 
ensure that State and local officials get the actionable 
intelligence information necessary to stop an attack.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2200 was introduced in the House on May 1, 2015, by 
Ms. McSally, Mr. McCaul, Mr. King of New York, Mr. Meehan, Mr. 
Thompson of Mississippi, and Mr. Payne and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 2200 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and 
Intelligence and the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, 
Response, and Communications.
    The Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications considered H.R. 2200 on May 14, 2015, and 
forwarded the measure to the Full Committee for consideration, 
as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair discharged the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism 
and Intelligence from further consideration of H.R. 2200 on May 
20, 2015.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 2200 on May 20, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 2200 to the House on June 17, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-164.
    The House considered H.R. 2200 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 23, 2015, and passed the measure, on June 25, 
2015, amended, by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 420 yeas and 2 nays, 
(Roll No. 389).
    H.R. 2200 was received in the Senate on July 7, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



         KNOW THE CBRN TERRORISM THREATS TO TRANSPORTATION ACT

                               H.R. 3350

To require a terrorism threat assessment regarding the 
transportation of chemical, biological, nuclear, and 
radiological materials through United States land borders and 
within the United States, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation requires the Department of Homeland 
Security to conduct a terrorism threat assessment on the 
transportation of chemical, biological, nuclear, and 
radiological materials through United States land borders and 
within the United States. The bill requires the Office of 
Intelligence and Analysis within the Department to conduct the 
assessment and directs that the results of the assessment be 
shared with relevant Federal, State and local agencies, 
including the Department of Energy.

Legislative History

    H.R. 3350 was introduced in the House on July 29, 2015, by 
Mr. Higgins, Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, and Mr. King of New 
York and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within 
the Committee, H.R. 3350 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Counterterrorism and Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence 
considered H.R. 3350 on September 17, 2015, and reported the 
measure to the Full Committee with a favorable recommendation, 
without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3350 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, without amendment, 
by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3350 to the House on October 
20, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-296.
    The House considered H.R. 3350 under Suspension of the 
Rules on October 20, 2015, and passed the measure, without 
amendment, by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 416 yeas and 0 nays, 
(Roll No. 551).
    H.R. 3350 was received in the Senate on October 21, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



 DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INSIDER THREAT AND MITIGATION ACT OF 
                                  2015

                               H.R. 3361

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish the 
Insider Threat Program, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-296) to establish an Insider Threat program within 
the Department of Homeland Security. The bill mandates employee 
education and training programs, and establishes an internal 
steering committee to manage and coordinate insider threat 
activities across the Department.

Legislative History

    H.R. 3361 was introduced in the House on July 29, 2015, by 
Mr. King of New York, Mr. Higgins, Mr. Barletta, Mr. Katko, and 
Mr. Donovan and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 3361 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence 
considered H.R. 3361 on September 17, 2015, and reported the 
measure to the Full Committee with a favorable recommendation, 
as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3361 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 3361 to 
the House on November 2, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-321.
    The House considered H.R. 3361 on November 2, 2015, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure, amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 3361 was received in the Senate on November 3, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security 
and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered H.R. 3361 on February 10, 2016, and ordered 
the measure to be reported to the Senate, with an Amendment in 
the Nature of a Substitute, favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported H.R. 3361 to the Senate on July 12, 2016, as 
S. Rpt. 114-297.

                                ------                                



 DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY SUPPORT TO FUSION CENTERS ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 3503

To require an assessment of fusion center personnel needs, and 
for other purposes; to the Committee on Homeland Security.

Summary

    This legislation requires an assessment of Department of 
Homeland Security support to fusion centers, including 
Departmental personnel assigned to fusion centers and whether 
such assignments are sufficient. Additionally, the bill 
supports ongoing efforts by the Office of Intelligence and 
Analysis to sponsor Top Secret / Sensitive Compartmented 
Information (TS/SCI) clearances for appropriate State and local 
analysts at fusion centers and report on whether a higher 
clearance level improves threat awareness and information 
sharing.

Legislative History

    H.R. 3503 was introduced in the House on September 11, 
2015, by Ms. McSally, Mr. McCaul, Mr. King of New York, Mr. 
Loudermilk, and Mr. Barletta and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 3503 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence 
considered H.R. 3503 on September 17, 2015, and reported the 
measure to the Full Committee with a favorable recommendation, 
without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3503 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    On October 28, 2015, the Chair of the House Permanent 
Select Committee on Intelligence sent a letter to the Chair of 
the Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration of H.R. 3503, the Committee on 
Intelligence would not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 3503. 
The letter further requested the support for Conferees should a 
House-Senate Conference be called. On the following day, the 
Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded, 
acknowledging the jurisdictional interest of the Committee on 
Intelligence and the support for the request to appoint 
Conferees.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3503 to the House on November 
2, 2014 as H. Rpt. 114-322.
    The House considered H.R. 3503 under Suspension of the 
Rules on November 2, 2015, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 3503 was received in the Senate on November 3, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security 
and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CLEARANCE MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 
                                  ACT

                               H.R. 3505

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to improve the 
management and administration of the security clearance 
processes throughout the Department of Homeland Security, and 
for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-296) to require the Secretary of Homeland Security 
to conduct a review of the sensitivity level designations of 
national security positions within the Department to ensure 
employees with security clearances continue to need access to 
such sensitive information. The bill requires the Department 
conduct an accounting of workforce needs to better manage the 
costs of unnecessary background investigations and limit the 
number of positions that may be vulnerable to insider threats 
and targeting by foreign intelligence services.

Legislative History

    H.R. 3505 was introduced in the House on September 15, 
2015, by Mr. Thompson of Mississippi and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 3505 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and 
Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence 
considered H.R. 3505 on September 17, 2015, and reported the 
measure to the Full Committee with a favorable recommendation, 
without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3505 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, without amendment, 
by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 3503 to 
the House on November 2, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-323.
    The House considered H.R. 3503 on November 2, 2015, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure, amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 3505 was received in the Senate on November 3, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security 
and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



                 FUSION CENTER ENHANCEMENT ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 3598

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to enhance the 
partnership between the Department of Homeland Security and the 
National Network of Fusion Centers, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation updates the existing language in Section 
210A of the Homeland Security Act (Pub. L. 107-296) to enhance 
State and local partners access to homeland security 
information and coordination with the Department of Homeland 
Security's Components. The bill reflects the evolution of the 
National Network of Fusion Centers, as well as the Office of 
Intelligence and Analysis relationship with fusion centers in 
the Network. The bill adds several new responsibilities for the 
Under Secretary of Intelligence and Analysis to reflect the 
current role of fusion centers in detecting and preventing a 
terrorist attack or other emergency. Additionally, this 
legislation requires the Under Secretary to submit a report on 
the efforts of the Office of Intelligence and Analysis and 
departmental components to support the National Network of 
Fusion Centers.

Legislative History

    Prior to introduction, the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism 
and Intelligence considered a Committee Print entitled the 
``Fusion Center Enhancement Act of 2015'' on September 17, 
2015, and reported the measure to the Full Committee with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    H.R. 3598 was introduced in the House on September 24, 
2015, by Mr. Barletta, and Mr. King of New York and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3598 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House, as amended, by voice vote.
    On October 28, 2015, the Chair of the House Permanent 
Select Committee on Intelligence sent a letter to the Chair of 
the Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration of H.R. 3598, the Committee on 
Intelligence would not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 3598. 
The letter further requested the support for Conferees should a 
House-Senate Conference be called. On the following day, the 
Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded, 
acknowledging the jurisdictional interest of the Committee on 
Intelligence and the support for the request to appoint 
Conferees.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3598 to the House on November 
2, 2014 as H. Rpt. 114-324.
    On November 2, 2015, the Chair of the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of 
the Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 3598. The letter further requested the support 
for Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be called. The 
Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded on 
November 2, 2015, acknowledging the jurisdictional interest of 
the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and the 
support for the request to appoint Conferees.
    The House considered H.R. 3598 under Suspension of the 
Rules on November 2, 2015, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 3598 was received in the Senate on November 3, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security 
and Governmental Affairs.

                              ----------                              


                Oversight Activities of the Subcommittee


        DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTELLIGENCE ENTERPRISE

    On January 28, 2015, the Chairman of the Full Committee, 
the Chairman of the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and 
Intelligence, and the Chairman of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security sent a letter to the Secretary of 
Homeland Security requesting an explanation for modifications 
made by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to 
existing security mandates at certain foreign airports. The 
letter requested an explanation for the modifications and the 
intelligence assessments used to justify the change.
    Committee staff met with numerous outside experts and think 
tank representatives on the Department's intelligence 
enterprise (DHS IE), Federal information sharing, and 
coordination with State and local law enforcement. These 
meetings included Business Executives for National Security 
(BENS), the Intelligence National Security Alliance (INSA), the 
American Enterprise Institute (AEI) and former Department of 
Homeland Security (DHS) and Federal Bureau of Investigation 
(FBI) officials.
    On October 29, 2015, Committee staff met with officials 
from the TSA on the agency's legislative authority to designate 
information Sensitive Security Information and how that program 
is managed and audited.
    The Chairman of the Full Committee and the Chairman of the 
Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence sent a letter 
to Secretary of Homeland Security on December 8, 2015, 
notifying the Department that the Committee was beginning an 
investigation of the Department's Intelligence Enterprise.
    On January 12, 2016, the Chairman and Ranking Member of the 
Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence and the Chair 
and Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response, and Communications sent a letter to 
Secretary of Homeland Security regarding the Department's 
participation in Capstone 16, the national exercise program.
    On January 19, 2016, Committee staff met with officials 
representing the Chief Intelligence Officer (CINT) of the 
Department regarding an ongoing Committee review of the DHS IE.
    On January 29, 2016, Committee staff received a briefing 
from TSA Office of Intelligence personnel regarding the 
structure and capability of the office.
    On March 1, 2016, the Chair of the Full Committee and the 
Chair of the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence 
sent a letter to the DHS Chief Intelligence Officer encouraging 
the Department to more fully utilize the information technology 
system known as CAPNET, and requesting data from the Department 
on the system's use by DHS components.
    On June 15, 2016, Committee staff met with the Department 
of Homeland Security Chief Procurement Officer, which included 
a discussion on how national security procurement concerns are 
addressed throughout the contracting process.
    On June 17, 2016, Committee staff met with officials from 
the Office of Intelligence and Analysis (I&A;), the DHS Office 
of Policy, TSA, Customs and Border Protection (CBP), and U.S. 
Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) on the Social 
Media Task Force and the development of Department-wide 
policies regarding the use of social media in intelligence 
products and security vetting.
    During the August 2016, Committee staff received briefings 
from the TSA Office of Intelligence; the CBP Office of 
Intelligence; Office within the National Protection and 
Programs Directorate (NPPD) with intelligence functions; and 
the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Homeland Security 
Investigations (HSI) Office of Intelligence. Additionally, 
Committee staff received briefings from the CINT and the Office 
of Operations Coordination (OPS) on their roles in the DHS IE.
    On October 6, 2016, Committee staff held a roundtable with 
think tank and law enforcement associations regarding 
recommendations for improvements to the DHS IE.

                  OFFICE OF INTELLIGENCE AND ANALYSIS

    On January 22, 2015, Majority staff of the Committee met 
with officials from the Department of Homeland Security Office 
of Intelligence and Analysis (I&A;) regarding their assessment 
of U.S. persons who had traveled to Syria to join jihadist 
groups.
    On February 10, 2015, Committee staff received a classified 
briefing on the Fiscal Year 2016 budget request for the Office 
of Intelligence and Analysis.
    On February 13, 2015, Committee staff received a classified 
briefing from I&A; Under Secretary on efforts to restructure I&A; 
analytical focus areas and realign its workforce, as well as an 
assessment of threats to the homeland.
    On February 20, 2015, Committee staff conducted a site 
visit at the Office of Intelligence and Analysis to conduct 
meetings with analysts focused on identifying travel patterns 
of U.S. persons attempting to travel to join the Islamic State 
of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) and other terror organizations.
    On May 19, 2015, Committee staff conducted a conference 
call with I&A; representatives on the use of social media in 
their analytic product and vetting protocols.
    On June 11, 2015, Committee staff met with I&A; 
representatives to receive an update on the agency's workforce 
realignment efforts.
    On June 18, 2015, Committee staff met with officials at I&A; 
to receive an update on I&A; initiatives and programs.
    On September 3, 2015, Committee staff held a conference 
call with I&A; officials regarding I&A; procedures for 
determining what information is subject to disclosure under the 
Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).
    On December 14, 2015, Committee staff conducted a series of 
briefings at I&A; related to analytic products, organizational 
restructure, and threats to the homeland.
    On March 1, 2016, Committee staff received a briefing on 
the I&A; fiscal year 2017 budget request.
    On June 3, 2016, Committee staff received a briefing from 
I&A; on initiatives and programs.

                  STATE AND LOCAL INFORMATION SHARING

    Committee Members and staff conducted numerous briefings 
and site visits with associations representing various State 
and local law enforcement and first responders, including the 
International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC), the National 
Fusion Center Association (NCFA), the National Governors' 
Association (NGA), International Association of Chiefs of 
Police (IACP), and the Major City Chiefs Association (MCCA), 
among others.
    On February 26, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Addressing Remaining Gaps in Federal, State, and 
Local Information Sharing.'' The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Mr. Mike Sena, President, National Fusion Center 
Association; Chief Richard Beary, President, International 
Association of Chiefs of Police; and Dr. Cedric Alexander, 
National President, National Organization of Black Law 
Enforcement Executives (NOBLE).
    On June 25, 2015, the Chairman of the Subcommittee on 
Counterterrorism and Intelligence and the Chairwoman of the 
Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response and 
Communication sent a letter to the Director of National 
Intelligence to express appreciation for the National 
Counterterrorism Center's (NCTC) work on the Joint 
Counterterrorism Assessment Team (JCAT) and requesting 
information on the program.
    On February 19, 2016, Committee staff participated in a 
briefing with personnel from the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency (FEMA) regarding the Capstone 2016 National Exercise 
Program to review information sharing aspects of the exercise.
    On March 7, 2016, Committee staff met with officials at the 
Virginia Fusion Center in Richmond, Virginia.
    On April 4, 2016, Committee staff received at briefing from 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation at the National Gang 
Intelligence Center (NGIC) on increased gang activity in 
certain U.S. communities and how information is shared and 
coordinated with local law enforcement.
    On April 5, 2016, Committee staff met with officials at the 
Pennsylvania Criminal Intelligence Center in Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania.
    On April 6, 2016, Committee staff met with officials at the 
Maryland Coordination and Analysis Center in Woodlawn, 
Maryland.
    On April 27, 2016, Committee staff received a briefing from 
the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and other 
Federal agencies regarding the Joint Counterterrorism Awareness 
Workshop Series, which included a discussion on how information 
sharing and suspicious activity reports will be included in 
future exercises.
    On May 31, 2016, Committee staff met with officials at the 
Washington Regional Threat Assessment Center in Washington D.C.
    On June 28, 2016, Committee staff received a classified 
briefing from Office of Intelligence and Analysis (I&A;) 
regarding their efforts to detail analysts and share 
information with the National Network of Fusion Centers.
    On July 14, 2016, the Chairman of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Director of the FBI to encourage the s efforts to 
increase the sharing of Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF) case 
information JTTF with State and local law enforcement.
    On August 5, 2016, Committee staff received a briefing and 
demo from DHS officials on the Homeland Security Information 
Network (HSIN), which is a platform to share unclassified 
information with Federal, State, local and private sector 
partners.
    On September 8, 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``State and Local Perspectives on Federal Information 
Sharing.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Chief 
Richard Beary, Immediate Past President, International 
Association of Chiefs of Police; Mr. Mike Sena, President, 
National Fusion Center Association; and Dr. Cedric Alexander, 
National President, National Organization of Black Law 
Enforcement Executives (NOBLE).
    On September 8 and September 29, 2016, Committee staff met 
with representatives from the National Fusion Center 
Association regarding issues raised in the hearing, including 
security clearances for fusion center analysts and access to 
the National Crime Information Center (NCIC).
    On September 20, 2016, Committee staff conducted a 
conference call with I&A; regarding Departmental capability to 
sponsor Top Secret / Sensitive Compartmented Information (TS/
SCI) clearances for appropriate State and local analysts at 
fusion centers.
    On September 28, 2016, Committee staff conducted a 
conference call with representatives from the FBI Criminal 
Justice Information Services (CJIS) regarding fusion center 
access to NCIC.
    From October 25-27, 2016, Committee staff attended the 
annual conference for the National Fusion Center Association in 
Alexandria, Virginia.

                   PRIVATE SECTOR INFORMATION SHARING

    On December 2, 2015, the Members of the Subcommittee on 
Counterterrorism and Intelligence and the Subcommittee on 
Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications received a 
briefing on security efforts and information sharing with the 
private sector.
    On June 29, 2016, Committee staff received a classified 
briefing from the Office of Intelligence and Analysis (I&A;) 
regarding ongoing initiatives to improve coordination and 
information sharing with the private sector.
    On June 29, 2016, Committee staff received a classified 
briefing from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) 
regarding the agency's ability to warn individuals and the 
private sector of terror threats.

                  EXPANSION OF TERROR GROUPS IN AFRICA

    On April 30, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Terrorism in Africa: The Imminent Threat to the United 
States.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. J. Peter 
Pham, Director, Africa Center, Atlantic Council; Mr. Thomas 
Joscelyn, Senior Fellow, Foundation for Defense of Democracies; 
and Dr. Daniel Byman, Research Director, Center for Middle East 
Policy, Center for Security Studies, The Brookings Institution.
    On May 17, 2016, the Members of the Subcommittee received a 
classified briefing on terror threats in sub-Saharan Africa. 
Representatives from the National Counterterrorism Center, the 
State Department's Bureau for Counterterrorism, the State 
Department's Bureau for African Affairs and the Defense 
Intelligence Agency were present.
    On June 28, 2016, Committee staff received a classified 
briefing from the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) 
regarding the agency's coordination with the Department of 
State (DOS) on threats to commercial aviation in North and West 
Africa.

                        VETTING SYRIAN REFUGEES

    On January 28, 2015, the Chairman of the Full Committee, 
the Chairman of the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and 
Intelligence, and the Chairman of the Subcommittee on Border 
and Maritime Security sent a letter to Ambassador Rice, 
Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs 
regarding security concerns related to the large number of 
Syrian refugees expected to be admitted to the United States 
during the next two years. The Members requested a detailed 
description of the number of Syrian refugees the United States 
expects to resettle, the timeline for resettlement over the 
next two years, and an overview of how the interagency will 
enhance security measures within the vetting process. 
Additionally, the letter requested a Member briefing from DHS, 
the Department of State, the Department of Justice, the Federal 
Bureau of Investigations, the National Counterterrorism Center, 
and the White House Advisor for Homeland Security and 
Counterterrorism. Majority Members of the Subcommittee received 
a classified briefing on these issues on October 1, 2015.
    On March 20, 2015, Committee staff met with employees from 
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) and their 
union representatives to discuss concerns about vetting of 
Syrian refugees.
    On March 24, 2015, Committee staff conducted a conference 
call with a former USCIS employee regarding their experience 
vetting refugee applicants and concerns with thoroughly vetting 
Syrian refugees for national security concerns.
    On June 24, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Admitting Syrian Refugees: The Intelligence Void and the 
Emerging Homeland Security Threat.'' The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Dr. Seth Jones, Director, International Security 
and Defense Policy Center, RAND Corporation; Mr. Thomas 
Fuentes, FBI Assistant Director (Retired); and Dr. Daveed 
Gartenstein-Ross, Senior Fellow, Foundation for Defense of 
Democracies.

                        TRANSPORTATION SECURITY

    On September 17, 2015, the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security and the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and 
Intelligence held a joint hearing entitled ``Safeguarding our 
Nation's Surface Transportation Systems Against Evolving 
Terrorist Threats.'' The Subcommittees received testimony from 
Mr. Eddie Mayenschein, Assistant Administrator, Office of 
Security Policy and Industry Engagement, Transportation 
Security Administration, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; 
Ms. Jennifer Grover, Director, Transportation Security and 
Coast Guard Issues, Homeland Security and Justice Team, U.S. 
Government Accountability Office; Mr. Raymond Diaz, Director of 
Security, Metropolitan Transportation Authority (New York); and 
Ms. Polly Hanson, Chief of Police, National Railroad Passenger 
Corporation (Amtrak).
    On February 1, 2016, the Chairman of the Subcommittee on 
Counterterrorism and Intelligence, the Chairman of the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security, and the Chairman of 
the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security sent a letter 
to Secretary Johnson to express concern over reports that 
passengers on an international flight from Mexico landing at 
John F. Kennedy International Airport were allowed to leave the 
airport without going through U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection screening.

              INTERNATIONAL COUNTERTERRORISM COORDINATION

    On January 9, 2015, Majority staff met with former 
Department of Homeland Security officials regarding 
recommendations to improve U.S. government efforts to develop 
countering violent extremism (CVE) programs.
    On February 6, 2015, Committee staff met with 
representatives from the Australian Embassy to discuss 
counterterrorism cooperation between the U.S. and Australia and 
homeland threats within Australia.
    On March 3, 2015, Committee staff met with representatives 
from the United-Kingdom-based Henry Jackson Society regarding 
U.K. challenges and recommendations for addressing the growing 
threat of homegrown radicalization.
    On March 12, 2015, Committee staff conducted a conference 
call with State Department personnel at the U.S. Embassy in 
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia regarding U.S. initiatives to improve 
counterterrorism cooperation with Malaysia and ongoing 
legislative action within the Malaysian Parliament focused on 
homegrown radicalization.
    On March 20, 2015, Committee staff received a classified 
briefing from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) on the 
results of their review into the Department of State 
Counterterrorism Bureau.
    On March 27, 2015, Committee staff received a classified 
briefing from the Department of State Bureau of Consular 
Affairs and the Counterterrorism Bureau regarding security 
issues and other issues of interest to the United States 
related to Malaysia and Australia, as well as the larger 
region.
    From April 3 through 12, 2015, Committee staff conducted a 
staff delegation visit to Turkey, Malaysia, and Australia 
focused on foreign fighters, counterterrorism information 
sharing, legal tools for prosecuting terrorists, and countering 
extremism.
    On May 7, 2015, Committee staff held a follow up meeting 
with officials from the Australian Embassy to review issues 
discussed during the staff delegation visit.
    On May 21, 2015, Committee staff met with the officials 
from the Canadian Embassy to discuss their domestic 
counterterrorism concerns and programs to counter violent 
extremism.
    On Friday, October 9, 2015, the Members of the Subcommittee 
received a briefing which examined what the United States can 
learn from the history of Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) in 
the United Kingdom. Representatives from United Kingdom-based 
Henry Jackson Society's Centre for the Response to 
Radicalisation and Terrorism (CRT) were present to provide a 
background and respond to Member questions.

                 COUNTERING VIOLENT ISLAMIST TERRORISM

    Throughout the Congress, Committee Members and staff met 
with numerous practitioners and stakeholders related to 
homegrown extremism and Islamist radicalization.
    On March 26, 2015, Committee staff held a roundtable with 
representatives from the Department of Homeland Security, 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, and Department of Justice 
regarding the Three-City Pilot for countering violent 
extremism.
    On April 14, 2015, Committee staff received a briefing from 
the Department of Justice's National Justice Institute 
regarding program evaluations for countering violent extremism 
programs.
    On May 27, 2015, Committee staff received a briefing from 
the NCTC regarding efforts to identify and counter Islamist 
extremism on various social media programs.
    On June 4 and July 22, 2015, Committee staff met with a 
senior law enforcement official from a jurisdiction 
participating in the Three-City Pilot to discuss ongoing 
challenges.
    On June 5, 2015, Committee staff met with representatives 
from the Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology 
Directorate regarding their efforts to identify indicators and 
countermeasures for radicalization.
    On February 12, 2016, Committee staff met with Federal 
agencies participating in an interagency task force focused on 
countering violent extremism.
    On March 29, 2016, Committee staff received a briefing from 
Department of Homeland Security personnel on plans for 
releasing countering violent extremism grant funding.
    On May 24, 2016, the Members of the Subcommittee on 
Counterterrorism and Intelligence received a classified 
briefing from the NCTC on terrorist use of encrypted 
technologies and the impact on law enforcement to identify and 
investigate potential homegrown threats.
    On June 5, 2016, Committee staff received a briefing from 
the Office of Community Partnerships (OCP) and the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) on the Notice of Funding 
announcement for the countering violent extremism grant 
program.
    On September 1, 2016, Committee staff received a classified 
briefing from OCP and the Office of Intelligence and Analysis 
(I&A;) regarding security vetting of grant applicants 
participating in the countering violent extremism grant 
program.
    On September 20, 2016, Committee staff conducted a 
conference call with staff from the I&A; and OCP regarding 
security vetting of grant applicants.

                   RADICALIZATION WITHIN U.S. PRISONS

    On February 27, 2015, the Chairman of the Subcommittee sent 
a letter to Assistant to the President for Homeland Security 
and Counterterrorism, requesting information on the state of 
counter-radicalization efforts in US prisons and requesting 
data on the number of those currently held on terror charges.
    On September 10, 2015, Committee staff met with officials 
from the Bureau of Prisons (BOP) regarding identifying and 
preventing radicalization in prisons. Committee staff held a 
follow up meeting with the BOP Religious Services Unit on 
October 5, 2015, on how employees and volunteers providing 
religious counseling to inmates are vetted. In preparation for 
the hearing, Committee staff also met with numerous other 
entities, including the Congressional Research Service, 
academics, and think tanks.
    On October 28, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Terror Inmates: Countering Violent Extremism in 
Prison and Beyond.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from 
Mr. Jerome P. Bjelopera, Specialist in Organized Crime and 
Terrorism, Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress; 
Mr. Tony C. Parker, Assistant Commissioner, Department of 
Correction, State of Tennessee; and Mr. Brian Levin, Professor, 
Department of Criminal Justice, Director, Center for Study of 
Hate and Extremism, California State University, San 
Bernardino.
    On December 1, 2015, the Chairman of the Subcommittee sent 
a letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security requesting an 
update on the Department's efforts to counter radicalization in 
U.S. prisons, which had been previously outlined in the 
Administration's 2011 CVE strategy.
    On January 12, 2016, the Chairman of the Subcommittee sent 
a letter to Director of the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) to 
urge BOP to share pre-release information related to terrorist 
cases with state and local authorities, and to request 
information on the Bureau's policies ``regarding allowing 
academic researchers access to BOP facilities and terror 
inmates.''

                    THREATS FROM IRAN AND HEZBOLLAH

    On October 22, 2015 and January 8, 2016, Committee staff 
met with experts from Washington D.C.-based think tanks 
regarding Iran's violations of Joint Comprehensive Plan of 
Action and the potential impact to homeland security.
    On February 11, 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``The Future of Iranian Terror and Its Threat to the 
US Homeland.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. 
Tzvi Kahn, Senior Policy Analyst, Foreign Policy Initiative; 
Mr. Ilan Berman, Vice President, American Foreign Policy 
Council; and Mr. Bilal Y. Saab, Senior Fellow for Middle East 
Security, Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security, 
Atlantic Council.
    On March 8, 2016, Committee staff received a briefing from 
the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) on DEA and European partner 
agency efforts to disrupt Hezbollah drug trafficking and money 
laundering activities.

                EXPANSION OF TERRORISM IN SOUTHEAST ASIA

    Throughout the months of March and April 2016, Committee 
staff met with numerous outside experts on Southeast Asia and 
extremism.
    On April 27, 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``ISIS in the Pacific: Assessing Terrorism in Southeast Asia 
and the Threat to the Homeland.'' The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Mr. John Watts, Nonresident Senior Fellow, Brent 
Scowcroft Center on International Security, Atlantic Council; 
Mr. Patrick Skinner, Director of Special Projects, The Soufan 
Group; Ms. Supna Zaidi Peery, Research Analyst, Counter 
Extremism Project; and Dr. Joseph C. Liow, Senior Fellow, 
Foreign Policy, Center for East Asia Policy Studies, The 
Brookings Institution.

                          TERRORIST FINANCING

    On March 17, 2015, Committee staff conducted a conference 
call with a West Coast police department regarding their 
concerns about terror finance connections and benefit fraud.
    On April 26, 2016, Committee staff met with academics from 
George Mason University regarding developing trends in terror 
finance.
    On March 29, 2016, Committee staff met with private 
industry regarding concerns that illegal and counterfeit 
products may be used to finance terror activities.
    On May 12, 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Following the Money: Examining Current Terrorist Financing 
Trends and the Threat to the Homeland.'' The Subcommittee 
received testimony from Dr. Louise Shelley, Director, 
Terrorism, Transnational Crime and Corruption Center, George 
Mason University; Dr. Jonathan Schanzer, Vice President for 
Research, Foundation for the Defense of Democracies; and Ms. 
Deborah Lehr, Chairman and Founder, The Antiquities Coalition.
    On June 9 and 14, 2016, Committee staff conducted follow up 
meetings with representatives from the experts on antiquity 
smuggling and terror finance.
    On June 22, 2016, Committee staff received a briefing from 
the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Cultural 
Properties Program on their efforts to identify the illicit 
trade of antiquities and the link to terror finance.
    On July 7, 2016, the Chairman of the Subcommittee on 
Counterterrorism and Intelligence and the Chairman of the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security sent a letter to the 
Attorney General requesting information on antiquities 
smuggling as a means to finance of terrorist networks.
    On July 11, 2016, Committee staff received a briefing from 
Customs and Border Protection's (CBP) Asset Identification and 
Removal Group regarding the identification of illicit cargo and 
potential links to terror finance.
    On July 12, 2016, Committee staff received a briefing from 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation regarding past and ongoing 
investigations linked to antiquities smuggling and terror 
finance.
    On July 19, 2016, Committee staff received a briefing from 
representatives from the Smithsonian Institute regarding 
antiquities smuggling.
    On July 20, 2016, Committee staff received a briefing from 
CBP's Office of Trade and the National Targeting Center (NTC) 
on the agency's ability to identify illicit antiquities.

                COUNTERINTELLIGENCE AND INSIDER THREATS

    Throughout the 114th Congress, Committee staff conducted a 
number of meetings with Federal and private sector entities 
regarding insider threat programs.
    On April 7, 2015, Committee staff received a classified 
briefing from the Office of the Chief Security Officer (OCSO) 
at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) regarding programs 
to identify insider threats at DHS and the Fiscal Year 2016 
budget request for the office.
    On February 4, 2016, Committee staff received a briefing 
from the Federal Protective Service (FPS) and the General 
Services Administration regarding security measures for 
Department of Homeland Security components utilizing office 
space in 1 World Trade Center in New York City, New York.
    On March 24, 2016, Committee staff received a classified 
briefing from the Defense Security Service (DSS) regarding 
counterintelligence threats to the defense industrial base.
    On May 5, 2016, Committee staff received a classified 
briefing from OSCSO and the Office of Intelligence and Analysis 
(I&A;) on the Department's counterintelligence and insider 
threat programs.
    On June 13, 2016, Committee staff received a classified 
briefing from the United States Coast Guard (USCG) on their 
counterintelligence and insider threat programs.
    On June 14, 2016, the Members of the Subcommittee received 
a classified threat briefing from the Defense Security Service 
(DSS) on counterintelligence threats.
    On June 27, 2016, Committee staff received a briefing from 
I&A; and the Office of the Chief Security Officer (OCSO) related 
to an incident involving a potential insider threat and 
concerns related to workplace violence.
    On July 13, 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Counterintelligence and Insider Threats: How Prepared is the 
Department of Homeland Security?'' The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Hon. Francis X. Taylor, Under Secretary, Office 
of Intelligence and Analysis, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security; Col. Richard D. McComb, Chief Security Officer, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security; and Rdml. Robert Hayes, 
Assistant Commandant for Intelligence, U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security.
    On August 11, 2016, Committee staff received a briefing and 
tour at the DHS Headquarters by the OCSO to review insider 
threat programs and workplace violence prevention measures.
    On September 14, 2016, Committee staff received a 
classified briefing from the DHS Science and Technology 
Directorate and I&A; regarding counterintelligence threats.
    On September 28, 2016, the Chairman of the Subcommittee 
sent a letter to the Chairman of the Federal Communications 
Commission (FCC) regarding the importance of the Number 
Portability Administration Center (NPAC) and expressing concern 
over vulnerabilities and possible foreign security violations.

   DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY OFFICE OF OPERATIONS COORDINATION

    On February 2, 2015, Committee staff received a briefing 
from representatives of the Office of Operations Coordination 
(OPS) on their planned reorganization.
    On February 20, 2015, Committee staff received a briefing 
and tour of the National Operations Center (NOC).
    On November 10, 2015, Committee staff conducted a 
conference call with NOC personnel regarding legislative 
options to update the NOC authorization in the Homeland 
Security Act.
    On March 1, 2016, Committee staff received a briefing on 
the OPS fiscal year 2017 budget request.

                        UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES

    On January 7, 2015, Majority staff met outside experts on 
the threat posed by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to mass 
gathering events within the Homeland.
    On February 9, 2015, Committee staff received a classified 
briefing from the Office of Intelligence and Analysis on 
threats posed by unmanned aerial vehicles within the Homeland.

                            TERROR WATCHLIST

    On March 31, 2015, Committee staff received a classified 
briefing from the Department of Justice (DOJ) and the 
Department of Homeland Security (DHS) on revisions the 
government will soon announce to the redress procedures for 
certain claims involving denials of boarding on commercial 
aircraft.

                    FOREIGN TERRORIST ORGANIZATIONS

    On December 14, 2015, the Chairman of the Subcommittee sent 
a letter to Assistant to the President for Homeland Security 
and Counterterrorism, regarding the results of a Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) review of the Foreign Terrorist 
Organization designation process and asking for information on 
how the process can be improved, and more effectively 
incorporate the Department of Homeland Security. 
    On February 20, 2016, Committee staff spoke with officials 
from the White House National Security Council regarding the 
Foreign Terrorist Organization (FTO) designation process.
    On May 2, 2016, Committee staff received a classified 
briefing from Department of State officials regarding the FTO 
designation process and designations under consideration.

                              ----------                              


                       Subcommittee Hearings Held


``Addressing Remaining Gaps in Federal, State, and Local 
        Information Sharing'' February 26, 2015. (Serial No. 
        114-6)
``Terrorism in Africa: The Imminent Threat to the United 
        States.'' April 29, 2015. (Serial No. 114-16)
``Admitting Syrian Refugees: The Intelligence Void and the 
        Emerging Homeland Security Threat.'' June 24, 2015. 
        (Serial No. 114-22)
Joint hearing with the Subcommittee on Transportation Security 
        ``Safeguarding our Nation's Surface Transportation 
        Systems Against Evolving Terrorist Threats.'' September 
        17, 2015. (Serial No. 114-32)
``Terror Inmates: Countering Violent Extremism in Prison and 
        Beyond.'' October 28, 2015. (Serial No. 114-40)
``The Future of Iranian Terror and Its Threat to the US 
        Homeland. February 11, 2016. (Serial No. 114-53)
``ISIS in the Pacific: Assessing Terrorism in Southeast Asia 
        and the Threat to the Homeland. April 27, 2016. (Serial 
        No. 114-65)
``Following the Money: Examining Current Terrorist Financing 
        Trends and the Threat to the Homeland.'' May 12, 2016. 
        (Serial No. 114-68)
``Counterintelligence and Insider Threats: How Prepared is the 
        Department of Homeland Security?'' July 13, 2016. 
        (Serial No. 114-82)
``State and Local Perspectives on Federal Information 
        Sharing.''September 6, 2016. (Serial No. 114-84)

          Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency

                  Scott Perry, Pennsylvania, Chairman

Jeff Duncan, South Carolina
Curt Clawson, Florida
Earl L. ``Buddy'' Carter, Georgia
Barry Loudermilk, Georgia
Michael T. McCaul, Texas
                  (ex officio)      Bonnie Watson Coleman, New Jersey
                                    Cedric L. Richmond, Louisiana
                                    Norma J. Torres, California
                                    Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi
                                                      (ex officio)

                              ----------                              


    During the 114th Congress, the Subcommittee on Oversight 
and Management Efficiency held 12 hearings, receiving testimony 
from 41 witnesses, and considered 5 measures, resulting in 5 
Public Laws.

                              ----------                              


               Legislative Activities of the Subcommittee



                DHS IT DUPLICATION REDUCTION ACT OF 2015

                     Public Law 114-43    H.R. 1626

To reduce duplication of information technology at the 
Department of Homeland Security, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This law requires the Chief Information Officer of the 
Department of Homeland Security to identify duplicative 
information technology systems within the Department and 
develop a strategy to reduce such duplications.

Legislative History

    H.R. 1626 was introduced in the House on March 25, 2015, by 
Mr. Hurd of Texas and seven original cosponsors and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 
1626 was referred to the Subcommittee on Oversight and 
Management Efficiency.
    The Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency 
considered H.R. 1626 on May 13, 2015, and ordered the measure 
reported to the Full Committee for consideration, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 1626 on May 20, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1626 to the House on June 17, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-162.
    The House considered H.R. 1626 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 23, 2015, and passed the measure, amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 1626 was received in the Senate on June 24, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs was discharged from further consideration of H.R. 1626 
on July 23, 2015, and the measure was passed, without 
amendment, by unanimous consent. Clearing the measure for the 
President.
    H.R. 1626 was presented to the President on July 27, 2015. 
The President signed H.R. 1626 into law on August 6, 2015, as 
Public Law 114-43.

                                ------                                



                  BORDER JOBS FOR VETERANS ACT OF 2015

                Public Law 114-68    H.R. 2835 (S. 1603)

To actively recruit members of the Armed Forces who are 
separating from military service to serve as Customs and Border 
Protection Officers.

Summary

    The purpose of this law is to connect veterans of the Armed 
Forces in need of employment with U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection (CBP), a component in need of qualified applicants 
to fill vacancies at understaffed U.S. ports of entry. The 
legislation requires the Department of Defense (DoD) and the 
Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to cooperate on efforts 
to recruit and expedite the hiring of outgoing U.S. military 
service members and report back to Congress on the progress 
made.

Legislative History

H.R. 2835
    H.R. 2835 was introduced in the House on June 18, 2015, by 
Ms. McSally and nine original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security, and the Committee on Armed 
Services. Within the Committee, H.R. 2835 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security and the 
Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency.
    The Chair of the Committee on Armed Services sent a letter 
to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on September 
25, 2015, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration on 
the House Floor, the Committee on Armed Services would not seek 
a sequential referral of H.R. 2835. On that same date, the 
Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded, agreeing 
to the jurisdictional interests of the Committee on Armed 
Services, and support for the appointment of Conferees, should 
a House-Senate Conference be called.
    The House agreed to Suspend the Rules and passed H.R. 2835 
on September 28, 2015, as amended, by a \2/3\ record vote of 
410 yeas and 0 nays, (Roll No. 519).
    H.R. 2835 was received in the Senate and read twice on 
September 29, 2015.
    The Senate passed H.R. 2835, without amendment, by 
unanimous consent on October 1, 2015. Clearing the measure for 
the President.
    H.R. 2835 was presented to the President on October 7, 
2015. The President signed H.R. 2835 into law on October 16, 
2015, as Public Law 114-68.

S. 1603
    S. 1603, the Senate companion measure, was introduced in 
the Senate on June 17, 2015, by Mr. Flake, Mr. Johnson, Mr. 
McCain, and Mr. Schumer, and referred to the Senate Committee 
on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 1603 on June 24, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported with an Amendment in the Nature of a 
Substitute, favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs filed a report on August 5, 2015, as (S. Rpt. 114-116).
    The Senate passed S. 1603 on September 9, 2015, as amended, 
by unanimous consent.
    S. 1603 was received in the House on September 10, 2015, 
and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security, and the 
Committee on Armed Services. Within the Committee, S. 1603 was 
referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security.
    The Committee on Rules met on September 16, 2015, and filed 
a Rule providing for the consideration of H.R. 3134 and H.R. 
3504. Rule filed in the House as H.Res. 421 (H. Rpt. 114-262). 
Section 4 of H.Res. 421 provided that upon passage of H.R. 3504 
the House shall be considered to have: (1) stricken all after 
the enacting clause of S. 1603 and inserted in lieu thereof the 
provisions of H.R. 3504, the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors 
Protection Act, as passed by the House; and (2) passed the 
Senate bill as so amended.
    The House considered H.Res. 421 as a privileged matter on 
September 17, 2015, and agreed to the Rule by a recorded vote 
of 246 yeas and 179 nays, (Roll No. 503). Pursuant to the 
provisions of H.Res. 421, S. 1603, as amended with the text of 
H.R. 3504, as adopted by the House, was passed by the House. 
The legislative text within the jurisdiction of the Committee 
on Homeland Security was thereby removed.
    On September 21, 2015, the message on the House action was 
received in Senate and at held at the desk.

                                ------                                



   EDWARD `TED' KAUFMAN AND MICHAEL LEAVITT PRESIDENTIAL TRANSITIONS 
                        IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 2015

                     Public Law 114-136    S. 1172

To improve the process of presidential transition.

Summary

    S. 1172 amends the Presidential Transition Act of 1963 
(Pub. L. 88-277) to provided for enhanced coordination in the 
transfer of power for the 2016 Presidential Election.
    Section 6 of this law directs the Department of Homeland 
Security to report to Congressional committees, not later than 
February 15, 2016, on threats and vulnerabilities during 
Presidential transitions. The report shall identify and discuss 
vulnerabilities related to border security and threats related 
to terrorism, including from weapons of mass destruction; shall 
identify steps being taken to address the threats and 
vulnerabilities during a presidential transition; and may 
include recommendations for actions by components and agencies 
within the Department of Homeland Security.

Legislative History

    S. 1172 was introduced in the Senate by Mr. Carper and Mr. 
Johnson on April 30, 2015, and referred to the Senate Committee 
on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 1172 on May 6, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported with amendments favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 1172 to the Senate on July 27, 2015, as S. 
Rpt. 114-94.
    The Senate considered S. 1172 on July 30, 2015, and passed 
the measure, amended, by unanimous consent.
    S. 1172 was received in the House on July 31, 2016, and 
referred to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, 
and in addition to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within 
the Committee, S. 1172 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Oversight and Management Efficiency.
    The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform considered 
S. 1172 on October 9, 2015, and ordered the measure to be 
reported to the House with an Amendment in the Nature of a 
Substitute, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform reported 
S. 1172 to the House on December 18, 2015 as H. Rpt. 114-384, 
Part I. Subsequently, the Committee on Homeland Security was 
discharged from further consideration.
    The House agreed to Suspend the Rules and passed S. 1172 on 
February 29, 2016, as amended, by voice vote.
    On March 8, 2016, the Senate concurred in the House 
amendment to S. 1172 by unanimous consent, clearing the measure 
for the President.
    S. 1172 was presented to the President on March 15, 2016. 
The President signed S. 1172 into law on March 18, 2016, as 
Public Law 114-136.

                                ------                                



      DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HEADQUARTERS CONSOLIDATION 
                       ACCOUNTABILITY ACT OF 2015

               Public Law 114-150    S. 1638 (H.R. 1640)

To direct the Secretary of Homeland Security to submit to 
Congress a report on the Department of Homeland Security 
headquarters consolidation project in the National Capital 
Region, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation requires the Secretary of Homeland 
Security to submit to Congress a report on the Department of 
Homeland Security's headquarters consolidation project in the 
National Capital Region.

Legislative History

H.R. 1640
    H.R. 1640 was introduced in the House on March 25, 2015, by 
Mr. Walker and seven original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 1640 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Oversight and Management 
Efficiency.
    The Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency 
considered H.R. 1640 on May 13, 2015, and ordered the measure 
reported to the Full Committee for consideration, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 1640 on May 20, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter on June 15, 2015, agreeing to 
forgo further consideration of H.R. 1640. The letter further 
requested the appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called. The Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure on June 17, 2015, 
acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure and the agreement to not seek 
a sequential referral of H.R. 1640, and supporting the request 
for Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be called.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1640 to the House on June 17, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-166.
    The House considered H.R. 1640 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 23, 2015, and passed the measure, amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 1640 was received in the Senate on June 24, 205, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

S. 1638
    S. 1638, the Senate companion measure, was introduced in 
the Senate on June 18, 2015, by Mr. Johnson and Mr. Carper, and 
referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 1638 on June 24, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate, without amendment, 
favorably.
    Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs 
reported S. 1638 to the Senate on March 14, 2016, as S. Rpt. 
114-227.
    The Senate considered S. 1638 on April 6, 2016, and passed 
the measure by unanimous consent.
    S. 1638 was received in the House on April 11, 2016, and 
held at the Desk.
    The House considered S. 1638 on April 18, 2016, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure by voice vote.
    S. 1638 was presented to the President on April 20, 2016. 
The President signed S. 1638 into law on April 29, 2016, as 
Public Law 114-150.

                                ------                                



                    DHS FOIA EFFICIENCY ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 1615

To direct the Chief FOIA Officer of the Department of Homeland 
Security to make certain improvements in the implementation of 
section 552 of title 5, United States Code (commonly known as 
the Freedom of Information Act), and for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation directs the Chief Freedom of Information 
Act Officer of the Department of Homeland Security to make 
certain improvements in the implementation of section 552 of 
title 5, United States Code (commonly known as the Freedom of 
Information Act).

Legislative History

    H.R. 1615 was introduced in the House on March 25, 2015, by 
Mr. Carter of Georgia and seven original cosponsors and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 1615 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Oversight and Management Efficiency.
    The Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency 
considered H.R. 1615 on May 13, 2015, reported the measure to 
the Full Committee for consideration, with a favorable 
recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 1615 on May 20, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1615 to the House on June 11, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-148.
    The House considered H.R. 1615 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 23, 2015, and passed the measure on June 25, 
2015, amended, by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 423 yeas and 0 nays, 
(Roll No. 387).
    H.R. 1615 was received in the Senate on July 7, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on the Judiciary.

                                ------                                



        DHS PAID ADMINISTRATIVE LEAVE ACCOUNTABILITY ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 1633

To provide for certain improvements relating to the tracking 
and reporting of employees of the Department of Homeland 
Security placed on administrative leave, or any other type of 
paid non-duty status without charge to leave, for personnel 
matters, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation requires the Department of Homeland 
Security to track and report on employees placed on 
administrative leave for personnel matters. The head of each 
component within the Department is directed to report to Chief 
Human Capital Office on a quarterly basis on staff who are 
placed on administrative leave.

Legislative History

    H.R. 1633 was introduced in the House on March 25, 2015, by 
Mr. Loudermilk and seven original cosponsors and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 
1633 was referred to the Subcommittee on Oversight and 
Management Efficiency.
    The Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency 
considered H.R. 1633 on May 13, 2015, and ordered the measure 
reported to the Full Committee for consideration, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 1633 on May 20, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1633 to the House on June 17, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-163.
    The House considered H.R. 1633 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 23, 2015, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 1633 was received in the Senate on June 24, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



          FEDERALLY FUNDED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT SUNSHINE 
                              ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 1637

To require annual reports on the activities and accomplishments 
of federally funded research and development centers within the 
Department of Homeland Security, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation requires the Secretary of Homeland 
Security to annually submit to Congress a list of the ongoing 
and completed projects that Federally Funded Research and 
Development Centers within the Department have been tasked.

Legislative History

    H.R. 1637 was introduced in the House on March 25, 2015, by 
Mr. Ratcliffe and seven original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 1637 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, 
Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies and the 
Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency.
    On May 20, 2015, the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, 
Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies and the 
Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency were 
discharged from further consideration of H.R. 1637.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 1637 on 
May 20, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to the 
House, with a favorable recommendation, without amendment, by 
voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1637 to the House on June 11, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-149.
    The Chair of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on June 23, 2015, agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee would 
not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 1637. The letter further 
requested support for the appointment of Conferees should a 
House-Senate Conference be called. On that same date, the Chair 
of the Committee on Homeland Security sent a letter to the 
Chair of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology 
acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology and the agreement to not seek a 
sequential referral of H.R. 1637.
    The House considered H.R. 1637 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 23, 2015, and passed the measure, amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 1637 was received in the Senate on June 24, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions relating to H.R. 1637 were included in Sec. 1906 
of the Conference Report to accompany S. 2943.
    (See also action on S. 2943 under Full Committee 
legislative activities).

                                ------                                



          HOMELAND SECURITY DRONE ASSESSMENT AND ANALYSIS ACT

                               H.R. 1646

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to research how 
certain commercially available small and medium sized unmanned 
aircraft systems could be used in an attack, how to prevent or 
mitigate the risk of such an attack, and for other purposes.
[To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to research how 
small and medium sized unmanned aerial systems could be used in 
an attack, how to prevent or mitigate the effects of such an 
attack, and for other purposes.]

Summary

    This legislation requires the Secretary of Homeland 
Security to research how certain commercially available small 
and medium sized unmanned aircraft systems could be used in an 
attack, how to prevent or mitigate the risk of such an attack, 
and for other purposes.

Legislative History

    H.R. 1646 was introduced in the House on March 26, 2015, by 
Mrs. Watson Coleman and Mr. Thompson and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security, and in addition to the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 1646 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Oversight and Management Efficiency and the Subcommittee on 
Counterterrorism and Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency 
considered H.R. 1646 on May 13, 2015, and ordered the measure 
reported to the Full Committee for consideration, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence was 
discharged from further consideration of H.R. 1646 on May 20, 
2015.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 1646 on May 20, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on June 9, 2015, agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration of H.R. 1646 on the House Floor, the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure would waive 
further consideration of H.R. 1646. The letter further 
requested the appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called. The Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security responded on June 10, 2015, acknowledging the 
agreement of Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure to 
waive further consideration of H.R. 1646.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported to the House on 
June 18, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-169, Pt. I. Subsequently, the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure was discharged 
from further consideration of H.R. 1646.
    The House considered H.R. 1646 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 23, 2015, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote. During consideration, the title was amended so as 
to read ``To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to 
research how certain commercially available small and medium 
sized unmanned aircraft systems could be used in an attack, how 
to prevent or mitigate the risk of such an attack, and for 
other purposes.''
    H.R. 1646 was received in the Senate on June 24, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                              ----------                              


                Oversight Activities of the Subcommittee


    DEPARTMENTAL EFFICIENCY AND WASTE, FRAUD ABUSE, AND DUPLICATION

    The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 forced the 
United States to fundamentally rethink the threats it faces and 
its approach to defending the Nation. Given the current 
financial climate and importance of the mission, it is 
imperative the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) be a good 
steward of taxpayer dollars and operate in an effective and 
efficient manner. As such, the Subcommittee conducted rigorous 
oversight to identify and remedy waste, fraud, abuse, and 
duplicative programs at DHS.
    On January 26, 2015, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to GAO's Comptroller General requesting to sign on to 
ongoing work on DHS's fee-based programs, the 2014 DHS 
Quadrennial Homeland Security Review, and DHS's tactical 
communications, among other topics. The Ranking Member sent a 
letter on March 2, 2015, requesting to sign on this work. 
Subcommittee staff received an update briefings from GAO on its 
work related to DHS fee funded programs on May 29, 2015.
    On February 26, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Assessing DHS's Performance: Watchdog 
Recommendations to Improve Homeland Security.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Hon. John Roth, Inspector 
General, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Ms. Rebecca 
Gambler, Director, Homeland Security and Justice Issues, U.S. 
Government Accountability Office; and Dr. Daniel M. Gerstein, 
Senior Policy Researcher, The RAND Corporation. The purpose of 
the hearing was to determine what demonstrable progress DHS has 
made in implementing recommendations by the GAO and the OIG to 
end duplication, minimize inefficiency, root out wasteful 
spending, and identify further issue areas which may require 
Subcommittee oversight.
    On March 27, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives from the Government Accountability Office to 
discuss GAO's perspective on DHS's QHSR efforts to date and 
potential areas that could be addressed with new 
reauthorization legislation. As a follow up, Subcommittee staff 
received an update from GAO on its work related to the 2014 
Quadrennial Homeland Security Review (QHSR) on June 5, 2015.
    On July 8, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Examining DHS's Misplaced Focus on Climate Change.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Thomas P. Smith, 
Acting Assistant Secretary, Strategy, Planning, Analysis, and 
Risk, Office of Policy, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; 
Mr. Roy Wright, Deputy Associate Administrator, Federal 
Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Federal Emergency 
Management Agency, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. 
Robert Kolasky, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Infrastructure 
Protection, National Protection and Programs Directorate, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security; and Mr. Marc A. Levy, Deputy 
Director, Center for International Earth, Science Information 
Network, Columbia University.
    The 2014 QHSR states ``Natural disasters, pandemics, and 
the trends associated with climate change continue to present a 
major area of homeland security risk.'' The purpose of this 
hearing was to examine DHS's focus, role, and budget regarding 
climate change.
    On June 17, 2015, the Chair of the Subcommittee met with 
the Under Secretary for Management at DHS to discuss the Under 
Secretary's priorities and vision for the Department. This 
meeting was followed by additional briefings on June 19, and 
October 30, 2015, to discuss the USM's progress on his 
management priorities.
    On July 16, 2015, the Chair of the Subcommittee met with 
the Deputy Under Secretary for the National Protection and 
Programs Directorate to discuss the proposed reorganization of 
NPPD. As a follow up to this briefing, on September 15, 2015, 
the Chair of the Subcommittee, along with all the other Chair 
and Ranking Members on the Committee and its Subcommittees sent 
a letter to Secretary of Homeland Security regarding the 
proposed reorganization of the National Protection and Programs 
Directorate. The letter requested the Secretary's 
recommendation for the organization of NPPD in order to help 
the Committee with drafting legislation that would assist the 
Department with the reorganization. The Secretary responded on 
October 6, 2015.
    On July 17, 2015, Subcommittee majoirty staff received a 
briefing from the DHS Office of the Chief Readiness Support 
Officer on pilot programs conducted in Seattle and Boston 
designed to identify field efficiencies and other opportunities 
for cost savings within the Department's real property 
holdings. As part of ongoing oversight of this issue, on 
October 21, 2015, the Chair of the Subcommittee, along with the 
Ranking Member of the Subcommittee, sent a letter to the DHS 
Under Secretary for Management regarding the Department's real 
property holdings. The letter urged the Under Secretary to 
conduct an analysis of DHS's real property holdings in order to 
find possible efficiencies, such as co-locating offices, in 
order to achieve cost savings. The Under Secretary responded on 
November 18, 2015.
    On August 20, 2015, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from TSA on plans to relocate the agency's headquarters. 
Furthermore, on November 16, 2015, GAO issued its report 
Screening Partnership Program: TSA Can Benefit from Improved 
Cost Estimates [GAO-16-19]. The report contained three 
recommendations for executive action.
    On March 9, 2016, Subcommittee staff was briefed by DHS 
officials on recently conducted field efficiency studies.
    On June 21, 2016, the Chair and Ranking Member of the 
Subcommittee sent a letter to the GAO Comptroller General 
requesting the GAO conduct a review of DHS's international 
affairs enterprise management. The Chair and Ranking Member 
requested that the report focus on defining the roles, 
responsibilities, and authorities of each of DHS's various 
international affairs offices, and determine the operation 
costs associated within the offices. On June 30, 2016, the GAO 
Comptroller General sent a letter to the Chair and Ranking 
Member of the Subcommittee accepting the request.
    On June 21, 2016, the Chair and Ranking Member of the 
Subcommittee sent a letter to the GAO Comptroller General 
requesting that GAO conduct a review of DHS's international 
affairs enterprise management. The Chair and Ranking Member 
requested that the report focus on defining the roles, 
responsibilities, and authorities of each of DHS's various 
international affairs offices, and determine the operation 
costs associated within the offices. On June 30, 2016, the GAO 
Comptroller General sent a letter to the Chair and Ranking 
Member of the Subcommittee accepting the request.

                         ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT

    The Department of Homeland Security invests extensively in 
major acquisition programs to develop new systems that help the 
Department execute its many critical missions. These programs 
have major implications for the American taxpayer, costing 
hundreds of billions of dollars in costs over the life of a 
program. Given the current budget climate, the Subcommittee 
conducted oversight on the Department's management of its 
acquisition programs to ensure taxpayer dollars were not 
wasted.
    On January 15, 2015, Subcommittee staff held a meeting with 
the Transportation Security Administrator to discuss a new 
procurement strategy for airports that are a part of the 
Screening Partnership Program.
    On April 8, 2015, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from DHS's Program Accountability and Risk Management (PARM) 
Office. The briefing covered PARM's ongoing work related to 
overseeing major DHS acquisitions. On March 12, 2015 GAO issued 
its report Homeland Security Acquisitions: DHS Should Better 
Define Oversight Roles and Improve Program Reporting to 
Congress [GAO-15-292]. The report contained five 
recommendations for executive action.
    On April 22, 2015, GAO released its report Homeland 
Security Acquisitions: Major Program Assessments Reveal Actions 
Needed to Improve Accountability [GAO 15-171SP]. The report 
contained three recommendations for executive action. In order 
to examine the findings and recommendations from the GAO 
report, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled ``Acquisition 
Oversight: How Effectively Is DHS Safeguarding Taxpayer 
Dollars?'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Ms. Michele 
Mackin, Director, Acquisition and Sourcing Management, U.S. 
Government Accountability Office; Hon. Chip Fulghum, Chief 
Financial Officer, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and 
Dr. Cedric Sims, Partner, Evermay Consulting Group.
    On July 10, 2015, Subcommittee staff received an update 
from the DHS Chief Procurement Officer. The update focused on 
the office's performance in fiscal year 2015 and initiatives 
and strategies to better engage industry. An additional update 
was provided to the Subcommittee on December 17, 2015.
    On July 23, 2015 the Chair and Ranking Member of the 
Subcommittee sent a letter to the GAO Comptroller General 
requesting GAO review the organization and activities of the 
DHS Joint Requirements Council. The Chair and Ranking Member 
requested the review focus on how the JRC is positioned to 
increase Department-wide efficiencies and to identify and 
eliminate redundancies across acquisition programs. On August 
6, 2015, GAO sent a letter to the Chair and Ranking Member of 
the Subcommittee accepting the request. On August 7, 2015, 
Subcommittee staff also received a briefing from the Chair of 
the Joint Requirements Council on its structure, priorities and 
ongoing work.
    On September 18, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Making DHS More Efficient: Industry Recommendations 
to Improve Homeland Security.'' The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Mr. Marc A. Pearl, President and Chief Executive 
Officer, Homeland Security and Defense Business Council; Mr. 
Harry Totonis, Board Director, Business Executives for National 
Security; and Hon. Elaine Duke, Principal, Elaine Duke & 
Associates, LLC.
    As an organization with an extremely diverse set of 
missions, comprised of components with a variety of 
capabilities and functions, DHS is similar to large private-
sector commercial conglomerates. This hearing examined how DHS 
can adopt best practices from the private sector to improve its 
operations and execute its mission effectively and efficiently.
    On October 26, 2015, the Chair of the Subcommittee, along 
with the Ranking Member of the Subcommittee, sent a letter to 
the GAO Comptroller General requesting that GAO conduct an 
audit of a specific category of acquisition programs at DHS. 
The audit would specifically focus on the total value, 
component tracking and reporting of data related to these 
programs, and the extent to which DHS headquarters oversight 
entities are involved in this category of acquisition program. 
On November 9, 2015, GAO sent a letter to the Chair and Ranking 
Member accepting the request.
    On April 14, 2016, the Chair and Ranking Member of the 
Subcommittee sent a letter to the DHS Under Secretary for 
Management to request information regarding the recommendations 
presented by a GAO report released on March 31, 2016, which 
reviewed the Department's major acquisition management 
practices. On April 29, 2016, the Chair and Ranking Member of 
the Subcommittee received a response from the DHS Under 
Secretary of Management that outlined the implementation 
efforts put forth by DHS on each individual recommendation made 
by the March 31, 2016, GAO report.
    On June 15, 2016, Subcommittee staff held a meeting with 
the DHS Chief Procurement Officer who provided a quarterly 
update on acquisition management within the Department.
    On June 15, 2016, the Chair and Ranking Member of the 
Subcommittee, sent a letter to the GAO Comptroller General 
requesting GAO review the operations and maintenance of the 
Department's major acquisitions programs. The Chair and Ranking 
Member requested that the report focus on the extent which DHS 
has incorporated accurate costs into program estimates, the 
change of cost estimates over the lifecycle on major programs, 
and what challenges the Department faces when determining these 
estimated costs. On June 30, 2016, the GAO Comptroller General 
sent a letter to the Chair and Ranking Member of the 
Subcommittee accepting the request.

                          FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

    DHS is currently in the process of modernizing its 
financial systems Department-wide. Many of the components and 
agencies within DHS use different systems and oftentimes, the 
data in these different systems are not compatible, making it 
nearly impossible for senior officials at headquarters to get 
an enterprise-wide view of its lines of business. Without 
knowing where and what the Department is spending its money on, 
it is impossible for DHS to operate as efficiently as possible.
    On April 7, 2015, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from the DHS Office of the Chief Financial Officer on DHS's 
efforts to modernize its financial systems. A follow up 
briefing was provided to Subcommittee staff on April 23, 2015. 
Subcommittee staff received an additional briefing, on June 9, 
2015, that provided a general update on financial system 
modernization efforts and reported on the migration of the 
financial system of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office to a 
shared service provider.
    On July 23, 2015, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from the Department of the Interior's Interior Business Center 
(IBC) on DHS plans to migrate some DHS financial systems to the 
IBC, a Federal shared services provider. The IBC answered staff 
questions on the security of the IBC networks and systems as 
well.
    On February 16, 2016, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Department of Homeland Security Chief Financial 
Officer to request information regarding the recommendations 
presented to the Department by an independent audit on Fiscal 
Year 2015. At the conclusion of the audit, 45 recommendations 
were presented to address seven significant internal control 
deficiencies. On March 16, 2016, the Chair of the Subcommittee 
received a response from the DHS CFO that outlined the FY2015 
financial report highlights and the progress and efforts the 
Department is making to improving internal controls. On June 9, 
2016, Subcommittee staff met with the DHS Chief Financial 
Officer to discuss efforts to modernize financial systems and 
improve internal controls.
    Throughout February 2016, Subcommittee staff was briefed by 
many of the components within DHS on Fiscal Year 2017 budget 
views and estimates.
    On March 1, 2016, Subcommittee staff held a meeting with 
DHS financial management shared services.
    On March 8, 2016, Subcommittee staff were briefed by the 
DHS Inspector General on a report released by OIG regarding DHS 
reimbursable work agreements.

                   INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT

    Given the rapidly changing nature of the threats facing the 
Homeland, it is imperative that DHS has the technology systems 
it needs in order to combat these threats. Procuring these 
systems, however, are significant investments; if they are not 
maintained properly, these systems can quickly become outdated 
or obsolete. The Subcommittee's oversight efforts on this topic 
focused on ensuring DHS had the systems needed, verifying that 
the systems functioned effectively, and confirming that the 
systems were being procured and updated in an efficient and 
cost effective manner.
    On February 27, 2015 Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from the Office of the Chief Information Officer (CIO) 
regarding the Department's oversight of IT programs and its 
planned implementation of the Federal Information Technology 
Reform Act (FITARA). Subcommittee staff also received a follow 
up briefing on December 16, 2015.
    On March 3, 2015, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from the DHS Geospatial Management Office, within the Office of 
the Chief Information Officer. The briefing provided an 
overview the Geospatial Management Office and its roles and 
responsibilities.
    On March 23, 2015, GAO released its report Border Security: 
Additional Efforts Needed to Address Persistent Challenges in 
Achieving Radio Interoperability [GAO-15-201]. The report 
contained six recommendations for executive action.
    On July 9, 2015, Subcommittee staff received an additional 
briefing from the DHS Chief Information Officer on a recent 
reorganization that occurred within the CIO's office.
    On July 22, 2015, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from GAO on its ongoing work related to examining DHS efforts 
to consolidate its human resources information technology 
systems. On October 28, 2015, Subcommittee staff received a 
follow up briefing from GAO, which also provided an update on 
additional GAO work related to the USCIS transformation 
project. The USCIS transformation project consists of USCIS' 
efforts to move the application for and adjudication of 
immigration benefits to an electronic system in place of a 
paper-based system. On May 18, 2015, GAO released its report 
Immigration Benefits System: Better Informed Decision Making 
Needed on Transformation Program [GAO-15-415]. The report 
contained five recommendations for executive actions.
    On July 29, 2015, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from Immigration and Customs Enforcement on its efforts to 
modernization the TECS system. On August 3, 2015, Subcommittee 
staff received an additional briefing from Customs and Border 
Protection on its efforts to modernize TECS. These meetings 
served as a follow up to a Subcommittee hearing held in the 
113th Congress titled ``Examining Challenges and Wasted 
Taxpayer Dollars in Modernizing Border Security IT Systems.''
    On October 29, 2015, Subcommittee majority staff received a 
classified briefing from the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency on information technology resiliency.
    On January 4, 2016, the Chair of the Full Committee wrote 
the Secretary requesting that DHS provide the Committee with 
the report mandated by the DHS IT Duplication Reduction Act of 
2015 (Pub. L. 114-43). Later that day, DHS provided the report, 
which outlined a strategy to reduce IT system duplication, to 
the Committee.
    In response to the information provided in the report, the 
Subcommittee held a hearing on February 25, 2016, entitled 
``Probing DHS's Botched Management of the Human Resources 
Information Technology Program.'' The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Ms. Carol R. Cha, Director, Information 
Technology Acquisition Management Issues, U.S. Government 
Accountability Office; Hon. Chip Fulghum, Deputy Under 
Secretary for Management, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; 
and Ms. Angela Bailey, Chief Human Capital Officer, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security.
    On May 23, 2016, Subcommittee staff received an update 
briefing by the Department on Human Resources Information 
Technology.
    On June 23, 2016, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Inspector General of the Department of Homeland 
Security, requesting a copy of the record of investigation 
related to this case. On June 28, 2016, the Chair of the 
Subcommittee received a response from the Inspector General.
    On June 1, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with the DHS Chief 
Information Officer (CIO) for a quarterly update to discuss the 
challenges facing the information technology (IT) systems and 
human capital management. On June 24, 2016, the Chair of the 
Subcommittee sent a letter to the DHS CIO, requesting 
information regarding IT management within the Department, and 
additional challenges that are to be expected. The Chair of the 
Subcommittee received an initial reply from the CIO on July 1, 
2016. An additional response that contained the entirety of the 
requested documentation was received on September 19, 2016.
    On July 8, 2016, the Chair of the Subcommittee on Oversight 
and Management Efficiency, and the Chair of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security sent a letter to the GAO Comptroller 
General requesting that GAO conduct a review of the 
Transportation Security Administration's Technology Information 
Modernization program, which is intended to create a 
centralized information technology (IT) system to manage 
credential applications and the associated review process. The 
Chairs requested that the report focus on the technical 
challenges that the program faces, and to what extent of 
oversight is being performed by the TSA to ensure that previous 
problems are not repeated.

                         DEPARTMENTAL WORKFORCE

    DHS is the third largest agency in the Federal Government, 
with hundreds of thousands of full time employees. Despite the 
importance of the mission, DHS continually ranks towards the 
bottom in both employee engagement and global satisfaction in 
the annual Federal Viewpoints Survey. In fact, in 2015, the 
Department's scores in these categories fell, resulting in a 
last place ranking among large agencies. This is especially 
troubling given the numerous initiatives DHS launched to 
improve employee morale over the past few years.
    On January 8, 2015, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services on how the 
President's Executive Order on immigration will affect the 
organization's operations. A new service center acquisition and 
staffing increases were among the topics discussed.
    On April 7, 2015, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security regarding the 
possible use of private email accounts to conduct official 
business. The letter expressed concerns that any individual who 
may be using a private account may be in violation of DHS 
policy and Federal law, and requested information on whether or 
not any senior officials were using private email accounts to 
conduct official business. The Acting Deputy Under Secretary 
for Management responded, on behalf of the Secretary, on April 
30, 2015. After being made aware that some DHS officials had 
received an exemption to DHS policy, thereby allowing them to 
access private email accounts via DHS-owned equipment, the 
Chair of the Subcommittee sent another letter to the Secretary 
of Homeland Security on July 27, 2015. This letter requested 
additional information on the exemptions, including the names 
and positions of those officials who were granted an exemption. 
The Under Secretary for Management responded, on behalf of the 
Secretary, on August 21, 2015.
    On April 13, 2015, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security expressing concern 
that the individual serving as the head of the Office of Policy 
may be doing so in violation of the Federal Vacancy Reform Act. 
The letter requested information on the justification for 
placing this individual in this position along with the 
Administration's plan to fill the position with a Senate 
confirmed, Presidential appointee, as required by law. The 
Assistant Secretary for Legislative Affairs responded on April 
27, 2015.
    On June 2, 2015, the Chair of the Subcommittee, along with 
the Chair of the Full Committee and the Chair of the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security, sent a letter to the 
Secretary of Homeland Security regarding covert testing results 
of airport checkpoints. The letter requested information on 
what steps the Department has taken to eliminate the 
vulnerabilities exposed through the covert testing. The 
Secretary responded on June 12, 2015. On June 3, 2015, 
Subcommittee staff received a classified briefing on the topic 
from TSA.
    On June 8, 2015, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from the Department on the role veterans play at DHS and 
efforts to recruit and retain veterans within the Department.
    On June 9, 2015, the Chair of the Subcommittee, along with 
the Chair of the Full Committee and the Chair of the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security, sent a letter to the 
Secretary of Homeland Security regarding an Office of the 
Inspector General Report that found some aviation workers with 
access to secure areas of airports had ties to terrorism. The 
letter requested additional information on TSA's vetting 
process and what additional steps are being taken in wake of 
the OIG report findings. The Secretary responded on July, 10, 
2015.
    On December 16, 2015, Subcommittee staff received an update 
from the DHS Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer 
regarding the Department's cyber workforce initiatives and 
hiring process improvements.
    Over the span of January and February of 2016, Subcommittee 
staff received multiple briefings from the NPPD Under Secretary 
and staff to review reorganization proposals.
    In response to a DHS Office of the Inspector General (OIG) 
report entitled, TSA's Human Capital Services Contract Terms 
and Oversight Need Strengthening [OIG-16-32], the Chair of the 
Subcommittee sent a letter on February 12, 2016, requesting 
that the appropriate Transportation Security Administration 
officials brief the Subcommittee staff on actions taken to 
address the concerns laid out in the report. On March 16, 2016, 
the Subcommittee received a response from the Administrator of 
the TSA. Following the response, Subcommittee staff were 
briefed by TSA officials on HR Access.
    On March 10, 2016, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Department of Homeland Security Under Secretary 
of Management regarding the continued lack of adequate 
oversight on DHS workforce training centers. The letter 
referenced a January 2016, OIG report entitled DHS' Oversight 
of Its Workforce Training Needs Improvement [OIG-16-19], which 
outlined many alarming shortfalls in DHS training methods. On 
April 4, 2016, the Chair of the Subcommittee received a 
response to his letter.
    On March 16, 2016, Subcommittee staff were briefed by ICE 
officials on human capital issues.
    On April 13, 2016, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Under Secretary for Management at DHS requesting 
information on employees within the Department who have 
transitioned from a non-career position to a career or non-
political excepted service position within DHS. On June 13, 
2016, the Chair received a response from the Under Secretary 
for Management at DHS.
    On June 24, 2016, Subcommittee staff were briefed by DHS 
Office of Policy on various issues.
    In response to the findings of an OIG report entitled CBP 
Needs better Data to Justify Its Criminal Investigator Staffing 
[OIG-16-75], the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a letter which 
outlined his concerns to the DHS Chief Human Capital Officer, 
on June 3, 2016. The Chair of the Subcommittee received a 
response to his letter on July 27, 2016.
    On June 2, 2016, Subcommittee staff received a quarterly 
update from the DHS Chief Human Capital Officer.
    On June 17, 2016, Subcommittee staff received a classified 
briefing on social media vetting programs. DHS officials were 
present to provide information and answer any questions from 
staff.

                           EMPLOYEE INTEGRITY

    Given the seriousness of its mission, it is imperative that 
employees of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) conduct 
themselves with the utmost integrity. Although the vast 
majority of employees conduct themselves appropriately, even 
one corrupt employee represents a management challenge. 
Unfortunately, recent years have seen DHS employees, including 
some senior officials, embroiled in several high profile 
scandals.
    On January 22, 2015, Subcommittee staff held a meeting with 
the DHS Chief Human Capital Officer. The subject of the meeting 
was the Department's policy on and use of paid administrative 
leave.
    On March 24, 2015, the DHS Office of the Inspector General 
(OIG) released a management alert, ``IG Investigation of 
employee complaints regarding management of USCIS' EB-5 
program.'' After the alert was released, Subcommittee staff 
received a briefing on the management alert from the Office of 
the Inspector General. Subcommittee staff also held a 
conference call with the Ombudsman of the United States 
Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to discuss the 
findings in the management alert. The Subcommittee staff had a 
follow up briefing with the DHS Office of the Inspector General 
on April 6, 2015. As part of ongoing oversight of this issue, 
Subcommittee staff had a conference call with representatives 
from the Office of Government Ethics to discuss potential 
ethics violations outlined in the OIG report.
    As a follow up to two Full Committee hearings on March 26, 
2015 and April 30, 2015, the Chair of the Subcommittee, along 
with the Chair of the Full Committee, sent a letter to the 
Secretary of Homeland Security on May 20, 2015, regarding 
allegations of special access related to the EB-5 program. 
Specifically, the letter requested that DHS hand over documents 
related to any national security concerns that arose due to the 
mismanagement of the EB-5 program.
    On March 10, 2015, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) on recent 
misconduct within the Federal Air Marshall Service. On 
September 17, 2015, the Chair of the Subcommittee, along with 
the Chair of the Full Committee and the Chair of the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security, sent a letter to the 
Administrator of TSA regarding issues with the Federal Air 
Marshal Service that were brought to the Committee's attention. 
The letter requested information on a recent sexual misconduct 
scandal, firearms malfunctions, and what TSA is doing in 
response to both situations. The Administrator responded on 
October 20, 2015 and the Subcommittee received a follow up 
update on October 29, 2015. The Chair of the Subcommittee, 
along with the Chair of the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security, on December 15, 2015, sent a letter to Secretary of 
Homeland Security announcing the initiation of an investigation 
into TSA employee misconduct. The investigation will examine 
the extent to which TSA has implemented GAO's prior 
recommendations [GAO-13-624] and addressed employee misconduct.
    In November 2015, the Homeland Security Advisory Council 
(HSAC) established a Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) 
Subcommittee, which was tasked with developing finding and 
recommendations related to CVE. On June 20, 2016, the Chair of 
the Subcommittee sent a letter to the Secretary of the 
Department of Homeland Security, expressing his grave concern 
regarding the conduct of a member of the CVE Subcommittee. 
Further, the letter requested a review of the status and 
qualifications of this individual. The Chair of received a 
response to his letter from the Executive Director of the 
Homeland Security Advisory Council (HSAC) on July 13, 2016.
    On July 8, 2016, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security regarding the 
events that transpired at a United States Citizenship and 
Immigration Services (USCIS) building in the aftermath of the 
San Bernardino, California shootings. Specifically, the Chair 
requested information related to reports of a USCIS employee 
interfering with an OIG investigation into the shootings. The 
letter expressed deep concerns that the USCIS employee 
unlawfully acted to thwart the OIG investigation and that under 
different circumstances could have had disastrous consequences.
    On April 27, 2016, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Comptroller General of the United States 
requesting that his name be added as a co-requester of a report 
that GAO is preparing on misconduct at the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency (FEMA). On May 18, 2016, the GAO Controller 
General sent a letter to the Chair of the Subcommittee 
accepting his request.
    On May 11, 2016, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the GAO Comptroller General requesting GAO review the 
internal affairs offices for Customs and Border Protection 
(CBP), the TSA, and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). 
The Chair requested that the report focus on: Data of employee 
misconduct investigations; a review of the investigative 
practices; what disciplinary actions were taken; and what 
performance and internal control standards are in place within 
these components. On June 30, 2016, the GAO Comptroller General 
sent a letter to the Chair of the Subcommittee accepting the 
request.
    On July 8, 2016, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security regarding the 
events that transpired at a USCIS building in the aftermath of 
the San Bernardino shootings. Specifically, the Chair requested 
information related to reports of a USCIS employee interfering 
with an OIG investigation into the shootings. The letter 
expressed deep concerns that the USCIS employee unlawfully 
acted to thwart the OIG investigation and that under different 
circumstances could have had disastrous consequences.

                      UNITED STATES SECRET SERVICE

    The Subcommittee examined the homeland security operations 
of the United States Secret Service (USSS), including its 
critical roles of protecting the President of the United States 
and the integrity the U.S. financial system. USSS is currently 
in the process of enhancing its training regimen and 
modernizing the way it does business, both of which are topics 
the Subcommittee examined in depth. Finally, the Subcommittee 
conducted rigorous oversight of the Secret Service's recent 
challenges related to employee integrity and morale.
    On March 17, 2015, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from the DHS Office of the Inspector General on their ongoing 
work related to the Secret Service.
    On March 30, 2015, Subcommittee staff visited United States 
Secret Service headquarters and met with the Service's Chief 
Financial Officer. Staff received a briefing on USSS financial 
modernization efforts and viewed a demo of the Secret Service's 
financial management software.
    On April 7, 2015, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Director of the Secret Service regarding the 
Papal visit in September 2015. The letter requested an update 
on the Secret Service's preparations for the protective mission 
related to the Pope's visit. The Director responded on April 
13, 2015. As a follow up to the letter, Subcommittee staff 
received a classified briefing from the Secret Service on April 
17, 2015. On September 21, 2015, Subcommittee staff attended a 
Secret Service led Staff Delegation related to the Papal visit. 
Staff observed the sites the Pope would be visiting and USSS 
preparations to secure the sites.
    On June 11, 2015, the Members of the Subcommittee conducted 
a site visit to the U.S. Secret Service training center in 
Beltsville, Maryland. Members toured the facility and were 
briefed by representatives from the Secret Service on training 
and facility programs.
    On July 9, 2015, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) providing an 
update on their examination of the United States Secret Service 
(USSS) domestic field structure.
    On January 29, 2016, Subcommittee staff were briefed by the 
USSS Chief Operating Officer on domestic field office structure 
and management priorities for 2016.
    On July 23, 2015, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Director of the USSS outlining the Subcommittee's 
oversight priorities related to the Secret Service. These 
priorities included restoring the integrity of the Secret 
Service, enhancing the protective mission, and modernizing the 
way the Secret Service conducts business. The Director 
responded on September 1, 2015.
    The DHS Office of the Inspector General released a 
management alert on September 25, 2015 titled, ``Investigation 
into the Improper Access and Distribution of Information 
Contained Within a Secret Service Data System.'' On October 19, 
2015, Subcommittee staff received a briefing from the Secret 
Service on the investigation detailed in the management alert 
as well as an update on USSS progress to implement the 
recommendations made in the 2014 Protective Mission Panel 
report.
    On November 17, 2015, the Subcommittee on Oversight and 
Management Efficiency and the Subcommittee on Regulatory 
Affairs and Federal Management of the Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs, U.S. Senate held a joint 
hearing entitled ``Examining Ongoing Challenges at the U.S. 
Secret Service and their Government-wide Implications.'' The 
Subcommittees received testimony from Mr. Joseph P. Clancy, 
Director, United States Secret Service, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Hon. John Roth, Inspector General, Office of 
the Inspector General, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; 
and Mr. Joel C. Willemssen, Managing Director, Information 
Technology Issues, U.S. Government Accountability Office. Over 
the past few years, the Secret Service has been plagued by a 
variety of scandals that appear to be symptoms of larger 
management issues within the Secret Service that must be 
resolved. The purpose of this hearing was to examine the 
progress the Secret Service has made in implementing the 
recommendations of the Protective Mission Panel; how the 
Service has been combating the cultural issues that have helped 
produce many of the recent scandals; identify any additional 
actions senior USSS leadership must take in order to restore 
the Secret Service's elite reputation; and discuss how other 
government agencies can learn from the challenges currently 
facing the Secret Service.
    As a follow up to the November 17, 2015 hearing, the Chair 
of the Subcommittee sent a letter to the Director of the United 
States Secret Service requesting information regarding specific 
administrative actions taken against those employees who 
accessed sensitive personally identifiable information (PII) 
without the necessary clearance. Additionally, Subcommittee 
staff met with DHS and USSS officials to discuss disciplinary 
actions in regard to the PII data leak on June 17, 2016. The 
Director responded on June 14, 2016.
    On November 23, 2015, Subcommittee staff received a 
briefing from representatives of the United States Secret 
Service's National Threat Assessment Center on its upcoming 
report entitled, Attacks on Federal Government 2001-2013: 
Threat Assessment Considerations. The report was subsequently 
released in December 2015.
    On December 17, 2015, the DHS OIG issued its report 
entitlled The Secret Service Did Not Identify Best Practices 
and Lessons Learned from the 2011 White House Shooting Incident 
[OIG-16-16]. The report did not contain any recommendations for 
executive action.
    On February 10, 2016, GAO issued its report U.S. Secret 
Service: Data Analyses Could Better Inform the Domestic Field 
Office Structure [GAO-16-21]. The report contained three 
recommendations for executive action.

                      PRIVACY AND CIVIL LIBERTIES

    The protection of the privacy of American citizens is 
critically important, especially when implementing programs and 
policies to secure the Nation. It is the responsibility of the 
Chief Privacy Officer to establish privacy standards that all 
DHS programs must follow. This Congress, the Subcommittee 
conducted extensive oversight to ensure DHS programs that 
collect and analyze personal identifiable information or other 
sensitive information are constitutional and adhere to the 
standards established by the Chief Privacy Officer.
    On April 16, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives from the DHS Office of Privacy and Immigration 
and Customs Enforcement's Enforcement and Removal Operations on 
ICE's solicitation for a commercial service provider for 
license plate reader.
    On March 19, 2015, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from the DHS Private Sector Office. The briefing covered the 
office's structure, roles and responsibilities, and outreach 
efforts.
    On April 29, 2016, Subcommittee staff were presented with a 
quarterly brief by the Department Office of Privacy.
    On April 29, 2016, Subcommittee staff were presented with a 
quarterly brief by the Department Office of Civil Rights and 
Civil Liberties.
    On May 12, 2016, Subcommittee staff were briefed by the 
newly created DHS Office of Community Partnerships on their 
mission and goals.

                        UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEMS

    Unmanned aerial systems, colloquially know as drones, is 
one of today's fastest emerging technologies. While UASs have 
the potential to save lives and revolutionize industry, 
nefarious actors can also utilize them to cause harm and 
violate American citizen's right to privacy. Given its mission, 
DHS will play an important role in countering any threat posed 
by this new technology.
    On February 9, 2015, Subcommittee staff received a 
classified briefing from the DHS Office of Intelligence and 
Analysis on the threat posed by unmanned aerial vehicles. On 
March 9, 2015, Subcommittee staff received an additional 
classified briefing from DHS Office of Policy, DHS Science and 
Technology Directorate, the United States Secret Service, and 
the Federal Protective Service on UAS threats and mitigation 
technologies.
    On March 18, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Unmanned Aerial System Threats: Exploring Security 
Implications and Mitigation Technologies.'' The Subcommittee 
received testimony from Dr. Todd E. Humphreys, Assistant 
Professor, Cockrell School of Engineering, The University of 
Texas at Austin; Major General Frederick Roggero, (USAF-Ret.), 
President and Chief Executive Officer, Resilient Solutions, 
Ltd.; Chief Richard Beary, President, International Association 
of Chiefs of Police; and Gregory S. McNeal, JD/PhD, Associate 
Professor, School of Law, Pepperdine University. Given the 
projected growth of the domestic use of unmanned aerial systems 
(UAS), a variety of security and privacy challenges have 
rapidly emerged. The purpose of this hearing was to better 
understand security threats posed by UASs, technological 
mitigations to combat those threats, DHS' role in overseeing 
the use of UASs within the homeland, and challenges posed by 
the civilian use of UASs to Federal, State, and local law 
enforcement. As a result of this hearing, on April 7, 2015, the 
Chair of the Subcommittee sent a letter to the Secretary of 
Homeland Security regarding the threat potential of small and 
medium sized UASs. The letter requested that DHS provide the 
Subcommittee with information on DHS's strategy to counter the 
emerging threat. The Under Secretary for Science and Technology 
responded, on behalf of the Secretary on May 11, 2015.
    On November 30, 2015, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the GAO Comptroller General requesting to be added as 
a co-requester to ongoing work related to the use of unmanned 
aerial systems for border security. GAO responded on December 
14, 2015, acknowledging and accepting the Chair of the 
Subcommittee's request.
    On June 22, 2016, Members of the Subcommittee on Oversight 
and Management Efficiency received a classified briefing on 
risks associated with non-traditional aviation technology, such 
as small unmanned aerial systems, and mitigation efforts. 
Representatives from the Department of Homeland Security's 
Science and Technology Directorate and National Protection and 
Programs Directorate were present to provide the briefing and 
answer Member questions.

                       FEDERAL PROTECTIVE SERVICE

    In today's heightened threat environment, every Federal 
building is a potential target for terrorists. The Federal 
Protective Service (FPS) is responsible for protecting these 
buildings and the individuals within them. FPS has also been 
plagued by several recent management challenges, and as a 
result, millions of taxpayer dollars have been wasted. The 
Subcommittee focused its oversight on ensuring FPS is operating 
as efficiently and effectively as possible.
    On April 27, 2015, GAO released its report Facility 
Security: Federal Protective Service's and Selected Federal 
Tenants' Sharing of and Response to Incident Information [GAO-
15-406R]. On December 16, 2015, GAO issued an additional report 
Homeland Security: FPS and GSA Should Strengthen Collaboration 
to Enhance Facility Security [GAO-16-135]. The report contained 
four recommendations for executive actions.
    On September 10, 2015, Subcommittee staff visited FPS 
headquarters and received a briefing on its Activity Based Cost 
modeling method.
    On September 16, 2015, Subcommittee staff received a 
briefing from FPS on their MIST/ISC validation, which was 
prompted by a letter FPS received from the Interagency Security 
Committee (ISC) that stated MIST was not up to ISC standards.
    On October 16, 2015, Subcommittee staff visited an FPS-
secured building and received a briefing/demonstration of 
typical facility security assessment conducted by FPS 
personnel.
    The DHS Office of the Inspector General issued a report 
titled The FPS Vehicle Fleet is Not Managed Effectively on 
October 21, 2015. As part of the oversight into this issue, 
Subcommittee staff had a meeting with FPS on November 10, 2015 
to discuss the report's findings.
    On October 21, 2015, the DHS OIG released its report The 
FPS Vehicle Fleet is Not Managed Effectively [OIG 16-02]. The 
report contained five recommendations for executive action. In 
order to examine the findings and recommendations outlined in 
the report, on December 3, 2015, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing entitled ``Driving Away with Taxpayer Dollars: DHS's 
Failure to Effectively Manage the FPS Vehicle Fleet.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Hon. John Roth, Inspector 
General, Office of Inspector General, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Mr. L. Eric Patterson, Director, Federal 
Protective Service, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and 
Mr. Thomas Chaleki, Deputy Chief Readiness Support Officer, 
Management Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland Security.
    On January 7, 2016, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Department of Homeland Security Under Secretary 
for Management requesting information regarding the FPS Vehicle 
Fleet, including information that was failed to be made 
available during the previously held hearing. The letter 
requested that FPS provide the fleet program manual, along with 
fleet data information from fiscal years 2014 and 2015, and 
explanations of standard operational management of the FPS 
vehicle fleet. Subcommittee staff held a meeting with the FPS 
Director to follow up on the December 3, 2015, hearing on 
vehicle fleet management. The Under Secretary of Management 
provided a response to the January 7, 2016, letter on March 4, 
2016.

        DHS HEADQUARTERS CONSOLIDATION PROJECT AT ST. ELIZABETHS

    DHS is the third largest department in the Federal 
Government but unlike other large departments does not have all 
its components and agencies located in one central area. For 
example, DHS components and offices are located in 50 different 
locations throughout the National Capital Region. In an effort 
to consolidate locations and increase a unified organization, 
construction is currently underway for a new headquarters 
facility. The construction of the Department's Headquarters at 
the St. Elizabeths campus, in Washington, D.C. is the largest 
Federal construction project to occur in the National Capital 
Region since the construction of The Pentagon.
    On February 10, 2015, Subcommittee staff received a 
briefing from DHS and the General Services Administration on 
the enhanced construction plan for the St. Elizabeths. As a 
follow up, on April 28, 2015, the Members of the Subcommittee 
conducted a site visit to the Department of Homeland Security 
Consolidated Headquarters at St. Elizabeths in Washington, DC. 
Members toured the facility and were briefed by the Department 
on construction progress and the status of the consolidation 
efforts. Subcommittee staff received an additional update from 
DHS on St. Elizabeths on October 15, 2015.
    Ongoing efforts to conduct oversight of the Department of 
Homeland Security Headquarters Consolidation Project at St. 
Elizabeths in Washington, D.C. led Committee staff to meet with 
various stakeholders and DHS officials to discuss the status of 
the project. On July 28, 2016, Committee Staff conducted a site 
visit to the Department of Homeland Security Headquarters 
Consolidation Project at St. Elizabeths, site visit to the St. 
Elizabeths campus; Subcommittee staff toured the facilities and 
was briefed by the Department on the status of the project.

                      ELECTROMAGNETIC PULSE EVENTS

    Electromagnetic pulses, or EMPs, can cause wide ranging and 
damaging effects to our electrical grid and communication 
infrastructure. An EMP can be generated by nuclear weapons, 
from naturally-occurring sources such as solar storms, or 
specialized non-nuclear EMP weapons. A successful EMP attack 
has a high likelihood of the Nation's electric grid and the 
effects of an attack could also cascade into other critical 
infrastructures.
    On November 5, 2015, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Government Accountability Comptroller General 
requesting to be added as a co-requester to ongoing work 
related to efforts by the electric industry to prepare for and 
mitigate against electromagnetic threats. GAO acknowledged 
receipt of the letter and added the Chair of the Subcommittee 
to the request on November 20, 2015.
    On May 17, 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Oversight of Federal Efforts to Address Electromagnetic 
Risks.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Chris P. 
Currie, Director, Homeland Security and Justice Issues, U.S. 
Government Accountability Office; Mr. Brandon Wales, Director, 
Office of Cyber and Infrastructure Analysis, National 
Protection and Programs Directorate, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Mr. Joseph McClelland, Director, Office of 
Energy Infrastructure Security, Federal Energy Regulatory 
Commission, U.S. Department of Energy; and Mr. Judson Freed, 
Director, Emergency Management & Homeland Security, Ramsey 
County, Minnesota, testifying on behalf of the National 
Association of Counties.

                                  CUBA

    In 2014, President Obama announced a dramatic shift in U.S. 
policy towards the Republic of Cuba. This new policy moved to 
normalize relations, eased embargo restrictions, removed Cuba 
from the list of state sponsors of terrorism, and increased 
cooperation and information sharing on topics such as migration 
and anti-drug efforts. Despite the normalization of relations, 
Cuba still presents a threat to our national security and the 
Subcommittee conducted robust oversight to ensure the security 
of the Homeland is not jeopardized by efforts to normalize 
relations.
    On November 18, 2015, Subcommittee staff, along with staff 
from the Subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere of the 
Committee on Foreign Affairs, received a briefing from 
representatives at DHS and the State Department on the DHS 
Deputy Secretary's recent trip to Cuba.
    On February 22, 2016, Subcommittee staff were briefed by 
the United States Coast Guard on Cuban migration issues.
    On April 12, 2016, the Chair of the Subcommittee on 
Oversight and Management Efficiency, the Chair of the Full 
Committee, and the Chair of the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security, sent a letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security 
to express concerns about the Administration's plan to begin 
regularly scheduled commercial air service between the United 
States and Cuba. In the letter, the Chair outlined that the 
rapid speed at which preparations for regular commercial 
flights between the U.S. and Cuba will come at the cost of 
failing that adequate safety and security protocols are in 
place. A continued effort to move forward with this plan would 
be jeopardizing the safety of U.S. travelers and our homeland 
and national security. On May 13, 2016, the Committee received 
a response from the Secretary of Homeland Security.

                        GUANTANAMO BAY DETAINEES

    On April 28, 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Transferring Guantanamo Bay Detainees to the Homeland: 
Implications for States and Local Communities.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Hon. Nikki R. Haley, 
Governor, State of South Carolina; Mr. Michael Bouchard, 
Sheriff of Oakland County, Michigan, Oakland County Sheriff's 
Office, testifying on behalf of the Major County Sheriff's 
Association; Mr. Todd Thompson, County Attorney, Leavenworth 
County Attorney's Office, Leavenworth County, Kansas; and Mr. 
Ken Gude, Senior Fellow, National Security, Center for American 
Progress.
    Throughout the month of March 2016, Subcommittee staff held 
meetings with stakeholders to gather state and local 
perspectives on the transfer of detainees to the Homeland.

        MISCONDUCT AT THE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION

    On July 7, 2016, the Subcommittee on Oversight and 
Management Efficiency and the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security held a joint hearing entitled ``How Pervasive is 
Misconduct at TSA: Examining Findings from a Joint Subcommittee 
Investigation.'' The Subcommittees received testimony from Dr. 
Huban Gowadia, Deputy Administrator, Transportation Security 
Administration, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and Mr. 
Andrew Oosterbaan, Assistant Inspector General for 
Investigations, Office of Inspector General, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security.
    In December 2015, the Subcommittee began an investigation 
into employee misconduct at the Transportation Security 
Administration (TSA). This was a result of numerous 
whistleblowers contacting the Committee alleging serious 
misconduct committed by senior TSA officials--ranging from 
egregious bonuses for senior officials to mandated employee 
transfers around the country in retaliation for, in some cases, 
employees elevating security concerns.
    From February of 2016, to June of 2016, the Subcommittee on 
Oversight and Management Efficiency obtained various documents 
and testimony that outlined TSA policies related to employee 
misconduct and directed reassignments, and analyzed misconduct 
allegation data for fiscal years 2013 to 2015 from TSA, the 
Department of Homeland Security Office of the Inspector 
General, and the Office of Special Counsel. The Subcommittee 
conducted interviews with relevant officials from four TSA 
airports, TSA's Offices of Inspection, Professional 
Responsibility, and Human Capital; DHS's OIG; and the U.S. 
Office of Special Counsel, among others. Additionally, 
Subcommittee staff interviewed numerous TSA employees who came 
forward to the Committee with allegations of senior level 
misconduct and retaliation. Further, Subcommittee staff 
assessed TSA's efforts to address misconduct against a GAO 
report released on September 10, 2014, entitled Standards for 
Internal Control in the Federal Government [GAO-14-704G].
    On May 31, 2016, the Chair of the Subcommittee on Oversight 
and Management Efficiency, along with the Chair of the Full 
Committee and the Chair of the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security, sent a letter to the Department of Homeland Security 
Inspector General requesting serious consideration by the OIG 
to launch an investigation into the review process as it 
applies to the designation of ``Security Sensitive 
Information'' (SSI) by the Transportation Security 
Administration. The Committee received a response from the 
Inspector General on June 9, 2016.
    On June 9, 2016, the Chair of the Subcommittee on Oversight 
and Management Efficiency, along with the Chair of the Full 
Committee and the Chair of the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security, sent a letter to the Administrator of the 
Transportation Security Administration regarding the employment 
status of a TSA official. The Assistant Administrator for 
Legislative Affairs responded to the letter on July 5, 2016.
    On September 28, 2016, the Chair of the Subcommittee on 
Oversight and Management Efficiency, and the Chair of the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security, sent a letter to the 
Administrator of the Transportation Security Administration to 
request information containing the steps being taken to address 
employee misconduct within the TSA.

                           IDENTIFYING TERROR

    On September 22, 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Identifying the Enemy: Radical Islamist Terror.'' 
The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. George Selim, 
Director, Office of Community Partnerships, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Hon. Peter Hoekstra, Shillman Senior Fellow, 
Investigative Project on Terrorism; Dr. M. Zuhdi Jasser, 
President, American Islamic Forum for Democracy; Ms. Sahar F. 
Aziz, Professor of Law, Texas A&M; University School of Law; and 
Ms. Shireen Qudosi, Senior Contributor, CounterJihad.com.

                          UNACCOUNTED PROPERTY

    Within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS)--from 
October 2012 through April 2015--over 360 pieces of body armor 
and around 150 firearms were unaccounted for. Although a 
majority of DHS components reported lost or stolen property, 
Customs and Border Protection (CBP) had over twice as many 
items reported as lost or stolen compared to other components. 
Between 2012 and 2015, CBP reported 61 firearms stolen compared 
to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (17 stolen firearms) and 
the Transportation Security Administration (17 stolen 
firearms). Additionally, among the data provided, CBP was 
responsible for over half of the body armor, badges, and 
credentials that were lost or stolen across DHS. 
    On April 20, 2016, the Chair of the Subcommittee on 
Oversight and Management Efficiency sent a letter to the 
Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, which 
stressed his concerns over the disturbing amount of lost or 
stolen property in recent years. Throughout the months of April 
and May, 2016, Subcommittee staff held various meetings with 
stakeholders and DHS representatives to discuss departmental 
record keeping, as well as procurement and acquisition 
reorganization efforts. On June 22, 2016, the Chair of the 
Subcommittee received a response to his letter.

                        PRESIDENTIAL TRANSITION

    On August 10, 2016, Subcommittee staff were briefed by DHS 
officials regarding preparations being made for the 
Presidential transition process.

                              ----------                              


                       Subcommittee Hearings Held


``Assessing DHS's Performance: Watchdog Recommendations to 
        Improve Homeland Security.'' February 26, 2015. (Serial 
        No. 114-5)
``Unmanned Aerial System Threats: Exploring Security 
        Implications and Mitigation Technologies.'' March 18, 
        2015. (Serial No. 114-9)
``Acquisition Oversight: How Effectively Is DHS Safeguarding 
        Taxpayer Dollars?'' April 22, 2015. (Serial No. 114-15)
``Examining DHS' Misplaced Focus on Climate Change.'' July 8, 
        2015. (Serial No. 114-24)
``Making DHS More Efficient: Industry Recommendations to 
        Improve Homeland Security.'' September 18, 2015. 
        (Serial No. 114-33)
Joint hearing with the Subcommittee on Regulatory Affairs and 
        Federal Management of the Committee on Homeland 
        Security and Governmental Affairs, U.S. Senate. 
        ``Examining Ongoing Challenges at the U.S. Secret 
        Service and their Government-wide 
        Implications.''November 17, 2015. (Serial No. 114-43)
``Driving Away with Taxpayer Dollars: DHS's Failure to 
        Effectively Manage the FPS Vehicle Fleet.'' December 3, 
        2015. (Serial No. 114-46)
``Probing DHS's Botched Management of the Human Resources 
        Information Technology Program.'' February 25, 2016. 
        (Serial No. 114-54)
``Transferring Guantanamo Bay Detainees to the Homeland: 
        Implications for States and Local Communities.'' April 
        28, 2016. (Serial No. 114-66)
``Oversight of Federal Efforts to Address Electromagnetic 
        Risks.'' May 17, 2016. (Serial No. 114-69)
Joint with the Subcommittee on Transportation Security. ``How 
        Pervasive is Misconduct at TSA: Examining Findings from 
        a Joint Subcommittee Investigation.''July 7, 2016. 
        (Serial No. 114-78)
``Identifying the Enemy: Radical Islamist Terror.'' September 
        22, 2016. (Serial No. 114-88)

                Subcommittee on Transportation Security

                     John Katko, New York, Chairman

Mike Rogers, Alabama
Earl L. ``Buddy'' Carter, Georgia
Mark Walker, North Carolina
John Ratcliffe, Texas
Michael T. McCaul, Texas
                  (ex officio)      Kathleen M. Rice, New York
                                    William R. Keating, Massachusetts
                                    Donald M. Payne, Jr., New Jersey
                                    Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi
                                                      (ex officio)

                              ----------                              


    During the 114th Congress, the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security held 16 hearings, receiving testimony 
from 58 witnesses, and considered 5 measures, resulting in 7 
Public Laws.

                              ----------                              


               Legislative Activities of the Subcommittee



                HUMAN TRAFFICKING DETECTION ACT OF 2015

           Public Law 114-22      H.R. 460 (S. 178 / S. 623)

To direct the Secretary of Homeland Security to train 
Department of Homeland Security personnel how to effectively 
deter, detect, disrupt, and prevent human trafficking during 
the course of their primary roles and responsibilities, and for 
other purposes.

Summary

    An estimated 17,500 individuals are trafficked into the 
United States each year. Victims include both U.S. citizens and 
noncitizens and trafficking occurs in every State in the 
Nation. H.R. 460 requires the Secretary of Homeland Security to 
implement a human trafficking awareness program to train, and 
periodically retrain, relevant Departmental personnel. The 
training must be given to personnel within the Transportation 
Security Administration, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, 
and other Departmental offices. Additionally, the legislation 
requires the Secretary to annually reassess the training 
program to ensure it is consistent with current techniques, 
patterns, and trends associated with human trafficking and 
authorizes the Secretary to provide training curricula to any 
State, local, or Tribal Government or private organization 
seeking to establish a human trafficking awareness training 
program.

Legislative History

    H.R. 460 was introduced in the House on January 21, 2015, 
by Mr. Walker and nine original cosponsors, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security, and in addition to the 
Committee on the Judiciary. Within the Committee, H.R. 460 was 
referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security.
    On January 22, 2015, the Chair of the Committee on the 
Judiciary sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on the 
Judiciary would waive further consideration of H.R. 460; on 
that same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the 
Committee on the Judiciary, and the agreement to not waive 
further consideration.
    The House considered H.R. 460 under Suspension the Rules on 
January 27, 2015, and passed H.R. 460 by voice vote.
    H.R. 460 was received in the Senate, read twice, and 
referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered H.R. 460 on March 4, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs report filed in the Senate on May 14, 2015, as S. Rpt. 
114-46.
    The text of H.R. 460, as passed by the House was added to 
Title IX of S. 178, as passed by the Senate.
            S. 178
    S. 178, the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act of 2015, 
was introduced in the Senate on January 13, 2015, by Mr. Cornyn 
and referred to the Senate Committee on the Judiciary.
    The Senate Committee on the Judiciary considered S. 178 on 
February 26, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the Senate, favorably, with an Amendment in the Nature of a 
Substitute.
    On March 2, 2015, the Senate Committee on the Judiciary 
reported S. 178 to the Senate with no written report.
    The Senate considered S. 178 on March 10, 11, 12, 16, 17, 
18, 19; April 14, 16, 16, 20, 21, and 22, 2015. On April 22, 
2015, the Senate passed S. 178 by a recorded vote of 99 yeas 
and 0 nays, (Roll No. 163).
    S. 178 was received in the House on April 23, 2015, and 
held at the Desk.
    The House considered S. 178 under Suspension of the Rules 
on May 18, 2015, and on May 19, 2015, passed the measure, by a 
\2/3\ recorded vote of 420 yeas and 3 nays, (Roll No. 244).
    Subsequently, pursuant to H. Con. Res. 47, the enrollment 
of S. 178 was corrected.
    S. 178 was presented to the President on May 21, 2015. The 
President signed S. 178 into law on May 29, 2015, as Public Law 
114-22.
            S. 623
    S. 623, the Senate companion measure to H.R. 460 was 
introduced in the Senate on March 3, 2016, by Mr. Johnson and 
referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



SURFACE TRANSPORTATION AND VETERANS HEALTH CARE CHOICE IMPROVEMENT ACT 
                                OF 2015

                     Public Law 114-41    H.R. 3236

To provide an extension of Federal-aid highway, highway safety, 
motor carrier safety, transit, and other programs funded out of 
the Highway Trust Fund, to provide resource flexibility to the 
Department of Veterans Affairs for health care services, and 
for other purposes.

Summary

    Public Law 114-41 authorizes appropriations for various 
surface transportation programs, including revisions to the 
aviation security service passenger fee requirements, among 
other things. Aviation security services are authorized for 
Fiscal Years 2024 and 2025.

Legislative History

    H.R. 3236 was introduced in the House on July 28, 2015, by 
Mr. Shuster, Mr. Miller of Florida, and Mr. Ryan of Wisconsin, 
and referred to the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure, and in addition to the Committee on Ways and 
Means, the Committee on Energy and Commerce, the Committee on 
Science, Space and Technology, the Committee on Natural 
Resources, the Committee on Veterans' Affairs, the Committee on 
Education and the Workforce, the Committee on the Budget, and 
the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 
3236 was referred to the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security.
    The Committee on Rules met on July 28, 2015, and granted a 
Rule providing for the consideration of H.R. 3236, the Rule was 
filed in the House as H.Res. 388 (H. Rpt. 114-234). The House 
agreed to the Rule on July 29, 2015, by a recorded vote of 243 
yeas and 183 nays, (Roll No. 484).
    The House considered H.R. 3236 on July 29, 2015, under the 
provisions of H.Res. 388, and passed the measure by a recorded 
vote of 385 yeas, 34 nays, and 1 voting present, (Roll No. 
486).
    H.R. 3236 was received in the Senate on July 30, 2015, read 
twice, considered, read the third time, and passed under the 
order of July 29, 2015, without amendment, by a recorded vote 
of 91 yeas and 4 nays, (Record Vote No. 261).
    H.R. 3236 was presented to the President on July 31, 2015. 
The President signed H.R. 3236 into law on July 31, 2015, as 
Public Law 114-41.

                                ------                                



             GERARDO HERNANDEZ AIRPORT SECURITY ACT OF 2015

                     Public Law 114-50    H.R. 720

To improve intergovernmental planning for and communication 
during security incidents at domestic airports, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    Public Law 114-50 improves security incident preparedness 
by directing the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) 
to verify that airports across the United States have 
incorporated procedures for responding to active shooters 
targeting security checkpoints into existing incident plans. 
Additionally, the Administrator of TSA is directed to report to 
the appropriate Congressional committees on the 
Administration's findings regarding the levels of preparedness 
at airports. Further, the law mandates that TSA establish a 
mechanism by which best practices in security incident 
mitigation can be shared with airports across the country and 
requires that the agency certify to the appropriate 
Congressional committees that all screening personnel have 
participated in training for active shooter scenarios. 
Additionally, TSA is required to provide an analysis to the 
appropriate Congressional committees on how cost savings can be 
used to increase funding for reimbursable agreements for 
airport law enforcement over the next five years. Finally, the 
legislation requires TSA to conduct a review of the 
interoperable communications capabilities of the law 
enforcement, fire, and medical personnel responsible for 
responding to a security incident at airports in the United 
States.

Legislative History

113th Congress
    In the 113th Congress, H.R. 4802 was introduced in the 
House on June 5, 2014, by Mr. Hudson and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 4802 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    The Chair discharged the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security from further consideration of H.R. 4802 on June 11, 
2014. The Full Committee considered H.R. 4802 on June 11, 2014, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 4802 to 
the House on July 3, 2014, as H. Rpt. 113-512.
    The House considered H.R. 4802 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 22, 2014, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 4802 was received in the Senate on July 23, 2014, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.

114th Congress
    H.R. 720 was introduced in the House on February 4, 2015, 
by Mr. Katko and seven original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 720 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    The House considered H.R. 720 under Suspension of the Rules 
on February 10, 2015, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 411 yeas and 1 nay, (Roll No. 70).
    H.R. 720 was received in the Senate on February 11, 2015, 
and on February 12, 2015, was referred to the Senate Committee 
on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.
    The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation considered H.R. 720 on February 26, 2015, and 
reported the measure to the Senate, favorably, as amended. 
Senate Committee report filed on July 23, 2015, as S. Rpt. 114-
92.
    The Senate considered H.R. 720 on August 5, 2015, and 
passed the measure, amended, by unanimous consent.
    The House agreed on September 16, 2015, to Suspend the 
Rules and concur in the Senate amendment to H.R. 720, by voice 
vote.
    Presented to the President on September 17, 2015. The 
President signed H.R. 720 into law on September 24, 2015, as 
Public Law 114-50.

                                ------                                



 ESSENTIAL TRANSPORTATION WORKER IDENTIFICATION CREDENTIAL ASSESSMENT 
                                  ACT

                    Public Law 114-278      H.R. 710

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to prepare a 
comprehensive security assessment of the transportation 
security card program, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This measure responds to a key recommendation made by the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO), to conduct a security 
assessment of the effectiveness of the Transportation Worker 
Identification Credential (TWIC).
    The TWIC program is run jointly within the Department of 
Homeland Security by the U.S. Coast Guard and the 
Transportation Security Administration. The program uses 
biometric credentials to limit access to secure areas of 
maritime facilities and vessels to only those vetted 
individuals who have a legitimate need access the ports or 
vessels.
    The TWIC program remains incomplete, as biometric readers 
have not yet been fully deployed, as a result there remains 
uncertainty for our Nation's transportation and maritime 
industry. While regulations were in place beginning in 2007 for 
maritime workers to purchase the biometric credentials, 
regulations requiring the issuance of card readers remained 
incomplete.
    A scathing report by the Government Accountability Office 
Transportation Worker Identification Credential:Card Reader 
Pilot Results Are Unreliable; Security Benefits Need to Be 
Reassessed [GAO-13-198] called into question the underlying 
security value of the TWIC program and raised very serious 
questions about the future of this program. This legislation 
was responsive to the GAO's most recent recommendation on the 
program--conducting an independent security assessment of the 
TWIC program.

Legislative History

113th Congress
    In the 113th Congress, H.R. 3202 was introduced in the 
House on September 27, 2013, by Ms. Jackson Lee, Mr. Thompson 
of Mississippi, and Mrs. Miller of Michigan, and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 
3202 was referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime 
Security, and the Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    On May 20, 2014, the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime 
Security considered H.R. 3202 and forwarded the measure to the 
Full Committee for consideration, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 3202 on June 11, 2014, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter on July 8, 2014, to the Chair of 
the Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 3202. The letter further requested the 
appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be 
called. On that same date, the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security responded, agreeing to the jurisdictional 
interests of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure 
and the agreement to not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 
3202.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3202 to the House on July 18, 
2014, as H. Rpt. 113-528.
    The House considered H.R. 3202 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 28, 2014, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 400 yeas and 0 nays, (Roll No. 456).
    H.R. 3202 was received in the Senate on July 29, 2014, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation considered H.R. 3202 on May 20, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the Senate with an 
Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute, favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation reported H.R. 3202 to the Senate on April 25, 
2016 as S. Rpt. 114-244.

114th Congress
    H.R. 710 was introduced in the House on February 4, 2015, 
by Ms. Jackson Lee, Mrs. Miller of Michigan, and Mr. Thompson 
of Mississippi, and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 710 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security and the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on February 5, 2015, agreeing that, in order 
to expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would forego action on H.R. 
710. The letter further requested support for the appointment 
of Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be called. On 
that same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded acknowledging the jurisdictional concerns of the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and the 
agreement to forgo consideration.
    The House considered H.R. 710 under Suspension of the Rules 
on February 10, 2015, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 710 was received in the Senate on February 11, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs. On April 22, 2015, a 
unanimous-consent agreement was reached providing that H.R. 710 
be discharged from the Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs and be referred to the Senate Committee on 
Commerce, Science and Transportation.
    The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation considered H.R. 710 on May 20, 2015, and 
reported the measure to the Senate, with an amendment.
    The Senate considered H.R. 710 on December 9, 2016, and 
passed the measure, amended.
    The House concured in the Senate amendments to H.R. 710 on 
December 14, 2016. Clearing the measure for the President.
    H.R. 710 was presented to the President on December 15, 
2016. The President signed H.R. 710 into law on December 16, 
2016, as Public Law 114-278.

                                ------                                



           BOTTLES AND BREASTFEEDING EQUIPMENT SCREENING ACT

              Public Law 114-293      H.R. 5065 (S. 3299)

To direct the Secretary of Homeland Security to notify air 
carriers and security screening personnel of the Transportation 
Security Administration of such Administration's guidelines 
regarding permitting baby formula, breast milk, and juice on 
airplanes, and for other purposes.

Summary

    Although travelers are explicitly permitted by the 
Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to bring formula 
and breast milk that exceed the 3-1-1 Liquids Rule for carry-on 
baggage, there have been reports of passengers experiencing 
inconsistent implementation of these procedures during airport 
security screening. As a result some travelers were forced to 
dump expressed breast milk; leave behind ice packs or coolers 
needed for proper milk storage; or miss their flights. This 
measure requires the TSA to provide ongoing training to ensure 
its officers consistently enforce TSA Special Procedures 
related to breast milk, formula, and infant feeding equipment 
across all airport security checkpoints.

Legislative History

H.R. 5065
    H.R. 5065 was introduced in the House on April 26, 2016, by 
Ms. Herrera Beutler, Mr. Katko, and Miss Rice of New York; and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 5065 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security.
    The Subcommittee on Transportation Security was discharged 
from further consideration of H.R. 5065 on September 14, 2016.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5065 on September 14, 
2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committed reported H.R. 5065 to the House on September 
20, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-775.
    The House considered H.R. 5065 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 27, 2016, and passed the measure by voice 
vote. During consideration, the title was amended so as to read 
``To direct the Administrator of the Transportation Security 
Administration to notify air carriers and security screening 
personnel of the Transportation Security Administration of such 
Administration's guidelines regarding permitting baby formula, 
breast milk, purified deionized water, and juice on airplanes, 
and for other purposes.''
    The Senate considered H.R. 5065 on December 9 and 10, 2016, 
and passed the measure on legislative day of December 9, 2016. 
Clearing the measure for the President.
    H.R. 5065 was presented to the President on December 14, 
2016. The President signed H.R. 5065 into law on December 16, 
2016, as Public Law 114-301.

S. 3299
    S. 3299, the Senate companion measure, was introduced in 
the Senate on September 9, 2016, by Ms. Ayotte and referred to 
the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.

                                ------                                



                 PRECLEARANCE AUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2015

                                H.R. 998

To establish the conditions under which the Secretary of 
Homeland Security may establish preclearance facilities, 
conduct preclearance operations, and provide customs services 
outside the United States, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation authorized the operation and expansion of 
U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) preclearance 
operations abroad. Preclearance operations, a program under 
which passengers and their luggage undergo screening by CBP 
officers prior to boarding a U.S.-bound flight, have been in 
place in some foreign airports for years and DHS sought to 
expand the program. This act established certain guidelines for 
the program to help capture the benefits of the program without 
jeopardizing security or negatively impacting screening at U.S. 
ports of entry and provide for enhanced congressional 
oversight.
    H.R. 998 creates conditions for the Secretary of Homeland 
Security to establish preclearance facilities, conduct 
preclearance operations, and provide customs services outside 
the United States. Specifically the bill authorizes DHS to 
establish preclearance operations in a foreign country. It 
further requires the Secretary of Homeland Security to notify 
Congress 180 days before entering into an agreement with a 
foreign government to establish a preclearance operation and 
provide Congress with a copy of the proposed agreement, any 
proposed terms and conditions for CBP officers operating at the 
location, an impact assessment on trade and travel, a threat 
assessment of the proposed location, an impact assessment for 
CBP staffing at domestic ports of entry, potential economic and 
competitive impacts on U.S. air carriers, any anticipated 
homeland security details, security vulnerabilities, and 
mitigation plans. The bill also requires the Secretary report 
to Congress 90 days before entering into an agreement and 
provide Congress with a remediation plan to reduce customs 
processing times at the 25 domestic airports with the highest 
volume of international travel. In addition, aviation security 
screening standards at a preclearance location must be 
comparable to those required by TSA and if they are not, 
rescreening can occur when the passenger or goods are in the 
United States. Finally, the bill mandates that a foreign 
country with a preclearance facility routinely submit 
information concerning stolen and lost travel documents to 
INTERPOL and the U.S. Government.

Legislative History

    H.R. 998 was introduced in the House on February 13, 2015, 
by Mr. Meehan and five original cosponsors, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security, and in addition to the 
Committee on Ways and Means. Within the Committee, H.R. 998 was 
referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security 
and the Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    On June 25, 2015, the Chair discharged the Subcommittee on 
Border and Maritime Security and the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security from further consideration of H.R. 998.
    The Committee considered H.R. 998 on June 25, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Ways and Means sent a letter 
to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on July 16, 
2015, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration on the 
House Floor, the Committee on Ways and Means would forgo 
further consideration of H.R. 998.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 998 to the 
House on July 22, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-219, Pt. I. 
Subsequently, the Committee on Ways and Means was discharged 
from further consideration of H.R. 998.
    The House considered H.R. 998 under Suspension of the Rules 
on July 27, 2015, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 998 was received in the Senate on July 28, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs 
considered H.R. 998 on October 7, 2015, and ordered the measure 
to be reported to the Senate, with an Amendment in the Nature 
of a Substitute.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported H.R. 998 to the Senate on December 15, 2015, 
as S. Rpt. 114-180.
    H.R. 988 was included in Section 811 of H.R. 644, as 
reported by the Committee of Conference. (See also action on 
H.R.644 listed above).

                                ------                                



                    SECURING EXPEDITED SCREENING ACT

                               H.R. 2127

To direct the Administrator of the Transportation Security 
Administration to limit access to expedited airport security 
screening at an airport security checkpoint to participants of 
the PreCheck program and other known low-risk passengers, and 
for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 2127 directs the Transportation Security 
Administration to suspend the use of alternate methods for 
granting passengers access to PreCheck expedited screening, 
unless the agency can prove the security effectiveness of such 
methods. Specifically, this bill requires that expedited 
screening be limited to passengers who have successfully 
enrolled in the PreCheck program or who are eligible for 
PreCheck by being part of an already identified low-risk 
population. This bill helps ensure that expedited screening is 
both deliberate and secure, and that the population of known 
travelers is expanded so that resources can be directed towards 
unknown travelers.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2127 was introduced in the House on April 30, 2015, by 
Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, Mr. Katko, and Miss Rice of New 
York, and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 2127 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    On June 25, 2015, the Chair discharged the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security from further consideration of H.R. 
2127.
    The Committee considered H.R. 2127 on June 25, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 2127 to 
the House on July 22, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-220.
    The House considered H.R. 2127 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 27, 2015, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 2127 was received in the Senate on July 28, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.

                                ------                                



       IMPROVED SECURITY VETTING FOR AVIATION WORKERS ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 2750

To reform programs of the Transportation Security 
Administration, streamline transportation security regulations, 
and for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation addresses recent findings outlined by the 
DHS-OIG highlighting TSA and airport's inability to properly 
vet aviation workers who have access to sensitive areas of the 
nation's airports. H.R. 2750 ensures that the TSA coordinates 
with interagency watch-listing partners to determine needed 
Terrorist Identity Datamart Environment (TIDE) category codes 
to properly vet aviation workers and requires TSA issue new 
guidance for its Inspectors to annually conduct a comprehensive 
review of airport badging office procedures. Also, the bill 
ensures TSA works with the Federal B to determine feasibility 
of implementing the Rap-Back system for recurrent criminal 
vetting and requires TSA issue new guidance mandating 
expiration dates on airport credentials of workers with 
temporary U.S. work authorizations. Finally, it requires TSA to 
review, identify, and address airports that have systematic 
issues in determining an applicant's lawful work status and 
ensures TSA brief Congress on the status of the change, once 
completed.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2750 was introduced in the House on June 12, 2015, by 
Mr. Katko, Mr. McCaul, Miss Rice of New York, and Mr. Payne, 
and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 2750 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security.
    The Subcommittee on Transportation Security considered H.R. 
2750 on June 16, 2015, and reported the measure to the Full 
Committee with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    The Committee considered H.R. 2750 on June 25, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 2750 to the House on July 27, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-227.
    The House considered H.R. 2750 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 27, 2015, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 2750 was received in the Senate on July 28, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.

                                ------                                



               KEEPING OUR TRAVELERS SAFE AND SECURE ACT

                               H.R. 2770

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to require certain 
maintenance of security-related technology at airports, and for 
other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 2770 requires the Administrator of the Transportation 
Security Administration (TSA) to develop and implement a 
preventive maintenance validation process for security-related 
technology deployed to airports. The process must include 
specific maintenance schedules, guidance for TSA personnel and 
contractors on how to conduct and document maintenance actions, 
mechanisms to ensure compliance, and penalties for 
noncompliance.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2770 was introduced in the House on June 15, 2015, by 
Miss Rice of New York, Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, Mr. Katko, 
and Mr. Payne and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 2770 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    The Subcommittee on Transportation Security considered H.R. 
2770 on June 16, 2015, and reported the measure to the Full 
Committee with a favorable recommendation, without amendment, 
by voice vote.
    The Committee considered H.R. 2770 on June 25, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committed on Homeland Security reported H.R. 2770 to 
the House on July 22, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-218.
    The House considered H.R. 2770 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 27, 2015, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 380 yeas and 0 nays, (Roll No. 469).
    H.R. 2770 was received in the Senate on July 28, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.

                                ------                                



                 CROSS-BORDER RAIL SECURITY ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 2786

To require the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection to submit a report on cross-border rail security, 
and for other purposes.

Summary

    The U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Office of 
Field Operations is principally responsible for facilitating 
trade and travel entering the United States and ensuring 
adequate security measures. CBP attempts to prevent terrorist 
and terrorist instruments from entering the United States and 
works to enforce trade, agriculture, and immigration 
regulations across all transportation domains. This bill 
fulfills the recommendations from a DHS Office of Inspector 
General report U.S. Customs and Border Protection Did Not 
Effectively Target and Examine Rail Shipments From Canada and 
Mexico [OIG-15-39] which detailed how high-risk rail shipments 
arriving into the U.S. from Canada and Mexico were not being 
properly targeted and screened.
    This bill requires the Commissioner of CBP to submit a 
report on cross-border rail security to the House and Senate 
Homeland Security Committees. The report would include: The 
number of shipments entering the U.S. annually that are 
determined to be high-risk; details on the status of radiation 
detection units on the northern and southern land borders; and 
whether additional radiation detection equipment is needed. The 
report must also include a plan for ensuring all CBP personnel 
receive proper training and guidance on the use of CBP's 
Automated Targeting System.
    H.R. 2786 also requires the Government Accountability 
Office to periodically audit CBP operations at rail crossings 
on the northern and southern international borders.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2786 was introduced in the House on June 15, 2015, by 
Mr. Vela and Mrs. Miller of Michigan and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 2786 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Transportation Security and 
the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security.
    On June 25, 2015, the Chair discharged the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security and the Subcommittee on Border and 
Maritime Security from further consideration of H.R. 2786.
    The Committee considered H.R. 2786 on June 25, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 2786 to the House on July 28, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-233.
    The House considered H.R. 278 under Suspension of the Rules 
on September 28, 2015, and passed the measure, with an 
amendment by a recorded vote of 412 yeas and 0 nays, (Roll No. 
520).
    H.R. 2786 was received in the Senate on September 29, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



                       TSA PRECHECK EXPANSION ACT

                               H.R. 2843

To require certain improvements in the Transportation Security 
Administration's PreCheck expedited screening program, and for 
other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 2843 requires the Administrator of the Transportation 
Security Administration (TSA) to publish PreCheck application 
enrollment standards to allow private-sector entities to 
provide services to support increased enrollment in the 
program. The standards must allow for the use of secure 
technologies including: Online enrollment; kiosks; tablets; or 
staffed laptop stations at which people can apply for entry 
into the program. The bill requires the Administrator to 
coordinate with interested parties to deploy TSA-approved, 
ready-to-market private sector technology that meets new 
enrollment standards. The bill also requires the Administrator 
to develop and implement a process for approving private-sector 
marketing of the PreCheck program and a strategy for partnering 
with the private sector to encourage program enrollment. The 
bill further requires the Administrator to leverage Department 
of Homeland Security data and technology to verify the 
citizenship of individuals enrolling in the program and assess 
security vulnerabilities in the application vetting process 
that includes an evaluation of whether subjecting program 
participants to recurring fingerprint-based criminal history 
record checks and checks against terrorist watchlists could 
strengthen program security in a cost-effective manner.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2843 was introduced in the House on June 15, 2015, by 
Mr. Katko, Mr. McCaul and Mr. Rogers of Alabama and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 
2843 was referred to the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security.
    On June 25, 2015, the Chair discharged the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security from further consideration of H.R. 
2843.
    The Committee considered H.R. 2843 on June 25, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 2843 to 
the House on July 22, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-221.
    The House considered H.R. 2843 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 27, 2015, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 2843 was received in the Senate on July 28, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation considered H.R. 2843 on December 9, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the Senate with an 
Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute, favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation reported to the Senate on March 7, 2016, as S. 
Rpt. 114-223.
    Provisions of H.R. 2843 were included in the Title II 
Subtitle A of H.R. 636. (See also action on H.R. 636 listed 
above.)

                                ------                                



        HIGHWAY AND TRANSPORTATION FUNDING ACT OF 2015, PART II

                               H.R. 3038

To provide an extension of Federal-aid highway, highway safety, 
motor carrier safety, transit, and other programs funded out of 
the Highway Trust Fund, and for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 3038 extends the programmatic and expenditure 
authority of the Highway Trust Fund (HTF) through December 18, 
2015. The bill also authorizes appropriations for Federal-aid 
highway, highway safety, and public transportation programs. 
The bill subjects funding for these programs generally to the 
same manner of distribution, administration, limitation, and 
availability for obligation, but at a specified pro rata of the 
total amount as funds authorized for appropriation out of the 
HTF for such programs and activities for the current fiscal 
year. The bill also transfers approximately $6.1 billion from 
Treasury's General Fund to the HTF's Highway Account and $2 
billion to its Mass Transit Account. Included within this 
measure were increase in fees fro Fiscal Years 2024 and 2025 
for the Aviation Security Capital Fund.

Legislative History

    H.R. 3038 was introduced in the House on July 13, 2015, by 
Mr. Ryan of Wisconsin and Mr. Shuster, and referred to the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and in addition 
to the Committee on Ways and Means, the Committee on Natural 
Resources, the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, the 
Committee on Energy and Commerce, the Committee on Homeland 
Security, and the Committee on Education and the Workforce. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 3038 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    The Committee on Rules met on July 14, 2015, and granted a 
Rule providing for the consideration of H.R. 3038, the Rule was 
filed in the House as H.Res. 362 (H. Rpt. 114-204). The House 
agreed to the Rule on July 15, 2015, by a recorded vote of 245 
yeas and 183 nays, (Roll No. 439).
    The House considered H.R. 3038 on July 15, 2015, under the 
provisions of H.Res. 362, and passed the measure by a recorded 
vote of 312 yeas and 119 nays, (Roll No. 441).
    H.R. 3038 was received in the Senate on July 16, 2015, and 
read a first time. The measure was read a second time on July 
21, 2015, and placed on the Senate Legislative Calendar.

                                ------                                



        AIRPORT ACCESS CONTROL SECURITY IMPROVEMENT ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 3102

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to reform programs 
of the Transportation Security Administration, streamline 
transportation security regulations, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-296) by requiring the Administrator of the 
Transportation Security Administration to establish a risk-
based screening model for employees at airports to ensure: That 
only individuals authorized to have access to secure areas of 
airports are granted such access; that individuals are denied 
access to secure areas of airports if such authorization has 
been withdrawn; and a means of restricting access among 
employees to particular portions of secure areas.

Legislative History

    H.R. 3102 was introduced in the House on July 16, 2015, by 
Mr. Katko and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 3102 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    On July 23, 2015, the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security considered H.R. 3102 and reported the measure to the 
Full Committee for consideration with a favorable 
recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3102 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3012 to the House on October 6, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-283.
    The House considered H.R. 3102 under Suspension of the 
Rules on October 6, 2015, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 3102 was received in the Senate on October 7, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.

                                ------                                



                   PARTNERS FOR AVIATION SECURITY ACT

                               H.R. 3144

To require consultation with the Aviation Security Advisory 
Committee regarding modifications to the prohibited item list, 
require a report on the Transportation Security Oversight 
Board, and for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 3144 requires that the Administrator of the 
Transportation Security Administration (TSA) consult with the 
Aviation Security Advisory Committee (ASAC) regarding 
modifications to the prohibited items list, prior to making a 
final determination. Additionally, the bill requires TSA to 
submit a report to Congress providing general information 
concerning the activities and composition of the Transportation 
Security Oversight Board. Finally, the bill makes a technical 
correction to existing statute establishing the ASAC, to 
authorize members of the Advisory Committee to remain in their 
position after their term has expired, until either a successor 
begins serving or they are reappointed.

Legislative History

    H.R. 3144 was introduced in the House on July 21, 2015, by 
Mr. Payne and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 3144 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    On July 23, 2015, the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security considered a H.R. 3144, and reported the measure to 
the Full Committee for consideration with a favorable 
recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3144 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3144 to the House on November 
2, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-320.
    The House considered H.R. 3144 under Suspension of the 
Rules on November 16, 2015, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 3144 was received in the Senate on November 17, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.

                                ------                                



 TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION REFORM AND IMPROVEMENT ACT OF 
                                  2015

                               H.R. 3584

To reform programs of the Transportation Security 
Administration, streamline transportation security regulations, 
and for other purposes.

Summary

    This bill provides for streamlining and reforming certain 
programs within the Transportation Security Administration 
(TSA). This measure provides for an authorization of TSA's 
PreCheck program, and for the TSA to implement a pilot project 
to establish a secure, automated, biometric-based system at 
airports to verify the identity of individuals enrolled in 
PreCheck. Additionally, TSA is required to develop and 
implement technology solutions to verify travel and identity 
documents for standard screening lane passengers at large hub 
airports. Both of these initiatives are focused on reducing the 
number of TSA screening personnel needed to perform these 
duties, reduce wait times, reduce operating expenses, and 
integrate with watchlist matching programs and other checkpoint 
technologies.

Legislative History

    On July 23, 2015, the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security considered a Committee Print entitled the 
``Transportation Security Administration Reform and Improvement 
Act of 2015'' and reported the measure to the Full Committee 
for consideration with a favorable recommendation, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 3584 was introduced in the House on September 22, 
2015, by Mr. Katko and Mr. McCaul and referred to the Committee 
on Homeland Security.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3584 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3584 to the House on January 
12, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-396.
    The House considered H.R. 3584 under Suspension of the 
Rules on February 23, 2016, and passed the measure by voice 
vote.
    H.R. 3584 was received in the Senate on February 24, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.

                                ------                                



           TREATING SMALL AIRPORTS WITH FAIRNESS ACT OF 2016

                          H.R. 4549 (S. 2549)

To require the Transportation Security Administration to 
conduct security screening at certain airports, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    This bill returns security screening and personnel to 
airports that have had been denied by the Transportation 
Security Administration (TSA) after temporary gaps in 
commercial air service. The TSA has stated they have no 
requirement under law to return this needed service, and 
instead has directed the airports to allow passengers to fly 
unscreened to their next destination, and undergo reverse 
security screening there. This poses serious security issues, 
and would increase travel time and costs for passengers. 
According to local officials and the commercial airlines hoping 
to return service to these small airports, this is not a 
feasible option due to the security concerns of 30 passengers 
flying unscreened to a major metropolitan area, the added 
travel time caused by using a shuttle bus to reach the front of 
the airport for screening, and other logistical challenges.
    H.R. 4549 requires the TSA to provide the necessary staff 
and screening equipment to any airport that lost commercial air 
service on or after January 1, 2013, if the operator submits a 
request for security screening to the Administrator and a 
written confirmation of a commitment from a commercial air 
carrier that such carrier intends to resume commercial air 
service at such airport not later than one year after the date 
that the operator submitted a request for security screening to 
the Administrator. This bill also requires the Administrator to 
ensure that security screening is implemented by the TSA at an 
airport not later than the later of 90 days after the airport 
operator submits a request for such screening or the date which 
the commercial air carrier that is the subject of such request 
intends to resume commercial air service at such airport.

Legislative History

H.R. 4549
    H.R. 4549 was introduced in the House on February 11, 2016, 
by Mr. Walden, Mr. Hurd of Texas, Mrs. Lummis, Mr. DeFazio, and 
Mr. Kilmer and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 4549 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    The Subcommittee on Transportation Security was discharged 
from further consideration on March 23, 2016. The Full 
Committee considered H.R. 4549 on March 23, 2016, and ordered 
the measure to be reported to the House with a favorable 
recommendation, as amended, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 4549 to 
the House on April 13, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-493.
    The House considered H.R. 4549 on April 13, 2016, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 4549 was received in the Senate on April 14, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.

S. 2549
    S. 2549, the Senate companion measure, was introduced in 
the Senate on February 11, 2016, by Mr. Merkley, Mr. Barrasso, 
Mr. Enzi, Mr. Wyden, and Mr. Hatch and referred to the 
Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.

                                ------                                



   SECURING AVIATION FROM FOREIGN ENTRY POINTS AND GUARDING AIRPORTS 
                 THROUGH ENHANCED SECURITY ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 4698

To enhance aviation by requiring airport security assessments 
and a security coordination enhancement plan, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    This bill directs the Transportation Security 
Administration (TSA) of the Department of Homeland Security to 
conduct a comprehensive security risk assessment of all last 
point of departure airports with nonstop flights to the United 
States. This legislation also allows TSA to donate security 
screening equipment to a foreign last point of departure 
airport operator and will require TSA submit to the Government 
Accountability Office and Congress a plan that assesses TSA's 
ability to work with foreign government entities to allow TSA 
representatives conduct inspections of foreign airports without 
advance notice; and enhances collaboration and information-
sharing about international inbound-aviation between the U.S. 
and foreign and domestic partners to enhance security 
capabilities at foreign airports.

Legislative History

    H.R. 4689 was introduced in the House on March 3, 2016, by 
Mr. Katko, Mr. McCaul, Mr. Keating, Mr. Donovan, and Mr. King 
of New York and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 4689 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    The Chair discharged the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security from further consideration of H.R. 4689 on March 23, 
2016.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 4689 on March 23, 2016, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4689 to the House on April 21, 
2016, as H. Rpt. 114-513.
    The House considered H.R. 4689 under Suspension of the 
Rules on April 26, 2016, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 4689 was received in the Senate on April 27, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    Provisions of H.R. 4698 were included in the Title II, 
Subtitle B of H.R. 636. (See also, action on H.R. 636, listed 
above.)

                                ------                                



           CHECKPOINT OPTIMIZATION AND EFFICIENCY ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 5338

To reduce passenger wait times at airports, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    This bill allows for the assessment of staffing model of 
the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to determine 
whether those staffing positions that are necessary, including 
canine explosives detection technology and teams, for all 
airports in the U.S. where TSA controls passenger checkpoints. 
In addition, this legislation requires: TSA Behavior Detection 
Officers be present at baggage and passenger screening areas, 
including PreCheck lanes; increases efforts to ensure the 
public understands the TSA PreCheck program; and requests the 
Aviation Security Advisory Committee submit recommendations on 
best practices for checkpoint operations optimization.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5338 was introduced in the House on May 26, 2016, by 
Mr. Katko and nine original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 5338 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    The House agreed to Suspend the Rules on June 7, 2016, and 
passed H.R. 5338, as amended, by voice vote.
    H.R. 5338 was received in the Senate on June 8, 2016, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.

                                ------                                



                   CUBAN AIRPORT SECURITY ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 5728

To prohibit scheduled passenger air transportation between the 
United States and Cuba until a study has been completed 
regarding security measures and equipment at Cuba's airports, 
to amend title 49, United States Code, to clarify the role of 
the Secretary of Homeland Security regarding security standards 
at foreign airports, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation requires the Administrator of the 
Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to submit to the 
relevant Congressional committees a report detailing the 
following security measures at each of Cuba's ten international 
airports: Information about the type of equipment used at 
screening checkpoints and an analysis of such equipment's 
capability and weaknesses; information about each airport's 
canine program; the frequency of training for screening and 
security personnel; access controls in place to ensure only 
credentialed personnel have access to the secure and sterile 
areas of such airports; an assessment of the ability of known 
or suspected terrorists to use Cuba as a gateway to enter the 
United States; airport perimeter security; a mitigation 
assessment regarding Man Portable Air Defense Systems; the 
vetting practices and procedures for airport employees; and any 
other information determined relevant to the security 
practices, procedures and equipment in place at such airports.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5728 was introduced in the House on July 14, 2016, by 
Mr. Katko, Mr. McCaul, Mr. Hudson, and Mr. Cuellar and referred 
to the Committee on Homeland Security and the Committee on 
Foreign Affairs. Within the Committee, H.R. 5728 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    The Subcommittee on Transportation Security was discharged 
from further consideration of H.R. 5728 on September 14, 2016.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5728 on September 14, 
2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.

                              ----------                              


                Oversight Activities of the Subcommittee


            ACCESS CONTROL MEASURES AT OUR NATION'S AIRPORTS

    On February 3, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``A Review of Access Control Measures at Our Nation's 
Airports.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Mark 
Hatfield, Acting Deputy Administrator, Transportation Security 
Administration, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. Doug 
Perdue, Deputy Assistant Director, Counterterrorism Division, 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, U.S. Department of Justice; 
Ms. Sharon L. Pinkerton, Senior Vice President, Legislative and 
Regulatory Policy, Airlines for America; and Mr. Miguel 
Southwell, General Manager, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta 
International Airport.
    On March 3, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives from the TSA regarding processing delays in the 
Transportation Worker Identification Credential program.
    On March 16, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with the American 
Association of Airport Executives to discuss airport access 
controls.
    The Subcommittee continued its hearing on April 30, 2015, 
with a hearing entitled ``A Review of Access Control Measures 
at Our Nation's Airports, Part II.'' The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Mr. Melvin J. Carraway, Acting Administrator, 
Transportation Security Administration, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Jeanne M. Olivier, A.A.E., Assistant 
Director, Aviation Security and Technology, Security Operations 
and Programs Department, The Port Authority of New York & New 
Jersey, testifying on behalf of The American Association of 
Airport Executives; and Mr. Steven Grossman, Chief Executive 
Officer/Executive Director, Jacksonville International Airport, 
Jacksonville Aviation Authority, testifying on behalf of The 
Airports Council International, North America.
    On June 9, 2015, the Chairs of the Full Committee, the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security, and the Subcommittee 
on Oversight and Management Efficiency, sent a letter to the 
Secretary of Homeland Security regarding the Inspector 
General's report TSA Can Improve Aviation Worker Vetting (OIG-
15-98) which found that 73 aviation workers with access to 
secure areas of airports across the United States were found to 
have ties to terrorism.
    On June 10, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with the DHS 
Office of the Inspector General to discuss aviation worker 
vetting procedures.
    On June 16, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``How TSA Can Improve Aviation Worker Vetting.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Hon. John Roth, Inspector 
General, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Ms. Stacey 
Fitzmaurice, Deputy Assistant Administrator, Office of 
Intelligence and Analysis, Transportation Security 
Administration, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and Ms. 
Jennifer Grover, Director, Transportation Security and Coast 
Guard Issues, Homeland Security and Justice Team, U.S. 
Government Accountability Office.
    On December 16, 2015, Chair of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security sent a letter to the Administrator, 
Transportation Security Administration, regarding the state of 
airport access controls across the United States.
    From October 2015 to May 2016, Subcommittee staff conducted 
site visits to multiple airports in various regions in the 
United States to investigate employee access controls and 
insider threat prevention and mitigation efforts.
    On June 6, 2016, the Chair of the Committee sent a letter 
to the Secretary of Homeland Security, regarding recent news 
reports that a Somali man accused of war crimes, was working as 
a security guard at Dulles International Airport.

                    PASSENGER AND BAGGAGE SCREENING

    On March 4, 2015, the Members of the Subcommittee received 
a classified briefing from representatives from the U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security Office of Inspector General and 
the Government Accountability Office on air passenger and 
baggage screening capabilities.

                              TSA PRECHECK

    On January 15, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with TSA's 
Office of Acquisitions to discuss a new procurement process for 
the Screening Partnership Program.
    On February 11, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with GAO to 
discuss ongoing work regarding the TSA Screening Partnership 
Program.
    On March 4, 2015, the Subcommittee held a classified Member 
briefing on air passenger and baggage screening capabilities. 
Representatives from the DHS-IG and the GAO were available to 
provide an overview of capabilities and testing efforts and to 
respond to Member questions.
    On March 25, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Risk-Based Security: Assessing the Path Forward for TSA 
PreTM.'' The Subcommittee received testimony 
from Hon. John Roth, Inspector General, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Mr. Kenneth Fletcher, Chief Risk Officer, 
Transportation Security Administration, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; and Ms. Jennifer Grover, Director, Homeland 
Security and Justice, U.S. Government Accountability Office.
    On March 31, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives from the Department of Justice and the 
Department of Homeland Security to discuss revisions to the 
traveler redress process.
    On April 10, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives from GAO to discuss watchlisting policies and 
information sharing within TSA and DHS. 
    On April 17, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives from GAO to discuss work regarding terrorist 
prevention efforts at TSA.
    On June 2, 2015, the Chairs of the Full Committee, the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security, and the Subcommittee 
on Oversight and Management Efficiency sent a letter to the 
Secretary of Homeland Security regarding the leaked testing 
results from DHS Inspector General's ongoing covert testing of 
airport checkpoint security.
    On June 11, 2015, the Full Committee held a classified 
Member briefing on covert screening checkpoint test results 
conducted by the DHS-IG. Representatives from the Department of 
Homeland Security, TSA, and the DHS-IG were available to 
respond to Member questions.
    On September 9, 2015, the Subcommittee held a classified 
Member briefing on recent airport screening checkpoint test 
results, as well as related actions directed by Secretary of 
Homeland Security. This briefing provided Members with an 
opportunity to have an open discussion with members of the 
Administrator of the Transportation Security Administration.
    On October 6, 2015, Subcommittee staff conducted a site 
visit to the Transportation Security Administration System 
Integration Facility (TSIF) located at Reagan National Airport 
(DCA) in Arlington, Virginia, to review enhanced screening 
measures and the technology used at security checkpoints.
    On October 7, 2015, the Subcommittee held a classified 
Member briefing on a recent DHS Inspector General report 
concerning covert airport screening checkpoint test results. 
This meeting provided Members with an opportunity to have a 
discussion with the Inspector General on the report, who was 
also available to answer Member questions.
    On November 30, 2015, the Chairs of the Full Committee, the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security sent a letter to 
Comptroller General of the United States regarding the 
effectiveness of the AIT-ATR systems.
    On February 2, 2016, the Subcommittee held a Member 
briefing on the process for placing individuals on the no-fly 
list and other terrorist watchlisting practices. This meeting 
provided Members with an opportunity to have discussion with 
representatives from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) 
Terrorist Screening Center (TSC) and the National 
Counterterrorism Center (NCTC).
    On March 23, 2016, the Subcommittee staff were briefed by 
TSA in regard to an anticipated increase in checkpoint wait 
times over the summer
    On May 18, 2016, the Subcommittee held a Member briefing on 
screening wait times at airports across the United States. This 
meeting provided Members and Subcommittee staff the opportunity 
to discuss the topic with representatives from various airlines 
and airports across the U.S.
    On May 26, 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Long Lines, Short Patience: Local Perspectives.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Ms. Christina R. Callahan, 
Executive Director, Syracuse Hancock International Airport, 
Syracuse, New York; Ms. Bonnie A. Allin, President and CEO, 
Tucson Airport Authority, Tucson, Arizona; Ms. Lydia Beairsto, 
Managing Deputy Commissioner for Security, Department of 
Aviation, City of Chicago, Illinois; Ms. Kerry Philipovitch, 
Senior Vice President, Customer Experience, American Airlines; 
and Mr. J. David Cox, Sr., National President, American 
Federation of Government Employees.
    On June 3, 2015, Subcommittee staff received a classified 
briefing from DHS regarding recent changes made to airport 
security screening and training.
    On June 10, 2016, the Chairman of the Subcommittee, along 
with Members of the Subcommittee conducted a site visit to the 
Transportation Security Administration System Integration 
Facility (TSIF) located at Reagan National Airport (DCA) in 
Arlington, Virginia, to review enhanced screening measures and 
the technology used at security checkpoints.
    On November 17, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Assessing TSA's Management and Implementation of the 
Screening Partnership Program.'' The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Ms. Jennifer Grover, Director, Homeland Security 
and Justice, U.S. Government Accountability Office; and Ms. 
Carolyn Dorgham, Director, Screening Partnership Program, 
Office of Security Operations, Transportation Security 
Administration, U.S. Department of Homeland Security.
    On December 10, 2015, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Director of the National Counterterrorism Center 
(NCTC) and the Director of the Terrorist Screening Center 
regarding concerns over the terrorist watchlisting process.
    On December 14, 2015, the Chairs of the Full Committee, the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security, and the Subcommittee 
on Oversight and Management Efficiency sent a letter to the 
Secretary of Homeland Security (DHS), regarding how DHS and the 
Transportation Security Administration (TSA) coordinate with 
foreign partners, evaluate and implement security screening 
operations, and share intelligence information.
    On February 1, 2016, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security, regarding 
passengers on an international flight from Mexico allowed to 
leave John F. Kennedy (JFK) International Airport without going 
through screening by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP).
    On July 7, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with TSA for an 
update on TSA's Screening Partnership Program (SPP) Cost 
Estimates.

                              TSA PRECHECK

    On March 19, 2015, the Subcommittee sent a letter to the 
Secretary of Homeland Security regarding the Request for 
Proposal (RFP) for the TSA's Precheck Application Expansion 
Solicitation HSTS02-15-OIA037, issued on December 22, 2014.
    On May 20, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives from TSA regarding the agency's PreCheck 
program. On June 17, 2016, multiple Subcommittee's staff were 
briefed by TSA on cybersecurity issues relating to the PreCheck 
program.

                             CARGO SECURITY

    On March 18, 2016, the Chairs of the Full Committee, the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security sent a letter to the 
Comptroller General of the United States regarding the risk 
posed by the roughly 10 billion pounds of cargo transported on 
both all-cargo and passenger inbound flights to the United 
States annually.
    On April 27, 2016, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Administrator of the Transportation Security 
Administration, regarding malfunctioning AT X-Ray machines 
utilized by TSA to screen baggage throughout airports in the 
United States.
    On June 15, 2016, Subcommittee staff received a brief from 
TSA regarding current policies and procedures pertaining to 
cargo transportation.
    On July 7, 2016, the Members of the Subcommittee received a 
briefing on the challenges to cargo security as well as to gain 
industry perspectives on TSA's role in the cargo environment.

              AVIATION AND SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY

    On January 28, 2015, the Chairs of the Full Committee, the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security, and the Subcommittee 
on Counterterrorism and Intelligence sent a letter to the 
Secretary of Homeland Security expressing concern for 
modifications that were being made to existing security 
mandates at certain foreign airports.
    On February 4, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with TSA's 
Office of Global Strategies and Office of Security Policy and 
Industry Engagement to discuss existing security directives and 
emergency amendments implemented by TSA.
    On June 2, 2015, the Members of the Subcommittee received a 
classified briefing from representatives from the U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security 
Administration on aviation and surface transportation security.
    On July 28, 2015, the Chairman of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security, along with Members of the Subcommittee 
conducted a visit to the Transportation Security Administration 
Headquarters in Arlington, Virginia, to participate in the 
Administrator's Daily Intelligence Brief (ADIB).
    On September 17, 2015, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to TSA Administrator regarding the efforts and 
capabilities employed by the TSA to secure the surface 
transportation sector in the United States.
    On November 10, 2015, Subcommittee staff conducted a site 
visit to the Federal Air Marshal Service (FAMS) Training 
Headquarters in Atlantic City, New Jersey, to review training 
programs and facilities.
    On November 30, 2015, the Chairs of the Full Committee and 
the Subcommittee sent a letter to the Comptroller General of 
the United States regarding the security of the U.S. freight 
rail system.
    On December 8, 2015, the Chair and Ranking Member of the 
Subcommittee sent a letter to the Chair and Ranking Members of 
the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure regarding 
the statuary ban on general aviation aircraft flying over large 
stadiums.
    On December 15, 2015, the Chairs of the Full and 
Subcommittee sent a letter to the Comptroller General of the 
United States regarding TSA's Surface Transportation Security 
Inspectors.
    On January 4, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with Anne Marie 
Pellerin, Principal at Pellerin & Associates and former TSA 
Attach at the U.S. Embassy in Paris, on EU Aviation Security 
Regulatory Organizations.
    On January 28 and 29, 2016, Subcommittee staff went to TSA 
and received briefings from every component within the agency 
on their duties and responsibilities.
    On May 11, 2016, the Subcommittee met with the American 
Trucking Association to discuss their legislative priorities.
    On July, 15, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with TSA 
regarding policies for Law Enforcement Officers flying armed.
    On July 19, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with Homeland 
Security Investigations (HSI) representatives for a brief on 
operational aviation related task forces.
    On September 9, 2016, Subcommittee staff were briefed by 
TSA/FAMS on the FAMS staffing allocation model.
    On September 27, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with the 
Airline Pilots Association regarding the current status of the 
Federal Flight Deck Officer Program (FFDO) and potential 
expansion.
    On October 27, 2016, Subcommittee staff conducted a site 
visit to the Federal Air Marshal Service (FAMS) Training 
Headquarters in Atlantic City, New Jersey, to review training 
programs and facilities.

                    LAST POINT OF DEPARTURE AIRPORTS

    On December 1, 2015, the Members of the Subcommittee 
received a briefing on Last Point of Departure Airports and 
Securing international aviation.
    On December 8, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Examining TSA's Global Efforts to Protect the 
Homeland from Aviation Threats and Enhance Security at Last 
Point of Departure Airports.'' The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Mr. Joseph P. Terrell, Deputy Assistant 
Administrator, Office of Global Strategies, Transportation 
Security Administration, U.S. Department of Homeland Security.
    On March 18, 2016, the Chair of the Full and Subcommittee 
sent a letter to the Comptroller General of the United States 
regarding the request for an updated review of TSA's foreign 
airport assessment and air carrier inspection programs to 
determine what progress has been made to work with industry 
partners to address vulnerabilities and ensure the security of 
last point of departure flights to the U.S.
    On June 6, 2016, the Chair of the Full Committee sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security, regarding concern 
over security vulnerabilities associated with Last Points of 
Departure airports to the United States.
    On June 23, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives from TSA, State Department, Department of 
Transportation, and Department of Homeland Security to discuss 
the process by which foreign airports are certified as last 
points of departure to the U.S.

     FY 2017 TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION BUDGET REQUEST

    On February 12, 2016, Subcommittee staff were briefed by 
TSA on their FY 2017 budget request.
    On February 25, 2016, the Subcommittee held a Member 
briefing on the Fiscal Year 207 Budget request by the 
Transportation Security Administration. This meeting provided 
both Members and Subcommittee staff an opportunity to have 
discussion from stakeholders.
    On March 2, 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``The Transportation Security Administration's FY2017 Budget 
Request.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Hon. Peter 
V. Neffenger, Administrator, Transportation Security 
Administration, U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

                           PIPELINE SECURITY

    On November 30, 2015, the Chair of the Full and 
Subcommittee sent a letter to the Comptroller General of the 
United States regarding the vulnerability of the US' network of 
energy pipelines to terrorists and vandals.
    On April 13, 2016, the Members of the Subcommittee received 
a briefing from industry stakeholders on pipeline security.
    On April 19, 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Pipelines: Securing the Veins of the American Economy.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Ms. Sonya Proctor, Surface 
Division Director, Office of Security Policy and Industry 
Engagement, Transportation Security Administration, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security; Mr. Andrew Black, President 
and CEO, Association of Oil Pipe Lines, testifying on behalf of 
the American Petroleum Institute; Ms. Kathleen S. Judge, 
Director of Risk and Compliance for Global Security, National 
Grid, testifying on behalf of the American Gas Association; and 
Dr. Paul W. Parfomak, Specialist in Energy and Infrastructure 
Policy, Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress.

                          AIR SERVICE TO CUBA

    On April 12, 2016, the Chairs of the Full Committee and the 
Subcommittees on Transportation Security and Oversight and 
Management Efficiency sent a letter to the Secretary of 
Homeland Security, regarding the Administration's plan to begin 
regularly scheduled commercial air service between the United 
States and Cuba.
    On May 4, 2016, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a letter 
to the Administrator of the Transportation Security 
Administration, regarding proposed witnesses for a subcommittee 
hearing on the security of airports in Cuba.
    On May 6, 2016, the Chair of the Full Committee sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security, regarding DHS' 
proposed witness for the subcommittee hearing on the security 
of airports in Cuba.
    On May 18, 2016, the Chairs of the Full Committee and 
Subcommittee sent a letter to the Secretary of Homeland 
Security, regarding the request for further information from 
the Cuba hearing witnesses, who testified on May 17, 2016.
    On March 7, 2016, Subcommittee staff were briefed by TSA on 
their operations in Cuba.
    On May 17, 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Flying Blind: What are the security risks of resuming U.S. 
Commercial Air Service to Cuba?'' The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Mr. Larry Mizell, TSA Representative, 
Transportation Security Administration, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Mr. Paul Fujimura, Assistant Administrator, 
Office of Global Strategies, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security; Mr. John Wagner, Deputy Executive Assistant 
Commissioner, Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Mr. Seth Stodder, Assistant Secretary of 
Homeland Security, Border, Immigration and Trade Policy, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security; and Mr. Kurt Tong, Principal 
Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Economic and Business 
Affairs, U.S. Department of State.

        MISCONDUCT AT THE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION

    On September 14, 2015, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to Administrator of the Transportation Security 
Administration (TSA) regarding misconduct by three Federal Air 
Marshals in Chicago, IL as well as eight Sig Sauer P229 
firearms that experienced failure-to-fire malfunctions while on 
the firing range.
    On March 10, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives from the TSA Office of Law Enforcement/Federal 
Air Marshal Service to discuss misconduct issues within the 
Federal Air Marshal Service.
    On June 30, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with TSA's Office 
of Law Enforcement/Federal Air Marshal Service to discuss 
ongoing misconduct investigations and mission challenges within 
the Federal Air Marshal Service.
    On July 9, 2015, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to TSA Administrator regarding allegations that the TSA 
paid passengers $3 million during the past five years due to 
claims that TSA screeners stole, lost, or damaged their luggage 
or personal property.
    On July 7, 2016, the Subcommittee on Oversight and 
Management Efficiency and the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security held a joint hearing entitled ``How Pervasive is 
Misconduct at TSA: Examining Findings from a Joint Subcommittee 
Investigation.'' The Subcommittees received testimony from Dr. 
Huban Gowadia, Deputy Administrator, Transportation Security 
Administration, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and Mr. 
Andrew Oosterbaan, Assistant Inspector General for 
Investigations, Office of Inspector General, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security.

                            TSA CHECKPOINTS

    On September 9, 2015, the Members of the Subcommittee 
received a classified briefing from the Administrator of the 
Transportation Security Administration on recent airport 
screening checkpoint test results, as well as related actions 
directed by the Secretary of Homeland Security. The 
Subcommittee continued their investigation with a second 
classified Member briefing on October 7, 2015.

                    SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY

    On September 17, 2015, the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security and the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and 
Intelligence held a joint hearing entitled ``Safeguarding our 
Nation's Surface Transportation Systems Against Evolving 
Terrorist Threats.'' The Subcommittees received testimony from 
Mr. Eddie Mayenschein, Assistant Administrator, Office of 
Security Policy and Industry Engagement, Transportation 
Security Administration, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; 
Ms. Jennifer Grover, Director, Transportation Security and 
Coast Guard Issues, Homeland Security and Justice Team, U.S. 
Government Accountability Office; Mr. Raymond Diaz, Director of 
Security, Metropolitan Transportation Authority (New York); and 
Ms. Polly Hanson, Chief of Police, National Railroad Passenger 
Corporation (Amtrak).

                   REFORM AND IMPROVEMENT OF THE TSA

    On October 8, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Reform and Improvement: Assessing the Path Forward 
for the Transportation Security Administration.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from The Honorable John Roth, 
Inspector General, Office of Inspector General, U.S. Department 
of Homeland Security; and The Honorable Peter Neffenger, 
Administrator, Transportation Security Administration, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security.

               SECURITY MEASURES AT THE NATION'S AIRPORTS

    On October 26, 2015, the Subcommittee held a field hearing 
in Syracuse, New York, entitled ``Examining Critical Security 
Measures, Communications, and Response at our Nation's 
Airports.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Jeremy 
Martelle, President, New York Aviation Management Association; 
and Ms. Marisa Maola, Regional Director, Region One, 
Transportation Security Administration, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security.

                     SCREENING PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM

    On December 2, 2015, the Members of the Subcommittee 
received a briefing on TSA's technology acquisition and 
technology vision.

                           ACQUISITION REFORM

    On January 7, 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Transportation Security Acquisition Reform Act: 
Examining Remaining Challenges.'' The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Mr. Steven Wallen, Director, Explosives 
Division, Homeland Security Advanced Research Projects Agency, 
Science and Technology Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security; Ms. Jill Vaughan, Assistant Administrator, Office of 
Security Technologies, Transportation Security Administration, 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Ms. Michele Mackin, 
Director, Office Acquisition and Sourcing Management, U.S. 
Government Accountability Office; and Mr. TJ Schulz, Executive 
Director, Security Manufacturers Coalition.

            NO FLY LISTS AND THE TERRORIST SCREENING CENTER

    On February 2, 2016, the Subcommittee Members received a 
classified briefing from the FBI's Terrorist Screening Center 
(TSC) and the National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC) on the 
process for placing individuals on the no-fly list and other 
terrorist watchlisting practices.

                             CARGO SECURITY

    On July 7, 2016, the Members of the Subcommittee received a 
briefing from industry stakeholders on challenges to cargo 
security and gain perspectives on TSA's role in the cargo 
environment.

                           WORLDWIDE THREATS

    On September 14, 2016, the Members of the Subcommittee 
received a briefing from the Transportation Security 
Administration, Office of Intelligence and Analysis on on 
worldwide threats to aviation security.
    The Members of the Subcommittee on Transportation Security 
and the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security received a 
classified briefing on efforts to mitigate threats to the 
aviation system on September 21, 2016. Representatives from the 
Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs 
Enforcement, Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) team were 
present to provide Members a background on their efforts at the 
Newark International Airport.

                    INSIDER THREATS AT U.S. AIRPORTS

    On November 18, 2016, the Members of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security and the Subcommittee on Border and 
Maritime Security received a briefing the efforts by the U.S. 
Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Homeland Security 
Investigations (HSI) to mitigate insider threats at major U.S. 
airports. Members were briefed by a representative from the HSI 
Newark, New Jersey, Office of Special Agent-in-Charge on 
current investigations and operations focusing on the criminal 
activity of employees with access to Federal Inspection Site 
areas throughout the Newark Liberty International Airport.

                              ----------                              


                       Subcommittee Hearings Held


``A Review of Access Control Measures at Our Nation's 
        Airports.'' February 3, 2015. (Serial No. 114-1)
``Risk-Based Security: Assessing the Path Forward for TSA 
        PreTM'' March 25, 2015. (Serial No. 
        114-12)
``A Review of Access Control Measures at Our Nation's Airports: 
        Part II.'' April 30, 2015. (Serial No. 114-1)
``How TSA Can Improve Aviation Worker Vetting.'' June 16, 2015. 
        (Serial No. 114-21)
``Examining the Federal Air Marshal Service and Its Readiness 
        to Meet the Evolving Threat.'' July 16, 2015. (Serial 
        No. 114-28)
Joint hearing with the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and 
        Intelligence. ``Safeguarding our Nation's Surface 
        Transportation Systems Against Evolving Terrorist 
        Threats.'' September 17, 2015. (Serial No. 114-32)
``Reform and Improvement: Assessing the Path Forward for the 
        Transportation Security Administration.'' October 8, 
        2015. (Serial No. 114-36)
Field hearing in Syracuse, New York, ``Examining Critical 
        Security Measures, Communications, and Response at Our 
        Nation's Airports. October 6, 2015. (Serial No. 114-39)
``Assessing TSA's Management and Implementation of the 
        Screening Partnership Program.'' November 17, 2015. 
        (Serial No. 114-44)
``Examining TSA's Global Efforts to Protect the Homeland from 
        Aviation Threats and Enhance Security at Last Point of 
        Departure Airports.'' December 8, 2015. (Serial No. 
        114-47)
``Transportation Security Acquisition Reform Act: Examining 
        Remaining Challenges.'' January 7, 2015. (Serial No. 
        114-48)
``The Transportation Security Administration's FY2017 Budget 
        Request.'' March 2, 2016. (Serial No. 114-58)
``Pipelines: Securing the Veins of the American Economy.'' 
        April 19, 2016. (Serial No. 114-64)
``Flying Blind: What are the security risks of resuming U.S. 
        Commercial Air Service to Cuba?'' May 17, 2016. (Serial 
        No. 114-70)
``Long Lines, Short Patience: Local Perspectives.'' May 26, 
        2016. (Serial No. 114-74)
Joint with the Subcommittee on Oversight and Management 
        Efficiency. ``How Pervasive is Misconduct at TSA: 
        Examining Findings from a Joint Subcommittee 
        Investigation.'' July 7, 2016. (Serial No. 114-78)

              Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security

                   Martha McSally, Arizona, Chairman

Lamar Smith, Texas
Mike Rogers, Alabama
Candice S. Miller, Michigan
Jeff Duncan, South Carolina
Lou Barletta, Pennsylvania
Will Hurd, Texas
Michael T. McCaul, Texas
                  (ex officio)      Filemon Vela, Texas
                                    Loretta Sanchez, California
                                    Sheila Jackson Lee, Texas
                                    Brian Higgins, New York
                                    Norma J. Torres, California
                                    Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi
                                                      (ex officio)

                              ----------                              


    During the 114th Congress, the Subcommittee on Border and 
Maritime Security held 12 hearings, receiving testimony from 54 
witnesses, resulting in 7 Public Laws.

                              ----------                              


               Legislative Activities of the Subcommittee



                HUMAN TRAFFICKING DETECTION ACT OF 2015

            Public Law 114-22    H.R. 460 (S. 178 / S. 623)

To direct the Secretary of Homeland Security to train 
Department of Homeland Security personnel how to effectively 
deter, detect, disrupt, and prevent human trafficking during 
the course of their primary roles and responsibilities, and for 
other purposes.

Summary

    An estimated 17,500 individuals are trafficked into the 
United States each year. Victims include both U.S. citizens and 
noncitizens and trafficking occurs in every State in the 
nation. H.R. 460 requires the Secretary of Homeland Security to 
implement a human trafficking awareness program to train and 
periodically retrain relevant Departmental personnel. The 
training must be given to personnel within the Transportation 
Security Administration, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, 
and other Departmental offices. Additionally, the legislation 
requires the Secretary to annually reassess the training 
program to ensure it is consistent with current techniques, 
patterns, and trends associated with human trafficking and 
authorizes the Secretary to provide training curricula to any 
State, local, or Tribal Government or private organization 
seeking to establish a human trafficking awareness training 
program.

Legislative History

H.R. 460
    H.R. 460 was introduced in the House on January 21, 2015, 
by Mr. Walker and nine original cosponsors, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security, and in addition to the 
Committee on the Judiciary. Within the Committee, H.R. 460 was 
referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security, 
and the Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    On January 22, 2015, the Chair of the Committee on the 
Judiciary sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on the 
Judiciary would waive further consideration of H.R. 406; on 
that same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the 
Committee on the Judiciary, and the agreement to not waive 
further consideration.
    The House considered H.R. 460 under Suspension the Rules on 
January 27, 2015, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 460 was received in the Senate on January 28, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered H.R. 460 on March 4, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate, favorably. The Senate 
Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs 
reported H.R.460 to the Senate on May 15, 2015, as S. Rpt. 114-
46.
    The text of H.R. 460, as passed by the House was added to 
Title IX of S. 178, as passed by the Senate.

S. 178
    S. 178, the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act of 2015, 
was introduced in the Senate on January 13, 2015, by Mr. Cornyn 
and referred to the Senate Committee on the Judiciary.
    The Senate Committee on the Judiciary considered S. 178 on 
February 26, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the Senate, favorably, with an Amendment in the Nature of a 
Substitute.
    On March 2, 2015, the Senate Committee on the Judiciary 
reported S. 178 to the Senate with no written report.
    The Senate considered S. 178 on March 10, 11, 12, 16, 17, 
18, 19; April 14, 16, 20, 21, and 22, 2015. On April 22, 2015, 
the Senate passed S. 178 by a recorded vote of 99 yeas and 0 
nays, (Roll No. 163).
    S. 178 was received in the House on April 23, 2015, and 
held at the Desk.
    The House considered S. 178 under Suspension of the Rules 
on May 18, 2015, and on May 19, 2015, passed the measure, by a 
\2/3\ recorded vote of 420 yeas and 3 nays, (Roll No. 244).
    Subsequently, pursuant to H. Con. Res. 47, the enrollment 
of S. 178 was corrected.
    S. 178 was presented to the President on May 21, 2015. The 
President signed S. 178 into law on May 29, 2015, as Public Law 
114-22.

S. 623
    S. 623, the Human Trafficking Detection Act of 2015, the 
Senate companion measure of H.R. 460, was introduced in the 
Senate on March 3, 2015, by Mr. Johnson, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



                  NORTHERN BORDER SECURITY REVIEW ACT

                Public Law 114-267    S. 1808 (H.R. 455)

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to conduct a 
northern border threat analysis, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The Department of Homeland Security had never conducted a 
threat analysis for the Northern border. Such an analysis would 
help inform future homeland security resourcing needs. Due to 
the vast expanse along the 4,000 miles of the Northern border, 
it would be cost prohibitive to allocate enforcement resources 
using a brute force model of additional agents, technology, and 
infrastructure in an ad hoc fashion. A more cost-effective 
approach to resource allocation on the Northern border would be 
to first analyze the security gaps and most pressing needs to 
inform the location and type of solutions required to secure 
the Northern border.
    H.R. 455 would require the Secretary of Homeland Security 
to submit to the appropriate Congressional committees, within 
six months from the date of enactment, a northern border threat 
analysis. The threat analysis must include an analysis of 
current and potential terrorist threats posed by individuals 
seeking to enter the United States through the northern border; 
an analysis of improvements needed at ports of entry along the 
northern border to prevent terrorists and instruments of terror 
from crossing the border; an analysis of gaps in law, policy, 
international agreements, or tribal agreements that hinder 
border security efforts along the northern border; an analysis 
of unlawful cross border activity between ports of entry, 
including the maritime border of the Great Lakes; an analysis 
of the terrain, population density, and climate; and an 
analysis of adding new preclearance and pre-inspection 
locations.

Legislative History

H.R. 455
    H.R. 455 was introduced in the House on January 21, 2015, 
by Mr. Katko, Mr. King of New York, Mrs. Miller of Michigan and 
Mr. Higgins, and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 455 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security.
    On June 25, 2015, the Chair discharged the Subcommittee on 
Border and Maritime Security from further consideration of H.R. 
455.
    The Committee considered H.R. 455 on June 25, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 455 to the 
House on July 28, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-232. Placed on the Union 
Calendar, Calendar No. 175.
    On October 28, 2015, the House agreed to Suspend the Rules 
and passed H.R. 455, amended, by voice vote.
    H.R. 455 was received in the Senate on October 29, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

S. 1808
    S. 1808, the Senate companion measure, was introduced in 
the Senate on July 21, 2015, by Ms. Heitkamp, Ms. Ayotte, Mr. 
Peters, and Mr. Johnson and referred to the Senate Committee on 
Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 1808 on July 29, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate, with an Amendment in the 
Nature of a Substitute, favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 1808 to the Senate on October 19, 2015, as 
S. Rpt. 114-155. S. 1808 was placed on the Senate Legislative 
Calendar, Calendar No. 269.
    The Senate passed S. 1808 on November 16, 2016, by 
unanimous consent.
    S. 1808 was received in the House on November 17, 2016, and 
held at the Desk.
    The House agreed to take from the Speakers table and passed 
S. 1808 on November 29, 2016, clearing the measure for the 
President.
    S. 1808 was presented to the President on December 2, 2016. 
The President signed S. 1808 into Law on December 14, 2016, as 
Pub. L. 114-267.

                                ------                                



 ESSENTIAL TRANSPORTATION WORKER IDENTIFICATION CREDENTIAL ASSESSMENT 
                                  ACT

                     Public Law 114-278    H.R. 710

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to prepare a 
comprehensive security assessment of the transportation 
security card program, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This measure responds to a key recommendation made by the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO), to conduct a security 
assessment of the effectiveness of the Transportation Worker 
Identification Credential (TWIC).
    The TWIC program is run jointly within the Department of 
Homeland Security by the U.S. Coast Guard and the 
Transportation Security Administration. The program uses 
biometric credentials to limit access to secure areas of 
maritime facilities and vessels to only those vetted 
individuals who have a legitimate need access the ports or 
vessels.
    The TWIC program remains incomplete, as biometric readers 
have not yet been fully deployed, as a result there remains 
uncertainty for our Nation's transportation and maritime 
industry. While regulations were in place beginning in 2007 for 
maritime workers to purchase the biometric credentials, 
regulations requiring the issuance of card readers remained 
incomplete.
    A scathing report by the Government Accountability Office 
Transportation Worker Identification Credential:Card Reader 
Pilot Results Are Unreliable; Security Benefits Need to Be 
Reassessed [GAO-13-198] called into question the underlying 
security value of the TWIC program and raised very serious 
questions about the future of this program. This legislation 
was responsive to the GAO's most recent recommendation on the 
program--conducting an independent security assessment of the 
TWIC program.

Legislative History

113th Congress
    In the 113th Congress, H.R. 3202 was introduced in the 
House on September 27, 2013, by Ms. Jackson Lee, Mr. Thompson 
of Mississippi, and Mrs. Miller of Michigan, and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 
3202 was referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime 
Security, and the Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    On May 20, 2014, the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime 
Security considered H.R. 3202 and forwarded the measure to the 
Full Committee for consideration, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 3202 on June 11, 2014, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter on July 8, 2014, to the Chair of 
the Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 3202. The letter further requested the 
appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be 
called. On that same date, the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security responded, agreeing to the jurisdictional 
interests of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure 
and the agreement to not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 
3202.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3202 to the House on July 18, 
2014, as H. Rpt. 113-528.
    The House considered H.R. 3202 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 28, 2014, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 400 yeas and 0 nays, (Roll No. 456).
    H.R. 3202 was received in the Senate on July 29, 2014, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation considered H.R. 3202 on May 20, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the Senate with an 
Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute, favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation reported H.R. 3202 to the Senate on April 25, 
2016 as S. Rpt. 114-244.

114th Congress
    H.R. 710 was introduced in the House on February 4, 2015, 
by Ms. Jackson Lee, Mrs. Miller of Michigan, and Mr. Thompson 
of Mississippi, and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 710 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security and the 
Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on February 5, 2015, agreeing that, in order 
to expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would forego action on H.R. 
710. The letter further requested support for the appointment 
of Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be called. On 
that same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded acknowledging the jurisdictional concerns of the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and the 
agreement to forgo consideration.
    The House considered H.R. 710 under Suspension of the Rules 
on February 10, 2015, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 710 was received in the Senate on February 11, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs. On April 22, 2015, a 
unanimous-consent agreement was reached providing that H.R. 710 
be discharged from the Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs and be referred to the Senate Committee on 
Commerce, Science and Transportation.
    The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation considered H.R. 710 on May 20, 2015, and 
reported the measure to the Senate, with an amendment.
    The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation reported H.R. 710 to the Senate on April 25, 
2016, as S. Rpt. 114-244.
    The Senate considered considered H.R. 710 on December 9, 
2016, and passed the measure, amended.
    The House concured in the Senate amendments to H.R. 710 on 
December 14, 2016. Clearing the measure for the President.

                                ------                                


               CROSS-BORDER TRADE ENHANCEMENT ACT OF 2015

                Public Law 114-279     H.R. 875 (S. 461)

To provide for alternative financing arrangements for the 
provision of certain services and the construction and 
maintenance of infrastructure at land border ports of entry, 
and for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation reauthorizes and expands the pilot 
programs that permit United States Customs and Border 
Protection (CBP) to enter into agreements with private or State 
or local government entities for reimbursable services or 
property donations at CBP ports of entry. The authorization of 
public-private partnerships under this bill will allow private 
sector and State and local government entities to fund 
improvements at CBP ports of entry that will increase trade and 
travel efficiencies at no cost to the taxpayer.

Legislative History

H.R. 875
    H.R. 875 was introduced in the House on February 11, 2015, 
by Mr. Cuellar and referred to the Committee on Ways and Means, 
and in addition to the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure, the Committee on the Judiciary, the Committee 
on Homeland Security, and the Committee on Agriculture. Within 
the Committee, H.R. 875 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Border and Maritime Security.
    The House considered H.R. 875 on December 6, 2016, and 
agreed to Suspend the Rules and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    The Senate considered H.R. 875 on December 9, 2016, and 
passed the measure without amendment. Clearing the measure for 
the President.
    H.R. 875 was presented to the President on December 15, 
2016. The President signed H.R. 875 into law on December 16, 
2016, as Public Law 114-279.
S. 461
    S. 461, the Senate companion measure, was introduced in the 
Senate on February 11, 2015, by Mr. Cornyn and Ms. Klobuchar) 
and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 461 on May 25, 2016, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate with an Amendment in the 
Nature of a Substitute, favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 461 to the Senate on July 12, 2016 with no 
written report. The Senate Committee on Homeland Security 
report filed in the Senate on August 30, 2016, as S. Rpt. 114-
303.
    The Senate considered S. 461 on November 29, 2016, and 
withdrew the Committee Substitute by unanimous consent and 
subsequently passed the measure.

                                ------                                



              VISA WAIVER PROGRAM IMPROVEMENT ACT OF 2015

                                H.R. 158

To amend the Immigration and Nationality Act to provide 
enhanced security measures for the visa waiver program, and for 
other purposes.
[To clarify the grounds for ineligibility for travel to the 
United States regarding terrorism risk, to expand the criteria 
by which a country may be removed from the Visa Waiver Program, 
to require the Secretary of Homeland Security to submit a 
report on strengthening the Electronic System for Travel 
Authorization to better secure the international borders of the 
United States and prevent terrorists and instruments of 
terrorism from entering the United States, and for other 
purposes.]

Summary

    H.R. 158 sought to strengthen the Visa Waiver Program (VWP) 
and deny individuals who have connections to terrorist hotspots 
entry into the United States. VWP country citizens with ties to 
high-risk countries such as Iraq and Syria may pose an 
increased security risk if allowed to enter the United States. 
H.R. 158 denies VWP travel to travelers who are dual nationals 
of--or have visited during the past five years--Iraq, Syria, 
and other countries with significant terrorist activity. 
Instead, these travelers are required to seek a visa for entry 
into the United States.
    The measure also demanded strong intelligence and law 
enforcement information sharing from our VWP partners. When VWP 
countries fail to share counterterrorism information with the 
United States, it puts our security at risk. H.R. 158 
authorized the Secretary of Homeland Security to terminate a 
country from the program if the country does not share such 
data-and doesn't allow the country back into the VWP until it 
complies with the program requirements. Such authority improved 
information sharing and help the U.S. better identify potential 
terrorists and foreign fighters.
    H.R. 158 requires all VWP countries to check travelers 
against INTERPOL databases, in order to determine whether the 
traveler is wanted by law enforcement agencies based on ties to 
terrorism or criminal activity. Better screening against 
INTERPOL databases closes a glaring gap in the global travel 
system.
    The bill was aimed at preventing extremists from using 
fraudulent documents to evade detection Secure documents make 
it harder for extremists to falsify their identities. H.R. 158 
required all VWP countries to issue to their citizens fraud-
resistant ``e-passports,'' containing biometric information and 
requires countries to be able to confirm that such documents 
are legitimate when they are scanned.
    The threat environment can change quickly, which is why 
regular reviews of security in VWP countries must be conducted. 
H.R. 158 required top U.S. security agencies to conduct more 
frequent intelligence and threat assessments of VWP countries 
to determine whether they pose a high risk to the national 
security of United States. If a VWP country is designated as 
``high risk,'' they can be suspended from the program.
    Additionally, background checks on VWP travelers are 
important, which is the bill ensured that the information they 
provide is accurate. H.R. 158 requires the Department of 
Homeland Security to take steps to better detect false 
information, improve the validation of data supplied by 
travelers, and add new data fields to enhance checks on each 
traveler.

Legislative History

    H.R. 158 was introduced in the House on January 6, 2015, by 
Mrs. Miller of Michigan and Mr. McCaul, and referred to the 
Committee on the Judiciary and in addition to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 158 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security.
    On June 25, 2015, the Chair discharged the Subcommittee on 
Border and Maritime Security from further consideration of H.R. 
158.
    The Committee considered H.R. 158 on June 25, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 158 to the House on December 7, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-369, Pt. I.
    The House considered H.R. 158 under Suspension of the Rules 
on December 8, 2015, and passed the measure, as amended, by a 
\2/3\ recorded vote of 407 yeas and 19 nays, (Roll No. 679). 
The title of the measure was amended so as to read: ``A bill to 
amend the Immigration and Nationality Act to provide enhanced 
security measures for the visa waiver program, and for other 
purposes''.
    Provisions of H.R. 158 were included in H.R. 2029, Public 
Law 114-113. (For further action see H.R. 2029, listed above.)

                                ------                                



                  SECURE OUR BORDERS FIRST ACT OF 2015

                      H.R. 399 (H.R. 229 / S. 208)

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to gain and 
maintain operational control of the international borders of 
the United States, and for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 399 is the result of many hearings, meetings and 
discussions with border security stakeholders and is based on 
the Chair of the Full Committee border security blueprint 
released in October 2014.
    The bill included a capability deployment through a sector-
by-sector analysis of threats and needs and attaches to that 
the resources necessary to gain operational control. The bill 
requires fencing where fencing is needed and technology where 
technology is needed to provide for a smart, safe, and cost 
effective border security policy. This bill also required the 
Department to conduct a similar analysis of the threats and 
needs associated with the northern border.
    The Secure our Borders First Act also established an 
independent commission to verify that the border is secure. 
Members of the commission are to be border security experts--
people who know the border best.

Legislative History

H.R. 399
    H.R. 399 was introduced in the House on January 16, 2015, 
by Mr. McCaul and 13 original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security, and addition to the Committee 
on Armed Services, the Committee on Natural Resources, and the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    On January 21, 2015, the Committee met and ordered H.R. 399 
to be reported to the House with a favorable recommendation, 
amended, by a recorded vote of 18 yeas and 12 nays, (Roll Call 
Vote No. 11).
    On January 22, 2015, the Chair of the Committee on the 
Judiciary sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on the 
Judiciary would not request a sequential referral of H.R. 399; 
on that same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security responded acknowledging the jurisdictional interests 
of the Committee on the Judiciary, and the agreement to not 
seek a sequential referral. On January 22, 2015, the Chair of 
the Committee on Natural Resources sent a letter to the Chair 
of the Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order 
to expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Natural Resources would waive further consideration of H.R. 
399; on that same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security responded acknowledging the jurisdictional interests 
of the Committee on Natural Resources and the agreement to 
waive further consideration of H.R. 399.
    On January 22, 2015, the Chair of the Committee on 
Agriculture sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on Agriculture 
would waive further consideration of H.R. 399; on that same 
date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded 
acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the Committee on 
Agriculture and the agreement to waive further consideration of 
H.R. 399. On January 23, 2015, the Chair of the Committee on 
Armed Services sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on Armed 
Services would waive further consideration of H.R. 399; on that 
same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the 
Committee on Armed Services and the agreement to waive further 
consideration of H.R. 399.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 399 to the 
House on January 27, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-10, Pt. I. 
Subsequently, the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on 
Natural Resources, and the Committee on Agriculture were 
discharged from further consideration of H.R. 399.

H.R. 229
    H.R. 229, the Biometric Exit Improvement Act of 2015, was 
introduced in the House on January 8, 2015, by Mrs. Miller of 
Michigan and Mr. McCaul and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 229 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security.
    The text of H.R. 229 was included in section 14 of H.R. 
399, as reported by the Committee.

S. 208
    S. 208, the Senate companion measure, was introduced in the 
Senate on January 21, 2015, by Mr. Johnson, Mr. Cornyn, Mr. 
Flake, and Mr. Cain, and referred to the Senate Committee on 
Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



                 PRECLEARANCE AUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2015

                                H.R. 998

To establish the conditions under which the Secretary of 
Homeland Security may establish preclearance facilities, 
conduct preclearance operations, and provide customs services 
outside the United States, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation authorized the operation and expansion of 
U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) preclearance 
operations abroad. Preclearance operations, a program under 
which passengers and their luggage undergo screening by CBP 
officers prior to boarding a U.S.-bound flight, have been in 
place in some foreign airports for years and the Department of 
Homeland Security (DHS) sought to expand the program. This act 
established certain guidelines for the program to help capture 
the benefits of the program without jeopardizing security or 
negatively impacting screening at U.S. ports of entry and 
provide for enhanced congressional oversight.
    H.R. 998 creates conditions for the Secretary of Homeland 
Security to establish preclearance facilities, conduct 
preclearance operations, and provide customs services outside 
the United States. Specifically the bill authorizes DHS to 
establish preclearance operations in a foreign country. It 
further requires the Secretary of Homeland Security to notify 
Congress 180 days before entering into an agreement with a 
foreign government to establish a preclearance operation and 
provide Congress with a copy of the proposed agreement, any 
proposed terms and conditions for CBP officers operating at the 
location, an impact assessment on trade and travel, a threat 
assessment of the proposed location, an impact assessment for 
CBP staffing at domestic ports of entry, potential economic and 
competitive impacts on U.S. air carriers, any anticipated 
homeland security details, security vulnerabilities, and 
mitigation plans. The bill also requires the Secretary report 
to Congress 90 days before entering into an agreement and 
provide Congress with a remediation plan to reduce customs 
processing times at the 25 domestic airports with the highest 
volume of international travel. In addition, aviation security 
screening standards at a preclearance location must be 
comparable to those required by the Transportation Security 
Administration and if they are not, rescreening can occur when 
the passenger or goods are in the United States. Finally, the 
bill mandates that a foreign country with a preclearance 
facility routinely submit information concerning stolen and 
lost travel documents to INTERPOL and the U.S. Government.

Legislative History

    H.R. 998 was introduced in the House on February 13, 2015, 
by Mr. Meehan and five original cosponsors, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security, and in addition to the 
Committee on Ways and Means. Within the Committee, H.R. 998 was 
referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security 
and the Subcommittee on Transportation Security.
    On June 25, 2015, the Chair discharged the Subcommittee on 
Border and Maritime Security and the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security from further consideration of H.R. 998.
    The Committee considered H.R. 998 on June 25, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Ways and Means sent a letter 
to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on July 16, 
2015, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration on the 
House Floor, the Committee on Ways and Means would forgo 
further consideration of H.R. 998.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 998 to the 
House on July 22, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-219, Pt. I. 
Subsequently, the Committee on Ways and Means was discharged 
from further consideration of H.R. 998.
    The House considered H.R. 998 under Suspension of the Rules 
on July 27, 2015, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 998 was received in the Senate on July 28, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs 
considered H.R. 998 on October 7, 2015, and ordered the measure 
to be reported to the Senate, with an Amendment in the Nature 
of a Substitute.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported H.R. 998 to the Senate on December 15, 2015, 
as S. Rpt. 114-180.
    H.R. 988 was included in Section 811 of H.R. 644, as 
reported by the Committee of Conference. (See also action on 
H.R.644 listed above).

                                ------                                



         BORDER SECURITY TECHNOLOGY ACCOUNTABILITY ACT OF 2015

                          H.R. 1634 (S. 1873)

To strengthen accountability for deployment of border security 
technology at the Department of Homeland Security, and for 
other purposes.

Summary

    Since 2005, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) 
Acquisition Management Activities have been on the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) ``High-Risk List'' because of their 
high susceptibility to waste and mismanagement. In 2012, GAO 
found that less than one-third of major DHS acquisition 
programs have Acquisition Program Baselines in place, important 
measurements for performance and cost-control.
    H.R. 1634 required the Secretary of Homeland Security to 
ensure that each border security technology acquisition program 
with an expected lifecycle cost of at least $300 million have 
an acquisition program baseline approved by the relevant 
acquisition decision authority. The Secretary is required to 
document that each such program is meeting cost, schedule, and 
performance thresholds as specified in its baseline and 
complies with departmental acquisition policies and the Federal 
Acquisition Regulation, and have a plan for meeting program 
implementation objectives by managing contractor performance.
    H.R. 1634 further required the DHS Under Secretary for 
Management should to work with the Commissioner of the U.S. 
Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to implement internal 
control standards and best practices for such programs as 
identified by the Comptroller General. The DHS Under Secretary 
for Management and the Commissioner of the CBP are required to 
develop and submit to Congress a plan for the testing and 
evaluation of border security technologies, as well as for the 
use of independent verification and validation resources.

Legislative History

H.R. 1634
    H.R. 1634 was introduced in the House on March 25, 2015, by 
Ms. McSally and six original cosponsors, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 1634 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime 
Security.
    On June 25, 2015, the Chair discharged the Subcommittee on 
Border and Maritime Security from further consideration of H.R. 
1634.
    The Committee considered H.R. 1634 on June 25, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 1634 to 
the House on July 27, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-226.
    The House considered H.R. 1634 on July 27, 2015, under 
Suspension of the Rules, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 1634 was received in the Senate on July 28, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

S. 1873
    S. 1873, the Senate companion measure, was introduced in 
the Senate on July 28, 2015, by Mr. McCain and referred to the 
Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 1873 on October 7, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate with an Amendment in the 
Nature of a Substitute.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 1873 to the Senate on April 4, 2016, as S. 
Rpt. 114-234.

                                ------                                



              PREVENT TRAFFICKING IN CULTURAL PROPERTY ACT

                               H.R. 2285

To improve enforcement against trafficking in cultural property 
and prevent stolen or illicit cultural property from financing 
terrorist and criminal networks, and for other purposes.

Summary

    Terrorists and terrorist organizations have used proceeds 
from the smuggling of antiquities and cultural property to fund 
their activities and bolster their financial networks.
    H.R. 2285 strengthened the enforcement efforts of U.S. 
Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and U.S. Immigration and 
Customs Enforcement (ICE) to interdict, detain, seize, and 
investigate cultural property illegally imported into the 
United States. Additionally, it required CBP and ICE to disrupt 
and dismantle smuggling and trafficking networks engaged in the 
illegal trade of cultural property.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2285 was introduced in the House on May 13, 2015, by 
Mr. Keating, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. Engel, and referred to the 
Committee on Ways and Means and in addition to the Committee on 
Homeland Security and the Committee on the Judiciary. Within 
the Committee, H.R. 2285 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Border and Maritime Security.
    On November 4, 2015, the Subcommittee on Border and 
Maritime Security was discharged from further consideration of 
H.R. 2285.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 2285 on November 4, 
2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 2285 to 
the House on December 15, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-380, Pt. I.
    The Committee on Ways and Means reported H.R. 2285 to the 
House on September 19, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-380, Pt. II. 
Subsequently, the Committee on the Judiciary was discharged 
from further consideration of H.R. 2285.
    The House considered H.R. 2285 under Suspension of the 
Rules and passed the measure on September 22, 2016, by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 415 yeas and 0 nays, (Roll No. 547).
    H.R. 2285 was received in the Senate on September 26, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Finance.

                                ------                                



                 CROSS-BORDER RAIL SECURITY ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 2786

To require the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection to submit a report on cross-border rail security, 
and for other purposes.

Summary

    The U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Office of 
Field Operations is principally responsible for facilitating 
trade and travel entering the United States and ensuring 
adequate security measures. CBP attempts to prevent terrorist 
and terrorist instruments from entering the United States and 
works to enforce trade, agriculture, and immigration 
regulations across all transportation domains. This bill 
fulfills the recommendations from a DHS Office of Inspector 
General report detailing how high-risk rail shipments arriving 
into the U.S. from Canada and Mexico were not being properly 
targeted and screened U.S. Customs and Border Protection Did 
Not Effectively Target and Examine Rail Shipments From Canada 
and Mexico [OIG-15-39].
    This bill requires the Commissioner of CBP to submit a 
report on cross-border rail security to the House and Senate 
Homeland Security Committees. The report would include: The 
number of shipments entering the U.S. annually that are 
determined to be high-risk; details on the status of radiation 
detection units on the northern and southern land borders; and 
whether additional radiation detection equipment is needed. The 
report must also include a plan for ensuring all CBP personnel 
receive proper training and guidance on the use of CBP's 
Automated Targeting System.
    H.R. 2786 also requires the Government Accountability 
Office to periodically audit CBP operations at rail crossings 
on the northern and southern international borders.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2786 was introduced in the House on June 15, 2015, by 
Mr. Vela and Mrs. Miller of Michigan and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 2786 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Transportation Security and 
the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security.
    On June 25, 2015, the Chair discharged the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security and the Subcommittee on Border and 
Maritime Security from further consideration of H.R. 2786.
    The Committee considered H.R. 2786 on June 25, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 2786 to the House on July 28, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-233.
    The House considered H.R. 278 under Suspension of the Rules 
on September 28, 2015, and passed the measure, with an 
amendment by a recorded vote of 412 yeas and 0 nays, (Roll No. 
520).
    H.R. 2786 was received in the Senate on September 29, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



         COUNTERTERRORISM SCREENING AND ASSISTANCE ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 4314

To require a plan to combat international travel by terrorists 
and foreign fighters, accelerate the transfer of certain border 
security systems to foreign partner governments, establish 
minimum international border security standards, authorize the 
suspension of foreign assistance to countries not making 
significant efforts to comply with such minimum standards, and 
for other purposes.

Summary

    Since the attacks of September 11, 2001, the U.S. has spent 
billions of dollars to help our allies close security gaps that 
may allow terrorists and foreign fighters to travel 
internationally and avoid detection. However, the lack of a 
risk-based approach has increased the chances that gaps may 
still exist. Improving foreign-partner engagement to combat 
travel by terrorists and foreign fighters would help improve 
security beyond national borders to mitigate threats before 
they reach the U.S. and reduce overlap, waste and unnecessary 
duplication.
    H.R. 4314 requires the President to submit a plan to 
Congress to coordinate with foreign partners, catalogue 
existing border security capacity, and identify areas for 
improvement. The bill accelerated the transfer of certain 
nonlethal equipment and two border security systems--U.S. 
Customs and Border Protection's Automated Targeting System-
Global and the Department of State's Personal Identification 
Secure Comparison and Evaluation System--to foreign partner 
governments. Finally, the bill established minimum 
international border security standards, and authorized the 
suspension of non-humanitarian and nontrade-related foreign aid 
to countries which do not make significant efforts to comply 
with the minimum standards.

Legislative History

    H.R. 4314 was introduced in the House on January 5, 2016, 
by Mr. Zeldin, Mr. Katko, Ms. McSally, Mr. Loudermilk, Mr. Hurd 
of Texas, and Mr. Ratcliffe, and referred to the Committee on 
Foreign Affairs, and in addition to the Committee Homeland 
Security and the Committee on the Judiciary. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 4314 was referred to the Subcommittee on Border 
and Maritime Security.
    The Committee on Foreign Affairs considered H.R. 4314 on 
January 7, 2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the 
House, amended, by unanimous consent.
    The House agreed to Suspend the Rules on March 21, 2016, 
and passed H.R. 4314 as amended, by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 
371 yeas and 2 nays, (Roll No. 130).
    H.R. 4314 was received in the Senate on April 4, 2016, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Foreign 
Relations.

                                ------                                



              DHS HUMAN TRAFFICKING PREVENTION ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 4383

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to enhance 
Department of Homeland Security coordination on how to identify 
and record information regarding individuals suspected or 
convicted of human trafficking, and for other purposes.

Summary

    On January 4, 2016 the Department of Homeland Security 
(DHS) Office of the Inspector General released a report titled 
ICE and USCIS Could Improve Data Quality and Exchange to Help 
Identify Potential Human Trafficking Cases [OIG-16-17]. The 
report found that known human traffickers utilized work and 
fiance visas to bring victims into the United States legally, 
and discovered that data quality and exchange issues hindered 
efforts to combat human trafficking.
    Specifically, the OIG matched the Immigration and Custom 
Enforcement (ICE) database of information on known human 
traffickers against all available data on visa petitions 
submitted to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). 
While cooperation exists between USCIS and ICE in some human 
trafficking cases, more consistent data sharing and 
coordination could improve their ability to identify instances 
of human trafficking. Without concerted DHS efforts to collect 
and share information, substantial risk exists that human 
traffickers can continue to abuse other individuals.
    This legislation implements recommendations by the 
Inspector General for DHS components to establish procedures 
for identifying and recording information on individuals 
suspected or convicted of human trafficking, and procedures to 
routinely share such information on suspected or convicted of 
human trafficking with other components within the Department 
of Homeland Security.

Legislative History

    H.R. 4383 was introduced in the House on January 13, 2016, 
by Ms. Loretta Sanchez of California and Ms. McSally, and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and in addition 
to the Committee on the Judiciary. Within the Committee, H.R. 
4383 was referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime 
Security.
    On February 2, 2016, the Subcommittee on Border and 
Maritime was discharged from further consideration of H.R. 
4383.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4383 on February 2, 2016, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4383 to the House on December 
8, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-855, Pt. I. Subsequently, the Committee 
on the Judiciary was discharged from further consideration of 
H.R. 4383.

                                ------                                



        SOUTHWEST BORDER SECURITY THREAT ASSESSMENT ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 4482

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to prepare a 
southwest border threat analysis, and for other purposes.

Summary

    In May 2012, the U.S. Border Patrol released an updated 
five-year strategic plan, marking the first time the strategy 
had been updated since 2004 2014-2016 Border Patrol Strategic 
Plan The Mission: Protect America. According to the Border 
Patrol leadership, the updated Plan marked a shift in focus 
from being ``resource-based'' to ``risk-based.'' However, 
because of the evolving challenges and threats from drug 
cartels, large populations of migrants and child migrants 
looking to cross the border, and international terrorist 
organizations taking advantage of border security 
vulnerabilities, the Committee felt the updated strategy lacked 
critical elements for the Border Patrol to gauge its successes.
    H.R. 4482 directed the Secretary of the Department of 
Homeland Security to submit a threat analysis of the southwest 
border to Congress 180 days after enactment. The analysis shall 
include: An assessment of current and potential terrorism and 
criminal threats posed by individuals and organizations seeking 
to exploit border security vulnerabilities; an assessment of 
improvements needed between ports of entry to prevent 
terrorists and instruments of terror from entering the United 
States; an assessment of gaps in law, policy, and cooperation 
between State, local, or Tribal law enforcement, international 
agreements, or tribal agreements that hinder effective and 
efficient border security; an assessment of the current 
percentage of situational awareness achieved by the Department 
of Homeland Security of the international land and maritime 
borders of the United States; and an assessment of the current 
percentage of operational control achieved by the Department.
    In addition, H.R. 4482 directed the Chief of the Border 
Patrol to issue a Border Patrol Strategic Plan, updated every 
five years. The plan must include a threat assessment of the 
southwest border, efforts to increase situational awareness, 
and efforts to detect, prevent, and interdict terrorists, 
aliens, and illicit drugs.

Legislative History

    H.R. 4482 was introduced in the House on February 4, 2016, 
by Ms. McSally and 10 original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 4482 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime 
Security.
    The Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security was 
discharged from further consideration on March 23, 2016. The 
Full Committee considered H.R. 4482 on March 23, 2016, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 4482 to 
the House on April 13, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-492.
    The House considered H.R. 4482 on April 13, 2016, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 4482 was received in the Senate on April 14, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



               STRONG VISA INTEGRITY SECURES AMERICA ACT

                               H.R. 5253

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 and the Immigration 
and Nationality Act to improve visa security, visa applicant 
vetting, and for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 5253 takes the necessary steps to address potential 
security gaps to strengthen counterterror vetting and screening 
of individuals applying for entry into the United States. This 
bill increases the number of Immigration and Custom Enforcement 
(ICE) Visa Security Units (VSU) from 26 to no fewer than 50. 
This allows specially trained investigators to conduct in-depth 
reviews of high-risk visa applicants.
    While there are more than 220 visa issuing posts around the 
world, each VSU costs an estimated $2.7 million, making it 
nearly impossible to place one at each consular post. 
Therefore, the bill also expanded the Pre-Adjudicated Threat 
Recognition Intelligence Operations Team (PATRIOT) program, 
which conducts security checks remotely, to an additional 50 
locations. This allowed visa issuing posts with limited space 
or insufficient workload the benefits of certain visa security 
vetting activities in the absence of a VSU.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5253 was introduced in the House on May 16, 2016, by 
Mr. Hurd of Texas, Mr. McCaul, Mrs. Miller of Michigan, Mr. 
King of New York, Mr. Katko, and Ms. McSally and referred to 
the Committee on the Judiciary and in addition to the Committee 
on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 5253 was 
referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security.
    The Chair discharged the Subcommittee on Border and 
Maritime Security from further consideration of H.R. 5253 on 
June 8, 2016.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5253 on June 8, 2016, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5253 to the House on December 
8, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-850, Pt. I.

                              ----------                              


                Oversight Activities of the Subcommittee


                          VISA WAIVER PROGRAM

    The threat of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) 
and the identification of ``Jihadi John'' as a radicalized 
British National highlights the fact that many members of ISIS 
are not Syrian or Iraqi, but rather foreign fighters from 
countries throughout the world, including the United States. On 
February 26, 2015, Director of National Intelligence testified 
before the House of Representatives, Committee on Armed 
Services that 20,000 foreign fighters, including approximately 
3,400 citizens of Western nations, are estimated to have joined 
ISIS.  This means that approximately two-thirds of the ISIS 
fighting force consists of foreign fighters and that number 
continues to grow.
    Westerners actively engaged with ISIS present a unique 
threat to the homeland because they often travel to the United 
States under the Visa Waiver Program (VWP), without the 
requirement of an in-person visa interview. Under the VWP, 
travelers from 38 countries can enter the United States as 
temporary visitors for business or pleasure for up to 90 days. 
While there is no specific evidence that individuals from Visa 
Waiver countries who have fought with ISIS have traveled into 
the United States, the potential for them to board U.S.-bound 
flights has been identified as a potential vulnerability. While 
this threat exists, this hearing allowed Members to examine 
what mechanisms are in place within the VWP to strengthen 
homeland security and help identify returning foreign fighters, 
as well as address further steps that can be made to strengthen 
the VWP.
    On March 17, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Combating Terrorist Travel: Does the Visa Waiver Program Keep 
Our Nation Safe?'' The Subcommittee received testimony from 
Marc E. Frey. PhD, Senior Director, Steptoe and Johnson, LLP; 
Mr. Roger J. Dow, President and Chief Executive Officer, U.S. 
Travel Association; Dr. Steven P. Bucci, Director, The Douglas 
and Sarah Allison Center for Foreign and National Security 
Policy, The Heritage Foundation; and Mr. Brian Michael Jenkins, 
Senior Adviser to the RAND President, The RAND Corporation.
    This hearing was part of continued oversight of the VWP. In 
January 2016, the Chair of the Full Committee and other Members 
submitted a letter to the President expressing grave concerns 
over the implementation of the ``Visa Waiver Program 
Improvement and Terrorist Travel Prevention Act of 2015.'' In 
March 2015, Subcommittee Chairman Candice Miller also submitted 
a letter to Secretary Johnson seeking information of how the 
compliance of Visa Waiver Program participants is ensured and 
what countries were being consider for addition into the 
program.

                     OUTER RING OF BORDER SECURITY

    The Department of Homeland Security implements a risk-based 
strategy to mitigate threats to the Nation from abroad. 
International border security programs are designed to ``push 
the border out'' and operate as the first line of defense to 
prevent inadmissible, potentially dangerous individuals from 
entering the United States.
    These programs and the nation's efforts overseas constitute 
an ``outer ring of border security'' that gives DHS officials 
multiple opportunities to prevent attacks early in the visa and 
travel process. DHS created several security focused programs 
that actively engage foreign allies in an effort to improve 
international cooperation in regards to visa security, aviation 
security, border security, immigration policy, law enforcement, 
and cargo security.
    On June 2, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``The Outer Ring of Border Security: DHS's International 
Security Programs.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from 
Hon. Alan D. Bersin, Assistant Secretary and Chief Diplomatic 
Officer, Office of Policy, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security; Mr. John Wagner, Deputy Assistant Commissioner, 
Office of Field Operations, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. Lev J. Kubiak, 
Assistant Director, International Operations, Homeland Security 
Investigations, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security; and Ms. Rebecca Gambler, 
Director, Homeland Security and Justice Issues, U.S. Government 
Accountability Office.
    This hearing provided Members an opportunity to examine the 
security value and return on investment that these programs 
provide to quickly and effectively identify and interdict 
threats that originate overseas prior to travel to the United 
States.

                     CBP AIR AND MARINE OPERATIONS

    On June 17, 2015, the Subcommittee held a classified Member 
briefing for the Members of the Committee on a recent shooting 
of a Customs and Border Protection Air and Marine helicopter in 
Laredo, Texas. The Members received an update on the situation 
by representatives from the Department of Homeland Security.
    The maritime borders of the United States cover millions of 
square miles. Illicit drug and migrant flow has remained a 
principle concern of DHS. However, as the Department has 
strengthened security along the southern land border, the 
cartels adapt and the flow shifts. Specifically, drug cartels 
operating in the maritime environment send panga boats from 
Mexico to as far north as San Francisco.
    From the Great Lakes, to the coast of California, to the 
Gulf of Mexico, to the Caribbean and Central America transit 
zones, the maritime security components of the Department of 
Homeland Security have a massive area of water to protect. As a 
result, they must coordinate effectively, share intelligence to 
understand the threat, and smartly position resources to stop 
it.
    CBP's Air and Marine Operations (AMO) has a fleet of over 
280 marine vessels and more than 250 aircraft, making it 
essentially the largest civilian law enforcement air force in 
the world. They have an enormous responsibility to interdict 
drugs and migrants who use the sea as a means to enter the 
country.
    On July 14, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Securing the Maritime Border: The future of the CBP Air and 
Marine.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Randolph 
D. Alles, Assistant Commissioner, Office of Air and Marine, 
U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security; and Hon. John Roth, Inspector General, Office of 
Inspector General, U.S. Department of Homeland Security.
    This hearing explored how AMO, a relatively small 
operational component of CBP, fits into the larger maritime 
security strategy of DHS.  How Air and Marine's authorities 
support and compliment the Coast Guard's security and 
interdiction missions, Border Patrol's riverine 
responsibilities, and most importantly, examined the security 
value that American taxpayer is getting for the roughly $750 
million dollars AMO is appropriated each year.

                    CYBERSECURITY AT MARITIME PORTS

    More than $1.3 trillion in cargo travels through U.S. 
seaports each year and the Nation's economy relies on the 
constant and unrestricted flow of goods in the marine 
transportation system. Shutting down major ports in the U.S. 
would have detrimental effects on global trade and shipping and 
be damaging to the domestic economy.
    The growing automation of business operations systems, 
industrial control systems and onboard vessel control systems 
has created cyber-security vulnerabilities in areas that were 
previously safe from external threats. New cyber-threats can 
originate from nation states, terrorist groups, hackers and 
disgruntled workers.
    On October 8, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Protecting Maritime Facilities in the 21st Century: 
Are our Nation's ports at risk for a cyber-attack?'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Rear Admiral Paul F. 
Thomas, Assistant Commandant, Prevention Policy, U.S. Coast 
Guard, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. Gregory C. 
Wilshusen, Director, Information Security Issues, U.S. 
Government Accountability Office; Mr. Randy D. Parsons, 
Director, Security Services, Port of Long Beach, California; 
and Mr. Jonathan Sawicki, Security Improvement Program Manager, 
Ports of Brownsville and Harlingen, Texas.
    The purpose of this hearing was to provide an overview of 
the Department of Homeland Security's efforts in securing 
cybersecurity at seaports. This hearing examined the current 
threat landscape and Department of Homeland Security 
initiatives to counter the growing cyber-threat.

                   CBP'S PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS

    In recent years, the United States has experienced a record 
increase in international trade and travel. U.S. Customs and 
Border Protection (CBP) is frequently asked to provide new or 
additional port of entry (POE) related services to support 
rising travel and cargo volumes but is not always able to 
accommodate these requests due to resource constraints. Within 
an austere budget climate, authorities like Public Private 
Partnerships, including reimbursable fee agreements and 
donation acceptance authorities, can be utilized to modernize 
our nation's ports of entry, reduce wait times, and improve our 
nation's homeland security and economic prosperity.
    On November 4, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``A New Approach to Increase Trade and Security: An 
Examination of CBP's Public Private Partnerships.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. John Wagner, Deputy 
Assistant Commissioner, Office of Field Operations, U.S. 
Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security; Hon. Michael Gelber, Deputy Commissioner, Public 
Buildings Service, U.S. General Services Administration; Mr. 
Sam F. Vale, President, Starr-Camargo Bridge Company; and Mr. 
David A. Garcia, County Administrator, Cameron County, Texas.
    This hearing allowed Members to better understand how CBP 
and the General Services Administration (GSA) utilize unique 
public private partnership authorities at POEs to meet our 
nation's economic and security needs. Members also had the 
opportunity to question industry stakeholders, some of whom 
have entered into agreements with CBP, on the benefits and 
challenges they are seeing from these innovative pilot 
authorities.

                  DHS BORDER SECURITY JOINT TASK FORCE

    On October 7, 2015, the Members of the Subcommittee 
received a classified briefing on the Department of Homeland 
Security's Border Security Joint Task Force.
    On November 17, 2015, the Members of the Subcommittee 
received a classified briefing by representatives from the 
Department of Homeland Security's Border Security Joint Task 
Force on the current status of the task force and concerns.
    This briefing allowed Members to question leadership of the 
Department of Homeland Security responsible for the 
establishment of the Joint Task Forces (JTF) and for executing 
the Department's Southern Border and Approaches Campaign. This 
briefing provided insight from DHS leaders on the early 
successes and challenges associated with the implementation of 
the Secretary's most significant unity of effort initiative.

                          STATE OF THE BORDER

    On February 25, 2016, the Members of the Subcommittee 
received a briefing on the state of the border by 
representatives from U.S. Border Patrol and the U.S. Customs 
and Border Protection Office of Intelligence.
    This briefing allowed Members to question Border Patrol 
leadership as well as experts within Customs and Border 
Protection's (CBP) Office of Intelligence, on the state of 
border security and related threats and risks along the border. 
Specifically, the brief provided Members the opportunity to 
learn how technology, including the use of geospatial 
technology, and synthetic aperture radar is helping CBP to 
achieve greater situational awareness along the border.

                  SITUATIONAL AWARENESS ON THE BORDER

    Understanding both the severity of the threat and the gaps 
in our security along the border is a prerequisite for gaining 
effective control of the border. Understanding the true state 
of the border requires a full understanding of the threat 
picture along the border to determine how effective CBP and 
other DHS components are at preventing and interdicting illicit 
activity.
    While the number of agents, miles of fence and technology 
on the border are important indicators of security capacity, 
they are, in isolation, poor indicators of effectiveness.
    A more productive border security conversation involves a 
discussion of how effective CBP is at preventing the illicit 
movement of drugs and migrants with the level of resources 
currently deployed in an area. A hearing was called to provide 
Members an opportunity to understand gaps in Situational 
Awareness along the border and gain an understanding of how to 
truly ensure our borders are secure.
    On March 1, 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Transparency, Trust and Verification: Measuring Effectiveness 
and Situational Awareness along the Border.'' The Subcommittee 
received testimony from Mr. Ronald D. Vitiello, Acting Chief, 
U.S. Border Patrol, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Maj. 
Gen. Randolph D. ``Tex'' Alles (Ret.-USMC), Assistant 
Commissioner, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security; and Ms. Rebecca Gambler, 
Director, Homeland Security and Justice Issues, U.S. Government 
Accountability Office.
    In response to concerns raised at this hearing, the Chair 
of the Subcommittee sent a letter to the Secretary of Homeland 
on September 21, 2016, expressing concern over the flaws in the 
current way the Department measures interdiction rates on the 
border and requested greater transparency on the true state of 
the border through the use of improved metrics. To date, no 
response has been received.

                   CBP'S STAFFING AND INFRASTRUCTURE

    The U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is the lead 
Federal agency charged with keeping terrorists, criminals and 
other inadmissible aliens out of the country while facilitating 
an efficient flow of legitimate trade and travel at our 
nation's ports of entry. CBP's mission requires a cadre of 
professional law enforcement officers and, equally important, 
modern port of entry infrastructure. Unfortunately, CBP faced 
significant hiring shortages and struggled to modernize many of 
its ports of entry. This often results in significant delays 
for legitimate trade that may adversely affect the economy.
    On April 19, 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Keeping Pace with Trade, Travel, and Security: How does CBP 
Prioritize and Improve Staffing and Infrastructure?'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Eugene Schied, Acting 
Executive Assistant Commissioner, Office of Enterprise 
Services, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department 
of Homeland Security; Ms. Linda Jacksta, Assistant 
Commissioner, Office of Human Resources Management, U.S. 
Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security; Mr. John P. Wagner, Deputy Assistant Commissioner, 
Office of Field Operations, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. Michael Gelber, 
Deputy Commissioner, Public Buildings Service, U.S. General 
Services Administration; and Mr. Anthony Reardon, National 
President, National Treasury Employees Union.
    This hearing examined CBP's plans to meet its own internal 
staffing requirements, including efforts to recruit and hire 
qualified military veterans, as required by law. In addition, 
CBP and the General Services Administration (GSA) were asked to 
provide details on the prioritization of investments in port of 
entry infrastructure, which is vital to the efficient movement 
of people and goods, as well as to our nation's homeland 
security.

                 LOCAL PERSPECTIVES ON BORDER SECURITY

    The subcommittee convened a field hearing in Southern 
Arizona to get a perspective not often heard in Washington, DC: 
the perspective from local law enforcement officials, business 
and community leaders, ranchers and residents. These are 
individuals who understand the very real border security 
challenges because they live and work on or near the Southern 
border and experience the ramifications of an unsecure border 
every day.
    On May 9, 2016, the Subcommittee held a field hearing in 
Sahuarita, Arizona, entitled ``Life on the Border: Examining 
Border Security through the Eyes of Local Residents and Law 
Enforcement.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Hon. 
Mark Dannels, Sheriff, Cochise County, Arizona; Hon. Danny 
Ortega, Mayor, Douglas, Arizona; Mr. Art Del Cueto, President, 
Local 2544, National Border Patrol Council; Mr. Dan Bell, 
President, ZZ Cattle Corporation; Mr. Mark S. Adams, 
Coordinator, Frontera De Cristo; Mr. Jaime S. Chamberlain, 
President, J-C Distributing Inc.; Ms. Nan Stockholm-Walden, 
Vice President and Legal Counsel, Farmers Investment Co. 
(FICO); and Mr. Frank Krentz, Rancher.

                           BORDER TECHNOLOGY

    Technology, such as cameras, night vision devices, motion 
sensors, and surveillance equipment have become a key element 
of security operations across the rugged terrain of the 
southwest border. It enhanced agent safety, provided constant 
monitoring of difficult access areas, and extended agent 
situational awareness and ability to interdict criminal 
activity.
    On May 24, 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Border Security Gadgets, Gizmos, and Information: Using 
Technology to Increase Situational Awareness and Operational 
Control.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Ronald 
Vitiello, Acting Chief, U.S. Border Patrol, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Maj. Gen. Randolph D. ``Tex'' Alles (Ret.-
USMC), Executive Assistant Commissioner, Office of Air and 
Marine Operations, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security; Mr. Mark Borkowski, Assistant 
Commissioner and Chief Acquisition Executive, Office of 
Technology Innovation and Acquisition, U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and Ms. 
Rebecca Gambler, Director, Homeland Security and Justice, U.S. 
Government Accountability Office.
    This hearing examined the use of technology to secure the 
border and examine a procurement process that has struggled to 
provide technology to our agents on the ground, on budget, and 
in a timely fashion. This hearing followed up on a Government 
Accountability Office report Border Security: Progress and 
Challenges in DHS's Efforts to Implement and Assess 
Infrastructure and Technology [GAO-15-171SP] issued in response 
to a Subcommittee request to examine the Department's border 
technology acquisition programs.

                             VISA OVERSTAYS

    Fifteen years after the attack on September 11, 2001, one 
of the few unfilled recommendations of the 9/11 Commission is 
the failure of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to 
establish a viable biometric exit system. The 9/11 Commission 
understood that the creation of such an entry-exit system was 
an ambitious task, but called it, ``an essential investment in 
our national security.'' As many as four of the 9/11 hijackers 
had either overstayed, or violated the terms of their visa, and 
several other high-profile terrorist plots have originated with 
aliens who had entered the country legally and overstayed.
    Mandates for an electronic exit system designed to verify 
when aliens on a valid visa depart the country have existed 
since 1996. While progress has been made strengthening the 
collection of information, including fingerprints and 
photographs, of aliens upon entry into the United States, DHS 
cannot match such biometric information upon exit from the 
country.
    According to the data released by the Department, in Fiscal 
Year 2015, more people overstayed their travel visas (482,781 
individuals), than were apprehended illegally crossing the 
border (337,117). Given that the number of overstays has 
surpassed the number of apprehensions, it is likely previous 
academic studies indicating that as many as 40 percent of all 
illegal aliens enter the country on a valid visa, are no longer 
valid, and the number may in fact be closer to 68 percent. This 
paradigm shift demonstrates that any attempt to fully secure 
the border must also address the challenge of identifying and 
then removing visa overstays.
    The Department released a report entitled Entry/Exit 
Overstay Report on January 19, 2016, which discussed the status 
of biometric entry/exit systems in the air, maritime, and land 
domain as a counterterrorism tool and determine if ICE can 
identify and quickly remove individuals who have overstayed and 
pose a threat to national security and public safety threats.
    As a follow up to the Department's report, the Subcommittee 
held a hearing on June 14, 2016, entitled ``Overstaying Their 
Welcome: National Security Risks Posed by Visa Overstays.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. John Wagner, Deputy 
Assistant Commissioner, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. Craig Healy, 
Assistant Director for National Security Investigations, 
Homeland Security Investigations, U.S. Immigration and Customs 
Enforcement, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Ms. Kelli 
Ann Burriesci, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Department of 
Homeland Security's Screening, Coordination Office, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security; and Mr. Robert Burns, Homeland 
Security Advanced Research Projects Agency Deputy Director, 
Science and Technology Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security.

                       MARITIME SECURITY THREATS

    The job of improving security for nuclear weapons and 
weapons-usable nuclear materials is never ``done''-security 
must constantly evolve as the threat changes, technologies 
shift, and new vulnerabilities are revealed. In the two years 
since the last nuclear security summit, security for nuclear 
materials has improved modestly-but the desire of some 
terrorist groups, particularly the Islamic State to obtain 
nuclear material, has grown dramatically, suggesting that the 
threat of nuclear smuggling is very real. However, there 
remains a gap between terrorist's intent to obtain material and 
their capability to deliver it to the United States.
    On July 6, 2016, the Members of the Subcommittee received a 
classified briefing by representatives the U.S. Coast Guard, 
the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Domestic Nuclear 
Detection Office, and U.S. Customs and Border Protection on 
maritime security threats.
    This briefing allowed Members to gain a better 
understanding of the Global Nuclear Detection Architecture, and 
specific threats to U.S. ports in a classified setting and 
produced relevant background information for the hearing below.

                       MARITIME SECURITY THREATS

    International trade is a critical component of the U.S. 
economy, with U.S. trade amounting to about $4 trillion in 
2014, with more than 26 million cargo containers arriving in 
America's ports every year. The efficient flow of legitimate 
trade in and out of the United States is a vital element of the 
country's economic security.
    While U.S. trade and commerce depends on the smooth flow of 
cargo through U.S. seaports, the goal of trade facilitation 
often competes with two additional goals: enforcement of U.S. 
trade laws and maritime security. How to strike the appropriate 
balance among these goals is a fundamental question at the 
heart of DHS maritime security policies.
    The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 led to a 
greater emphasis on transportation and port security. Thus, 
security measures enacted after 9/11 placed additional 
responsibilities on customs officials to pro-actively prevent 
weapons of mass destruction, and other threats to the homeland, 
from entering the United States and have made maritime security 
a central feature of U.S. homeland security policy. Maritime 
security has become an important feature of DHS's international 
efforts, and the United States and its partners have adopted 
new security protocols for tracking, inspecting, and screening 
containerized imports and exports, in a manner that pushes the 
border out.
    On July 7, 2016, the Subcommittee on Coast Guard and 
Maritime Transportation of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure and the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime 
Security held a joint hearing entitled ``An Examination of the 
Maritime Nuclear Smuggling Threat.'' The Subcommittees received 
testimony from Rear Admiral Linda L. Fagan, Deputy Commandant 
for Operations, Policy, and Capabilities, U.S. Coast Guard, 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Dr. Todd C. Owen, 
Assistant Commissioner, Office of Field Operations, U.S. 
Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security; Dr. Wayne Brasure, Acting Director, Domestic Nuclear 
Detection Office; Ms. Anne Harrington, Deputy Administrator, 
Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, National Nuclear Security 
Administration; Ms. Jennifer Grover, Director, Homeland 
Security and Justice Issues, U.S. Government Accountability 
Office; Dr. Gregory H. Canavan, Senior Fellow, Los Alamos 
National Laboratories; Mr. David A. Espie, Director of 
Security, Maryland Port Administration, Port of Baltimore; and 
Mr. James H.I. Weakley, President, Lake Carriers' Association.
    This hearing examined the status of equipment and 
international programs used by CBP and the U.S. Coast Guard to 
prevent nuclear and terrorist threats from entering the country 
through its ports and examined broader threats to U.S. port 
security.

             U.S. BORDER PATROL'S DEFENSE-IN-DEPTH STRATEGY

    According to detractors, the U.S. Border Patrol's strategy 
of ``Defense-in-Depth'' cedes crucial time and space to drug 
cartels in the rural areas of the border by not apprehending 
individuals soon after they cross, and instead, uses rugged 
terrain to wait hours and sometimes days to interdict illegal 
activities. As a result, populated rural areas adjacent to the 
border are faced with the prospect of increased illegal 
activity on their property and in their communities.
    Supporters of Defense-in-Depth argue that, through the use 
of interior checkpoints and other enforcement tools, the Border 
patrol is able to interdict illegal persons and contraband that 
are able to evade the first line of defense on the border.
    On September 13, 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Moving the Line of Scrimmage: Re-examining the 
Defense-in-Depth Strategy.'' The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Mr. Mark Morgan, Chief, U.S. Border Patrol, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security; Ms. Peggy Davis, Private 
Citizen; Mr. Gary Brasher, Private Citizen; Dr. Elyse Golob, 
Executive Director, National Center for Border Security and 
Immigration, The University of Arizona; and Mr. Christian 
Ramirez, Director, Southern Border Communities Coalition.
    This hearing examined the Defense-in-Depth Strategy, and 
effectiveness of interior checkpoints as a border security 
tool. The subcommittee heard from Border Patrol leadership as 
well as local citizens who live near the border who testified 
on the effects of ``Defense-in-Depth'' on their everyday lives.

                    INSIDER THREATS AT U.S. AIRPORTS

    On November 18, 2016, the Members of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security and the Subcommittee on Border and 
Maritime Security received a briefing the efforts by the U.S. 
Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Homeland Security 
Investigations (HSI) to mitigate insider threats at major U.S. 
airports. Members were briefed by a representative from the HSI 
Newark, New Jersey, Office of Special Agent-in-Charge on 
current investigations and operations focusing on the criminal 
activity of employees with access to Federal Inspection Site 
areas throughout the Newark Liberty International Airport.

                              ----------                              


                       Subcommittee Hearings Held


``Combating Terrorist Travel: Does the Visa Waiver Program Keep 
        Our Nation Safe?'' March 17, 2015. (Serial No. 114-8)
``The Outer Ring of Border Security: DHS's International 
        Security Programs.'' June 17, 2015. (Serial No. 114-18)
``Securing the Maritime Border: The Future of CBP Air and 
        Marine.'' July 14, 2015. (Serial No. 114-25)
``Protecting Maritime Facilities in the 21st Century: Are our 
        Nation's ports at risk for a cyber-attack?'' October 8, 
        015. (Serial No. 114-35)
``A New Approach to Increase Trade and Security: An Examination 
        of CBP's Public Private Partnerships.'' November 4, 
        2015. (Serial No. 114-42)
``Transparency, Trust and Verification: Measuring Effectiveness 
        and Situational Awareness along the Border.'' March 1, 
        2016. (Serial No. 114-57)
``Keeping Pace with Trade, Travel, and Security: How does CBP 
        Prioritize and Improve Staffing and Infrastructure?'' 
        April 19, 2016. (Serial No. 114-63)
Field hearing in Sahuarita, Arizona. ``Life on the Border: 
        Examining Border Security through the Eyes of Local 
        Residents and Law Enforcement.'' May 9, 2016. (Serial 
        No. 114-67)
``Border Security Gadgets, Gizmos, and Information: Using 
        Technology to Increase Situational Awareness and 
        Operational Control.'' May 24, 2016. (Serial No. 114-
        72)
``Overstaying Their Welcome: National Security Risks Posed by 
        Visa Overstays.'' June 14, 2016. (Serial No. 114-75)
Joint with the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, 
        Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime 
        Transportation. ``An Examination of the Maritime 
        Nuclear Smuggling Threat.'' July 7, 2016. (Serial No. 
        114-79)

Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
                              Technologies

                    John Ratcliffe, Texas, Chairman

Peter T. King, New York
Tom Marino, Pennsylvania
Scott Perry, Pennsylvania
Curt Clawson, Florida
Daniel M. Donovan, Jr., New York
Michael T. McCaul, Texas
                  (ex officio)      Cedric L. Richmond, Louisiana
                                    Loretta Sanchez, California
                                    Sheila Jackson Lee, Texas
                                    James R. Langevin, Rhode Island
                                    Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi
                                                      (ex officio)

                              ----------                              


    During the 114th Congress, the Subcommittee on 
Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
Technologies held 14 hearings, receiving testimony from 62 
witnesses, and considered 4 measures, resulting in 1 Public 
Law.

                              ----------                              


               Legislative Activities of the Subcommittee



          UNITED STATES-ISRAEL ADVANCED RESEARCH PARTNERSHIP 
                              ACT OF 2016

                    Public Law 114-304     H.R. 5877

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 and the United 
States-Israel Strategic Partnership Act of 2014 to promote 
cooperative homeland security research and antiterrorism 
programs relating to cybersecurity, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-296) and the United States-Israel Strategic 
Partnership Act of 2014 (Pub. L. 113-296) to allow the 
Department of Homeland Security and the Department of State to 
enter into cooperative programs with Israel for the purposes of 
enhancing cybersecurity capabilities. These programs include 
both the Homeland Security Advanced Research Projects Agency 
and the program for establishing cooperative research 
activities with foreign partner governments that are United 
States' allies in the global war on terrorism, a program 
established by the Department's Under Secretary for Science and 
Technology (S&T;).

Legislative History

    H.R. 5877 was introduced in the House on July 14, 2016, by 
Mr. Ratcliffe and Mr. Langevin and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security and the Committee on Foreign Affairs. Within 
the Committee, H.R. 5877 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
Technologies.
    The Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies. was discharged from 
further consideration of H.R. 5877 on September 14, 2016.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5877 on September 14, 
2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Foreign Affairs sent a letter 
to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on November 
14, 2016, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration on 
the House Floor, the Committee on Foreign Affairs would forego 
further consideration of H.R. 5877. On the following day, the 
Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded 
acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the Committee on 
Foreign Affairs and the agreement to forego consideration.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 5877 to 
the House on November 15, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-827, Pt. I. 
Subsequently, the Committee on Foreign Affairs was discharged 
from further consideration of H.R. 5877.
    The House considered H.R. 5877 on November 29, 2016, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 5877 was received in the Senate on November 30, 2016.
    The Senate considered H.R. 5877 on December 9 and 10, 2016, 
and passed the measure without amendment on legislative day of 
December 9, 2016. Clearing the measure for the President.
    H.R. 5877 was presented to the President on December 14, 
2016. The President signed H.R. 5877 into law on December 16, 
2016, as Public Law 114-304.

                                ------                                



                 CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION ACT

                          H.R. 1073 (S. 1846)

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to secure critical 
infrastructure against electromagnetic threats, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub.L. 107-296) to secure critical infrastructure against 
electromagnetic threats. The Department of Homeland Security 
(DHS) has a re-sponsibility to assess critical infrastructure 
resilience to both man- made and natural threats. The threat of 
electromagnetic pulses (EMP), whether due to a nuclear weapon 
or solar flares, represents another high-consequence, low-
probability threat to the the nations critical infrastructure.
    This legislation requires the Secretary to assess both EMP 
threats in the context of other threats to determine the 
research and development needs to mitigate the threat and 
consequences of EMP events. It also requires the development of 
strategic guidance for the Department, and conduct outreach to 
educate owners and operators of the critical infrastructure, 
emergency planners, and emergency response providers regarding 
the threat of EMP events.

Legislative History

113th Congress
    In the 113th Congress, H.R. 3410 was introduced in the 
House on October 30, 2013, by Mr. Franks of Arizona and Mr. 
Sessions, and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 3410 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and 
Security Technologies.
    On December 1, 2014, the Chair of the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology sent a letter to the Chair of the 
Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 3410. On that same date, the Chair of the 
Committee on Homeland Security responded, acknowledging the 
jurisdictional interests of the Committee on Science, Space, 
and Technology and the agreement to not seek a sequential 
referral.
    The House considered H.R. 3410 under Suspension of the 
Rules on December 1, 2014, and passed the measure, amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 3410 was received in the Senate on December 2, 2014, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

114th Congress
H.R. 1073
    H.R. 1073 was introduced in the House on February 25, 2015, 
by Mr. Franks of Arizona and Mr. Sessions, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 1073 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, 
Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies.
    On June 25, 2015, the Chair discharged the Subcommittee on 
Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
Technologies from further consideration of H.R. 1073.
    The Committee considered H.R. 1073 on June 25, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 1073 to 
the House on August 4, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-240.
    The House considered H.R. 1073 under Suspension of the 
Rules on November 16, 2015, and passed the measure by voice 
vote, as amended.
    H.R. 1073 was received in the Senate on November 17, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of Sec. 2 of H.R. 1073 were included in Section 
1913 of the Conference Report to accompany S. 2943, the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017. (See 
action taken on S. 2943, under Full Committee legislative 
activities).

S. 1846
    S. 1846, the Senate companion measure, was introduced in 
the Senate on July 23, 2015, by Mr. Johnson and Mr. Cruz and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 1846 on July 29, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate, with an Amendment in the 
Nature of a Substitute, favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 1846 to the Senate on May 9, 2016, as S. 
Rpt. 114-250.

                                ------                                



          FEDERALLY FUNDED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT SUNSHINE 
                              ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 1637

To require annual reports on the activities and accomplishments 
of federally funded research and development centers within the 
Department of Homeland Security, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation requires the Secretary of Homeland 
Security to annually submit to Congress a list of the ongoing 
and completed projects that Federally Funded Research and 
Development Centers within the Department have been tasked.

Legislative History

    H.R. 1637 was introduced in the House on March 25, 2015, by 
Mr. Ratcliffe and seven original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 1637 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, 
Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies and the 
Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency.
    On May 20, 2015, the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, 
Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies and the 
Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency were 
discharged from further consideration of H.R. 1637.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 1637 on 
May 20, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to the 
House, with a favorable recommendation, without amendment, by 
voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1637 to the House on June 11, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-149.
    The Chair of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on June 23, 2015, agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee would 
not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 1637. The letter further 
requested support for the appointment of Conferees should a 
House-Senate Conference be called. On that same date, the Chair 
of the Committee on Homeland Security sent a letter to the 
Chair of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology 
acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology and the agreement to not seek a 
sequential referral of H.R. 1637.
    The House considered H.R. 1637 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 23, 2015, and passed the measure, amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 1637 was received in the Senate on June 24, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions relating to H.R. 1637, the Federally Funded 
Research and Development Sunshine Act of 2015, were included in 
Sec. 1906 of the Conference Report to accompany S. 2943.
    (See also action on S. 2943 under Full Committee 
legislative activities).

                                ------                                



                   PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER

                               H.R. 1887

To authorize the Comptroller General of the United States to 
assess a study on the alternatives for the disposition of Plum 
Island Animal Disease Center, and for other purposes.
[To amend certain appropriation Acts to repeal the requirement 
directing the Administrator of General Services to sell Federal 
property and assets that support the operations of the Plum 
Island Animal Disease Center in Plum Island, New York, and for 
other purposes.]

Summary

    In 2005, the Department of Homeland Security announced that 
the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC) in New York, 
managed by the Science and Technology Directorate, would be 
moved to a new Federal facility in Kansas. PIADC has served as 
a form of defense against accidental or intentional 
introduction of transboundary animal diseases since 1954. The 
traditional interagency consultation process regarding the 
disposal of Federal property was bypassed, putting the 
potential sale of this island on the fast track without 
consulting the local community or other Federal agencies. 
Locally, the Town of Southold, New York passed ordinances 
preventing any private development of Plum Island.
    This legislation requires the Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) to assess the study by the Department to address 
options for the disposition of Plum Island. The legislation 
requires GAO to assess the methodologies used by the Department 
in the study, determining whether these methodologies 
adequately support the study's findings. Additionally, the 
legislation suspends the requirement to sell Plum Island until 
a further review of the analysis of alternatives is conducted 
by the Department and the GAO.

Legislative History

113th Congress
    In the 113th Congress, H.R. 2691 was introduced in the 
House by Mr. Bisop of New York, Mr. Courtney, and Mr. Grimm, 
and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.

114th Congress
    H.R. 1887 was introduced in the House on April 16, 2015, by 
Mr. Zeldin and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 1887 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and 
Security Technologies.
    The Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies was discharged from 
further consideration of H.R. 1887 on April 28, 2016. The Full 
Committee considered H.R. 1887 on April 28, 2016, and ordered 
the measure to be reported to the House with a favorable 
recommendation, as amended, by unanimous consent.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter on May 12, 2016, to the Chair of 
the Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 1887. The letter further requested support for 
the appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate Conference 
be called. The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded on May 16, 2016, agreeing to the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure waiving its right to seek a 
sequential referral of H.R. 1887.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 1887 to 
the House on May 16, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-568.
    The House considered H.R. 1887 under Suspension of the 
Rules on May 16, 2016, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote. During consideration the title of the bill was 
amended so as to read ``To authorize the Comptroller General of 
the United States to assess a study on the alternatives for the 
disposition of Plum Island Animal Disease Center, and for other 
purposes.''
    H.R. 1887 was received in the Senate on May 26, 2016, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



         HOMELAND SECURITY UNIVERSITY-BASED CENTERS REVIEW ACT

                               H.R. 2390

To require a review of university-based centers for homeland 
security, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Centers of 
Excellence (COE) are charged with performing basic and applied 
research in areas of emerging threats. These research projects 
are typically long-term, support a technology development 
program some years later, and are typically tasked with 
addressing the `over the horizon' threats.
    This legislation requires the Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) to initiate a study assessing the university-based 
centers for homeland security program and provide 
recommendations to Congress for appropriate improvements. This 
study includes a review of the Department of Homeland 
Security's efforts to identify areas of study needed to support 
its missions, along with a review of selection criteria for 
designating university-based centers, an examination of best 
practices to organize and use university-based research, a 
review of criteria and metrics DHS uses to measure progress of 
university based centers, an examination of the means by which 
other academic institutions can contribute to the research 
mission of the Science and Technology Directorate, an 
assessment of the interrelationship between the different COEs, 
and a review of any other essential elements of the programs.
    The Committee believes key areas of needed study to support 
the homeland security missions will be identified by this 
review, and the review will also provide insight into the 
method by which university based centers, which are federally 
funded research and develop centers, receive tasking from the 
Department.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2390 was introduced in the House on May 18, 2015, by 
Mr. Bennie Thompson of Mississippi and Mr. Richmond and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and the 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 2390 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
Technologies.
    The Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies was discharged from 
further consideration of H.R. 2390 on May 20, 2015.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 2390 on May 20, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on June 17, 2015, agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee would 
forego further consideration of H.R. 2390. On that same date, 
the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded 
acknowledging the agreement to forego further consideration and 
supporting the request for Conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called.
    Committee on Homeland Security reported to the House on 
June 18, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-168, Pt. I. Subsequently, the 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology was discharged from 
further consideration of H.R. 2390.
    The House considered H.R. 2390 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 23, 2015, and passed the measure, amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 2390 was received in the Senate on June 24, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



                          EINSTEIN ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 3305

To help enhance American network security and mitigate 
cybersecurity risks, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
and requires the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to 
deploy, operate, and maintain capabilities to protect Federal 
agency information and Federal civilian information systems. 
This includes technologies used to continuously diagnose, 
detect, prevent, and mitigate cybersecurity risks that involve 
these information systems. The Secretary is authorized to 
retain, use and disclose information obtained through such 
activities to protect Federal agency information and Federal 
civilian information systems from cybersecurity risks.

Legislative History

    H.R. 3305 was introduced in the House on July 29, 2015, by 
Mr. Hurd of Texas, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. Ratcliffe, and referred 
to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, and the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 3305 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, 
Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies.
    On December 16, 2015, the House Committee on Rules met and 
granted a Rule providing for the consideration of H.R. 2029. 
The Rule was filed in the House as H.Res. 566 (H. Rpt. 114-
382). The Rule provides for the consideration of the Senate 
amendment to H.R. 2029. Resolution makes in order a motion that 
the House concur in the Senate amendment with 2 House 
amendments. Each amendment is debatable for one hour. The 
resolution provides that the question shall be divided between 
the two House amendments. If only House amendment #2 is 
adopted, that amendment shall be engrossed as an amendment in 
the nature of a substitute to the Senate amendment to H.R. 
2029. Amendment #1 is the text of the ``Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2016''. As introduced, Amendment #1 
includes the text of H.R. 158; and provisions of H.R. 1731, 
H.R. 3305, and H.R. 3333. Amendment #2 is the text of the 
``Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015''
    (See also action taken on H.R. 2029 under Full Committee).

                                ------                                



         STRENGTHENING STATE AND LOCAL CYBER CRIME FIGHTING ACT

                               H.R. 3490

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to authorize the 
National Computer Forensics Institute, and for other purposes.

Summary

    It is imperative that the Nation provide tools and training 
to address challenges by cyber criminals to law enforcement to 
protect against being exploited through computers, mobile 
devices and the internet. Since 2008, the United States Secret 
Service (USSS) has operated the National Computer Forensics 
Institute (NCFI), which has garnered a reputation as the 
premier cybercrime training center in the Nation providing 
support to State and local law enforcement investigators, 
prosecutors, and judicial officials. Since its existence, it 
has not yet been authorized. This legislation amends the 
Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 107-296) to codify the 
NCFI and facilitate the expansion of the USSS network of 
Electronic Crimes Task Forces throughout the Nation.

Legislative History

    H.R. 3490 was introduced in the House on September 11, 
2015, by Mr. Ratcliffe, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. Palmer and referred 
to the Committee on the Judiciary, and in addition to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 3490 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, 
Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies.
    The Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies considered H.R. 3490 on 
September 17, 2015, and reported the measure to the Full 
Committee with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    The Committee on the Judiciary considered H.R. 3490 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House, amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3490 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    The Committee on the Judiciary reported H.R. 3490 to the 
House on November 19, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-345, Pt. I.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 3490 to 
the House on November 30, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-345, Pt. II.
    The House considered H.R. 3490 under Suspension of the 
Rules on November 30, 2015, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 3490 was received in the Senate on December 1, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on the 
Judiciary.

                                ------                                



                    SECURING THE CITIES ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 3493

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish the 
Securing the Cities program to enhance the ability of the 
United States to detect and prevent terrorist attacks and other 
high consequence events utilizing nuclear or other radiological 
materials that pose a high risk to homeland security in high-
risk urban areas, and for other purposes.

Summary

    With terrorists and rogue nation states continuing to show 
interest in developing `crude' nuclear weapons, it is 
imperative that the U.S. remain vigilant in preventing and 
deterring nuclear smuggling and terrorism. This legislation 
amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 107-296) to 
establish the Securing the Cities Program within the Domestic 
Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO). It would require the Director 
of DNDO to assist state and local governments by designing, 
implementing, and enhancing capabilities for coordinating 
detection and interdiction of nuclear or other radiological 
materials. The legislation would provide resources to enhance 
detection, analysis, communication and coordination and 
increased oversight and accountability by requiring the 
Government Accountability Office to conduct a review on the 
effectiveness of the program.

Legislative History

    H.R. 3493 was introduced in the House on September 11, 
2015, by Mr. Donovan, Mr. King of New York, and Mr. McCaul and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 3493 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
Technologies.
    The Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies considered H.R. 3493 on 
September 17, 2015, and reported the measure to the Full 
Committee with a favorable recommendation, without amendment, 
by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3490 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3493 to the House on October 
20, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-295.
    The House considered H.R. 3493 under Suspension of the 
Rules on October 20, 2015, and passed the measure, amended, by 
a \2/3\ recorded vote of 411 yeas and 4 nays, (Roll No. 550).
    H.R. 3493 was received in the Senate on October 21, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



         DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CYBERSECURITY STRATEGY
                              ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 3510

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to require the 
Secretary of Homeland Security to develop a cybersecurity 
strategy for the Department of Homeland Security, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    Increasingly, sophisticated cyber threats have underscored 
the need to manage and strengthen the cybersecurity of the 
Nation's critical infrastructure. In a report entitled 
Cybersecurity: A Better Defined and Implemented National 
Strategy is Needed to Address Persistent Challenges [GAO-13-
462T], the Government Accountability Office recommended that an 
overarching Federal cybersecurity strategy be implemented and 
that such strategy should define key elements of a national 
strategy including roles and responsibilities.
    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-296) to instruct the Secretary of Homeland 
Security to develop such a Departmental cybersecurity strategy 
and implementation plan. The legislation further prohibits the 
Department from reorganizing or realigning offices within the 
National Protection and Programs Directorate without 
Congressional approval.

Legislative History

    H.R. 3510 was introduced in the House on September 15, 
2015, by Mr. Richmond and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 3510 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and 
Security Technologies.
    The Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies considered H.R. 3510 on 
September 17, 2015, and reported the measure to the Full 
Committee with a favorable recommendation, without amendment, 
by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3510 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3510 to the House on October 6, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-284.
    The House considered H.R. 3510 on October 6, 2015, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 3510 was received in the Senate on October 7, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 3510 were included in Section 1912 of 
the Conference Report to accompany S. 2943, the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017. (See action 
taken on S. 2943, listed under Full Committee legislative 
activities).

                                ------                                



           DHS SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY REFORM AND IMPROVEMENTS
                              ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 3578

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to strengthen and 
make improvements to the Directorate of Science and Technology 
of the Department of Homeland Security, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-296) to strengthen and make improvements to the 
Direc*torate of Science and Technology within the Department of 
Home*land Security. The legislation would improve the Science 
and Tech*nology Directorate's ability to carry out its 
responsibility to conduct re*search and development by, among 
other things, modifying the criteria for the designation of 
colleges or universities centers for homeland security to 
require expertise in nuclear explosives countermeasures or 
detection.

Legislative History

    Prior to introduction, the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, 
Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies considered 
a Committee Print entitled ``DHS Science and Technology Reform 
and Improvements Act of 2015'' on September 17, 2015, and 
reported the measure to the Full Committee with a favorable 
recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    H.R. 3578 was introduced in the House on September 18, 
2015, by Mr. Ratcliffe and Mr. Richmond and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3578 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on October 22, 2015, agreeing that, in order 
to expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 3572. The letter further requested the 
appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be 
called. On that same day, the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee 
on Transportation and Infrastructure acknowledging the 
agreement to not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 3572 and 
the agreement to support the request for Conferees should a 
House-Senate Conference be called.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3578 to the House on December 
8, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-372.
    The House considered H.R. 3578 under Suspension of the 
Rules on December 10, 2015, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 416 yeas and 0 nays, (Roll No. 687).
    H.R. 3578 was received in the Senate on December 14, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



       NATIONAL CYBERSECURITY PREPAREDNESS CONSORTIUM ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 4743

To authorize the Secretary of Homeland Security to work with 
cybersecurity consortia for training, and for other purposes.
[To authorize the Secretary of Homeland Security to establish a 
National Cybersecurity Preparedness Consortium, and for other 
purposes.]

Summary

    To support efforts to address cybersecurity risks and 
incidents, this legislation authorizes the Department of 
Homeland Security to work with consortia including the National 
Cybersecurity Preparedness Consortium (NCPC or the Consortium), 
which currently provides State and local communities with tools 
to prevent, detect, respond to, and recover from cyber attacks 
as they would any other disaster or emergency situation. The 
Consortium also evaluates communities' cybersecurity posture 
and provides them with a roadmap to correct deficiencies in the 
security of their information systems. Based out of the 
University of Texas San Antonio's Center for Infrastructure 
Assurance and Security, the NCPC has members located throughout 
the Nation, including: The Criminal Justice Institute at the 
University of Arkansas; the University of Memphis Center for 
Information Assurance; the Norwich University Applied Research 
Institutes; and the Texas A&M; Engineering Extension Service.
    The Department may also engage consortia to assist the 
National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center 
(NCCIC) in providing training to State and local first 
responders in preparing for and responding to cybersecurity 
risks and incidents. The NCCIC is the central location within 
the Department where cyber operations are conducted.

Legislative History

    H.R. 4743 was introduced in the House on March 15, 2016, by 
Mr. Castro of Texas, Mr. Richmond, Mr. Hurd of Texas, Mr. 
Doggett, Mr. Cuellar, Mr. Smith of Texas, and Mr. Welch and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 4743 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
Technologies.
    The Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies was discharged from 
further consideration of H.R. 4743 on April 28, 2016. Full 
Committee considered H.R. 4743 on April 28, 2016, and ordered 
the measure to be reported to the House with a favorable 
recommendation, as amended, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4743 to the House on May 13, 
2016, as H. Rpt. 114-565.
    The House considered H.R. 4743 under Suspension of the 
Rules on May 16, 2016, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 394 yeas and 3 nays, (Roll No. 194).
    H.R. 4743 was received in the Senate on May 17, 2016, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



          IMPROVING SMALL BUSINESS CYBER SECURITY ACT OF 2016

                          H.R. 5064 (S. 3024)

To amend the Small Business Act to allow small business 
development centers to assist and advise small business 
concerns on relevant cyber security matters, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    This legislation amends the Small Business Act and provides 
Small Business Development Centers (SBDC) with tools, 
resources, and expert guidance to enable these SBDCs to utilize 
and leverage existing Federal cyber resources in order to more 
effectively meet the information security needs of small 
businesses and the National and economic security needs of the 
United States.
    The legislation improves small business cybersecurity by 
leveraging existing Federal programs, as well as the expertise 
of nearly 1,000 SBDCs around the country to streamline cyber 
support for small businesses. It specifically amends the Small 
Business Act (15 U.S.C. 631 et seq.; 72 Stat. 384 et seq.) and 
the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 107-296) to allow 
the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and any other 
Federal Department or agency coordinating with DHS, to provide 
information on cybersecurity risks and other cyber-related 
assistance to SBDCs as they help small businesses develop or 
enhance cybersecurity infrastructure, threat awareness, and 
training programs. Further, the Small Business Administration 
(SBA) and the Department are required to jointly develop a 
strategy to provide guidance to SBDCs on how they can leverage 
existing Federal resources to provide better access to much-
needed cyber support services. To the extent practicable, SBDCs 
must offer cybersecurity specialists to counsel, assist, and 
inform small business clients, and the SBA Administrator is 
authorized to award SBDC grants in furtherance of the cyber 
strategy.
    Further, the legislation requires the Government 
Accountability Office to review current cybersecurity programs 
at the Federal level aimed at providing assistance to small 
businesses. The review will include an assessment of the wide 
utilization of existing resources by small businesses, whether 
they are duplicative of other resources, and whether they could 
be better structured to improve accessibility and 
effectiveness.

Legislative History

H.R. 5064
    H.R. 5064 was introduced in the House on April 26, 2016, by 
Mr. Hanna and 12 original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Small Business and in addition to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 5064 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5064 on June 8, 2016, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5064 to the House on July 1, 
2016, as H. Rpt. 114-654, Pt. I.
    Provisions of H.R. 5064, were included in Secs. 1841 and 
1843 of the Conference Report to accompany S. 2943, the 
National Defense Authorization Act of 2017. (See also action on 
S. 2943 listed under Full Committee legislative activities).

S. 3024
    S. 3024, the Senate companion measure, was introduced in 
the Senate on June 6, 2016, by Mr. Vitter and Mr. Peters and 
referred to the Senate Committee on Small Business and 
Entrepreneurship.
    The Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship 
considered S. 2034 on June 9, 2016, and ordered the measure to 
be reported to the Senate without amendment.

                                ------                                



                     CYBER PREPAREDNESS ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 5459

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to enhance 
preparedness and response capabilities for cyber attacks, 
bolster the dissemination of homeland security information 
related to cyber threats, and for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 5459 seeks to enhance preparedness and response 
capabilities for cyber attacks and bolster the sharing of 
information related to cyber threats. The bill includes, as a 
function of the National Cybersecurity and Communications 
Integration Center (NCCIC), sharing information about cyber 
best practices, in addition to the sharing of cyber threat 
indicators and defensive measures currently required by law. 
The bill also authorizes representatives from State and major 
urban area fusion centers, as defined in the bill, to be 
assigned to the NCCIC, similar to the assignment of 
representatives from information sharing and analysis centers 
(ISACs) permitted under current law.
    H.R. 5459 authorizes the use of State Homeland Security 
Grant Program and Urban Area Security Initiative funds for 
cybersecurity enhancements. Cyber expenditures are currently 
allowable under yearly grant guidance for these programs and 
this section will codify the authorization to highlight the 
importance of these expenditures and ensure they continue to be 
allowable.
    Finally, H.R. 5459 expresses the sense of Congress that the 
Department of Homeland Security should work to lessen the 
classification level or provide information in an unclassified 
form, as practicable, to enable greater sharing of actionable 
intelligence related to cyber threats.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5459 was introduced in the House on June 13, 2016, by 
Mr. Donovan, Mr. McCaul, Mr. Ratcliffe, and Mr. Payne, and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 5459 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
Technologies and the Subcommittee on Emergency Preapredness, 
Response, and Communications.
    The Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications considered H.R. 5459 on June 14, 2016, and 
passed the measure, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies was discharged from 
further consideration of H.R. 5459 on September 14, 2016.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5459 on September 14, 
2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5459 to the House on September 
19, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-756.
    The House considered H.R. 5459 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 26, 2016, and passed the measure by voice 
vote.
    H.R. 5459 was received in the Senate on September 27, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



 UNITED STATES-ISRAEL CYBERSECURITY COOPERATION ENHANCEMENT ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 5843

To establish a grant program at the Department of Homeland 
Security to promote cooperative research and development 
between the United States and Israel on cybersecurity.

Summary

    In accordance with the Agreement between the Government of 
the United States of America and the Government of the State of 
Israel on Cooperation in Science and Technology for Homeland 
Security Matters signed on May 29, 2008, this legislation 
requires the Department of Homeland Security to establish a 
grant program to support cybersecurity research, development, 
demonstration, and commercializion of cybersecurity technology.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5843 was introduced in the House on July 14, 2016, by 
Mr. Langevin and Mr. Ratcliffe and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 5843 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies.
    The Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies was discharged from 
further consideration of H.R. 5843 on September 14, 2016.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5843 on September 14, 
2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 5843 to 
the House on November 15, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-826.
    The House considered H.R. 5843 on November 29, 2016, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 5843 was received in the Senate on November 30, 2016.

                                ------                                


                Oversight Activities of the Subcommittee


                   EMERGING THREATS AND TECHNOLOGIES

    On February 12, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Emerging Threats and Technologies to Protect the 
Homeland.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. Andy 
Ozment, Assistant Secretary, Office of Cybersecurity and 
Communications, National Protection and Programs Directorate, 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Dr. Huban Gowadia, 
Director, Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Mr. Joseph Martin, Acting Director, Homeland 
Security Enterprise and First Responders Group, Science and 
Technology Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; 
Mr. William Noonan, Deputy Special Agent in Charge, Criminal 
Investigative Division, Cyber Operations Branch, United States 
Secret Service, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and Mr. 
William Painter, Analyst, Government and Finance Division, 
Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress.

       THE PRESIDENT'S CYBERSECURITY INFORMATION SHARING PROPOSAL

    On March 4, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Industry Perspectives on the President's Cybersecurity 
Information Sharing Proposal.'' The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Mr. Matthew J. Eggers, Senior Director, National 
Security and Emergency Preparedness, U.S. Chamber of Commerce; 
Ms. Mary Ellen Callahan, Jenner & Block and Former Chief 
Privacy Officer, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. 
Gregory T. Garcia, Executive Director, Financial Services 
Sector Coordinating Council; and Dr. Martin Libicki, The RAND 
Corporation.

                       INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION

    On March 3, 2016, the Chair of the Full Committee and the 
Ranking Member of the Full Committee sent a letter to the 
Secretary of Homeland Security concerning the Department's 
approach to securing ammonium nitrate (AN) and other Improvised 
Explosive Devices (IED) precursor chemicals from 
misappropriation by terrorists. The Under Secretary of NPPD 
responded on April 20, 2016, noting that, since receiving the 
authority from Congress through the Secure Handling of Ammonium 
Nitrate Act of 2007 (Sec. 563 of Pub. L. 110-161) which 
directed the regulation of the sale and transfer of Ammonium 
Nitrate to prevent it from being used in an act of terrorism, 
the Department has worked to develop a program that balances 
not only security value but also cost to U.S. businesses and 
public. The Under Secretary noted, however, the difficulty in 
finding such balance under the requirement by the legislation, 
particularly due to the current terrorist threat and existing 
legitimate use of ammonium nitrate in the United States. Thus, 
the letter notes that the Department had started engaging 
stakeholders, as well as Congress regarding approaches to 
regulate ammonium nitrate and other explosive precursor 
chemicals that could to make improvised explosive devices 
(IED). It also references expanded efforts by the Office of 
Bombing Prevention to protect against IEDs. The Under Secretary 
maintained that the Department continues to pursue a final rule 
in furtherance of the statute while it considers potential 
alternative approaches to regulating AN and other IED 
precursors.
    Due to the legitimate use of the compound in the United 
States, the Under Secretary has stated the difficulty in 
developing a regulatory program that balances both security 
value and the associated cost to American businesses and the 
public. The Under Secretary noted the Department's continuance 
of rulemaking activity in order to carry out the statute, along 
with the Department's recent engagement of Congress and the 
private and non-governmental sectors regarding potential 
alternative approaches to regulating AN and other IED 
precursors. Additionally, the Department's responses to the 
oversight questions were enclosed, with the offer of providing 
a Member-level briefing on the issue with the Department's 
Assistant Secretary for Infrastructure Protection.

                   SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY DIRECTORATE

    On May 19, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Examining DHS Science and Technology Directorate's Engagement 
with Academia and Industry.'' The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Mr. Jake Parker, Director Government Relations, 
Security Industry Association; Mr. Marc Pearl, President and 
Chief Executive Officer, Homeland Security and Defense Business 
Council; and Dr. Samuel H. Aronson, President, American 
Physical Society and American Association for the Advancement 
of Science Fellow.

                         EMERGING CYBER THREATS

    On June 4, 2015, the Members of the Subcommittee received a 
classified briefing from the Department of Homeland Security's 
National Protection and Programs Directorate, Office of 
Cybersecurity and Communications; the Office of Intelligence 
and Analysis; and the U.S. Secret Service on emerging cyber 
threats to the Nation and critical infrastructure.

WIRELESS INTRUSION DETECTION SYSTEMS AND WIRELESS INTRUSION PREVENTION 
                                SYSTEMS

    On June 17, 2015 the Chair of the Full Committee and the 
Chair of the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs sent letters to the Chairman of the 
Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and the Department of 
Homeland Security (DHS) requesting information to gain a better 
understanding of the FCC and the Department's position on the 
use of Wireless Intrusion Detection Systems and Wireless 
Intrusion Prevention Systems (WIDS/WIPS) as well as better 
understand the FCC's coordination with the Department. On June 
29, 2015, the Chairman of the FCC responded providing the 
requested information.

                     PROTECTION OF FEDERAL NETWORKS

    On June 24, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``DHS' Efforts to Secure .Gov.'' The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Dr. Andy Ozment, Assistant Secretary, Office of 
Cybersecurity and Communications, National Programs and 
Protections Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; 
Mr. Gregory C. Wilshusen, Director, Information Security 
Issues, Government Accountability Office; and Dr. Daniel M. 
Gerstein, Senior Fellow, The RAND Corporation.

                      WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION

    On July 14, 2015, the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, 
Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies and the 
Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications held a joint hearing entitled ``Weapons of Mass 
Destruction: Bolstering DHS to Combat Persistent Threats to 
America.'' The Subcommittees received testimony from Dr. 
Reginald Brothers, Under Secretary for Science and Technology, 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Dr. Kathryn Brinsfield, 
Assistant Secretary, Office of Health Affairs, U.S. Department 
of Homeland Security; Dr. Huban Gowadia, Director, Domestic 
Nuclear Detection Office, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; 
Mr. Alan D. Cohn, Counsel, Steptoe & Johnson LLP; Mr. Rick 
``Ozzie'' Nelson, Senior Associate, Homeland Security and 
Counterterrorism Program, Center for Strategic and 
International Studies; and Mr. Warren Stern, Former Director, 
Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security.

                               SAFETY ACT

    On July 28, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Promoting and Incentivizing Cybersecurity Best Practices.'' 
The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Brian Finch, 
Senior Fellow, Center for Cyber and Homeland Security, George 
Washington University; Mr. Raymond B. Biagini, Partner, 
Covington and Burling; and Dr. Andrea M. Matwyshyn, Visiting 
Professor, Center for Information Technology Policy, Princeton 
University.

              NATIONAL PROTECTION AND PROGRAMS DIRECTORATE

    On September 15, 2015, the Chair and Ranking Member of the 
Full Committee, along with the Chairs and Ranking Members of 
the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, 
and Security Technology, the Subcommittee on Border and 
Maritime Security; the Subcommittee on Oversight and Management 
Efficiency; and the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, 
Response and Communications sent a letter to the Secretary of 
the Department of Homeland Security and stated concerns with 
the lack of transparency of the proposed reorganization of the 
National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD) and 
requesting information on the Department's recommendation for 
NPPD's organization. To date, no response has been received by 
the Committee.
    On October 7, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Examining the Mission, Structure, and Reorganization 
Effort of the National Protection and Programs Directorate.'' 
The Subcommittee received testimony from Hon. Suzanne 
Spaulding, Under Secretary, National Programs and Protection 
Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Dr. Phyllis 
Schneck, Deputy Under Secretary, Cybersecurity and 
Communications, National Programs and Protections Directorate, 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Dr. Ronald J. Clark, 
Deputy Under Secretary, National Programs and Protections 
Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and Mr. 
Chris P. Currie, Director, Emergency Management National 
Preparedness and Critical Infrastructure Protection Homeland 
Security and Justice Team, U.S. Government Accountability 
Office.

                           NUCLEAR SMUGGLING

    On November 4, 2015, the Chair of the Full Committee and 
the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a letter to the Secretary of 
Homeland Security expressing concerns regarding the amount of 
radiological and nuclear material present within the former 
Soviet Bloc and the potential threat of extremist groups or 
terrorist organizations' obtaining this material. The Committee 
received a response on December 2, 2016, from the Domestic 
Nuclear Detection Office.

                         WASSENAAR ARRANGEMENT

    On January 12, 2016, the Subcommittee on Information 
Technology of the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform 
and the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies held a joint hearing 
entitled ``Wassenaar: Cybersecurity & Export Control.'' The 
Subcommittees received testimony from Hon. Kevin J. Wolf, 
Assistant Secretary for Export Administration, U.S. Department 
of Commerce; Ms. Ann K. Ganzer, Director of Conventional Arms 
Threat Reduction, Bureau of International Security and 
Nonproliferation, U.S. Department of State; Mr. Vann H. Van 
Diepen, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of 
International Security and Nonproliferation, U.S. Department of 
State; Dr. Phyllis Schneck, Deputy Under Secretary, 
Cybersecurity and Communications, National Protection and 
Programs Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Ms. 
Cheri Flynn McGuire, Vice President, Global Government Affairs 
and Cybersecurity Policy, Symantec; Mr. Iain Mulholland, Vice 
President, Engineering Trust and Assurance, VMware, Inc.; Ms. 
Cristin Flynn Goodwin, Assistant General Counsel, 
Cybersecurity, Microsoft Corporation; and Mr. Dean C. Garfield, 
President and CEO, Information Technology Industry Council.
    In response to the hearing, on January 12, 2016, the Chair 
and Ranking Member of the Full Committee, the Chair and Ranking 
Member of the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies, the Chair and Ranking 
Member of the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, the 
Chair and Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on Information 
Technology sent a letter to the Secretary of State stating 
concerns that the Wassenaar Arrangement may not be the 
appropriate framework within which to control cybersecurity 
tools and requested that the interagency undertake a 
Government-wide review before agreeing to future export 
controls for cybersecurity tools. The letter asked for 
confirmation regarding whether or not the U.S. Department of 
State will seek changes to the 2013 Wassenaar Arrangement's 
control on cybersecurity intrusion and surveillance during the 
2016 round of the plenary session. A Member briefing was 
requested for the Committees no later than February 26, 2016. 
The letter further requested that notification be provided 
within twenty-four hours of any proposed export control by the 
Wassenaar participating states on issues relating to computer 
forensics tools or techniques, mobile device or network 
forensics, or encryption.

                             CYBER THREATS

    On February 25, 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Emerging Cyber Threats to the United States.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Frank Cillufo, 
Associate Vice President and Director, Center for Cyber and 
Homeland Security, The George Washington University; Ms. 
Jennifer Kolde, Lead Technical Director, FireEye Threat 
Intelligence; Mr. Adam Bromwich, Vice President, Security 
Technology and Response, Symantec, testifying on behalf of the 
Cyber Threat Alliance; and Dr. Isaac Porche, Associate 
Director, Forces and Logistics Program, The RAND Army Research 
Division, The RAND Corporation.

                            CYBER INSURANCE

    On March 22, 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``The Role of Cyber Insurance in Risk Management.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Matthew P. McCabe, 
Senior Vice President, Network Security and Data Privacy, Marsh 
FINPRO; Mr. Adam W. Hamm, Commissioner, North Dakota Insurance 
Department, testifying on behalf of the National Association of 
Insurance Commissioners; Mr. Daniel Nutkis, Chief Executive 
Officer, Health Information Trust Alliance; and Mr. Thomas M. 
Finan, Chief Strategy Officer, Ark Network Security Solutions.

                           CYBER PREPAREDNESS

    On April 7, 2016, the Subcommittee held a field hearing in 
Sherman, Texas, entitled ``Cyber Preparedness and Response at 
the Local Level.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. 
Alphonse G. Davis, Deputy Director/Chief Operations Officer, 
Texas A&M; Engineering Extension Service; Mr. Sam Greif, Chief, 
Plano Fire-Rescue Department, Plano, Texas, testifying on 
behalf of the International Association of Fire Chiefs; Lt. 
Richard F. Wilson, Dallas Police Department, Dallas, Texas; and 
Mr. Don Waddle, Detective (Ret.), Greenville Police Department, 
Greenville, Texas.
    The Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications and the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, 
Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies held a 
joint hearing on May 24, 2016, entitled ``Enhancing 
Preparedness and Response Capabilities to Address Cyber 
Threats.'' The Subcommittees received testimony from Mr. Mark 
Ghilarducci, Director, Emergency Services, Office of the 
Governor, State of California; Lt. Col. Daniel J. Cooney, 
Assistant Deputy Superintendent, Office of Counter Terrorism, 
New York State Police; Brig. Gen. Steven Spano (Ret.--USAF), 
President and Chief Operating Officer, Center for Internet 
Security; Mr. Mark Raymond, Vice President, National 
Association of State Chief Information Officers; and Mr. Robert 
Galvin, Chief Technology Officer, Port Authority of New York 
and New Jersey.

                     THE CYBERSECURITY ACT OF 2015

    On June 15, 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Oversight of the Cybersecurity Act of 2015.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Matthew J. Eggers, 
Executive Director, Cybersecurity Policy, National Security and 
Emergency Preparedness, U.S. Chamber of Commerce; Mr. Robert H. 
Mayer, Vice President, Industry and State Affairs, United 
States Telecom Association; Mr. Mark G. Clancy, Chief Executive 
Officer, Soltra; Mr. Mordecai Rosen, General Manager, Security 
Business Unit, CA Technologies; and Ms. Ola Sage, President and 
Chief Executive Officer, e-Management.

                        CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE

    On July 12, 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Value of DHS' Vulnerability Assessments in Protecting our 
Nation's Critical Infrastructure.'' The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Mr. Chris P. Currie, Director, Homeland Security 
and Justice Issues, U.S. Government Accountability Office; Dr. 
Andy Ozment, Assistant Secretary, Office of Cybersecurity and 
Communications, National Protection and Programs Directorate, 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Ms. Caitlin Durkovich, 
Assistant Secretary, Office of Infrastructure Protection, 
National Protection and Programs Directorate, U.S. Department 
of Homeland Security; and Mr. Marcus L. Brown, Homeland 
Security Advisor, Director of the Office of Homeland Security, 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

     NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL LABORATORIES

    From October 17 through 21, 2016, Subcommittee staff 
visited National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) 
National Laboratories in order to familiarize Subcommittee 
staff with the capabilities resident at the NNSA National 
Laboratories that could affect Homeland Security issues. The 
staff visited the Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandia 
National Laboratory; and Lawrence Livermore National 
Laboratory.

              NATIONAL PROTECTION AND PROGRAMS DIRECTORATE

    From February 18 through 19, 2016 Subcommittee staff 
visited the National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD) 
Region 4 Regionalization Pilot Program. As part of the 
Committee's oversight work of the Department of Homeland 
Security and authorization work of NPPD, staff visited NPPD's 
office space in Atlanta, Georgia and met with organizations 
that utilize NPPD services in the region.

                        CYBER INCIDENT RESPONSE

    On February 27, 2015, the Chairs of the Committee on 
Homeland Security and the Committee on Foreign Affairs sent a 
letter to the President requesting information on the 
Administration's actions in response malicious activities by 
foreign government in cyberspace, in response to the cyber 
attack committed by North Korea on Sony pictures, as well as 
the attack on Anthem, Inc., which had the potential to also be 
state-sponsored. Information was also requested on how the 
Administration defines and classifies different types of cyber 
attacks as well as the U.S. Government's response to those 
attacks upon occurrence. To date, no response has been received 
by the Committee.

                       SET-TOP BOX CYBERSECURITY

    On May 23, 2016, the Chair and Ranking Member of the Full 
Committee along with the Chair and Ranking Member of the Senate 
Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs sent a 
letter to the Chair of the Federal Communication Commission 
requesting information to better understand impact of the 
Federal Communications Commission (FCC) rulemaking related to 
set-top boxes on cybersecurity. Answers to the proposed 
questions were requested by June 10, 2016. A response from the 
Chair of the Federal Communications Commission was sent, 
providing further information and explanation of the FCC's 
enforcement in the area of access to unlicensed spectrum and 
effective cyber defense, stating that enforcement has focused 
on circumstances where companies are using their defense 
capabilities to deny legitimate users from accessing shared 
unlicensed spectrum.

                   SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY DIRECTORATE

    On May 26, 2016, the Chair of the Full Committee sent a 
letter to the Under Secretary of the Department of Homeland 
Security's Science and Technology Directorate regarding the 
placement of the Director of the Finance and Budget Division of 
the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology 
Directorate on Administrative Leave. The Chair requested a 
briefing for Committee staff regarding the status and relevant 
details of the Director's Leave, by no later than June 6, 2016.
    To date, no response has been received by the Committee.

                            CYBER WORKFORCE

    On September 21, 2016, the Chair of the Full Committee and 
the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a letter to the Secretary of 
the Department of Homeland Security regarding concerns over the 
slow speed at which the Department has carried out several 
provisions enacted to bolster the U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security's cybersecurity workforce, specifically the 
Cybersecurity Workforce Assessment Act (Pub. L. 113-246) and 
the Border Patrol Agent Pay Reform Act of 2014 (Pub. L. 113-
277). The letter referenced the Cybersecurity Workforce 
Assessment Act, under which the Department is required to 
assess the readiness and capacity of its workforce to meet its 
cybersecurity mission, as well as requires to development of a 
cybersecurity workforce strategy for the Department, noting its 
slow progress in implementing both a cyber workforce strategy 
and a personnel system that would address the authorities 
provided by Congress for the creation of a cyber workforce. The 
letter further requested that the Committee be provided: The 
cybersecurity workforce assessment and strategy required in the 
Cybersecurity Workforce Assessment Act; the plan for execution 
of authorities; the annual report related to cybersecurity 
recruitment and retention; and the cybersecurity critical needs 
report required by the Border Patrol Agent Pay Reform Act of 
2014, not later than October 3, 2016.
    On October 28, 2016, the Department responded, noting in 
May of 2016 Congress was provided with the plan for execution 
of authorities and the annual report related to cybersecurity 
recruitment and retention. The reports were also included in 
the response letter. The Under Secretary explained the 
Department is preparing a comprehensive report to Congress that 
covers the requirements of the Cybersecurity Workforce 
Assessment Act, the Border Patrol Agency Pay Reform Act of 
2014, and the Federal Cybersecurity Workforce Assessment Act of 
2015 (Title III of Pub. L. 114-113) which the Department plans 
to transmit the report in December of 2016, and deliver the 
workforce strategy in strategy in March 2017.

                              ----------                              


                       Subcommittee Hearings Held


``Emerging Threats and Technologies to Protect the Homeland.'' 
        February 12, 2015. (Serial No. 114-3)
``Industry Perspectives on the President's Cybersecurity 
        Information Sharing Proposal.'' March 4, 2015. (Serial 
        No. 114-7)
``Examining DHS Science and Technology Directorate's Engagement 
        with Academia and Industry.'' May 19, 2015. (Serial No. 
        114-17)
``DHS' Efforts to Secure .Gov.'' June 24, 2015. (Serial No. 
        114-23)
``Weapons of Mass Destruction: Bolstering DHS to Combat 
        Persistent Threats to America.'' Joint with the 
        Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
        Communications. July 14, 2015. (Serial No. 114-26)
``Promoting and Incentivizing Cybersecurity Best Practices.'' 
        July 28, 2015. (Serial No. 114-29)
``Examining the Mission, Structure, and Reorganization Effort 
        of the National Protection and Programs Directorate.'' 
        October 7, 2015. (Serial No. 114-34)
``Wassenaar: Cybersecurity & Export Control.'' Joint hearing 
        with the Subcommittee on Information Security of the 
        Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. January 
        12, 2016. (Serial No. 114-49)
``Emerging Cyber Threats to the United States.'' February 25, 
        2016. (Serial No. 114-55)
``The Role of Cyber Insurance in Risk Management.'' March 22, 
        2016. (Serial No. 114-61)
Field hearing in Sherman, Texas. ``Cyber Preparedness and 
        Response at the Local Level.'' April 7, 2016. (Serial 
        No. 114-62)
``Enhancing Preparedness and Response Capabilities to Address 
        Cyber Threats.'' Joint hearing with the Subcommittee on 
        Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications. 
        May 24, 2016. (Serial No. 114-71)
``Oversight of the Cybersecurity Act of 2015.'' June, 15, 2016. 
        (Serial No. 114-76)
Value of DHS' Vulnerability Assessments in Protecting our 
        Nation's Critical Infrastructure.'' July 12, 2016. 
        (Serial No. 114-81)

  Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications

               Daniel M. Donovan, Jr., New York, Chairman

Tom Marino, Pennsylvania
Mark Walker, North Carolina
Barry Loudermilk, Georgia
Martha McSally, Arizona
Michael T. McCaul, Texas
                  (ex officio)      Donald M. Payne, Jr., New Jersey
                                    Bonnie Watson Coleman, New Jersey
                                    Kathleen M. Rice, New York
                                    Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi
                                                      (ex officio)
                              ----------                              


    During the 114th Congress, the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response, and Communications held 11 hearings, 
receiving testimony from 58 witnesses; and considered 7 
measures, resulting in 4 Public Laws.

                              ----------                              


               Legislative Activities of the Subcommittee



    DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTEROPERABLE COMMUNICATIONS ACT

                     Public Law 114-29    H.R. 615

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to require the Under 
Secretary for Management of the Department of Homeland Security 
to take administrative action to achieve and maintain 
interoperable communications capabilities among the components 
of the Department of Homeland Security, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This bill amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 
107-295) to include, among the responsibilities of the Under 
Secretary for Management (USM) of the Department of Homeland 
Security, achieving and maintaining interoperable 
communications among the Department's components. The law 
requires the USM to develop, and submit to the Committee on 
Homeland Security of the House of Representatives and the 
Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs of the 
Senate, a strategy for achieving and maintaining interoperable 
communications among the Department's components. The law 
further requires the USM to report to the Committees on the 
status of efforts to achieve the milestones detailed in the 
strategy.
    H.R. 615 advances the Committee's oversight of 
interoperable communications by ensuring that the Department 
will continue to keep the Committee informed of its efforts to 
address the Department's Inspector General recommendations in 
its November 2012 report DHS' Oversight of Interoperable 
Communications [OIG-13-06] and develop and maintain 
interoperable communications among the components.

Legislative History

113th Congress
    In the 113th Congress, H.R. 4450 was introduced in the 
House on March 24, 2014, by Mr. Payne and Mrs. Brooks of 
Indiana and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 4289 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications.
    On March 27, 2014, the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response, and Communications considered H.R. 
4289, and forwarded the measure to the Full Committee for 
consideration, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 4289 on June 11, 2014, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment by voice vote.
    H.R. 4289 was reported to the House on June 19, 2014, as H. 
Rpt. 113-484.
    The House considered H.R. 4289 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 8, 2014, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 393 yeas and 0 nays, (Roll No. 370).
    H.R. 4289 was received in the Senate, on July 9, 2014, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

114th Congress
    H.R. 615 was introduced in the House on January 28, 2015, 
by Mr. Payne, Mrs. Brooks of Indiana, Mr. Thompson of 
Mississippi, and Mr. McCaul, and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 615 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications.
    The House considered H.R. 615 under Suspension of the Rules 
on February 2, 2015, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ recorded 
vote of 379 yeas and 0 nays, (Roll No. 52).
    H.R. 615 was received in the Senate on February 3, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered H.R. 615 on March 4, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate favorably, with an 
Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute.
    On May 21, 2015, the Senate Committee on Homeland Security 
and Governmental Affairs reported H.R. 615 to the Senate as S. 
Rpt. 114-53.
    The Senate passed H.R. 615 with an amendment by unanimous 
consent on June 11, 2015.
    The House concurred in the Senate amendment to H.R. 615 
under Suspension of the Rules on June 23, 2015, and passed the 
measure by voice vote. Clearing the measure for the President.
    H.R. 615 was presented to the President on June 24, 2015. 
The President signed H.R. 615 into law on July 6, 2015, as 
Public Law 114-29.

                                ------                                



                 SOCIAL MEDIA WORKING GROUP ACT OF 2015

                     Public Law 114-80    H.R. 623

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to authorize the 
Department of Homeland Security to establish a social media 
working group, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This law amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 
107-296) to authorize and enhance the Department of Homeland 
Security's Virtual Social Media Working Group (the Group), a 
group existing within the Department's Science and Technology 
Directorate. During two hearings in the 113th Congress, the 
Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications heard from numerous stakeholders, including the 
private sector, on this new reality and the vital role social 
media plays in the response efforts after a disaster. One of 
the key takeaways from the hearings was that during and after a 
disaster there needs to be better communication between the 
public and private sectors, specifically in the use of social 
media and other emerging technologies.
    H.R. 623 considered the lessons learned from those hearings 
and amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to authorize and 
enhance the Group to ensure information sharing between the 
Department and appropriate stakeholders regarding the use of 
social media before, during, and after a terrorist attack or 
other emergency. It expands the membership of the Group to 
include representatives from state, local, and tribal law 
enforcement, the fire service, emergency management, and public 
health; along with universities and academia, non-profit 
disaster relief organizations, and no fewer than three private 
sector organizations. The bill appoints the Secretary, or a 
designee, as the Chair of the working group and requires the 
Secretary, or designee, to appoint a co-chair from among the 
group's state or local representatives.
    The law requires the Group to meet within 90 days of 
enactment and biannually thereafter, or at the call of the 
Chair. The bill also requires the Group to submit an annual 
report to Congress on its activities, including a review of 
current and emerging technologies; best practices and lessons 
learned; available training on the use of social media in the 
aftermath of a disaster; and recommendations to improve the 
Department's use of social media for emergency management 
purposes.

Legislative History

113th Congress
    In the 113th Congress, H.R. 4263 was introduced in the 
House on March 14, 2013, by Mrs. Brooks of Indiana, Mr. Payne, 
Mr. Palazzo, and Mr. Swalwell of California, and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 
4263 was referred to the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response, and Communications.
    On March 27, 2014, the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response, and Communications considered H.R. 
4263, and forwarded the measure to the Full Committee for 
consideration, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 4263 on June 11, 2014, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    H.R. 4263 was reported to the House on June 19, 2014, as H. 
Rpt. 113-480.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on July 7, 2014, agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration of H.R. 4263, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 4263. The letter further requested the 
appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be 
called. On that same date, the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security responded acknowledging the jurisdictional 
interests of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure 
and the agreement to not seek a sequential referral.
    The House considered H.R. 4263 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 8, 2014, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 375 yeas and 19 nays, (Roll No. 369).
    H.R. 4263 was received in the Senate, on July 9, 2014, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

114th Congress
    H.R. 623 was introduced in the House on January 30, 2015, 
by Mrs. Brooks of Indiana, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. Payne and 
referred to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, 
and the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, 
H.R. 623 was referred to the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response, and Communications.
    The House considered H.R. 623 under Suspension of the Rules 
on February 2, 2015, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ recorded 
vote of 328 yeas and 51 nays, (Roll No. 53).
    H.R. 623 was received in the Senate on February 3, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered H.R. 623 on May 6, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate, with an amendment, 
favorably.
    Senate considered H.R. 623 on October 7, 2015, and passed 
the measure with an Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute.
    On October 28, 2015, the House agreed to Suspend the Rules 
and concurred in the Senate amendment to H.R. 623. Clearing the 
measure for the President.
    H.R. 623 was presented to the President on November 2, 
2015. The President signed H.R.623 into law on November 5, 
2015, as Public Law 114-80.

                                ------                                



  INTEGRATED PUBLIC ALERT AND WARNING SYSTEM MODERNIZATION ACT OF 2015

         Public Law 114-143    S. 1180 (H.R. 1738 / H.R. 1472)

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to direct the 
Secretary of Homeland Security to modernize and implement the 
national integrated public alert and warning system to 
disseminate homeland security information and other 
information, and for other purposes.

Summary

    Since its establishment in April 2007, the Department of 
Homeland Security (DHS) Integrated Public Alert and Warning 
System (IPAWS) Program Management Office (PMO) has been 
operating without Congressional authorization. Given the 
significant progress that the PMO has accomplished since its 
establishment, the time has come for Congress to provide the 
necessary support and direction to ensure that IPAWS reaches 
its goals. This legislation provides the Secretary with 
direction on the necessary system requirements that IPAWS must 
achieve, such as the ability to provide timely alerts and 
warnings to the largest segment of the population possible.
    This legislation is the product of a number of hearings and 
briefing held by the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, 
Response, and Communications in the 112th and 113th Congresses, 
including a July 8, 2011, hearing entitled, ``Communicating 
With the Public During Emergencies: An Update on Federal Alerts 
and Warnings,'' which focused specifically on IPAWS and at 
which Members of the Subcommittee received testimony from 
Federal witnesses and stakeholders. The Subcommittee continued 
its oversight of IPAWS at a November 17, 2011, hearing, which 
explored the various emergency communications offices and 
programs at the Department of Homeland Security. The director 
of the IPAWS PMO testified at that hearing and provided Members 
of the Subcommittee with an update on the national test of the 
Emergency Alert System and implementation of the Commercial 
Mobile Alert System (CMAS) now known as Wireless Emergency 
Alert (WEA). The Subcommittee also held a Member briefing on 
May 7, 2013, to receive an update on the system and its use. 
The Assistant Administrator for National Continuity Programs 
from the Federal Emergency Management Administration provided 
the briefing.
    The need for, and benefit of, a robust integrated public 
alert and warning system has been repeatedly demonstrated in 
recent events. Alerts through the IPAWS system were sent after 
the Boston Marathon bombings and wireless emergency alerts have 
been credited with helping to save lives during natural 
disasters, including Hurricane Sandy and the severe tornadoes 
hit the South and Midwest in Spring 2014. This legislation will 
help to ensure that as much information as possible is made 
available and accessible to the public before, during, and 
after terrorist attacks, natural disasters, and other 
emergencies to get them out of harm's way.

Legislative History

112th Congress
    In the 112th Congress, H.R. 3563 was introduced in the 
House on December 6, 2011, by Mr. Bilirakis and Ms. Richardson, 
and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security, and the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 3563 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications.
    The Subcommittee considered H.R. 3563 on December 8, 2011, 
and reported the measure to the Full Committee with a favorable 
recommendation, amended, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 3563 on March 28, 2012, 
and ordered the measure to be favorably reported to the House, 
amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 3563 to 
the House on September 20, 2012, as H. Rpt. 112-685, Pt. I. 
Subsequently, the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure was discharged from further consideration.
    A provision similar to H.R. 3563 was included in section 
102 of the FEMA Reauthorization Act of 2012 (H.R. 2903), which 
passed the House of Representatives on September 19, 2012.

113th Congress
    In the 113th Congress, H.R. 3283 was introduced in the 
House on October 10, 2013, by Mr. Bilirakis and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security, and in addition to the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 3283 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications.
    On March 27, 2014, the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response, and Communications considered H.R. 
3283, and forwarded the measure to the Full Committee for 
consideration, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 3283 on April 30, 2014, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, by voice vote.

114th Congress
S. 1180
    S. 1180 was introduced in the Senate on May 4, 2015, by Mr. 
Johnson and Ms. McCaskill and referred to the Senate Committee 
on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 1180 on June 6, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate with an amendment, 
favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 1180 to the Senate on June 25, 2015, as S. 
Rpt. 114-73.
    The Senate considered S. 1180 on July 9, 2015, and passed 
the measure, with amendments, by unanimous consent.
    S. 1180 was received in the House on July 13, 2015, and 
held at the Desk.
    The House considered S. 1180 under Suspension of the Rules 
on March 21, 2016, and passed the measure by voice vote. 
Clearing the measure for the President.
    S. 1180 was presented to the President on March 31, 2016, 
and signed into law on April 11, 2016, as Public Law 114-143.

H.R. 1738
    H.R. 1738 was introduced in the House on April 13, 2015, by 
Mr. Bilirakis, Mr. McCaul, and Mrs. Brooks of Indiana and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 1738 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications.
    The Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications was discharged from further consideration of 
H.R. 1738 on May 20, 2015.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 1738 on May 20, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1738 to the House on December 
8, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-854, Pt. I.

H.R. 1472
    H.R. 1472 was introduced in the House on March 19, 2015, by 
Mr. Barletta, Mr. Carson of Indiana, Mr. Shuster, and Mr. 
DeFazio and referred to the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure.
    The Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure 
considered H.R. 1472 on April 15, 2015 and ordered the measure 
to be reported to the House by voice vote.

                                ------                                



                FIRST RESPONDER ANTHRAX PREPAREDNESS ACT

               Public Law 114-268    S. 1915 (H.R. 1300)

To direct the Secretary of Homeland Security to make anthrax 
vaccines and antimicrobials available to emergency response 
providers, and for other purposes.

Summary

    An anthrax attack is a serious mass casualty threat. The 
National response capability to a wide-area anthrax attack 
would be greatly enhanced by having pre-vaccinated responders, 
able to deploy immediately and confidently, knowing that they 
have been afforded as much protection as possible. Pre-event 
vaccination is a safe, effective way to protect these 
responders so they can respond in an anthrax attack without 
fear of contracting disease. The first responder community has 
been requesting this capability and the Committee has worked 
with the Department to establish an effective program.
    The Department of Homeland Security Office of Health 
Affairs has been working with the Centers for Disease Control 
and Prevention on a pilot program to provide surplus pre-event 
anthrax vaccine from the Strategic National Stockpile to 
emergency response providers on a voluntary basis and free of 
charge. This legislation authorizes that program.

Legislative History

113th Congress
    In the 113th Congress, H.R. 5620 was introduced in the 
House on September 18, 2015, by Mr. King of New York and Mr. 
Pascrell and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and 
the Committee on Energy and Commerce. Within the Committee, 
H.R. 5620 was Referred to the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response and Communications.

114th Congress
H.R. 1300
    H.R. 1300 was introduced in the House on March 4, 2015, by 
Mr. King of New York, Mr. Pascrell, Mr. Rooney of Florida, and 
Mr. Katko and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security 
and the Committee on Energy and Commerce. Within the Committee, 
H.R. 1300 was referred to the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response, and Communications.
    The Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications considered H.R. 1300 on May 14, 2015, and 
forwarded the measure to the Full Committee for consideration, 
as amended, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 1300 on May 20, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Energy and Commerce sent a 
letter to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on 
July 22, 2015, agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the Floor of the House, the Committee on 
Energy and Commerce would waive further consideration of H.R. 
1300. On July 21, 2015, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security responded, acknowledging the jurisdictional interests 
of the Committee on Energy and Commerce and the agreement to 
waive further consideration of H.R. 1300.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 1300 to 
the House on July 22, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-222, Pt. I. 
Subsequently, the Committee on Energy and Commerce was 
discharged from further consideration of H.R. 1300.
    The House considered H.R. 1300 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 27, 2015, and passed the measure on July 29, 
2015, by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 424 yeas and 0 nays, (Roll 
No. 485).
    H.R. 1300 was received in the Senate on July 30, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

S. 1915
    S. 1915, the Senate companion measure to Sec. 301 of H.R. 
3583 as passed by the House, was introduced in the Senate by 
Ms. Ayotte, Mr. Booker, and Mr. Coons on August 3, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 1915 on December 9, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate, with an amendment.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 1915 to the Senate on May 9, 2016, as S. 
Rpt. 114-251.
    The Senate passed S. 1915 on November 16, 2016, by 
unanimous consent with an amendment and an amendment to the 
title.
    S. 1915 was received in the House on November 17, 2016, and 
held at the Desk.
    The House agreed to take from the Speakers table and passed 
S. 1915 on November 29, 2016, clearing the measure for the 
President.
    S. 1915 was presented to the President on December 2, 2016. 
The President signed S. 1915 into law on December 14, 2016, as 
Pub. L. 114-268.

                                ------                                



         CBRN INTELLIGENCE AND INFORMATION SHARING ACT OF 2015

                               H.R. 2200

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish 
chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear intelligence 
and information sharing functions of the Office of Intelligence 
and Analysis of the Department of Homeland Security and to 
require dissemination of information analyzed by the Department 
to entities with responsibilities relating to homeland 
security, and for other purposes.

Summary

    Terrorist groups have long strived to employ chemical, 
biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) materials in their 
attacks. Furthermore, events such as the Boston Marathon 
bombing in 2013 illustrate the need for better information 
sharing between Federal and local officials. This legislation 
requires that the Office of Intelligence and Analysis within 
the Department of Homeland Security enhance intelligence 
analysis and information sharing on CBRN threats and work to 
ensure that State and local officials get the actionable 
intelligence information necessary to stop an attack.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2200 was introduced in the House on May 1, 2015, by 
Ms. McSally, Mr. McCaul, Mr. King of New York, Mr. Meehan, Mr. 
Thompson of Mississippi, and Mr. Payne and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 2200 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and 
Intelligence and the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, 
Response, and Communications.
    The Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications considered H.R. 2200 on May 14, 2015, and 
forwarded the measure to the Full Committee for consideration, 
as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair discharged the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism 
and Intelligence from further consideration of H.R. 2200 on May 
20, 2015.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 2200 on May 20, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 2200 to the House on June 17, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-164.
    The House considered H.R. 2200 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 23, 2015, and passed the measure, on June 25, 
2015, amended, by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 420 yeas and 2 nays, 
(Roll No. 389).
    H.R. 2200 was received in the Senate on July 7, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



        STATE WIDE INTEROPERABLE COMMUNICATIONS ENHANCEMENT ACT

                               H.R. 2206

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to require 
recipients of State Homeland Security Grant Program funding to 
preserve and strengthen interoperable emergency communications 
capabilities, and for other purposes.

Summary

    Despite an investment of more than $5 billion in grant 
funding to enhance communications capabilities over the past 10 
years, interoperability remains a challenge, particularly 
during disaster scenarios. H.R. 2206 recognizes the important 
role played by Statewide Interoperability Coordinators (SWICs), 
be it through the development of Statewide Communications 
Interoperability Plans, coordinating interoperable 
communications projects and grant requests, or engaging with 
the First Responder Network Authority as it works to design and 
build the Nation-wide public safety broadband network. The bill 
requires a governor to certify, as part of the application for 
State Homeland Security Grant Program (SHSGP) funds, that the 
State has designated a SWIC, or, if a SWIC has not been 
designated, that the State is performing in another manner the 
functions of a SWIC.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2206 was introduced in the House on May 1, 2015, by 
Mr. Payne, Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, Mr. McCaul, and Ms. 
McSally, and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 2206 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications.
    The Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications considered H.R. 2206 on May 14, 2015, and 
forwarded the measure to the Full Committee for consideration, 
without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 2206 on May 20, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 2206 to the House on June 17, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-165.
    The House considered H.R. 2206 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 27, 2015, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 2206 was received in the Senate on July 28, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



     FIRST RESPONDER IDENTIFICATION OF EMERGENCY NEEDS IN DISASTER 
                               SITUATIONS

                               H.R. 2795

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to submit a study 
on the circumstances which may impact the effectiveness and 
availability of first responders before, during, or after a 
terrorist threat or event.

Summary

    H.R. 2795 was introduced as the Nation neared the tenth 
anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. Catastrophic emergencies like 
Hurricane Katrina and the 2014 Ebola scare in Texas impact 
entire communities that State and local first responders are 
responsible for protecting. These first responders are also 
responsible for protecting their own families impacted by 
emergencies. This bill analyzes how much is being done to 
support the needs of first responders--particularly with 
respect to concerns about their families--so that they can 
continue to do their job successfully. This measure provides 
Congress with relevant information about policies and programs 
at both the State and local levels that support the protection 
and preparedness of first responders and their families during 
emergencies.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2795 was introduced in the House on June 16, 2015, by 
Ms. Jackson Lee and 14 original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 2795 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, 
Response, and Communications.
    On November 4, 2015, the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response and Communications was discharged from 
further consideration of H.R. 2795.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 2795 on November 4, 
2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 2795 to the House on December 
7, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-370.
    The House considered H.R. 2795 under Suspension of the 
Rules on December 10, 2015, and passed the bill, as amended, by 
a \2/3\ recorded vote of 396 yeas and 12 nays, (Roll No. 689).
    H.R. 2795 was received in the Senate on December 14, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



   PROMOTING RESILIENCE AND EFFICIENCY IN PREPARING FOR ATTACKS AND 
                     RESPONDING TO EMERGENCIES ACT

                               H.R. 3583

To reform and improve the Federal Emergency Management Agency, 
the Office of Emergency Communications, and the Office of 
Health Affairs of the Department of Homeland Security, and for 
other purposes.

Summary

    The Promoting Resilience and Efficiency in Preparing for 
Attacks and Responding to Emergencies (PREPARE) Act seeks to 
enhance accountability at the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency, Office of Emergency Communications, and Office of 
Health Affairs at the Department of Homeland Security. As a 
part of the Committee's authorization process, the PREPARE Act 
builds efficiencies and increases coordination for preparedness 
improvements, while providing greater accountability for 
taxpayers.

Legislative History

H.R. 3583
    The Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications considered a Committee Print entitled 
``Promoting Resilience and Efficiency in Preparing for Attacks 
and Responding to Emergencies Act'' on September 10, 2015, and 
reported the measure to the Full Committee for consideration, 
with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    H.R. 3583 was introduced in the House on September 22, 
2015, by Ms. McSally, Mr. McCaul, Mr. Donovan, and Mr. Payne 
and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security, the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, and the 
Committee on Energy and Commerce.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3583 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    On March 9, 2016, the Chair of the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of 
the Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would waive further 
consideration of H.R. 3583. The letter further requested 
support for the appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called. On March 10, the Chair of the Committee 
on Homeland Security responded acknowledging the jurisdictional 
interests of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure, and the agreement to not waive further 
consideration.
    On March 11, 2016, the Chair of the Committee on Energy and 
Commerce sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on Energy and 
Commerce would waive further consideration of H.R. 3583. The 
letter further requested support for the appointment of 
Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be called. On that 
same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the 
Committee on Energy and Commerce, and the agreement to not 
waive further consideration.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 3583 to 
the House on March 16, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-455, Pt. I. 
Subsequently, the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure and the Committee on Energy and Commerce were 
discharged from further consideration of H.R. 3583.
    On March 22, 2016, the Chair of the Committee on Financial 
Services sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on Financial 
Services would not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 3583. The 
letter further requested support for the appointment of 
Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be called. The Chair 
of the Committee on Homeland Security responded on April 6, 
2016, acknowledging the jurisdictional letter of the Committee 
on Financial Services, and the agreement to not seek a 
sequential referral.
    The House agreed to Suspend the Rules on April 26, 2016, 
and passed the measure, as amended, by voice vote.
    H.R. 3583 was received in the Senate on April 27, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



            STATE AND HIGH-RISK URBAN AREA WORKING GROUP ACT

                               H.R. 4509

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to clarify 
membership of State planning committees or urban area working 
groups for the Homeland Security Grant Program, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

     The Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 107-296) 
requires States and urban areas that receive State Homeland 
Security Grant Program and Urban Areas Security Initiative 
funds to have planning committees to determine how to 
efficiently and effectively expend these funds. H.R. 4509 
expands the stakeholders required to be involved in these 
committees to include representatives from public health, 
educational institutions, fusion centers, and interoperability 
coordinators, where appropriate.

Legislative History

    H.R. 4509 was introduced in the House on February 9, 2016, 
by Mr. Payne and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 4509 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications.
    The Subcommittee on Emergency Response and Communications 
was discharged from further consideration on March 23, 2016. 
The Full Committee considered H.R. 4509 on March 23, 2016, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 4509 to 
the House on April 13, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-491.
    The House considered H.R. 4509 on April 13, 2016, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 4509 was received in the Senate on April 14, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 4509 were included in Section 1911 of 
the Conference Report to accompany S. 2943, the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017. (See action 
taken on S. 2943, listed under Full Committee legislative 
activities).

                                ------                                



                 SECURING OUR AGRICULTURE AND FOOD ACT

                               H.R. 5346

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to make the 
Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security for Health Affairs 
responsible for coordinating the efforts of the Department of 
Homeland Security related to food, agriculture, and veterinary 
defense against terrorism, and for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 5346 amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to 
authorize a program to coordinate the Department of Homeland 
Security's efforts related to food, agriculture, and veterinary 
defense from acts of terrorism and other high-consequence 
events that pose a high risk to homeland security.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5346 was introduced in the House on May 26, 2016, by 
Mr, Young of Iowa and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security, and in addition to the Committee on Energy and 
Commerce and the Committee on Agriculture. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 5346 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications.
    On June 16, 2016, the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Communications, Preparedness, and Response considered H.R. 5346 
and reported the measure to the Full Committee, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Agriculture sent a letter to 
the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on September 6, 
2016, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration on the 
House Floor, the Committee on Agriculture would waive its right 
to consider H.R. 5346.
    The Chair of the Committee on Energy and Commerce sent a 
letter to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on 
September 14, 2016, agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on Energy and 
Commerce would waive its right to consider H.R. 5346. On that 
same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded acknowledging the agreement by the Committee on 
Energy and Commerce to forgo consideration of H.R. 5346, and 
the agreement to support the appointment of Conferees should a 
House-Senate Conference be called.
    The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded 
to the Chair of the Committee on Agriculture on September 14, 
2016, acknowledging an agreement by the Committee on 
Agriculture to forgo consideration of H.R. 5346, and the 
agreement to support the appointment of Conferees should a 
House-Senate Conference be called.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5346 on September 15, 
2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 5346 to 
the House on September 19, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-755, Pt. I. 
Subsequently, the Committee on Energy and Commerce and the 
Committee on Agriculture were discharged from further 
consideration of H.R. 5346.
    The House considered H.R. 5346 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 26, 2016, and passed the measure by voice 
vote.
    H.R. 5346 was received in the Senate on September 27, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



                     CYBER PREPAREDNESS ACT OF 2016

                               H.R. 5459

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to enhance 
preparedness and response capabilities for cyber attacks, 
bolster the dissemination of homeland security information 
related to cyber threats, and for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 5459 seeks to enhance preparedness and response 
capabilities for cyber attacks and bolster the sharing of 
information related to cyber threats. The bill includes, as a 
function of the National Cybersecurity and Communications 
Integration Center (NCCIC), sharing information about cyber 
best practices, in addition to the sharing of cyber threat 
indicators and defensive measures currently required by law. 
The bill also authorizes representatives from State and major 
urban area fusion centers, as defined in the bill, to be 
assigned to the NCCIC, similar to the assignment of 
representatives from information sharing and analysis centers 
(ISACs) permitted under current law.
    H.R. 5459 authorizes the use of State Homeland Security 
Grant Program and Urban Area Security Initiative funds for 
cybersecurity enhancements. Cyber expenditures are currently 
allowable under yearly grant guidance for these programs and 
this section will codify the authorization to highlight the 
importance of these expenditures and ensure they continue to be 
allowable.
    Finally, H.R. 5459 expresses the sense of Congress that the 
Department of Homeland Security should work to lessen the 
classification level or provide information in an unclassified 
form, as practicable, to enable greater sharing of actionable 
intelligence related to cyber threats.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5459 was introduced in the House on June 13, 2016, by 
Mr. Donovan, Mr. McCaul, Mr. Ratcliffe, and Mr. Payne, and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 5459 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
Technologies and the Subcommittee on Emergency Preapredness, 
Response, and Communications.
    The Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications considered H.R. 5459 on June 14, 2016, and 
passed the measure, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies was discharged from 
further consideration of H.R. 5459 on September 14, 2016.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5459 on September 14, 
2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5459 to the House on September 
19, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-756.
    The House considered H.R. 5459 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 26, 2016, and passed the measure by voice 
vote.
    H.R. 5459 was received in the Senate on September 27, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


         FIRST RESPONDER ACCESS TO INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES ACT

                               H.R. 5460

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish a 
review process to review applications for certain grants to 
purchase equipment or systems that do not meet or exceed any 
applicable national voluntary consensus standards, and for 
other purposes.

Summary

    This measure amends Subsection (f) of section 2008 of the 
Home*land Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 609) by adding at the 
end a re*view process for applications seeking to purchase 
equipment or sys*tems that do not meet or exceed applicable 
national voluntary con*sensus standards using funds from the 
Urban Area Security Initia*tive or the State Homeland Security 
Grant Program. This bill addresses complaints raised by 
stakeholder groups that Federal Emergency Management Agency 
lacks a uniform, predictable, and transparent process to review 
grantee requests to use grant funding to purchase equipment 
that does not meet or exceed voluntary consensus standards or 
for which no voluntary consensus standard exists.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5460 was introduced in the House on June 13, 2016, by 
Mr. Payne and Mr. Donovan, and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 5460 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications.
    On June 16, 2016, the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Communications, Preparedness, and Response considered H.R. 5460 
and reported the measure to the Full Committee, without 
amendment, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5460 on September 16, 
2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5460 to the House on September 
26, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-788.
    The House considered H.R. 5460 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 26, 2016, and passed the measure by voice 
vote.
    H.R. 5460 was received in the Senate on September 27, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                



              COMMUNITY COUNTERTERRORISM PREPAREDNESS ACT

                               H.R. 5859

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish the 
major metropolitan area counterterrorism training and exercise 
grant program, and for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 5859 authorizes $39 million for emergency response 
providers in major metropolitan areas to conduct training and 
exercises to prevent, prepare for, and respond to the most 
likely terrorist attack scenarios, including active shooters.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5859 was introduced in the House on July 14, 2016, by 
Mr. McCaul and 25 original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 5859 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, 
Response, and Communications.
    The Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications was discharged from further consideration of 
H.R. 5859 on September 14, 2016.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5859 on September 14, 
2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committed reported H.R. 5859 to the House on September 
19, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-754.
    The House considered H.R. 5859 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 21, 2016, and passed the measure, as 
amended, by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 395 yeas and 30 nays, 
(Roll No. 537).
    H.R. 5859 was received in the Senate on September 22, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


                Oversight Activities of the Subcommittee


             DISASTER PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND RECOVERY

    Since the beginning of the 114th Congress, States and 
localities have experienced a number of disasters including: 
terrorist attacks in San Bernardino, California and Orlando, 
Florida, hurricanes, tornadoes, wildfires, and flooding. It is 
imperative that the Federal Government, along with its partners 
at the State and local levels and the private sector, work to 
prepare for and respond to terrorist attacks, natural 
disasters, and other emergencies.
    The Members of the Subcommittee conducted a site visit to 
the Federal Emergency Management Agency Headquarters in 
Washington, D.C. on March 18, 2015, to meet with the 
Administrator and tour the National Response Coordination 
Center.
    On April 3, 2015, the Full Committee and Subcommittee 
Chairs, as well as the Chair and Ranking Member of the Senate 
Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, sent a 
letter to Administrator Fugate regarding the recommendations 
found in Hurricane Sandy: FEMA Has Improved Disaster Aid 
Verification but Could Act to Further Limit Improper Assistance 
[GAO-15-15] and Opportunities Exist to Strengthen Oversight of 
the Administrative Cost for Major Disasters [GAO-15-65]. The 
Committee received a response from FEMA's Office of Response 
and Recovery on May 20, 2015.
    On April 30, 2015, Committee staff met with representatives 
of the National Academy of Public Administration to discuss 
their work related to the Federal Emergency Management Agency.
    On May 21, 2015, Committee staff met with representatives 
of the Government Accountability Office to discuss the Office's 
ongoing work related to the response to and recovery from 
Hurricane Sandy.
    On June 25, 2015, the Subcommittee Chair and the Chair of 
the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence sent a 
letter to the Director of National Intelligence regarding the 
Joint Counterterrorism Assessment Team and information sharing 
between Federal, State, and local public safety officials. The 
Subcommittees received a response on November 9, 2015.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency's Protection and National 
Preparedness Directorate on July 29, 2015, to receive a 
briefing on Presidential Preparedness Directive-8.
    As a result of the disaster preparedness and response 
meetings above and meetings detailed in other sections of this 
report, on September 22, 2015, the Subcommittee Chair and 
Ranking Member, along with the Full Committee Chair and 
Representative Donovan, introduced H.R. 3583, the Promoting 
Resilience and Efficiency in Preparing for Attacks and 
Responding to Emergencies (PREPARE) Act. (For additional 
information on H.R. 3583, please see the legislative action 
section above.)
    Shortly after the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, on 
September 28, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with representatives 
of the RAND Corporation to receive a briefing on the evolution 
of disaster response capabilities since Hurricane Katrina.
    On October 8, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency's Office of Response and Recovery 
to receive a briefing on current operations and the Office's 
realignment.
    On October 22, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Ready and Resilient?: Examining Federal Emergency 
Preparedness and Response Capabilities.'' The Subcommittee 
received testimony from the Hon. W. Craig Fugate, 
Administrator, Federal Emergency Management Agency, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security; Mr. Bryan Koon, Director, 
Florida Division of Emergency Management, testifying on behalf 
of the National Emergency Management Association; and Mr. Chris 
P. Currie, Director, Emergency Management, National 
Preparedness, and Critical Infrastructure Protection, Homeland 
Security and Justice Team, U.S. Government Accountability 
Office. This hearing provided Subcommittee Members with an 
opportunity to receive testimony from Federal and State 
emergency management officials and the Government 
Accountability Office to examine the current state of 
preparedness and response capabilities, particularly in light 
of the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina and 3rd 
anniversary of Hurricane Sandy.
    On March 2, 2016, Subcommittee staff participated in a 
conference call with representatives of the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency regarding Hurricane Sandy recovery 
operations.
    On March 3, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Texas A&M; University Veterinary 
Emergency Response Team to receive information on the Team's 
disaster response efforts related to animals.
    From May 3--5, 2016, Subcommittee staff conducted site 
visits in New York, New York, and Bayonne, New Jersey to 
observe U.S. Coast Guard emergency response operations and 
operations and equipment funded using Federal homeland security 
grants.
    On May 26, 2016, the Subcommittee Chair visited the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency to meet with the Administrator and 
tour the National Response Coordination Center.
    Subcommittee staff received a briefing from representatives 
of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, National Oceanic 
and Atmospheric Administration, and American Red Cross on June 
1, 2016, regarding forecasts and preparations for the 2016 
Atlantic Hurricane season.
    On June 21, 2016, the Subcommittee held a field hearing in 
Jersey City, New Jersey entitled ``Protecting Our Passengers: 
Perspectives on Securing Surface Transportation in New Jersey 
and New York.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Ms. 
Sonya Proctor, Director, Surface Division, Office of Security 
Policy and Industry Engagement, Transportation Security 
Administration, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. 
Thomas Belfiore, Chief Security Officer, The Port Authority of 
New York and New Jersey; Mr. Raymond Diaz, Director of 
Security, Metropolitan Transportation Authority (New York); Mr. 
Christopher Trucillo, Chief of Police, New Jersey Transit 
Police Department; Mr. Martin Conway, Deputy Police Chief, 
National Railroad Passenger CorporationAMTRAK; Sergeant W. Greg 
Kierce, Director, Office of Emergency Management and Homeland 
Security, City of Jersey City, New Jersey; Mr. Rick Sposa, 
Operations Coordinator, Emergency Medical Services, Jersey City 
Medical Center; Lieutenant Vincent Glenn, Commander, Emergency 
Services Unit, Police Department, Jersey City, New Jersey; 
Captain Richard D. Gorman, Department of Fire and Emergency 
Services, Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security, 
Jersey City, New Jersey; and Mr. Mike Mollahan, Trustee, Port 
Authority Police Benevolent Association. This hearing examined 
the preparedness and response capabilities of major surface 
transportation systems and first responders in the New York and 
New Jersey area.
    In preparation for this hearing, on April 21, 2016, the 
Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications and the Subcommittee on Transportation Security 
held a roundtable with representatives of transit systems to 
receive information on their security efforts.
    Subsequent to this hearing, on September 7, 2016, the 
Subcommittee Chair and Ranking Member introduced H.R. 5943, the 
Transit Security Grant Program Flexibility Act. (For additional 
information on H.R. 5943, please see the legislative action 
section above.)
    On July 11, 2016, the Subcommittee held a field hearing on 
Staten Island, New York entitled ``A Prepared Community is a 
Resilient Community.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from 
Mr. Michael Byrne, Deputy Regional Administrator, Region II, 
Federal Emergency Management Agency, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Ms. Marion McFadden, Deputy Assistant 
Secretary, Grant Programs, Office of Community Planning and 
Development, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; 
Mr. Daniel A. Zarrilli, Chief Resilience Officer, Office of the 
Mayor, City of New York, New York; Mr. Vincent M. Ignizio, 
Chief Executive Officer, Catholic Charities of Staten Island, 
Staten Island, New York; Mr. Brad Gair, Private Citizen; Ms. 
Donna Moravick, Executive Director, Southside Hospital, Bay 
Shore, New York; and Ms. Kelly D. Higgs, Disaster Recovery and 
Resiliency Coordinator, New Jersey Voluntary Organizations 
Active in Disaster. This hearing provided Members with an 
opportunity to hear from representatives of Federal and local 
governments, non-profit organizations, and the private sector 
regarding response and recovery operations to Hurricane Sandy 
and provided recommendations for improvements to those 
operations for future disasters.
    Based on the findings of the hearing, on August 22, 2016, 
the Subcommittee Chair sent a letter to the Administrator of 
the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Secretary of 
Housing and Urban Development, informing them of the hearing's 
findings and requesting additional information. The 
Subcommittee received a response to the letter on October 28, 
2016.
    During National Preparedness Month, on September 9, 2016, 
the Full Committee and Subcommittee Chairs visited FEMA 
Headquarters in Washington, DC to meet with the Administrator 
and receive an update on preparedness efforts and disaster 
operations.
    On October 6, 2016, Subcommittee staff attended a briefing 
with representatives of FEMA to receive an update on Federal 
response preparations for Hurricane Matthew. In the aftermath 
of the storm, staff also participated in a number of conference 
calls with Federal and State representatives to receive updates 
on response operations.

                          MEDICAL PREPAREDNESS

    The mission of the Department of Homeland Security's Office 
of Health Affairs is to provide health and medical expertise in 
support of the Department's mission to prepare for, respond to, 
and recover from all hazards impacting the Nation's health 
security. As a result, the Subcommittee conducted a number of 
oversight activities related to the Office of Health Affairs in 
the 114th Congress.
    On March 17, 2015, the Subcommittee Chair met with Dr. 
Kathryn Brinsfield, Assistant Secretary for Health Affairs, 
Department of Homeland Security.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the Office 
of Health Affairs on August 11, 2015, to receive a briefing on 
improvised explosive device and active shooter response 
guidance.
    On September 21, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Office of Health Affairs to receive a 
briefing on efforts to combat Severe Avian Respiratory Syndrome 
(SARS).
    Subcommittee staff received a briefing from representatives 
of the Office of Health Affairs and U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection on October 21, 2015 on the Southwest Border Health 
Initiative.
    On October 22, 2015, the Subcommittee Chair met with Dr. 
Kathryn Brinsfield, Assistant Secretary for Health Affairs, 
Department of Homeland Security and Dr. Nicole Lurie, Assistant 
Secretary for Preparedness and Response, Department of Health 
and Human Services.
    On January 19, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Trust for America's Health to receive a 
briefing on its report, Outbreaks: Protecting Americans from 
Infectious Diseases.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the Office 
of Health Affairs and U.S. Customs and Border Protection on 
January 20, 2016 to receive a briefing on efforts to prevent 
the spread of Chagas Disease in the Department of Homeland 
Security's canine population.
    On January 27, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Department of Homeland Security's Office 
of Inspector General to receive a briefing on their assessment 
of the Department's response to the Ebola cases in the United 
States in 2014.
    On February 5, 2016, the Full Committee and Subcommittee 
Chairs sent a letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security 
regarding efforts by the Department to combat the threat of 
emerging infectious diseases in light of the spread of the Zika 
Virus.
    Subcommittee staff participated in a briefing with 
representatives of the New York City Department of Health and 
Mental Hygiene on February 22, 2016.
    On April 14, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention's (CDC) Office of Emergency Preparedness and 
Response to receive a briefing on the CDC's Zika Virus 
preparedness and response efforts.
    On July 12, 2016, the Members of the Subcommittee received 
a briefing from representatives of the Department of Health and 
Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and 
Department of Homeland Security to receive information on 
Federal efforts to combat the Zika virus.
    Subcommittee staff attended a briefing with Dr. Anthony 
Fauci of the National Institutes of Health on July 29, 2016 
regarding research and development of vaccines and antivirals 
to combat Zika virus.
    On December 7, 2016, the Subcommittee Chair met with the 
Assistant Secretary of Health Affairs to discuss the future of 
the Office of Health Affairs and its programs.

   OUTREACH TO STATE, LOCAL, AND TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS, AND THE PRIVATE 
                                 SECTOR

    Throughout the 114th Congress, Subcommittee staff met with 
various Federal agencies and stakeholder groups representing 
the first responder and emergency management communities and 
the private sector to discuss issues of concern to their 
membership. These meetings included the International 
Association of Fire Chiefs, National Volunteer Fire Council, 
International Association of Firefighters, Congressional Fire 
Services Institute, National Emergency Management Association, 
International Association of Emergency Managers, National 
Governors Association, National Association of Counties, U.S. 
Conference of Mayors, National Fusion Center Association, Major 
County Sheriffs Association, Major Cities Chiefs Association, 
National Sheriffs Association, National Association of State 
Emergency Medical Services Officials, National Association of 
Emergency Medical Technicians, Business Executives for National 
Security, and the American Red Cross. This engagement provides 
valuable insights for the Subcommittee and has contributed to 
the development of legislative and oversight activities.
    On January 27, 2015, the Subcommittee Chair met with the 
Director of the Arizona Division of Emergency Management.
    On March 16, 2015, Subcommittee staff participated in a 
panel discussion at the National Emergency Management 
Association's (NEMA) Mid Year Conference in Washington, D.C. 
Subsequently, on March 17, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with 
NEMA's leadership to receive an update on their priorities.
    Following the November 2015 attacks in Paris that impacted 
a number of private sector entities, on December 2, 2015, the 
Subcommittee, jointly with the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism 
and Intelligence, held a roundtable with members of the private 
sector to discuss information sharing with the Federal 
government. Subcommittee Members received a briefing from 
representatives of the hotel, retail, and entertainment 
industries. In preparation for the roundtable, Subcommittee 
staff met with representatives of the National Fusion Center 
Association to discuss fusion center efforts to share 
information with the private sector.
    Subsequent to this roundtable, on February 4, 2016, the 
Subcommittees held a classified briefing with representatives 
from the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Department of 
Homeland Security's Office of Intelligence and Analysis and 
Office of Infrastructure Protection to discuss the findings of 
the December 2nd roundtable and receive information on Federal 
efforts to engage and share information with the private 
sector.
    On February 1, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the National Governors Association's 
Governors Homeland Security Advisors Council (GHSAC) Executive 
Committee to receive a briefing on current GHSAC initiatives.
    Subcommittee staff participated in a site visit to the 
Department of Homeland Security's Office of National Capital 
Region Coordination and the District of Columbia Homeland 
Security and Emergency Management Agency on March 31, 2016.
    On April 6, 2016, Subcommittee staff participated in a 
panel discussion at the National Emergency Management 
Association's (NEMA) Mid Year Conference in Washington, D.C. 
Subsequently, on April 7, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
NEMA's leadership to receive an update on their priorities.
    On August 2, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of Business Executives for National Security to 
discuss the organization's study of private sector preparedness 
and response capabilities and engagement with the Department of 
Homeland Security.

     EFFICIENCY AND EFFECTIVENESS OF ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL 
                      GOVERNMENTS AND INDIVIDUALS

    The Department of Homeland Security has distributed 
approximately $40 billion in grants to States and localities 
since the September 11th attacks. Administered by the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency's Grant Programs Directorate, this 
funding is used to help jurisdictions prevent, prepare for, 
mitigate, and respond to terrorist attacks. FEMA is also 
responsible for the distribution of disaster relief funding to 
States and individuals following disaster declarations.
    On February 25, 2015, Members of the Subcommittee received 
a briefing from representatives of the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency's Grant Programs Directorate on the non-
disaster grant programs administered by the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency.
    Subcommittee staff attended a briefing with representatives 
of the Grant Programs Directorate on March 31, 2015, to receive 
information on Fiscal Year 2015 Homeland Security Grant Program 
allocations. Subcommittee staff attended a final allocations 
briefing on July 27, 2015.
    On May 8, 2015, Subcommittee staff conducted a conference 
call with representatives of the U.S. Government Accountability 
Office to discuss ongoing work related to the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency's Public Assistance Program.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the Grant 
Programs Directorate on July 9, 2015, to discuss performance 
metrics, transparency, and accountability for FEMA's non-
disaster grant programs.
    Subcommittee staff attended a briefing with representatives 
of the Grant Programs Directorate on February 16, 2016, to 
receive information on Fiscal Year 2016 Homeland Security Grant 
Program allocations. Subcommittee staff attended a final 
allocations briefing on June 28, 2016.
    As a result of the Administration's Fiscal Year 2017 budget 
proposal to cut homeland security grants by 50 percent, on 
March 15, 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``State of Emergency: The Disaster of Cutting Preparedness 
Grants.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from the Hon. 
Bill de Blasio, Mayor, City of New York, New York; Mr. Jim 
Butterworth, Director, Emergency Management/Homeland Security, 
State of Georgia, testifying on behalf of the National 
Emergency Management Association, Ms. Rhoda Mae Kerr, Fire 
Chief, City of Austin Fire Department, Austin, Texas, 
testifying on behalf of the International Association of Fire 
Chiefs, Mr. George Turner, Chief of Police, Atlanta Police 
Department, Atlanta, Georgia, testifying on behalf of the Major 
Cities Chiefs Association; Mr. Mike Sena, Director, Northern 
California Regional Intelligence Center, testifying on behalf 
of the National Fusion Center Association; and Sergeant W. Greg 
Kierce, Director, Office of Emergency Management and Homeland 
Security, City of Jersey City, New Jersey. This hearing 
provided Subcommittee Members with an opportunity to hear from 
State and local stakeholders about the impact the proposed cuts 
would have on their ability to prevent, prepare for, protect 
against, and respond to terrorist attacks at a time when the 
threat to the United States is the highest since the September 
11th terrorist attacks.
    Subsequent to this hearing, on March 23, 2016, the Chairs 
of the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response and 
Communications, and the Chair of the Subcommittee on 
Counterterrorism and Intelligence sent a letter to the Chair of 
the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Homeland Security, 
sharing the findings of the hearing and requesting that they 
provide funding equal to the Fiscal Year 2016 levels in the 
Fiscal Year 2017 Department of Homeland Security Appropriations 
Act.
    On March 30, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Department of Homeland Security's Office 
of Community Partnerships and Federal Emergency Management 
Agency's Grant Programs Directorate to receive a briefing on 
grants to counter violent extremism.
    On June 29, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Government Accountability Office to 
receive an update on their review of the Assistance to 
Firefighters and Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency 
Response grant programs.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of FEMA's Grant 
Programs Directorate, the Office of Community Partnerships, and 
the Office of Intelligence and Analysis on September 1, 2016, 
to receive a classified briefing on the Countering Violent 
Extremism Grant Program and efforts to vet applicants for 
funding.
    On October 13, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Grant Programs Directorate to receive a 
briefing on the use of State Homeland Security Grant Program 
and Urban Area Security Initiative funding for law enforcement 
terrorism prevention activities.
    On December 6, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Federal Emergency Management Agency to 
discuss the guidance and review process for the Complex 
Coordinated Terrorist Attacks Grant Program.

CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL, RADIOLOGICAL, AND NUCLEAR PLANNING, PREPAREDNESS, 
                              AND RESPONSE

    Terrorists have actively plotted to use chemical, 
biological, radiological, and nuclear agents to attack the 
United States. The Committee has worked with various 
organizations, including the Commission on the Prevention of 
Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferation and Terrorism (WMD 
Commission) and the Blue Ribbon Study Panel on Biodefense, to 
examine these threats and the Federal government's ability to 
prevent, prepare for, respond to, and recover from them.
    On January 22, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Federal Emergency Management Agency's 
Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Office to 
receive a briefing on current operations.
    On January 26, 2015, Subcommittee staff with 
representatives of the Government Accountability Office to 
receive an update on the Office's review of the Office of 
Health Affairs' National Biosurveillance Integration Center.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the Office 
of Health Affairs on January 29, 2016, to receive a briefing on 
preparedness efforts related to anthrax.
    On February 4, 2015, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from representatives of the Office of Health Affairs on the 
President's Fiscal Year 2016 budget request.
    Subcommittee staff received a classified briefing from 
representatives of the Department of Homeland Security on 
Presidential Policy Directive--25 on March 3, 2015.
    On March 19, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Agents of Opportunity: Responding to the Threat of Chemical 
Terrorism.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. Mark 
Kirk, Director, Chemical Defense Program, Office of Health 
Affairs, Department of Homeland Security; Dr. Christina 
Catlett, Associate Director, Office of Critical Event 
Preparedness and Response, Department of Emergency Medicine, 
The Johns Hopkins Hospital; Chief G. Keith Bryant, Fire Chief, 
Oklahoma City Fire Department, testifying on behalf of the 
International Association of Fire Chiefs; and Mr. Armando B. 
Fontoura, Sheriff, Essex County, New Jersey. This hearing 
provided Subcommittee Members with an opportunity to examine 
the threat of chemical terrorism and the steps being taken at 
the Federal, State, and local government levels to address the 
threat of chemical attacks.
    Prior to this hearing, on February 18, 2015, Subcommittee 
staff attended the Baltimore Chemical Defense Demonstration 
hosted by the Office of Health Affairs' Chemical Defense 
Program and the Maryland Transit Administration in Baltimore, 
Maryland, to receive a briefing and observe chemical security 
technology on the Baltimore transit system.
    On April 22, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Strategic Perspectives on the Bioterrorism Threat.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from the Hon. Jim Talent, 
Former Senator from the State of Missouri and Co-Chair, the 
Commission on the Prevention of Weapons of Mass Destruction 
Proliferation and Terrorism; Dr. Charles B. Cairns, Interim 
Dean, Health Sciences Center, University of Arizona College of 
Medicine; and Marisa Raphael, MPH, Deputy Commissioner, Office 
of Emergency Planning and Response, Department of Health and 
Mental Hygiene, New York City, New York. This hearing 
highlighted the threat of bioterrorism and assessed the Federal 
government's efforts to prepare for and defend against this 
threat.
    Subsequent to the March 19th and April 22nd hearings, the 
Subcommittee Chair and Ranking Member, along with the Full 
Committee Chairman and Ranking Member, Representative King of 
New York, and Representative Meehan, introduced H.R. 2200, the 
CBRN Intelligence and Information Sharing Act of 2015. (For 
additional information on H.R. 2200, please see the legislative 
action section above.)
    Subcommittee staff received a briefing on April 30, 2015 
from representatives of the Department of Homeland Security on 
efforts to build the National Bio- and Agro-Defense Facility in 
Manhattan, Kansas.
    On May 29, 2015, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from representatives of the Office of Health Affairs and the 
Science and Technology Directorate on efforts to collaborate on 
the future of the BioWatch program.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the Science 
and Technology Directorate on June 16, 2015, to receive a 
briefing on Material Threat Assessments and Material Threat 
Determinations.
    On July 14, 2015, the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, 
Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies and the 
Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications held a joint hearing entitled ``Weapons of Mass 
Destruction: Bolstering DHS to Combat Persistent Threats to 
America.'' The Subcommittees received testimony from Dr. 
Reginald Brothers, Under Secretary for Science and Technology, 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Dr. Kathryn Brinsfield, 
Assistant Secretary, Office of Health Affairs, U.S. Department 
of Homeland Security; Dr. Huban Gowadia, Director, Domestic 
Nuclear Detection Office, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; 
Mr. Alan D. Cohn, Counsel, Steptoe & Johnson LLP; Mr. Rick 
``Ozzie'' Nelson, Senior Associate, Homeland Security and 
Counterterrorism Program, Center for Strategic and 
International Studies; and Mr. Warren Stern, Former Director, 
Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security. This hearing reviewed the Department of Homeland 
Security's proposal to consolidate certain chemical, 
biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosives defense 
activities at the Department's headquarters to ensure America 
is prepared to combat these threats.
    Prior to this hearing, Subcommittee staff received a number 
of briefings on the proposed consolidation, including on April 
30, 2015. In addition, on May 29, 2015, Subcommittee staff 
received a classified briefing from representatives of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation on its Weapons of Mass 
Destruction Directorate. These activities culminated in the 
introduction of H.R. 3875, the Department of Homeland Security 
CBRNE Defense Act of 2015, which authorized the consolidation 
of a number of CBRNE functions from the Office of Health 
Affairs, Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, Science and 
Technology Directorate, Office of Policy, and Office of 
Operations into a new CBRNE Directorate (For further action on 
this legislation, please see the Full Committee legislative 
action section above).
    On September 14, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of Texas A&M;'s Institute for Infectious Animal 
Diseases (IIAD) to receive a briefing on IIAD's efforts to 
address infectious disease preparedness and other biological 
threats.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the National 
Biosurveillance Integration Center on October 26, 2015, to 
receive a briefing on NBIC's efforts to address the findings of 
the Government Accountability Office's report, Biosurveillance: 
Challenges and Options for the National Biosurveillance 
Integration Center [GAO-15-793].
    On October 29, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Blue Ribbon Study Panel on Biodefense to 
discuss the release of the panel's forthcoming report, A 
National Blueprint for Biodefense: Leadership and Major Reform 
Needed to Optimize Efforts.
    On January 14, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Federal Bureau of Investigation to 
receive a briefing on synthetic biology.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the 
Department of Defense on January 20, 2016, to receive a 
briefing on biodetection efforts and collaboration with the 
Office of Health Affairs' BioWatch Program.
    On January 29, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Office of Health Affairs to discuss the 
findings of the Government Accountability Office's report, 
Biosurveillance: DHS Should Not Pursue BioWatch Upgrades or 
Enhancements Until System Capabilities Are Established [GAO-16-
99].
    On February 2, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Science and Technology Directorate to 
receive a briefing on chemical and biological research and 
development efforts.
    On February 11, 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled, ``Improving the Department of Homeland Security's 
Biological Detection and Surveillance Programs.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. Kathryn Brinsfield, 
Assistant Secretary, Office of Health Affairs, U.S. Department 
of Homeland Security; Dr. Reginald Brothers, Under Secretary 
for Science and Technology, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security; Mr. Chris P. Currie, Director, Emergency Management, 
National Preparedness, and Critical Infrastructure Protection, 
Homeland Security and Justice Team, U.S. Government 
Accountability Office. This hearing built upon previous 
biological threat hearings to review the Department of Homeland 
Security's biological detection and surveillance programs.
    Prior to this hearing, on February 10, 2016, the 
Subcommittee held a roundtable on biodetection with 
representatives of the private sector.
    On February 17, 2016, Subcommittee staff received a 
briefing from representatives of the Office of Health Affairs 
and Domestic Nuclear Detection Office on the President's Fiscal 
Year 2017 budget request.
    Members of the Subcommittee received a classified briefing 
on the threat of chemical terrorism from representatives of the 
National Counterterrorism Center and Department of Homeland 
Security on February 24, 2016.
    On February 26, 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Food for Thought: Efforts to Defend the Nation's 
Agriculture and Food.'' The Subcommittee received testimony 
from R. Douglas Meckes, D.V.M., State Veterinarian, Veterinary 
Division, Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, 
State of North Carolina; Tammy R. Beckham, D.V.M., Ph.D., Dean, 
College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University; Mr. 
Bobby Acord, Former Administrator, Animal Plant Health 
Inspection Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, testifying 
on behalf of the National Pork Producers Council; and Mr. Brian 
Williams, Assistant Extension Professor, Mississippi State 
University. This hearing examined the risk to the nation from a 
terrorist attack on, or natural disruption of, U.S. 
agricultural or food systems, including an assessment of the 
threat and overview of capabilities and efforts to enhance our 
security posture.
    On March 1, 2016, the Chair of the Subcommittee met with 
the Undersecretary for Science and Technology, U.S. Department 
of Homeland Security.
    The Subcommittee Chair sent a letter to the Comptroller 
General of the Government Accountability Office on March 1, 
2016, requesting a report on DHS efforts to combat chemical 
weapons. The review is underway.
    On August 23, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Government Accountability Office to 
receive a briefing on the findings of their report, Nuclear 
Security: NRC Has Enhanced the Controls of Dangerous 
Radioactive Materials, but Vulnerabilities Remain [GAO-16-330].

                        EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS

    The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 exposed 
communications failures with catastrophic implications. 
Communications challenges persisted during Hurricane Katrina. 
Since that time, great strides have been made in interoperable 
communications, including through the National Emergency 
Communications Plan and the establishment of the First 
Responder Network Authority (FirstNet). However, more recent 
disasters have demonstrated that communications challenges 
remain. Within the Department of Homeland Security, the Office 
of Emergency Communications is charged with assisting State and 
local first responders to achieve and maintain interoperable 
communications.
    On January 15, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Office of Emergency Communications to 
receive an update on current operations.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the Office 
of Emergency Communications on February 5, 2015, to receive a 
briefing on the President's Fiscal Year 2016 budget request.
    On February 12, 2015, Members of the Subcommittee received 
a briefing from representatives of the Office of Emergency 
Communications on the Office's programs and efforts to assist 
State and local first responders.
    On July 8, 2015 and October 2, 2015, Subcommittee staff met 
with representatives of the National Protection and Programs 
Directorate to discuss their reorganization proposal, which 
would impact the Office of Emergency Communications.
    On September 15, 2015 the Chairs and Ranking Members of the 
Full Committee as well as the Subcommittees on Cybersecurity, 
Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies; Border 
and Maritime Security; Oversight and Management Efficiency; and 
Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications sent a 
letter to the Secretary of DHS regarding the proposed 
reorganization of the National Protection and Programs 
Directorate, including the impact of the proposed 
reorganization on the Office of Emergency Communications.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the First 
Responder Network Authority on September 1, 2015, October 14, 
2015, and January 8, 2016 to discuss current operations and the 
PREPARE Act (H.R. 3583).
    On January 13, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Government Accountability Office to 
discuss their ongoing work on emergency communications.
    Staff met with representatives of the Office of Emergency 
Communications (OEC) on January 20, 2016 to receive a briefing 
about OEC programs.
    On April 20, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the First Responder Network Authority to 
receive an update on its operations.
    On May 24, 2016, the Full Committee and Subcommittee Chairs 
and the Full Committee and Subcommittee Ranking Members sent a 
letter to the Comptroller General of the Government 
Accountability Office requesting a report assessing the Office 
of Emergency Communication's role in the National Protection 
and Programs Directorate as well as its relationship with 
stakeholders. This review is underway.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the 
Department of Homeland Security's Joint Wireless Program 
Management Office on June 2, 2016 to discuss the DHS 
Interoperable Communications Strategy pursuant to Public Law 
114--29, the DHS InteroperableCommunications Act.
    On June 13, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the DHS Office of Inspector General to 
discuss their ongoing work on the Department's efforts to 
achieve and maintain interoperability between and among DHS 
components.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the National 
Protection and Programs Directorate on numerous occasions to 
discuss the reorganization proposal and its impact on the 
Office of Emergency Communications, including on January 19, 
2016, February 10, 2016, and March 17, 2016.
    On November 16, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Office of Emergency Communications to 
receive a briefing on OEC's internal organization.
    On December 7, 2016, the Chair of the Subcommittee met with 
the President of the First Responder Network Authority to 
receive an update on FirstNet's operations.

                    SOCIAL MEDIA AND NEW TECHNOLOGY

    In today's technology driven world, social media and other 
types of new technology are becoming one of the primary ways 
people receive, process, and relay information. Studies have 
shown that more than 60 percent of the people in the United 
States have at least one social media account, with many having 
multiple accounts, including Facebook pages and Twitter 
profiles. While social media originally started out as a way to 
share information among friends, it is evident that is has 
evolved to serve other functions, and is a prevalent source for 
news, advertising, and entertainment. The management of ``big 
data'' and the use of social media can provide enormous 
opportunities for efficiencies in emergency management.
    On July 28, 2015, Members of the Subcommittee received a 
briefing on the use of social media and new technology during 
disasters. The Members met with representatives from the 
private sector to discuss current capabilities and concerns.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of Texas A&M; 
University on August 26, 2105, to discuss research and 
development of robots and unmanned aerial systems for use in 
emergency response.
    On October 20, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with Facebook 
Disaster Relief Engineers to discuss Facebook's disaster 
response and relief efforts.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the Science 
and Technology Directorate's First Responder Group on February 
23, 2016, to receive an update on current research and 
development efforts.
    On April 27, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Federal Emergency Management Agency to 
receive a briefing on the Agency's use of social media during 
disasters.
    Subsequent to numerous meetings with stakeholders 
throughout the 114th Congress regarding the need for innovative 
emergency response technology, the Subcommittee Ranking Member, 
along with the Chair, introduced H.R. 5460, the First Responder 
Access to Innovative Technologies Act. (For additional 
information on H.R. 5460, please see the legislative action 
section above).

                          ALERTS AND WARNINGS

    Terrorist attacks and natural disasters can occur at any 
time, often with little-to-no notice. Alerts and warnings 
provided in advance of potential threats and hazards can help 
to direct the public to seek safety or, in the event of the 
September 2016 IED attacks in New York and New Jersey, assist 
in the investigation.
    Over the course of the 114th Congress, Subcommittee staff 
worked with Senate staff and multiple stakeholder organizations 
to finally pass legislation (S. 1180) to authorize the 
Integrated Public Alert and Warning System. The President 
signed S. 1180 into law on April 11, 2016 (Pub. L. 114-143). 
(For additional information on Pub. L. 114-143, please see the 
legislative action section above).
    On June 29, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of FEMA's Integrated Public Alert and Warning 
System program office to receive a briefing on current 
operations and implementation of Pub. L. 114-143.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of American 
Public Television on August 15, 2016 to discuss ways public 
television stations are assisting localities with alerts and 
warnings.
    On October 7, 2016, the Subcommittee Chair and Ranking 
Member sent a letter to the Chairman of the Federal 
Communications Commission regarding sustaining the capabilities 
of the Emergency Alert System.

                            SCHOOL SECURITY

    The Department of Homeland Security, in coordination with 
the Department of Education, Federal Bureau of Investigation, 
and Department of Health and Human Services, provides numerous 
resources to enhance state and local school security efforts. 
These resources include guidance, security assessments as well 
as grant funding to prevent, protect, mitigate, respond to, and 
recover from potential emergencies. According to the Government 
Accountability Office, eighteen states provided State Homeland 
Security Grant Program funds to school districts for emergency 
planning activities that ranged from $25,000 to $1.2 million in 
Fiscal Year 2014. With fifty million students in public schools 
alone, it is crucial to ensure the continued coordination of 
federal resources to support state and local school security.
    On March 10, 2015 and November 12, 2015, Subcommittee staff 
met with representatives of the Government Accountability 
Office to receive an update on Committee requested work on 
school security.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives from the Texas 
School Safety Center on November 19, 2015, to receive a 
briefing on their programs.
    On December 2, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives from the Department of Homeland Security's 
National Protection and Programs Directorate to discuss school 
security efforts.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the Security 
Industry Association on February 18, 2016, regarding innovative 
technology to enhance school security.
    On July 5, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Department of Homeland Security's Office 
of Academic Engagement to learn more about the office's work 
with institutes of higher education, including an upcoming 
security table top exercise.
    The Chair and Ranking Member of the Subcommittee along with 
Rep. Brooks of Indiana and Rep. Larsen of Washington, sent a 
letter to the Comptroller General of the United States on July 
5, 2016, requesting the Government Accountability Office 
conduct a review of the Federal Government's progress in 
assisting institutes of higher learning in enhancing campus 
security.
    As a result of this request, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Government Accountability Office on 
October 18, 2016.

                         TRAINING AND EXERCISES

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency, through its 
National Exercise Division and partners such as the National 
Domestic Preparedness Consortium, supports training and 
exercises for emergency response providers. As terrorists 
continually change their tactics, these programs are vital for 
emergency response providers so they are prepared for the 
threats and hazards they face.
    On June 2, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Rural Domestic Preparedness Consortium 
to receive an update on current training offerings to first 
responders.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of FEMA's 
National Exercise Division on June 25, 2015, to receive an 
update on the National Exercise Program and plans for Capstone 
2016.
    From August 5--6, 2015, Subcommittee staff visited the 
Texas Engineering Extension Service, a National Domestic 
Preparedness Consortium member, to observe first responder 
training programs.
    On September 1, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response 
Training (ALERRT) Center to discuss active shooter training.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the National 
Exercise Division and Office of Response and Recovery on 
December 16, 2015 to discuss exercise after action reports.
    On January 12, 2016 the Subcommittee Chair and Ranking 
Member, along with the Chair and Ranking Member of the 
Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence, sent a 
letter to Secretary Johnson regarding coordination of relevant 
Federal, State, and local stakeholders during the Capstone 16 
National Level Exercise. A copy of the letter was also sent to 
Administrator Fugate of the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency, Director Clapper of the Office of the Director of 
National Intelligence, Director Comey of the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, and Secretary Carter of the Department of 
Defense. The Committee received a response from Administrator 
Fugate February 9, 2016 confirming that FEMA would brief the 
Committee on the details of Capstone 16.
    On February 19, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the National Exercise Division to receive a 
classified briefing on Capstone 2016.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the National 
Domestic Preparedness Consortium on March 15, 2016, to discuss 
first responder training opportunities.
    On April 27, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of FEMA, the National Counterterrorism Center, 
and the Federal Bureau of Investigation to receive a briefing 
on the Joint Counterterrorism Awareness Workshop Series 
(JCTAWS) and plans for future offerings.
    Subcommittee staff traveled to Brooklyn, New York on August 
18, 2016 to observe a joint exercise of the Securing the Cities 
Program conducted by the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office and 
the New York Police Department.
    On October 27, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of FEMA's Office of Counterterrorism and 
Security Preparedness to receive an update on JCTAWS, fusion 
center technical assistance, and grants to prepare for complex, 
coordinated terrorist attacks.

                        CYBER INCIDENT RESPONSE

    Cybersecurity is a major national security issue and the 
threat is real and immediate. For instance, a cyber-attack 
causing widespread power outages could have major cascading 
consequences on public health and safety. While gains in cyber 
incident responder capabilities have been made, for the third 
year in a row, the 2015 National Preparedness Report highlights 
States' concerns about their cybersecurity capabilities. It is 
vital that the Federal government share information with 
emergency response providers about the cyber threat so they are 
prepared to respond.
    On May 24, 2016, the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response, and Communications and the Subcommittee 
on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
Technologies held a joint hearing entitled ``Enhancing 
Preparedness and Response Capabilities to Address Cyber 
Threats.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Mark 
Ghilarducci, Director, Emergency Services, Office of the 
Governor, State of California; Lt. Col. Daniel J. Cooney, 
Assistant Deputy Superintendent, Office of Counter Terrorism, 
New York State Police; Brg. Gen. Steven Spano (USAF, Ret.), 
President and Chief Operating Officer, Center for Internet 
Security; Mr. Mark Raymond, Vice President, National 
Association of State Chief Information Officers; and Mr. Robert 
Galvin, Chief Technology Officer, Port Authority of New York 
and New Jersey. This joint hearing examined Department of 
Homeland Security efforts to assist States in preparing for and 
responding to cyber attacks.
    Subsequent to this hearing, on June 13, 2016, the 
Subcommittee Chair, along with the Full Committee Chair and the 
Chair of the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies, introduced H.R. 5459, 
the Cyber Preparedness Act of 2016, to address findings from 
the hearing, including the need for better cyber information 
sharing with State and major urban area fusion centers. (For 
additional information on H.R. 5459, please see the legislative 
action section above).
    On June 9, 2016, Subcommittee staff spoke on a panel at the 
National Council of ISACs conference.

                  DEFENSE SUPPORT OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES

    In times of emergency, Federal, State, and local civilian 
response agencies can greatly benefit from the experience and 
capabilities of the United States Military, be it active duty, 
National Guard, or reserve forces. It is vital that civilian 
agencies are aware of, and can leverage, the support that the 
military is willing and able to provide.
    Continuing oversight work that began in the 113th Congress, 
on June 10, 2015, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Defense Support of Civil Authorities: A Vital Resource in the 
Nation's Homeland Security Missions.'' The Subcommittee 
received testimony from Mr. Robert H. Fenton, Jr., Deputy 
Associate Administrator, Office of Response and Recovery, 
Federal Emergency Management Agency, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Mr. Robert G. Salesses, Deputy Assistant 
Secretary, Homeland Defense Integration and Defense Support of 
Civil Authorities, U.S. Department of Defense; Brg. Gen. Joseph 
E. Whitlock, Deputy Director, Western Hemisphere, Strategic 
Plans and Policy Directorate (J5), Joint Staff, U.S. Department 
of Defense; Joseph W. Kirschbaum, Ph.D., Director, Defense 
Capabilities and Management, U.S. Government Accountability 
Office; Maj. Gen. Michael T. McGuire, Adjutant General, 
Department of Emergency and Military Affairs, State of Arizona; 
Mr. Jimmy J. Gianato, Director, Division of Homeland Security 
and Emergency Management, State of West Virginia, testifying on 
behalf of the National Emergency Management Association; and 
Mr. Peter Gaynor, Director, Emergency Management Office, State 
of Rhode Island. This hearing examined the vital role played by 
the military in homeland defense and explored their support 
capabilities in cybersecurity, chemical, biological, 
radiological, and nuclear incident response, and other disaster 
response activities.
    On September 1, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Office of Homeland Defense Integration 
and Defense Support of Civil Authorities at the Pentagon for a 
further discussion on the military's role in disaster response.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the National 
Guard Bureau on May 16, 2016, to discuss Army National Guard 
readiness for the DSCA mission.

  MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS OF THE FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY

    Efficient and effective management of the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency (FEMA)is vital to ensuring its ability to 
meet its mission. While FEMA has made great strides since 
Hurricane Katrina in agency transformation, challenges remain 
in FEMA's management functions.
    On February 4, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Federal Emergency Management Agency to 
receive a briefing on the President's Fiscal Year 2016 budget 
request.
    Subcommittee staff met with FEMA's Chief Human Capital 
Officer on February 27, 2015, to receive an update on efforts 
to address personnel challenges.
    On March 13, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of FEMA's Office of Response and Recovery to 
receive a briefing on FEMA's grant systems modernization 
effort.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the 
Department's Office of Inspector General on March 26, 2015, to 
discuss grants management and human capital at FEMA.
    On April 27, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of FEMA's Mission Support Bureau.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the 
Government Accountability Office on June 12, 2015, to discuss 
FEMA information technology systems.
    On September 14, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Office of Inspector General to discuss 
FEMA's progress in addressing OIG recommendations. Subcommittee 
staff held a similar meeting with representatives of the 
Government Accountability Office on September 22, 2015.
    Subcommittee staff met with the Associate Administrator for 
Mission Support on September 25, 2015 to discuss efforts to 
efficiently and effectively management FEMA.
    On October 29, 2015, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of FEMA to receive a briefing on FEMA's 
information technology resiliency review.
    On February 11, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of FEMA to receive a briefing on the Presidents 
Fiscal Year 2017 budget request.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the 
Government Accountability Office on April 15, 2016 to discuss 
FEMA's information technology systems.
    On May 2, 2016, Subcommittee staff met with FEMA's Chief 
Administrative Officer and Chief Procurement Officer to discuss 
management programs.
    Subcommittee staff continued its FEMA Mission Support 
Bureau meetings on May 25, 2016, meeting with the Chief 
Information Officer, Chief Human Capital Officer, and Chief 
Security Officer.

                              ----------                              


                       Subcommittee Hearings Held


``Agents of Opportunity: Responding to the Threat of Chemical 
        Terrorism.'' March 19, 2015. (Serial No. 114-10)
``Strategic Perspectives of the Bioterrorism Threat.'' April 
        22, 2015. (Serial No. 114-14)
``Defense Support of Civil Authorities: A Vital Resource in the 
        Nation's Homeland Security Missions.'' June 10, 2105. 
        (Serial No. 114-20)
``Weapons of Mass Destruction: Bolstering DHS to Combat 
        Persistent Threats to America.'' Joint with the 
        Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
        Protection, and Security Technologies. July 14, 2015. 
        (Serial No. 114-26)
``Ready and Resilient?: Examining Federal Emergency 
        Preparedness and Response Capabilities.'' October 22, 
        2015. (Serial No. 114-38)
``Improving the Department of Homeland Security's Biological 
        Detection and Surveillance Programs.'' February 11, 
        2016. (Serial No. 114-52)
``Food for Thought: Efforts to Defend the Nation's Agriculture 
        and Food.'' February 26, 2016. (Serial No. 114-56)
``State of Emergency: The Disaster of Cutting Preparedness 
        Grants.'' March 15, 2016. (Serial No. 114-59)
Joint with the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
        Protection, and Security Technologies. ``Enhancing 
        Preparedness and Response Capabilities to Address Cyber 
        Threats.'' May 24, 2016. (Serial No. 114-71)
Field hearing in Jersey City, New Jersey. ``Protecting our 
        Passengers: Perspectives on Securing Surface 
        Transportation in New Jersey and New York.'' June 21, 
        2016. (Serial No. 114-77)
Field hearing in Staten Island, New York. ``A Prepared 
        Community is a Resilient Community.'' July 11, 2016. 
        (Serial No. 114-80)

  Oversight Plan of the Committee on Homeland Security for the 114th 
                                Congress

    Clause 2(d), Rule X of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives for the 114th Congress requires each standing 
Committee to adopt an oversight plan for the two-year period of 
the Congress and to submit the plan to the Committees on 
Oversight and Government Reform and House Administration not 
later than February 15th of the first session of the Congress.
    Rule XI, clause 1(2)(d)(1) requires each Committee to 
submit to the House of Representatives not later than January 
2, of each odd-numbered year, a report on the activities of 
that committee under Rule X and Rule XI during the Congress 
ending on January 3 of such year. Clause 1(2)(d)(3) of Rule XI 
also requires that such report include a summary of the action 
taken and recommendations made with respect to each such plan; 
and a summary of any additional oversight activities undertaken 
by the Committee, and any recommendations made or actions taken 
thereon.
    Part A of this section contains the Committee on Homeland 
Security Oversight Plan for the 114th Congress which the Full 
Committee considered and adopted by voice vote on January 21, 
2015, a quorum being present.
    Part B of this section contains a summary of the actions 
taken by the Committee on Homeland Security to implement the 
Oversight Plan for the 114th Congress and the recommendations 
made with respect to this plan. Part B also contains a summary 
of the additional oversight activities undertaken by the 
Committee, and the recommendations made or actions taken 
thereon.

                              ----------                              


         PART A--COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY OVERSIGHT PLAN

    This is the oversight plan for the Committee on Homeland 
Security for the 114th Congress. It includes the areas in which 
the Committee expects to conduct oversight during the 114th 
Congress, but does not preclude oversight or investigation of 
additional matters as needs arise. The Full Committee will 
examine the following four key priorities, among other issues.

             PREVENTING A TERRORIST ATTACK ON THE HOMELAND

    Protecting the homeland from a terrorist attack is the 
reason the Department of Homeland Security was created in the 
wake of the 9/11 attacks. Consequently, this Committee's 
highest priority is focusing on helping ensure that our Nation 
is strong and resilient, in the face of ever-evolving terrorist 
threats. We must also conduct robust oversight to ensure that 
the Department of Homeland Security and its partners at the 
Federal, State and local level can detect, disrupt, and defend 
against a multitude of threats facing the United States.
    During the 114th Congress, the Committee will examine the 
persisting threats to Americans and American interests from 
Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, Al Qaeda in the Arabian 
Peninsula other existing and emerging terrorist cells inspired 
by Al Qaeda, and homegrown violent extremists, and domestic 
terrorists. The Committee will work to identify and address 
vulnerabilities within our Nation's critical infrastructure and 
systems and help ensure that mechanisms that dangerous people 
and entities aspire to exploit, such as our aviation and other 
transit systems, our cyber networks, and critical 
infrastructure control systems, are protected.

                          SECURING OUR BORDERS

    During the 114th Congress, the Committee will continue to 
examine the Department's efforts to secure the land, air, and 
maritime borders of the United States. The Committee will 
assess programs and technologies used to secure U.S.land 
borders on the north and the south, as well as the Caribbean 
region. A large portion of the Committee's oversight in the 
114th Congress will focus on examining what the Department is 
doing to secure the border in the face of the multiple 
immigration crises currently facing the United States. The 
Committee will also examine how the Department is leveraging 
defense technologies on the border, including equipment re-
deployed from Iraq and Afghanistan.

                    PROTECTING AGAINST CYBER ATTACKS

    Cyber attacks are one of the biggest homeland security 
threats that our Nation faces. Malicious organized criminal 
organizations, along with state-sponsored cyber attackers 
continue to target our critical infrastructure and compromise 
our sensitive and confidential information on a daily basis. 
Our Committee, throughout the 114th Congress, will continue its 
efforts to ensure the Department has the resources and 
personnel to effectively execute its cybersecurity mission of 
protecting critical infrastructure and Federal civilian 
networks.

     ENSURING THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY RUNS EFFECTIVELY

    The current leadership of the Department has undertaken a 
number of reviews and reforms to address a series of well-
documented management challenges, many of which harken back to 
the days when twenty two agencies were brought together to form 
this new Federal Department in 2003. Key management challenges 
include acquisitions management, and chronically-low employee 
morale. In the 114th Congress, the Committee will continue to 
conduct oversight to ensure that DHS effectively conducts its 
operations while guarding against waste, fraud, abuse, and 
duplication. We will also give close scrutiny to efforts to 
improve acquisition and procurement outcomes, bolster employee 
morale, and effectively address instances of employee 
corruption. Furthermore, the Committee is planning to advance 
legislation to authorize the activities of the Department of 
Homeland Security during the 114th Congress in an effort to 
provide statutory guidance and hold the Department accountable, 
as it seeks to carry out its core mission of protecting the 
homeland, while executing its traditional non-homeland security 
missions.

                                ------                                


          SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND MANAGEMENT EFFICIENCY

    DEPARTMENTAL EFFICIENCY AND WASTE, FRAUD, ABUSE, AND DUPLICATION

    In the 114th Congress, the Committee will oversee the 
Department of Homeland Security's day-to-day operations to 
ensure that it is operating in the most efficient and effective 
manner possible. Pursuant to Rule X, clause 2(d)(F) of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives, the Committee will work 
to identify potential opportunities to eliminate duplicative or 
unnecessary programs, find efficiencies that will contribute to 
the Department's ability to meet its vital missions, and 
identify areas for cost savings. The Committee will investigate 
homeland security programs and practices, as warranted. The 
Committee will also conduct rigorous oversight to ensure the 
Department conducts effective outreach to the private sector 
and utilize commercial best practices, as appropriate. The 
Committee will continue to monitor the security of Federal 
buildings and facilities, including the role and effectiveness 
of the Federal Protective Service.

                         ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT

    During the 114th Congress, the Committee will review the 
efforts of the Department of Homeland Security to improve 
acquisition outcomes, and to ensure that effective management 
controls are put in place to prevent contract waste, fraud, and 
abuse while promoting efficiency and effectiveness. The 
Committee will review the authorities and activities of the 
Undersecretary for Management and Chief Procurement Officer to 
ensure the effective management of these key functions. The 
Committee will monitor the cost, schedule, and performance 
status of major Department acquisition programs. The Committee 
will also examine the impact of the Department's acquisition 
initiatives to enhance processes and improve outcomes related 
to its major acquisition programs.
    The Committee also will review the Department's 
implementation of Section 831(a) of the Homeland Security Act 
of 2002, which grants the Secretary authority with respect to 
research and development projects to use more flexible 
contracting mechanisms in an effort to attract ``nontraditional 
government contractors'' for needed homeland security 
technologies, as well as the Secretary's use of other 
streamlined acquisition practices. The Committee will continue 
to monitor the Department's efforts to leverage strategic 
sourcing, as outlined in Federal guidance, to increase 
efficiencies.

                          FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

    In the 114th Congress, the Committee will continue its 
oversight of the Department of Homeland Security's progress to 
properly manage financial systems and data to minimize 
inefficient and wasteful spending, make more informed decisions 
to manage its programs and implement Department policies. The 
Committee will also review the Department's efforts to enhance 
its managerial cost accounting, address internal control 
weaknesses in financial reporting, achieve a clean audit 
opinion on its financial statements, and reduce the reliance on 
manual data calls to collect cost information from the various 
components and compile consolidated, reliable data.

                   INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT

    During the 114th Congress, the Committee will review the 
Department's efforts to address information technology (IT) 
challenges, including the management and integration of the 
Department's IT systems. The Committee will review the 
authorities and activities of the Chief Information Officer 
(CIO) and component CIOs to ensure the effective management and 
coordination of these key functions. The Committee will also 
monitor the Department's progress in IT architectural planning, 
investment management, cloud computing, policy development, 
operations, and related personnel management.

                         DEPARTMENTAL WORKFORCE

    Throughout the 114th Congress, the Committee will monitor 
the Department's efforts to recruit and retain personnel and to 
address employee concerns set forth in the Office of Personnel 
Management's Federal Human Capital Survey and the Department's 
own personnel surveys, which have indicated morale problems 
across the Department. In addition, the Committee will continue 
to examine the Department's efforts to ensure an appropriate 
balance is struck between Federal employees and private 
contracts and guard against any unnecessary elimination of 
private sector jobs.
    The Committee will continue to monitor the Department's 
efforts to effectively and efficiently consolidate its 
headquarters from more than 40 locations throughout the 
National Capital Region, known as the St. Elizabeth's 
Headquarters Consolidation Project.

                           EMPLOYEE INTEGRITY

    In the 114th Congress, the Committee will examine employee 
corruption and misconduct issues and their effect on homeland 
security. Although the vast majority of Department employees 
reflect the agency's core values, even one corrupt employee 
represents a significant management challenge. The Committee 
will review Department statistics and case studies associated 
with employee integrity issues, as well as, the effectiveness 
of policies, procedures, and practices the Department utilizes 
to address such issues.

                      UNITED STATES SECRET SERVICE

    In the 114th Congress, the Committee will examine the 
homeland security operations of the United States Secret 
Service, including its critical role of protecting the 
President of the United States, and the protection of 
presidential candidates in the 2016 presidential election. The 
Committee will also monitor the efforts of the Department to 
reform the agency.

                      PRIVACY AND CIVIL LIBERTIES

    Section 222 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (the Act) 
created a Privacy Officer for the Department of Homeland 
Security to ensure that the Department's information gathering 
and analysis functions and other programs across its components 
adhere to established standards for the protection of privacy. 
Section 705 of the Act also established an Officer for Civil 
Rights and Liberties to review and assess information alleging 
abuses of civil rights or civil liberties by employees and 
officials of the Department of Homeland Security. During the 
114th Congress, the Committee will continue to monitor the 
Department's efforts under such laws to strike an appropriate 
balance between the need to combat terrorist attacks against 
the United States with the privacy expectations and civil 
rights of US citizens. The Committee will also examine the 
extent to which the Department is transparent with the American 
people including its process for managing Freedom of 
Information Act (FOIA) requests.

                                ------                                


  SUBCOMMITTEE ON EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND COMMUNICATIONS

                       PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE

    During the 114th Congress, the Committee will examine the 
Administration's efforts to implement Presidential Policy 
Directive 8 (PPD-8), and the required National Preparedness 
System, which includes the various frameworks and the National 
Preparedness Goal. The Committee will review preparedness 
capabilities for mass gatherings. Additionally, the Committee 
will review the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA) 
response and recovery efforts for declared disasters to ensure 
capabilities are enhanced by lessons learned and Federal 
resources are used appropriately. The Committee will 
investigate issues, if any, of waste, fraud, and abuse 
associated with FEMA's disaster response efforts.

     ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS AND FIRST RESPONDERS

    Throughout the 114th Congress, the Committee will examine 
FEMA's allocation and administration of grants to enhance the 
ability of state and local governments and emergency response 
providers to prevent, prepare for, respond to, mitigate, and 
recover from a terrorist attack, including proposals for 
reforms to these programs. The Committee will review the 
coordination of grant programs across the Federal government; 
coordination within the Department of Homeland Security in 
developing guidance and administering grants; the ability of 
state and local governments to access, obligate, and expend 
funds; the strength of regional partnerships developed through 
grants; and the risk-based distribution and expenditure of such 
grants at the state and local levels. The Committee will 
examine options to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of 
grant programs. The Committee will also review ongoing efforts 
to comprehensively assess these investments and the impact on 
preparedness capabilities through the lens of the National 
Preparedness Goal, National Preparedness Report, State 
Preparedness Reports, and other related assessments.

CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL, RADIOLOGICAL, AND NUCLEAR PLANNING, PREPAREDNESS, 
                              AND RESPONSE

    During the 114th Congress, the Committee will examine the 
significant challenges posed by chemical, biological, 
radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) weapons to homeland security 
and assess the Department's progress in implementing security 
strategies including prevention, preparedness, and response 
approaches that utilize multiple tools and policies to reduce 
the likelihood and impact of CBRN attacks, and, thus, the CBRN 
risk to the Nation. The Committee will oversee the Department's 
efforts to predict and respond to the evolving CBRN threat 
landscape, and ensure that CBRN expenditures are risk-based, 
coordinated, and in general represent wise use of taxpayer 
dollars. The Committee will examine the Department's capability 
to mitigate CBRN risks through appropriate means including the 
detection of, preparedness for, and response to CBRN threats. 
The Committee will continue its oversight of those activities 
needed to ensure the safety of the public and the first 
responder community in the event of an attack, such as through 
the development of medical countermeasures programs.

                             COMMUNICATIONS

    In the 114th Congress, the Committee will examine the 
coordination of various communications programs and offices 
within the Department of Homeland Security, including the 
achievement and maintenance of interoperable communications 
capabilities among the Department's components. The Committee 
will monitor activities of the First Responder Network 
Authority (FirstNet) and the development of the public safety 
interoperable wireless broadband network. In addition, the 
Committee will review the Department's Integrated Public Alert 
and Warning System to ensure timely and effective alerts and 
warnings are provided to the public in the event of an 
emergency.

                  EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROVIDER TRAINING

    During the 114th Congress, the Committee will review the 
Department's terrorism preparedness training programs, 
including awareness of these resources among first responders 
and state and local governments and the level of coordination 
among Federal, state, and local training programs. The 
Committee will also review existing training centers and 
determine whether the Department is optimally utilizing these 
facilities to enhance first responder terrorism preparedness.

                       EXERCISES AND SIMULATIONS

    The Committee will examine the Department's efforts to 
streamline and improve the National Exercise Program to ensure 
the program enhances the preparedness of the Nation. The 
Committee will monitor the extent to which FEMA is 
incorporating lessons learned from national exercises into 
future training, planning, and response, recovery, and 
mitigation activities.

                                ------                                


                SUBCOMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION SECURITY

                      ADDRESSING EVOLVING THREATS

    In the 114th Congress, the Committee will examine efforts 
within the Department of Homeland Security to mitigate known 
and evolving terrorist threats to domestic transportation 
systems. With respect to aviation security, the Committee will 
review the Transportation Security Administration's (TSA) 
multi-layered, risk-based approach to preventing an attack on 
cargo and passenger aircraft, both at home and overseas. The 
Committee will also evaluate the capabilities of the TSA 
workforce and checkpoint technologies to ensure that TSA is 
effectively screening passengers and baggage.
    In addition, the Committee will review TSA security 
measures for international flights bound for the U.S., 
including but not limited to, the use of the Federal Air 
Marshal Service (FAMS), directives that augment security 
protocols in select foreign airports, and the Secure Flight 
Program's watch list matching process. The Committee will also 
evaluate how TSA is working to leverage other federal law 
enforcement resources to enhance security on aircraft.

                     ADVANCING RISK-BASED SECURITY

    During the 114th Congress, the Committee will examine TSA's 
long-term goals for TSA PreTM and assess the 
effectiveness of TSA's other passenger screening programs, such 
as Managed Inclusion. The Committee will evaluate TSA's 
approach to expanding enrollment in TSA 
PreTM, including through contracts with 
private sector entities, and examine TSA's methodology to 
decide which passengers are eligible for TSA 
PreTM. Additionally, the Committee will 
monitor TSA's efforts to protect passenger privacy, and will 
monitor TSA's implementation of two new laws to provide 
expedited screening to certain passengers: the Helping Heroes 
Fly Act (Pub. L. 113-27) and the Honor Flight Act (Pub. L. 113-
221).
    The Committee will also examine how TSA is ensuring that 
passengers that are designated high-risk are receiving enhanced 
screening at the checkpoint. Finally, the Committee will assess 
whether there are additional ways for TSA to enhance security 
and implement risk-based strategies at the screening checkpoint 
or in other areas of security, such as checked baggage 
screening operations and access control points at domestic 
airports.

                  ENHANCING PRIVATE SECTOR ENGAGEMENT

    In the 114th Congress, the Committee will conduct oversight 
to ensure that TSA is effectively engaging the private sector 
to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of its operations. 
Specifically, the Committee will evaluate the contracting 
process and management of TSA's Screening Partnership Program 
(SPP). The Committee will also monitor TSA's implementation of 
the Aviation Security Stakeholder Participation Act of 2014 
(Pub. L. 113-238). The Committee will work to ensure that 
stakeholders are properly consulted on major security policy 
decisions, through the Aviation Security Advisory Committee or 
other means. The Committee will encourage TSA to find new ways 
to leverage private sector expertise, innovation, and 
technologies in its mission to secure the Nation's critical 
transportation systems in the most effective and efficient 
manner possible.

                   TARGETING WASTE, FRAUD, AND ABUSE

    During the 114th Congress, the Committee will conduct 
oversight to help identify and prevent waste, fraud, or abuse 
within TSA. As part of this overall effort, the Committee will 
conduct oversight on the implementation of H.R.2719, the 
Transportation Security Acquisition Reform Act (Public Law 113-
245), and monitor whether TSA is complying with the provisions 
outlined in the Act. This includes, among other things, better 
private sector engagement, strategic planning, and transparency 
in how tax dollars are spent to avoid wasteful spending on 
technologies that do not perform as intended. Additionally, the 
Committee's oversight will include continued focus on the 
misclassification of employees within TSA's Office of 
Inspection, which according to the DHS Office of Inspector 
General could cost taxpayers as much as $17 million over the 
next five years if it goes uncorrected.

STREAMLINING AND IMPROVING SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY PROGRAMS AND 
                              REGULATIONS

    In the 114th Congress, the Committee will review TSA's 
efforts to secure surface transit systems, including the 
highest-risk mass transit and rail systems. The Committee's 
oversight will include a review of the Visible Intermodal 
Prevention and Response Program, the Surface Transportation 
Security Inspection Program, and TSA's surface transportation 
security regulations. The Committee will review the extent to 
which TSA effectively coordinates with its Federal, State, 
local, and private sector partners to secure our Nation's 
transportation systems and to help prevent conflicting or 
unnecessarily redundant regulations. The Committee will also 
assess the effectiveness of TSA's efforts to secure the 
Nation's pipeline systems through TSA's oversight and 
inspection activities.

                                ------                                


SUBCOMMITTEE ON CYBERSECURITY, INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION, AND SECURITY 
                              TECHNOLOGIES

    During the 114th Congress, the Committee will conduct 
oversight of the cybersecurity activities of the Department of 
Homeland Security (DHS) with particular attention to the 
activities within the National Protection and Programs 
Directorate (NPPD) and the U.S.Secret Service. Areas of 
examination will include the President's Executive Order 13636 
``Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity,'' and 
operations of NPPD's EINSTEIN and Continuous Diagnostics and 
Mitigation (CDM) programs.
    Finally, the Committee will examine the implementation of 
cybersecurity legislation enacted by the 113th Congress to, 
among other things, authorize the National Cybersecurity 
Communications and Integration Center (NCCIC), help improve the 
cybersecurity workforce, and grant DHS the authority to carry 
out protection of Federal civilian networks (Public Laws 113-
246, 113-274, 113-277, 113-282, and 113-283).

                 PROTECTION OF CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE

    In the 114th Congress, the Committee will review the 
Department's programs to help protect critical infrastructure 
that are operated by NPPD. One of the key areas of focus will 
be on coordination within NPPD so that capabilities are 
leveraged on both sides of the house-cyber and physical-
including the work of the Office of Cyber and Infrastructure 
Analysis (OCIA). The Committee will also review how DHS, 
through NPPD, works with the critical infrastructure sectors to 
foster greater security against threats to critical 
infrastructure.
    During the 114th Congress the Committee with conduct 
oversight of the implementation of recently-passed legislation 
authorizing the Department's Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism 
Standard (CFATS) program (Pub. L. 113-254). Further the 
Subcommittee will continue to monitor the Department's efforts 
at establishing an Ammonium Nitrate Security program, which has 
been delayed for several years.

             SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    Throughout the 114th Congress the Subcommittee will focus 
on the Science and Technology Directorate (S&T;) and its ability 
to provide DHS components with the technology advancements 
needed to effectively carry out their respective missions.
    The Subcommittee will also examine S&T;'s collaboration with 
the Federally Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDC) 
and the transparency in which S&T; reports this work to 
Congress.

                   NUCLEAR AND RADIOLOGICAL DETECTION

    During the 114th Congress the Subcommittee will examine on 
the threat and challenges of the Department to prevent, detect 
and respond to a chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear 
attack (CBRN). The Subcommittee will specifically examine the 
efforts of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) and its 
efforts to provide DHS components with the capabilities to 
detect and prevent radiological and nuclear material from being 
smuggled into the United States.
    The Subcommittee will be working closely with the 
Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response and 
Communications (EPRC) on examining the efforts of the 
Department to better predict, prevent and respond to CBRN 
threats and ensure these efforts are risk based and well 
coordinated. The Subcommittee's will be examining the 
Departments proposals to reorganize and merge components within 
the Department including the Office of Health Affairs (OHA) and 
DNDO to better coordinate the Departments efforts to combat 
this threat.

                                ------                                


              SUBCOMMITTEE ON BORDER AND MARITIME SECURITY

                 BORDER SECURITY BETWEEN PORTS OF ENTRY

    During the 114th Congress, the Committee will examine the 
Department's efforts to secure land and maritime borders of the 
United States, including but not limited to personnel, 
technology, infrastructure, and coordination between 
components. The Committee will also assess the status of 
programs and international agreements to secure US borders, 
from illegal entry by persons or contraband. The Committee will 
monitor the extent to which the Department can measure its 
performance in securing the borders and how these measures 
reflect the state of border security.
    The Committee will also examine the technologies used to 
secure the borders. Specifically, the Committee will conduct 
oversight of the Department's acquisitions of border 
technologies, as well as examine the extent to which the 
Department is leveraging Department of Defense technologies 
declared excess, or available to the Department through long-
term loan to effectively secure the borders.
    The Committee will also examine the Department's efforts to 
identify, detain, prioritize, and remove criminal aliens from 
the United States, including those apprehended at or near US 
borders and ports of entry who are subject to removal, and 
particularly those from special interest countries.

                   BORDER SECURITY AT PORTS OF ENTRY

    In the 114th Congress, the Committee will examine the 
integration and effectiveness of transportation and border 
security screening systems at ports of entry for detecting 
high-risk passengers and cargo transported within the United 
States and across our borders, including efforts to better 
facilitate travel and trade such as implementation of ``trusted 
traveler'' programs and the Beyond the Border Agreement with 
Canada.
    The Committee will continue its rigorous oversight of the 
Department of Homeland Security's biometric programs including 
the accuracy and completeness of databases and the development 
and implementing of a biometric exit system in the air, sea and 
land environments. The biometric entry system was a 9/11 
Commission recommendation and was first implemented in 2003 
with the creation of US-VISIT. The recommendation to support a 
biometric exit system has not been completed, and DHS has 
attempted to implement partial solutions short of the biometric 
requirements found in law.
    The Committee will examine the technology and 
infrastructure needs at ports of entry to better facilitate 
trade and travel while also increasing border security.

                             VISA SECURITY

    In the 114th Congress, the Committee intends to review 
efforts to ensure the deployment and implementation of training 
and infrastructure enhancements to assist border and consular 
officials in identifying, intercepting, and disrupting 
terrorists or others who would do our Nation harm and who are 
attempting to enter the U.S.The Committee will address any 
security-related deficiencies in the immigration and 
naturalization process that terrorists could use to gain entry 
to or remain in the country for illegitimate purposes. These 
weaknesses may be exploited by terrorists and those seeking to 
commit terrorist acts. The Committee intends to continue to 
explore challenges associated with visa security.
    The Committee will continue to review visa security 
programs and policies to ensure adequate screening and vetting 
by DHS law enforcement including the Visa Security Program, the 
Preadjudicated Threat Recognition and Intelligence Operations 
Teams (PATRIOT), as well as reviewing the criteria for 
admission under the Visa Waiver Program and the Electronic 
System for Travel Authorization (ESTA). These programs are 
critical to countering the growing threat of foreign fighters, 
including Americans and Europeans, who may attempt to join ISIS 
or its affiliates in Syria or Iraq, and who may return or 
travel to the United States to commit acts of terrorism.
    The Committee will also examine the integration, security, 
and reliability of criminal, immigration, and terrorist 
databases used to screen persons seeking to enter and exit this 
country, to include advanced passenger information. The 
Committee will also assess the development of secure travel 
documents.

                       PORT AND MARITIME SECURITY

    In the 114th Congress, the Committee will examine various 
aspects of port and maritime security, including the security 
of port facilities; the screening of vessels, passengers, 
cargo, and crew, for potential terrorists, terrorist weapons, 
and contraband. Specifically, the Committee will examine 
nuclear detection efforts and the development of international 
security standards for shipping and containers as well as 
conduct a comprehensive analysis of the operations, including 
technology utilized, of the Transportation Worker 
Identification Credential.
    The Committee also plans to review how the Department 
manages risks emerging from maritime threats and 
vulnerabilities such as small go-fast boats and semi-
submersible vessels, the increasing maritime smuggling threat 
along the California coast and the impact of fewer interdiction 
assets and holding platforms in the source and transit zones.
    The Committee plans to review the efficiency and 
effectiveness of the Department's supply chain security 
programs, such as the Customs Trade Partnership Against 
Terrorism (C-TPAT), the Container Security Initiative (CSI), 
the need to utilize a risk-based methodology and the future of 
the Radiation Portal Monitor program to ensure a proper balance 
between the facilitation of lawful trade and the security of 
the homeland. This will include an assessment of implementation 
of the Maritime and Transportation Security Act of 2002 (Pub. 
L. 107-295), the Security and Accountability for Every (SAFE) 
Port Act of 2006 (Pub. L. 109-347), relevant provisions of the 
Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (Pub. 
L. 108-458), and the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 
Commission Act of 2007 (Pub. L. 110-53).
    The Committee will examine the operations and procedures of 
the Customs and Border Protection Office of Air and Marine 
(OAM), specifically looking at OAM's interagency working 
relationships with law enforcement and Department partners and 
its specific capabilities and authorities. The Committee will 
review OAM's operational platforms and future acquisition 
programs to ensure both aviation and maritime assets are 
capable of meeting future mission needs and service 
requirements.
    The Committee plans to review the Coast Guard's statutorily 
defined homeland security missions, to include ports, 
waterways, and coastal security; drug interdiction; migrant 
interdiction; law enforcement; and defense readiness. The 
Committee will examine Coast Guard operations to ensure that 
the service is using a risk-based, layered strategy to enforce 
laws and keep America's waters secure. This will include a 
specific assessment of the Coast Guard's counter terrorism 
capabilities, including the Maritime Safety and Security Teams, 
Port Security Units, Tactical Law Enforcement Teams, and the 
Maritime Security Response Team.
    The Committee will review resource and asset needs within 
the Coast Guard to determine whether the service is 
operationally ready to address the varied threats to America's 
ports and waterways while pursuing a long-term sustainable path 
of fleet recapitalization.
    Additionally, the Committee will investigate the Coast 
Guard's specific maritime security operations and initiatives, 
such as the International Port Security Program and the 
inspection of vessels originating from ports with inadequate 
anti-terrorism measures. The Committee will examine these and 
other programs to ensure that the service is improving its 
maritime domain awareness and executing all of its missions in 
the most effective manner possible to keep America secure.

                                ------                                


           SUBCOMMITTEE ON COUNTERTERRORISM AND INTELLIGENCE

    The security of the United States is undeniably linked to 
international security. Vulnerabilities in one part of the 
world can quickly become security threats in another; to 
include the U.S.Homeland. During the 114th Congress, the 
Committee will examine the capabilities and efforts of the 
Federal government, particularly the Department of Homeland 
Security (DHS), to identify, prevent, deter, and respond to 
threats to the Homeland.

       EMERGING THREATS AND HOMELAND COUNTERTERRORISM ACTIVITIES

    The Committee will examine worldwide threats against the 
U.S.Homeland from various terrorist groups, including al Qaeda 
core, al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), the Islamic 
State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), al Qaeda in the Islamic 
Maghreb (AQIM), al Shahbab, Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), 
Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT), Boko Haram, and other emerging groups 
that seek to establish safe havens in destabilized regions from 
which they can plot attacks against U.S.citizens and the 
Homeland. The Committee will monitor issues related to 
homegrown terror threats and the U.S.Government's response, the 
programs and policies to counter violent extremism, as well as 
threats directed towards soft targets and those posed by active 
shooters. The Committee will conduct oversight on foreign 
fighter travel and trends, economic threats, terrorist 
financing. The Committee will also examine cyber threats to the 
Homeland from nation states and terrorist groups.
    The Committee will continue to study national efforts to 
deter terrorist activity through terrorist designations, and 
efforts to prevent individuals from entering the United States 
who are members of or have provided support to terrorist 
groups. This oversight will include how DHS contributes to 
designation decisions as well as how multiple DHS components 
use this information in determining eligibility for entry into 
the United States.

            COUNTERINTELLIGENCE AND INSIDER THREAT PROGRAMS

    The Committee will continue to assess the development of 
DHS counterintelligence and insider threat programs, including 
Departmental organizational changes, resources, monitoring 
programs, and training initiatives. DHS's counterintelligence 
efforts are intended to prevent adversaries from penetrating 
the Department to exploit sensitive information, operations, 
programs, personnel, and resources.

               HOMELAND SECURITY INTELLIGENCE ENTERPRISE

    The Committee will conduct oversight of DHS's Intelligence 
Enterprise (DHS IE), including intelligence activities 
throughout the Department and component agencies. This will 
include a focus on the coordination and collaboration across 
intelligence offices and personnel within the Headquarters' 
elements and component agencies. Additionally, the Committee 
will review efforts to build the intelligence, analytical, and 
assessment capabilities of the Department and to ensure its 
full participation in the Intelligence Community as part of its 
homeland security mission. This will include an examination of 
the hiring authorities, practices, and career-development of 
intelligence analysts and professionals within Headquarters 
elements and component agencies.
    The Committee will examine the Department's role in 
managing, distributing, and otherwise using terrorist threat 
information in furtherance of its homeland security mission. 
The Committee will monitor the extent to which DHS effectively 
coordinates and collaborates with other Federal, state, and 
local agencies to mitigate threats to the Homeland. 
Additionally, the Committee will assess how threat information 
is incorporated in Departmental investments and programs, such 
as improvements to component traveler screening and visa 
programs, as well as research, staffing, and technology.

                      COUNTERING VIOLENT EXTREMISM

    The Committee will continue to review federal efforts to 
counter violent extremism (CVE) in the United States. This will 
include programs and policies designed to counter the narrative 
of violent Islamist extremism in the United States, as well as 
national efforts to carry out engagement and outreach to 
communities at risk for radicalization and recruitment by 
jihadist networks.

                          INFORMATION SHARING

    The Committee will examine the Department's efforts to 
improve homeland security and terrorism information sharing 
among Federal, state, and local governments; law enforcement 
entities; first responders and emergency management personnel; 
and the private sector. The Committee will examine the 
Department's initiatives to coordinate information sharing to 
and from state and local fusion centers throughout the country, 
and will continue to evaluate the efficacy and efficiency of 
the National Network of Fusion Centers to determine their 
impact on securing the homeland. The Committee will also review 
coordination and information sharing procedures between state 
and local fusion centers and Joint Terrorism Task Forces. The 
Committee will examine the Department's role in managing, 
distributing, and otherwise using terrorist threat information 
in furtherance of its homeland security mission. The Committee 
will monitor the extent to which DHS effectively coordinates 
and collaborates with other Federal, state, and local agencies 
to mitigate threats to the Homeland. Additionally, the 
Committee will examine how threat information is incorporated 
in Departmental investments and programs, such as improvements 
to component traveler screening and visa programs, as well as 
research, staffing, and technology.

                              ----------                              


PART B--IMPLEMENTATION OF THE COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY OVERSIGHT 
                      PLAN FOR THE 114TH CONGRESS

    Part B of this section contains a summary of the actions 
taken by the Committee on Homeland Security to implement the 
Oversight Plan for the 114th Congress and the recommendations 
made with respect to this plan. Part B also contains a summary 
of the additional oversight activities undertaken by the 
Committee, and the recommendations made or actions taken 
thereon.

             PREVENTING A TERRORIST ATTACK ON THE HOMELAND

    During the 114th Congress, the Committee on Homeland 
Security held numerous hearings on preventing the next 
terrorist attack in the homeland. Additionally the Committee 
had numerous threat briefings and site visits to examine 
countering violent extremism and radical Islamist terrorism. 
The Full Committee held a roundtable with various tech 
companies to discuss best practices to confront violent 
extremism over the internet.

                          SECURING OUR BORDERS

    Throughout the 114th Congress the Committee, through the 
Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security held eight 
hearings relating to the border and securing the border. The 
Committee heard from locals who experience the influx of people 
entering into the United States to the agencies who work to 
control the flow.

                    PROTECTING AGAINST CYBER ATTACKS

    In the 114th Congress, the Committee on Homeland Security 
examined the Department of Homeland Security's capabilities and 
programs to protect against Cyber attacks. The Committee had 
numerous briefings on the state of our cyber defenses and 
information sharing in the private sector. Additionally the 
Committee held a hearing on how to better protect from cyber 
attacks through private sector information sharing and examined 
the President's proposal to facilitate cyber information 
sharing between the federal government and private sector.

     ENSURING THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY RUNS EFFECTIVELY

    During the 114th Congress, the Committee on Homeland 
Security investigated allegations of special access and 
improper influence at the Department of Homeland Security. The 
Committee also examined the leadership and management 
challenges that have plagued the Department since its 
inception. The full Committee held two hearings concerning 
these leadership problems and heard testimony directly from the 
Deputy Secretary concerning improper influence at the 
Department. Additionally, we examined Departmental management, 
policy, and programs by holding a Department of Homeland 
Security budget hearing and various briefings concerning DHS 
component budgets and programs.

                                ------                                


          SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND MANAGEMENT EFFICIENCY

    DEPARTMENTAL EFFICIENCY AND WASTE, FRAUD, ABUSE, AND DUPLICATION

    During the 114th Congress, the Subcommittee on Oversight 
and Management Efficiency investigated programs and practices 
of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to ensure 
efficient and effective management was being conducted. The 
Subcommittee conducted several hearings to identify cost 
savings, find efficiencies, and eliminate duplicative or 
unnecessary programs. These hearings included examinations of 
watchdog recommendations, inefficiencies associated with the 
Federal Protective Service's vehicle fleet management, and 
failures with the implementation of the Human Resources 
Information Technology program. The Subcommittee also received 
testimony regarding the extent to which the Department conducts 
effective outreach to the private sector and utilizes 
commercial best practices. Subcommittee Members introduced 
several pieces of legislation to better ensure efficient and 
effective management of DHS on issues such as paid 
administrative leave, the Department's headquarters 
consolidation efforts, and oversight of its Freedom of 
Information Act response process. Subcommittee Members 
requested that the DHS Office of Inspector General and 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) conduct numerous audits 
on a variety of issues to probe DHS management and operations.

                         ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT

    The Subcommittee conducted oversight to improve acquisition 
outcomes at DHS.The Subcommittee held a hearing with DHS and 
GAO to examine assessments of DHS's major acquisition programs. 
Committee Members introduced legislation to reform the 
Department's acquisition processes and increase transparency 
and accountability of DHS's purchases. At the request of the 
Subcommittee, GAO completed several reviews to audit the cost, 
schedule, and performance status of major acquisition programs, 
as well as, the Department's acquisition initiatives, such as 
the reestablished Joint Requirements Council. Subcommittee 
Members and staff received several updates from senior 
management officials regarding the performance of DHS 
acquisition programs.

                          FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

    The Subcommittee continued its oversight of the progress in 
properly managing financial systems and data. The Subcommittee 
Chair sent a letter to the Chief Financial Officer regarding 
the Department's efforts to address internal control weaknesses 
in financial reporting. Subcommittee staff received briefings 
from the Office of Chief Financial Officer regarding its 
efforts to modernize DHS financial systems through the use of a 
federal shared service provider.

                   INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT

    In the 114th Congress, the Subcommittee reviewed 
information technology (IT) challenges across the Department 
and at specific DHS components. The Committee Members passed 
legislation to review duplicative IT programs within DHS and 
identify a plan to reduce unnecessarily duplicative systems. 
This legislation became public law and the Department provided 
a report to the Committee as mandated by this legislation. At 
the request of the Subcommittee, GAO examined IT issues 
including U.S.Citizenship and Immigration Services IT 
transformation program and radio interoperability. The 
Subcommittee Chair sent letters regarding the Department's 
policies on using private email to conduct official business. 
The Subcommittee staff held briefings with senior DHS 
officials, such as the Chief Information Officer, on efforts to 
implement the Federal Information Technology Reform Act and 
Secret Service and border security IT modernization efforts. 
The Subcommittee Chair also requested GAO to review the 
Transportation Security Administration's IT modernization 
efforts.

                         DEPARTMENTAL WORKFORCE

    The Subcommittee continued its oversight of DHS's efforts 
to consolidate its headquarters at the St. Elizabeths campus in 
Washington DC. Committee Members toured the site and received a 
briefing on the construction progress. The Committee also 
passed legislation, which became public law, to provide greater 
transparency and oversight to the project. Subcommittee staff 
received several briefings from the Office of the Chief Human 
Capital Officer to review DHS's efforts to improve morale and 
recruit and retain a talented workforce. The Subcommittee Chair 
sent a letter to the Chief Human Capital Officer regarding law 
enforcement position classification issues. The Subcommittee 
Chair also wrote the Under Secretary for Management on 
oversight of DHS workforce training centers. The Subcommittee 
Chair sent a letter to DHS to monitor political conversions as 
the change in administrations approached. Subcommittee staff 
also received a briefing on preparations for the presidential 
transition. In addition, Committee majority staff released a 
report examining the workforce's footprint domestically titled 
``Streamlining the Department of Homeland Security's Overhead 
Will Make the Homeland Safer.''

                           EMPLOYEE INTEGRITY

    Throughout the 114th Congress, the Committee investigated 
allegations of employee misconduct at DHS.Employee misconduct 
represents a major management challenge at the Department. The 
Committee held hearings regarding allegations of improper 
access and influence of the Deputy Secretary. The Subcommittee 
Chair wrote to the Administrator of the transportation Security 
Administration (TSA) regarding alleged misconduct by employees 
in the Federal Air Marshal Service. The Committee majority 
staff also released a report titled ``Misconduct at TSA 
Threatens the Security of the Flying Public.'' The Subcommittee 
Chair also requested GAO to review the internal affairs offices 
of U.S.Customs and Border Enforcement, the TSA, and Immigration 
and Customs Enforcement to determine their effectiveness in 
identifying and addressing employee misconduct. The 
Subcommittee Chair became a requester of an ongoing GAO audit 
examining misconduct at the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency.

                      UNITED STATES SECRET SERVICE

    Through a Subcommittee hearing, Member site visit, numerous 
letters, and staff briefings, the Committee conducted rigorous 
oversight of the Secret Service. Following the Inspector 
General's report on improper access and distribution of a 
Member of Congress's personal information, the Subcommittee, 
along with Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs 
Subcommittee on Regulatory Affairs and Federal Management, 
conducted a joint oversight hearing of the Secret Service. In 
addition, Committee Members toured the Secret Service training 
center in Beltsville, Maryland following a breach of White 
House security. The Subcommittee Chair sent a letter regarding 
security for the Papal visit in 2015 and a staff delegation 
observed security at sites the Pope would visit. The 
Subcommittee staff also examined protective operations 
associated with the 2016 presidential conventions. At the 
Subcommittee's request, GAO completed a review of Secret 
Service's domestic field office structure. The Committee sent 
several letters regarding the need for reform of the Secret 
Service.

                      PRIVACY AND CIVIL LIBERTIES

    The Subcommittee continued its oversight of issues 
associated with privacy and civil liberties. The Subcommittee 
held a hearing that examined DHS's countering violent extremism 
program, which began in the Department's Civil Rights and Civil 
Liberties office and later led by the newly created Office of 
Community Partnerships. The Committee passed legislation to 
reform and improve the Department's oversight of its Freedom of 
Information Act process. The Subcommittee staff received 
several briefings from the Chief Privacy Officer on the 
office's efforts to safeguard the privacy of American citizens. 
Additionally, the Subcommittee staff received a briefing from 
senior DHS officials on the Department's social media vetting 
programs to discuss ongoing efforts and policies.

                                ------                                


  SUBCOMMITTEE ON EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND COMMUNICATIONS

                       PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE

    During the 114th Congress, the Subcommittee conducted 
oversight of efforts at the Federal, State, local, Tribal, and 
private sector levels to prepare for, respond to, and recover 
from terrorist attacks and natural disasters. Through a series 
of hearings, field hearings, briefings, and site visits, the 
Subcommittee worked to ensure that the whole community is 
engaged in these efforts. The Subcommittee held hearings to 
assess the response readiness of Federal Emergency Management 
Agency (FEMA); examine Hurricane Sandy recovery and community 
resiliency; assess preparedness for events impacting mass 
transit; examine military support to civilian disaster 
response; and examine cyber incident response capabilities. 
Subcommittee Members visited the FEMA National Response 
Coordination Center to observe response capabilities and 
operations. As a result of this oversight, the Committee passed 
legislation that was referred to the Subcommittee, including 
H.R.3583, the Promoting Resilience and Efficiency in Preparing 
for Attacks and Responding to Emergencies (PREPARE) Act.

     ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS AND FIRST RESPONDERS

    The Department of Homeland Security has awarded nearly $40 
billion to State and local governments and first responders 
since the September 11th terrorist attacks. As a result of the 
Administration's Fiscal Year 2017 budget proposal to cut 
homeland security grants by 50 percent, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing with State and local stakeholders to hear about the 
impact the proposed cuts would have on their ability to 
prevent, prepare for, protect against, and respond to terrorist 
attacks. In addition, Committee staff has held briefings with 
FEMA representatives on the development of performance metrics 
to measure the effectiveness of the grants and programmatic and 
financial monitoring efforts. Grants management provisions were 
included in Title I of H.R.3583, the PREPARE Act. The Committee 
also considered legislation, H.R.5943, the Transit Security 
Grant Program Flexibility Act, which was introduced by the 
Subcommittee Chair.

CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL, RADIOLOGICAL, AND NUCLEAR PLANNING, PREPAREDNESS, 
                              AND RESPONSE

    Preparedness for and response to chemical, biological, 
radiological, and nuclear events has remained a focus for the 
Subcommittee in the 114th Congress. The Subcommittee has 
received numerous briefings on the Office of Health Affairs' 
BioWatch, National Biosurveillance Integration Center, and 
Chemical Defense Programs at both the classified and 
unclassified levels. The Subcommittee also held hearings on the 
chemical terrorism threat, the bioterrorism threat, BioWatch, 
and the appropriate organization of chemical, biological, 
radiological, nuclear, and explosives policy offices within the 
Department of Homeland Security. In furtherance of this 
oversight, the Committee passed legislation that was referred 
to the Subcommittee, H.R.1300 and H.R.2200, authorizing a 
voluntary anthrax vaccination program for first responders and 
requiring better sharing of CBRN threat information, 
respectively. Provisions related to this oversight were also 
included in H.R.3583, the PREPARE Act.

                             COMMUNICATIONS

    In the 114th Congress, the Subcommittee continued its 
oversight of communications issues with briefings on the Office 
of Emergency Communications, the First Responder Network 
Authority and the implementation of the Public Safety Broadband 
Network, and the Integrated Public Alert and Warning System. 
After multiple Congresses, the Subcommittee was pleased that 
the Integrated Public Alert and Warning System Modernization 
Act was signed into law. This oversight also resulted in the 
inclusion of a Communications title in H.R.3583, the PREPARE 
Act.

    EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROVIDER TRAINING, EXERCISES AND SIMULATIONS

    As part of its oversight of first responder training 
programs, the Subcommittee received numerous briefings on DHS-
funded training programs and from Federal and State training 
providers. Committee staff visited the National Emergency 
Response and Rescue Training Center to observe training and 
exercise programs. The Subcommittee also received briefings 
from FEMA's National Exercise Division and Office of 
Counterterrorism and Security Preparedness on training and 
exercise programs.

                                ------                                


                SUBCOMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION SECURITY

                      ADDRESSING EVOLVING THREATS

    During the 114th Congress, the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security conducted extensive oversight efforts 
within the Department of Homeland Security to prevent and 
mitigate known and evolving terrorist threats to domestic 
transportation systems. Through a series of hearings, 
briefings, and site visits, the Subcommittee worked to ensure 
that the Transportation Security Administration's (TSA) multi-
layered, risk-based approach to preventing an attack on cargo 
and passenger aircraft at home and overseas was efficiently 
managed and maintained. The Subcommittee also provided strict 
evaluation the capabilities of the TSA workforce and checkpoint 
technologies to ensure that TSA is effectively screening 
passengers and baggage.
    Additionally, the Subcommittee has worked hard to review 
the TSA security measures for international flights bound for 
the United States, including but not limited to, the use of 
Federal Air Marshal Service (FAMS), directives that augment 
security protocols in the select foreign airports, and the 
Secure Flight Programs watch list matching process. The 
Subcommittee also reviewed how TSA leverages additional Federal 
Law Enforcement resources to enhance security measures on U.S. 
bound aircraft.

                     ADVANCING RISK-BASED SECURITY

    The Subcommittee continued oversight related to TSA's long-
term goals for TSA PreTM. The Subcommittee 
assessed the effectiveness of TSA programs, in addition to 
PreTM, such as Managed Inclusion. The 
Subcommittee conducted evaluation of TSA's approach to expand 
enrollment into the TSA PreTM program, 
including through contracts with private sector entities, and 
examined methodology to decide eligibility requirements for 
passengers applying to enter the program. Additionally, the 
Subcommittee closely monitored TSA's effort to protect 
passenger privacy, in conjunction with new laws that aim to 
provide expedited screening to certain passengers.
    Moreover, the Subcommittee continued to examine how TSA is 
ensuring that passengers that are designated high-risk are 
subject to enhanced screening procedures at checkpoints. 
Finally, the Subcommittee has provided strong oversight of 
TSA's use of innovative technologies and implementation of 
risk-based strategies at the screening checkpoint or in other 
areas of security, such as baggage screening operation 
facilities and access control points for employees at domestic 
airports.

                  ENHANCING PRIVATE SECTOR ENGAGEMENT

    Throughout the 114th Congress, the Subcommittee closely 
maintained oversight efforts to ensure that TSA effectively 
engaged the private sector in an effort to improve the 
effectiveness and efficiency of TSA security operations. 
Specifically, the Subcommittee conducted numerous briefings 
which outlined the contract and bidding process for management 
of TSA's PreTM program, as well as TSA's 
Screening Partnership Program (SPP). The Subcommittee closely 
monitored TSA's implementation of the Aviation Security 
Stakeholder Participation Act of 2014 (Public Law 113-238), 
through oversight letters and briefings. The oversight work by 
the Subcommittee was aimed at ensuring that stakeholders are 
properly consulted on major security policy decisions, through 
the Aviation Security Advisory Committee or other means. The 
Subcommittee insistently encouraged TSA to create broad means 
of communications with the private sector, and leverage their 
expertise, innovation, and technologies in the overall mission 
to secure the nation's critical transportation systems in a 
manner that is most effective and efficient for passengers, 
TSA, and our partners in the private sector.

                   TARGETING WASTE, FRAUD, AND ABUSE

    During the 114th Congress, the Subcommittee conducted 
oversight to identify and prevent waste, fraud, or abuse within 
the Transportation Security Administration. Throughout the 
oversight efforts, the Subcommittee monitored programs and 
practices to ensure that TSA effectively implements and 
complies with provisions outlined in H.R. 2719, the 
Transportation Security Acquisition Reform Act (Pub. Law 113-
245). These provisions include, among other things, better 
private sector engagement, strategic planning, and transparency 
when working with the Subcommittee and Congressional oversight 
bodies. The Subcommittee was diligent in the review of 
nefarious salary bonuses being distributed among executive 
level staff, and submitted multiple information requests 
regarding other forms of misconduct throughout the TSA.

STREAMLINING AND IMPROVING SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY PROGRAMS AND 
                              REGULATIONS

    The Subcommittee continued its oversight of issues related 
to TSA's effort to secure surface transit systems, including 
the highest-risk mass transit and rail systems. As part of its 
oversight of the surface transit systems, the Subcommittee held 
multiple briefings to review programs associated with, but not 
limited to, the Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response 
Program, the Surface Transportation Security Inspection 
Program, and TSA's surface transportation security regulations. 
Additionally, the Subcommittee held a hearing to review and 
assess the effectiveness of TSA's efforts to secure the 
Nation's pipeline systems through TSA's oversight and 
inspection activities.

                                ------                                


SUBCOMMITTEE ON CYBERSECURITY, INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION, AND SECURITY 
                              TECHNOLOGIES

                 PROTECTION OF CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE

    During the 114th Congress, the Subcommittee on 
Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
Technologies investigated programs and authorities of the 
Department of Homeland Security to protect critical 
infrastructure from both cyber and physical threats. The 
Subcommittee conducted several hearings to examine ways to 
enhance these efforts such as increasing the sharing of cyber 
threat information, promoting and incentivizing greater 
adoption of cybersecurity best practices, assessing the role of 
cyber insurance in risk management, ensuring preparedness and 
response capabilities to address cyber threats, and ensuring 
value of the vulnerability assessments by the National 
Protection and Programs Directorate in protecting our Nation's 
critical infrastructure. Additionally, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing to examine the mission, structure, and reorganization 
effort of the National Protection and Programs Directorate that 
led to legislation that would authorize a National 
Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Protection Agency to improve 
critical infrastructure protection. Last, the Committee passed 
H.R. 1731, the Cybersecurity Act of 2015 (which was included in 
Pub. L. 114--92) to improve the sharing of cyber threat 
information to further protect critical infrastructure from 
cybersecurity risks.

             SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    During the 114th Congress, the Subcommittee on 
Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
Technologies investigated programs and authorities of the 
Department of Homeland Security (DHS)to strengthen and make 
improvements to the Directorate of Science and Technology (S&T;) 
of the Department. The Subcommittee conducted several hearings 
that evaluated emerging threats and technologies to protection 
the Homeland and examined S&T;'s Engagement with academia and 
industry. The Subcommittee also led a Staff delegation visit to 
the National Laboratories to better understand how S&T; is 
collaborating with the National labs to both identify and 
address gaps in homeland security technology. Last, the 
Subcommittee passed legislation, H.R. 3578, the DHS Science and 
Technology Reform and Improvement Act of 2015 which made 
tailored improvements to how S&T; carries out its responsibility 
to conduct research and development.

                   NUCLEAR AND RADIOLOGICAL DETECTION

    During the 114th Congress, the Subcommittee on 
Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
Technologies investigated programs and authorities of the 
Department of Homeland Security to prevent, detect and respond 
to chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear attack (CBRN). 
The Subcommittee conducted several hearings that examined 
emerging threats and technologies to protect the Homeland and 
ways to bolster DHS' efforts to combat persistent threat from 
weapons of mass destruction. Additionally, the Subcommittee 
held briefings on nuclear and radiological threats to the 
homeland and counterintelligence concerns regarding 
transportation security technologies. The Subcommittee also 
passed legislation to assist State and local governments by 
designing, implementing, and enhancing capabilities for 
coordinating detection and interdiction of nuclear or other 
radiological materials. The legislation would provide resources 
to enhance detection, analysis, communication and coordination 
and increased oversight and accountability by requiring the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) to conduct a review on 
the effectiveness of the program. Last, the Subcommittee also 
passed legislation that would authorizes a Chemical, 
Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) 
Office within the Department of Homeland Security.

                                ------                                


              SUBCOMMITTEE ON BORDER AND MARITIME SECURITY

                 BORDER SECURITY BETWEEN PORTS OF ENTRY

    Through legislation, hearings briefings, and site visits, 
the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security conducted 
rigorous oversight of the security between the Nation's Ports 
of Entry. Legislation was introduced to set Sector by Sector 
requirements for infrastructure, staffing, and policy in order 
to secure our nation's borders. Additionally, three bills 
passed the House of Representatives that specify how new 
technology is acquired after previous costly overruns, and 
directs the Secretary to complete a thorough threat assessment 
of the Southern and Northern Border. The Subcommittee 
dovetailed its legislative activities with hearings and 
briefings on the Department of Homeland Security's Border 
Security Joint Task Forces, local challenges for border 
residents, border technology, and the Department's ``Defense in 
Depth'' strategy. The Subcommittee culminated this Congress 
with a bipartisan, bicameral Staff Delegation trip to the 
Southwest Border, examining nearly every facet of border 
security to include security between the ports of entry along 
the border, maritime challenges, new technology, and staffing.

                   BORDER SECURITY AT PORTS OF ENTRY

    Much like the strategy to secure the Border between ports-
of-entry, the Subcommittee took a holistic approach to 
improving security, while not impairing the flow of commerce, 
at our nation's ports of entry. The subcommittee conducted 
briefings and introduced legislation to address staffing 
shortages, security, and senescent infrastructure. In order to 
bolster staffing at and between ports of entry, the 
Subcommittee introduced the Border Jobs for Veterans Act of 
2015 (H.R.2835) to actively recruit veterans for Customs and 
Border Protection (CBP) positions. This Act was signed into law 
(Pub. L. 114-68) and assists CBP in addressing its staffing 
shortage by reaching a previously untapped pool of potential 
employment applicants. Additionally, the subcommittee authored 
Title VIII of the Trade Facilitation and Trade Enforcement Act 
of 2015 (Pub. L. 114-125) to formally authorize U.S.Customs and 
Border Protection, enhance security within the global supply 
chain, streamline commerce at Ports of Entry, and authorized 
the Secretary to expand and conduct preclearance operations 
domestically and overseas in order to ``push out'' the border 
and shorten travel delays. The Subcommittee also conducted 
hearings on CBP's staffing and infrastructure to address 
staffing shortages and aging infrastructure at U.S.Ports of 
Entry and examined the feasibility of public-private 
partnerships to improve infrastructure and security at our 
nation's ports. These hearings led to the house passage of 
H.R.3586, as amended, to allow for private funds to be used to 
improve infrastructure at ports of entry.

                             VISA SECURITY

    In January 2015 the Subcommittee introduced legislation to 
strengthen the security of the Visa Waiver Program and the 
Electronic System for Travel Authorization, which was included 
in Public Law 114-113. Using this legislation as a foundation 
the Subcommittee held hearings on combating terrorist travel 
through the Visa Waiver Program, DHS's international security 
programs, and ensuring those granted visas or arriving through 
the visa waiver program do not overstay their authorized time 
in the United States. The Subcommittee also completed an 
international Staff Delegation to Asia and the Middle East to 
conduct oversight of the visa issuing and the security vetting 
process first hand.

                       PORT AND MARITIME SECURITY

    The cornerstone of the Subcommittee's work on Port and 
Maritime Security was the introduction, and House passage of 
H.R.3586, the Border and Maritime Coordination Improvement Act. 
H.R.3586 included various port and maritime security provisions 
to strengthen coordination between the Coast Guard and 
U.S.Customs and Border Protection, evaluate the effectiveness 
of the Coast Guard Deployable Specialized Forces, and 
strengthen security within international shipping programs such 
as the Container Security Initiative and the Customs-Trade 
Partnership Against Terrorism. The Subcommittee also worked 
diligently to address a myriad of issues within the Transit 
Worker Identification Card (TWIC) Program through the 
introduction and House passage of H.R.710, which seeks to 
strengthen internal controls when issuing TWIC cards and 
evaluate the effectiveness of TWIC as a secure credential. 
Hearings and classified briefings were held on nuclear 
smuggling and cyber security threats to U.S.ports in order to 
guide continuing oversight and any need for future legislation.

                    ADDITIONAL OVERSIGHT ACTIVITIES

    The Subcommittee ensured it conducted additional oversight 
of the Department with due diligence and held classified member 
briefings on the state of the U.S.border. The Subcommittee also 
ensured that it questioned the new Chief of the U.S.Border 
Patrol, at subcommittee hearing on the Border Patrol's 
``Defense in Depth'' strategy.

                                ------                                


           SUBCOMMITTEE ON COUNTERTERRORISM AND INTELLIGENCE

       EMERGING THREATS AND HOMELAND COUNTERTERRORISM ACTIVITIES

    Examining current and emerging threats to the U.S.Homeland 
as a top Subcommittee priority. The Subcommittee conducted 
regular briefings and hearings with government and non-
government experts on threats posed by international terror 
groups. Subcommittee Members and staff conducted meetings with 
foreign embassy personnel and traveled to several countries to 
discuss threats and counterterrorism cooperation.
    The Subcommittee held a hearing and several classified 
briefings on terror threats in Africa targeting U.S.or 
U.S.interests. Additionally, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
and multiple briefings related to threats to the homeland from 
Iran and Hezbollah. In April 2016, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing on the spread of terrorism in Southeast Asia and 
related threats to the United States. Subcommittee staff also 
reviewed the Foreign Terrorist Organization designation process 
through a series of briefings and conversations with Federal 
agencies.
    The Subcommittee also reviewed threats associated with 
vetting of refugees during a June 2015 hearing and examined 
emerging areas linked to terror financing during a May 2016 
hearing. The Subcommittee focused on threats to soft targets in 
January and February of 2015 with briefings on threats posed by 
unmanned aerial vehicles to mass gathering events, as well as 
through a Member roundtable with the private industry 
representing potential soft targets.

            COUNTERINTELLIGENCE AND INSIDER THREAT PROGRAMS

    The Subcommittee conducted extensive oversight over 
Department of Homeland Security counterintelligence and insider 
threat programs. Members and staff met with the Office of 
Intelligence and Analysis, Office of the Chief Security 
Officer, the U.S.Coast Guard, the Defense Security Service, and 
other Federal agencies regarding threats and mitigation 
efforts. In July 2016, the Subcommittee held a hearing on DHS 
efforts and challenges related to both issues.
    The Subcommittee considered several pieces of legislation 
to address counterintelligence and insider threat issues, 
including H.R.3361, the Department of Homeland Security Insider 
Threat and Mitigation Act of 2015 and H.R.3505, the Department 
of Homeland Security Clearance Management and Administration 
Act.

               HOMELAND SECURITY INTELLIGENCE ENTERPRISE

    The Subcommittee held numerous briefings and site visits 
with Department of Homeland Security agencies and offices 
considered to be part of the DHS Intelligence Enterprise, 
including the Chief Intelligence Officer, the Office of 
Intelligence and Analysis, Customs and Border Protection, 
Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Transportation Security 
Administration, the U.S.Coast Guard, the National Operations 
Center, the Chief Security Officer, and offices within the 
National Protection and Programs Directorate. Additionally, the 
Subcommittee met with outside experts and former officials from 
Departmental agencies.
    The Subcommittee also conducted extensive oversight over 
the Office of Intelligence and Analysis (I&A;), including its 
missions, capabilities, and workforce realignment initiative. 
Subcommittee Members and staff also received regular classified 
briefings from I&A; officials regarding threats to the homeland 
and DHS mitigation efforts.

                      COUNTERING VIOLENT EXTREMISM

    The Subcommittee supported the efforts of the Full 
Committee in reviewing threats posed by Islamist radicalization 
of persons in the U.S., as well as programs intended to 
identify, prevent and deter such radicalization. The 
Subcommittee joined the Full Committee in sending multiple 
oversight letters to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) 
and other agencies regarding the various pilots, programs and 
policies. Subcommittee staff also held a number of meetings 
with relevant DHS agencies, including the Office of Community 
Partnerships to review their plans and priorities related to 
countering homegrown Islamist extremism.
    The Subcommittee held a hearing in October 2015 focused on 
countering radicalization in U.S.prisons. In the lead up and 
aftermath of the hearing, the Subcommittee conducted a number 
of briefings with government and non-governmental entities.

                          INFORMATION SHARING

    The Subcommittee held several hearings focused on 
Department of Homeland Security and other Federal agency 
efforts to share threat information with State and local 
partners, as well as other stakeholders. Specifically, on 
February 26, 2015, and September 8, 2016, the Subcommittee held 
hearings with State and local law enforcement associations to 
receive recommendations on needed improvements to the 
information sharing environment.
    Additionally, the Subcommittee Members and staff conducted 
numerous briefings and site visits with Department of Homeland 
Security agencies, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the 
National Counterterrorism Center, State and local entities, the 
private sector, and outside experts. Subcommittee staff also 
conducted site visits at fusion centers in Virginia, Washington 
D.C., Pennsylvania, and Maryland.
    The Subcommittee considered several pieces of legislation 
to address the information sharing environment and the 
statutory requirement of the Department of Homeland Security to 
share information with State and local law enforcement, first 
responders, and the private sector, including H.R.3350, the 
Know the CBRN Terrorism Threats to Transportation Act; 
H.R.3503, the Department of Homeland security Support to Fusion 
Centers Act; and H.R.3598, the Fusion Center Enhancement Act.



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                          A P P E N D I C E S

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                               APPENDIX I

                            Committee Rules

                             114th Congress

                        Adopted January 21, 2015

                        Modified March 26, 2015

                                ------                                


                  RULE I.--GENERAL PROVISIONS.

(A)  Applicability of the Rules of the U.S. House of 
Representatives.--The Rules of the U.S. House of 
Representatives (the ``House'') are the rules of the Committee 
on Homeland Security (the ``Committee'') and its subcommittees 
insofar as applicable.

(B)  Applicability to Subcommittees.--Except where the terms 
``Full Committee'' and ``subcommittee'' are specifically 
mentioned, the following rules shall apply to the Committee's 
subcommittees and their respective Chairmen and Ranking 
Minority Members to the same extent as they apply to the Full 
Committee and its Chairman and Ranking Minority Member.

(C)  Appointments by the Chairman.--Clause 2(d) of Rule XI of 
the House shall govern the designation of a Vice Chairman of 
the Full Committee.

(D)  Recommendation of Conferees.--Whenever the Speaker of the 
House is to appoint a conference committee on a matter within 
the jurisdiction of the Full Committee, the Chairman shall 
recommend to the Speaker of the House conferees from the Full 
Committee. In making recommendations of Minority Members as 
conferees, the Chairman shall do so with the concurrence of the 
Ranking Minority Member of the Committee.

(E)  Motions to Disagree.--The Chairman is authorized to offer 
a motion under clause 1 of Rule XXII of the Rules of the House 
whenever the Chairman considers it appropriate.

(F)  Committee Website.--The Chairman shall maintain an 
official Committee web site for the purposes of furthering the 
Committee's legislative and oversight responsibilities, 
including communicating information about the Committee's 
activities to Committee Members, other Members, and the public 
at large. The Ranking Minority Member may maintain a similar 
web site for the same purposes. The official Committee web site 
shall display a link on its home page to the web site 
maintained by the Ranking Minority Member.

(G)  Activity Report.--Not later than January 2 of each odd 
numbered year, the Committee shall submit to the House a report 
on the activities of the Committee. After adjournment sine die 
of the last regular session of a Congress, or after December 15 
of an even-numbered year, whichever occurs first, the Chair may 
file the report with the Clerk at any time and without approval 
of the Committee provided that a copy of the report has been 
available to each Member of the Committee for at least seven 
calendar days and the report includes any supplemental, 
minority, additional, or dissenting views submitted by a Member 
of the Committee.

                  RULE II.--COMMITTEE PANELS.

(A)  Designation.--The Chairman of the Full Committee, with the 
concurrence of the Ranking Minority Member, may designate a 
panel of the Committee consisting of Members of the Committee 
to inquire into and take testimony on a matter or matters that 
warrant enhanced consideration and to report to the Committee.

(B)  Duration.--No panel appointed by the Chairman shall 
continue in existence for more than six months after the 
appointment.

(C)  Party Ratios and Appointment.--The ratio of Majority to 
Minority Members shall be comparable to the Full Committee, 
consistent with the party ratios established by the Majority 
party, with all Majority members of the panels appointed by the 
Chairman of the Committee and all Minority members appointed by 
the Ranking Minority Member of the Committee. The Chairman of 
the Committee shall choose one of the Majority Members so 
appointed who does not currently chair another Subcommittee of 
the Committee to serve as Chairman of the panel. The Ranking 
Minority Member of the Committee shall similarly choose the 
Ranking Minority Member of the panel.

(D)  Ex Officio Members.--The Chairman and Ranking Minority 
Member of the Full Committee may serve as ex-officio Members of 
each committee panel but are not authorized to vote on matters 
that arise before a committee panel and shall not be counted to 
satisfy the quorum requirement for any purpose other than 
taking testimony.

(E)  Jurisdiction.--No panel shall have legislative 
jurisdiction.

(F)  Applicability of Committee Rules.--Any designated panel 
shall be subject to all Committee Rules herein.

                   RULE III.--SUBCOMMITTEES.

(A) Generally.--The Full Committee shall be organized into the 
following six standing subcommittees and each shall have 
specific responsibility for such measures or matters as the 
Chairman refers to it:

 L(1)  Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence;

 L(2)  Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security;

 (3)  LSubcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection 
and Security Technologies;

 L(4)  Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency;

 L(5)  Subcommittee on Transportation Security; and

 L(6)  Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response and 
Communications.

(B)  Selection and Ratio of Subcommittee Members.--The ratio of 
Majority to Minority Members shall be comparable to the Full 
Committee, consistent with the part