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114th Congress       }                              {   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session         }                              {   114-96
====================================================================
 
        CONCURRENT RESOLUTION ON THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2016

                                _______
                                

                 April 29, 2015.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

 Mr. Tom Price of Georgia, from the committee of conference, submitted 
                             the following

                           CONFERENCE REPORT

                     [To accompany S. Con. Res. 11]

    The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the 
two Houses on the amendment of the House to the concurrent 
resolution (S. Con. Res. 11), setting forth the congressional 
budget for the United States Government for fiscal year 2016 
and setting forth the appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal 
years 2017 through 2025, having met, after full and free 
conference, have agreed to recommend and do recommend to their 
respective Houses as follows:
    That the Senate recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the House and agree to the same with an amendment 
as follows:
    In lieu of the matter proposed to be inserted by the House 
amendment, insert the following:

SECTION 1. CONCURRENT RESOLUTION ON THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2016.

    (a) Declaration.--Congress declares that this concurrent 
resolution is the concurrent resolution on the budget for 
fiscal year 2016 and that this concurrent resolution sets forth 
the appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 2017 through 
2025.
    (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this 
concurrent resolution is as follows:

Sec. 1. Concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2016.

                 TITLE I--RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS

               Subtitle A--Budgetary Levels in Both Houses

Sec. 1101. Recommended levels and amounts.
Sec. 1102. Major functional categories.

              Subtitle B--Levels and Amounts in the Senate

Sec. 1201. Social Security in the Senate.
Sec. 1202. Postal Service discretionary administrative expenses in the 
          Senate.

                        TITLE II--RECONCILIATION

Sec. 2001. Reconciliation in the Senate.
Sec. 2002. Reconciliation in the House of Representatives.

                      TITLE III--BUDGET ENFORCEMENT

              Subtitle A--Budget Enforcement in Both Houses

Sec. 3101. Point of order against increasing long-term deficits or 
          direct spending.
Sec. 3102. Allocation for Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on 
          Terrorism.
Sec. 3103. Point of order against certain changes in mandatory programs.
Sec. 3104. Point of order against provisions that constitute changes in 
          mandatory programs affecting the Crime Victims Fund.
Sec. 3105. Fair-value credit estimates.
Sec. 3106. Scoring rule for currency modernization.
Sec. 3107. Long-term scoring of changes in spending limits and extension 
          of highway programs.
Sec. 3108. Requiring clearer reporting of projected Federal spending and 
          deficits.
Sec. 3109. Congressional Budget Office estimates of measures with 
          significant outlay effects.
Sec. 3110. Prohibiting the use of guarantee fees as an offset.
Sec. 3111. Information for Congress and the public about projected 
          Federal outlays, revenues, and deficits.
Sec. 3112. Honest accounting: cost estimates for major legislation to 
          incorporate macroeconomic effects.

              Subtitle B--Budget Enforcement in the Senate

Sec. 3201. Extension of enforcement of budgetary points of order in the 
          Senate.
Sec. 3202. Point of order against advance appropriations in the Senate.
Sec. 3203. Supermajority enforcement of unfunded mandates in the Senate.
Sec. 3204. Repeal of Senate point of order against certain 
          reconciliation legislation.
Sec. 3205. Prohibition on agreeing to legislation without a score in the 
          Senate.
Sec. 3206. Protecting the savings in reported reconciliation bills in 
          the Senate.
Sec. 3207. Scoring rule for certain energy contracts in the Senate.
Sec. 3208. Adjustment for wildfire suppression funding in the Senate.

     Subtitle C--Budget Enforcement in the House of Representatives

Sec. 3301. Limitation on measures affecting Social Security solvency in 
          the House of Representatives.
Sec. 3302. Limitation on transfers from the general fund of the Treasury 
          to the Highway Trust Fund in the House of Representatives.
Sec. 3303. Adjustments for improved control of budgetary resources in 
          the House of Representatives.
Sec. 3304. Limitation on advance appropriations in the House of 
          Representatives.
Sec. 3305. Certain energy contracts in the House of Representatives.

                      Subtitle D--Other Provisions

Sec. 3401. Submission of findings for the elimination of waste, fraud, 
          and abuse.
Sec. 3402. Budgetary treatment of administrative expenses.
Sec. 3403. Application and effect of changes in allocations and 
          aggregates.
Sec. 3404. Adjustments to reflect changes in concepts and definitions.
Sec. 3405. Exercise of rulemaking powers.

                         TITLE IV--RESERVE FUNDS

                Subtitle A--Reserve Funds in Both Houses

Sec. 4101. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to reduce poverty and increase 
          opportunity and upward mobility for struggling Americans.

                 Subtitle B--Reserve Funds in the Senate

Sec. 4301. Spending-neutral reserve fund to increase the pace of 
          economic growth and private sector job creation in the United 
          States.
Sec. 4302. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to strengthen America's 
          priorities.
Sec. 4303. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to protect flexible and 
          affordable health care choices for all.
Sec. 4304. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for improving access to the 
          State Children's Health Insurance Program.
Sec. 4305. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for other health reforms.
Sec. 4306. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for child welfare.
Sec. 4307. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for veterans and servicemembers.
Sec. 4308. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for tax reform and 
          administration.
Sec. 4309. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to invest in the infrastructure 
          in America.
Sec. 4310. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for air transportation.
Sec. 4311. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to promote jobs in the United 
          States through international trade.
Sec. 4312. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to increase employment 
          opportunities for disabled workers.
Sec. 4313. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for Higher Education Act reform.
Sec. 4314. Spending-neutral reserve fund for energy legislation.
Sec. 4315. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to reform environmental 
          statutes.
Sec. 4316. Spending-neutral reserve fund for water resources 
          legislation.
Sec. 4317. Spending-neutral reserve fund on mineral security and mineral 
          rights.
Sec. 4318. Spending-neutral reserve fund to reform the abandoned mine 
          lands program.
Sec. 4319. Spending-neutral reserve fund to improve forest health.
Sec. 4320. Spending-neutral reserve fund to reauthorize funding for 
          payments in lieu of taxes to counties and other units of local 
          government.
Sec. 4321. Spending-neutral reserve fund for financial regulatory system 
          reform.
Sec. 4322. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to improve Federal program 
          administration.
Sec. 4323. Spending-neutral reserve fund to implement agreements with 
          freely associated states.
Sec. 4324. Spending-neutral reserve fund to protect payments to rural 
          hospitals and create sustainable access for rural communities.
Sec. 4325. Spending-neutral reserve fund to encourage State medicaid 
          demonstration programs to promote independent living and 
          integrated work for the disabled.
Sec. 4326. Spending-neutral reserve fund to allow pharmacists to be paid 
          for the provision of services under Medicare.
Sec. 4327. Spending-neutral reserve fund to improve our Nation's 
          community health centers.
Sec. 4328. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to the funding of 
          independent agencies, which may include subjecting the 
          Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to the regular 
          appropriations process.
Sec. 4329. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to reform, improve, and enhance 
          529 college savings plans.
Sec. 4330. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to securing overseas 
          diplomatic facilities of the United States.
Sec. 4331. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to expanding, 
          enhancing, or otherwise improving science, technology, 
          engineering, and mathematics.
Sec. 4332. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to promoting 
          manufacturing in the United States.
Sec. 4333. Spending-neutral reserve fund to prohibit aliens without 
          legal status in the United States from qualifying for a 
          refundable tax credit.
Sec. 4334. Deficit-reduction reserve fund for report elimination or 
          modification.
Sec. 4335. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to address heroin, 
          methamphetamine, and prescription opioid abuse.
Sec. 4336. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to strengthen our Department of 
          Defense civilian workforce.
Sec. 4337. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for Department of Defense 
          reform.
Sec. 4338. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to improve Federal workforce 
          development, job training, and reemployment programs.
Sec. 4339. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to provide energy assistance and 
          invest in energy efficiency and conservation.
Sec. 4340. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to end Operation Choke Point and 
          protect the Second Amendment.
Sec. 4341. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to prevent the use of Federal 
          funds for the bailout of improvident State and local 
          governments.
Sec. 4342. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to improve health outcomes and 
          lower the costs of caring for medically complex children in 
          Medicaid.
Sec. 4343. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to maintain and enhance access, 
          choice, and accountability in veterans care through the 
          Veterans Choice Card program.
Sec. 4344. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to promoting equal pay.
Sec. 4345. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to legislation 
          submitted to Congress by the President of the United States to 
          protect and strengthen Social Security.
Sec. 4346. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to a simplified income-
          driven student loan repayment option.
Sec. 4347. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to keeping the Federal 
          Water Pollution Control Act focused on the protection of water 
          quality.
Sec. 4348. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to supporting Israel.
Sec. 4349. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to family and medical 
          leave.
Sec. 4350. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to providing health 
          care to veterans who have geographic inaccessibility to care.
Sec. 4351. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to increasing access to 
          higher education for low-income Americans through the Federal 
          Pell Grant program.
Sec. 4352. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to transparency in 
          health premium billing.
Sec. 4353. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to carbon emissions.
Sec. 4354. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to requiring the 
          Federal Government to allow states to opt out of Common Core 
          without penalty.
Sec. 4355. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to the disposal of 
          certain Federal land.
Sec. 4356. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to prohibiting funding 
          of international organizations during the implementation of 
          the United Nations Arms Trade Treaty prior to Senate 
          ratification and adoption of implementing legislation.
Sec. 4357. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to reimposing waived 
          sanctions and imposing new sanctions against Iran for 
          violations of the Joint Plan of Action or a comprehensive 
          nuclear agreement.
Sec. 4358. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to supporting United 
          States citizens held hostage in the United States embassy in 
          Tehran, Iran, between November 3, 1979, and January 20, 1981.
Sec. 4359. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to reasonable 
          accommodations for pregnant workers.
Sec. 4360. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to permanently eliminate the 
          Federal estate tax.
Sec. 4361. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to regulation by the 
          Environmental Protection Agency of greenhouse gas emissions.
Sec. 4362. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to protecting privately 
          held water rights and permits.
Sec. 4363. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to prohibiting 
          awarding of construction contracts based on awardees entering 
          or not entering into agreements with labor organizations.
Sec. 4364. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to prevent American jobs from 
          being moved overseas by reducing the corporate income tax 
          rate.
Sec. 4365. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to increase wages for American 
          workers.
Sec. 4366. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to deterring the 
          migration of unaccompanied children from El Salvador, 
          Guatemala, and Honduras.
Sec. 4367. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to ensuring proper 
          economic consideration in designation of critical habitat.
Sec. 4368. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to end ``too big to fail'' 
          bailouts for Wall Street mega-banks (over $500 billion in 
          total assets).
Sec. 4369. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to ending Washington's 
          illegal exemption from the Patient Protection and Affordable 
          Care Act.
Sec. 4370. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to increasing funding 
          for the relocation of the United States Embassy in Israel from 
          Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.
Sec. 4371. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to promoting the return 
          of children who have been legally adopted by United States 
          citizens from the Democratic Republic of the Congo.
Sec. 4372. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to development of a new 
          nuclear-capable cruise missile by the Department of Defense 
          and the National Nuclear Security Administration.
Sec. 4373. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to provide equity in the tax 
          treatment of public safety officer death benefits.
Sec. 4374. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to eliminating the 
          backlog of sexual assault evidence kits.
Sec. 4375. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to mixed oxide fuel 
          fabrication.
Sec. 4376. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to reforming Offices of 
          Inspectors General and preventing extended vacancies.
Sec. 4377. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to improving retirement 
          security.
Sec. 4378. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to improve the competitiveness 
          of the United States.
Sec. 4379. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to ensuring that the 
          conservation of northern long-eared bat populations and local 
          economic development are compatible.
Sec. 4380. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to improve cybersecurity.
Sec. 4381. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to allow the Drug Enforcement 
          Administration and Federal Bureau of Investigation to enter 
          into joint task forces with tribal and local law enforcement 
          agencies.
Sec. 4382. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to encouraging cost 
          savings in office space used by Federal agencies.
Sec. 4383. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to providing technical 
          assistance to small businesses and aspiring entrepreneurs 
          through small business development centers.
Sec. 4384. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to ensuring that 
          medical facilities of the Department of Veterans Affairs meet 
          the needs of women veterans.
Sec. 4385. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to supporting efficient 
          resourcing for the Asia rebalance policy.
Sec. 4386. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to preventing access to 
          marijuana edibles by children in States that have 
          decriminalized marijuana.
Sec. 4387. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to providing mortgage 
          lending to rural areas.
Sec. 4388. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to the construction of 
          Arctic polar icebreakers.
Sec. 4389. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to researching health 
          conditions of the descendants of veterans exposed to toxic 
          substances during service in the Armed Forces.
Sec. 4390. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to raising the Family 
          of Funds limit of the Small Business Investment Company 
          Program.
Sec. 4391. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to detection, 
          investigation, and prosecution of the owners and operators of 
          websites who knowingly allow such websites to be used to 
          advertise commercial sex with children over the Internet.
Sec. 4392. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to protecting the 
          reliability of the electricity grid.
Sec. 4393. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to preserve and protect the open 
          Internet.
Sec. 4394. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to reforming the 
          Federal regulatory process.
Sec. 4395. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to providing coverage 
          of virtual colonoscopies as a colorectal cancer screening test 
          under the Medicare program.
Sec. 4396. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to the modernization of 
          the nuclear command, control, and communications architecture 
          of the United States.
Sec. 4397. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to BARDA and the 
          BioShield Special Reserve Fund.
Sec. 4398. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to improving the 
          nuclear forces and missions of the Air Force.
Sec. 4399. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to promoting economic 
          growth and job creation for small businesses and full funding 
          for at-sea and dockside monitoring for certain fisheries.
Sec. 4400. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to the definition of 
          full-time employee.
Sec. 4401. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to improving the 
          effectiveness and efficiency of the Federal regulatory 
          process.
Sec. 4402. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to expedite awards under the 
          Internal Revenue Service whistleblower program.
Sec. 4403. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to encouraging the 
          increased use of performance contracting in Federal 
          facilities.
Sec. 4404. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to improving 
          information sharing by the Inspector General of the Department 
          of Veterans Affairs with respect to investigations relating to 
          substandard health care, delayed and denied health care, 
          patient deaths, other findings that directly relate to patient 
          care, and other management issues of the Department.
Sec. 4405. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to address the disproportionate 
          regulatory burdens on community banks and credit unions.
Sec. 4406. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to protect the Corporation for 
          National and Community Service.
Sec. 4407. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to ensuring that 
          Department of Justice attorneys comply with disclosure 
          obligations in criminal prosecutions.
Sec. 4408. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to promote biomedical research.
Sec. 4409. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to providing access to 
          necessary equipment for Medicare beneficiaries.
Sec. 4410. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to prioritizing the 
          construction of infrastructure projects that are of national 
          and regional significance and projects in high priority 
          corridors.
Sec. 4411. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to encouraging the 
          United States' NATO allies to reverse declines in defense 
          spending and bear a more proportionate burden for ensuring the 
          security of NATO.
Sec. 4412. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to the investigation 
          and recovery of missing weapons and military equipment 
          provided to the Government of Yemen by the United States 
          Government.
Sec. 4413. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to improving higher 
          education data and transparency.
Sec. 4414. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to Native children.
Sec. 4415. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to provide additional 
          funding for international strategic communications.
Sec. 4416. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for elementary and secondary 
          education.
Sec. 4417. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to support research.
Sec. 4418. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to support for Ukraine.
Sec. 4419. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to underground and 
          surface mining safety research.
Sec. 4420. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to saving Medicare.

        Subtitle C--Reserve Funds in the House of Representatives

Sec. 4501. Reserve fund for the repeal of the President's health care 
          law.
Sec. 4502. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for promoting real health care 
          reform.
Sec. 4503. Deficit-neutral reserve fund related to the Medicare 
          provisions of the President's health care law.
Sec. 4504. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for the State Children's Health 
          Insurance Program.
Sec. 4505. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for graduate medical education.
Sec. 4506. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for trade agreements.
Sec. 4507. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for reforming the tax code.
Sec. 4508. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for revenue measures.
Sec. 4509. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for transportation.
Sec. 4510. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for Federal retirement reform.
Sec. 4511. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for national defense.

  TITLE V--ESTIMATES OF DIRECT SPENDING IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Sec. 5001. Direct spending.

                       TITLE VI--POLICY STATEMENTS

              Subtitle A--Policy Statements in Both Houses

Sec. 6101. Policy statement on balanced budget amendment.
Sec. 6102. Policy statement on Social Security.

      Subtitle B--Policy Statement in the House of Representatives

Sec. 6201. Policy statement on budget process and baseline reform.
Sec. 6202. Policy statement on economic growth and job creation.
Sec. 6203. Policy statement on tax reform.
Sec. 6204. Policy statement on trade.
Sec. 6205. Policy statement on repealing the President's health care law 
          and promoting real health care reform.
Sec. 6206. Policy statement on Medicare.
Sec. 6207. Policy statement on medical discovery, development, delivery 
          and innovation.
Sec. 6208. Policy statement on Federal regulatory reform.
Sec. 6209. Policy statement on higher education and workforce 
          development opportunity.
Sec. 6210. Policy statement on Department of Veterans Affairs.
Sec. 6211. Policy statement on Federal accounting methodologies.
Sec. 6212. Policy statement on reducing unnecessary, wasteful, and 
          unauthorized spending.
Sec. 6213. Policy statement on deficit reduction through the 
          cancellation of unobligated balances.
Sec. 6214. Policy statement on agency fees and spending.
Sec. 6215. Policy statement on responsible stewardship of taxpayer 
          dollars.
Sec. 6216. Policy statement on ``No Budget, No Pay''.
Sec. 6217. Policy statement on national security funding.

                TITLE I--RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS

              Subtitle A--Budgetary Levels in Both Houses

SEC. 1101. RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS.

    The following budgetary levels are appropriate for each of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025:
            (1) Federal revenues.--For purposes of the 
        enforcement of this concurrent resolution:
                    (A) The recommended levels of Federal 
                revenues are as follows:
    Fiscal year 2016: $2,676,733,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2017: $2,776,156,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2018: $2,870,206,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2019: $2,982,310,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2020: $3,107,111,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2021: $3,247,391,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2022: $3,392,968,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2023: $3,554,412,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2024: $3,723,973,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2025: $3,906,111,000,000.
                    (B) The amounts by which the aggregate 
                levels of Federal revenues should be changed 
                are as follows:
    Fiscal year 2016: $0.
    Fiscal year 2017: $0.
    Fiscal year 2018: $0.
    Fiscal year 2019: $0.
    Fiscal year 2020: $0.
    Fiscal year 2021: $0.
    Fiscal year 2022: $0.
    Fiscal year 2023: $0.
    Fiscal year 2024: $0.
    Fiscal year 2025: $0.
            (2) New budget authority.--For purposes of the 
        enforcement of this concurrent resolution, the 
        appropriate levels of total new budget authority are as 
        follows:
    Fiscal year 2016: $3,039,215,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2017: $2,956,581,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2018: $2,970,682,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2019: $3,107,123,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2020: $3,234,011,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2021: $3,313,719,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2022: $3,420,057,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2023: $3,484,446,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2024: $3,504,239,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2025: $3,634,452,000,000.
            (3) Budget outlays.--For purposes of the 
        enforcement of this concurrent resolution, the 
        appropriate levels of total budget outlays are as 
        follows:
    Fiscal year 2016: $3,091,442,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2017: $2,982,215,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2018: $2,963,926,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2019: $3,086,454,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2020: $3,205,304,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2021: $3,291,249,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2022: $3,434,709,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2023: $3,470,642,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2024: $3,466,541,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2025: $3,610,342,000,000.
            (4) Deficits.--For purposes of the enforcement of 
        this concurrent resolution, the amounts of the deficits 
        are as follows:
    Fiscal year 2016: $414,709,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2017: $206,059,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2018: $93,720,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2019: $104,144,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2020: $98,193,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2021: $43,858,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2022: $41,741,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2023: -$83,770,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2024: -$257,432,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2025: -$295,769,000,000.
            (5) Public debt.--Pursuant to section 301(a)(5) of 
        the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the appropriate 
        levels of the public debt are as follows:
    Fiscal year 2016: $19,059,000,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2017: $19,490,000,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2018: $19,826,000,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2019: $20,164,000,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2020: $20,494,000,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2021: $20,773,000,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2022: $21,033,000,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2023: $21,188,000,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2024: $21,194,000,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2025: $21,149,000,000,000.
            (6) Debt held by the public.--The appropriate 
        levels of debt held by the public are as follows:
    Fiscal year 2016: $13,842,000,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2017: $14,124,000,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2018: $14,307,000,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2019: $14,523,000,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2020: $14,757,000,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2021: $14,965,000,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2022: $15,204,000,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2023: $15,354,000,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2024: $15,374,000,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2025: $15,405,000,000,000.

SEC. 1102. MAJOR FUNCTIONAL CATEGORIES.

    Congress determines and declares that the appropriate 
levels of new budget authority and outlays for fiscal years 
2016 through 2025 for each major functional category are:
            (1) National Defense (050):
                    Fiscal year 2016:
                    (A) New budget authority, $531,306,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $564,325,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2017:
                    (A) New budget authority, $544,515,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $549,357,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2018:
                    (A) New budget authority, $557,764,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $548,021,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2019:
                    (A) New budget authority, $571,039,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $560,439,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2020:
                    (A) New budget authority, $585,330,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $572,493,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2021:
                    (A) New budget authority, $599,646,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $585,628,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2022:
                    (A) New budget authority, $632,804,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $615,907,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2023:
                    (A) New budget authority, $646,039,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $628,518,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2024:
                    (A) New budget authority, $659,310,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $638,235,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2025:
                    (A) New budget authority, $673,490,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $658,011,000,000.
            (2) International Affairs (150):
                    Fiscal year 2016:
                    (A) New budget authority, $40,202,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $46,028,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2017:
                    (A) New budget authority, $40,246,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $43,086,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2018:
                    (A) New budget authority, $41,176,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $41,818,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2019:
                    (A) New budget authority, $42,100,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $41,391,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2020:
                    (A) New budget authority, $43,092,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $41,518,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2021:
                    (A) New budget authority, $44,085,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $42,005,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2022:
                    (A) New budget authority, $45,333,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $42,749,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2023:
                    (A) New budget authority, $46,348,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $43,510,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2024:
                    (A) New budget authority, $47,408,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $44,367,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2025:
                    (A) New budget authority, $48,485,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $45,266,000,000.
            (3) General Science, Space, and Technology (250):
                    Fiscal year 2016:
                    (A) New budget authority, $29,187,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $29,555,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2017:
                    (A) New budget authority, $29,771,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $29,707,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2018:
                    (A) New budget authority, $30,432,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $30,162,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2019:
                    (A) New budget authority, $31,104,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $30,647,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2020:
                    (A) New budget authority, $31,805,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $31,283,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2021:
                    (A) New budget authority, $32,508,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $31,875,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2022:
                    (A) New budget authority, $33,242,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $32,579,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2023:
                    (A) New budget authority, $33,978,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $33,306,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2024:
                    (A) New budget authority, $34,743,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $34,053,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2025:
                    (A) New budget authority, $35,517,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $34,815,000,000.
            (4) Energy (270):
                    Fiscal year 2016:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$3,201,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $1,412,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2017:
                    (A) New budget authority, $1,962,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $1,095,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2018:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$746,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$2,111,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2019:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$856,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$1,936,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2020:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$884,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$1,811,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2021:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$948,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$1,657,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2022:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$1,030,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$1,651,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2023:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$1,098,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$1,643,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2024:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$1,144,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$1,614,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2025:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$1,153,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$1,589,000,000.
            (5) Natural Resources and Environment (300):
                    Fiscal year 2016:
                    (A) New budget authority, $36,374,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $39,499,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2017:
                    (A) New budget authority, $37,654,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $40,016,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2018:
                    (A) New budget authority, $38,325,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $39,595,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2019:
                    (A) New budget authority, $38,923,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $39,465,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2020:
                    (A) New budget authority, $40,388,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $40,563,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2021:
                    (A) New budget authority, $41,191,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $41,461,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2022:
                    (A) New budget authority, $41,650,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $41,770,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2023:
                    (A) New budget authority, $42,496,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $42,726,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2024:
                    (A) New budget authority, $43,935,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $43,453,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2025:
                    (A) New budget authority, $45,039,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $44,409,000,000.
            (6) Agriculture (350):
                    Fiscal year 2016:
                    (A) New budget authority, $19,098,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $21,572,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2017:
                    (A) New budget authority, $22,846,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $22,376,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2018:
                    (A) New budget authority, $21,964,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $20,853,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2019:
                    (A) New budget authority, $20,652,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $19,875,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2020:
                    (A) New budget authority, $19,681,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $19,132,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2021:
                    (A) New budget authority, $19,545,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $19,025,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2022:
                    (A) New budget authority, $19,509,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $18,979,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2023:
                    (A) New budget authority, $20,119,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $19,590,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2024:
                    (A) New budget authority, $20,253,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $19,699,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2025:
                    (A) New budget authority, $20,540,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $20,028,000,000.
            (7) Commerce and Housing Credit (370):
                    Fiscal year 2016:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$997,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$10,566,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2017:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$8,697,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$21,748,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2018:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$8,277,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$25,173,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2019:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$7,401,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$26,866,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2020:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$5,156,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$22,499,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2021:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$4,806,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$19,423,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2022:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$4,250,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$20,716,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2023:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$3,613,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$21,520,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2024:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$2,754,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$21,962,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2025:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$2,278,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$22,335,000,000.
            (8) Transportation (400):
                    Fiscal year 2016:
                    (A) New budget authority, $72,055,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $87,153,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2017:
                    (A) New budget authority, $72,715,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $82,838,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2018:
                    (A) New budget authority, $73,262,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $79,648,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2019:
                    (A) New budget authority, $73,696,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $78,845,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2020:
                    (A) New budget authority, $74,070,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $78,268,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2021:
                    (A) New budget authority, $74,409,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $77,871,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2022:
                    (A) New budget authority, $55,154,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $73,378,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2023:
                    (A) New budget authority, $56,254,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $66,074,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2024:
                    (A) New budget authority, $56,798,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $62,874,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2025:
                    (A) New budget authority, $57,190,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $61,710,000,000.
            (9) Community and Regional Development (450):
                    Fiscal year 2016:
                    (A) New budget authority, $15,486,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $20,692,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2017:
                    (A) New budget authority, $16,344,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $19,144,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2018:
                    (A) New budget authority, $16,737,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $19,692,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2019:
                    (A) New budget authority, $16,973,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $20,450,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2020:
                    (A) New budget authority, $16,984,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $20,702,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2021:
                    (A) New budget authority, $16,903,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $20,682,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2022:
                    (A) New budget authority, $9,965,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $19,034,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2023:
                    (A) New budget authority, $9,947,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $15,892,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2024:
                    (A) New budget authority, $9,993,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $13,220,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2025:
                    (A) New budget authority, $10,077,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $11,515,000,000.
            (10) Education, Training, Employment, and Social 
        Services (500):
                    Fiscal year 2016:
                    (A) New budget authority, $83,315,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $93,293,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2017:
                    (A) New budget authority, $89,084,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $92,888,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2018:
                    (A) New budget authority, $91,432,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $91,193,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2019:
                    (A) New budget authority, $90,189,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $89,369,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2020:
                    (A) New budget authority, $92,597,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $91,891,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2021:
                    (A) New budget authority, $93,900,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $93,562,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2022:
                    (A) New budget authority, $95,502,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $95,022,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2023:
                    (A) New budget authority, $96,984,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $96,608,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2024:
                    (A) New budget authority, $98,820,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $98,336,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2025:
                    (A) New budget authority, $100,785,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $100,297,000,000.
            (11) Health (550):
                    Fiscal year 2016:
                    (A) New budget authority, $433,064,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $430,917,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2017:
                    (A) New budget authority, $397,209,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $394,211,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2018:
                    (A) New budget authority, $387,638,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $397,302,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2019:
                    (A) New budget authority, $398,203,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $399,888,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2020:
                    (A) New budget authority, $420,326,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $411,116,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2021:
                    (A) New budget authority, $426,184,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $426,218,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2022:
                    (A) New budget authority, $442,681,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $442,701,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2023:
                    (A) New budget authority, $461,378,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $461,378,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2024:
                    (A) New budget authority, $476,599,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $476,631,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2025:
                    (A) New budget authority, $493,913,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $494,059,000,000.
            (12) Medicare (570):
                    Fiscal year 2016:
                    (A) New budget authority, $579,430,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $579,361,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2017:
                    (A) New budget authority, $571,876,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $571,830,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2018:
                    (A) New budget authority, $566,754,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $566,656,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2019:
                    (A) New budget authority, $628,736,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $628,652,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2020:
                    (A) New budget authority, $667,036,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $666,951,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2021:
                    (A) New budget authority, $711,198,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $711,111,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2022:
                    (A) New budget authority, $800,458,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $800,363,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2023:
                    (A) New budget authority, $812,590,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $812,496,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2024:
                    (A) New budget authority, $815,240,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $815,139,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2025:
                    (A) New budget authority, $923,187,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $923,082,000,000.
            (13) Income Security (600):
                    Fiscal year 2016:
                    (A) New budget authority, $523,086,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $523,645,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2017:
                    (A) New budget authority, $496,233,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $492,511,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2018:
                    (A) New budget authority, $485,055,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $476,530,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2019:
                    (A) New budget authority, $476,663,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $471,357,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2020:
                    (A) New budget authority, $484,015,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $478,199,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2021:
                    (A) New budget authority, $489,999,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $484,318,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2022:
                    (A) New budget authority, $498,503,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $497,869,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2023:
                    (A) New budget authority, $503,364,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $499,521,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2024:
                    (A) New budget authority, $510,872,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $501,192,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2025:
                    (A) New budget authority, $517,417,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $511,441,000,000.
            (14) Social Security Retirement and Disability 
        (650):
                    Fiscal year 2016:
                    (A) New budget authority, $33,885,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $33,928,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2017:
                    (A) New budget authority, $36,535,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $36,563,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2018:
                    (A) New budget authority, $39,407,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $39,424,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2019:
                    (A) New budget authority, $42,634,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $42,634,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2020:
                    (A) New budget authority, $46,104,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $46,104,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2021:
                    (A) New budget authority, $49,712,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $49,712,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2022:
                    (A) New budget authority, $53,547,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $53,547,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2023:
                    (A) New budget authority, $57,455,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $57,455,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2024:
                    (A) New budget authority, $61,546,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $61,546,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2025:
                    (A) New budget authority, $65,751,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $65,751,000,000.
            (15) Veterans Benefits and Services (700):
                    Fiscal year 2016:
                    (A) New budget authority, $166,261,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $171,862,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2017:
                    (A) New budget authority, $164,546,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $168,559,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2018:
                    (A) New budget authority, $162,740,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $162,753,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2019:
                    (A) New budget authority, $174,599,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $173,869,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2020:
                    (A) New budget authority, $179,485,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $178,581,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2021:
                    (A) New budget authority, $183,721,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $182,821,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2022:
                    (A) New budget authority, $196,041,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $195,056,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2023:
                    (A) New budget authority, $192,637,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $191,640,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2024:
                    (A) New budget authority, $189,442,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $188,356,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2025:
                    (A) New budget authority, $203,290,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $202,189,000,000.
            (16) Administration of Justice (750):
                    Fiscal year 2016:
                    (A) New budget authority, $50,976,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $56,455,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2017:
                    (A) New budget authority, $57,639,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $56,693,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2018:
                    (A) New budget authority, $55,885,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $54,562,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2019:
                    (A) New budget authority, $57,582,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $56,699,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2020:
                    (A) New budget authority, $59,324,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $61,755,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2021:
                    (A) New budget authority, $61,247,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $62,635,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2022:
                    (A) New budget authority, $63,791,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $63,748,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2023:
                    (A) New budget authority, $65,688,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $65,589,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2024:
                    (A) New budget authority, $67,626,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $67,266,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2025:
                    (A) New budget authority, $69,425,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $68,892,000,000.
            (17) General Government (800):
                    Fiscal year 2016:
                    (A) New budget authority, $23,151,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $22,981,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2017:
                    (A) New budget authority, $23,194,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $23,289,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2018:
                    (A) New budget authority, $23,426,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $23,371,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2019:
                    (A) New budget authority, $24,000,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $23,685,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2020:
                    (A) New budget authority, $24,703,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $24,290,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2021:
                    (A) New budget authority, $25,202,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $24,878,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2022:
                    (A) New budget authority, $25,962,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $25,562,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2023:
                    (A) New budget authority, $26,698,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $26,272,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2024:
                    (A) New budget authority, $27,130,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $26,766,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2025:
                    (A) New budget authority, $27,881,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $27,435,000,000.
            (18) Net Interest (900):
                    Fiscal year 2016:
                    (A) New budget authority, $367,542,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $367,542,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2017:
                    (A) New budget authority, $416,418,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $416,418,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2018:
                    (A) New budget authority, $479,446,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $479,446,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2019:
                    (A) New budget authority, $533,121,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $533,121,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2020:
                    (A) New budget authority, $579,344,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $579,344,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2021:
                    (A) New budget authority, $611,558,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $611,558,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2022:
                    (A) New budget authority, $642,888,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $642,888,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2023:
                    (A) New budget authority, $669,066,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $669,066,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2024:
                    (A) New budget authority, $687,195,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $687,195,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2025:
                    (A) New budget authority, $694,215,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $694,215,000,000.
            (19) Allowances (920):
                    Fiscal year 2016:
                    (A) New budget authority, $25,256,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $45,538,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2017:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$21,661,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$5,856,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2018:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$50,890,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$40,133,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2019:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$60,624,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$53,987,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2020:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$72,620,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$65,480,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2021:
                    (A) New budget authority, 
                -$104,010,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$98,128,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2022:
                    (A) New budget authority, 
                -$119,157,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$111,033,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2023:
                    (A) New budget authority, 
                -$131,418,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$122,924,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2024:
                    (A) New budget authority, 
                -$168,306,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$160,427,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2025:
                    (A) New budget authority, 
                -$204,728,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$186,150,000,000.
            (20) Undistributed Offsetting Receipts (950):
                    Fiscal year 2016:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$82,548,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$82,548,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2017:
                    (A) New budget authority, -$96,446,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$96,446,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2018:
                    (A) New budget authority, 
                -$103,441,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$103,441,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2019:
                    (A) New budget authority, 
                -$101,796,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$101,796,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2020:
                    (A) New budget authority, 
                -$101,191,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$101,191,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2021:
                    (A) New budget authority, 
                -$105,094,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$105,094,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2022:
                    (A) New budget authority, 
                -$112,536,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$112,536,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2023:
                    (A) New budget authority, 
                -$120,466,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$120,466,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2024:
                    (A) New budget authority, 
                -$130,467,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$130,467,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2025:
                    (A) New budget authority, 
                -$143,591,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, -$143,591,000,000.
            (21) Overseas Contingency Operations (970):
                    Fiscal year 2016:
                    (A) New budget authority, $96,287,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $48,798,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2017:
                    (A) New budget authority, $64,598,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $65,684,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2018:
                    (A) New budget authority, $62,593,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $63,758,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2019:
                    (A) New budget authority, $57,586,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $60,653,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2020:
                    (A) New budget authority, $49,578,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $54,095,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2021:
                    (A) New budget authority, $47,569,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $50,191,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2022:
                    (A) New budget authority, $0.
                    (B) Outlays, $19,493,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2023:
                    (A) New budget authority, $0.
                    (B) Outlays, $7,554,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2024:
                    (A) New budget authority, $0.
                    (B) Outlays, $2,683,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2025:
                    (A) New budget authority, $0.
                    (B) Outlays, $892,000,000.

              Subtitle B--Levels and Amounts in the Senate

SEC. 1201. SOCIAL SECURITY IN THE SENATE.

    (a) Social Security Revenues.--For purposes of Senate 
enforcement under sections 302 and 311 of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974, the amounts of revenues of the Federal Old-
Age and Survivors Insurance Trust Fund and the Federal 
Disability Insurance Trust Fund are as follows:
    Fiscal year 2016: $793,987,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2017: $826,098,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2018: $858,899,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2019: $892,421,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2020: $927,413,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2021: $963,896,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2022: $1,002,225,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2023: $1,041,673,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2024: $1,082,208,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2025: $1,124,298,000,000.
    (b) Social Security Outlays.--For purposes of Senate 
enforcement under sections 302 and 311 of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974, the amounts of outlays of the Federal Old-
Age and Survivors Insurance Trust Fund and the Federal 
Disability Insurance Trust Fund are as follows:
    Fiscal year 2016: $777,085,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2017: $822,772,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2018: $878,895,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2019: $937,383,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2020: $1,002,161,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2021: $1,070,556,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2022: $1,143,375,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2023: $1,221,800,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2024: $1,305,195,000,000.
    Fiscal year 2025: $1,393,212,000,000.
    (c) Social Security Administrative Expenses.--In the 
Senate, the amounts of new budget authority and budget outlays 
of the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance Trust Fund and 
the Federal Disability Insurance Trust Fund for administrative 
expenses are as follows:
            Fiscal year 2016:
                    (A) New budget authority, $5,146,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $5,205,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2017:
                    (A) New budget authority, $5,296,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $5,296,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2018:
                    (A) New budget authority, $5,469,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $5,440,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2019:
                    (A) New budget authority, $5,645,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $5,614,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2020:
                    (A) New budget authority, $5,827,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $5,795,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2021:
                    (A) New budget authority, $6,012,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $5,980,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2022:
                    (A) New budget authority, $6,205,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $6,172,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2023:
                    (A) New budget authority, $6,399,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $6,365,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2024:
                    (A) New budget authority, $6,600,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $6,565,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2025:
                    (A) New budget authority, $6,805,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $6,769,000,000.

SEC. 1202. POSTAL SERVICE DISCRETIONARY ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES IN THE 
                    SENATE.

    In the Senate, the amounts of new budget authority and 
budget outlays of the Postal Service for discretionary 
administrative expenses are as follows:
            Fiscal year 2016:
                    (A) New budget authority, $266,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $265,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2017:
                    (A) New budget authority, $277,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $277,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2018:
                    (A) New budget authority, $288,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $288,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2019:
                    (A) New budget authority, $299,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $298,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2020:
                    (A) New budget authority, $310,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $310,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2021:
                    (A) New budget authority, $321,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $320,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2022:
                    (A) New budget authority, $334,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $333,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2023:
                    (A) New budget authority, $346,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $345,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2024:
                    (A) New budget authority, $358,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $357,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2025:
                    (A) New budget authority, $371,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $370,000,000.

                        TITLE II--RECONCILIATION

SEC. 2001. RECONCILIATION IN THE SENATE.

    (a) In General.--
            (1) Committee on finance.--The Committee on Finance 
        of the Senate shall report changes in laws within its 
        jurisdiction to reduce the deficit by not less than 
        $1,000,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2016 
        through 2025.
            (2) Committee on health, education, labor, and 
        pensions.--The Committee on Health, Education, Labor, 
        and Pensions of the Senate shall report changes in laws 
        within its jurisdiction to reduce the deficit by not 
        less than $1,000,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 
        2016 through 2025.
            (3) Submissions.--In the Senate, not later than 
        July 24, 2015, the Senate Committees named in 
        paragraphs (1) and (2) shall submit their 
        recommendations to the Committee on the Budget of the 
        Senate. Upon receiving all such recommendations, the 
        Committee on the Budget of the Senate shall report to 
        the Senate a reconciliation bill carrying out all such 
        recommendations without any substantive revision.
    (b) Limit on Senate Consideration of Reconciliation.--
            (1) Point of order.--It shall not be in order in 
        the Senate to consider a bill or joint resolution 
        reported pursuant to subsection (a), or an amendment 
        to, conference report on, or amendment between the 
        Houses in relation to such a bill or joint resolution, 
        which would increase the public debt limit under 
        section 3101 of title 31, United States Code, during 
        the period of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.
            (2) Waiver.--This subsection may be waived or 
        suspended in the Senate only by the affirmative vote of 
        two-thirds of the Members, duly chosen and sworn.
            (3) Appeals.--An affirmative vote of two-thirds of 
        the Members of the Senate, duly chosen and sworn, shall 
        be required to sustain an appeal of the ruling of the 
        Chair on the point of order raised under this 
        subsection.

SEC. 2002. RECONCILIATION IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

    (a) In General.--
            (1) Committee on education and the workforce.--The 
        Committee on Education and the Workforce of the House 
        of Representatives shall submit changes in laws within 
        its jurisdiction to reduce the deficit by not less than 
        $1,000,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2016 
        through 2025.
            (2) Committee on energy and commerce.--The 
        Committee on Energy and Commerce of the House of 
        Representatives shall submit changes in laws within its 
        jurisdiction to reduce the deficit by not less than 
        $1,000,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2016 
        through 2025.
            (3) Committee on ways and means.--The Committee on 
        Ways and Means of the House of Representatives shall 
        submit changes in laws within its jurisdiction to 
        reduce the deficit by not less than $1,000,000,000 for 
        the period of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.
            (4) Submission providing for deficit reduction.--In 
        the House of Representatives, not later than July 24, 
        2015, the committees named in paragraphs (1), (2), and 
        (3) shall submit their recommendations to the Committee 
        on the Budget of the House of Representatives to carry 
        out this section.
    (b) Reconciliation Procedures.--
            (1) Estimating assumptions.--
                    (A) Assumptions.--In the House of 
                Representatives, for purposes of titles III and 
                IV of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 
                U.S.C. 631 et seq. and 651 et seq.), the 
                Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the 
                House of Representatives shall use the baseline 
                underlying the Congressional Budget Office's 
                March 2015 update to the Budget and Economic 
                Outlook: 2015 to 2025 (January 2015) when 
                making estimates of any bill or joint 
                resolution, or any amendment thereto, amendment 
                between the Houses in relation thereto, or 
                conference report thereon. If adjustments to 
                the baseline are made subsequent to the 
                adoption of this concurrent resolution, then 
                such Chairman shall determine whether to use 
                any of these adjustments when making such 
                estimates.
                    (B) Intent.--The authority set forth in 
                subparagraph (A) should only be exercised if 
                the estimates used to determine the compliance 
                of such measures with the budgetary 
                requirements included in this concurrent 
                resolution are inaccurate because adjustments 
                made to the baseline are inconsistent with the 
                assumptions underlying the budgetary levels set 
                forth in this concurrent resolution. Such 
                inaccurate adjustments made after the adoption 
                of this concurrent resolution may include 
                selected adjustments for rulemaking, judicial 
                actions, adjudication, and interpretative rules 
                that have major budgetary effects and are 
                inconsistent with the assumptions underlying 
                the budgetary levels set forth in this 
                concurrent resolution.
                    (C) Congressional budget office 
                estimates.--Upon the request of the Chairman of 
                the Committee on the Budget of the House of 
                Representatives, the Congressional Budget 
                Office shall prepare for any measure an 
                estimate based on the baseline determination 
                made by such Chairman pursuant to subparagraph 
                (A).
            (2) Repeal of the president's health care law 
        through reconciliation.--In the House of 
        Representatives, in preparing their submissions under 
        subsection (a) to the Committee on the Budget of the 
        House of Representatives, the committees named in 
        subsection (a) shall--
                    (A) note the policies discussed in title VI 
                that repeal the Affordable Care Act and the 
                health care related provisions of the Health 
                Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010; 
                and
                    (B) determine the most effective methods by 
                which the health care laws referred to in 
                subparagraph (A) shall be repealed in their 
                entirety.
            (3) Revision of budgetary levels.--
                    (A) In general.--Upon the submission of a 
                reconciliation recommendation to the House of 
                Representatives or the Committee on the Budget 
                of the House of Representatives or the 
                submission of a conference report to the House 
                of Representatives pursuant to this section, in 
                which a committee is deemed to have complied 
                with its directive by virtue of section 310(c) 
                of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 
                U.S.C. 641(c)), the Chairman of the Committee 
                on the Budget of the House of Representatives 
                may file with the House of Representatives 
                appropriately revised allocations, aggregates, 
                and functional levels.
                    (B) Revision.--Allocations and aggregates 
                revised pursuant to this paragraph shall be 
                considered to be allocations and aggregates 
                established by this concurrent resolution on 
                the budget pursuant to section 301 of the 
                Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 
                632).

                     TITLE III--BUDGET ENFORCEMENT

             Subtitle A--Budget Enforcement in Both Houses

SEC. 3101. POINT OF ORDER AGAINST INCREASING LONG-TERM DEFICITS OR 
                    DIRECT SPENDING.

    (a) Congressional Budget Office Analysis of Proposals.--The 
Director of the Congressional Budget Office shall, to the 
extent practicable, prepare an estimate of whether a measure 
would cause, relative to current law, a net increase in on-
budget deficits in the Senate, and a net increase in direct 
spending in the House, in excess of $5,000,000,000 in any of 
the 4 consecutive 10-fiscal year periods beginning with the 
first fiscal year that is 10 fiscal years after the budget year 
provided for in the most recently adopted concurrent resolution 
on the budget--
            (1) in the Senate, for each bill and joint 
        resolution reported by a committee, other than the 
        Committee on Appropriations, and amendments thereto, 
        amendments between the Houses in relation thereto, 
        conference reports thereon, and motions thereon; and
            (2) in the House of Representatives, for each bill 
        and joint resolution reported by a committee, other 
        than the Committee on Appropriations, and amendments 
        thereto and conference reports thereon.
    (b) Point of Order.--It shall not be in order--
            (1) in the Senate to consider any bill, joint 
        resolution, amendment, amendment between the Houses, 
        conference report, or motion that would cause a net 
        increase in on-budget deficits in excess of 
        $5,000,000,000 in any of the 4 consecutive 10-fiscal 
        year periods described in subsection (a); and
            (2) in the House of Representatives to consider any 
        bill or joint resolution, or amendment thereto or 
        conference report thereon, that would cause a net 
        increase in direct spending in excess of $5,000,000,000 
        in any of the 4 consecutive 10-fiscal year periods 
        described in subsection (a).
    (c) Supermajority Waiver and Appeal in the Senate.--
            (1) Waiver.--In the Senate, subsection (b) may be 
        waived or suspended only by the affirmative vote of 
        three-fifths of the Members, duly chosen and sworn.
            (2) Appeal.--In the Senate, an affirmative vote of 
        three-fifths of the Members, duly chosen and sworn, 
        shall be required to sustain an appeal of the ruling of 
        the Chair on a point of order raised under subsection 
        (b).
    (d) Limitation.--The provisions of this section shall not 
apply to--
            (1) in the Senate, any bills, joint resolutions, 
        amendments, amendments between the Houses, conference 
        reports, or motions for which the Chairman of the 
        Committee on the Budget of the Senate has made 
        adjustments to the allocations, levels, or limits 
        contained in this concurrent resolution pursuant to 
        section 4303(1); and
            (2) in the House of Representatives, any bills or 
        joint resolutions, or amendments thereto or conference 
        reports thereon, for which the Chairman of the 
        Committee on the Budget of House of Representatives has 
        made adjustments to the allocations, levels, or limits 
        contained in this concurrent resolution pursuant to 
        section 4501, 4502, or 4503.
    (e) Determinations of Budget Levels.--For purposes of this 
section--
            (1) the levels of net increases in deficits shall 
        be determined on the basis of estimates provided by the 
        Committee on the Budget of the Senate; and
            (2) the levels of net increases in direct spending 
        shall be determined on the basis of estimates provided 
        by the Committee on the Budget of the House of 
        Representatives.
    (f) Repeal in the Senate.--In the Senate, section 311 of S. 
Con. Res. 70 (110th Congress), the concurrent resolution on the 
budget for fiscal year 2009, shall no longer apply.
    (g) Sunset in the House of Representatives.--In the House 
of Representatives, this section shall remain in effect through 
September 30, 2017.

SEC. 3102. ALLOCATION FOR OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS/GLOBAL WAR ON 
                    TERRORISM.

    (a) Separate Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on 
Terrorism Allocation.--In the Senate and the House of 
Representatives, there shall be a separate allocation of new 
budget authority and outlays provided to the Committee on 
Appropriations for the purposes of Overseas Contingency 
Operations/Global War on Terrorism, which shall be deemed an 
allocation under section 302(a) of the Congressional Budget Act 
of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 633(a)). Section 302(a)(3) of such Act shall 
not apply to such separate allocation.
    (b) 302 Allocations.--The separate allocation referred to 
in subsection (a) shall be the exclusive allocation for 
Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism under 
section 302(b) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 
U.S.C. 633(b)). The Committee on Appropriations of the 
applicable House of Congress may provide suballocations of such 
separate allocation under such section 302(b).
    (c) Application.--
            (1) In general.--For purposes of enforcing the 
        separate allocation referred to in subsection (a) under 
        section 302(f) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 
        (2 U.S.C. 633(f)), the ``first fiscal year'' and the 
        ``total of fiscal years'' shall be deemed to refer to 
        fiscal year 2016. Section 302(c) of such Act (2 U.S.C. 
        633(c)) shall not apply to such separate allocation.
            (2) Additional senate enforcement.--In the Senate, 
        section 302(f)(2)(A) of the Congressional Budget Act of 
        1974 (2 U.S.C. 633(f)(2)(A)) shall apply with respect 
        to the separate allocation to the Committee on 
        Appropriations referred to in subsection (a).
    (d) Designations.--New budget authority or outlays shall 
only be counted toward the allocation referred to in subsection 
(a) if they are designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) 
of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
1985 (2 U.S.C. 901(b)(2)(B)(A)(ii)).
    (e) Adjustments.--For purposes of subsection (a) for fiscal 
year 2016, no adjustment shall be made under section 314(a) of 
the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 if any adjustment would be 
made under section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced Budget and 
Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (2 U.S.C. 
901(b)(2)(B)(A)(ii)).
    (f) Adjustments To Fund Overseas Contingency Operations/
Global War on Terrorism.--The Chairman of the Committee on the 
Budget of the applicable House of Congress may adjust the 
allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate budgetary levels 
related to Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on 
Terrorism or the allocation under section 302(a) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 633(a)) to the 
Committee on Appropriations set forth in the joint statement of 
managers accompanying this concurrent resolution to account for 
new information.

SEC. 3103. POINT OF ORDER AGAINST CERTAIN CHANGES IN MANDATORY 
                    PROGRAMS.

    (a) Definition.--In this section, the term ``CHIMP'' means 
a provision that--
            (1) would have been estimated as affecting direct 
        spending or receipts under section 252 of the Balanced 
        Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (2 
        U.S.C. 902) (as in effect prior to September 30, 2002) 
        if the provision was included in legislation other than 
        appropriation Acts; and
            (2) results in a net decrease in budget authority 
        in the budget year, but does not result in a net 
        decrease in outlays over the period of the total of the 
        current year, the budget year, and all fiscal years 
        covered under the most recently adopted concurrent 
        resolution on the budget.
    (b) Points of Order.--
            (1) In the senate.--It shall not be in order in the 
        Senate to consider a bill or joint resolution making 
        appropriations for a full fiscal year, or an amendment 
        thereto, amendment between the Houses in relation 
        thereto, conference report thereon, or motion thereon, 
        that includes a CHIMP that, if enacted, would cause the 
        absolute value of the total budget authority of all 
        such CHIMPs enacted in relation to a full fiscal year 
        to be more than the amount specified in paragraph (3).
            (2) In the house of representatives.--
                    (A) In general.--A provision in a bill or 
                joint resolution making appropriations for a 
                full fiscal year that proposes a CHIMP that, if 
                enacted, would cause the absolute value of the 
                total budget authority of all such CHIMPs 
                enacted in relation to a full fiscal year to be 
                more than the amount specified in paragraph 
                (3), shall not be in order in the House of 
                Representatives.
                    (B) Amendments and conference reports.--It 
                shall not be in order in the House of 
                Representatives to consider an amendment to, or 
                a conference report on, a bill or joint 
                resolution making appropriations for a full 
                fiscal year if such amendment thereto or 
                conference report thereon proposes a CHIMP 
                that, if enacted, would cause the absolute 
                value of the total budget authority of all such 
                CHIMPs enacted in relation to a full fiscal 
                year to be more than the amount specified in 
                paragraph (3).
            (3) Amount.--The amount specified in this paragraph 
        is--
                    (A) for fiscal year 2016, $19,100,000,000;
                    (B) for fiscal year 2017, $19,100,000,000;
                    (C) for fiscal year 2018, $17,000,000,000; 
                and
                    (D) for fiscal year 2019, $15,000,000,000.
    (c) Determination.--For purposes of this section, budgetary 
levels shall be determined on the basis of estimates provided 
by the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the 
applicable House of Congress.
    (d) Supermajority Waiver and Appeal in the Senate.--In the 
Senate, subsection (b) may be waived or suspended only by an 
affirmative vote of three-fifths of the Members, duly chosen 
and sworn. An affirmative vote of three-fifths of the Members 
of the Senate, duly chosen and sworn, shall be required to 
sustain an appeal of the ruling of the Chair on a point of 
order raised under subsection (b).
    (e) Repeal.--In the Senate, section 314 of S. Con. Res. 70 
(110th Congress), the concurrent resolution on the budget for 
fiscal year 2009, shall no longer apply.

SEC. 3104. POINT OF ORDER AGAINST PROVISIONS THAT CONSTITUTE CHANGES IN 
                    MANDATORY PROGRAMS AFFECTING THE CRIME VICTIMS 
                    FUND.

    (a) Definition.--In this section--
            (1) the term ``CHIMP'' has the meaning given such 
        term in section 3103(a); and
            (2) the term ``Crime Victims Fund'' means the Crime 
        Victims Fund established under section 1402 of the 
        Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (42 U.S.C. 10601).
    (b) Point of Order in the Senate.--
            (1) In general.--When the Senate is considering a 
        bill or joint resolution making full-year 
        appropriations for fiscal year 2016, or an amendment 
        thereto, amendment between the Houses in relation 
        thereto, conference report thereon, or motion thereon, 
        if a point of order is made by a Senator against a 
        provision containing a CHIMP affecting the Crime 
        Victims Fund that, if enacted, would cause the absolute 
        value of the total budget authority of all CHIMPs 
        affecting the Crime Victims Fund in relation to fiscal 
        year 2016 to be more than $10,800,000,000, and the 
        point of order is sustained by the Chair, that 
        provision shall be stricken from the measure and may 
        not be offered as an amendment from the floor.
            (2) Form of the point of order.--A point of order 
        under paragraph (1) may be raised by a Senator as 
        provided in section 313(e) of the Congressional Budget 
        Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 644(e)).
            (3) Conference reports.--When the Senate is 
        considering a conference report on, or an amendment 
        between the Houses in relation to, a bill or joint 
        resolution, upon a point of order being made by any 
        Senator pursuant to paragraph (1), and such point of 
        order being sustained, such material contained in such 
        conference report or House amendment shall be stricken, 
        and the Senate shall proceed to consider the question 
        of whether the Senate shall recede from its amendment 
        and concur with a further amendment, or concur in the 
        House amendment with a further amendment, as the case 
        may be, which further amendment shall consist of only 
        that portion of the conference report or House 
        amendment, as the case may be, not so stricken. Any 
        such motion in the Senate shall be debatable. In any 
        case in which such point of order is sustained against 
        a conference report (or Senate amendment derived from 
        such conference report by operation of this 
        subsection), no further amendment shall be in order.
            (4) Supermajority waiver and appeal.--In the 
        Senate, this subsection may be waived or suspended only 
        by an affirmative vote of three-fifths of the Members, 
        duly chose and sworn. An affirmative vote of three-
        fifths of Members of the Senate, duly chosen and sworn 
        shall be required to sustain an appeal of the ruling of 
        the Chair on a point of order raised under this 
        subsection.
            (5) Determination.--For purposes of this 
        subsection, budgetary levels shall be determined on the 
        basis of estimates provided by the Chairman of the 
        Committee on the Budget of the Senate.
    (c) Points of Order in the House.--
            (1) In general.--A provision in a bill or joint 
        resolution making full-year appropriations for fiscal 
        year 2016 that proposes a CHIMP affecting the Crime 
        Victims Fund that, if enacted, would cause the absolute 
        value of the total budget authority of all CHIMPs 
        affecting the Crime Victims Fund in relation to fiscal 
        year 2016 to be more than $10,800,000,000, shall not be 
        in order in the House of Representatives.
            (2) Amendments and conference reports.--It shall 
        not be in order in the House of Representatives to 
        consider an amendment to, or a conference report on, a 
        bill or joint resolution making full-year 
        appropriations for fiscal year 2016 if such amendment 
        thereto or conference report thereon proposes a CHIMP 
        affecting the Crime Victims Fund that, if enacted, 
        would cause the absolute value of the total budget 
        authority of all CHIMPs affecting the Crime Victims 
        Fund in relation to fiscal year 2016 to be more than 
        $10,800,000,000.
            (3) Determination.--For purposes of this 
        subsection, budgetary levels shall be determined on the 
        basis of estimates provided by the Chairman of the 
        Committee on the Budget of the House of 
        Representatives.
    (d) Review of Procedures Regarding CHIMPs.--The Committee 
on the Budget and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate 
and the Committee on the Budget and the Committee on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives shall review 
existing budget enforcement procedures regarding CHIMPs 
included in appropriations legislation. These committees of 
jurisdiction should consult with other relevant committees of 
jurisdiction and other interested parties to review such 
procedures, including for Crime Victims Fund spending, and 
include any agreed upon recommendations in subsequent 
concurrent resolutions on the budget.

SEC. 3105. FAIR-VALUE CREDIT ESTIMATES.

    (a) Fair-value Estimates.--Upon the request of the Chairman 
of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate or the Chairman of 
the Committee on the Budget of the House of Representatives, 
any estimate prepared by the Congressional Budget Office under 
title V of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 661 
et seq.) of the cost of a measure shall include, when 
practicable, an additional estimate of the cost, measured on a 
fair-value basis--
            (1) in the Senate, for any bill, joint resolution, 
        amendment, amendment between the Houses, conference 
        report, or motion; and
            (2) in the House of Representatives, for any bill 
        or joint resolution, or amendment thereto or conference 
        report thereon.
    (b) Estimates for Housing and Student Loan Programs.--Any 
estimate prepared by the Congressional Budget Office under 
title V of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 661 
et seq.) of the cost of a provision in a measure relating to a 
housing, residential mortgage, or student loan program shall 
include an additional estimate of the cost, measured on a fair-
value basis--
            (1) in the Senate, for any bill, joint resolution, 
        amendment, amendment between the Houses, conference 
        report, or motion; and
            (2) in the House of Representatives, for any bill 
        or joint resolution, or amendment thereto or conference 
        report thereon.
    (c) Enforcement in the House of Representatives.--If the 
Director of the Congressional Budget Office provides an 
estimate pursuant to subsection (a) or (b), the Chairman of the 
Committee on the Budget of the House of Representatives may use 
such estimate to determine compliance with the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 621 et seq.) and other budgetary 
enforcement controls.

SEC. 3106. SCORING RULE FOR CURRENCY MODERNIZATION.

    In the Senate and the House of Representatives, for 
purposes of determining points of order under the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 621 et seq.) or any concurrent 
resolution on the budget, any provision contained in a measure 
relating to a transition from the $1 note to a $1 coin shall--
            (1) in the Senate, for each bill, joint resolution, 
        amendment, amendment between the Houses, conference 
        report, or motion--
                    (A) record the changes in budget authority, 
                outlays, and revenues of the provision in the 
                first year in which the provision takes effect;
                    (B) determine the changes in budget 
                authority, outlays, and revenues of the 
                provision based on a net present value estimate 
                of the changes in budget authority, outlays, 
                and revenues of the provision over a 30-year 
                period; and
                    (C) incorporate the changes in budget 
                authority, outlays, and revenues of the 
                provision due to behavioral changes; and
            (2) in the House of Representatives, for each bill 
        or joint resolution, or amendment thereto or conference 
        report thereon--
                    (A) record the changes in budget authority, 
                outlays, and revenues of the provision in the 
                first year in which the provision takes effect;
                    (B) determine the changes in budget 
                authority, outlays, and revenues of the 
                provision based on a net present value estimate 
                of the changes in budget authority, outlays, 
                and revenues of the provision over a 30-year 
                period; and
                    (C) incorporate the changes in budget 
                authority, outlays, and revenues of the 
                provision due to behavioral changes.

SEC. 3107. LONG-TERM SCORING OF CHANGES IN SPENDING LIMITS AND 
                    EXTENSION OF HIGHWAY PROGRAMS.

    (a) Scoring of Legislation Increasing the Discretionary 
Spending Limits.--Any estimate provided by the Congressional 
Budget Office shall provide, in addition to such estimate, an 
estimate of the changes in budget authority, outlays, and 
revenues under the legislation over the period of fiscal year 
2016 through fiscal year 2045--
            (1) in the Senate, for any bill, joint resolution, 
        amendment, amendment between the Houses, conference 
        report, or motion that increases the discretionary 
        spending limits under section 251(c) of the Balanced 
        Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (2 
        U.S.C. 901(c)); and
            (2) in the House of Representatives, for any bill 
        or joint resolution, or amendment thereto or conference 
        report thereon, that increases the discretionary 
        spending limits under section 251(c) of the Balanced 
        Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (2 
        U.S.C. 901(c)).
    (b) Scoring of Legislation Relating to the Highway Trust 
Fund.--Any estimate provided by the Congressional Budget Office 
shall provide, in addition to such estimate, an estimate of the 
changes in budget authority, outlays, and revenues under the 
legislation over the period of fiscal year 2016 through fiscal 
year 2045--
            (1) in the Senate, for any bill, joint resolution, 
        amendment, amendment between the Houses, conference 
        report, or motion that transfers amounts from the 
        general fund of the Treasury to the Highway Trust Fund; 
        and
            (2) in the House of Representatives, for any bill 
        or joint resolution, or amendment thereto or conference 
        report thereon, that transfers amounts from the general 
        fund of the Treasury to the Highway Trust Fund.

SEC. 3108. REQUIRING CLEARER REPORTING OF PROJECTED FEDERAL SPENDING 
                    AND DEFICITS.

    When the Congressional Budget Office releases its annual 
update to the Budget and Economic Outlook, the Congressional 
Budget Office shall provide a projection of Federal revenues, 
outlays, and deficits for the 30-year period beginning with the 
budget year, expressed in terms of dollars and as a percent of 
gross domestic product, as part of its annual update required 
under the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 621 et 
seq.).

SEC. 3109. CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE ESTIMATES OF MEASURES WITH 
                    SIGNIFICANT OUTLAY EFFECTS.

    The Congressional Budget Office shall prepare, to the 
extent practicable, an estimate of the outlay changes during 
the second and third decade of enactment for any spending 
legislative provision--
            (1) which proposes a change or changes to law that 
        the Congressional Budget Office determines has an 
        outlay impact in excess of 0.25 percent of the gross 
        domestic product of the United States during the first 
        decade or in the tenth year; or
            (2) with respect to which the Chairman of the 
        Committee on the Budget of the Senate or the Chairman 
        of the Committee on the Budget of the House of 
        Representatives has requested such an estimate.

SEC. 3110. PROHIBITING THE USE OF GUARANTEE FEES AS AN OFFSET.

    In the Senate and the House of Representatives, for 
purposes of determining points of order under the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 621 et seq.) or any concurrent 
resolution on the budget, any provision that increases, or 
extends the increase of, any guarantee fees of the Federal 
National Mortgage Association or the Federal Home Loan Mortgage 
Corporation shall not be counted in estimating the level of 
budget authority, outlays, or revenues--
            (1) in the Senate, for any bill, joint resolution, 
        amendment, amendment between the Houses, conference 
        report, or motion; and
            (2) in the House of Representatives, for any bill 
        or joint resolution, or amendment thereto or conference 
        report thereon.

SEC. 3111. INFORMATION FOR CONGRESS AND THE PUBLIC ABOUT PROJECTED 
                    FEDERAL OUTLAYS, REVENUES, AND DEFICITS.

    As part of the annual update to the Budget and Economic 
Outlook required under section 202(e) of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 602(e)), and at any other time the 
Congressional Budget Office releases projections of Federal 
deficits over any term of years, the Congressional Budget 
Office shall publish with its projection a 1-page statement--
            (1) summarizing and categorizing total outlays, 
        receipts, surpluses, and deficits of the Federal 
        Government on a unified basis for that same prospective 
        time period; and
            (2) categorizing and subtotaling separately--
                    (A) outlays for mandatory programs and for 
                discretionary programs;
                    (B) outlays, payroll tax revenue, and 
                offsetting receipts for Social Security and for 
                Medicare;
                    (C) the surplus or deficit of revenues over 
                outlays for Social Security and for Medicare; 
                and
                    (D) revenues.

SEC. 3112. HONEST ACCOUNTING: COST ESTIMATES FOR MAJOR LEGISLATION TO 
                    INCORPORATE MACROECONOMIC EFFECTS.

    (a) CBO and JCT Estimates.--During the 114th Congress, any 
estimate provided by the Congressional Budget Office under 
section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 
653) or by the Joint Committee on Taxation to the Congressional 
Budget Office under section 201(f) of such Act (2 U.S.C. 
601(f)) for major legislation considered in the House of 
Representatives or the Senate shall, to the greatest extent 
practicable, incorporate the budgetary effects of changes in 
economic output, employment, capital stock, and other 
macroeconomic variables resulting from such major legislation.
    (b) Contents.--Any estimate referred to in subsection (a) 
shall, to the extent practicable, include--
            (1) a qualitative assessment of the budgetary 
        effects (including macroeconomic variables described in 
        subsection (a)) of the major legislation in the 20-
        fiscal year period beginning after the last fiscal year 
        of the most recently agreed to concurrent resolution on 
        the budget that sets forth budgetary levels required 
        under section 301 of the Congressional Budget Act of 
        1974 (2 U.S.C. 632); and
            (2) an identification of the critical assumptions 
        and the source of data underlying that estimate.
    (c) Definitions.--In this section:
            (1) Major legislation.--The term ``major 
        legislation'' means--
                    (A) in the Senate, a bill, joint 
                resolution, conference report, amendment, 
                amendment between the Houses, or treaty--
                            (i) for which an estimate is 
                        required to be prepared pursuant to 
                        section 402 of the Congressional Budget 
                        Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 653) and that 
                        causes a gross budgetary effect (before 
                        incorporating macroeconomic effects and 
                        not including timing shifts) in a 
                        fiscal year in the period of years of 
                        the most recently agreed to concurrent 
                        resolution on the budget equal to or 
                        greater than--
                                    (I) 0.25 percent of the 
                                current projected gross 
                                domestic product of the United 
                                States for that fiscal year; or
                                    (II) for a treaty, equal to 
                                or greater than $15,000,000,000 
                                for that fiscal year; or
                            (ii) designated as such by--
                                    (I) the Chairman of the 
                                Committee on the Budget of the 
                                Senate for all direct spending 
                                and revenue legislation; or
                                    (II) the Senator who is 
                                Chairman or Vice Chairman of 
                                the Joint Committee on Taxation 
                                for revenue legislation; and
                    (B) in the House of Representatives, a bill 
                or joint resolution, or amendment thereto or 
                conference report thereon--
                            (i) for which an estimate is 
                        required to be prepared pursuant to 
                        section 402 of the Congressional Budget 
                        Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 653) and that 
                        causes a gross budgetary effect (before 
                        incorporating macroeconomic effects and 
                        not including timing shifts) in a 
                        fiscal year in the period of years of 
                        the most recently agreed to concurrent 
                        resolution on the budget equal to or 
                        greater than 0.25 percent of the 
                        current projected gross domestic 
                        product of the United States for that 
                        fiscal year; or
                            (ii) designated as such by--
                                    (I) the Chairman of the 
                                Committee on the Budget of the 
                                House of Representatives for 
                                all direct spending and revenue 
                                legislation; or
                                    (II) the Member who is 
                                Chairman or Vice Chairman of 
                                the Joint Committee on Taxation 
                                for revenue legislation.
            (2) Budgetary effects.--The term ``budgetary 
        effects'' means changes in revenues, direct spending 
        outlays, and deficits.
            (3) Timing shifts.--The term ``timing shifts'' 
        means--
                    (A) provisions that cause a delay of the 
                date on which outlays flowing from direct 
                spending would otherwise occur from one fiscal 
                year to the next fiscal year; or
                    (B) provisions that cause an acceleration 
                of the date on which revenues would otherwise 
                occur from one fiscal year to the prior fiscal 
                year.

              Subtitle B--Budget Enforcement in the Senate

SEC. 3201. EXTENSION OF ENFORCEMENT OF BUDGETARY POINTS OF ORDER IN THE 
                    SENATE.

    (a) Extension of Congressional Budget Act of 1974 Points of 
Order.--
            (1) In general.--Notwithstanding any provision of 
        the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 621 et 
        seq.), subsections (c)(2) and (d)(3) of section 904 of 
        the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 621 
        note) shall remain in effect for purposes of Senate 
        enforcement through September 30, 2025.
            (2) Repeal.--In the Senate, section 205 of S. Con. 
        Res. 21 (110th Congress), the concurrent resolution on 
        the budget for fiscal year 2008, shall no longer apply.
    (b) Other Points of Order.--
            (1) Pay-As-You-Go.--Section 201(d) of S. Con. Res. 
        21 (110th Congress), the concurrent resolution on the 
        budget for fiscal year 2008, is repealed.
            (2) Short-term deficits.--Section 404(e) of S. Con. 
        Res. 13 (111th Congress), the concurrent resolution on 
        the budget for fiscal year 2010, is repealed.

SEC. 3202. POINT OF ORDER AGAINST ADVANCE APPROPRIATIONS IN THE SENATE.

    (a) In General.--
            (1) Point of order.--Except as provided in 
        subsection (b), it shall not be in order in the Senate 
        to consider any bill, joint resolution, motion, 
        amendment, amendment between the Houses, or conference 
        report that would provide an advance appropriation for 
        a discretionary account.
            (2) Definition.--In this section, the term 
        ``advance appropriation'' means any new budget 
        authority provided in a bill or joint resolution making 
        appropriations for fiscal year 2016 that first becomes 
        available for any fiscal year after 2016, or any new 
        budget authority provided in a bill or joint resolution 
        making general appropriations or continuing 
        appropriations for fiscal year 2017, that first becomes 
        available for any fiscal year after 2017.
    (b) Exceptions.--Advance appropriations may be provided--
            (1) for fiscal years 2017 and 2018 for programs, 
        projects, activities, or accounts identified in the 
        joint explanatory statement of managers accompanying 
        this concurrent resolution under the heading ``Accounts 
        Identified for Advance Appropriations'' in an aggregate 
        amount not to exceed $28,852,000,000 in new budget 
        authority in each fiscal year;
            (2) for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting; 
        and
            (3) for the Department of Veterans Affairs for the 
        Medical Services, Medical Support and Compliance, and 
        Medical Facilities accounts of the Veterans Health 
        Administration.
    (c) Supermajority Waiver and Appeal.--
            (1) Waiver.--In the Senate, subsection (a) may be 
        waived or suspended only by an affirmative vote of 
        three-fifths of the Members, duly chosen and sworn.
            (2) Appeal.--An affirmative vote of three-fifths of 
        the Members of the Senate, duly chosen and sworn, shall 
        be required to sustain an appeal of the ruling of the 
        Chair on a point of order raised under subsection (a).
    (d) Form of Point of Order.--A point of order under 
subsection (a) may be raised by a Senator as provided in 
section 313(e) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 
U.S.C. 644(e)).
    (e) Conference Reports.--When the Senate is considering a 
conference report on, or an amendment between the Houses in 
relation to, a bill or joint resolution, upon a point of order 
being made by any Senator pursuant to this section, and such 
point of order being sustained, such material contained in such 
conference report or House amendment shall be stricken, and the 
Senate shall proceed to consider the question of whether the 
Senate shall recede from its amendment and concur with a 
further amendment, or concur in the House amendment with a 
further amendment, as the case may be, which further amendment 
shall consist of only that portion of the conference report or 
House amendment, as the case may be, not so stricken. Any such 
motion in the Senate shall be debatable. In any case in which 
such point of order is sustained against a conference report 
(or Senate amendment derived from such conference report by 
operation of this subsection), no further amendment shall be in 
order.

SEC. 3203. SUPERMAJORITY ENFORCEMENT OF UNFUNDED MANDATES IN THE 
                    SENATE.

    Paragraphs (1) and (2) of section 425(a) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 658d(a)) shall be 
subject to the waiver and appeal requirements of subsections 
(c)(2) and (d)(3), respectively, of section 904 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 621 note).

SEC. 3204. REPEAL OF SENATE POINT OF ORDER AGAINST CERTAIN 
                    RECONCILIATION LEGISLATION.

    Section 202 of S. Con. Res. 21 (110th Congress), the 
concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2008, shall 
no longer apply in the Senate.

SEC. 3205. PROHIBITION ON AGREEING TO LEGISLATION WITHOUT A SCORE IN 
                    THE SENATE.

    (a) In General.--In the Senate, it shall not be in order to 
vote on passage of matter that requires an estimate under 
section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 
653), unless such estimate was made publicly available on the 
website of the Congressional Budget Office not later than 28 
hours before the time the vote commences.
    (b) Supermajority Waiver and Appeal.--
            (1) Waiver.--In the Senate, subsection (a) may be 
        waived or suspended only by an affirmative vote of 
        three-fifths of the Members, duly chosen and sworn.
            (2) Appeal.--An affirmative vote of three-fifths of 
        the Members of the Senate, duly chosen and sworn, shall 
        be required to sustain an appeal of the ruling of the 
        Chair on a point of order raised under subsection (a).

SEC. 3206. PROTECTING THE SAVINGS IN REPORTED RECONCILIATION BILLS IN 
                    THE SENATE.

    In the Senate, section 310(d)(1) of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 641(d)(1)) shall apply and may be 
waived in accordance with the procedures applicable to a point 
of order raised under section 310(d)(2) of such Act.

SEC. 3207. SCORING RULE FOR CERTAIN ENERGY CONTRACTS IN THE SENATE.

    (a) Estimates.--In the Senate, for purposes of determining 
points of order established under the Congressional Budget Act 
of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 621 et seq.) or any concurrent resolution on 
the budget, any estimate by the Congressional Budget Office of 
a provision in a bill, joint resolution, amendment, conference 
report, or amendment between the Houses that directly or 
indirectly modifies the use of the authority to enter covered 
energy savings contracts shall--
            (1) record in the first year in which the provision 
        would become effective, the changes in budget 
        authority, outlays, and revenues (as estimated in 
        accordance with paragraph (2)) of any modifications to 
        the use of the authority to enter the covered energy 
        savings contracts;
            (2) in estimating the changes in budget authority, 
        outlays, and revenues of the legislation, calculate the 
        costs and savings arising from covered energy savings 
        contracts, including required payments under the 
        covered energy savings contracts, anticipated savings 
        from reductions in energy use, and other anticipated 
        costs and reductions in spending associated with the 
        covered energy savings contracts, on a net present 
        value basis; and
            (3) classify the effects of the provision to be 
        changes in spending subject to the availability of 
        appropriations.
    (b) Rule of Construction.--Nothing in subsection (a) shall 
be construed to modify the methodology for estimating the 
changes in budget authority, outlays, and revenues of a 
provision that--
            (1) does not relate to covered energy savings 
        contracts in a bill, joint resolution, amendment, 
        conference report, or amendment between the Houses that 
        contains a provision described in subsection (a); or
            (2) provides appropriations.
    (c) Definition.--In this section, the term ``covered energy 
savings contract'' means--
            (1) an energy savings performance contract 
        authorized under section 801 of the National Energy 
        Conservation Policy Act (42 U.S.C. 8287); and
            (2) a utility energy service contract, as described 
        in the Office of Management and Budget Memorandum on 
        Federal use of energy savings performance contracting, 
        dated July 25, 1998 (M-98-13), and the Office of 
        Management and Budget Memorandum on the Federal use of 
        energy saving performance contracts and utility energy 
        service contracts, dated September 28, 2012 (M-12-21), 
        or any successor to either memorandum.

SEC. 3208. ADJUSTMENT FOR WILDFIRE SUPPRESSION FUNDING IN THE SENATE.

    If a measure becomes law that amends the adjustments to 
discretionary spending limits established under section 251(b) 
of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
1985 (2 U.S.C. 901(b)) for wildfire suppression funding, which 
may include criteria for making such an adjustment, the 
Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may 
adjust the allocation called for in section 302(a) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 633(a)) to the 
appropriate committee or committees of the Senate, and may 
adjust all other budgetary aggregates, allocations, levels, and 
limits contained in this concurrent resolution, as necessary, 
consistent with such measure.

     Subtitle C--Budget Enforcement in the House of Representatives

SEC. 3301. LIMITATION ON MEASURES AFFECTING SOCIAL SECURITY SOLVENCY IN 
                    THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

    (a) In General.--For purposes of the enforcement of this 
concurrent resolution, upon its adoption until the end of 
fiscal year 2016, it shall not be in order to consider in the 
House of Representatives a bill or joint resolution, or an 
amendment thereto or conference report thereon, that reduces 
the actuarial balance by at least 0.01 percent of the present 
value of future taxable payroll of the Federal Old-Age and 
Survivors Insurance Trust Fund established under section 201(a) 
of the Social Security Act for the 75-year period utilized in 
the most recent annual report of the Board of Trustees provided 
pursuant to section 201(c)(2) of the Social Security Act.
    (b) Exception.--Subsection (a) shall not apply to a measure 
that would improve the actuarial balance of the combined 
balance in the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance Trust 
Fund and the Federal Disability Insurance Trust Fund for the 
75-year period utilized in the most recent annual report of the 
Board of Trustees provided pursuant to section 201(c)(2) of the 
Social Security Act.

SEC. 3302. LIMITATION ON TRANSFERS FROM THE GENERAL FUND OF THE 
                    TREASURY TO THE HIGHWAY TRUST FUND IN THE HOUSE OF 
                    REPRESENTATIVES.

    In the House of Representatives, for purposes of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 621 et seq.), the 
Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (2 
U.S.C. 900 et seq.), and the rules or orders of the House of 
Representatives, a bill or joint resolution, or an amendment 
thereto or conference report thereon, that transfers funds from 
the general fund of the Treasury to the Highway Trust Fund, 
amounts transferred shall be counted as new budget authority 
and outlays equal to the amount of the transfer in the fiscal 
year the transfer occurs.

SEC. 3303. ADJUSTMENTS FOR IMPROVED CONTROL OF BUDGETARY RESOURCES IN 
                    THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

    (a) Adjustments of Discretionary and Direct Spending 
Levels.--In the House of Representatives, if a committee (other 
than the Committee on Appropriations) reports a bill or joint 
resolution, or any amendment thereto is offered or any 
conference report thereon is submitted, providing for a 
decrease in direct spending (budget authority and outlays 
flowing therefrom) for any fiscal year and also provides for an 
authorization of appropriations for the same purpose, upon the 
enactment of such measure, the Chairman of the Committee on the 
Budget of the House of Representatives may decrease the 
allocation to such committee and increase the allocation of 
discretionary spending (budget authority and outlays flowing 
therefrom) to the Committee on Appropriations for fiscal year 
2016 by an amount equal to the new budget authority (and 
outlays flowing therefrom) provided for in a bill or joint 
resolution making appropriations for the same purpose.
    (b) Determinations.--In the House of Representatives, for 
the purpose of enforcing this concurrent resolution, the 
allocations and aggregate levels of new budget authority, 
outlays, direct spending, new entitlement authority, revenues, 
deficits, and surpluses for fiscal year 2016 and the period of 
fiscal years 2016 through fiscal year 2025 shall be determined 
on the basis of estimates made by the Chairman of the Committee 
on the Budget of the House of Representatives and such Chairman 
may adjust applicable levels of this concurrent resolution.

SEC. 3304. LIMITATION ON ADVANCE APPROPRIATIONS IN THE HOUSE OF 
                    REPRESENTATIVES.

    (a) In General.--In the House of Representatives, except as 
provided for in subsection (b), any bill or joint resolution, 
or amendment thereto or conference report thereon, making a 
general appropriation or continuing appropriation may not 
provide for advance appropriations.
    (b) Exceptions.--An advance appropriation may be provided 
for programs, projects, activities, or accounts identified in 
the report to accompany this concurrent resolution or the joint 
explanatory statement of managers to accompany this concurrent 
resolution under the heading--
            (1) General.--``Accounts Identified for Advance 
        Appropriations''.
            (2) Veterans.--``Veterans Accounts Identified for 
        Advance Appropriations''.
    (c) Limitations.--The aggregate level of advance 
appropriations shall not exceed--
            (1) General.--$28,852,000,000 in new budget 
        authority for all programs identified pursuant to 
        subsection (b)(1).
            (2) Veterans.--$63,271,000,000 in new budget 
        authority for programs in the Department of Veterans 
        Affairs identified pursuant to subsection (b)(2).
    (d) Definition.--The term ``advance appropriation'' means 
any new discretionary budget authority provided in a bill or 
joint resolution, or any amendment thereto or conference report 
thereon, making general appropriations or continuing 
appropriations, for the fiscal year following fiscal year 2016.

SEC. 3305. CERTAIN ENERGY CONTRACTS IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

    The House of Representatives shall assess the 
implementation of section 3207 of this concurrent resolution 
through a collaborative assessment with the Senate and the 
Congressional Budget Office of the appropriate scorekeeping 
methodology for evaluating the budgetary effects of energy 
savings performance contracts authorized under section 801 of 
the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (42 U.S.C. 8287).

                      Subtitle D--Other Provisions

SEC. 3401. SUBMISSION OF FINDINGS FOR THE ELIMINATION OF WASTE, FRAUD, 
                    AND ABUSE.

    (a) In General.--In the Senate and the House of 
Representatives, all committees are directed to review programs 
within their jurisdiction to identify waste, fraud, abuse, or 
duplication, and increase the use of performance data to inform 
committee work.
    (b) Review.--Committees are also directed to review the 
applicable matters for congressional consideration identified 
in the Office of Inspector General semiannual reports and the 
Office of Inspector General's list of unimplemented 
recommendations and on the Government Accountability Office's 
High Risk list and the annual report to reduce program 
duplication.
    (c) Report.--After completing the oversight and performance 
reviews of programs within their jurisdiction under subsections 
(a) and (b), the committees are directed to include 
recommendations for improved governmental performance in their 
annual views and estimates reports submitted by the committees 
to the Committees on the Budget of the applicable House of 
Congress under section 301(d) of the Congressional Budget Act 
of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 632(d)).

SEC. 3402. BUDGETARY TREATMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES.

    (a) In General.--Notwithstanding section 302(a)(1) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 633(a)(1)), section 
13301 of the Budget Enforcement Act of 1990 (2 U.S.C. 632 
note), and section 2009a of title 39, United States Code, the 
report accompanying this concurrent resolution on the budget or 
the joint explanatory statement accompanying the conference 
report on any concurrent resolution on the budget shall include 
in its allocation under section 302(a) of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974 to the Committee on Appropriations of the 
applicable House of Congress amounts for the discretionary 
administrative expenses of the Social Security Administration 
and the United States Postal Service.
    (b) Special Rule.--In the Senate and the House of 
Representatives, for purposes of enforcing sections 302(f) of 
the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 633(f)), 
estimates of the level of total new budget authority and total 
outlays provided by a measure shall include any discretionary 
amounts described in subsection (a).

SEC. 3403. APPLICATION AND EFFECT OF CHANGES IN ALLOCATIONS AND 
                    AGGREGATES.

    (a) Application.--Any adjustments of allocations and 
aggregates made pursuant to this concurrent resolution shall--
            (1) apply while that measure is under 
        consideration;
            (2) take effect upon the enactment of that measure; 
        and
            (3) be published in the Congressional Record as 
        soon as practicable.
    (b) Effect of Changed Allocations and Aggregates.--Revised 
allocations and aggregates resulting from these adjustments 
shall be considered for the purposes of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 621 et seq.) as allocations and 
aggregates contained in this concurrent resolution.
    (c) Budget Committee Determinations.--For purposes of this 
concurrent resolution the levels of new budget authority, 
outlays, direct spending, new entitlement authority, revenues, 
deficits, and surpluses for a fiscal year or period of fiscal 
years shall be determined on the basis of estimates made by the 
Committee on the Budget of the applicable House of Congress.
    (d) Aggregates, Allocations and Application.--In the House 
of Representatives, for purposes of this concurrent resolution 
and budget enforcement, the consideration of any bill or joint 
resolution, or amendment thereto or conference report thereon, 
for which the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the 
House of Representatives makes adjustments or revisions in the 
allocations, aggregates, and other budgetary levels of this 
concurrent resolution shall not be subject to the points of 
order set forth in clause 10 of rule XXI of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives or section 3101 of this concurrent 
resolution.

SEC. 3404. ADJUSTMENTS TO REFLECT CHANGES IN CONCEPTS AND DEFINITIONS.

    Upon the enactment of a bill or joint resolution providing 
for a change in concepts or definitions, the Chairman of the 
Committee on the Budget of the applicable House of Congress may 
make adjustments to the levels and allocations in this 
concurrent resolution in accordance with section 251(b) of the 
Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (2 
U.S.C. 901(b)).

SEC. 3405. EXERCISE OF RULEMAKING POWERS.

    Congress adopts the provisions of this title--
            (1) as an exercise of the rulemaking power of the 
        Senate and the House of Representatives, respectively, 
        and as such they shall be considered as part of the 
        rules of each House or of that House to which they 
        specifically apply, and such rules shall supersede 
        other rules only to the extent that they are 
        inconsistent with such other rules; and
            (2) with full recognition of the constitutional 
        right of either the Senate or the House of 
        Representatives to change those rules (insofar as they 
        relate to that House) at any time, in the same manner, 
        and to the same extent as is the case of any other rule 
        of the Senate or House of Representatives.

                        TITLE IV--RESERVE FUNDS

                Subtitle A--Reserve Funds in Both Houses

SEC. 4101. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO REDUCE POVERTY AND INCREASE 
                    OPPORTUNITY AND UPWARD MOBILITY FOR STRUGGLING 
                    AMERICANS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
and the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the House of 
Representatives may revise the allocations of a committee or 
committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this 
resolution--
            (1) in the Senate, for one or more bills, joint 
        resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, 
        conference reports, or motions relating to programs or 
        policies designed to reduce poverty and increase 
        opportunity and upward mobility for struggling 
        Americans on the road to personal and financial 
        independence by the amounts provided in such 
        legislation for those purposes, provided that such 
        legislation would neither adversely impact job creation 
        nor increase the deficit over either the period of the 
        total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period 
        of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025; and
            (2) in the House of Representatives, for one or 
        more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, or 
        conference reports relating to programs or policies 
        designed to reduce poverty and increase opportunity and 
        upward mobility for struggling Americans on the road to 
        personal and financial independence by the amounts 
        provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
        provided that such legislation would neither adversely 
        impact job creation nor increase the deficit over 
        either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
        through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 
        2016 through 2025.

                Subtitle B--Reserve Funds in the Senate

SEC. 4301. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO INCREASE THE PACE OF 
                    ECONOMIC GROWTH AND PRIVATE SECTOR JOB CREATION IN 
                    THE UNITED STATES.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating 
to--
            (1) growing the economy;
            (2) lowering the after-tax costs of investment, 
        savings, and work;
            (3) reducing the costs to business and individuals 
        from the Internal Revenue Code of 1986;
            (4) reducing the costs borne by economic activity 
        in the United States stemming from Federal regulations, 
        including the costs incurred by individuals in 
        complying with Federal law when starting a business;
            (5) reducing the costs of frivolous lawsuits;
            (6) creating a more competitive financial sector to 
        support economic growth and job creation while 
        enhancing the credit worthiness of lending 
        institutions; or
            (7) improving the ability of policy makers to 
        estimate the economic effects of policy change through 
        the enhanced use of economic models and data in scoring 
        legislation;

without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4302. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO STRENGTHEN AMERICA'S 
                    PRIORITIES.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
enhanced funding for national security or domestic 
discretionary programs by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4303. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO PROTECT FLEXIBLE AND 
                    AFFORDABLE HEALTH CARE CHOICES FOR ALL.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger that are 
deficit-neutral over 11 years, for one or more bills, joint 
resolutions, amendments, amendments between the Houses, 
motions, or conference reports relating to--
            (1) full repeal of the Patient Protection and 
        Affordable Care Act (Public Law 111-148; 124 Stat. 119) 
        and the health care related provisions of the Health 
        Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (Public 
        Law 111-152; 124 Stat. 1029); or
            (2) replacing the Patient Protection and Affordable 
        Care Act (Public Law 111-148; 124 Stat. 119) or the 
        health care related provisions of the Health Care and 
        Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (Public Law 111-
        152; 124 Stat. 1029);

by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4304. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR IMPROVING ACCESS TO THE 
                    STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAM.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
improving access to affordable health care for low-income 
children, including the State Children's Health Insurance 
Program, by the amounts provided in such legislation for that 
purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the 
deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 
2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 
2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4305. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR OTHER HEALTH REFORMS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating 
to--
            (1) the requirement to individually purchase, or 
        jointly provide, health insurance;
            (2) extending expiring health care provisions;
            (3) the September 11th terrorism attacks at the 
        World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and the Shanksville 
        Crash site, which may include legislation that extends 
        medical monitoring and treatment services and 
        compensation for first responders, survivors, and their 
        families;
            (4) improvements in medical research, innovation 
        and safety; or
            (5) strengthening program integrity initiatives to 
        reduce fraud, waste, and abuse in Federal health care 
        programs;

by the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4306. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR CHILD WELFARE.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating 
to--
            (1) child nutrition programs;
            (2) replacing ineffective policies and programs 
        with evidence-based alternative that improve the 
        welfare of vulnerable children; or
            (3) policies that protect children from sexual 
        predators in our schools or communities;

by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4307. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR VETERANS AND 
                    SERVICEMEMBERS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
the improvement of the delivery of benefits and services to 
veterans and servicemembers by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4308. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR TAX REFORM AND 
                    ADMINISTRATION.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating 
to--
            (1) reforming the Internal Revenue Code of 1986;
            (2) amending the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to 
        extend certain expiring tax relief provisions;
            (3) innovation and high quality manufacturing jobs, 
        including the repeal of the 2.3 percent excise tax on 
        medical device manufacturers; or
            (4) operations and administration of the Department 
        of the Treasury;

by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4309. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO INVEST IN THE INFRASTRUCTURE 
                    IN AMERICA.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
Federal investment in the infrastructure of the United States, 
including programs that expedite the deployment of broadband to 
rural areas by the amounts provided in such legislation for 
that purpose, provided that such legislation shall not include 
transfers from other trust funds but may include transfers from 
the general fund of the Treasury that are offset, provided 
further that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4310. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR AIR TRANSPORTATION.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
Federal spending on civil air traffic control services, which 
may include air traffic management at airport towers across the 
United States or at facilities of the Federal Aviation 
Administration, by the amounts provided in such legislation for 
that purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase 
the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 
2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 
2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4311. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO PROMOTE JOBS IN THE UNITED 
                    STATES THROUGH INTERNATIONAL TRADE.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating 
to--
            (1) suspending or reducing tariffs on miscellaneous 
        imports;
            (2) reauthorization of trade related Federal 
        agencies;
            (3) implementing international trade agreements;
            (4) reauthorizing or extending trade adjustment 
        assistance programs;
            (5) reauthorizing preference programs; or
            (6) enhancing the protection of United States 
        intellectual property rights at the border and abroad;

by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4312. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO INCREASE EMPLOYMENT 
                    OPPORTUNITIES FOR DISABLED WORKERS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
the administration of disability benefits and the improved 
employment of disabled workers by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4313. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR HIGHER EDUCATION ACT 
                    REFORM.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports that amend 
the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1001 et seq.) by 
the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4314. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR ENERGY LEGISLATION.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating 
to--
            (1) reform of the management of civilian and 
        defense nuclear waste;
            (2) reform and reauthorization of programs at the 
        Department of Energy related to research and 
        development of alternative or renewable forms of 
        energy, fossil fuel exploration and use, clean coal 
        technologies (including carbon capture and 
        sequestration), nuclear energy, or the electricity 
        grid;
            (3) expansion of North American energy production; 
        or
            (4) reform of the permitting and siting processes 
        for energy infrastructure;

without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4315. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO REFORM ENVIRONMENTAL 
                    STATUTES.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
reform of environmental statutes to promote job growth by the 
amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided 
that such legislation would not increase the deficit over 
either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 
2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 
2025.

SEC. 4316. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR WATER RESOURCES 
                    LEGISLATION.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
improving flood control, expanding opportunities for commercial 
navigation, and improving the environmental restoration of the 
nation's waterways, assisting the States in carrying out 
drought prevention plans, strengthening waterborne commerce in 
the Nation's ports and harbors, or relating to the authority of 
the Secretary of the Interior to designate funds for rural 
water projects and Indian irrigation and water settlement 
projects, without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided 
in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such 
legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4317. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND ON MINERAL SECURITY AND 
                    MINERAL RIGHTS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating 
to--
            (1) reducing reliance on mineral imports; or
            (2) the authority to deduct certain amounts from 
        mineral revenues payable to States;

without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4318. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO REFORM THE ABANDONED MINE 
                    LANDS PROGRAM.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (30 
U.S.C. 1201 et seq.) without raising new revenue, by the 
amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided 
that such legislation would not increase the deficit over 
either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 
2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 
2025.

SEC. 4319. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO IMPROVE FOREST HEALTH.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating 
to--
            (1) increasing timber production from Federal lands 
        and providing bridge funding to counties and other 
        units of local government until timber production 
        levels increase;
            (2) decreasing forest hazardous fuel loads;
            (3) improving stewardship contracting; or
            (4) reform of the process of budgeting for wildfire 
        suppression operations;
without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4320. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO REAUTHORIZE FUNDING FOR 
                    PAYMENTS IN LIEU OF TAXES TO COUNTIES AND OTHER 
                    UNITS OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
Payments In Lieu of Taxes (PILT), which may include funding the 
payments in lieu of taxes program at levels roughly equivalent 
to lost tax revenues due to the presence of Federal land 
without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4321. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR FINANCIAL REGULATORY 
                    SYSTEM REFORM.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
regulatory relief for small financial firms, improvements in 
the effectiveness of the financial regulatory framework, 
enhancements in oversight and accountability of the Federal 
Reserve System, and expansions in access to capital markets 
without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4322. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO IMPROVE FEDERAL PROGRAM 
                    ADMINISTRATION.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
improving the processing of earnings reports for the 
Supplemental Security Income and Social Security Disability 
Insurance programs by the amounts provided in such legislation 
for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4323. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO IMPLEMENT AGREEMENTS WITH 
                    FREELY ASSOCIATED STATES.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
the implementation of agreements between the United States and 
nations with whom it maintains a Compact of Free Association 
without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4324. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO PROTECT PAYMENTS TO RURAL 
                    HOSPITALS AND CREATE SUSTAINABLE ACCESS FOR RURAL 
                    COMMUNITIES.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
protecting payments to rural hospitals and creating sustainable 
access for rural communities without raising new revenue, by 
the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4325. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO ENCOURAGE STATE MEDICAID 
                    DEMONSTRATION PROGRAMS TO PROMOTE INDEPENDENT 
                    LIVING AND INTEGRATED WORK FOR THE DISABLED.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
encouraging State Medicaid demonstration programs to promote 
independent living and integrated work for the disabled without 
raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4326. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO ALLOW PHARMACISTS TO BE 
                    PAID FOR THE PROVISION OF SERVICES UNDER MEDICARE.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
payments to pharmacists for the provision of services under 
Medicare without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided 
in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such 
legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4327. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO IMPROVE OUR NATION'S 
                    COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTERS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
supporting and improving community health centers without 
raising new revenue, by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4328. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO THE FUNDING OF 
                    INDEPENDENT AGENCIES, WHICH MAY INCLUDE SUBJECTING 
                    THE CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU TO THE 
                    REGULAR APPROPRIATIONS PROCESS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
the funding of independent agencies, which may include 
subjecting the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to the 
regular appropriations process without raising new revenue, by 
the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4329. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO REFORM, IMPROVE, AND ENHANCE 
                    529 COLLEGE SAVINGS PLANS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
reforms, improvements, and enhancements of 529 college savings 
plans by the amounts provided in such legislation for that 
purpose, provided that such legislation would not increase the 
deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 
2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 
2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4330. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO SECURING OVERSEAS 
                    DIPLOMATIC FACILITIES OF THE UNITED STATES.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
the security of the overseas diplomatic facilities of the 
United States by the amounts provided in such legislation for 
those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4331. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO EXPANDING, 
                    ENHANCING, OR OTHERWISE IMPROVING SCIENCE, 
                    TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, AND MATHEMATICS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
expanding, enhancing, or otherwise improving science, 
technology, engineering, and mathematics by the amounts 
provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that 
such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4332. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO PROMOTING 
                    MANUFACTURING IN THE UNITED STATES.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
investment in the manufacturing sector in the United States, 
which may include educational or research and development 
initiatives, public-private partnerships, or other programs, by 
the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4333. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO PROHIBIT ALIENS WITHOUT 
                    LEGAL STATUS IN THE UNITED STATES FROM QUALIFYING 
                    FOR A REFUNDABLE TAX CREDIT.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
benefits for aliens without legal status in the United States, 
which may include prohibiting qualification for certain tax 
benefits without raising new revenue, by the amounts provided 
in such legislation for that purpose, provided that such 
legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4334. DEFICIT-REDUCTION RESERVE FUND FOR REPORT ELIMINATION OR 
                    MODIFICATION.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports that achieve 
savings through the elimination, modification, or the reduction 
in frequency of congressionally mandated reports from Federal 
agencies, and reduce the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2021 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025. The Chairman may also 
make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger over 6 and 11 
years to ensure that the deficit reduction achieved is used for 
deficit reduction only. The adjustments authorized under this 
section shall be of the amount of deficit reduction achieved.

SEC. 4335. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO ADDRESS HEROIN, 
                    METHAMPHETAMINE, AND PRESCRIPTION OPIOID ABUSE.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
addressing efforts to combat heroin, methamphetamine, and 
prescription opioid abuse by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4336. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO STRENGTHEN OUR DEPARTMENT OF 
                    DEFENSE CIVILIAN WORKFORCE.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
strengthening our civilian workforce by the amounts provided in 
such legislation for that purpose, provided that such 
legislation would not increase the deficit over the period of 
either the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4337. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE 
                    REFORM.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
improving Department of Defense financial management, which may 
include achieving full auditability or eliminating waste, 
fraud, and abuse, by the amounts provided in such legislation 
for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4338. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO IMPROVE FEDERAL WORKFORCE 
                    DEVELOPMENT, JOB TRAINING, AND REEMPLOYMENT 
                    PROGRAMS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
reducing inefficient overlap, improving access, and enhancing 
outcomes with Federal workforce development, job training, and 
reemployment programs by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4339. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO PROVIDE ENERGY ASSISTANCE 
                    AND INVEST IN ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating 
to--
            (1) energy efficiency, which may include 
        weatherization and energy efficiency retrofit programs 
        for low-income individuals;
            (2) the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program, 
        which may include seasonal assistance and crisis fuel 
        assistance to low-income individuals;
            (3) Federal programs for land and water 
        conservation, including the Land and Water Conservation 
        Fund; or
            (4) the reduction of duplicative Federal green 
        building programs;
by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4340. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO END OPERATION CHOKE POINT 
                    AND PROTECT THE SECOND AMENDMENT.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
the Department of Justice, which may include ending the 
Operation Choke Point program, by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4341. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO PREVENT THE USE OF FEDERAL 
                    FUNDS FOR THE BAILOUT OF IMPROVIDENT STATE AND 
                    LOCAL GOVERNMENTS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
a prohibition, except in the case of Federal assistance 
provided in response to a natural disaster, on any entity of 
the Federal Government providing funds to State and local 
governments to prevent receivership or to facilitate exit from 
receivership or to prevent default on its obligations by a 
State government by the amounts provided in such legislation 
for that purpose, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4342. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO IMPROVE HEALTH OUTCOMES AND 
                    LOWER THE COSTS OF CARING FOR MEDICALLY COMPLEX 
                    CHILDREN IN MEDICAID.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
improving the health outcomes and lowering the costs of caring 
for medically complex children in Medicaid, which may include 
creating or expanding integrated delivery models or improving 
care coordination, by the amounts provided in such legislation 
for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4343. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO MAINTAIN AND ENHANCE ACCESS, 
                    CHOICE, AND ACCOUNTABILITY IN VETERANS CARE THROUGH 
                    THE VETERANS CHOICE CARD PROGRAM.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
maintaining and enhancing access, choice, and accountability in 
veterans care through the Veterans Choice Card program by the 
amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4344. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO PROMOTING EQUAL 
                    PAY.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
promoting equal pay, which may include preventing 
discrimination on the basis of sex and preventing retaliation 
against employees for seeking or discussing wage information, 
by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4345. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO LEGISLATION 
                    SUBMITTED TO CONGRESS BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE 
                    UNITED STATES TO PROTECT AND STRENGTHEN SOCIAL 
                    SECURITY.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
legislation submitted to Congress by the President of the 
United States to protect current beneficiaries of the Social 
Security program and prevent the insolvency of the program by 
the amounts provided in such legislation for such purpose, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4346. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO A SIMPLIFIED 
                    INCOME-DRIVEN STUDENT LOAN REPAYMENT OPTION.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
addressing student loan debt, which may include reducing 
overlapping student loan repayment programs and creating a 
simplified income-driven student loan repayment option, by the 
amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4347. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO KEEPING THE 
                    FEDERAL WATER POLLUTION CONTROL ACT FOCUSED ON THE 
                    PROTECTION OF WATER QUALITY.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
ensuring that Federal jurisdiction under the Federal Water 
Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq.) is focused on 
water quality, which may include limiting jurisdiction based on 
the movement of birds, mammals, or insects through the air or 
over the land, the movement of water through the ground, or the 
movement of rainwater or snowmelt over the land, or limiting 
jurisdiction over puddles, isolated ponds, roadside ditches, 
irrigation ditches, stormwater systems, wastewater systems, or 
water delivery, reuse, or reclamation systems, by the amounts 
provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that 
such legislation would not raise new revenue and would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4348. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO SUPPORTING ISRAEL.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
United States policy toward Israel and the prevention of anti-
Semitism in Europe, which may include preventing the United 
Nations and other international institutions, including human 
rights organizations, from taking unfair or discriminatory 
action against Israel, and supporting efforts to prevent anti-
Semitism in Europe, by the amounts provided in such legislation 
for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4349. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO FAMILY AND MEDICAL 
                    LEAVE.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
efforts to improve workplace benefits and reduce health care 
costs, which may include tax credits for employers providing 
paid family and medical leave, by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4350. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO PROVIDING HEALTH 
                    CARE TO VETERANS WHO HAVE GEOGRAPHIC 
                    INACCESSIBILITY TO CARE.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
providing health care to veterans who reside more than 40 miles 
driving distance from the closest medical facility of the 
Department of Veterans Affairs that provides the care sought by 
the veteran by the amounts provided in such legislation for 
those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4351. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO INCREASING ACCESS 
                    TO HIGHER EDUCATION FOR LOW-INCOME AMERICANS 
                    THROUGH THE FEDERAL PELL GRANT PROGRAM.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
increasing access to higher education for low-income Americans 
through the Federal Pell Grant program, which may include 
allowing for 1 or more additional payment periods during the 
same award year, by the amounts provided in such legislation 
for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4352. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO TRANSPARENCY IN 
                    HEALTH PREMIUM BILLING.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
increased disclosure of any Patient Protection and Affordable 
Care Act (Public Law 111-148) tax in health insurance monthly 
premium statements by the amounts provided in such legislation 
for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4353. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO CARBON EMISSIONS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports related to 
carbon emissions, which may include prohibitions on Federal 
taxes or fees imposed on carbon emissions from any product or 
entity that is a direct or indirect source of emissions, by the 
amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4354. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO REQUIRING THE 
                    FEDERAL GOVERNMENT TO ALLOW STATES TO OPT OUT OF 
                    COMMON CORE WITHOUT PENALTY.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
prohibiting the Federal Government from mandating, 
incentivizing, or coercing States to adopt the Common Core 
State Standards or any other specific academic standards, 
instructional content, curricula, assessments, or programs of 
instruction and allowing States to opt out of the Common Core 
State Standards without penalty by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation 
would not raise new revenue and would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4355. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO THE DISPOSAL OF 
                    CERTAIN FEDERAL LAND.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
initiatives to sell or transfer to, or exchange with, a State 
or local government any Federal land that is not within the 
boundaries of a National Park, National Preserve, or National 
Monument by the amounts provided in such legislation for those 
purposes, provided that such legislation would not raise new 
revenue and would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4356. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO PROHIBITING 
                    FUNDING OF INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS DURING THE 
                    IMPLEMENTATION OF THE UNITED NATIONS ARMS TRADE 
                    TREATY PRIOR TO SENATE RATIFICATION AND ADOPTION OF 
                    IMPLEMENTING LEGISLATION.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
funding, which may include prohibiting funding for the United 
Nations Arms Trade Treaty Secretariat or any international 
organizations created to support the implementation of the 
United Nations Arms Trade Treaty prior to Senate ratification 
and adoption of implementing legislation, by the amounts 
provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that 
such legislation would not raise new revenue and would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4357. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO REIMPOSING WAIVED 
                    SANCTIONS AND IMPOSING NEW SANCTIONS AGAINST IRAN 
                    FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE JOINT PLAN OF ACTION OR A 
                    COMPREHENSIVE NUCLEAR AGREEMENT.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
Iran, which may include efforts to immediately reimpose waived 
sanctions and impose new sanctions against the Government of 
Iran if the President cannot make a determination and certify 
that Iran is complying with the Joint Plan of Action or a 
comprehensive agreement on Iran's nuclear program, by the 
amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4358. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO SUPPORTING UNITED 
                    STATES CITIZENS HELD HOSTAGE IN THE UNITED STATES 
                    EMBASSY IN TEHRAN, IRAN, BETWEEN NOVEMBER 3, 1979, 
                    AND JANUARY 20, 1981.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
supporting citizens of the United States held hostage in the 
United States embassy in Tehran, Iran, between November 3, 
1979, and January 20, 1981, by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4359. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO REASONABLE 
                    ACCOMMODATIONS FOR PREGNANT WORKERS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
efforts to increase employment opportunities and prevent 
employment discrimination, which may include measures to 
prevent employment discrimination against pregnant workers, to 
provide pregnant workers with a right to workplace 
accommodations, and to ensure that employers comply with 
requirements regarding such workplace accommodations for 
pregnant workers, by the amounts provided in such legislation 
for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4360. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO PERMANENTLY ELIMINATE THE 
                    FEDERAL ESTATE TAX.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
changes in the Federal income tax laws, which may include 
eliminating the Federal estate tax, by the amounts provided in 
such legislation for that purpose, provided that such 
legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4361. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO REGULATION BY THE 
                    ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY OF GREENHOUSE GAS 
                    EMISSIONS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
the regulation by the Environmental Protection Agency of 
greenhouse gas emissions, which may include a prohibition on 
withholding highway funds from States that refuse to submit 
State Implementation Plans required under the Clean Power Plan 
of the Agency, by the amounts provided in such legislation for 
those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4362. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO PROTECTING 
                    PRIVATELY HELD WATER RIGHTS AND PERMITS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
protecting communities, businesses, recreationists, farmers, 
ranchers, or other groups that rely on privately held water 
rights and permits from Federal takings by the amounts provided 
in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such 
legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4363. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO PROHIBITING 
                    AWARDING OF CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS BASED ON 
                    AWARDEES ENTERING OR NOT ENTERING INTO AGREEMENTS 
                    WITH LABOR ORGANIZATIONS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
a prohibition on the awarding of construction contracts on 
behalf of the Government based upon any solicitations, bid 
specifications, project agreements, or other controlling 
documents that require or prohibit bidders, offerors, 
contractors, or subcontractors to enter into or adhere to 
agreements with one or more labor organizations or discriminate 
against or give preference to such bidders, offerors, 
contractors, or subcontractors based on their entering or 
refusing to enter into such agreements by the amounts provided 
in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such 
legislation would not raise new revenue and would not increase 
the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 
2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 
2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4364. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO PREVENT AMERICAN JOBS FROM 
                    BEING MOVED OVERSEAS BY REDUCING THE CORPORATE 
                    INCOME TAX RATE.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
preventing American jobs from being moved overseas, which may 
include a reduction in the corporate income tax rate, by the 
amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4365. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO INCREASE WAGES FOR AMERICAN 
                    WORKERS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
reaffirming the ability of States to adopt minimum wages higher 
than the Federal minimum wage level commensurate with the cost 
of living in the State, which may include the adoption of pro-
employment and wage-increasing policies by providing pro-growth 
tax relief and eliminating excessive government mandates, by 
the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4366. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO DETERRING THE 
                    MIGRATION OF UNACCOMPANIED CHILDREN FROM EL 
                    SALVADOR, GUATEMALA, AND HONDURAS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
deterring the attempted migration of unaccompanied children 
from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras into the United 
States, which may include the expedited removal of unlawful 
entrants from noncontiguous countries, by the amounts provided 
in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such 
legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4367. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO ENSURING PROPER 
                    ECONOMIC CONSIDERATION IN DESIGNATION OF CRITICAL 
                    HABITAT.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
critical habitat designations, which may include requirements 
that the United States Fish and Wildlife Service examine the 
cumulative economic effects of the designation, such as on land 
or property uses or values, regional employment, or revenue 
impacts on States and units of local government, by the amounts 
provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that 
such legislation would not raise new revenue and would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4368. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO END ``TOO BIG TO FAIL'' 
                    BAILOUTS FOR WALL STREET MEGA-BANKS (OVER $500 
                    BILLION IN TOTAL ASSETS).

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
any bank holding companies with over $500,000,000,000 in total 
assets to better protect taxpayers, including such measures as 
capital or leverage requirements, restrictions on the growth, 
activities, or operations of a company, or divestiture of 
assets or operations of any company that is unable to present a 
credible plan to facilitate an orderly bankruptcy or 
resolution, by the amounts provided in such legislation for 
those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4369. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO ENDING WASHINGTON'S 
                    ILLEGAL EXEMPTION FROM THE PATIENT PROTECTION AND 
                    AFFORDABLE CARE ACT.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
developing methods that ensure that all Members of Congress, 
the President, the Vice President, and all political appointees 
of the Administration procure their health insurance on the 
individual exchange in the same way as Americans at the same 
income level by the amounts provided in such legislation for 
those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4370. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO INCREASING FUNDING 
                    FOR THE RELOCATION OF THE UNITED STATES EMBASSY IN 
                    ISRAEL FROM TEL AVIV TO JERUSALEM.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
increasing funding for United States embassies, which may 
include the relocation of the United States Embassy in Israel 
from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation 
would not raise new revenue and would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4371. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO PROMOTING THE 
                    RETURN OF CHILDREN WHO HAVE BEEN LEGALLY ADOPTED BY 
                    UNITED STATES CITIZENS FROM THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC 
                    OF THE CONGO.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
promoting the return of children who have been legally adopted 
by United States citizens from the Democratic Republic of the 
Congo by the amounts provided in such legislation for those 
purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the 
deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 
2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 
2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4372. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO DEVELOPMENT OF A 
                    NEW NUCLEAR-CAPABLE CRUISE MISSILE BY THE 
                    DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AND THE NATIONAL NUCLEAR 
                    SECURITY ADMINISTRATION.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
the development of a new nuclear-capable cruise missile by the 
Department of Defense and the National Nuclear Security 
Administration by the amounts provided in such legislation for 
those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4373. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO PROVIDE EQUITY IN THE TAX 
                    TREATMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICER DEATH BENEFITS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
providing tax equity for death benefits paid to the families of 
public safety officers who lose their lives in the line of duty 
by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4374. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO ELIMINATING THE 
                    BACKLOG OF SEXUAL ASSAULT EVIDENCE KITS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
eliminating the backlog of sexual assault evidence kits, which 
may include auditing the hidden backlog of untested sexual 
assault kits and ensuring that the collection and processing of 
DNA evidence by law enforcement agencies from crimes is carried 
out in an appropriate and timely manner, by the amounts 
provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that 
such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4375. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO MIXED OXIDE FUEL 
                    FABRICATION.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
mixed oxide fuel fabrication by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4376. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO REFORMING OFFICES 
                    OF INSPECTORS GENERAL AND PREVENTING EXTENDED 
                    VACANCIES.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
strengthening and reforming Federal Offices of Inspectors 
General, reducing vacancies in such Offices, and providing for 
improvements in the overall economy, efficiency, and 
effectiveness of Inspectors General by the amounts provided in 
such legislation for those purposes, provided that such 
legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4377. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO IMPROVING 
                    RETIREMENT SECURITY.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
improving retirement security by making it easier for small 
businesses to provide retirement plans for their employees by 
easing the administrative burden and by encouraging individuals 
to increase their savings by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4378. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO IMPROVE THE COMPETITIVENESS 
                    OF THE UNITED STATES.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
improving basic science research and development programs in 
the United States by the amounts provided in such legislation 
for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4379. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO ENSURING THAT THE 
                    CONSERVATION OF NORTHERN LONG-EARED BAT POPULATIONS 
                    AND LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ARE COMPATIBLE.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), 
which may include requirements that State conservation plans 
relating to the northern long-eared bat are given maximum 
flexibility to be successful so as to preserve and protect 
local and rural economies before any Federal listing decision 
is made with respect to the northern long-eared bat, by the 
amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4380. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO IMPROVE CYBERSECURITY.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
increased sharing of cybersecurity threat information while 
protecting individual privacy and civil liberties interests by 
the amounts provided in such legislation for that purpose, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4381. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO ALLOW THE DRUG ENFORCEMENT 
                    ADMINISTRATION AND FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 
                    TO ENTER INTO JOINT TASK FORCES WITH TRIBAL AND 
                    LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
the Drug Enforcement Administration and Federal Bureau of 
Investigation entering into joint task forces with tribal and 
local law enforcement agencies by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for that purpose, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4382. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO ENCOURAGING COST 
                    SAVINGS IN OFFICE SPACE USED BY FEDERAL AGENCIES.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
encouraging cost savings in office space used by Federal 
agencies, which may include encouraging Federal agencies to 
utilize office space unused by the Federal Government before 
purchasing or renting additional space, by the amounts provided 
in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such 
legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4383. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO PROVIDING TECHNICAL 
                    ASSISTANCE TO SMALL BUSINESSES AND ASPIRING 
                    ENTREPRENEURS THROUGH SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT 
                    CENTERS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
providing technical assistance to small businesses and aspiring 
entrepreneurs through small business development centers by the 
amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4384. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO ENSURING THAT 
                    MEDICAL FACILITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS 
                    AFFAIRS MEET THE NEEDS OF WOMEN VETERANS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
ensuring that medical facilities of the Department of Veterans 
Affairs meet the needs of women veterans by the amounts 
provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that 
such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4385. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO SUPPORTING 
                    EFFICIENT RESOURCING FOR THE ASIA REBALANCE POLICY.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
providing funding related to supporting efficient resourcing 
for the Asia rebalance policy by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4386. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO PREVENTING ACCESS 
                    TO MARIJUANA EDIBLES BY CHILDREN IN STATES THAT 
                    HAVE DECRIMINALIZED MARIJUANA.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
preventing access to edible marijuana products by children in 
States that have decriminalized marijuana by the amounts 
provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that 
such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4387. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO PROVIDING MORTGAGE 
                    LENDING TO RURAL AREAS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
providing mortgage lending to rural areas by the amounts 
provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that 
such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4388. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO THE CONSTRUCTION OF 
                    ARCTIC POLAR ICEBREAKERS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
the construction of Arctic polar icebreakers by the amounts 
provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that 
such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4389. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO RESEARCHING HEALTH 
                    CONDITIONS OF THE DESCENDANTS OF VETERANS EXPOSED 
                    TO TOXIC SUBSTANCES DURING SERVICE IN THE ARMED 
                    FORCES.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
researching health conditions of the descendants of veterans 
exposed to toxic substances during service in the Armed Forces 
by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4390. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO RAISING THE FAMILY 
                    OF FUNDS LIMIT OF THE SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT 
                    COMPANY PROGRAM.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
the Small Business Investment Company Program of the Small 
Business Administration, which may include raising the Family 
of Funds limit of the Small Business Investment Company 
Program, by the amounts provided in such legislation for those 
purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the 
deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 
2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 
2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4391. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO DETECTION, 
                    INVESTIGATION, AND PROSECUTION OF THE OWNERS AND 
                    OPERATORS OF WEBSITES WHO KNOWINGLY ALLOW SUCH 
                    WEBSITES TO BE USED TO ADVERTISE COMMERCIAL SEX 
                    WITH CHILDREN OVER THE INTERNET.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
online child sex trafficking, which may include the detection, 
investigation, and prosecution of the owners and operators of 
websites who knowingly allow such websites to be used to 
advertise commercial sex with children over the Internet, by 
the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4392. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO PROTECTING THE 
                    RELIABILITY OF THE ELECTRICITY GRID.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
prohibiting the Administrator of the Environmental Protection 
Agency from proposing, finalizing, or issuing any regulation 
that would reduce the reliability of the electricity grid by 
the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4393. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO PRESERVE AND PROTECT THE 
                    OPEN INTERNET.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
protecting the open Internet and promoting further innovation 
and investment in Internet services, content, infrastructure, 
and technologies by the amounts provided in such legislation 
for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4394. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO REFORMING THE 
                    FEDERAL REGULATORY PROCESS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating 
to--
            (1) creating an effective mechanism for the review 
        of the existing Federal regulatory burden to identify 
        rules for repeal or modification that--
                    (A) impose paperwork burdens that could be 
                reduced substantially without significantly 
                diminishing regulatory effectiveness;
                    (B) impose disproportionately high costs on 
                small businesses;
                    (C) could be strengthened in their 
                effectiveness while reducing regulatory costs;
                    (D) have been rendered obsolete by 
                technological or market changes;
                    (E) have achieved their goals and can be 
                repealed without target problems recurring;
                    (F) impose the greatest opportunity costs 
                in terms of economic growth;
                    (G) are ineffective;
                    (H) overlap, duplicate, or conflict with 
                other Federal regulations or with State or 
                local regulations; or
                    (I) impose costs that are not justified by 
                benefits produced for society within the United 
                States;
            (2) reforming the process by which new regulations 
        are made by Federal agencies, including independent 
        agencies, for the purposes of--
                    (A) prioritizing early public outreach in 
                the rulemaking process;
                    (B) ensuring the use of the best available 
                scientific, economic, and technical data;
                    (C) preventing the misuse of guidance 
                documents to skirt public input;
                    (D) ensuring the use of best practices for 
                regulatory analysis, including cost-benefit 
                analysis, into each step of the rulemaking 
                process;
                    (E) facilitating the adoption by Federal 
                agencies of the least costly regulatory 
                alternative that would achieve the goals of the 
                statutory authorization;
                    (F) ensuring more careful consideration of 
                proposed high-cost rules;
                    (G) ensuring effective oversight of the 
                Federal regulatory program, including 
                independent regulatory commissions, by the 
                Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs;
                    (H) improving the consideration of adverse 
                impacts on small businesses;
                    (I) providing greater transparency in the 
                rulemaking process; and
                    (J) improving compliance with section 515 
                of the Treasury and General Government 
                Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 2001 (Public 
                Law 106-554; 114 Stat. 2736A-153) (commonly 
                known as the ``Information Quality Act''), the 
                Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (2 U.S.C. 
                1501 et seq.), and chapter 6 of title 5, United 
                States Code (commonly known as the ``Regulatory 
                Flexibility Act'');
            (3) enhancing accountability by facilitating fair 
        and effective judicial review of agency actions; and
            (4) ensuring that Congress can effectively exercise 
        its appropriate role in the regulatory process through 
        legislation and oversight;

by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not raise new revenue and 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4395. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO PROVIDING COVERAGE 
                    OF VIRTUAL COLONOSCOPIES AS A COLORECTAL CANCER 
                    SCREENING TEST UNDER THE MEDICARE PROGRAM.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
providing coverage of virtual colonoscopies as a colorectal 
cancer screening test under the Medicare program by the amounts 
provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that 
such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4396. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO THE MODERNIZATION 
                    OF THE NUCLEAR COMMAND, CONTROL, AND COMMUNICATIONS 
                    ARCHITECTURE OF THE UNITED STATES.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
modernizing the triad of strategic nuclear delivery systems, 
the nuclear command and control system, and the nuclear weapons 
stockpile, and supporting related infrastructure, by the 
amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4397. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO BARDA AND THE 
                    BIOSHIELD SPECIAL RESERVE FUND.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
strengthening our national security, which may include fully 
funding the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development 
Authority and the BioShield Special Reserve Fund, by the 
amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4398. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO IMPROVING THE 
                    NUCLEAR FORCES AND MISSIONS OF THE AIR FORCE.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
the nuclear force improvement program of the Air Force by the 
amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4399. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO PROMOTING ECONOMIC 
                    GROWTH AND JOB CREATION FOR SMALL BUSINESSES AND 
                    FULL FUNDING FOR AT-SEA AND DOCKSIDE MONITORING FOR 
                    CERTAIN FISHERIES.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
promoting economic growth and job creation by making it easier 
for small businesses to plan their capital investments and 
reducing the uncertainty of taxation, and supporting at-sea and 
dockside monitoring for fisheries that have received economic 
disaster assistance, by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4400. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO THE DEFINITION OF 
                    FULL-TIME EMPLOYEE.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports related to 
the employer penalties under the Patient Protection and 
Affordable Care Act (Public Law 111-148), which may include 
changes to the definition of ``full time employee'' under that 
Act, by the amounts provided in such legislation for those 
purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase the 
deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal years 
2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 
2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4401. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO IMPROVING THE 
                    EFFECTIVENESS AND EFFICIENCY OF THE FEDERAL 
                    REGULATORY PROCESS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the Federal 
regulatory process by the amounts provided in such legislation 
for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4402. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO EXPEDITE AWARDS UNDER THE 
                    INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE WHISTLEBLOWER PROGRAM.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
the processing of award submissions, which may include the 
Internal Revenue Service whistleblower program, by the amounts 
provided in such legislation for that purpose, provided that 
such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4403. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO ENCOURAGING THE 
                    INCREASED USE OF PERFORMANCE CONTRACTING IN FEDERAL 
                    FACILITIES.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
encouraging the increased use of performance contracting in 
Federal facilities by the amounts provided in such legislation 
for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4404. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO IMPROVING 
                    INFORMATION SHARING BY THE INSPECTOR GENERAL OF THE 
                    DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS WITH RESPECT TO 
                    INVESTIGATIONS RELATING TO SUBSTANDARD HEALTH CARE, 
                    DELAYED AND DENIED HEALTH CARE, PATIENT DEATHS, 
                    OTHER FINDINGS THAT DIRECTLY RELATE TO PATIENT 
                    CARE, AND OTHER MANAGEMENT ISSUES OF THE 
                    DEPARTMENT.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
improving information sharing by the Inspector General of the 
Department of Veterans Affairs with respect to investigations 
relating to substandard health care, delayed and denied health 
care, patient deaths, other findings that directly relate to 
patient care, and other management issues of the Department by 
the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4405. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO ADDRESS THE DISPROPORTIONATE 
                    REGULATORY BURDENS ON COMMUNITY BANKS AND CREDIT 
                    UNIONS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
alleviating disproportionate regulatory burdens on community 
banks and credit unions by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4406. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO PROTECT THE CORPORATION FOR 
                    NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
the Corporation for National and Community Service by the 
amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4407. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO ENSURING THAT 
                    DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ATTORNEYS COMPLY WITH 
                    DISCLOSURE OBLIGATIONS IN CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
ensuring that all Department of Justice attorneys comply with 
all legal and ethical obligations in criminal prosecutions, 
which may include legislation that ensures the disclosure to 
the defendant in a timely manner of all information known to 
the Government that tends to negate the guilt of the defendant, 
mitigate the offense charged or the sentence imposed, or 
impeach the Government's witnesses or evidence, by the amounts 
provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that 
such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4408. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO PROMOTE BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
Federal investments in precision medicine and biomedical 
research, which may include increasing funding to account for 
inflation, to support finding ways to prevent, treat, and cure 
diseases or conditions like Alzheimer's and other life-
threatening or chronic illnesses, and to provide long-term cost 
savings to the Federal Government, by the amounts provided in 
such legislation for those purposes, provided that such 
legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4409. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO PROVIDING ACCESS TO 
                    NECESSARY EQUIPMENT FOR MEDICARE BENEFICIARIES.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
developing methods that ensure that Medicare beneficiaries have 
access to equipment like eye tracking accessories for speech 
generating devices and speech generating devices by the amounts 
provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that 
such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4410. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO PRIORITIZING THE 
                    CONSTRUCTION OF INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS THAT ARE OF 
                    NATIONAL AND REGIONAL SIGNIFICANCE AND PROJECTS IN 
                    HIGH PRIORITY CORRIDORS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
the prioritization of the Federal investment in the 
infrastructure of the United States on projects that are of 
national and regional significance and projects in high 
priority corridors of the National Highway System by the 
amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not raise new revenue and 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4411. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO ENCOURAGING THE 
                    UNITED STATES' NATO ALLIES TO REVERSE DECLINES IN 
                    DEFENSE SPENDING AND BEAR A MORE PROPORTIONATE 
                    BURDEN FOR ENSURING THE SECURITY OF NATO.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
encouraging the United States' NATO allies to reverse declines 
in defense spending and bear a more proportionate burden for 
ensuring the security of NATO by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4412. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO THE INVESTIGATION 
                    AND RECOVERY OF MISSING WEAPONS AND MILITARY 
                    EQUIPMENT PROVIDED TO THE GOVERNMENT OF YEMEN BY 
                    THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
the investigation and to the extent practicable the recovery of 
missing weapons and military equipment provided to the 
Government of Yemen by the United States Government to ensure 
that such items are not in the possession of or used by radical 
extremist groups operating in the country by the amounts 
provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that 
such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4413. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO IMPROVING HIGHER 
                    EDUCATION DATA AND TRANSPARENCY.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
improving higher education data and transparency by the amounts 
provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that 
such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4414. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO NATIVE CHILDREN.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
Native children or the construction of Bureau of Indian 
Education schools, which may include replacement school 
construction, by the amounts provided in such legislation for 
those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4415. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO PROVIDE ADDITIONAL 
                    FUNDING FOR INTERNATIONAL STRATEGIC COMMUNICATIONS.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
funding for international counter-propaganda communications in 
order to combat misinformation, undermine ideologies of 
violence and hatred, and ensure moderate voices are heard by 
the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4416. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY 
                    EDUCATION.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
reforming and strengthening elementary and secondary education 
by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4417. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO SUPPORT RESEARCH.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
Federal investments in scientific research and development, 
which may include supporting biomedical research to find ways 
to prevent, treat, and cure diseases or conditions like 
Alzheimer's and other life-threatening or chronic illnesses, 
providing long-term cost savings to the Federal Government, and 
supporting national security, basic energy research, innovative 
solutions, and American competitiveness, by the amounts 
provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that 
such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4418. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO SUPPORT FOR 
                    UKRAINE.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
providing support to the Government of Ukraine, which may 
include the provision of lethal defensive articles, by the 
amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2020 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.

SEC. 4419. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO UNDERGROUND AND 
                    SURFACE MINING SAFETY RESEARCH.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
underground and surface mining safety research by the amounts 
provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that 
such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4420. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO SAVING MEDICARE.

    The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
extending the life of the Federal Hospital Insurance Trust 
Fund, which may include the creation of a point of order 
against legislation that accelerates the insolvency of such 
Trust Fund, by the amounts provided in such legislation for 
those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

       Subtitle C--Reserve Funds in the House of Representatives

SEC. 4501. RESERVE FUND FOR THE REPEAL OF THE PRESIDENT'S HEALTH CARE 
                    LAW.

    In the House of Representatives, the Chairman of the 
Committee on the Budget may revise the allocations, aggregates, 
and other budgetary levels in this concurrent resolution for 
the budgetary effects of any bill or joint resolution, or 
amendment thereto or conference report thereon, that consists 
solely of the full repeal of the Affordable Care Act and the 
health care related provisions of the Health Care and Education 
Reconciliation Act of 2010.

SEC. 4502. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR PROMOTING REAL HEALTH CARE 
                    REFORM.

    In the House of Representatives, the Chairman of the 
Committee on the Budget may revise the allocations, aggregates, 
and other budgetary levels in this concurrent resolution for 
the budgetary effects of any bill or joint resolution, or 
amendment thereto or conference report thereon, that promotes 
real health care reform, if such measure would not increase the 
deficit for the period of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4503. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATED TO THE MEDICARE 
                    PROVISIONS OF THE PRESIDENT'S HEALTH CARE LAW.

    In the House of Representatives, the Chairman of the 
Committee on the Budget may revise the allocations, aggregates, 
and other budgetary levels in this concurrent resolution for 
the budgetary effects of any bill or joint resolution, or 
amendment thereto or conference report thereon, that repeals 
all or part of the decreases in Medicare spending included in 
the Affordable Care Act or the Health Care and Education 
Reconciliation Act of 2010, if such measure would not increase 
the deficit for the period of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4504. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR THE STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH 
                    INSURANCE PROGRAM.

    In the House of Representatives, the Chairman of the 
Committee on the Budget may revise the allocations, aggregates, 
and other budgetary levels in this concurrent resolution for 
any bill or joint resolution, or amendment thereto or 
conference report thereon, if such measure extends the State 
Children's Health Insurance Program, but only if such measure 
would not increase the deficit over the period of fiscal years 
2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4505. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION.

    In the House of Representatives, the Chairman of the 
Committee on the Budget may revise the allocations, aggregates, 
and other budgetary levels in this concurrent resolution for 
any bill or joint resolution, or amendment thereto or 
conference report thereon, if such measure reforms, expands 
access to, and improves, as determined by such Chairman, 
graduate medical education programs, but only if such measure 
would not increase the deficit over the period of fiscal years 
2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4506. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR TRADE AGREEMENTS.

    In the House of Representatives, the Chairman of the 
Committee on the Budget may revise the allocations, aggregates, 
and other budgetary levels in this concurrent resolution for 
the budgetary effects of any bill or joint resolution reported 
by the Committee on Ways and Means, or amendment thereto or 
conference report thereon, that implements a trade agreement, 
but only if such measure would not increase the deficit for the 
period of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4507. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR REFORMING THE TAX CODE.

    In the House of Representatives, if the Committee on Ways 
and Means reports a bill or joint resolution that reforms the 
Internal Revenue Code of 1986, the Chairman of the Committee on 
the Budget may revise the allocations, aggregates, and other 
budgetary levels in this concurrent resolution for the 
budgetary effects of any such bill or joint resolution, or 
amendment thereto or conference report thereon, if such measure 
would not increase the deficit for the period of fiscal years 
2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4508. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR REVENUE MEASURES.

    In the House of Representatives, the Chairman of the 
Committee on the Budget may revise the allocations, aggregates, 
and other budgetary levels in this concurrent resolution for 
the budgetary effects of any bill or joint resolution reported 
by the Committee on Ways and Means, or amendment thereto or 
conference report thereon, that decreases revenue, but only if 
such measure would not increase the deficit for the period of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4509. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR TRANSPORTATION.

    In the House of Representatives, the Chairman of the 
Committee on the Budget may revise the allocations, aggregates, 
and other budgetary levels in this concurrent resolution for 
any bill or joint resolution, or amendment thereto or 
conference report thereon, if such measure maintains the 
solvency of the Highway Trust Fund, but only if such measure 
would not increase the deficit over the period of fiscal years 
2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4510. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR FEDERAL RETIREMENT REFORM.

    In the House of Representatives, the Chairman of the 
Committee on the Budget may revise the allocations, aggregates, 
and other budgetary levels in this concurrent resolution for 
any bill or joint resolution, or amendment thereto or 
conference report thereon, if such measure reforms, improves 
and updates the Federal retirement system, as determined by 
such Chairman, but only if such measure would not increase the 
deficit over the period of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

SEC. 4511. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR NATIONAL DEFENSE.

    In the House of Representatives, the Chairman of the 
Committee on the Budget may revise the allocations, aggregates, 
and other budgetary levels in this concurrent resolution for 
any bill or joint resolution, or amendment thereto or 
conference report thereon, if such measure supports the 
following activities: Department of Defense training and 
maintenance associated with combat readiness, modernization of 
equipment, auditability of financial statements, or military 
compensation and benefit reforms, by the amount provided for 
these purposes, but only if such measure would not increase the 
deficit (without counting any net revenue increases in that 
measure) over the period of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

 TITLE V--ESTIMATES OF DIRECT SPENDING IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

SEC. 5001. DIRECT SPENDING.

    (a) Means-Tested Direct Spending.--
            (1) Findings.--The House of Representatives finds 
        the following:
                    (A) For means-tested direct spending, the 
                average rate of growth in the total level of 
                outlays during the 10-year period preceding 
                fiscal year 2016 is 6.8 percent.
                    (B) For means-tested direct spending, the 
                estimated average rate of growth in the total 
                level of outlays during the 10-year period 
                beginning with fiscal year 2016 is 4.6 percent 
                under current law.
            (2) Proposed reforms.--The following reforms are 
        proposed under this concurrent resolution by the House 
        of Representatives for means-tested direct spending:
                    (A) In 1996, a Republican Congress and a 
                Democratic President reformed welfare by 
                limiting the duration of benefits, giving 
                States more control over the program, and 
                helping recipients find work. In the 5 years 
                following passage, child-poverty rates fell, 
                welfare caseloads fell, and workers' wages 
                increased. This budget assumes the enactment of 
                proposals to reduce poverty and increase 
                opportunity and upward mobility for struggling 
                Americans on the road to personal and financial 
                independence. Based on the successful welfare 
                reforms of the 1990s, these proposals would 
                improve work requirements and provide flexible 
                funding for States to help those most in need 
                find gainful employment, escape poverty, and 
                move up the economic ladder.
                    (B) For Medicaid, this budget is predicated 
                on a framework proposed by the chairmen of the 
                committees of jurisdiction of the House of 
                Representatives and the Senate, to modernize 
                and improve the program while increasing State 
                flexibility and protecting the most vulnerable 
                populations. This budget also assumes the 
                repeal of the Medicaid expansions in the 
                President's health care law.
    (b) Nonmeans-Tested Direct Spending.--
            (1) Findings.--The House of Representatives finds 
        the following:
                    (A) For nonmeans-tested direct spending, 
                the average rate of growth in the total level 
                of outlays during the 10-year period preceding 
                fiscal year 2016 is 5.4 percent.
                    (B) For nonmeans-tested direct spending, 
                the estimated average rate of growth in the 
                total level of outlays during the 10-year 
                period beginning with fiscal year 2016 is 5.5 
                percent under current law.
            (2) Medicare reforms.--For Medicare, this budget 
        advances policies to put seniors, not the Federal 
        Government, in control of their health care decisions. 
        Putting seniors in charge of how their health care 
        dollars are spent will encourage providers to compete 
        against each other on price and quality. Improvements 
        to Medicare are necessary to extend the life of the 
        Federal Hospital Insurance Trust Fund and protect the 
        program for future generations.

                      TITLE VI--POLICY STATEMENTS

              Subtitle A--Policy Statements in Both Houses

SEC. 6101. POLICY STATEMENT ON BALANCED BUDGET AMENDMENT.

    It is the policy of this concurrent resolution that 
Congress should pass, and send to the States for their 
approval, a joint resolution amending the Constitution of the 
United States to require an annual balanced Federal budget.

SEC. 6102. POLICY STATEMENT ON SOCIAL SECURITY.

    It is the policy of this concurrent resolution that the 
President and Congress should work together on a bipartisan 
basis to preserve Social Security for current and future 
generations. To achieve that goal--
            (1) Congress should enact legislation to prevent 
        the near-term insolvency of the Disability Insurance 
        program, improve the administration and coordination of 
        benefits, and increase employment opportunities for 
        disabled workers; and
            (2) the President should submit legislation to 
        Congress addressing the long-term insolvency of both 
        the Old-Age and Survivors Insurance program and the 
        Disability Insurance program, and such legislation 
        should achieve a sustainable annual cash-flow balance 
        between taxes and benefits over the foreseeable future, 
        rather than temporarily increasing and then depleting 
        the balance of Government securities held by each 
        program's trust fund.

      Subtitle B--Policy Statement in the House of Representatives

SEC. 6201. POLICY STATEMENT ON BUDGET PROCESS AND BASELINE REFORM.

    (a) Findings.--
            (1) In 1974, after more than 50 years of executive 
        dominance over fiscal policy, Congress acted to 
        reassert its ``power of the purse'', and passed the 
        Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act.
            (2) The measure explicitly sought to establish 
        congressional control over the budget process, to 
        provide for annual congressional determination of the 
        appropriate level of taxes and spending, to set 
        important national budget priorities, and to find ways 
        in which Members of Congress could have access to the 
        most accurate, objective, and highest quality 
        information to assist them in discharging their duties.
            (3) Far from achieving its intended purpose, 
        however, the process has instituted a bias toward 
        higher spending and larger government. The behemoth of 
        the Federal Government has largely been financed 
        through either borrowing or taking ever greater amounts 
        of the national income through high taxation.
            (4) The process does not treat programs and 
        policies consistently and shows a bias toward higher 
        spending and higher taxes.
            (5) It assumes extension of spending programs (of 
        more than $50 million per year) scheduled to expire.
            (6) Yet it does not assume the extension of tax 
        policies in the same way. consequently, extending 
        existing tax policies that may be scheduled to expire 
        is characterized as a new tax reduction, requiring 
        offsets to ``pay for'' merely keeping tax policy the 
        same even though estimating conventions would not 
        require similar treatment of spending programs.
            (7) The original goals set for the congressional 
        process are admirable in their intent, but because the 
        essential mechanisms of the process have remained the 
        same, and ``reforms'' enacted over the past 40 years 
        have largely taken the form of layering greater levels 
        of legal complexity without reforming or reassessing 
        the very fundamental nature of the process.
    (b) Policy Statement.--It is the policy of this concurrent 
resolution on the budget that as the primary branch of 
Government, Congress must:
            (1) Restructure the fundamental procedures of 
        budget decision making.
            (2) Reassert Congress's ``power of the purse'', and 
        reinforce the balance of powers between Congress and 
        the President, as the 1974 Act intended.
            (3) Create greater incentives for lawmakers to do 
        budgeting as intended by the Congressional Budget Act 
        of 1974, especially adopting a budget resolution every 
        year.
            (4) Encourage more effective control over spending, 
        especially currently uncontrolled direct spending.
            (5) Consider innovative fiscal tools such as: zero 
        based budgeting, which would require a department or 
        agency to justify its budget as if it were a new 
        expenditure; and direct spending caps to enhance 
        oversight of automatic pilot spending that increases 
        each year without congressional approval.
            (6) Promote efficient and timely budget actions, so 
        that lawmakers complete their budget actions by the 
        time the new fiscal year begins.
            (7) Provide access to the best analysis of economic 
        conditions available and increase awareness of how 
        fiscal policy directly impacts overall economic growth 
        and job creation.
            (8) Remove layers of complexity that have 
        complicated the procedures designed in 1974, and made 
        budgeting more arcane and opaque.
            (9) Remove existing biases that favor higher 
        spending.
            (10) Include procedures by which current tax laws 
        may be extended and treated on a basis that is not 
        different from the extension of entitlement programs.
    (c) Budget Process Reform.--Comprehensive budget process 
reform should also remove the bias in the baseline against the 
extension of current tax laws in the following ways:
            (1) Permanent extension of tax laws should not be 
        used as a means to increase taxes on other taxpayers.
            (2) For those expiring tax provisions that are 
        proposed to be permanently extended, Congress should 
        use a more realistic baseline that does not require 
        them to be offset.
            (3) Tax-reform legislation should not include tax 
        increases just to offset the extension of current tax 
        laws.
    (d) Legislation.--The Committee on the Budget of the House 
of Representatives intends to draft legislation during the 
114th Congress that will rewrite the Congressional Budget and 
Impoundment Control Act of 1974 to fulfill the goals of making 
the congressional budget process more effective in ensuring 
taxpayers' dollars are spent wisely and efficiently.

SEC. 6202. POLICY STATEMENT ON ECONOMIC GROWTH AND JOB CREATION.

    (a) Findings.--The House of Representatives finds the 
following:
            (1) Although the United States economy technically 
        emerged from recession more than 5 years ago, the 
        subsequent recovery has felt more like a malaise than a 
        rebound. Real gross domestic product GDP growth over 
        the past 5 years has averaged slightly more than 2 
        percent, well below the 3.2 percent historical trend 
        rate of growth in the United States. Although the 
        economy has shown some welcome signs of improvement of 
        late, the Nation remains in the midst of the weakest 
        economic recovery of the modern era.
            (2) Looking ahead, CBO expects the economy to grow 
        by an average of just 2.3 percent over the next 10 
        years. That level of economic growth is simply 
        unacceptable and insufficient to expand opportunities 
        and the incomes of millions of middle-income Americans.
            (3) Sluggish economic growth has also contributed 
        to the country's fiscal woes. Subpar growth means that 
        revenue levels are lower than they would otherwise be 
        while government spending (e.g. welfare and income-
        support programs) is higher. Clearly, there is a dire 
        need for policies that will spark higher rates of 
        economic growth and greater, higher-quality job 
        opportunities.
            (4) Although job gains have been trending up of 
        late, other aspects of the labor market remain weak. 
        The labor force participation rate, for instance, is 
        hovering just under 63 percent, close to the lowest 
        level since 1978. Long-term unemployment also remains a 
        problem. Of the roughly 8.7 million people who are 
        currently unemployed, 2.7 million (more than 30 
        percent) have been unemployed for more than 6 months. 
        Long-term unemployment erodes an individual's job 
        skills and detaches them from job opportunities. It 
        also undermines the long-term productive capacity of 
        the economy.
            (5) Perhaps most important, wage gains and income 
        growth have been subpar for middle-class Americans. 
        Average hourly earnings of private-sector workers have 
        increased by just 1.6 percent over the past year. Prior 
        to the recession, average hourly earnings were tracking 
        close to 4 percent. Likewise, average income levels 
        have remained flat in recent years. Real median 
        household income is just under $52,000, one of the 
        lowest levels since 1995.
            (6) The unsustainable fiscal trajectory has cast a 
        shadow on the country's economic outlook. investors and 
        businesses make decisions on a forward-looking basis. 
        they know that today's large debt levels are simply 
        tomorrow's tax hikes, interest rate increases, or 
        inflation and they act accordingly. This debt overhang, 
        and the uncertainty it generates, can weigh on growth, 
        investment, and job creation.
            (7) Nearly all economists, including those at the 
        CBO, conclude that reducing budget deficits (thereby 
        bending the curve on debt levels is a net positive for 
        economic growth over time. The logic is that deficit 
        reduction creates long-term economic benefits because 
        it increases the pool of national savings and boosts 
        investment, thereby raising economic growth and job 
        creation.
            (8) CBO analyzed the House Republican fiscal year 
        2016 budget resolution and found it would increase real 
        output per capita (a proxy for a country's standard of 
        living) by about $1,000 in 2025 and roughly $5,000 by 
        2040 relative to the baseline path. That means more 
        income and greater prosperity for all Americans.
            (9) In contrast, if the Government remains on the 
        current fiscal path, future generations will face ever-
        higher debt service costs, a decline in national 
        savings, and a ``crowding out'' of private investment. 
        This dynamic will eventually lead to a decline in 
        economic output and a diminution in our country's 
        standard of living.
            (10) The key economic challenge is determining how 
        to expand the economic pie, not how best to divide up 
        and re-distribute a shrinking pie.
            (11) A stronger economy is vital to lowering 
        deficit levels and eventually balancing the budget. 
        According to CBO, if annual real GDP growth is just 0.1 
        percentage point higher over the budget window, 
        deficits would be reduced by $326 billion.
            (12) This budget resolution therefore embraces pro-
        growth policies, such as fundamental tax reform, that 
        will help foster a stronger economy, greater 
        opportunities and more job creation.
    (b) Policy on Economic Growth and Job Creation.--In the 
House of Representatives, it is the policy of this concurrent 
resolution to promote faster economic growth and job creation. 
By putting the budget on a sustainable path, this concurrent 
resolution ends the debt-fueled uncertainty holding back job 
creators. Reforms to the tax code will put American businesses 
and workers in a better position to compete and thrive in the 
21st century global economy. This concurrent resolution targets 
the regulatory red tape and cronyism that stack the deck in 
favor of special interests. All of the reforms in this 
concurrent resolution serve as means to the larger end of 
helping the economy grow and expanding opportunity for all 
Americans.

SEC. 6203. POLICY STATEMENT ON TAX REFORM.

    (a) Findings.--The House of Representatives finds the 
following:
            (1) A world-class tax system should be simple, 
        fair, and promote (rather than impede) economic growth. 
        The United States tax code fails on all three counts: 
        It is notoriously complex, patently unfair, and highly 
        inefficient. The tax code's complexity distorts 
        decisions to work, save, and invest, which leads to 
        slower economic growth, lower wages, and less job 
        creation.
            (2) Over the past decade alone, there have been 
        4,107 changes to the tax code, more than one per day. 
        Many of the major changes over the years have involved 
        carving out special preferences, exclusions, or 
        deductions for various activities or groups. These 
        loopholes add up to more than $1 trillion per year and 
        make the code unfair, inefficient, and highly complex.
            (3) In addition, these tax preferences are 
        disproportionately used by upper-income individuals.
            (4) The large amount of tax preferences that 
        pervade the code end up narrowing the tax base. A 
        narrow tax base, in turn, requires much higher tax 
        rates to raise a given amount of revenue.
            (5) It is estimated that American taxpayers end up 
        spending $160 billion and roughly 6 billion hours a 
        year complying with the tax code waste of time and 
        resources that could be used in more productive 
        activities.
            (6) Standard economic theory shows that high 
        marginal tax rates dampen the incentives to work, save, 
        and invest, which reduces economic output and job 
        creation. Lower economic output, in turn, mutes the 
        intended revenue gain from higher marginal tax rates.
            (7) Roughly half of United States active business 
        income and half of private sector employment are 
        derived from business entities (such as partnerships, S 
        corporations, and sole proprietorships) that are taxed 
        on a ``pass-through'' basis, meaning the income flows 
        through to the tax returns of the individual owners and 
        is taxed at the individual rate structure rather than 
        at the corporate rate. Small businesses, in particular, 
        tend to choose this form for Federal tax purposes, and 
        the top Federal rate on such small business income can 
        reach nearly 45 percent. For these reasons, sound 
        economic policy requires lowering marginal rates on 
        these pass-through entities.
            (8) The United States corporate income tax rate 
        (including Federal, State, and local taxes) sums to 
        slightly more than 39 percent, the highest rate in the 
        industrialized world. Tax rates this high suppress 
        wages and discourage investment and job creation, 
        distort business activity, and put American businesses 
        at a competitive disadvantage with foreign competitors.
            (9) By deterring potential investment, the United 
        States corporate tax restrains economic growth and job 
        creation. The United States tax rate differential with 
        other countries also fosters a variety of complicated 
        multinational corporate behaviors intended to avoid the 
        tax, which have the effect of moving the tax base 
        offshore, destroying American jobs, and decreasing 
        corporate revenue.
            (10) The ``worldwide'' structure of United States 
        international taxation essentially taxes earnings of 
        United States firms twice, putting them at a 
        significant competitive disadvantage with competitors 
        with more competitive international tax systems.
            (11) Reforming the United States tax code to a more 
        competitive international system would boost the 
        competitiveness of United States companies operating 
        abroad and it would also greatly reduce tax avoidance.
            (12) The tax code imposes costs on American workers 
        through lower wages, on consumers in higher prices, and 
        on investors in diminished returns.
            (13) Revenues have averaged about 17.4 percent of 
        the economy throughout modern American history. 
        Revenues rise above this level under current law to 
        18.3 percent of the economy by the end of the 10-year 
        budget window.
            (14) Attempting to raise revenue through new tax 
        increases to meet out-of-control spending would sink 
        the economy and Americans' ability to save for their 
        retirement and their children's education.
            (15) This concurrent resolution also rejects the 
        idea of instituting a carbon tax in the United States, 
        which some have offered as a new source of revenue. 
        Such a plan would damage the economy, cost jobs, and 
        raise prices on American consumers.
            (16) Closing tax loopholes to fund spending does 
        not constitute fundamental tax reform.
            (17) The goal of tax reform should be to curb or 
        eliminate loopholes and use those savings to lower tax 
        rates across the board not to fund more wasteful 
        Government spending. Washington has a spending problem, 
        not a revenue problem.
            (18) Many economists believe that fundamental tax 
        reform (i.e. a broader tax base and lower tax rates) 
        would lead to greater labor supply and increased 
        investment, which, over time, would have a positive 
        impact on total national output.
            (19) Heretofore, the congressional scorekeepers the 
        Congressional Budget Office (CBO) and the Joint 
        Committee on Taxation (JCT).
            (20) Static scoring implicitly assumes that the 
        size of the economy (and therefore key economic 
        variables such as labor supply and investment) remains 
        fixed throughout the considered budget horizon. This is 
        an abstraction from reality.
            (21) A new House of Representatives rule was 
        adopted at the beginning of the 114th Congress to help 
        correct this problem. This rule requires CBO and JCT to 
        incorporate the macroeconomic effects of major 
        legislation into their official cost estimates.
            (22) This rule seeks to bridge the divide between 
        static estimates and scoring that incorporates economic 
        feedback effects by providing policymakers with a 
        greater amount of information about the likely economic 
        impact of policies under their consideration while at 
        the same time preserving traditional scoring methods 
        and reporting conventions.
    (b) Policy on Tax Reform.--In the House of Representatives, 
it is the policy of this concurrent resolution that Congress 
should enact legislation that provides for a comprehensive 
reform of the United States tax code to promote economic 
growth, create American jobs, increase wages, and benefit 
American consumers, investors, and workers through fundamental 
tax reform that--
            (1) simplifies the tax code to make it fairer to 
        American families and businesses and reduces the amount 
        of time and resources necessary to comply with tax 
        laws;
            (2) substantially lowers tax rates for individuals 
        and consolidates the current seven individual income 
        tax brackets into fewer brackets;
            (3) repeals the Alternative Minimum Tax;
            (4) reduces the corporate tax rate; and
            (5) transitions the tax code to a more competitive 
        system of international taxation.

SEC. 6204. POLICY STATEMENT ON TRADE.

    (a) Findings.--The House of Representatives finds the 
following:
            (1) Opening foreign markets to American exports is 
        vital to the United States economy and beneficial to 
        American workers and consumers. The Commerce Department 
        estimates that every $1 billion of United States 
        exports supports more than 5,000 jobs here at home.
            (2) The United States can increase economic 
        opportunities for American workers and businesses 
        through the expansion of trade, adherence to trade 
        agreement rules by the United States and its trading 
        partners, and the elimination of foreign trade barriers 
        to United States goods and services.
            (3) Trade Promotion Authority is a bipartisan and 
        bicameral effort to strengthen the role of Congress in 
        setting negotiating objectives for trade agreements, to 
        improve consultation with Congress by the 
        Administration, and to provide a clear framework for 
        congressional consideration and implementation of trade 
        agreements.
            (4) Global trade and commerce is not a zero-sum 
        game. The idea that global expansion tends to ``hollow 
        out'' United States operations is incorrect. Foreign-
        affiliate activity tends to complement, not substitute 
        for, key parent activities in the United States such as 
        employment, worker compensation, and capital 
        investment. When United States headquartered 
        multinationals invest and expand operations abroad it 
        often leads to more jobs and economic growth at home.
            (5) Trade agreements have saved the average 
        American family of four more than $10,000 per year, as 
        a result of lower duties. Trade agreements also lower 
        the cost of manufacturing inputs by removing duties.
            (6) American businesses and workers have shown 
        that, on a level playing field, they can excel and 
        surpass the international competition.
            (7) When negotiating trade agreements, United 
        States laws on Intellectual Property (IP) protection 
        should be used as a benchmark for establishing global 
        IP frameworks. Strong IP protections have contributed 
        significantly to the United States status as a world 
        leader in innovation across sectors, including in the 
        development of life-saving biologic medicines. The data 
        protections afforded to biologics in United States law, 
        including 12 years of data protection, allow continued 
        development of pioneering medicines to benefit patients 
        both in the United States and abroad. To maintain the 
        cycle of innovation and achieve truly 21st century 
        trade agreements, it is vital that our negotiators 
        insist on the highest standards for IP protections.
            (8) The status quo of the current tax code also 
        undermines the competitiveness of United States 
        businesses and costs the United States economy 
        investment and jobs.
            (9) The United States currently has an antiquated 
        system of international taxation whereby United States 
        multinationals operating abroad pay both the foreign-
        country tax and United States corporate taxes. They are 
        essentially taxed twice. This puts them at an obvious 
        competitive disadvantage. A modern and competitive 
        international tax system would facilitate global 
        commerce for United States multinational companies and 
        would encourage foreign business investment and job 
        creation in the United States.
            (10) The ability to defer United States taxes on 
        their foreign operations, which some erroneously refer 
        to as a ``tax loophole,'' cushions this disadvantage to 
        a certain extent. Eliminating or restricting this 
        provision (and others like it) would harm United States 
        competitiveness.
            (11) This budget resolution advocates fundamental 
        tax reform that would lower the United States corporate 
        rate, now the highest in the industrialized world, and 
        switch to a more competitive system of international 
        taxation. This would make the United States a much more 
        attractive place to invest and station business 
        activity and would chip away at the incentives for 
        United States companies to keep their profits overseas 
        (because the United States corporate rate is so high).
    (b) Policy on Trade.--In the House of Representatives, it 
is the policy of this concurrent resolution to pursue 
international trade, global commerce, and a modern and 
competitive United States international tax system to promote 
job creation in the United States. The United States should 
continue to seek increased economic opportunities for American 
workers and businesses through the expansion of trade 
opportunities, adherence to trade agreements and rules by the 
United States and its trading partners, and the elimination of 
foreign trade barriers to United States goods and services by 
opening new markets and by enforcing United States rights. To 
that end, Congress should pass Trade Promotion Authority to 
strengthen the role of Congress in setting negotiating 
objectives for trade agreements, to improve consultation with 
Congress by the Administration, and to provide a clear 
framework for congressional consideration and implementation of 
trade agreements.

SEC. 6205. POLICY STATEMENT ON REPEALING THE PRESIDENT'S HEALTH CARE 
                    LAW AND PROMOTING REAL HEALTH CARE REFORM.

    (a) Findings.--The House of Representatives finds the 
following:
            (1) The President's health care law put 
        Washington's priorities first, and not patients'. The 
        Affordable Care Act (ACA) has failed to reduce health 
        care premiums as promised; instead, the law mandated 
        benefits and coverage levels, denying patients the 
        opportunity to choose the type of coverage that best 
        suits their health needs and driving up health coverage 
        costs. A typical family's health care premiums were 
        supposed to decline by $2,500 a year; instead, 
        according to the 2014 Employer Health Benefits Survey, 
        health care premiums have increased by 7 percent for 
        individuals and families since 2012.
            (2) The President pledged, ``If you like your 
        health care plan, you can keep your health care plan.'' 
        Instead, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office 
        now estimates 9 million Americans with employment-based 
        health coverage will lose those plans due to the 
        President's health care law, further limiting patient 
        choice.
            (3) Then-Speaker of the House, Pelosi, said that 
        the President's health care law would create 4 million 
        jobs over the life of the law and almost 400,000 jobs 
        immediately. Instead, the Congressional Budget Office 
        estimates that the reduction in hours worked due to 
        Obamacare represents a decline of about 2.0 to 2.5 
        million full-time equivalent workers, compared with 
        what would have occurred in the absence of the law. The 
        full impact on labor represents a reduction in 
        employment by 1.5 percent to 2.0 percent, while 
        additional studies show less modest results. A recent 
        study by the Mercatus Center at George Mason University 
        estimates that Obamacare will reduce employment by up 
        to 3 percent, or about 4 million full-time equivalent 
        workers.
            (4) The President has charged the Independent 
        Payment Advisory Board, a panel of unelected 
        bureaucrats, with cutting Medicare by an additional 
        $20.9 billion over the next ten years, according to the 
        President's most recent budget.
            (5) Since ACA was signed into law, the 
        administration has repeatedly failed to implement it as 
        written. The President has unilaterally acted to make a 
        total of 28 changes, delays, and exemptions. The 
        President has signed into law another 17 changes made 
        by Congress. The Supreme Court struck down the forced 
        expansion of Medicaid; ruled the individual ``mandate'' 
        could only be characterized as a tax to remain 
        constitutional; and rejected the requirement that 
        closely held companies provide health insurance to 
        their employees if doing so violates these companies' 
        religious beliefs. Even now, almost five years after 
        enactment, the Supreme Court continues to evaluate the 
        legality of how the President's administration has 
        implemented the law. All of these changes prove the 
        folly underlying the entire program--health care in the 
        United States cannot be run from a centralized 
        bureaucracy.
            (6) The President's health care law is 
        unaffordable, intrusive, overreaching, destructive, and 
        unworkable. Its complex structure of subsidies, 
        mandates, and penalties perversely impact individuals, 
        married couples, and families. The law should be fully 
        repealed, allowing for real, patient-centered health 
        care reform: the development of real health care 
        reforms that puts patients first, that make affordable, 
        quality health care available to all Americans, and 
        that build on the innovation and creativity of all the 
        participants in the health care sector.
    (b) Policy on Promoting Real Health Care Reform.--In the 
House of Representatives, it is the policy of this concurrent 
resolution that the President's health care law should be fully 
repealed and real health care reform promoted in accordance 
with the following principles:
            (1) In general.--Health care reform should enhance 
        affordability, accessibility, quality, innovation, 
        choices and responsiveness in health care coverage for 
        all Americans, putting patients, families, and doctors 
        in charge, not Washington, DC. These reforms should 
        encourage increased competition and transparency. Under 
        the President's health care law, government controls 
        Americans' health care choices. Under true, patient-
        centered reform, Americans would.
            (2) Affordability.--Real reform should be centered 
        on ensuring that all Americans, no matter their age, 
        income, or health status, have the ability to afford 
        health care coverage. The health care delivery 
        structure should be improved, and individuals should 
        not be priced out of the health insurance market due to 
        pre-existing conditions, but nationalized health care 
        is not only unnecessary to accomplish this, it 
        undermines the goal. Individuals should be allowed to 
        join together voluntarily to pool risk through 
        mechanisms such as Individual Membership Associations 
        and Small Employer Membership Associations.
            (3) Accessability.--Instead of Washington outlining 
        for Americans the ways they cannot use their health 
        insurance, reforms should make health coverage more 
        portable. Individuals should be able to own their 
        insurance and have it follow them in and out of jobs 
        throughout their career. Small business owners should 
        be permitted to band together across State lines 
        through their membership in bona fide trade or 
        professional associations to purchase health coverage 
        for their families and employees at a low cost. This 
        will increase small businesses' bargaining power, 
        volume discounts, and administrative efficiencies while 
        giving them freedom from State-mandated benefit 
        packages. Also, insurers licensed to sell policies in 
        one State should be permitted to offer them to 
        residents in any other State, and consumers should be 
        permitted to shop for health insurance across State 
        lines, as they are with other insurance products 
        online, by mail, by phone, or in consultation with an 
        insurance agent.
            (4) Quality.--Incentives for providers to deliver 
        high-quality, responsive, and coordinated care will 
        promote patient outcomes and drive down health care 
        costs. Likewise, reforms that work to restore the 
        patient-physician relationship by reducing 
        administrative burdens and allowing physicians to do 
        what they do best--care for patients.
            (5) Choices.--Individuals and families should be 
        free to secure the health care coverage that best meets 
        their needs, rather than instituting one-size-fits-all 
        directives from Federal bureaucracies such as the 
        Internal Revenue Service, the Department of Health and 
        Human Services, and the Independent Payment Advisory 
        Board.
            (6) Innovation.--Instead of stifling innovation in 
        health care technologies, treatments, medications, and 
        therapies with Federal mandates, taxes, and price 
        controls, a reformed health care system should 
        encourage research, development and innovation.
            (7) Responsiveness.--Reform should return authority 
        to States wherever possible to make the system more 
        responsive to patients and their needs. Instead of 
        tying States' hands with Federal requirements for their 
        Medicaid programs, the Federal Government should return 
        control of this program to the States. Not only does 
        the current Medicaid program drive up Federal debt and 
        threaten to bankrupt State budgets, but States are 
        better positioned to provide quality, affordable care 
        to those who are eligible for the program and to track 
        down and weed out waste, fraud and abuse. Beneficiary 
        choices in the State Children's Health Insurance 
        Program (SCHIP) and Medicaid should be improved. States 
        should make available the purchase of private insurance 
        as an option to their Medicaid and SCHIP populations 
        (though they should not require enrollment).
            (8) Reforms.--Reforms should be made to prevent 
        lawsuit abuse and curb the practice of defensive 
        medicine, which are significant drivers increasing 
        health care costs. The burden of proof in medical 
        malpractice cases should be based on compliance with 
        best practice guidelines, and States should be free to 
        implement those policies to best suit their needs.

SEC. 6206. POLICY STATEMENT ON MEDICARE.

    (a) Findings.--The House of Representatives finds the 
following:
            (1) More than 50 million Americans depend on 
        Medicare for their health security.
            (2) The Medicare Trustees Report has repeatedly 
        recommended that Medicare's long-term financial 
        challenges be addressed soon. Each year without reform, 
        the financial condition of Medicare becomes more 
        precarious and the threat to those in or near 
        retirement becomes more pronounced. According to the 
        Medicare Trustees Report--
                    (A) the Hospital Insurance Trust Fund will 
                be exhausted in 2030 and unable to pay 
                scheduled benefits;
                    (B) Medicare enrollment is expected to 
                increase by over 50 percent in the next two 
                decades, as 10,000 baby boomers reach 
                retirement age each day;
                    (C) enrollees remain in Medicare three 
                times longer than at the outset of the program;
                    (D) current workers' payroll contributions 
                pay for current beneficiaries;
                    (E) in 2013, the ratio was 3.2 workers per 
                beneficiary, but this falls to 2.3 in 2030 and 
                continues to decrease over time;
                    (F) most Medicare beneficiaries receive 
                about three dollars in Medicare benefits for 
                every one dollar paid into the program; and
                    (G) Medicare spending is growing faster 
                than the economy and Medicare outlays are 
                currently rising at a rate of 6.5 percent per 
                year over the next 10 years. According to the 
                Congressional Budget Office's 2014 Long-Term 
                Budget Outlook, spending on Medicare is 
                projected to reach 5 percent of gross domestic 
                product (GDP) by 2043 and 9.3 percent of GDP by 
                2089.
            (3) Failing to address this problem will leave 
        millions of American seniors without adequate health 
        security and younger generations burdened with enormous 
        debt to pay for spending levels that cannot be 
        sustained.
    (b) Policy on Medicare Reform.--In the House of 
Representatives, it is the policy of this concurrent resolution 
to preserve the program for those in or near retirement and 
strengthen Medicare for future beneficiaries.
    (c) Assumptions.--This concurrent resolution assumes reform 
of the Medicare program such that--
            (1) current Medicare benefits are preserved for 
        those in or near retirement;
            (2) permanent reform of the sustainable growth rate 
        is responsibly accounted for to ensure physicians 
        continue to participate in the Medicare program and 
        provide quality health care for beneficiaries;
            (3) when future generations reach eligibility, 
        Medicare is reformed to provide a premium support 
        payment and a selection of guaranteed health coverage 
        options from which recipients can choose a plan that 
        best suits their needs;
            (4) Medicare will maintain traditional fee-for-
        service as a plan option;
            (5) Medicare will provide additional assistance for 
        lower income beneficiaries and those with greater 
        health risks; and
            (6) Medicare spending is put on a sustainable path 
        and the Medicare program becomes solvent over the long-
        term.

SEC. 6207. POLICY STATEMENT ON MEDICAL DISCOVERY, DEVELOPMENT, DELIVERY 
                    AND INNOVATION.

    (a) Findings.--The House of Representatives finds the 
following:
            (1) For decades, the Nation's commitment to the 
        discovery, development, and delivery of new treatments 
        and cures has made the United States the biomedical 
        innovation capital of the world, bringing life-saving 
        drugs and devices to patients and well over a million 
        high-paying jobs to local communities.
            (2) Thanks to the visionary and determined 
        leadership of innovators throughout America, including 
        industry, academic medical centers, and the National 
        Institutes of Health (NIH), the United States has led 
        the way in early discovery. The United States 
        leadership role is being threatened, however, as other 
        countries contribute more to basic research from both 
        public and private sources.
            (3) The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and 
        Development predicts that China, for example, will 
        outspend the United States in total research and 
        development by the end of the decade.
            (4) Federal policies should foster innovation in 
        health care, not stifle it. America should maintain its 
        world leadership in medical science by encouraging 
        competitive forces to work through the marketplace in 
        delivering cures and therapies to patients.
            (5) Too often the bureaucracy and red-tape in 
        Washington hold back medical innovation and prevent new 
        lifesaving treatments from reaching patients. This 
        concurrent resolution recognizes the valuable role of 
        the NIH and the indispensable contributions to medical 
        research coming from outside Washington.
            (6) America is the greatest, most innovative Nation 
        on Earth. Her people are innovators, entrepreneurs, 
        visionaries, and relentless builders of the future. 
        Americans were responsible for the first telephone, the 
        first airplane, the first computer, for putting the 
        first man on the moon, for creating the first vaccine 
        for polio and for legions of other scientific and 
        medical breakthroughs that have improved and prolonged 
        human health and life for countless people in America 
        and around the world.
    (b) Policy on Medical Innovation.--
            (1) In the House of Representatives, it is the 
        policy of this concurrent resolution to support the 
        important work of medical innovators throughout the 
        country, including private-sector innovators, medical 
        centers and the National Institutes of Health.
            (2) At the same time, the budget calls for 
        continued strong funding for the agencies that engage 
        in valuable research and development, while also urging 
        Washington to get out of the way of researchers, 
        discoverers and innovators all over the country.

SEC. 6208. POLICY STATEMENT ON FEDERAL REGULATORY REFORM.

    (a) Findings.--The House of Representatives finds the 
following:
            (1) Excessive regulation at the Federal level has 
        hurt job creation and dampened the economy, slowing the 
        Nation's recovery from the economic recession.
            (2) Since President Obama's inauguration in 2009, 
        the administration has issued more than 468,500 pages 
        of regulations in the Federal Register including 70,066 
        pages in 2014.
            (3) The National Association of Manufacturers 
        estimates the total cost of regulations is as high as 
        $2.03 trillion per year. Since 2009, the White House 
        has generated more than $494 billion in regulatory 
        activity, with an additional $87.6 billion in 
        regulatory costs currently pending.
            (4) The Dodd-Frank financial services legislation 
        (Public Law 111-203) has resulted in more than $32 
        billion in compliance costs and saddled job creators 
        with more than 63 million hours of compliance 
        paperwork.
            (5) Implementation of the Affordable Care Act to 
        date has added 132.9 million annual hours of compliance 
        paperwork, imposing $24.3 billion of compliance costs 
        on the private sector and an $8 billion cost burden on 
        the States.
            (6) The highest regulatory costs come from rules 
        issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); 
        these regulations are primarily targeted at the coal 
        industry. In June 2014, the EPA proposed a rule to cut 
        carbon pollution from the Nation's power plants. The 
        proposed standards are unachievable with current 
        commercially available technology, resulting in a de-
        facto ban on new coal-fired power plants.
            (7) Coal-fired power plants provide roughly 40 
        percent of the United States electricity at a low cost. 
        Unfairly targeting the coal industry with costly and 
        unachievable regulations will increase energy prices, 
        disproportionately disadvantaging energy-intensive 
        industries like manufacturing and construction, and 
        will make life more difficult for millions of low-
        income and middle class families already struggling to 
        pay their bills.
            (8) Three hundred and thirty coal units are being 
        retired or converted as a result of EPA regulations. 
        Combined with the de-facto prohibition on new plants, 
        these retirements and conversions may further increase 
        the cost of electricity.
            (9) A recent study by the energy market analysis 
        group Energy Ventures Analysis Inc. estimates the 
        average energy bill in West Virginia will rise $750 per 
        household by 2020, due in part to EPA regulations. West 
        Virginia receives 95 percent of its electricity from 
        coal.
            (10) The Heritage Foundation found that a phase-out 
        of coal would cost 600,000 jobs by the end of 2023, 
        resulting in an aggregate gross domestic product 
        decrease of $2.23 trillion over the entire period and 
        reducing the income of a family of four by $1,200 per 
        year. Of these jobs, 330,000 will come from the 
        manufacturing sector, with California, Texas, Ohio, 
        Illinois, Pennsylvania, Michigan, New York, Indiana, 
        North Carolina, Wisconsin, and Georgia seeing the 
        highest job losses.
    (b) Policy on Federal Regulatory Reform.--In the House of 
Representatives, it is the policy of this concurrent resolution 
that Congress should, in consultation with the public burdened 
by excessive regulation, enact legislation that--
            (1) promotes economic growth and job creation by 
        eliminating unnecessary red tape and streamlining and 
        simplifying Federal regulations;
            (2) requires the implementation of a regulatory 
        budget to be allocated amongst Government agencies, 
        which would require congressional approval and limit 
        the maximum costs of regulations in a given year;
            (3) requires congressional approval of all new 
        major regulations (those with an impact of $100 million 
        or more) before enactment as opposed to current law in 
        which Congress must expressly disapprove of regulation 
        to prevent it from becoming law, which would keep 
        Congress engaged as to pending regulatory policy and 
        prevent costly and unsound policies from being 
        implemented and becoming effective;
            (4) requires a three year retrospective cost-
        benefit analysis of all new major regulations, to 
        ensure that regulations operate as intended;
            (5) reinforces the requirement of regulatory impact 
        analysis for regulations proposed by executive branch 
        agencies but also expands the requirement to 
        independent agencies so that by law they consider the 
        costs and benefits of proposed regulations rather than 
        merely being encouraged to do so as is current 
        practice; and
            (6) requires a formal rulemaking process for all 
        major regulations, which would increase transparency 
        over the process and allow interested parties to 
        communicate their views on proposed legislation to 
        agency officials.

SEC. 6209. POLICY STATEMENT ON HIGHER EDUCATION AND WORKFORCE 
                    DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY.

    (a) Findings on Higher Education.--The House of 
Representatives finds the following:
            (1) A well-educated workforce is critical to 
        economic, job, and wage growth.
            (2) Roughly 20 million students are enrolled in 
        American colleges and universities.
            (3) Over the past decade, tuition and fees have 
        been growing at an unsustainable rate. Between the 
        2004-2005 Academic Year and the 2014-2015 Academic 
        Year--
                    (A) published tuition and fees at public 4-
                year colleges and universities increased at an 
                average rate of 3.5 percent per year above the 
                rate of inflation;
                    (B) published tuition and fees at public 
                two-year colleges and universities increased at 
                an average rate of 2.5 percent per year above 
                the rate of inflation; and
                    (C) published tuition and fees at private 
                nonprofit 4-year colleges and universities 
                increased at an average rate of 2.2 percent per 
                year above the rate of inflation.
            (4) Federal financial aid for higher education has 
        also seen a dramatic increase. The portion of the 
        Federal student aid portfolio composed of Direct Loans, 
        Federal Family Education Loans, and Perkins Loans with 
        outstanding balances grew by 119 percent between fiscal 
        year 2007 and fiscal year 2014.
            (5) This spending has failed to make college more 
        affordable.
            (6) In his 2012 State of the Union Address, 
        President Obama noted: ``We can't just keep subsidizing 
        skyrocketing tuition; we'll run out of money''.
            (7) American students are chasing ever-increasing 
        tuition with ever-increasing debt. According to the 
        Federal Reserve Bank of New York, student debt now 
        stands at nearly $1.2 trillion. This makes student 
        loans the second largest balance of consumer debt, 
        after mortgage debt.
            (8) Students are carrying large debt loads and too 
        many fail to complete college or end up defaulting on 
        these loans due to their debt burden and a weak economy 
        and job market.
            (9) Based on estimates from the Congressional 
        Budget Office, the Pell Grant Program will face a 
        fiscal shortfall beginning in fiscal year 2017 and 
        continuing in each subsequent year in the current 
        budget window.
            (10) Failing to address these problems will 
        jeopardize access and affordability to higher education 
        for America's young people.
    (b) Policy on Higher Education Affordability.--In the House 
of Representatives, it is the policy of this concurrent 
resolution to address the root drivers of tuition inflation, 
by--
            (1) targeting Federal financial aid to those most 
        in need;
            (2) streamlining programs that provide aid to make 
        them more effective;
            (3) maintaining the maximum Pell grant award level 
        at $5,775 in each year of the budget window; and
            (4) removing regulatory barriers in higher 
        education that act to restrict flexibility and 
        innovative teaching, particularly as it relates to non-
        traditional models such as online coursework and 
        competency-based learning.
    (c) Findings on Workforce Development.--The House of 
Representatives finds the following:
            (1) 8.7 million Americans are currently unemployed.
            (2) Despite billions of dollars in spending, those 
        looking for work are stymied by a broken workforce 
        development system that fails to connect workers with 
        assistance and employers with trained personnel.
            (3) The House Education and Workforce Committee 
        successfully consolidated 15 job training programs in 
        the recently enacted Workforce Innovation and 
        Opportunity Act.
    (d) Policy on Workforce Development.--In the House of 
Representatives, it is the policy of this concurrent resolution 
to address the failings in the current workforce development 
system, by--
            (1) further streamlining and consolidating Federal 
        job training programs; and
            (2) empowering states with the flexibility to 
        tailor funding and programs to the specific needs of 
        their workforce, including the development of career 
        scholarships.

SEC. 6210. POLICY STATEMENT ON DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS.

    (a) Findings.--The House of Representatives finds the 
following:
            (1) For years, there has been serious concern 
        regarding the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) 
        bureaucratic mismanagement and continuous failure to 
        provide veterans timely access to health care and 
        benefits.
            (2) In 2014, reports started breaking across the 
        Nation that VA medical centers were manipulating wait-
        list documents to hide long delays veterans were facing 
        to receive health care. The VA hospital scandal led to 
        the immediate resignation of then-Secretary of Veterans 
        Affairs Eric K. Shinseki.
            (3) In 2015, for the first time ever, VA health 
        care was added to the ``high-risk'' list of the 
        Government Accountability Office (GAO), due to 
        management and oversight failures that have directly 
        resulted in risks to the timeliness, cost-
        effectiveness, and quality of health care.
            (4) In response to the scandal, the House Committee 
        on Veterans' Affairs held several oversight hearings 
        and ultimately enacted the Veterans' Access, Choice and 
        Accountability Act of 2014 (VACAA) (Public Law 113-146) 
        to address these problems. VACAA provided $15 billion 
        in emergency resources to fund internal health care 
        needs within the department and provided veterans 
        enhanced access to private-sector health care under the 
        new Veterans Choice Program.
    (b) Policy on the Department of Veterans Affairs.--This 
budget supports the continued oversight efforts by the 
Committee on Veterans' Affairs of the House of Representatives 
to ensure the VA is not only transparent and accountable, but 
also successful in achieving its goals in providing timely 
health care and benefits to America's veterans. The Committee 
on the Budget of the House of Representatives will continue to 
closely monitor the VA's progress to ensure resources provided 
by Congress are sufficient and efficiently used to provide 
needed benefits and services to veterans.

SEC. 6211. POLICY STATEMENT ON FEDERAL ACCOUNTING METHODOLOGIES.

    (a) Findings.--The House of Representatives finds the 
following:
            (1) Given the thousands of Federal programs and 
        trillions of dollars the Federal Government spends each 
        year, assessing and accounting for Federal fiscal 
        activities and liabilities is a complex undertaking.
            (2) Current methods of accounting leave much to be 
        desired in capturing the full scope of government and 
        in presenting information in a clear and compelling way 
        that illuminates the best options going forward.
            (3) Most fiscal analysis produced by the 
        Congressional Budget Office (CBO) is conducted over a 
        relatively short time horizon: 10 or 25 years. While 
        this time frame is useful for most purposes, it fails 
        to consider the fiscal consequences over the longer 
        term.
            (4) Additionally, current accounting methodology 
        does not provide an analysis of how the Federal 
        Government's fiscal situation over the long run affects 
        Americans of various age cohorts.
            (5) Another consideration is how Federal programs 
        should be accounted for. The ``accrual method'' of 
        accounting records revenue when it is earned and 
        expenses when they are incurred, while the ``cash 
        method'' records revenue and expenses when cash is 
        actually paid or received.
            (6) The Federal budget accounts for most programs 
        using cash accounting. Some programs, however, 
        particularly loan and loan guarantee programs, are 
        accounted for using accrual methods.
            (7) GAO has indicated that accrual accounting may 
        provide a more accurate estimation of the Federal 
        Government's liabilities than cash accounting for some 
        programs specifically those that provide some form of 
        insurance.
            (8) Where accrual accounting is used, it is almost 
        exclusively calculated by CBO according to the 
        methodology outlined in the Federal Credit Reform Act 
        of 1990 (FCRA). CBO uses fair value methodology instead 
        of FCRA to measure the cost of Fannie Mae and Freddie 
        Mac, for example.
            (9) FCRA methodology, however, understates the risk 
        and thus the true cost of Federal programs. An 
        alternative is fair value methodology, which uses 
        discount rates that incorporate the risk inherent to 
        the type of liability being estimated in addition to 
        Treasury discount rates of the proper maturity length.
            (10) The Congressional Budget Office has concluded 
        that ``adopting a fair-value approach would provide a 
        more comprehensive way to measure the costs of Federal 
        credit programs and would permit more level comparisons 
        between those costs and the costs of other forms of 
        federal assistance'' than the current approach under 
        FCRA.
    (b) Policy on Federal Accounting Methodologies.--In the 
House of Representatives, it is the policy of this concurrent 
resolution that Congress should, in consultation with the 
Congressional Budget Office and the public affected by Federal 
budgetary choices, adopt Government-wide reforms of budget and 
accounting practices so the American people and their 
representatives can more readily understand the fiscal 
situation of the Government of the United States and the 
options best suited to improving it. Such reforms may include 
but should not be limited to the following:
            (1) Providing additional metrics to enhance our 
        current analysis by considering our fiscal situation 
        comprehensively, over an extended time horizon, and as 
        it affects Americans of various age cohorts.
            (2) Expanding the use of accrual accounting where 
        appropriate.
            (3) Accounting for certain Federal credit programs 
        using fair value accounting as opposed to the current 
        approach under the Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990.

SEC. 6212. POLICY STATEMENT ON REDUCING UNNECESSARY, WASTEFUL, AND 
                    UNAUTHORIZED SPENDING.

    (a) Findings.--The House of Representatives finds the 
following:
            (1) The Government Accountability Office (GAO) is 
        required by law to identify examples of waste, 
        duplication, and overlap in Federal programs, and has 
        so identified dozens of such examples.
            (2) In its report to Congress on Government 
        Efficiency and Effectiveness, the Comptroller General 
        has stated that addressing the identified waste, 
        duplication, and overlap in Federal programs could 
        ``lead to tens of billions of dollars of additional 
        savings.''.
            (3) In 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014 the GAO issued 
        reports showing excessive duplication and redundancy in 
        Federal programs including--
                    (A) two hundred nine Science, Technology, 
                Engineering, and Mathematics education programs 
                in 13 different Federal agencies at a cost of 
                $3 billion annually;
                    (B) two hundred separate Department of 
                Justice crime prevention and victim services 
                grant programs with an annual cost of $3.9 
                billion in 2010;
                    (C) twenty different Federal entities 
                administer 160 housing programs and other forms 
                of Federal assistance for housing with a total 
                cost of $170 billion in 2010;
                    (D) seventeen separate Homeland Security 
                preparedness grant programs that spent $37 
                billion between fiscal years 2011 and 2012;
                    (E) fourteen grant and loan programs, and 
                three tax benefits to reduce diesel emissions;
                    (F) ninety-four different initiatives run 
                by 11 different agencies to encourage ``green 
                building'' in the private sector; and
                    (G) twenty-three agencies implemented 
                approximately 670 renewable energy initiatives 
                in fiscal year 2010 at a cost of nearly $15 
                billion.
            (4) The Federal Government spends more than $80 
        billion each year for approximately 1,400 information 
        technology investments. GAO has identified broad 
        acquisition failures, waste, and unnecessary 
        duplication in the Government's information technology 
        infrastructure. experts have estimated that eliminating 
        these problems could save 25 percent or $20 billion.
            (5) GAO has identified strategic sourcing as a 
        potential source of spending reductions. In 2011 GAO 
        estimated that saving 10 percent of the total or all 
        Federal procurement could generate more than $50 
        billion in savings annually.
            (6) Federal agencies reported an estimated $106 
        billion in improper payments in fiscal year 2013.
            (7) Under clause 2 of rule XI of the Rules of the 
        House of Representatives, each standing committee must 
        hold at least one hearing during each 120 day period 
        following its establishment on waste, fraud, abuse, or 
        mismanagement in Government programs.
            (8) According to the Congressional Budget Office, 
        by fiscal year 2015, 32 laws will expire, possibly 
        resulting in $693 billion in unauthorized 
        appropriations. Timely reauthorizations of these laws 
        would ensure assessments of program justification and 
        effectiveness.
            (9) The findings resulting from congressional 
        oversight of Federal Government programs should result 
        in programmatic changes in both authorizing statutes 
        and program funding levels.
    (b) Policy on Reducing Unnecessary, Wasteful, and 
Unauthorized Spending.--
            (1) Each authorizing committee of the House of 
        Representatives annually should include in its Views 
        and Estimates letter required under section 301(d) of 
        the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 recommendations to 
        the Committee on the Budget of the House of 
        Representatives of programs within the jurisdiction of 
        such committee whose funding should be reduced or 
        eliminated.
            (2) Committees of jurisdiction should review all 
        unauthorized programs funded through annual 
        appropriations to determine if the programs are 
        operating efficiently and effectively.
            (3) Committees should reauthorize those programs 
        that in the committees' judgment should continue to 
        receive funding.
            (4) For those programs not reauthorized by 
        committees, the House of Representatives should enforce 
        the limitations on funding such unauthorized programs 
        in the House rules. If the strictures of the rules are 
        deemed to be too rapid in prohibiting spending on 
        unauthorized programs, then milder measures should be 
        adopted and enforced until a return to the full 
        prohibition of clause 2(a)(1) of rule XXI of the Rules 
        of the House.

SEC. 6213. POLICY STATEMENT ON DEFICIT REDUCTION THROUGH THE 
                    CANCELLATION OF UNOBLIGATED BALANCES.

    (a) Findings.--The House of Representatives finds the 
following:
            (1) According to the most recent estimate from the 
        Office of Management and Budget, Federal agencies were 
        expected to hold $844 billion in unobligated balances 
        at the close of fiscal year 2015.
            (2) These funds represent direct and discretionary 
        spending previously made available by Congress that 
        remains available for expenditure.
            (3) In some cases, agencies are granted funding and 
        it remains available for obligation indefinitely.
            (4) The Congressional Budget and Impoundment 
        Control Act of 1974 requires the Office of Management 
        and Budget to make funds available to agencies for 
        obligation and prohibits the Administration from 
        withholding or cancelling unobligated funds unless 
        approved by an Act of Congress.
            (5) Greater congressional oversight is required to 
        review and identify potential savings from canceling 
        unobligated balances of funds that are no longer 
        needed.
    (b) Policy on Deficit Reduction Through the Cancellation of 
Unobligated Balances.--In the House of Representatives, 
committees should through their oversight activities identify 
and achieve savings through the cancellation or rescission of 
unobligated balances that neither abrogate contractual 
obligations of the Government nor reduce or disrupt Federal 
commitments under programs such as Social Security, veterans' 
affairs, national security, and Treasury authority to finance 
the national debt.
    (c) Deficit Reduction.--The House of Representatives, with 
the assistance of the Government Accountability Office, the 
Inspectors General, and other appropriate agencies should 
continue to make it a high priority to review unobligated 
balances and identify savings for deficit reduction.

SEC. 6214. POLICY STATEMENT ON AGENCY FEES AND SPENDING.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) A number of Federal agencies and organizations 
        have permanent authority to collect fees and other 
        offsetting collections and to spend these collected 
        funds.
            (2) The total amount of offsetting fees and 
        offsetting collections is estimated by the Office of 
        Management and Budget to be $525 billion in fiscal year 
        2016.
            (3) Agency budget justifications are, in some 
        cases, not fully transparent about the amount of 
        program activity funded through offsetting collections 
        or fees. This lack of transparency prevents effective 
        and accountable government.
    (b) Policy on Agency Fees and Spending.--In the House of 
Representatives, it is the policy of this concurrent resolution 
that Congress must reassert its constitutional prerogative to 
control spending and conduct oversight. To do so, Congress 
should enact legislation requiring programs that are funded 
through fees, offsetting receipts, or offsetting collections to 
be allocated new budget authority annually. Such allocation may 
arise from--
            (1) legislation originating from the authorizing 
        committee of jurisdiction for the agency or program; or
            (2) fee and account specific allocations included 
        in annual appropriation Acts.

SEC. 6215. POLICY STATEMENT ON RESPONSIBLE STEWARDSHIP OF TAXPAYER 
                    DOLLARS.

    (a) Findings.--The House of Representatives finds the 
following:
            (1) The budget for the House of Representatives is 
        $188 million less than it was when Republicans became 
        the majority in 2011.
            (2) The House of Representatives has achieved 
        significant savings by consolidating operations and 
        renegotiating contracts.
    (b) Policy on Responsible Stewardship of Taxpayer 
Dollars.--In the House of Representatives, it is the policy of 
this concurrent resolution that:
            (1) The House of Representatives must be a model 
        for the responsible stewardship of taxpayer resources 
        and therefore must identify any savings that can be 
        achieved through greater productivity and efficiency 
        gains in the operation and maintenance of House 
        services and resources like printing, conferences, 
        utilities, telecommunications, furniture, grounds 
        maintenance, postage, and rent. This should include a 
        review of policies and procedures for acquisition of 
        goods and services to eliminate any unnecessary 
        spending. The Committee on House Administration should 
        review the policies pertaining to the services provided 
        to Members and committees of the House of 
        Representatives, and should identify ways to reduce any 
        subsidies paid for the operation of the House gym, 
        barber shop, salon, and the House dining room.
            (2) No taxpayer funds may be used to purchase first 
        class airfare or to lease corporate jets for Members of 
        Congress.
            (3) Retirement benefits for Members of Congress 
        should not include free, taxpayer-funded health care 
        for life.

SEC. 6216. POLICY STATEMENT ON ``NO BUDGET, NO PAY''.

    In the House of Representatives, it is the policy of this 
concurrent resolution that Congress should agree to a 
concurrent resolution on the budget every year pursuant to 
section 301 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974. If by 
April 15, the House of Representatives has not agreed to a 
concurrent resolution on the budget, the payroll administrator 
of the House of Representatives should carry out this policy in 
the same manner as the provisions of Public Law 113-3, the No 
Budget, No Pay Act of 2013, and should place in an escrow 
account all compensation otherwise required to be made for 
Members of the House of Representatives. Withheld compensation 
should be released to Members of the House of Representatives 
the earlier of the day on which the House of Representatives 
agrees to a concurrent resolution on the budget, pursuant to 
section 301 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, or the 
last day of that Congress.

SEC. 6217. POLICY STATEMENT ON NATIONAL SECURITY FUNDING.

    (a) Findings.--The House of Representatives finds the 
following:
            (1) Russian aggression, the growing threats of the 
        Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant in the Middle 
        East, North Korean and Iranian nuclear and missile 
        programs, and continued Chinese investments in high-end 
        military capabilities and cyber warfare shape the 
        parameters of an increasingly complex and challenging 
        security environment.
            (2) All four current service chiefs testified that 
        the National Military Strategy could not be executed at 
        sequestration levels.
            (3) The independent and bipartisan National Defense 
        Panel conducted risk assessments of force structure 
        changes triggered by the Budget Control Act of 2011 
        (BCA) and concluded that in addition to previous cuts 
        to defense dating back to 2009, the sequestration of 
        defense discretionary spending has ``caused significant 
        shortfalls in U.S. military readiness and both present 
        and future capabilities''.
            (4) The President's fiscal year 2016 budget 
        irresponsibly ignores current law and requests a 
        defense budget $38 billion above the caps for 
        rhetorical gain. By creating an expectation of spending 
        without a plan to avoid the BCA's guaranteed sequester 
        upon breaching of its caps, the White House's proposal 
        compounds the fiscal uncertainty that has affected the 
        military's ability to adequately plan for future 
        contingencies and make investments crucial for the 
        Nation's defense.
            (5) The President's budget proposes $1.8 trillion 
        in tax increases, in addition to the $1.7 trillion in 
        tax hikes the Administration has already imposed. The 
        President's tax increases would further burden economic 
        growth and is not a realistic source for offsets to 
        fund defense sequester replacement.
    (b) Policy on Fiscal Year 2016 National Defense Funding.--
In fiscal year 2015, the House-passed budget resolution 
anticipated $566 billion for national defense in the 
discretionary base budget for fiscal year 2016. With no 
necessary statutory change yet provided by Congress, the BCA 
statute would require limiting national defense discretionary 
base funding to $523 billion in fiscal year 2016. However, in 
total with $90 billion, the House of Representatives Budget 
estimate for Overseas Contingency Operations funding for the 
Department of Defense, the fiscal year 2016 budget provides 
over $613 billion total for defense spending that is higher 
than the President's budget request for the fiscal year.
    (c) Defense Readiness and Modernization Fund.--(1) The 
budget resolution recognizes the need to ensure robust funding 
for national defense while maintaining overall fiscal 
discipline. The budget resolution prioritizes our national 
defense and the needs of the warfighter by providing needed 
dollars through the creation of the ``Defense Readiness and 
Modernization Fund''.
    (2) The Defense Readiness and Modernization Fund provides 
the mechanism for Congress to responsibly allocate in a 
deficit-neutral way the resources the military needs to secure 
the safety and liberty of United States citizens from threats 
at home and abroad. The Defense Readiness and Modernization 
Fund will provide the chair of the Committee on the Budget of 
the House of Representatives the ability to increase 
allocations to support legislation that would provide for the 
Department of Defense warfighting capabilities, modernization, 
training and maintenance associated with combat readiness, 
activities to reach full auditability of the Department of 
Defense's financial statements, and implementation of military 
and compensation reforms.
    (d) Sequester Replacement for National Defense.--This 
concurrent resolution encourages an immediate reevaluation of 
Federal Government priorities to maintain the strength of 
America's national security posture. In identifying policies to 
restructure and stabilize the Government's major entitlement 
programs which, along with net interest, will consume all 
Federal revenue in less than 20 years, the budget also charts a 
course that can ensure the availability of needed national 
security resources.
    And the House agree to the same.

                                   Tom Price,
                                   Todd Rokita,
                                   Mario Diaz-Balart,
                                   Diane Black,
                                   John R. Moolenaar,
                                 Managers on the Part of the House.

                                   Michael B. Enzi,
                                   Chuck Grassley,
                                   Jeff Sessions,
                                   Mike Crapo,
                                   Lindsey Graham,
                                   Rob Portman,
                                   Patrick J. Toomey,
                                   Ron Johnson,
                                   Kelly Ayotte,
                                   Roger F. Wicker,
                                   Bob Corker,
                                   David Perdue,
                                Managers on the Part of the Senate.
       JOINT EXPLANATORY STATEMENT OF THE COMMITTEE OF CONFERENCE

      The managers on the part of the House and the Senate at 
the conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on 
the amendment of the House to the concurrent resolution (S. 
Con. Res. 11), setting forth the congressional budget for the 
United States Government for fiscal year 2016 and setting forth 
the appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 2017 through 
2025, submit the following joint statement to the House and the 
Senate in explanation of the effect of the action agreed upon 
by the managers and recommended in the accompanying conference 
report:
                   Joint Explanatory Statement of the
                        Committee on Conference

      The conference agreement between the Senate and the House 
on the fiscal year 2016 budget resolution is a statement of 
good faith to the American people that Congress can govern 
responsibly and effectively. This budget agreement achieves 
five important objectives:
             It balances the budget within 10 years to 
        address the problem of government overspending and 
        rising debt.
             It balances solely by limiting government 
        spending, not by raising taxes, thereby boosting the 
        private sector economy and job creation.
             It provides a path through reconciliation 
        to repeal the Affordable Care Act with its burdensome 
        mandates and restrictions, a first step toward 
        introducing real, patient-centered health care reform.
             It makes national defense a priority and 
        provides for the maximum allowable defense funding 
        under current law, with a fiscally responsible path for 
        further spending increases.
             It calls for a return to regular order in 
        Congress, allowing all committees to act fully and 
        Appropriations Committees to consider spending bills on 
        time.
      It is well known that a budget is more than a set of 
numbers. It is a reflection of national priorities, a vision of 
the future. When developed in a responsible way, a sound 
Federal budget can provide a foundation for moving America in 
the direction of greater opportunity and economic growth and a 
safer and more secure Nation.
      In writing this budget, Congress is restoring a priority 
neglected since fiscal year 2010. Moreover, in writing a 10-
year balanced budget, the House and Senate Budget Committees 
have accomplished something the President's budget never does 
and that Congress last achieved in fiscal year 2002--nearly 15 
years ago. Passing this budget will also let the congressional 
policymakers who actually allocate the dollars get to work and 
observe its spending limits to achieve the Nation's goals.
      The agreement presents a responsible path forward to 
reduce the Nation's debt burden and expand economic opportunity 
for all Americans. In meeting the goals cited above, the budget 
aims to restore public trust by eliminating wasteful Washington 
overspending; making government truly more effective and more 
accountable; protecting America's most vulnerable citizens; and 
strengthening the health and retirement of the Nation's 
seniors. It ensures taxpayers' dollars are spent more wisely, 
and that Medicare, Medicaid, nutrition assistance, and other 
programs can deliver on their promises. While providing a 
sturdy and reliable safety net for those who need it, this 
budget also helps others break free of government dependency 
and pursue self-sufficiency.
      The budget's deficit reduction also will have tangible 
benefits for the economy. The Congressional Budget Office [CBO] 
has analyzed how the funding changes contained in the 
conference report likely would affect U.S. economic 
performance, finding that the fully implemented spending levels 
of the budget resolution conference report would improve the 
economy. Specifically, the budget office found that: a) per 
capita real gross national product [GNP], a proxy for a 
country's standard of living, would be 1.4 percent higher in 
2025 than it would be without the spending changes; and b) 
nominal GDP would be $400 billion higher by fiscal year 2025 
than it would otherwise be.
      On the current fiscal trajectory, which is marked by 
rising debt levels as a share of the economy, government 
borrowing would eventually lead to a decline in national 
savings and a ``crowding out'' of private investment. Crowding 
out occurs when the Federal Government's borrowing competes 
successfully with that of private borrowers. Not only can the 
Federal Government command credit resources more readily, 
thanks to its generally superior rating for default risk when 
compared with private borrowers, but excessive borrowing can 
put upward pressure on interest rates that private borrowers 
must pay. Less credit available in private lending markets 
could mean higher prices for Americans as borrowers.
      CBO's analysis of the conference agreement indicates that 
deficit reduction also creates long-term economic benefits 
because it increases the pool of national savings and boosts 
private investment, thereby raising economic growth and job 
creation. CBO estimates that the conference agreement would 
maintain budget balance in the years beyond the budget window 
and significantly reduce Federal debt held by the public as a 
percent of GDP. To put this in perspective, publicly held debt 
to GDP currently stands at 74 percent, its highest level since 
1951, and is projected to rise steadily in the decades ahead 
under CBO's extended current law baseline. CBO estimates that 
the conference agreement would reduce debt as a percent of GDP 
to 56 percent in 2025 and ultimately to about 20 percent in 
2040.
      A congressional budget develops in stages, of which a 
concurrent resolution on the budget agreed to by the House and 
Senate is the first. The resolution establishes a framework for 
fiscal policy and proposes an alignment of resources with 
Congress's governing priorities. It is the only legislative 
vehicle that reflects a global assessment of the governing 
majority's priorities and the demands on Federal resources. 
Subsequently, respective committees of jurisdiction develop, in 
accordance with their judgments, policy reforms needed to 
achieve the budget's fiscal aims, guided by the budget's 
aggregates and recommended function levels, as presented later 
in this statement.
      The managers on the part of the House and the Senate of 
the conference on the votes in disagreement between the Houses 
on the concurrent resolution establishing the congressional 
budget for the United States Government for fiscal year 2016, 
and setting forth appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 
2017 through 2025 (S. Con. Res. 11) submit the following joint 
statement to the House and the Senate in explanation of the 
effect of the action agreed upon by the managers and 
recommended in the accompanying conference report.
      The House amendment struck all of the Senate concurrent 
resolution after the resolving clause and inserted the text of 
H. Con. Res. 27.
      The Senate recedes from its disagreement to the amendment 
of the House with an amendment that is a substitute for the 
Senate concurrent resolution and the House amendment. The 
differences among the Senate concurrent resolution, the House 
amendment thereto, and the substitute agreed to in conference 
are noted below, except for clerical corrections, conforming 
changes made necessary by agreements reached by the conferees, 
and minor drafting and clarifying changes.
      Conferees on the Concurrent Resolution on the Budget for 
Fiscal Year 2016 met in public session on Monday, April 20, 
2015.

                          DISPLAYS AND AMOUNTS

      The required contents of concurrent budget resolutions 
are set forth in section 301(a) of the Congressional Budget Act 
of 1974. The years in this document are fiscal years unless 
otherwise noted.
      Each function discussion provides recommended function 
totals for budget authority and outlays, as well as a breakout 
of discretionary (annually appropriated) and direct (or 
mandatory) spending amounts for fiscal year 2016. These figures 
are not binding; they are intended to provide an overall 
accounting of estimated spending requirements and priorities 
according to major categories of government activities. Figures 
for the Senate resolution and the House amendment are based on 
CBO's January 2015 baseline; conference agreement numbers are 
based on CBO's March 2015 baseline, adjusted for the enactment 
of H.R. 2.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate concurrent resolution includes all of the 
items required under Section 301(a) of the Congressional Budget 
Act.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment includes all of the items required as 
part of a concurrent budget resolution under section 301(a) of 
the Congressional Budget Act other than the spending and 
revenue levels for Social Security Retirement and Disability 
(which are used to enforce a point of order applicable only in 
the Senate). It also adds three additional separate budget 
functions: Government-Wide Savings (930); Overseas Contingency 
Operations/Global War on Terrorism (970); and Across-the-Board 
Adjustment (990).
      Discussion of the governing principles underlying the 
budget's recommended policy reforms can be found in House 
Report 114-47 accompanying H. Con. Res. 27, the House 
Concurrent Resolution on the Budget for Fiscal Year 2016.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement includes all of the items 
required under Section 301(a) of the Congressional Budget Act, 
and adds one separate budget function: Overseas Contingency 
Operations/Global War on Terrorism (970).

                     AGGREGATE AND FUNCTION LEVELS

      The following tables are included in this section:
             Table 1.--Economic Assumptions for the 
        Conference Agreement
             Table 2.--FY 2016 Budget Resolution 
        Conference Agreement Summary
             Table 3.--FY 2016 Budget Resolution 
        Conference Agreement Budget Aggregates
             Table 4.--FY 2016 Budget Resolution 
        Conference Agreement Discretionary Budget Authority
             Table 5.--FY 2016 Budget Resolution 
        Conference Agreement Mandatory Outlays
             Table 6.--FY 2016 Budget Resolution 
        Conference Agreement Aggregate and Function Levels
             Table 7.--FY 2016 Budget Resolution as 
        Passed by the Senate
             Table 8.--Fiscal Year 2016 Budget 
        Resolution Total Spending and Revenue, as Passed by the 
        House
             Table 9.--Fiscal Year 2016 Budget 
        Resolution Discretionary Spending, as Passed by the 
        House
             Table 10.--Fiscal Year 2016 Budget 
        Resolution Mandatory Spending, as Passed by the House

                          ECONOMIC ASSUMPTIONS

      Section 301(g)(2) of the Congressional Budget Act 
requires that the joint explanatory statement accompanying a 
conference report on a budget resolution set forth the common 
economic assumptions upon which the joint statement and 
conference report are based. The conference agreement is built 
upon the economic forecasts development by the Congressional 
Budget Office and presented in CBO's ``Updated Budget 
Projections: 2015 to 2015,'' (March 9, 2015).

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate resolution employed CBO's economic assumptions 
published in January 2015.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment uses CBO's economic assumptions 
published in January 2015.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement uses CBO's economic assumption 
published in March 2015.
      
      

                                               TABLE 1.--ECONOMIC ASSUMPTIONS FOR THE CONFERENCE AGREEMENT
                                                                      [Fiscal year]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                              2015      2016      2017      2018      2019      2020      2021      2022      2023      2024      2025
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Gross Domestic Product (GDP):
    Billions of dollars...................    18,016    18,832    19,701    20,558    21,404    22,315    23,271    24,262    25,287    26,352    27,456
    Percentage change.....................       4.4       4.5       4.6       4.4       4.1       4.3       4.3       4.3       4.2       4.2       4.2
Real GDP:
    Billions of 2009 dollars..............    16,405    16,893    17,361    17,763    18,127    18,524    18,934    19,346    19,762    20,180    20,603
    Percentage change.....................       2.7       3.0       2.8       2.3       2.1       2.2       2.2       2.2       2.2       2.1       2.1
Consumer Price Index, All Urban Consumers
 (CPI-U):
    1982-84=100...........................     238.6     243.3     248.9     254.7     260.7     267.0     273.5     280.2     287.0     294.0     301.0
    Percentage change.....................       1.1       2.0       2.3       2.4       2.3       2.4       2.4       2.4       2.4       2.4       2.4
Price Index, Personal Consumption
 Expenditures (PCE):
    2009=100..............................     109.7     111.6     113.7     116.0     118.3     120.7     123.1     125.6     128.1     130.7     133.3
    Percentage change.....................       1.1       1.7       1.9       2.0       2.0       2.0       2.0       2.0       2.0       2.0       2.0
Unemployment Rate, Civilian, 16 Years or
 Older:
    Percent...............................       5.6       5.4       5.4       5.3       5.4       5.5       5.5       5.5       5.4       5.4       5.4
Employment, Total Nonfarm (Establishment
 Survey):
    Millions..............................       141       143       144       146       146       147       148       149       150       151       152
    Percentage change.....................       2.0       1.4       1.1       0.8       0.5       0.6       0.6       0.6       0.6       0.6       0.6
10-Year Treasury Note:
    Percent...............................       2.6       3.2       3.8       4.1       4.4       4.6       4.6       4.6       4.6       4.6       4.6
Income, Personal:
    Billions of dollars...................    15,183    15,905    16,682    17,508    18,331    19,195    20,125    21,059    22,007    23,003    24,054
    Percentage of GDP.....................      84.3      84.5      84.7      85.2      85.6      86.0      86.5      86.8      87.0      87.3      87.6
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



                                                                 FUNCTIONS AND REVENUES
                                            TABLE 2.--FY 2016 BUDGET RESOLUTION CONFERENCE AGREEMENT SUMMARY
                                                                [Fiscal year, $ billions]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                            2016     2017     2018     2019     2020     2021     2022     2023     2024      2025     2016-20   2016-25
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Conference Levels:
    Outlays.............................    3,871    3,808    3,846    4,027    4,210    4,365    4,581    4,695     4,774     5,006    19,761    43,183
    Revenues............................    3,471    3,602    3,729    3,875    4,035    4,211    4,395    4,596     4,806     5,030    18,711    41,750
    Deficit(+)/Surplus(-)...............      400      206      117      152      176      153      186       99       -32       -24     1,050     1,432
    Debt held by the public.............   13,842   14,124   14,307   14,523   14,757   14,965   15,204   15,354    15,374    15,405
As a Share of GDP:a
    Outlays.............................    20.6%    19.4%    18.8%    18.8%    18.8%    18.7%    18.8%    18.5%     18.0%     18.1%     19.3%     18.8%
    Revenues............................    18.5%    18.4%    18.2%    18.1%    18.0%    18.1%    18.0%    18.1%     18.1%     18.2%     18.2%     18.2%
    Deficit(+)/Surplus(-)...............     2.1%     1.0%     0.6%     0.7%     0.8%     0.7%     0.8%     0.4%     -0.1%     -0.1%      1.0%      0.7%
    Debt held by the public.............    73.6%    72.1%    69.8%    67.9%    65.9%    64.2%    62.3%    60.5%     58.0%     55.6%      n.a.      n.a.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
aIn 2016-20 and 2016-25 columns, percentages reflect five- and ten-year averages, respectively.


                                       TABLE 3.--FY 2016 BUDGET RESOLUTION CONFERENCE AGREEMENT BUDGET AGGREGATES
                                                                [Fiscal year, $ billions]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                    2016      2017      2018      2019      2020      2021      2022      2023      2024      2025     2016-20   2016-25
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Discretionary:
  Defense (regular BA)a.........       523       536       549       562       576       590       623       636       649       662     2,746     5,906
  Nondefense (regular BA)a......       493       477       478       487       495       503       509       515       521       527     2,431     5,006
  Total Discretionary:
    BA..........................     1,120     1,085     1,097     1,113     1,128     1,148     1,132     1,151     1,170     1,189     5,542    11,332
    OT..........................     1,206     1,167     1,148     1,157     1,167     1,182     1,181     1,176     1,180     1,200     5,845    11,764
  % change (BA)b................     -0.2%     -3.1%      1.1%      1.5%      1.3%      1.8%     -1.4%      1.7%      1.7%      1.6%      0.1%      0.6%
Mandatory (OT)..................     2,390     2,316     2,311     2,431     2,559     2,667     2,853     2,943     2,997     3,196    12,007    26,662
  % changeb.....................      4.8%     -3.1%     -0.2%      5.2%      5.3%      4.2%      7.0%      3.2%      1.8%      6.6%      2.3%      3.4%
Net interest (OT)...............       275       325       387       438       484       516       548       576       598       611     1,910     4,757
  % changeb.....................     20.4%     18.0%     19.1%     13.3%     10.4%      6.5%      6.3%      5.2%      3.8%      2.1%     16.2%     10.3%
Total outlays...................     3,871     3,808     3,846     4,027     4,210     4,365     4,581     4,695     4,774     5,006    19,761    43,183
  % changeb.....................      5.1%     -1.6%      1.0%      4.7%      4.6%      3.7%      5.0%      2.5%      1.7%      4.9%      2.7%      3.1%
Revenues........................     3,471     3,602     3,729     3,875     4,035     4,211     4,395     4,596     4,806     5,030    18,711    41,750
  % changeb                           8.7%      3.8%      3.5%      3.9%      4.1%      4.4%      4.4%      4.6%      4.6%      4.7%      4.8%      4.7%
Unified deficit (+)/surplus (-).       400       206       117       152       176       153       186        99       -32       -24     1,050     1,432
  On-budget.....................       415       206        94       104        98        44        42       -84      -257      -296       917       365
  Off-budget....................       -15         0        23        48        78       109       144       183       226       272       133     1,067
Unified deficit/surplus % of GDP      2.1%      1.0%      0.6%      0.7%      0.8%      0.7%      0.8%      0.4%     -0.1%     -0.1%      1.0%      0.6%
Total Federal debt..............    19,072    19,503    19,840    20,178    20,509    20,788    21,048    21,203    21,209    21,165      n.c.      n.c.
Total Federal debt % of GDP.....    101.4%     99.5%     96.8%     94.3%     91.6%     89.2%     86.3%     83.5%     80.0%     76.4%      n.c.      n.c.
Debt held by the public.........    13,842    14,124    14,307    14,523    14,757    14,965    15,204    15,354    15,374    15,405      n.c.      n.c.
Debt held by the public % of GDP     73.6%     72.1%     69.8%     67.9%     65.9%     64.2%     62.3%     60.5%     58.0%     55.6%      n.c.      n.c.
MEMORANDA:
Economic Growth Benefitc (OT)...        38        20         0         0         0       -23       -24       -25       -53       -55        57      -124
Unified deficit (+)/surplus (-)        362       186       117       152       176       177       210       125        21        31       993     1,557
 without Economic Growth Benefit
Gross Domestic Product..........    18,800    19,600    20,500    21,400    22,400    23,300    24,400    25,400    26,500    27,700   102,700   230,000
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
aThese amounts are subject to discretionary spending limits in the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (the Deficit Control Act),
  as amended.
bPercentage change represents change from year prior. In 2016-20 and 2016-25 columns, percentage reflects average annual growth.
cCBO estimate of the effect on the deficit from the change in the economy attributable to the budget plan. In this table, the effect is included in the
  mandatory spending line.
 
n.c. = not computable.


                                 TABLE 4.--FY 2016 BUDGET RESOLUTION CONFERENCE AGREEMENT DISCRETIONARY BUDGET AUTHORITY
                                                                [Fiscal year, $ billions]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                              2016     2017     2018     2019     2020     2021     2022     2023     2024     2025    2016-20   2016-25
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Defense (regular BA):a
  Conference Agreement....................      523      536      549      562      576      590      623      636      649      662     2,746     5,906
  CBO March Baseline......................      523      536      549      562      576      590      605      620      635      651     2,746     5,848
                                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Difference............................        0        0        0        0        0        0       18       16       14       11         0        58
Nondefense (regular BA):a
  Conference Agreement....................      493      477      478      487      495      503      509      515      521      527     2,431     5,006
  CBO March Baseline......................      493      504      515      529      543      555      569      583      598      613     2,584     5,503
                                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Difference............................        0      -26      -37      -43      -47      -52      -60      -68      -77      -86      -153      -496
Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO):
  Conference Agreement....................       96       65       63       58       50       48        0        0        0        0       331       378
  President's Budget......................       58       27       27       27       27       27        0        0        0        0       191       191
                                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Difference............................       38       38       36       31       23       21        0        0        0        0       166       187
Disaster Relief Funding:
  Conference Agreement....................        7        7        7        7        7        7        0        0        0        0        34        41
  President's Budget......................        7        0        0        0        0        0        0        0        0        0         7         7
                                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Difference............................        0        7        7        7        7        7        0        0        0        0        27        34
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
aThese amounts are subject to discretionary spending limits in the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (the Deficit Control Act),
  as amended.


                                       TABLE 5.--FY 2016 BUDGET RESOLUTION CONFERENCE AGREEMENT MANDATORY OUTLAYS
                                                                [Fiscal year, $ billions]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                    2016      2017      2018      2019      2020      2021      2022      2023      2024      2025     2016-20   2016-25
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CBO March Baseline:a                 2,488     2,565     2,633     2,798     2,954     3,118     3,350     3,476     3,597     3,872    13,438    30,852
  % changeb.....................      9.1%      3.1%      2.7%      6.3%      5.6%      5.6%      7.4%      3.8%      3.5%      7.6%      5.3%      5.4%
Conference Agreement:c               2,390     2,316     2,311     2,431     2,559     2,667     2,853     2,943     2,997     3,196    12,007    26,662
  % changeb.....................      4.8%     -3.1%     -0.2%      5.2%      5.3%      4.2%      7.0%      3.2%      1.8%      6.6%      2.3%      3.4%
  Difference                           -99      -249      -323      -367      -395      -451      -498      -533      -601      -676    -1,432    -4,189
MEMORANDUM:
Gross Domestic Product..........    18,800    19,600    20,500    21,400    22,400    23,300    24,400    25,400    26,500    27,700   102,700   230,000
  % changeb.....................      4.4%      4.3%      4.6%      4.4%      4.7%      4.0%      4.7%      4.1%      4.3%      4.5%      4.5%      4.4%
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
aIncludes the effect of H.R. 2, which cleared Congress on April 14.
bPercentage change represents change from year prior. In 2016-20 and 2016-25 columns, percentage reflects average annual growth.
cIncludes economic growth benefit.


                                                     TABLE 6.--FY 2016 BUDGET RESOLUTION CONFERENCE AGREEMENT AGGREGATE AND FUNCTION LEVELS
                                                                                    [Fiscal year, $ billions]
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
           Function                 2016         2017         2018         2019         2020         2021         2022         2023         2024         2025         2016-20         2016-25
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
050-National Defense:
  BA..........................      531.306      544.515      557.764      571.039      585.330      599.646      632.804      646.039      659.310      673.490       2,789.954       6,001.243
  OT..........................      564.325      549.357      548.021      560.439      572.493      585.628      615.907      628.518      638.235      658.011       2,794.635       5,920.934
  Discretionary:
    BA........................      523.091      536.068      549.073      562.080      576.088      590.097      623.000      636.000      649.000      662.000       2,746.400       5,906.497
    OT........................      555.480      540.097      538.510      550.830      562.841      575.860      605.978      618.404      627.922      646.598       2,747.758       5,822.520
  Mandatory:
    BA........................        8.215        8.447        8.691        8.959        9.242        9.549        9.804       10.039       10.310       11.490          43.554          94.746
    OT........................        8.845        9.260        9.511        9.609        9.652        9.768        9.929       10.114       10.313       11.413          46.877          98.414
150-International Affairs:
  BA..........................       40.202       40.246       41.176       42.100       43.092       44.085       45.333       46.348       47.408       48.485         206.816         438.475
  OT..........................       46.028       43.086       41.818       41.391       41.518       42.005       42.749       43.510       44.367       45.266         213.841         431.738
  Discretionary:
    BA........................       40.094       40.745       41.629       42.522       43.468       44.417       45.417       46.416       47.461       48.527         208.458         440.696
    OT........................       47.086       44.391       43.507       43.184       43.366       43.846       44.394       45.187       46.079       47.018         221.534         448.058
  Mandatory:
    BA........................        0.108       -0.499       -0.453       -0.422       -0.376       -0.332       -0.084       -0.068       -0.053       -0.042          -1.642          -2.221
    OT........................       -1.058       -1.305       -1.689       -1.793       -1.848       -1.841       -1.645       -1.677       -1.712       -1.752          -7.693         -16.320
250-General Science, Space and
 Technology:
  BA..........................       29.187       29.771       30.432       31.104       31.805       32.508       33.242       33.978       34.743       35.517         152.299         322.287
  OT..........................       29.555       29.707       30.162       30.647       31.283       31.875       32.579       33.306       34.053       34.815         151.354         317.982
  Discretionary:
    BA........................       29.087       29.664       30.332       31.004       31.705       32.408       33.142       33.878       34.643       35.417         151.792         321.280
    OT........................       29.454       29.601       30.060       30.547       31.183       31.775       32.479       33.206       33.953       34.715         150.845         316.973
  Mandatory:
    BA........................        0.100        0.107        0.100        0.100        0.100        0.100        0.100        0.100        0.100        0.100           0.507           1.007
    OT........................        0.101        0.106        0.102        0.100        0.100        0.100        0.100        0.100        0.100        0.100           0.509           1.009
270-Energy:
  BA..........................       -3.201        1.962       -0.746       -0.856       -0.884       -0.948       -1.030       -1.098       -1.144       -1.153          -3.725          -9.098
  OT..........................        1.412        1.095       -2.111       -1.936       -1.811       -1.657       -1.651       -1.643       -1.614       -1.589          -3.351         -11.505
  Discretionary:
    BA........................        2.588        2.655        2.725        2.790        2.877        2.946        3.019        3.093        3.169        3.241          13.635          29.103
    OT........................        3.233        2.740        2.612        2.736        2.820        2.885        2.961        3.033        3.107        3.183          14.141          29.310
  Mandatory:
    BA........................       -5.789       -0.693       -3.471       -3.646       -3.761       -3.894       -4.049       -4.191       -4.313       -4.394         -17.360         -38.201
    OT........................       -1.821       -1.645       -4.723       -4.672       -4.631       -4.542       -4.612       -4.676       -4.721       -4.772         -17.492         -40.815
300-Natural Resources and
 Environment:
  BA..........................       36.374       37.654       38.325       38.923       40.388       41.191       41.650       42.496       43.935       45.039         191.664         405.975
  OT..........................       39.499       40.016       39.595       39.465       40.563       41.461       41.770       42.726       43.453       44.409         199.138         412.957
  Discretionary:
    BA........................       34.439       35.329       36.359       37.431       38.506       39.603       40.772       41.913       43.108       44.343         182.064         391.803
    OT........................       37.013       37.186       37.191       37.827       38.823       39.799       40.922       42.031       42.600       43.773         188.040         397.165
  Mandatory:
    BA........................        1.935        2.325        1.966        1.492        1.882        1.588        0.878        0.583        0.827        0.696           9.600          14.172
    OT........................        2.486        2.830        2.404        1.638        1.740        1.662        0.848        0.695        0.853        0.636          11.098          15.792
350-Agriculture:
  BA..........................       19.098       22.846       21.964       20.652       19.681       19.545       19.509       20.119       20.253       20.540         104.241         204.207
  OT..........................       21.572       22.376       20.853       19.875       19.132       19.025       18.979       19.590       19.699       20.028         103.808         201.129
  Discretionary:
    BA........................        5.998        6.152        6.330        6.513        6.699        6.884        7.084        7.278        7.487        7.699          31.692          68.124
    OT........................        5.939        6.077        6.252        6.428        6.609        6.792        6.989        7.182        7.385        7.595          31.305          67.248
  Mandatory:
    BA........................       13.100       16.694       15.634       14.139       12.982       12.661       12.425       12.841       12.766       12.841          72.549         136.083
    OT........................       15.633       16.299       14.601       13.447       12.523       12.233       11.990       12.408       12.314       12.433          72.503         133.881
370-Commerce and Housing
 Credit:
  BA..........................       -4.010      -11.014      -10.671      -10.096       -8.181       -7.989       -7.587       -7.204       -6.601       -6.379         -43.972         -79.732
  OT..........................      -13.580      -24.064      -27.566      -29.561      -25.522      -22.606      -24.053      -25.111      -25.809      -26.435        -120.293        -244.307
  Discretionary:
    BA........................      -10.605      -13.301      -13.279      -12.114       -9.774       -8.848       -7.588       -6.382       -5.319       -4.680         -59.073         -91.890
    OT........................       -7.165      -11.356      -12.285      -11.885      -10.163       -9.095       -8.000       -7.058       -6.021       -5.208         -52.854         -88.236
  Mandatory:
    BA........................        6.595        2.287        2.608        2.018        1.593        0.859        0.001       -0.822       -1.282       -1.699          15.101          12.158
    OT........................       -6.415      -12.708      -15.281      -17.676      -15.359      -13.511      -16.053      -18.053      -19.788      -21.227         -67.439        -156.071
370 on-budget:
  BA..........................       -0.997       -8.697       -8.277       -7.401       -5.156       -4.806       -4.250       -3.613       -2.754       -2.278         -30.528         -48.229
  OT..........................      -10.566      -21.748      -25.173      -26.866      -22.499      -19.423      -20.716      -21.520      -21.962      -22.335        -106.852        -212.808
  Discretionary:
    BA........................      -10.871      -13.578      -13.567      -12.413      -10.084       -9.169       -7.922       -6.728       -5.677       -5.051         -60.513         -95.060
    OT........................       -7.430      -11.633      -12.573      -12.183      -10.473       -9.415       -8.333       -7.403       -6.378       -5.578         -54.292         -91.399
  Mandatory:
    BA........................        9.874        4.881        5.290        5.012        4.928        4.363        3.672        3.115        2.923        2.773          29.985          46.831
    OT........................       -3.136      -10.115      -12.600      -14.683      -12.026      -10.008      -12.383      -14.117      -15.584      -16.757         -52.560        -121.409
400-Transportation:
  BA..........................       72.055       72.715       73.262       73.696       74.070       74.409       55.154       56.254       56.798       57.190         365.798         665.603
  OT..........................       87.153       82.838       79.648       78.845       78.268       77.871       73.378       66.074       62.874       61.710         406.752         748.659
  Discretionary:
    BA........................       30.083       30.772       31.607       32.465       33.352       34.247       35.168       36.106       35.506       36.451         158.279         335.757
    OT........................       86.083       82.021       79.159       78.766       78.603       78.624       74.550       67.646       63.296       62.689         404.632         751.437
  Mandatory:
    BA........................       41.972       41.943       41.655       41.231       40.718       40.162       19.986       20.148       21.292       20.739         207.519         329.846
    OT........................        1.070        0.817        0.489        0.079       -0.335       -0.753       -1.172       -1.572       -0.422       -0.979           2.120          -2.778
450-Community and Regional
 Development:
  BA..........................       15.486       16.344       16.737       16.973       16.984       16.903        9.965        9.947        9.993       10.077          82.524         139.409
  OT..........................       20.692       19.144       19.692       20.450       20.702       20.682       19.034       15.892       13.220       11.515         100.680         181.023
  Discretionary:
    BA........................       15.040       15.316       15.508       15.697       15.900       16.116        9.461        9.683        9.911       10.136          77.461         132.768
    OT........................       19.627       18.125       18.037       18.487       18.617       18.481       16.680       14.192       12.495       11.002          92.893         165.743
  Mandatory:
    BA........................        0.446        1.028        1.229        1.276        1.084        0.787        0.504        0.264        0.082       -0.059           5.063           6.641
    OT........................        1.065        1.019        1.655        1.963        2.085        2.201        2.354        1.700        0.725        0.513           7.787          15.280
500-Education, Training,
 Employment:
  BA..........................       83.315       89.084       91.432       90.189       92.597       93.900       95.502       96.984       98.820      100.785         446.617         932.608
  OT..........................       93.293       92.888       91.193       89.369       91.891       93.562       95.022       96.608       98.336      100.297         458.634         942.459
  Discretionary:
    BA........................       89.823       92.951       94.703       96.567       98.546      100.549      102.624      104.620      106.756      108.896         472.590         996.035
    OT........................       93.797       95.174       93.014       94.795       96.655       98.659      100.670      102.690      104.746      106.863         473.435         987.063
  Mandatory:
    BA........................       -6.508       -3.867       -3.271       -6.378       -5.949       -6.649       -7.122       -7.636       -7.936       -8.111         -25.973         -63.427
    OT........................       -0.504       -2.286       -1.821       -5.426       -4.764       -5.097       -5.648       -6.082       -6.410       -6.566         -14.801         -44.604
550-Health:
  BA..........................      433.064      397.209      387.638      398.203      420.326      426.184      442.681      461.378      476.599      493.913       2,036.440       4,337.195
  OT..........................      430.917      394.211      397.302      399.888      411.116      426.218      442.701      461.378      476.631      494.059       2,033.434       4,334.421
  Discretionary:
    BA........................       57.727       58.919       60.296       61.691       63.146       64.602       66.126       67.651       69.242       70.844         301.779         640.244
    OT........................       58.420       58.957       59.775       60.285       61.571       62.806       64.273       65.771       67.308       68.881         299.008         628.047
  Mandatory:
    BA........................      375.337      338.290      327.342      336.512      357.180      361.582      376.555      393.727      407.357      423.069       1,734.661       3,696.951
    OT........................      372.497      335.254      337.527      339.603      349.545      363.412      378.428      395.607      409.323      425.178       1,734.426       3,706.374
570-Medicare:
  BA..........................      579.430      571.876      566.754      628.736      667.036      711.198      800.458      812.590      815.240      923.187       3,013.832       7,076.505
  OT..........................      579.361      571.830      566.656      628.652      666.951      711.111      800.363      812.496      815.139      923.082       3,013.450       7,075.641
  Discretionary:
    BA........................        6.535        6.918        7.338        7.792        8.263        8.758        9.285        9.829       10.395       10.983          36.846          86.096
    OT........................        6.492        6.894        7.269        7.719        8.188        8.677        9.198        9.742       10.305       10.887          36.562          85.371
  Mandatory:
    BA........................      572.895      564.958      559.416      620.944      658.773      702.440      791.173      802.761      804.845      912.204       2,976.986       6,990.409
    OT........................      572.869      564.936      559.387      620.933      658.763      702.434      791.165      802.754      804.834      912.195       2,976.888       6,990.270
600-Income Security:
  BA..........................      523.086      496.233      485.055      476.663      484.015      489.999      498.503      503.364      510.872      517.417       2,465.052       4,985.207
  OT..........................      523.645      492.511      476.530      471.357      478.199      484.318      497.869      499.521      501.192      511.441       2,442.242       4,936.583
  Discretionary:
    BA........................       63.235       61.219       61.398       60.997       62.339       63.675       65.591       66.390       67.163       67.655         309.188         639.662
    OT........................       64.237       62.844       62.101       61.716       62.215       63.189       64.658       65.788       66.695       67.305         313.113         640.748
  Mandatory:
    BA........................      459.851      435.014      423.657      415.666      421.676      426.324      432.912      436.974      443.709      449.762       2,155.864       4,345.545
    OT........................      459.408      429.667      414.429      409.641      415.984      421.129      433.211      433.733      434.497      444.136       2,129.129       4,295.835
650-Social Security Retirement
 and Disability:
  BA..........................      928.939      978.390    1,039.410    1,104.586    1,174.741    1,248.387    1,325.517    1,406.861    1,491.896    1,579.505       5,226.066      12,278.232
  OT..........................      924.957      973.310    1,033.990    1,098.755    1,168.609    1,242.055    1,318.684    1,399.827    1,484.561    1,571.969       5,199.621      12,216.717
  Discretionary:
    BA........................        5.009        5.296        5.469        5.645        5.827        6.012        6.205        6.399        6.600        6.805          27.246          59.267
    OT........................        5.127        5.316        5.449        5.614        5.795        5.980        6.172        6.365        6.565        6.769          27.301          59.152
  Mandatory:
    BA........................      923.930      973.094    1,033.941    1,098.941    1,168.914    1,242.375    1,319.312    1,400.462    1,485.296    1,572.700       5,198.820      12,218.965
    OT........................      919.830      967.994    1,028.541    1,093.141    1,162.814    1,236.075    1,312.512    1,393.462    1,477.996    1,565.200       5,172.320      12,157.565
  650 on-budget:
    BA........................       33.885       36.535       39.407       42.634       46.104       49.712       53.547       57.455       61.546       65.751         198.565         486.576
    OT........................       33.928       36.563       39.424       42.634       46.104       49.712       53.547       57.455       61.546       65.751         198.653         486.664
  Discretionary:
    BA........................  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ..............  ..............
    OT........................        0.043        0.028        0.017  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........           0.088           0.088
  Mandatory:
    BA........................       33.885       36.535       39.407       42.634       46.104       49.712       53.547       57.455       61.546       65.751         198.565         486.576
    OT........................       33.885       36.535       39.407       42.634       46.104       49.712       53.547       57.455       61.546       65.751         198.565         486.576
700-Veterans Benefits and
 Services:
  BA..........................      166.261      164.546      162.740      174.599      179.485      183.721      196.041      192.637      189.442      203.290         847.631       1,812.762
  OT..........................      171.862      168.559      162.753      173.869      178.581      182.821      195.056      191.640      188.356      202.189         855.624       1,815.686
  Discretionary:
    BA........................       68.575       70.512       72.705       74.963       77.290       79.647       82.102       84.593       87.145       89.767         364.045         787.299
    OT........................       68.327       69.849       72.081       74.168       76.442       78.811       81.246       83.689       86.234       88.808         360.867         779.655
  Mandatory:
    BA........................       97.686       94.034       90.035       99.636      102.195      104.074      113.939      108.044      102.297      113.523         483.586       1,025.463
    OT........................      103.535       98.710       90.672       99.701      102.139      104.010      113.810      107.951      102.122      113.381         494.757       1,036.031
750-Administration of Justice:
  BA..........................       50.976       57.639       55.885       57.582       59.324       61.247       63.791       65.688       67.626       69.425         281.406         609.183
  OT..........................       56.455       56.693       54.562       56.699       61.755       62.635       63.748       65.589       67.266       68.892         286.164         614.294
  Discretionary:
    BA........................       51.172       53.352       55.105       56.918       58.784       60.676       62.647       64.646       66.694       68.607         275.331         598.601
    OT........................       51.981       53.328       54.891       56.622       58.312       60.207       62.163       64.153       66.188       68.081         275.134         595.926
  Mandatory:
    BA........................       -0.196        4.287        0.780        0.664        0.540        0.571        1.144        1.042        0.932        0.818           6.075          10.582
    OT........................        4.474        3.365       -0.329        0.077        3.443        2.428        1.585        1.436        1.078        0.811          11.030          18.368
800-General Government:
  BA..........................       23.151       23.194       23.426       24.000       24.703       25.202       25.962       26.698       27.130       27.881         118.474         251.347
  OT..........................       22.981       23.289       23.371       23.685       24.290       24.878       25.562       26.272       26.766       27.435         117.616         248.529
  Discretionary:
    BA........................       16.958       16.932       17.217       17.703       18.337       18.738       19.417       20.105       20.710       21.413          87.147         187.530
    OT........................       16.970       17.069       17.307       17.494       18.029       18.497       19.077       19.723       20.353       21.025          86.869         185.544
  Mandatory:
    BA........................        6.193        6.262        6.209        6.297        6.366        6.464        6.545        6.593        6.420        6.468          31.327          63.817
    OT........................        6.011        6.220        6.064        6.191        6.261        6.381        6.485        6.549        6.413        6.410          30.747          62.985
900-Net Interest:
  BA..........................      275.302      324.912      387.001      438.431      483.884      515.508      547.736      575.992      597.779      610.540       1,909.530       4,757.085
  OT..........................      275.302      324.912      387.001      438.431      483.884      515.508      547.736      575.992      597.779      610.540       1,909.530       4,757.085
  Discretionary:
    BA........................  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ..............  ..............
    OT........................  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ..............  ..............
  Mandatory:
    BA........................      275.302      324.912      387.001      438.431      483.884      515.508      547.736      575.992      597.779      610.540       1,909.530       4,757.085
    OT........................      275.302      324.912      387.001      438.431      483.884      515.508      547.736      575.992      597.779      610.540       1,909.530       4,757.085
  900 on-budget:
    BA........................      367.542      416.418      479.446      533.121      579.344      611.558      642.888      669.066      687.195      694.215       2,375.871       5,680.793
    OT........................      367.542      416.418      479.446      533.121      579.344      611.558      642.888      669.066      687.195      694.215       2,375.871       5,680.793
    Discretionary:
      BA......................  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ..............  ..............
      OT......................  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ..............  ..............
    Mandatory:
      BA......................      367.542      416.418      479.446      533.121      579.344      611.558      642.888      669.066      687.195      694.215       2,375.871       5,680.793
      OT......................      367.542      416.418      479.446      533.121      579.344      611.558      642.888      669.066      687.195      694.215       2,375.871       5,680.793
920-Allowances:
  BA..........................       25.256      -21.661      -50.890      -60.624      -72.620     -104.010     -119.157     -131.418     -168.306     -204.728        -180.539        -908.158
  OT..........................       45.538       -5.856      -40.133      -53.987      -65.480      -98.128     -111.033     -122.924     -160.427     -186.150        -119.918        -798.580
  Discretionary:
    BA........................       -5.395      -29.258      -40.330      -45.080      -53.213      -60.121      -71.330      -81.369      -89.614      -99.341        -173.276        -575.051
    OT........................       14.887      -17.027      -30.665      -38.828      -46.562      -54.135      -63.349      -73.092      -81.982      -91.116        -118.195        -481.869
  Mandatory:
    BA........................       30.651        7.597      -10.560      -15.544      -19.407      -43.889      -47.827      -50.049      -78.692     -105.387          -7.263        -333.107
    OT........................       30.651       11.171       -9.468      -15.159      -18.918      -43.993      -47.684      -49.832      -78.445      -95.034          -1.723        -316.711
950-Undistributed Offsetting
 Receipts:
  BA..........................      -99.168     -113.627     -121.235     -120.230     -120.280     -124.851     -132.974     -141.599     -152.306     -166.153        -574.540      -1,292.423
  OT..........................      -99.168     -113.627     -121.235     -120.230     -120.280     -124.851     -132.974     -141.599     -152.306     -166.153        -574.540      -1,292.423
  Discretionary:
    BA........................  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ..............  ..............
    OT........................  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ..............  ..............
  Mandatory:
    BA........................      -99.168     -113.627     -121.235     -120.230     -120.280     -124.851     -132.974     -141.599     -152.306     -166.153        -574.540      -1,292.423
    OT........................      -99.168     -113.627     -121.235     -120.230     -120.280     -124.851     -132.974     -141.599     -152.306     -166.153        -574.540      -1,292.423
  950 on-budget:
  BA..........................      -82.548      -96.446     -103.441     -101.796     -101.191     -105.094     -112.536     -120.466     -130.467     -143.591        -485.422      -1,097.576
  OT..........................      -82.548      -96.446     -103.441     -101.796     -101.191     -105.094     -112.536     -120.466     -130.467     -143.591        -485.422      -1,097.576
  Discretionary:
    BA........................  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ..............  ..............
    OT........................  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ..............  ..............
  Mandatory:
    BA........................      -82.548      -96.446     -103.441     -101.796     -101.191     -105.094     -112.536     -120.466     -130.467     -143.591        -485.422      -1,097.576
    OT........................      -82.548      -96.446     -103.441     -101.796     -101.191     -105.094     -112.536     -120.466     -130.467     -143.591        -485.422      -1,097.576
970-Overseas Contingency
 Operations/Global War on
 Terrorism:
  BA..........................       96.287       64.598       62.593       57.586       49.578       47.569  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........         330.642         378.211
  OT..........................       48.798       65.684       63.758       60.653       54.095       50.191       19.493        7.554        2.683        0.892         292.988         373.801
  Discretionary:
    BA........................       96.287       64.598       62.593       57.586       49.578       47.569  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........         330.642         378.211
    OT........................       48.798       65.684       63.758       60.653       54.095       50.191       19.493        7.554        2.683        0.892         292.988         373.801
  Mandatory:
    BA........................  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ..............  ..............
    OT........................  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ..............  ..............
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total:
  BA..........................    3,822.396    3,787.432    3,858.052    4,053.256    4,245.074    4,393.404    4,573.100    4,716.054    4,819.487    5,037.868      19,766.210      43,306.123
  OT..........................    3,870.597    3,807.959    3,845.860    4,026.756    4,210.237    4,364.602    4,580.919    4,695.216    4,774.454    5,006.223      19,761.409      43,182.823
  Discretionary:
    BA........................    1,119.741    1,084.839    1,096.778    1,113.170    1,127.718    1,147.975    1,132.142    1,150.849    1,170.057    1,188.763       5,542.246      11,332.032
    OT........................    1,205.786    1,166.970    1,148.023    1,157.158    1,167.439    1,181.849    1,180.554    1,176.206    1,179.911    1,199.760       5,845.376      11,763.656
  Mandatory:
    BA........................    2,702.655    2,702.593    2,761.274    2,940.086    3,117.356    3,245.429    3,440.958    3,565.205    3,649.430    3,849.105      14,223.964      31,974.091
    OT........................    2,664.811    2,640.989    2,697.837    2,869.598    3,042.798    3,182.753    3,400.365    3,519.010    3,594.543    3,806.463      13,916.033      31,419.167
  Total on-budget:
  BA..........................    3,039.215    2,956.581    2,970.682    3,107.123    3,234.011    3,313.719    3,420.057    3,484.446    3,504.239    3,634.452      15,307.612      32,664.525
  OT..........................    3,091.442    2,982.215    2,963.926    3,086.454    3,205.304    3,291.249    3,434.709    3,470.642    3,466.541    3,610.342      15,329.341      32,602.824
  Discretionary:
    BA........................    1,114.466    1,079.266    1,091.021    1,107.226    1,121.581    1,141.642    1,125.603    1,144.104    1,163.099    1,181.587       5,513.560      11,269.595
    OT........................    1,200.437    1,161.405    1,142.303    1,151.246    1,161.334    1,175.549    1,174.049    1,169.496    1,172.989    1,192.621       5,816.725      11,701.429
  Mandatory:
    BA........................    1,924.749    1,877.315    1,879.661    1,999.897    2,112.430    2,172.077    2,294.454    2,340.342    2,341.140    2,452.865       9,794.052      21,394.930
    OT........................    1,891.005    1,820.810    1,821.623    1,935.208    2,043.970    2,115.700    2,260.660    2,301.146    2,293.552    2,417.721       9,512.616      20,901.395
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Revenues......................    3,470.720    3,602.254    3,729.105    3,874.731    4,034.524    4,211.287    4,395.193    4,596.085    4,806.181    5,030.409      18,711.334      41,750.489
Revenues on-budget............    2,676.733    2,776.156    2,870.206    2,982.310    3,107.111    3,247.391    3,392.968    3,554.412    3,723.973    3,906.111      14,412.516      32,237.371
Surplus/Deficit (-)...........     -399.877     -205.705     -116.755     -152.025     -175.713     -153.315     -185.726      -99.131       31.727       24.186      -1,050.075      -1,432.334
  On-budget...................     -414.709     -206.059      -93.720     -104.144      -98.193      -43.858      -41.741       83.770      257.432      295.769        -916.825        -365.453
  Off-budget..................       14.832        0.354      -23.035      -47.881      -77.520     -109.457     -143.985     -182.901     -225.705     -271.583        -133.250      -1,066.881
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                                                   TABLE 7.--FY 2016 BUDGET RESOLUTION AS PASSED BY THE SENATE
                                                                                    [Fiscal year, $ billions]
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
             Function                 2015        2016        2017        2018        2019        2020        2021        2022        2023        2024        2025       2016-20       2016-25
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
050-National Defense:
  BA.............................     593.277     620.263     544.506     557.744     571.019     585.310     599.627     600.634     615.997     631.771     648.836    2,878.842     5,975.707
  OT.............................     590.190     605.189     576.934     558.049     564.685     573.614     586.038     596.103     603.051     611.920     632.992    2,878.471     5,908.575
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................     585.833     612.020     536.067     549.071     562.079     576.087     590.096     590.848     605.970     621.469     637.356    2,835.324     5,881.063
    OT...........................     582.690     596.886     568.349     549.213     555.646     564.355     576.503     586.322     593.026     601.623     621.580    2,834.449     5,813.503
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................       7.444       8.243       8.439       8.673       8.940       9.223       9.531       9.786      10.027      10.302      11.480       43.518        94.644
    OT...........................       7.500       8.303       8.585       8.836       9.039       9.259       9.535       9.781      10.025      10.297      11.412       44.022        95.072
150-International Affairs:
  BA.............................      53.012      47.791      41.839      42.802      43.749      44.754      45.276      46.553      47.593      48.681      49.786      220.935       458.824
  OT.............................      48.796      48.227      45.656      43.642      42.565      42.437      42.795      43.424      44.153      45.023      45.943      222.527       443.865
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................      53.905      48.342      41.853      42.761      43.678      44.650      45.625      46.653      47.678      48.753      49.846      221.284       459.839
    OT...........................      50.378      49.522      47.046      45.407      44.430      44.355      44.703      45.134      45.897      46.804      47.763      230.760       461.061
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................      -0.893      -0.551      -0.014       0.041       0.071       0.104      -0.349      -0.100      -0.085      -0.072      -0.060       -0.349        -1.015
    OT...........................      -1.582      -1.295      -1.390      -1.765      -1.865      -1.918      -1.908      -1.710      -1.744      -1.781      -1.820       -8.233       -17.196
250-General Science, Space and
 Technology:
  BA.............................      29.803      30.007      30.596      31.286      31.981      32.706      33.433      34.192      34.953      35.745      36.545      156.576       331.444
  OT.............................      29.286      30.007      30.529      31.165      31.712      32.400      33.022      33.756      34.512      35.290      36.084      155.813       328.477
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................      29.704      29.900      30.496      31.186      31.881      32.606      33.333      34.092      34.853      35.645      36.445      156.069       330.437
    OT...........................      29.187      29.902      30.427      31.065      31.612      32.300      32.922      33.656      34.412      35.190      35.984      155.306       327.470
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................       0.099       0.107       0.100       0.100       0.100       0.100       0.100       0.100       0.100       0.100       0.100        0.507         1.007
    OT...........................       0.099       0.105       0.102       0.100       0.100       0.100       0.100       0.100       0.100       0.100       0.100        0.507         1.007
270-Energy:
  BA.............................       5.369      -1.947       2.483       0.076       0.090       0.128       0.097       0.062       0.036       2.869       2.963        0.830         6.857
  OT.............................       5.417       2.365       2.112      -0.731      -0.753      -0.668      -0.543      -0.465      -0.393       2.521       2.655        2.325         6.100
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................       4.623       3.123       3.200       3.281       3.360       3.459       3.543       3.628       3.716       3.805       3.892       16.423        35.007
    OT...........................       5.439       4.151       3.761       3.494       3.462       3.518       3.556       3.649       3.737       3.825       3.917       18.386        37.070
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................       0.746      -5.070      -0.717      -3.205      -3.270      -3.331      -3.446      -3.566      -3.680      -0.936      -0.929      -15.593       -28.150
    OT...........................      -0.022      -1.786      -1.649      -4.225      -4.215      -4.186      -4.099      -4.114      -4.130      -1.304      -1.262      -16.061       -30.970
300-Natural Resources and
 Environment:
  BA.............................      36.003      36.277      36.685      37.680      39.125      41.066      40.951      41.844      43.240      44.125      45.522      190.833       406.515
  OT.............................      39.286      38.983      38.866      38.719      39.486      41.098      41.232      41.992      43.467      43.663      44.966      197.152       412.472
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................      34.413      34.513      35.402      36.433      37.505      38.583      39.683      40.852      41.995      43.191      44.427      182.436       392.584
    OT...........................      37.230      37.203      37.209      37.226      37.829      38.838      39.874      41.004      42.098      42.678      43.856      188.305       397.815
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................       1.590       1.764       1.283       1.247       1.620       2.483       1.268       0.992       1.245       0.934       1.095        8.397        13.931
    OT...........................       2.056       1.780       1.657       1.493       1.657       2.260       1.358       0.988       1.369       0.985       1.110        8.847        14.657
350-Agriculture:
  BA.............................      17.328      20.628      24.247      23.204      22.083      20.974      21.078      20.914      21.506      21.620      21.834      111.136       218.088
  OT.............................      16.587      20.585      23.696      22.471      21.401      20.498      20.613      20.476      21.051      21.125      21.416      108.651       213.332
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................       5.923       5.922       6.075       6.252       6.433       6.617       6.801       6.998       7.191       7.398       7.608       31.299        67.295
    OT...........................       5.835       5.902       6.027       6.178       6.346       6.528       6.709       6.904       7.095       7.296       7.505       30.981        66.490
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................      11.405      14.706      18.172      16.952      15.650      14.357      14.277      13.916      14.315      14.222      14.226       79.837       150.793
    OT...........................      10.752      14.683      17.669      16.293      15.055      13.970      13.904      13.572      13.956      13.829      13.911       77.670       146.842
370-Commerce and Housing Credit:
  BA.............................     -18.404       1.948      -4.376      -1.858      -2.211      -1.170      -1.508      -0.296       0.511       1.401       1.969       -7.667        -5.590
  OT.............................     -31.249     -11.678     -18.718     -16.688     -22.065     -21.790     -16.821     -17.426     -17.883     -18.298     -18.561      -90.939      -179.928
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................      -3.508      -8.065     -10.512     -10.300      -9.018      -6.716      -5.647      -4.314      -3.056      -1.942      -1.252      -44.611       -60.822
    OT...........................      -3.493      -7.943     -10.391     -10.273      -9.117      -6.832      -5.768      -4.439      -3.182      -2.075      -1.384      -44.556       -61.404
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................     -14.896      10.013       6.136       8.442       6.807       5.546       4.139       4.018       3.567       3.343       3.221       36.944        55.232
    OT...........................     -27.756      -3.735      -8.327      -6.415     -12.948     -14.958     -11.053     -12.987     -14.701     -16.223     -17.177      -46.383      -118.524
370 on-budget:
  BA.............................     -16.682       2.260      -3.959      -1.264      -1.316       0.055      -0.075       1.341       2.452       3.648       4.520       -4.224         7.662
  OT.............................     -29.527     -11.365     -18.302     -16.095     -21.170     -20.567     -15.388     -15.789     -15.942     -16.051     -16.011      -87.499      -166.680
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................      -3.767      -8.332     -10.789     -10.588      -9.317      -7.026      -5.968      -4.648      -3.402      -2.300      -1.623      -46.052       -63.993
    OT...........................      -3.752      -8.209     -10.668     -10.561      -9.415      -7.142      -6.088      -4.772      -3.527      -2.432      -1.754      -45.995       -64.568
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................     -12.915      10.592       6.830       9.324       8.001       7.081       5.893       5.989       5.854       5.948       6.143       41.828        71.655
    OT...........................     -25.775      -3.156      -7.634      -5.534     -11.755     -13.425      -9.300     -11.017     -12.415     -13.619     -14.257      -41.504      -102.112
400-Transportation:
  BA.............................      85.889      71.528      72.392      73.286      74.077      74.826      75.549      76.221      76.840      77.506      78.208      366.109       750.433
  OT.............................      91.361      88.436      83.756      80.329      79.437      78.935      78.708      78.973      79.228      79.123      79.426      410.893       806.351
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................      31.428      29.118      29.744      30.558      31.396      32.261      33.134      34.033      34.948      34.324      35.246      153.077       324.762
    OT...........................      90.181      87.205      82.496      79.055      78.178      77.686      77.469      77.735      77.973      76.290      76.533      404.620       790.620
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................      54.461      42.410      42.648      42.728      42.681      42.565      42.415      42.188      41.892      43.182      42.962      213.032       425.671
    OT...........................       1.180       1.231       1.260       1.274       1.259       1.249       1.239       1.238       1.255       2.833       2.893        6.273        15.731
450-Community and Regional
 Development:
  BA.............................      17.051      17.414      18.263      18.606      18.862      18.870      18.771      18.782      18.861      18.975      19.140       92.015       186.544
  OT.............................      21.741      22.351      21.002      21.457      22.314      22.547      22.474      21.323      19.747      19.313      19.384      109.671       211.912
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................      16.766      16.250      16.715      16.946      17.174      17.420      17.678      17.939      18.205      18.479      18.750       84.505       175.556
    OT...........................      21.812      20.956      19.622      19.331      19.852      19.980      19.974      18.566      17.964      18.225      18.501       99.741       192.971
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................       0.285       1.164       1.548       1.660       1.688       1.450       1.093       0.843       0.656       0.496       0.390        7.510        10.988
    OT...........................      -0.071       1.395       1.380       2.126       2.462       2.567       2.500       2.757       1.783       1.088       0.883        9.930        18.941
500-Education, Training,
 Employment:
  BA.............................      91.688      86.251      87.848      90.703      89.535      91.991      93.353      94.970      96.575      98.439     100.362      446.328       930.027
  OT.............................      97.522      95.717      92.889      90.534      88.889      91.556      93.315      94.734      96.383      98.178     100.129      459.585       942.324
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................      91.783      91.399      93.004      94.915      96.838      98.851     100.872     102.975     105.077     107.271     109.472      475.007     1,000.674
    OT...........................      89.553      94.971      95.932      93.394      95.162      97.067      99.030     101.033     103.113     105.235     107.414      476.526       992.351
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................      -0.095      -5.148      -5.156      -4.212      -7.303      -6.860      -7.519      -8.005      -8.502      -8.832      -9.110      -28.679       -70.647
    OT...........................       7.969       0.746      -3.043      -2.860      -6.273      -5.511      -5.715      -6.299      -6.730      -7.057      -7.285      -16.941       -50.027
550-Health:
  BA.............................     483.912     414.351     385.565     388.629     402.511     425.526     433.351     452.426     471.644     489.491     512.965    2,016.582     4,376.459
  OT.............................     476.985     424.736     389.710     390.503     403.324     415.791     433.395     452.523     471.719     489.587     513.163    2,024.064     4,384.451
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................      59.474      57.751      58.920      60.297      61.690      63.145      64.602      66.127      67.650      69.241      70.842      301.803       640.265
    OT...........................      57.073      58.434      58.958      59.792      60.302      61.592      62.827      64.296      65.794      67.331      68.903      299.078       628.229
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................     424.438     356.600     326.645     328.332     340.821     362.381     368.749     386.299     403.994     420.250     442.123    1,714.779     3,736.194
    OT...........................     419.912     366.302     330.752     330.711     343.022     354.199     370.568     388.227     405.925     422.256     444.260    1,724.986     3,756.222
570-Medicare:
  BA.............................     529.733     567.213     562.941     562.143     619.228     657.658     698.284     776.034     787.879     797.075     902.467    2,969.183     6,930.922
  OT.............................     529.281     567.122     562.881     562.102     619.148     657.564     698.188     775.930     787.681     796.964     902.349    2,968.817     6,929.929
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................       6.618       6.605       6.994       7.424       7.888       8.368       8.875       9.412       9.967      10.547      11.145       37.279        87.225
    OT...........................       6.506       6.556       6.969       7.356       7.814       8.291       8.794       9.326       9.878      10.456      11.047       36.986        86.487
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................     523.115     560.608     555.947     554.719     611.340     649.290     689.409     766.622     777.912     786.528     891.322    2,931.904     6,843.697
    OT...........................     522.775     560.566     555.912     554.746     611.334     649.273     689.394     766.604     777.803     786.508     891.302    2,931.831     6,843.442
600-Income Security:
  BA.............................     517.037     529.494     458.455     466.015     460.943     471.826     481.804     493.877     502.550     512.932     521.641    2,386.733     4,899.537
  OT.............................     512.945     528.778     455.293     458.848     457.388     467.468     477.132     493.223     498.468     504.310     517.044    2,367.775     4,857.952
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................      64.786      65.057      60.403      59.887      58.087      59.130      60.255      62.519      62.539      62.520      62.051      302.564       612.448
    OT...........................      65.111      65.371      61.746      61.803      60.204      59.861      60.057      61.269      62.579      63.463      63.242      308.985       619.595
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................     452.251     464.437     398.052     406.128     402.856     412.696     421.549     431.358     440.011     450.412     459.590    2,084.169     4,287.089
    OT...........................     447.834     463.407     393.547     397.045     397.184     407.607     417.075     431.954     435.889     440.847     453.802    2,058.790     4,238.357
650-Social Security:
  BA.............................     891.618     929.956     981.220    1042.467    1107.220    1176.924    1249.477    1325.445    1405.708    1489.969    1577.505    5,237.787    12,285.891
  OT.............................     888.420     925.860     976.135    1037.038    1101.489    1170.893    1243.245    1318.712    1398.674    1482.735    1570.570    5,211.415    12,225.351
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................       5.555       5.026       5.175       5.345       5.518       5.699       5.881       6.072       6.266       6.462       6.665       26.763        58.109
    OT...........................       5.557       5.130       5.190       5.316       5.487       5.668       5.849       6.039       6.232       6.428       6.630       26.791        57.969
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................     886.063     924.930     976.045    1037.122    1101.702    1171.225    1243.596    1319.373    1399.442    1483.507    1570.840    5,211.024    12,227.782
    OT...........................     882.863     920.730     970.945    1031.722    1096.002    1165.225    1237.396    1312.673    1392.442    1476.307    1563.940    5,184.624    12,167.382
650 on-budget:
  BA.............................      31.554      33.878      36.535      39.407      42.634      46.104      49.712      53.547      57.455      61.546      65.751      198.558       486.569
  OT.............................      31.662      33.919      36.535      39.407      42.634      46.104      49.712      53.547      57.455      61.546      65.751      198.599       486.610
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000        0.000         0.000
    OT...........................       0.108       0.041       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000        0.041         0.041
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................      31.554      33.878      36.535      39.407      42.634      46.104      49.712      53.547      57.455      61.546      65.751      198.558       486.569
    OT...........................      31.554      33.878      36.535      39.407      42.634      46.104      49.712      53.547      57.455      61.546      65.751      198.558       486.569
700-Veterans Benefits and
 Services:
  BA.............................     153.408     166.708     164.905     163.101     174.989     179.899     184.172     196.530     193.156     189.999     203.895      849.602     1,817.354
  OT.............................     162.804     170.152     164.449     162.477     174.175     178.942     183.222     195.502     192.124     188.884     202.761      850.195     1,812.688
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................      65.346      68.602      70.540      72.735      74.992      77.320      79.678      82.135      84.626      87.179      89.826      364.189       787.633
    OT...........................      64.235      68.316      69.857      72.097      74.198      76.474      78.841      81.279      83.723      86.267      88.853      360.942       779.905
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................      88.062      98.106      94.365      90.366      99.997     102.579     104.494     114.395     108.530     102.820     114.069      485.413     1,029.721
    OT...........................      98.569     101.836      94.592      90.380      99.977     102.468     104.381     114.223     108.401     102.617     113.908      489.253     1,032.783
750-Administration of Justice:
  BA.............................      54.819      52.543      57.030      56.787      58.512      60.284      62.239      64.815      66.745      68.717      70.550      285.156       618.222
  OT.............................      55.088      56.757      58.576      57.929      57.973      59.888      61.690      64.224      66.238      68.091      69.922      291.123       621.288
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................      51.027      51.326      54.142      55.914      57.747      59.633      61.546      63.539      65.560      67.630      69.566      278.762       606.603
    OT...........................      50.542      51.999      53.623      55.353      57.179      58.946      61.010      62.988      64.995      67.050      68.999      277.100       602.142
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................       3.792       1.217       2.888       0.873       0.765       0.651       0.693       1.276       1.185       1.087       0.984        6.394        11.619
    OT...........................       4.546       4.758       4.953       2.576       0.794       0.942       0.680       1.236       1.243       1.041       0.923       14.023        19.146
800-General Government:
  BA.............................      23.264      23.755      24.046      24.755      25.485      26.202      26.958      27.766      28.493      29.022      29.809      124.243       266.291
  OT.............................      23.510      23.708      23.958      24.573      25.089      25.782      26.551      27.375      28.114      28.671      29.399      123.110       263.220
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................      16.462      17.192      17.730      18.341      18.974      19.618      20.274      20.961      21.655      22.367      23.101       91.855       200.213
    OT...........................      16.784      17.149      17.651      18.210      18.580      19.200      19.847      20.522      21.205      21.903      22.629       90.790       196.896
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................       6.802       6.563       6.316       6.414       6.511       6.584       6.684       6.805       6.838       6.655       6.708       32.388        66.078
    OT...........................       6.726       6.559       6.307       6.363       6.509       6.582       6.704       6.853       6.909       6.768       6.770       32.320        66.324
900-Net Interest:
  BA.............................     226.651     274.379     323.732     386.693     438.770     486.122     520.025     552.341     580.201     603.687     622.119    1,909.696     4,788.069
  OT.............................     226.651     274.379     323.732     386.693     438.770     486.122     520.025     552.341     580.201     603.687     622.119    1,909.696     4,788.069
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000        0.000         0.000
    OT...........................       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000        0.000         0.000
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................     226.651     274.379     323.732     386.693     438.770     486.122     520.025     552.341     580.201     603.687     622.119    1,909.696     4,788.069
    OT...........................     226.651     274.379     323.732     386.693     438.770     486.122     520.025     552.341     580.201     603.687     622.119    1,909.696     4,788.069
900 on-budget:
  BA.............................     323.951     366.579     415.132     478.693     532.670     580.522     614.725     645.841     671.301     690.987     703.419    2,373.596     5,699.869
  OT.............................     323.951     366.579     415.132     478.693     532.670     580.522     614.725     645.841     671.301     690.987     703.419    2,373.596     5,699.869
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000        0.000         0.000
    OT...........................       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000        0.000         0.000
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................     323.951     366.579     415.132     478.693     532.670     580.522     614.725     645.841     671.301     690.987     703.419    2,373.596     5,699.869
    OT...........................     323.951     366.579     415.132     478.693     532.670     580.522     614.725     645.841     671.301     690.987     703.419    2,373.596     5,699.869
920-Allowances:
  BA.............................      -0.021     -12.322      12.975     -10.750     -15.199     -46.590     -54.803     -98.454    -112.036     -90.119    -250.580      -71.886      -677.878
  OT.............................      -0.011      -5.571       2.923     -14.755     -16.838     -44.799     -51.787     -80.798    -101.438     -83.225    -234.419      -79.040      -630.707
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................      -0.021     -15.155       8.461       5.677       4.428      -1.149      -6.600     -45.393     -55.229     -63.761     -72.999        2.262      -241.720
    OT...........................      -0.011     -11.461      -3.112       1.097       2.626       0.429      -3.224     -27.583     -44.414     -56.657     -66.541      -10.421      -208.840
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................       0.000       2.833       4.514     -16.427     -19.627     -45.441     -48.203     -53.061     -56.807     -26.358    -177.581      -74.148      -436.158
    OT...........................       0.000       5.890       6.035     -15.852     -19.464     -45.228     -48.563     -53.215     -57.024     -26.568    -167.878      -68.619      -421.867
950-Undistributed Offsetting
 Receipts:
  BA.............................    -128.564     -86.017     -95.444    -102.025    -101.613    -102.666    -106.530    -112.775    -120.779    -130.843    -143.932     -487.765    -1,102.624
  OT.............................    -128.564     -86.028     -95.459    -102.044    -101.634    -102.689    -106.555    -112.800    -120.805    -130.869    -143.959     -487.854    -1,102.842
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000        0.000         0.000
    OT...........................       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000        0.000         0.000
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................    -128.564     -86.017     -95.444    -102.025    -101.613    -102.666    -106.530    -112.775    -120.779    -130.843    -143.932     -487.765    -1,102.624
    OT...........................    -128.564     -86.028     -95.459    -102.044    -101.634    -102.689    -106.555    -112.800    -120.805    -130.869    -143.959     -487.854    -1,102.842
950 on-budget:
  BA.............................    -112.410     -69.397     -78.263     -84.231     -83.179     -83.577     -86.773     -92.337     -99.646    -109.004    -121.370     -398.647      -907.777
  OT.............................    -112.410     -69.408     -78.278     -84.250     -83.200     -83.600     -86.798     -92.362     -99.672    -109.030    -121.397     -398.736      -907.995
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000        0.000         0.000
    OT...........................       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000       0.000        0.000         0.000
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................    -112.410     -69.397     -78.263     -84.231     -83.179     -83.577     -86.773     -92.337     -99.646    -109.004    -121.370     -398.647      -907.777
    OT...........................    -112.410     -69.408     -78.278     -84.250     -83.200     -83.600     -86.798     -92.362     -99.672    -109.030    -121.397     -398.736      -907.995
                                  --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total:
  BA.............................   3,662.873   3,790.220   3,729.908   3,851.344   4,059.156   4,244.640   4,421.604   4,611.881   4,759.673   4,941.062   5,051.604   19,675.268    43,461.092
  OT.............................   3,656.046   3,820.075   3,758.920   3,832.311   4,026.555   4,195.589   4,385.939   4,599.122   4,724.292   4,886.693   5,013.383   19,633.450    43,242.879
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................   1,120.117   1,118.926   1,064.409   1,086.723   1,110.650   1,135.582   1,159.629   1,139.076   1,159.611   1,180.578   1,201.987    5,516.290    11,357.171
    OT...........................   1,174.609   1,180.249   1,151.360   1,135.114   1,149.790   1,168.256   1,188.973   1,187.700   1,192.125   1,201.332   1,225.431    5,784.769    11,780.330
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................   2,542.756   2,671.294   2,665.499   2,764.621   2,948.506   3,109.058   3,261.975   3,472.805   3,600.062   3,760.484   3,849.617   14,158.978    32,103.921
    OT...........................   2,481.437   2,639.826   2,607.560   2,697.197   2,876.765   3,027.333   3,196.966   3,411.422   3,532.167   3,685.361   3,787.952   13,848.681    31,462.549
Total on-budget:
  BA.............................   2,917.985   3,003.274   2,894.221   2,958.672   3,107.799   3,228.534   3,337.729   3,455.558   3,525.594   3,624.025   3,646.263   15,192.500    32,781.669
  OT.............................   2,914.464   3,037.267   2,928.317   2,945.067   3,080.929   3,185.512   3,308.296   3,449.532   3,497.247   3,576.890   3,614.976   15,177.092    32,624.033
  Discretionary:
    BA...........................   1,114.303   1,113.633   1,058.957   1,081.090   1,104.833   1,129.573   1,153.427   1,132.670   1,152.999   1,173.758   1,194.951    5,488.086    11,295.891
    OT...........................   1,168.901   1,174.894   1,145.893   1,129.510   1,144.005   1,162.278   1,182.804   1,181.328   1,185.548   1,194.547   1,218.431    5,756.580    11,719.238
  Mandatory:
    BA...........................   1,803.682   1,889.641   1,835.264   1,877.582   2,002.966   2,098.961   2,184.302   2,322.888   2,372.595   2,450.267   2,451.312    9,704.414    21,485.778
    OT...........................   1,745.563   1,862.373   1,782.424   1,815.557   1,936.924   2,023.234   2,125.492   2,268.204   2,311.699   2,382.343   2,396.545    9,420.512    20,904.795
                                  --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Revenues.........................   3,188.539   3,459.531   3,587.670   3,715.285   3,864.756   4,025.170   4,204.151   4,389.325   4,590.782   4,803.620   5,029.396   18,652.412    41,669.686
Revenues on-budget...............   2,425.883   2,666.755   2,763.328   2,858.131   2,974.147   3,099.410   3,241.963   3,388.688   3,550.388   3,722.144   3,905.648   14,361.771    32,170.602
Surplus/Deficit (-)..............    -467.507    -360.544    -171.250    -117.026    -161.799    -170.419    -181.788    -209.797    -133.510     -83.073      16.013     -981.038    -1,573.193
  On-budget......................    -488.581    -370.512    -164.989     -86.936    -106.782     -86.102     -66.333     -60.844      53.141     145.254     290.672     -815.321      -453.431
  Off-budget.....................      21.074       9.968      -6.261     -30.090     -55.017     -84.317    -115.455    -148.953    -186.651    -228.327    -274.659     -165.717    -1,119.762
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                                                         TABLE 8.--FY 2016 BUDGET RESOLUTION TOTAL SPENDING AND REVENUE, AS PASSED BY THE HOUSE
                                                                                                  [Fiscal year, in millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                    2016        2017        2018        2019        2020         2021         2022         2023         2024         2025            2016-2020             2016-2025
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                 SUMMARY
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total spending:
  BA...........................................................   3,720,708   3,706,440   3,833,169   4,038,671   4,260,329    4,407,830    4,615,122    4,758,942    4,899,220    5,116,195        19,559,316            43,356,626
  OT...........................................................   3,789,766   3,721,791   3,810,949   4,004,105   4,211,731    4,372,536    4,597,890    4,720,746    4,843,916    5,079,217        19,538,341            43,152,645
On-budget:
  BA...........................................................   2,936,989   2,874,003   2,944,067   3,091,104   3,248,181    3,328,045    3,463,044    3,529,161    3,586,560    3,715,369        15,094,345            32,716,524
  OT...........................................................   3,010,185   2,894,439   2,927,276   3,062,270   3,205,614    3,298,984    3,452,546    3,497,999    3,538,491    3,685,327        15,099,785            32,573,131
Off-budget:
  BA...........................................................     783,719     832,437     889,101     947,567   1,012,148    1,079,785    1,152,078    1,229,781    1,312,660    1,400,826         4,464,971            10,640,102
  OT...........................................................     779,581     827,352     883,672     941,835   1,006,117    1,073,552    1,145,344    1,222,746    1,305,425    1,393,890         4,438,556            10,579,514
Revenues:
  Total........................................................   3,459,531   3,587,670   3,715,285   3,864,756   4,025,170    4,204,151    4,389,325    4,590,782    4,803,620    5,029,396        18,652,412            41,669,686
  On-budget....................................................   2,666,755   2,763,328   2,858,131   2,974,147   3,099,410    3,241,963    3,388,688    3,550,388    3,722,144    3,905,648        14,361,771            32,170,602
  Off-budget...................................................     792,776     824,342     857,154     890,609     925,760      962,188    1,000,637    1,040,394    1,081,476    1,123,748         4,290,641             9,499,084
Recommended Change in Revenues:
  Total........................................................           0           0           0           0           0            0            0            0            0            0                 0                     0
  On-budget....................................................           0           0           0           0           0            0            0            0            0            0                 0                     0
  Off-budget...................................................           0           0           0           0           0            0            0            0            0            0                 0                     0
Surplus/Deficit(-):
  Total........................................................    -346,693    -152,211     -95,372    -139,326    -187,244     -169,288     -185,412     -105,526       12,408       32,791          -920,846            -1,335,873
  Macroeconomic Fiscal Impact..................................     -16,458     -18,090         291          22        -683         -903       23,153       24,437       52,704       82,611           -34,917               147,086
  On-budget....................................................    -343,430    -131,111     -69,145     -88,123    -106,204      -57,021      -63,858       52,389      183,653      220,321          -738,014              -402,529
  Off-budget...................................................      13,195      -3,010     -26,518     -51,226     -80,357     -111,364     -144,707     -182,352     -223,949     -270,142          -147,915            -1,080,430
Debt Held by the Public (end of year)..........................  13,839,152  14,041,709  14,146,945  14,340,084  14,562,210   14,744,287   15,130,369   15,302,457   15,164,550   15,237,647  ....................  ....................
Debt Subject to Limit (end of year)............................  19,048,915  19,395,251  19,643,341  19,949,858  20,263,382   20,507,829   20,908,840   21,078,135   20,918,559   20,907,169  ....................  ....................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                               BY FUNCTION
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
National Defense (050):
  BA...........................................................     531,334     582,506     607,744     620,019     632,310      644,627      657,634      670,997      683,771      698,836         2,973,913             6,329,778
  OT...........................................................     564,027     572,025     586,422     604,238     617,553      630,610      648,269      656,389      663,936      683,350         2,944,265             6,226,819
International Affairs (150):
  BA...........................................................      38,342      39,623      40,539      41,437      42,390       42,861       44,081       45,070       46,098       47,148           202,331               427,589
  OT...........................................................      42,923      40,821      39,736      39,214      39,564       40,108       40,868       41,633       42,470       43,349           202,258               410,686
General Science, Space and Technology (250):
  BA...........................................................      28,381      28,932      29,579      30,227      30,904       31,584       32,293       33,003       33,742       34,488           148,023               313,132
  OT...........................................................      29,003      28,924      29,357      29,798      30,388       30,957       31,637       32,338       33,059       33,795           147,471               309,257
Energy (270):
  BA...........................................................      -3,581       1,410       1,189       1,196       1,259        1,309        1,335        1,375        1,332         -964             1,473                 5,860
  OT...........................................................         654         649         234         307         472          728          863        1,000        1,037       -1,215             2,316                 4,729
Natural Resources & Environment (300):
  BA...........................................................      35,350      36,047      36,385      37,206      38,171       38,367       39,221       40,108       40,962       39,095           183,159               380,912
  OT...........................................................      38,113      38,268      37,674      37,747      38,304       38,685       39,361       40,319       40,486       38,471           190,105               387,427
Agriculture (350):
  BA...........................................................      20,109      23,064      21,987      20,907      19,835       19,296       19,245       19,821       20,020       20,256           105,901               204,538
  OT...........................................................      21,164      23,194      21,396      20,275      19,386       18,849       18,830       19,391       19,553       19,851           105,416               201,891
Commerce & Housing Credit (370):
  On-budget:
    BA.........................................................      -3,269     -12,373     -10,252      -8,801      -6,903       -6,522       -5,742       -4,965       -3,991       -3,370           -41,598               -66,189
    OT.........................................................     -16,617     -26,620     -24,998     -28,587     -27,479      -21,769      -22,819      -23,306      -23,635      -23,845          -124,301              -239,674
  Off-budget:
    BA.........................................................      -3,487      -3,347      -3,409      -3,619      -3,822       -3,886       -3,928       -3,972       -4,016       -4,159           -17,684               -37,645
    OT.........................................................      -3,488      -3,347      -3,409      -3,620      -3,822       -3,887       -3,929       -3,973       -4,017       -4,160           -17,686               -37,652
Transportation (400):
  BA...........................................................      36,743      69,381      70,298      76,397      77,763       79,149       80,613       82,128       83,709       85,335           330,582               741,516
  OT...........................................................      79,181      69,500      73,623      76,051      76,767       78,369       79,946       81,336       82,724       83,983           375,122               781,481
Community & Regional Development (450):
  BA...........................................................       7,082       7,688       8,089       8,381       8,409        8,305        8,304        8,359        8,447        8,579            39,649                81,641
  OT...........................................................      19,928      16,753      15,383      13,789      12,567       12,095       10,937        9,345        8,890        8,930            78,420               128,617
Education, Training, Employment, and Social Services (500):
  BA...........................................................      80,620      84,746      87,029      85,514      87,901       88,908       90,148       91,237       92,744       94,400           425,810               883,247
  OT...........................................................      90,389      90,513      87,366      85,290      87,669       89,276       90,467       91,646       93,101       94,734           441,227               900,451
Health (550):
  BA...........................................................     416,475     360,678     358,594     367,103     387,076      388,981      398,136      408,454      425,381      433,945         1,889,926             3,944,823
  OT...........................................................     426,860     364,823     360,468     367,916     377,341      389,025      398,233      408,529      425,477      434,143         1,897,408             3,952,815
Medicare (570):
  BA...........................................................     577,726     580,837     580,782     639,293     680,575      726,644      808,204      825,577      834,148      927,410         3,059,213             7,181,196
  OT...........................................................     577,635     580,777     580,741     639,213     680,481      726,548      808,100      825,379      834,037      927,292         3,058,847             7,180,203
Income Security (600):
  BA...........................................................     512,364     479,836     481,994     483,293     516,193      502,001      518,690      525,230      532,515      550,057         2,473,680             5,102,173
  OT...........................................................     513,709     475,234     471,951     477,470     510,603      496,856      518,542      519,391      521,105      543,361         2,448,967             5,048,222
Social Security (650):
  On-budget:
    BA.........................................................      33,878      36,535      39,407      42,634      46,104       49,712       53,547       57,455       61,546       65,751           198,558               486,569
    OT.........................................................      33,919      36,535      39,407      42,634      46,104       49,712       53,547       57,455       61,546       65,751           198,599               486,610
  Off-budget:
    BA.........................................................     896,078     944,535   1,002,680   1,064,126   1,130,310    1,199,245    1,271,338    1,347,673    1,427,813    1,511,114         5,037,729            11,794,912
    OT.........................................................     891,941     939,450     997,251   1,058,395   1,124,279    1,193,013    1,264,605    1,340,639    1,420,579    1,504,179         5,011,316            11,734,331
Veterans Benefits and Services (700):
  BA...........................................................     166,677     164,843     163,009     174,862     179,735      183,969      196,283      192,866      189,668      203,517           849,126             1,815,429
  OT...........................................................     170,121     164,387     162,385     174,048     178,778      183,019      195,255      191,834      188,553      202,383           849,719             1,810,763
Administration of Justice (750):
  BA...........................................................      52,156      55,450      55,169      56,854      58,585       60,498       63,032       64,917       66,844       68,632           278,214               602,137
  OT...........................................................      56,006      57,547      56,659      56,572      58,392       59,992       62,485       64,355       66,264       68,051           285,177               606,325
General Government (800):
  BA...........................................................      23,593      22,761      22,817      23,252      23,947       24,192       24,981       25,695       26,010       26,968           116,370               244,216
  OT...........................................................      23,576      23,202      23,279      23,084      23,602       24,309       25,114       25,840       25,878       26,825           116,743               244,709
Net Interest (900):
  On-budget:
    BA.........................................................     366,542     414,802     477,785     531,097     578,726      612,198      642,470      667,176      684,394      696,025         2,368,952             5,671,217
    OT.........................................................     366,542     414,802     477,785     531,097     578,726      612,198      642,470      667,176      684,394      696,025         2,368,952             5,671,217
  Off-budget:
    BA.........................................................     -92,252     -91,570     -92,376     -94,506     -95,251      -95,817      -94,894      -92,787      -89,298      -83,567          -465,956              -922,318
    OT.........................................................     -92,252     -91,570     -92,376     -94,506     -95,251      -95,817      -94,894      -92,787      -89,298      -83,567          -465,956              -922,318
Allowances (920):
  BA...........................................................     -33,462     -29,863     -32,175     -34,261     -39,009      -42,221      -46,013      -49,123      -50,652      -48,913          -168,770              -405,692
  OT...........................................................     -17,275     -24,277     -28,249     -31,078     -35,136      -38,438      -42,205      -45,430      -47,736      -48,058          -136,015              -357,882
Government-Wide Savings (930):
  BA...........................................................      27,465     -15,712     -32,429     -41,554     -50,240      -55,831      -63,954      -71,850      -78,889     -113,903          -112,470              -496,897
  OT...........................................................      18,416      -3,005     -20,148     -32,383     -42,168      -50,276      -57,849      -65,124      -71,689      -93,929           -79,288              -418,155
Undistributed Offsetting Receipts (950):
  On-budget:
    BA.........................................................     -73,514     -83,832     -90,115     -90,594     -92,193      -96,623      -99,437     -104,343     -111,213     -117,896          -430,248              -959,760
    OT.........................................................     -73,514     -83,832     -90,115     -90,594     -92,193      -96,623      -99,437     -104,343     -111,213     -117,896          -430,248              -959,760
  Off-budget:
    BA.........................................................     -16,620     -17,181     -17,794     -18,434     -19,089      -19,757      -20,438      -21,133      -21,839      -22,562           -89,118              -194,847
    OT.........................................................     -16,620     -17,181     -17,794     -18,434     -19,089      -19,757      -20,438      -21,133      -21,839      -22,562           -89,118              -194,847
Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism (970):
  BA...........................................................      96,000      26,666      26,666      26,666      26,666       26,666            0            0            0            0           202,664               229,330
  OT...........................................................      45,442      34,238      26,940      26,191      25,916       24,776        9,956        2,869          278            0           158,727               196,606
Across the Board Adjustment (990):
  BA...........................................................         -21         -22         -23         -23         -24          -24          -25          -26          -26          -27              -113                  -241
  OT...........................................................         -17         -20         -21         -22         -23          -23          -24          -25          -25          -26              -103                  -226
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Notes:
1. Only on-budget amounts for fiscal years 2016-2025 are entered into the budget resolution legislative text. Off-budget amounts are shown for display purposes only.
2. The Office of Management and Budget and the Congressional Budget Office do not separately track outlays for the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) once funds have been appropriated. The budget, therefore, shows in function 970 GWOT
  outlays that result from new budget authority occurring in fiscal years 2016-2025 only. Outlays resulting from GWOT activity prior to fiscal year 2016 are included in budget functions 050 and 150.


                                                                           TABLE 9.--FY 2016 BUDGET RESOLUTION DISCRETIONARY SPENDING, AS PASSED BY THE HOUSE
                                                                                                  [Fiscal year, in millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                   2016        2017        2018        2019         2020         2021         2022         2023         2024         2025            2016-2020             2016-2025
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                 SUMMARY
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total spending:
  BA..........................................................   1,112,582   1,060,530   1,078,106   1,095,980    1,114,158    1,132,646    1,124,781    1,143,903    1,163,349    1,183,126         5,461,356            11,209,161
  OT..........................................................   1,173,418   1,127,581   1,118,039   1,132,445    1,147,476    1,163,133    1,170,379    1,176,793    1,187,230    1,211,974         5,698,959            11,608,469
Base Defense (050):
  BA..........................................................     523,091     574,067     599,071     611,079      623,087      635,096      647,848      660,970      673,469      687,356         2,930,395             6,235,134
  OT..........................................................     555,724     563,440     577,586     595,199      608,294      621,075      638,488      646,364      653,639      671,938         2,900,243             6,131,747
Base Non Defense:
  BA..........................................................     493,491     459,797     452,369     458,235      464,405      470,884      476,933      482,933      489,880      495,770         2,328,297             4,744,697
  OT..........................................................     572,252     529,904     513,512     511,055      513,267      517,282      521,936      527,560      533,314      540,036         2,639,989             5,280,116
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                               BY FUNCTION
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
National Defense (050):
  BA..........................................................     523,091     574,067     599,071     611,079      623,087      635,096      647,848      660,970      673,469      687,356         2,930,395             6,235,134
  OT..........................................................     555,724     563,440     577,586     595,199      608,294      621,075      638,488      646,364      653,639      671,938         2,900,243             6,131,747
International Affairs (150):
  BA..........................................................      38,893      39,637      40,498      41,366       42,286       43,210       44,181       45,155       46,170       47,208           202,680               428,604
  OT..........................................................      44,218      42,211      41,501      41,079       41,482       42,016       42,578       43,377       44,251       45,169           210,491               427,882
General Science, Space and Technology (250):
  BA..........................................................      28,274      28,832      29,479      30,127       30,804       31,484       32,193       32,903       33,642       34,388           147,516               312,125
  OT..........................................................      28,898      28,822      29,257      29,698       30,288       30,857       31,537       32,238       32,959       33,695           146,964               308,250
Energy (270):
  BA..........................................................       2,054       2,110       2,169       2,221        2,295        2,350        2,411        2,470        2,533        2,590            10,849                23,203
  OT..........................................................       2,435       2,284       2,243       2,290        2,375        2,433        2,498        2,561        2,622        2,688            11,627                24,429
Natural Resources & Environment (300):
  BA..........................................................      34,366      35,256      36,284      37,357       38,429       39,524       40,692       41,831       43,025       44,260           181,693               391,024
  OT..........................................................      36,796      36,971      37,048      37,666       38,669       39,700       40,828       41,918       42,496       43,672           187,151               395,764
Agriculture (350):
  BA..........................................................       6,073       6,229       6,409       6,593        6,781        6,968        7,169        7,365        7,576        7,790            32,085                68,953
  OT..........................................................       5,979       6,141       6,324       6,504        6,689        6,873        7,072        7,266        7,471        7,684            31,637                68,003
Commerce & Housing Credit (370):
  On-budget:
    BA........................................................     -13,410     -16,367     -16,546     -15,510      -13,141      -12,370      -11,196      -10,054       -9,054       -8,478           -74,974              -126,127
    OT........................................................     -13,067     -16,159     -16,462     -15,566      -13,227      -12,459      -11,287      -10,146       -9,152       -8,575           -74,481              -126,099
  Off-budget:
    BA........................................................         267         277         288         299          310          321          334          346          358          371             1,441                 3,171
    OT........................................................         266         277         288         298          310          320          333          345          357          370             1,439                 3,164
Transportation (400):
  BA..........................................................      31,049      31,800      32,656      33,535       34,444       35,360       36,304       37,264       36,688       37,656           163,484               346,756
  OT..........................................................      78,107      68,491      72,712      75,345       76,185       77,851       79,470       80,868       80,694       81,906           370,840               771,629
Community & Regional Development (450):
  BA..........................................................       6,958       7,045       7,199       7,348        7,509        7,682        7,856        8,033        8,216        8,394            36,059                76,238
  OT..........................................................      19,577      16,283      14,037      11,996       10,565       10,081        8,591        7,908        8,083        8,268            72,458               115,389
Education, Training, Employment, and Social Services (500):
  BA..........................................................      88,248      92,897      94,491      96,297       98,241      100,227      102,273      104,164      106,241      108,321           470,174               991,400
  OT..........................................................      91,356      96,048      93,128      94,795       96,633       98,594      100,539      102,404      104,413      106,434           471,960               984,344
Health (550):
  BA..........................................................      57,726      58,920      60,297      61,690       63,145       64,602       66,127       67,650       69,241       70,842           301,778               640,240
  OT..........................................................      58,409      58,958      59,792      60,302       61,592       62,827       64,296       65,794       67,331       68,903           299,053               628,204
Medicare (570):
  BA..........................................................       6,605       6,994       7,424       7,888        8,368        8,875        9,412        9,967       10,547       11,145            37,279                87,225
  OT..........................................................       6,556       6,969       7,356       7,814        8,291        8,794        9,326        9,878       10,456       11,047            36,986                86,487
Income Security (600):
  BA..........................................................      61,414      62,035      62,909      63,908       65,548       67,096       68,664       70,242       71,806       73,260           315,814               666,882
  OT..........................................................      63,626      62,685      62,928      63,555       64,825       66,229       67,708       69,218       70,758       72,174           317,619               663,706
Social Security (650):
  On-budget:
    BA........................................................           0           0           0           0            0            0            0            0            0            0                 0                     0
    OT........................................................          41           0           0           0            0            0            0            0            0            0                41                    41
  Off-budget:
    BA........................................................       5,026       5,175       5,345       5,518        5,699        5,881        6,072        6,266        6,462        6,665            26,763                58,109
    OT........................................................       5,089       5,190       5,316       5,487        5,668        5,849        6,039        6,232        6,428        6,630            26,750                57,928
Veterans Benefits and Services (700):
  BA..........................................................      68,602      70,540      72,735      74,992       77,320       79,678       82,135       84,626       87,179       89,826           364,189               787,633
  OT..........................................................      68,316      69,857      72,097      74,198       76,474       78,841       81,279       83,723       86,267       88,853           360,942               779,905
Administration of Justice (750):
  BA..........................................................      51,019      52,562      54,296      56,089       57,934       59,805       61,756       63,732       65,757       67,648           271,900               590,598
  OT..........................................................      51,279      52,625      54,091      55,778       57,450       59,312       61,249       63,212       65,223       67,128           271,224               587,349
General Government (800):
  BA..........................................................      16,724      16,134      16,093      16,433       17,057       17,202       17,874       18,556       19,054       19,726            82,441               174,853
  OT..........................................................      16,682      16,555      16,578      16,239       16,689       17,275       17,935       18,608       18,790       19,504            82,743               174,855
Allowances (920):
  BA..........................................................     -27,758     -27,069     -29,787     -31,883      -36,240      -40,404      -43,857      -46,986      -48,549      -50,852          -152,737              -383,385
  OT..........................................................     -14,628     -22,704     -26,536     -29,263      -33,180      -36,961      -40,595      -43,876      -46,223      -48,425          -126,311              -342,391
Government-Wide Savings (930):
  BA..........................................................      31,382     -13,188     -29,847     -36,010      -42,360      -46,582      -53,441      -60,571      -66,986      -74,962           -90,023              -392,565
  OT..........................................................      22,333      -1,581     -18,166     -27,139      -34,488      -41,127      -47,436      -53,945      -59,886      -67,063           -59,041              -328,498
OverseasContingencyOperations/GlobalWaronTerrorism(970):
  BA..........................................................      96,000      26,666      26,666      26,666       26,666       26,666            0            0            0            0           202,664               229,330
  OT..........................................................      45,442      34,238      26,940      26,191       25,916       24,776        9,956        2,869          278            0           158,727               196,606
Across the Board Adjustment (990):
  BA..........................................................         -21         -22         -23         -23          -24          -24          -25          -26          -26          -27              -113                  -241
  OT..........................................................         -17         -20         -21         -22          -23          -23          -24          -25          -25          -26              -103                  -226
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                                                             TABLE 10.--FY 2016 BUDGET RESOLUTION MANDATORY SPENDING, AS PASSED BY THE HOUSE
                                                                                                  [Fiscal year, in millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                      2016        2017        2018        2019        2020        2021        2022         2023         2024         2025            2016-2020             2016-2025
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                 SUMMARY
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total spending:
  BA.............................................................   2,608,126   2,645,910   2,755,063   2,942,691   3,146,170   3,275,184   3,490,341    3,615,039    3,735,871    3,933,069        14,097,960            32,147,465
  OT.............................................................   2,616,348   2,594,209   2,692,910   2,871,660   3,064,255   3,209,403   3,427,511    3,543,953    3,656,685    3,867,242        13,839,382            31,544,176
On-budget:
  BA.............................................................   1,829,700   1,818,925   1,871,595   2,000,941   2,140,031   2,201,601   2,344,669    2,391,870    2,430,031    2,539,279         9,661,193            21,568,643
  OT.............................................................   1,842,122   1,772,325   1,814,842   1,935,610   2,064,116   2,142,020   2,288,539    2,327,784    2,358,045    2,480,352         9,429,015            21,025,754
Off-budget:
  BA.............................................................     778,426     826,985     883,468     941,750   1,006,139   1,073,583   1,145,672    1,223,169    1,305,840    1,393,790         4,436,767            10,578,822
  OT.............................................................     774,226     821,885     878,068     936,050   1,000,139   1,067,383   1,138,972    1,216,169    1,298,640    1,386,890         4,410,367            10,518,422
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                               BY FUNCTION
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
National Defense (050):
  BA.............................................................       8,243       8,439       8,673       8,940       9,223       9,531       9,786       10,027       10,302       11,480            43,518                94,644
  OT.............................................................       8,303       8,585       8,836       9,039       9,259       9,535       9,781       10,025       10,297       11,412            44,022                95,072
International Affairs (150):
  BA.............................................................        -551         -14          41          71         104        -349        -100          -85          -72          -60              -349                -1,015
  OT.............................................................      -1,295      -1,390      -1,765      -1,865      -1,918      -1,908      -1,710       -1,744       -1,781       -1,820            -8,233               -17,196
General Science, Space and Technology (250):
  BA.............................................................         107         100         100         100         100         100         100          100          100          100               507                 1,007
  OT.............................................................         105         102         100         100         100         100         100          100          100          100               507                 1,007
Energy (270):
  BA.............................................................      -5,635        -700        -980      -1,025      -1,036      -1,041      -1,076       -1,095       -1,201       -3,554            -9,376               -17,343
  OT.............................................................      -1,781      -1,635      -2,009      -1,983      -1,903      -1,705      -1,635       -1,561       -1,585       -3,903            -9,311               -19,700
Natural Resources & Environment (300):
  BA.............................................................         984         791         100        -151        -258      -1,157      -1,472       -1,723       -2,063       -5,164             1,466               -10,112
  OT.............................................................       1,317       1,297         625          81        -365      -1,015      -1,467       -1,599       -2,011       -5,200             2,955                -8,337
Agriculture (350):
  BA.............................................................      14,036      16,835      15,578      14,314      13,054      12,328      12,076       12,456       12,444       12,466            73,816               135,585
  OT.............................................................      15,185      17,053      15,072      13,771      12,697      11,976      11,758       12,125       12,082       12,167            73,779               133,888
Commerce & Housing Credit (370):
  On-budget:
    BA...........................................................      10,141       3,994       6,294       6,709       6,238       5,848       5,454        5,089        5,063        5,108            33,376                59,938
    OT...........................................................      -3,550     -10,461      -8,536     -13,021     -14,252      -9,310     -11,532      -13,160      -14,483      -15,270           -49,820              -113,575
  Off-budget:
    BA...........................................................      -3,754      -3,624      -3,697      -3,918      -4,132      -4,207      -4,262       -4,318       -4,374       -4,530           -19,125               -40,816
    OT...........................................................      -3,754      -3,624      -3,697      -3,918      -4,132      -4,207      -4,262       -4,318       -4,374       -4,530           -19,125               -40,816
Transportation (400):
  BA.............................................................       5,694      37,581      37,642      42,862      43,319      43,789      44,309       44,864       47,021       47,679           167,098               394,760
  OT.............................................................       1,074       1,009         911         706         582         518         476          468        2,030        2,077             4,282                 9,852
Community & Regional Development (450):
  BA.............................................................         124         643         890       1,033         900         623         448          326          231          185             3,590                 5,403
  OT.............................................................         351         470       1,346       1,793       2,002       2,014       2,346        1,437          807          662             5,962                13,228
Education, Training, Employment, and Social Services (500):
  BA.............................................................      -7,628      -8,151      -7,462     -10,783     -10,340     -11,319     -12,125      -12,927      -13,497      -13,921           -44,364              -108,153
  OT.............................................................        -967      -5,535      -5,762      -9,505      -8,964      -9,318     -10,072      -10,758      -11,312      -11,700           -30,733               -83,893
Health (550):
  BA.............................................................     358,749     301,758     298,297     305,413     323,931     324,379     332,009      340,804      356,140      363,103         1,588,148             3,304,583
  OT.............................................................     368,451     305,865     300,676     307,614     315,749     326,198     333,937      342,735      358,146      365,240         1,598,355             3,324,611
Medicare (570):
  BA.............................................................     571,121     573,843     573,358     631,405     672,207     717,769     798,792      815,610      823,601      916,265         3,021,934             7,093,971
  OT.............................................................     571,079     573,808     573,385     631,399     672,190     717,754     798,774      815,501      823,581      916,245         3,021,861             7,093,716
Income Security (600):
  BA.............................................................     450,950     417,801     419,085     419,385     450,645     434,905     450,026      454,988      460,709      476,797         2,157,866             4,435,291
  OT.............................................................     450,083     412,549     409,023     413,915     445,778     430,627     450,834      450,173      450,347      471,187         2,131,348             4,384,516
Social Security (650):
  On-budget:
    BA...........................................................      33,878      36,535      39,407      42,634      46,104      49,712      53,547       57,455       61,546       65,751           198,558               486,569
    OT...........................................................      33,878      36,535      39,407      42,634      46,104      49,712      53,547       57,455       61,546       65,751           198,558               486,569
  Off-budget:
    BA...........................................................     891,052     939,360     997,335   1,058,608   1,124,611   1,193,364   1,265,266    1,341,407    1,421,351    1,504,449         5,010,966            11,736,803
    OT...........................................................     886,852     934,260     991,935   1,052,908   1,118,611   1,187,164   1,258,566    1,334,407    1,414,151    1,497,549         4,984,566            11,676,403
Veterans Benefits and Services (700):
  BA.............................................................      98,075      94,303      90,274      99,870     102,415     104,291     114,148      108,240      102,489      113,691           484,937             1,027,796
  OT.............................................................     101,805      94,530      90,288      99,850     102,304     104,178     113,976      108,111      102,286      113,530           488,777             1,030,858
Administration of Justice (750):
  BA.............................................................       1,137       2,888         873         765         651         693       1,276        1,185        1,087          984             6,314                11,539
  OT.............................................................       4,727       4,922       2,568         794         942         680       1,236        1,143        1,041          923            13,953                18,976
General Government (800):
  BA.............................................................       6,869       6,627       6,724       6,819       6,890       6,990       7,107        7,139        6,956        7,242            33,929                69,363
  OT.............................................................       6,894       6,647       6,701       6,845       6,913       7,034       7,179        7,232        7,088        7,321            34,000                69,854
Net Interest (900):
  On-budget:
    BA...........................................................     366,542     414,802     477,785     531,097     578,726     612,198     642,470      667,176      684,394      696,025         2,368,952             5,671,217
    OT...........................................................     366,542     414,802     477,785     531,097     578,726     612,198     642,470      667,176      684,394      696,025         2,368,952             5,671,217
  Off-budget:
    BA...........................................................     -92,252     -91,570     -92,376     -94,506     -95,251     -95,817     -94,894      -92,787      -89,298      -83,567          -465,956              -922,318
    OT...........................................................     -92,252     -91,570     -92,376     -94,506     -95,251     -95,817     -94,894      -92,787      -89,298      -83,567          -465,956              -922,318
Allowances (920):
  BA.............................................................      -5,704      -2,794      -2,388      -2,378      -2,769      -1,817      -2,156       -2,137       -2,103        1,939           -16,033               -22,307
  OT.............................................................      -2,647      -1,573      -1,713      -1,815      -1,956      -1,477      -1,610       -1,554       -1,513          367            -9,704               -15,491
Government-Wide Savings (930):
  BA.............................................................      -3,917      -2,524      -2,582      -5,544      -7,880      -9,249     -10,513      -11,279      -11,903      -38,941           -22,447              -104,332
  OT.............................................................      -3,917      -1,424      -1,982      -5,244      -7,680      -9,149     -10,413      -11,179      -11,803      -26,866           -20,247               -89,657
Undistributed Offsetting Receipts (950):
  On-budget:
    BA...........................................................     -73,514     -83,832     -90,115     -90,594     -92,193     -96,623     -99,437     -104,343     -111,213     -117,896          -430,248              -959,760
    OT...........................................................     -73,514     -83,832     -90,115     -90,594     -92,193     -96,623     -99,437     -104,343     -111,213     -117,896          -430,248              -959,760
  Off-budget:
    BA...........................................................     -16,620     -17,181     -17,794     -18,434     -19,089     -19,757     -20,438      -21,133      -21,839      -22,562           -89,118              -194,847
    OT...........................................................     -16,620     -17,181     -17,794     -18,434     -19,089     -19,757     -20,438      -21,133      -21,839      -22,562           -89,118              -194,847
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                     National Defense: Function 050

                            FUNCTION SUMMARY

      The National Defense function includes funds to develop, 
maintain, and equip the military forces of the United States. 
Historically, about 95 percent of the funding in this function 
goes to Department of Defense military activities; the 
remaining funding applies to atomic energy defense activities 
of the Department of Energy and other defense-related 
activities.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate budget resolution calls for $531.3 billion in 
regular budget authority and $564.0 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2016. Regular discretionary budget authority in 
fiscal year 2016 totals $523.1 billion, with $555.7 billion in 
outlays; direct spending is $8.2 billion in budget authority 
and $8.3 billion in outlays. Over 10 years, regular budget 
authority totals $5,886.8 billion, and outlays are $5,821.5 
billion.
      As well, the function contains $89.0 billion in 
discretionary budget authority and $87.1 billion in related 
outlays for overseas contingency operations.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment abides by the Budget Control Act 
discretionary defense cap of $523 billion for fiscal year 2016. 
In addition to this funding, the House amendment continues to 
prioritize national defense by providing needed dollars through 
the creation of the ``Defense Readiness and Modernization 
Fund.'' The fund will provide the Chairman of the House 
Committee on the Budget the ability to increase the defense 
allocation, in a deficit-neutral way, to support legislation 
that would provide additional resources for the Department of 
Defense [DOD]. In total with $90 billion, the House budget 
estimate for Overseas Contingency Operations funding for DOD, 
the fiscal year 2016 budget provides more than $613 billion 
total for defense spending--higher than the President's budget 
request for the fiscal year.
      The House amendment includes a policy statement 
supporting national defense and the need to replace the defense 
discretionary sequester. Ultimately, the amendment fully 
supports U.S. troops, both at home and abroad, especially as 
the security environment becomes increasingly dangerous, 
complex, and unpredictable.
      The House amendment specifies $531.3 billion in budget 
authority and $564.0 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2016, 
per current law. Discretionary budget authority is $523.1 
billion, with $555.7 billion in associated outlays. Direct 
spending for fiscal year 2016 totals $8.2 billion in budget 
authority and $8.3 billion in outlays. The 10-year function 
totals for budget authority and outlays are $6,329.8 billion 
and $6,226.8 billion, respectively.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement calls for $531.3 billion in 
regular budget authority and $564.3 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2016. Regular discretionary budget authority in 
fiscal year 2016 totals $523.1 billion, with $555.5 billion in 
outlays; direct spending is $8.2 billion in budget authority 
and $8.8 billion in outlays. Over 10 years, regular budget 
authority totals $6,001.2 billion, and outlays are $5,920.9 
billion. Additional resources for national security are 
provided outside this budget function through overseas 
contingency operations funding in Function 970.
      The agreement supports funding for national defense that 
is consistent with current law, thus removing the possibility 
of across-the-board reductions to the national security budget. 
The agreement makes clear that U.S. troops will have the 
resources and support they need to meet the challenges of a 
complex security environment. Taking into account both funding 
in this function and the Overseas Contingency Operations 
function, the agreement supports national security spending 
levels above the President's request over the next 5 and 10 
years.

                  International Affairs: Function 150

                            FUNCTION SUMMARY

      The International Affairs function contains spending on 
international humanitarian and development assistance; 
international security assistance; the conduct of foreign 
affairs; foreign information and exchange activities; and 
international financial programs. Major agencies with programs 
funded under this function include the Departments of State, 
Treasury, and Agriculture; the U.S. Agency for International 
Development; and the Millennium Challenge Corporation. Negative 
numbers in the descriptions below reflect receipts from 
foreign-military sales and financing programs.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate budget resolution calls for $40.7 billion in 
regular budget authority and $46.6 billion in outlays in fiscal 
year 2016. Regular discretionary budget authority in fiscal 
year 2016 totals $41.3 billion, with $47.9 billion in related 
outlays. Direct spending is -$551 million in budget authority 
and -$1.3 billion in outlays. Over 10 years, regular budget 
authority totals $451.8 billion, and outlays are $437.1 
billion.
      The above figures exclude the $7.0 billion in 
discretionary budget authority and $6.8 billion in related 
outlays provided in this function for overseas contingency 
operations.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      Since 2001, funding for the international affairs base 
budget (excluding Global War on Terrorism/Overseas Contingency 
Operations funding) has increased by 45 percent, adjusting for 
inflation. Yet more spending has not yielded better results. 
Duplicative programs, programs unrelated to vital U.S. national 
interests, and inefficiencies are prevalent in the budget and 
should be addressed. This amendment represents a thorough re-
evaluation of accounts in this category and prioritizes 
programs that are both integral to the core mission and that 
effectively and efficiently achieve desired outcomes. For this 
budget category, the House amendment proposes a total of $38.3 
billion in budget authority and $42.9 billion in outlays for 
fiscal year 2016. Most of the function's spending is 
discretionary, totaling $38.9 billion in budget authority and 
$44.2 billion in outlays for fiscal year 2016. Direct spending 
amounts are -$551 million in budget authority and -$1.3 billion 
in outlays. Over 10 years the resolution provides $427.6 
billion in budget authority and $410.7 billion in outlays.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement calls for $40.2 billion in 
regular budget authority and $46.0 billion in outlays in fiscal 
year 2016. Regular discretionary budget authority in fiscal 
year 2016 totals $40.1 billion, with $47.1 billion in outlays; 
direct spending is $108 million in budget authority and -$1.1 
billion in outlays. Over 10 years, regular budget authority 
totals $438.5 billion, with outlays of $431.7 billion. 
Additional resources for international affairs are provided 
outside this budget function through overseas contingency 
operations funding in Function 970.
      The agreement supports international affairs activities 
with the goal of promoting U.S. interests abroad and supporting 
humanitarian and development assistance overseas. It recognizes 
the need for review of programs in this function as many of 
them continue to receive funding despite expired 
authorizations. The agreement supports efforts by the 
committees of jurisdiction to reform U.S. foreign aid programs 
to ensure that foreign assistance is prioritized to deliver aid 
in a more effective and transparent manner.

          General Science, Space, and Technology: Function 250

                            FUNCTION SUMMARY

      The General Science, Space, and Technology function 
includes the National Science Foundation, programs other than 
aviation programs at the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration, and general science programs at the Department 
of Energy.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate budget resolution calls for $30.0 billion in 
budget authority and $30.0 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2016. Discretionary budget authority in fiscal year 2016 totals 
$29.9 billion, with $29.9 billion in related outlays. Direct 
spending is $107 million in budget authority and $105 million 
in outlays. Over 10 years, budget authority totals $331.4 
billion, and outlays are $328.5 billion.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment reduces excess and unnecessary 
spending, while supporting core government responsibilities. It 
preserves basic research, providing stable funding for the 
National Science Foundation to conduct its authorized 
activities in science, space, and technology basic research, 
development, and science, technology, engineering, and math 
[STEM] education, while shifting the focus back to basic 
research. The amendment provides continued support for the 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA] and 
recognizes the vital strategic importance of the United States 
remaining the pre-eminent space-faring nation. The amendment 
aligns funding in accordance with the NASA core principles to 
support robust space capability, to allow for exploration 
beyond low Earth orbit, and to support the Nation's scientific 
and educational base. Total funding in the amendment is $28.4 
billion and $29.0 billion in budget authority and outlays, 
respectively, in fiscal year 2016. Nearly all the function's 
spending is discretionary, with $28.3 billion in budget 
authority and $28.9 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2016; 
direct spending is $107 million in budget authority and $105 
million in outlays. The 10-year totals are $313.1 billion in 
budget authority and $309.3 billion in outlays.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      Function 250 consists almost entirely of discretionary 
funding. The largest component of this category--about half of 
total spending--is for NASA's space-flight, research, and 
supporting activities. The conference agreement recognizes and 
supports preserving the Federal scientific community's original 
role as a venue for groundbreaking basic science research 
discoveries and a driver of innovation and economic growth. The 
agreement calls for $29.2 billion in budget authority and $29.6 
billion in outlays in fiscal year 2016. Discretionary budget 
authority in fiscal year 2016 is $29.1 billion, with outlays of 
$29.5 billion; direct spending is $100 million in budget 
authority and $101 million in outlays. Over 10 years, budget 
authority totals $322.3 billion, and outlays are $318.0 
billion.

                          Energy: Function 270

                            FUNCTION SUMMARY

      The Energy function concerns the production, development, 
and use of energy for the country. This function contains 
civilian energy programs at agencies including the Departments 
of Energy and Agriculture, Tennessee Valley Authority, Federal 
Energy Regulatory Commission, and Nuclear Regulatory 
Commission. Negative numbers in the function mainly reflect the 
incoming repayment of loans and receipts from the sale of 
electricity produced by Federal entities, which are accounted 
for as negative spending.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate budget resolution calls for -$1.9 billion in 
budget authority and $2.4 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2016. Discretionary budget authority in fiscal year 2016 totals 
$3.1 billion, with $4.2 billion in related outlays. Direct 
spending is -$5.1 billion in budget authority and -$1.8 billion 
in outlays. Over 10 years, budget authority totals $6.9 
billion, and outlays are $6.1 billion.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      A central aim of policies assumed in this function is to 
ensure that private sector capital is not crowded out by 
government overreach and bureaucratic waste. The policies also 
should protect taxpayers from poor government decision-making 
that wastes Federal dollars and increases energy prices. 
Finally, streamlining research and development activities 
across the Department of Energy will increase efficiency and 
consolidate operations, leading to reduced costs. These are the 
guiding principles for energy policy in the House amendment. 
For fiscal year 2016, the budget resolution provides -$3.6 
billion in budget authority, with $654 million in related 
outlays. The discretionary figures for fiscal year 2016 are 
$2.1 billion in budget authority and $2.4 billion in outlays, 
with direct spending of -$5.6 billion in budget authority and 
-$1.8 billion in outlays. Ten-year function totals are $5.9 
billion in budget authority and $4.7 billion in outlays.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement promotes abundant and affordable 
American energy production and use. It envisions policies that 
realign the size and role of government involvement in the 
private sector, while empowering the committees of jurisdiction 
to pursue legislation in pursuit of these broad goals. The 
agreement provides -$3.2 billion in budget authority for fiscal 
year 2016 and $1.4 billion in outlays. These amounts include 
$2.6 billion in discretionary budget authority and $3.2 billion 
in discretionary outlays, with direct spending of -$5.8 billion 
in budget authority and -$1.8 billion in outlays. Spending over 
the next 10 years totals -$9.1 billion in budget authority and 
-$11.5 billion in outlays.

            Natural Resources and Environment: Function 300

                            FUNCTION SUMMARY

      The Natural Resources and Environment function focuses on 
the management, development, and maintenance of the Nation's 
natural heritage. This function includes conservation of land 
and water resources; development of water power and 
transportation infrastructure; and agencies and resources 
associated with the management and regulation of pollution, 
public and recreational lands, and natural resources.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate budget resolution calls for $36.3 billion in 
budget authority and $39.0 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2016. Discretionary budget authority in fiscal year 2016 totals 
$34.5 billion, with $37.2 billion in related outlays. Direct 
spending is $1.8 billion in budget authority and $1.8 billion 
in outlays. Over 10 years, budget authority totals $406.5 
billion, and outlays are $412.5 billion.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment continues to support policies that 
will make America's natural resources available to producers 
who can provide a fair return to taxpayers. In addition to the 
receipts the Federal Government collects from royalties, rents, 
and bonus bids, the increased economic activity on Federal land 
will create jobs and boost economic output. The amendment 
supports reducing the Federal estate, and giving States and 
localities more control over the resources within their 
boundaries. The House budget provides $35.4 billion in budget 
authority for fiscal year 2016, with $38.1 billion in related 
outlays. The discretionary spending figures for fiscal year 
2016 are $34.4 billion in budget authority and $36.8 billion in 
outlays. For direct spending in fiscal 2016, the House 
amendment provides $984 million in budget authority and $1.3 
billion in outlays. Over 10 years, the function totals are 
$380.9 billion in budget authority and $387.4 billion in 
outlays.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement promotes a safe and healthy 
environment that can accompany robust economic growth and job 
creation. It supports better management of the lands and 
resources overseen by the Federal Government, including 
potentially reducing the Federal estate, and a more responsible 
relationship between regulatory agencies and the private 
sector. The agreement provides $36.4 billion in budget 
authority for fiscal year 2016 and $39.5 billion in outlays. 
These figures include $34.4 billion in discretionary budget 
authority and $37.0 billion in discretionary outlays, as well 
as $1.9 billion in direct spending budget authority with $2.5 
billion in outlays. Spending through the 10-year budget window 
totals $406.0 billion in budget authority and $413.0 billion in 
outlays.

                       Agriculture: Function 350

                            FUNCTION SUMMARY

      The Agriculture function helps provide for the continued 
success of American agriculture and the agricultural industry. 
This function includes only programs and policies concerned 
with agricultural production, including direct assistance and 
loans to farmers; export assistance; agricultural research; and 
marketing, information, and animal and plant health inspection 
services.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate budget resolution calls for $20.6 billion in 
budget authority and $20.6 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2016. Discretionary budget authority in fiscal year 2016 totals 
$5.9 billion, with $5.9 billion in related outlays. Direct 
spending is $14.7 billion in budget authority and $14.7 billion 
in outlays. Over 10 years, budget authority totals $218.1 
billion, and outlays are $213.3 billion.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment recommends that a higher priority be 
given to competitive grant-based agricultural research. This 
type of research funding, in contrast to formula-based and 
other types, is most likely to spur agricultural productivity 
growth, which is important to enhancing the international 
competitiveness of U.S. agriculture over the longer term. Also, 
continued attention should be given to streamlining and, where 
possible, consolidating operations and activities across U.S. 
Department of Agriculture agencies, including in its large 
network of county field offices.
      The 2014 farm bill made a number of reforms to 
agricultural policies, most notably by eliminating direct 
payments, but significant declines in market prices over the 
past year are expected to result in increased levels of 
assistance under the farm bill's new price- and revenue-based 
programs. While it is important to continue to reform 
agricultural programs, weather and market challenges continue 
to highlight the importance of maintaining a safety net for 
farmers.
      In this function, the amendment provides $20.1 billion in 
budget authority and $21.2 billion in outlays for fiscal year 
2016. Discretionary budget authority in fiscal 2016 is $6.1 
billion; outlays are $6.0 billion. The direct spending share of 
the fiscal year 2016 function totals are $14.0 billion in 
budget authority and $15.2 billion in outlays. For the period 
of fiscal years 2016 through 2025, budget authority totals 
$204.5 billion and outlays are $201.9 billion.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement empowers the Committees on 
Agriculture in the House of Representatives and Senate to build 
on the reforms in the 2014 farm bill to ensure American 
agriculture remains a vital part of the Nation's economy while 
supporting rural economies in a fiscally responsible way. The 
agreement provides $19.1 billion in budget authority for fiscal 
year 2016 and $21.6 billion in outlays in this function. These 
amounts include $6.0 billion in discretionary budget authority 
and $5.9 billion in discretionary outlays, as well as direct 
spending amounts of $13.1 billion in budget authority and $15.6 
billion in outlays. Total spending over the next 10 years in 
this function equals $204.2 billion in budget authority and 
$201.1 billion in outlays.

               Commerce and Housing Credit: Function 370

                            FUNCTION SUMMARY

      The Commerce and Housing Credit function includes 
mortgage credit, the U.S. Postal Service, deposit insurance, 
and most of the activities of the Departments of Commerce and 
Housing and Urban Development. Negative figures in this 
function mainly reflect the negative subsidy rates applied to 
certain loan and loan-guarantee programs scored under the 
guidelines of the Federal Credit Reform Act, such as the 
Federal Housing Administration [FHA] and the Government 
National Mortgage Association (commonly known as Ginnie Mae) 
programs.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate budget resolution calls for $1.9 billion in 
budget authority and -$11.7 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2016. Discretionary budget authority in fiscal year 2016 totals 
-$8.1 billion, with -$7.9 billion in related outlays. Direct 
spending is $10.0 billion in budget authority and -$3.7 billion 
in outlays. Over 10 years, budget authority totals -$5.6 
billion, and outlays are -$179.9 billion. These figures reflect 
the combined on- and off-budget amounts associated with this 
function.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment envisions a Federal system that 
supports commerce and housing and regulates in an efficient 
manner, providing sufficient oversight where necessary without 
wasting taxpayer monies or stifling free enterprise. The 
amendment calls for minimizing subsidies to commercial entities 
where possible and protecting taxpayers from the risk of future 
bailouts. Additionally, it envisions adjusting the budgets of 
Federal agencies to levels necessary to effectively and 
efficiently execute their missions, and creating a climate that 
supports rather than stifles commerce and free enterprise. The 
House amendment also recommends giving the Postal Service the 
flexibility that any business needs to respond to changing 
market conditions, including declining mail volume, which is 
down more than 25 percent since 2006.
      In this function, on a unified basis, the amendment 
provides -$6.8 billion in budget authority and -$20.1 billion 
in outlays for fiscal year 2016, of which -$13.1 billion is 
discretionary budget authority, with -$12.8 billion in outlays. 
Direct spending for fiscal 2016 is $6.4 billion in budget 
authority and -$7.3 billion in outlays. For fiscal years 2016 
through 2025, the amendment provides -$103.8 billion in budget 
authority and -$277.3 billion in outlays.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement supports policies that would 
reduce the risk of taxpayer bailouts and promote free 
enterprise. Additionally, the agreement aims to remove 
burdensome regulations so the economy can run more efficiently. 
Fiscal year 2016 budget authority totals -$4.0 billion, and 
outlays total -$13.6 billion. Discretionary budget authority in 
fiscal year 2016 totals -$10.6 billion, with -$7.2 billion in 
related outlays. Direct spending budget authority is $6.6 
billion in fiscal year 2016, with -$6.4 billion in outlays. 
Over 10 years, budget authority in Function 370 totals -$79.7 
billion, and outlays are -$244.3 billion. These totals reflect 
combined on- and off-budget amounts.

                      Transportation: Function 400

                            FUNCTION SUMMARY

      The Transportation function focuses on aid and regulation 
for ground transportation (including roads and highways, 
railroads, and urban mass transit), air transportation 
(including aeronautical research conducted by NASA), and 
maritime commerce. The major agencies included in this function 
are the Department of Transportation (including the Federal 
Aviation Administration, Federal Highway Administration, 
Federal Transit Administration, and Maritime Administration), 
the Department of Homeland Security (including the 
Transportation Security Administration, United States Coast 
Guard, and the Federal Air Marshal Service), and the National 
Railroad Passenger Corporation.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate budget resolution calls for $71.5 billion in 
budget authority and $88.4 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2016. Discretionary budget authority in fiscal year 2016 totals 
$29.1 billion, with $87.2 billion in related outlays. Direct 
spending is $42.4 billion in budget authority and $1.2 billion 
in outlays. Over 10 years, budget authority totals $750.4 
billion, and outlays are $806.4 billion.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The amendment prioritizes the solvency of the Highway 
Trust Fund, aligns spending with incoming revenue, and ensures 
any general fund transfers will be fully offset. It provides 
the authorizing committees flexibility through a deficit-
neutral reserve fund. It also maintains essential funding for 
surface transportation, aviation, and safety--offset by 
reductions in other transportation activities of lower priority 
to the Federal Government.
      For fiscal year 2016, the amendment provides $36.7 
billion in budget authority and $79.2 billion in associated 
outlays. Those amounts consist of $31.0 billion in fiscal 2016 
discretionary budget authority and $78.1 billion in outlays, 
and direct spending budget authority of $5.7 billion, with $1.1 
billion in outlays. Over 10 years, the function totals are 
$741.5 billion in budget authority and $781.5 billion in 
outlays.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement provides essential funding for 
surface transportation, aviation, and safety, offset by 
reductions in transportation activities of lower priority to 
the Federal Government. Through deficit-neutral reserve funds, 
the agreement gives the committees of jurisdiction flexibility 
in future legislation involving the Highway Trust Fund. The 
fund is put on more sound financial footing and its solvency 
reinstated. The agreement provides $72.1 billion in budget 
authority for fiscal year 2016 and $87.2 billion in outlays. 
These amounts include $30.1 billion in discretionary budget 
authority and $86.1 billion in discretionary outlays, with 
direct spending of $42.0 billion in budget authority and $1.1 
billion in outlays. Spending over the next 10 years totals 
$665.6 billion in budget authority and $748.7 billion in 
outlays.

            Community and Regional Development: Function 450

                            FUNCTION SUMMARY

      The Community and Regional Development function includes 
Federal programs to improve community economic conditions, 
promote rural development, and assist in Federal preparations 
for and in response to disasters. This function provides 
appropriated funding for the Community Development Block Grant 
Program, Department of Agriculture rural development programs, 
Bureau of Indian Affairs, Federal Emergency Management Agency, 
and other disaster mitigation and community development-related 
programs. It also provides direct funding for the National 
Flood Insurance Program.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate budget resolution calls for $17.4 billion in 
budget authority and $22.4 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2016. Discretionary budget authority in fiscal year 2016 totals 
$16.3 billion, with $21.0 billion in related outlays. Direct 
spending is $1.2 billion in budget authority and $1.4 billion 
in outlays. Over 10 years, budget authority totals $186.5 
billion, and outlays are $211.9 billion.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      While supporting programs in this function related to 
emergency preparedness and critical needs, the House amendment 
urges streamlining non-essential community and regional 
initiatives that are not core functions of the Federal 
Government. The House amendment provides $7.1 billion in budget 
authority and $19.9 billion in outlays for the function in 
fiscal year 2016. Discretionary spending for the year is $7.0 
billion in budget authority and $19.6 billion in outlays. 
Budget authority for direct spending in fiscal 2016 is $124 
million, with $351 million in outlays. Over 10 years, the 
amendment provides $81.6 billion and $128.6 billion in budget 
authority and outlays, respectively.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement funds programs relating to 
emergency preparedness and critical needs. Most of this 
category's funding is discretionary; the main direct spending 
component of this function is the National Flood Insurance 
Program. The agreement supports a more efficient grant system, 
which includes strengthening oversight of the grant programs to 
reduce waste and improve effectiveness. The agreement calls for 
$15.5 billion in budget authority and $20.7 billion in outlays 
in fiscal year 2016. Discretionary budget authority in fiscal 
year 2016 is $15.0 billion, with outlays of $19.6 billion; 
direct spending is $446 million in budget authority and $1.1 
billion in outlays. Over 10 years, budget authority totals 
$139.4 billion, and outlays are $181.0 billion.

                  Education, Training, Employment, and
                     Social Services: Function 500

                            FUNCTION SUMMARY

      The Education, Training, Employment, and Social Services 
function includes funding for the Department of Education, some 
social services programs within the Department of Health and 
Human Services, and employment and training programs within the 
Department of Labor.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate budget resolution calls for $86.3 billion in 
budget authority and $95.7 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2016. Discretionary budget authority in fiscal year 2016 totals 
$91.4 billion, with $95.0 billion in related outlays. Direct 
spending is -$5.1 billion in budget authority and $746 million 
in outlays. Over 10 years, budget authority totals $930.0 
billion, and outlays are $942.3 billion.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      Rather than foster a system that drives up tuition and 
presents too many students with the difficult choice between 
crippling debt and stopping short of their highest educational 
attainment, the House amendment envisions a framework that uses 
Federal dollars more efficiently, accounts for student loans in 
a way that reflects their true cost, and invests in a 
sustainable higher education system. The amendment also views 
Federal support for K-12 education as just that: It should 
support, not seize control from, State and local entities. Real 
gains in education result from the diversity and creativity of 
State and local educators, and the trend toward centralizing 
rules and standards in Washington risks smothering 
effectiveness and innovation.
      Toward these ends, the amendment provides $80.6 billion 
in budget authority and $90.4 billion in outlays for fiscal 
year 2016. Of those amounts, $88.2 billion is discretionary 
budget authority, with $91.4 billion in associated outlays. 
Direct spending in fiscal 2016 totals -$7.6 billion in budget 
authority and -$967 million in outlays. (The negative figures 
result mainly from the methodology used to score direct student 
loans under the Federal Credit Reform Act.) Over 10 years, the 
House amendment provides $883.2 billion in total budget 
authority and $900.5 billion in outlays.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement supports reforms to the current 
educational system in order to give the Nation's students the 
opportunity for a better, more affordable education. In 
addition, it encourages the enactment of policies that better 
equip Americans of all ages to excel not only in school but 
also in the workforce. Function 500 totals amount to $83.3 
billion in budget authority and $93.3 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2016. Discretionary budget authority in fiscal year 
2016 totals $89.8 billion, with $93.8 billion in related 
outlays. Direct spending budget authority is -$6.5 billion in 
fiscal year 2016, with -$504 million in outlays. Over 10 years, 
budget authority totals $932.6 billion, and outlays are $942.5 
billion.

                          Health: Function 550

                            FUNCTION SUMMARY

      The Health function contains spending on a variety of 
health care services administered by the Department of Health 
and Human Services. This function also includes health research 
conducted by the National Institutes of Health; public health 
and safety programs conducted by the Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention; primary health care services conducted 
by the Health Resources and Services Administration; and the 
regulation of pharmaceuticals, medical devices, and food 
products conducted by the Food and Drug Administration. The 
most significant drivers of spending in the function are the 
coverage provisions of the President's health care law and 
Medicaid.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate budget resolution calls for $414.4 billion in 
budget authority and $424.7 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2016. Discretionary budget authority in fiscal year 2016 totals 
$57.8 billion, with $58.4 billion in related outlays. Direct 
spending is $356.6 billion in budget authority and $366.3 
billion in outlays. Over 10 years, budget authority totals 
$4,376.5 billion, and outlays are $4,384.5 billion.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The amendment calls for repealing the Affordable Care Act 
in full--its spending, taxes, regulations, and mandates--as a 
first step toward introducing real, patient-centered health 
care reform in America. The amendment contains a policy 
statement describing the contours of this strategy, emphasizing 
affordability, accessibility, quality, choices, innovation, 
responsiveness, and legal reforms. The amendment also supports 
major reforms to strengthen and secure Medicaid benefits, such 
as converting the Federal share of Medicaid into State 
Flexibility Funds that each State may tailor to its own needs. 
For fiscal year 2016, the amendment provides $416.5 billion in 
budget authority in Function 550, with $426.9 billion in 
associated outlays. For discretionary spending, the amendment 
provides $57.7 billion in budget authority and $58.4 billion in 
outlays in fiscal year 2016. The direct spending amounts for 
that year are $358.7 billion in budget authority and $368.5 
billion in outlays. Over 10 years, the totals are $3,944.8 
billion in budget authority and $3,952.8 billion in outlays.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement calls for the repeal of the 
President's health care law. The agreement accommodates 
legislation from the committees of jurisdiction in the House 
and Senate to continue to develop health care solutions that 
lower costs and improve access to care. It envisions Medicaid 
reform, based on a framework proposed by the chairmen of the 
committees of jurisdiction in the House and the Senate, to 
modernize and improve the program while increasing State 
flexibility and protecting the most vulnerable populations.
      The conference agreement calls for $433.1 billion in 
budget authority and $430.9 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2016. Discretionary budget authority in fiscal year 2016 totals 
$57.7 billion, with $58.4 billion in related outlays. Direct 
spending in fiscal year 2016 is $375.3 billion in budget 
authority and $372.5 billion in outlays. Over 10 years, budget 
authority totals $4,337.2 billion, and outlays are $4,334.4 
billion.

                         Medicare: Function 570

                            FUNCTION SUMMARY

      The Medicare function includes only the Medicare program, 
which provides health insurance to senior citizens and certain 
persons with disabilities. Nearly 99 percent of spending in 
this function occurs on the direct side of the budget, and 
almost all of the direct spending consists of payments for 
Medicare benefits. The balance of spending is discretionary 
annual appropriations for the cost of administering and 
monitoring the Medicare program.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate budget resolution calls for $567.2 billion in 
budget authority and $567.1 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2016. Discretionary budget authority in fiscal year 2016 totals 
$6.6 billion, with $6.6 billion in related outlays. Direct 
spending is $560.6 billion in budget authority and $560.6 
billion in outlays. Over 10 years, budget authority totals 
$6,930.9 billion, and outlays are $6,929.9 billion.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The amendment recognizes the imperative of saving, 
strengthening, and securing the future of Medicare. The current 
spending trajectory of Medicare will result in an inability to 
provide the promised benefits to America's seniors in the not-
so-distant future. The amendment pursues a responsible course 
to ensure the viability of the Medicare Program through a 
number of structural reforms, including transitioning to a 
premium support model bringing patient choices and helpful 
competition into the program, allowing for improvement in 
quality care, increasing accessibility and affordability, and a 
real check on wasteful practices. For fiscal year 2016, the 
function totals in the amendment are $577.7 billion in budget 
authority and $577.6 billion in outlays. The direct spending 
portion for fiscal 2016 totals $6.6 billion in budget authority 
and outlays. Far more significant is the function's direct 
spending of $571.1 billion in budget authority and outlays. 
Over 10 years, Function 570 spending is projected at $7,181.2 
billion in budget authority and $7,180.2 billion in outlays.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement supports the repeal of the 
President's health care law, including the repeal of the 
Medicare Independent Payment Advisory Board. The agreement 
proposes the same amount of Medicare savings reflected in the 
Senate-passed fiscal year 2016 budget as a target to extend the 
life of the Hospital Insurance trust fund and tasks the 
committees of jurisdiction in the House and Senate with 
determining the specific Medicare reforms needed to bring 
spending levels under current law in line with the budget. 
Finally, the conference agreement accounts for the full cost of 
H.R. 2, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 
2015.
      The conference agreement calls for $579.4 billion in 
budget authority and $579.4 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2016. Discretionary budget authority in fiscal year 2016 totals 
$6.5 billion, with $6.5 billion in related outlays. Direct 
spending is $572.9 billion in budget authority and $572.9 
billion in outlays. Over 10 years, budget authority totals 
$7,076.5 billion, and outlays are $7,075.6 billion.

                     Income Security: Function 600

                            FUNCTION SUMMARY

      The Income Security function covers a range of income 
security programs that provide cash or near-cash assistance to 
low-income persons, and benefits to certain retirees, persons 
with disabilities, and the unemployed.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate budget resolution calls for $529.5 billion in 
budget authority and $528.8 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2016. Discretionary budget authority in fiscal year 2016 totals 
$65.1 billion, with $65.4 billion in related outlays. Direct 
spending is $464.4 billion in budget authority and $463.4 
billion in outlays. Over 10 years, budget authority totals 
$4,899.5 billion, and outlays are $4,858.0 billion.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment proposes to continue the successful 
welfare reforms of the 1990s by improving work requirements for 
means-tested programs to help more people escape poverty and 
move up the economic ladder. It focuses resources on programs 
that deliver real results, restraining spending to reasonable 
levels, reducing improper payments, and allowing States more 
ability to improve programs through policy innovation. For 
fiscal year 2016, the amendment provides $512.4 billion in 
budget authority, with $513.7 billion in associated outlays. 
The amendment provides $61.4 billion in fiscal 2016 
discretionary budget authority, with $63.6 billion in outlays, 
along with $451.0 billion in budget authority and $450.1 
billion in outlays for direct spending. Over 10 years, the 
totals are $5,102.2 billion in budget authority and $5,048.2 
billion in outlays.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement assumes the enactment of 
proposals to reduce poverty and increase opportunity and upward 
mobility for struggling Americans on the road to personal and 
financial independence. Based on the successful welfare reforms 
of the 1990s, these proposals would improve work requirements 
and provide flexible funding for States to help those most in 
need find gainful employment, escape poverty, and move up the 
economic ladder. The agreement focuses resources on programs 
that deliver real results, reducing wasteful spending and 
empowering States to make key decisions and improve welfare 
programs through policy innovation. In fiscal year 2016, the 
agreement provides $523.1 billion in total budget authority and 
$523.6 billion in total outlays. Discretionary budget authority 
is $63.2 billion, and outlays are $64.2 billion. Direct 
spending is $459.9 billion in budget authority and $459.4 
billion in outlays. Over 10 years, the totals are $4,985.2 
billion in budget authority and $4,936.6 billion in outlays.

        Social Security Retirement and Disability: Function 650

                            FUNCTION SUMMARY

      The Social Security function consists of the payroll-tax-
financed programs collectively known as Social Security: Old-
Age and Survivors Insurance and Disability Insurance. These 
programs provide retirement and disability benefits to 
approximately 56 million eligible retired workers, disabled 
persons, and their spouses, dependents, and survivors. This 
function includes both Social Security benefit payments and 
funds to administer the program and ensure program integrity.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate budget resolution calls for $930.0 billion in 
budget authority and $925.9 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2016. Discretionary budget authority in fiscal year 2016 totals 
$5.0 billion, with $5.1 billion in related outlays. Direct 
spending is $924.9 billion in budget authority and $920.7 
billion in outlays. Over 10 years, budget authority totals 
$12,285.9 billion, and outlays are $12,225.4 billion.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      Absent structural reform, Social Security will fail to 
fulfill its promises to the Nation's retired and disabled 
persons--and that outcome will occur sooner than expected. With 
each year Congress delays, the policy changes needed to correct 
the program's fiscal trajectory will become larger and more 
wrenching to adopt, eventually leading to sudden, steep 
reductions in benefits. The House amendment calls for a 
bipartisan way forward, encouraging the President and Congress 
to begin the process of reforming Social Security. The budget 
provides $930.0 billion in unified Function 650 budget 
authority in fiscal year 2016, and $925.9 billion in outlays. 
The discretionary figures for fiscal 2016 are $5.0 billion in 
budget authority and $5.1 billion in outlays. Direct spending 
that year is $924.9 billion in budget authority and $920.7 
billion in outlays. Over 10 years, the totals are $12,281.5 
billion in budget authority and $12,220.9 billion in outlays.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement presumes the President and 
Congress will work together on a bipartisan basis to preserve 
Social Security for current and future generations. It assumes 
enactment of legislation that will prevent the near-term 
insolvency of the Disability Insurance program; improve the 
administration and coordination of benefits; and increase 
employment opportunities for disabled workers. The agreement 
also assumes the President will submit legislation to Congress 
addressing the long-term insolvency both of the Old-Age and 
Survivors Insurance program and the Disability Insurance 
program. In fiscal year 2016, the agreement provides $928.9 
billion in total budget authority and $925.0 billion in total 
outlays. Discretionary budget authority is $5.0 billion, and 
outlays are $5.1 billion. Direct spending is $923.9 billion in 
budget authority and $919.8 billion in outlays. Over 10 years, 
the totals are $12,278.2 billion in budget authority and 
$12,216.7 billion in outlays. These figures reflect the 
combined on- and off-budget amounts associated with this 
function.

              Veterans Benefits and Services: Function 700

                            FUNCTION SUMMARY

      The Veterans Benefits and Services function includes 
Veterans' Health Administration and health services (majority 
of the discretionary spending), veterans' pensions and 
disability compensation (majority of the direct spending), and 
other veterans services.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate budget resolution calls for $166.7 billion in 
budget authority and $170.2 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2016. Discretionary budget authority in fiscal year 2016 totals 
$68.6 billion, with $68.3 billion in related outlays. Direct 
spending is $98.1 billion in budget authority and $101.8 
billion in outlays. Over 10 years, budget authority totals 
$1,817.4 billion, and outlays are $1,812.7 billion.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment fully funds veterans' discretionary 
benefits and services by providing CBO's estimated funding 
level of veterans discretionary programs needs for fiscal year 
2016, which is a 5 percent increase above last year's level. 
The House Budget Committee will continue to closely monitor the 
Department of Veterans Affairs' progress to ensure resources 
provided by Congress are sufficient and efficiently used to 
provide benefits and services to veterans. The resolution calls 
for $166.7 billion in budget authority and $170.1 billion in 
outlays in fiscal year 2016 for veterans' benefits and 
services. Fiscal year 2016 discretionary spending is $68.6 
billion in budget authority and $68.3 billion in outlays, while 
direct spending totals $98.1 billion in budget authority and 
$101.8 billion in outlays. The 10-year totals for budget 
authority and outlays are $1,815.4 billion and $1,810.8 
billion, respectively.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement fully funds veterans' 
discretionary benefits and services by providing CBO's 
estimated funding level of veterans discretionary program needs 
for fiscal year 2016, a 5-percent increase above last year's 
level. The House and Senate Budget Committees will continue to 
closely monitor the Department of Veterans Affairs' progress to 
ensure resources provided by Congress are sufficient and 
efficiently used to provide benefits and services to veterans. 
The agreement calls for $166.3 billion in budget authority and 
$171.9 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2016 for Veterans 
benefits and services. Discretionary budget authority in fiscal 
year 2016 is $68.6 billion, with outlays of $68.3 billion; 
direct spending is $97.7 billion in budget authority and $103.5 
billion in outlays. Over 10 years, budget authority totals 
$1,812.8 billion, and outlays are $1,815.7 billion.

                Administration of Justice: Function 750

                            FUNCTION SUMMARY

      The Administration of Justice function includes programs 
to provide judicial services, police protection, law 
enforcement (including civil rights), rehabilitation and 
incarceration of criminals, and the general maintenance of 
domestic order.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate budget resolution calls for $52.5 billion in 
budget authority and $56.8 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2016. Discretionary budget authority in fiscal year 2016 totals 
$51.3 billion, with $52.0 billion in related outlays. Direct 
spending is $1.2 billion in budget authority and $4.8 billion 
in outlays. Over 10 years, budget authority totals $618.2 
billion, and outlays are $621.3 billion.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      With the risk of terrorism, as well as a tidal wave of 
debt, the House amendment focuses Federal taxpayer money for 
the Departments of Justice and Homeland Security on 
administering justice, arresting and prosecuting terrorists, 
investigating crimes, and seeking punishment for those guilty 
of unlawful behavior. For fiscal year 2016, the House amendment 
provides $52.2 billion in total budget authority and $56.0 
billion in outlays, focused on core Federal Government 
responsibilities and reducing duplication, excess, and 
unnecessary spending. The discretionary totals--the majority of 
the function's spending--are $51.0 billion in budget authority 
and $51.3 billion in outlays; direct spending is $1.1 billion 
in budget authority and $4.7 billion in outlays. Over 10 years 
the amendment provides $602.1 billion and $606.3 billion in 
budget authority and outlays, respectively.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The vast majority of this category's funding is 
discretionary and used for Federal law-enforcement programs, 
litigation and judicial activities, correctional operations, 
and border security. A small amount of direct spending funds 
certain immigration activities, the Crime Victims Fund, the 
Assets Forfeiture Fund, and the Treasury Forfeiture Fund, among 
other purposes. Federal taxpayer money for the Departments of 
Justice and Homeland Security should be focused on core 
responsibilities, with priority given to those activities that 
are most essential to the Federal Government in this area. The 
conference agreement calls for $51.0 billion in budget 
authority and $56.5 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2016. 
Discretionary budget authority in fiscal year 2016 is $51.2 
billion, with outlays of $52.0 billion; direct spending is 
-$196 million in budget authority and $4.5 billion in outlays. 
Over 10 years, budget authority totals $609.2 billion, and 
outlays are $614.3 billion.

                    General Government: Function 800

                            FUNCTION SUMMARY

      The General Government function includes the activities 
of the White House and the Executive Office of the President, 
legislative branch, and programs to carry out the 
administrative responsibilities of the Federal Government, 
including personnel management, fiscal operations, and property 
control.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate budget resolution calls for $23.8 billion in 
budget authority and $23.7 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2016. Discretionary budget authority in fiscal year 2016 totals 
$17.2 billion, with $17.1 billion in related outlays. Direct 
spending is $6.6 billion in budget authority and $6.6 billion 
in outlays. Over 10 years, budget authority totals $266.3 
billion, and outlays are $263.2 billion.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment advances the idea that a government 
seeking greater efficiency in its programs should demand no 
less from its own operations. This should be achieved by 
eliminating waste across Federal Government branches and 
agencies wherever possible, in order to scale back government 
where it has expanded needlessly or beyond its proper role. The 
amendment provides $23.6 billion in budget authority and 
outlays for fiscal year 2016. The totals consist of $16.7 
billion in discretionary budget authority and outlays, and $6.9 
billion in direct spending budget authority and outlays. For 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025, the function totals are $244.2 
billion in budget authority and $244.7 billion in outlays.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement supports policies that reduce 
waste and streamline government operations across all Federal 
Government branches and agencies. Function 800 totals amount to 
$23.2 billion in budget authority and $23.0 billion in outlays 
in fiscal year 2016. Discretionary budget authority and outlays 
total $17.0 billion in fiscal year 2016. Direct spending budget 
authority is $6.2 billion in fiscal year 2016, with $6.0 
billion in outlays. Over 10 years, budget authority in totals 
$251.3 billion, and outlays are $248.5 billion.

                       Net Interest: Function 900

                            FUNCTION SUMMARY

      The Net Interest function contains the interest paid to 
private and foreign government holders of U.S. Treasury 
securities. This function includes interest on the public debt 
less the interest received by the Federal Government from trust 
fund investments and loans to the public. It contains direct 
payments, with no discretionary components.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate budget resolution calls for $274.4 billion in 
budget authority and $274.4 billion in outlays, all of which 
are direct spending, in fiscal year 2016. Over 10 years, budget 
authority totals $4,788.1 billion, and outlays are $4,788.1 
billion. These figures reflect the combined on- and off-budget 
amounts associated with this function.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment calls for $274.3 billion of direct 
spending for net interest payments in fiscal year 2016. The 
proposed 10-year total for net interest payments is $4,748.9 
billion.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement calls for $275.3 billion of 
direct spending for net interest payments in fiscal year 2016. 
The proposed 10-year total for net interest payments is 
$4,757.1 billion. There are no budget policies for this 
function.

                        Allowances: Function 920

                            FUNCTION SUMMARY

      The Allowances function displays the budgetary effects of 
proposals that cannot easily be distributed across other budget 
functions. It contains CBO's estimate of the budgetary effects 
of the Budget Control Act's automatic enforcement provisions 
for non-defense spending. Function 920 also contains 
government-wide savings. For example, this function includes 
CBO's estimate of the macroeconomic feedback effect resulting 
from the deficit-reduction path assumed in the budget 
resolution conference agreement.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate budget resolution calls for -$12.3 billion in 
budget authority and -$5.6 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2016. Discretionary budget authority in fiscal year 2016 totals 
-$15.2 billion, with -$11.5 billion in related outlays. Direct 
spending is $2.8 billion in budget authority and $5.9 billion 
in outlays. Over 10 years, budget authority totals -$677.9 
billion, and outlays are -$630.7 billion.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment recommends no changes in this 
function, leaving it instead at the CBO baseline levels. The 
CBO baseline includes total savings of $33.5 billion in budget 
authority and $17.3 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2016, and 
$405.7 billion and $357.9 billion in reductions for budget 
authority and outlays over 10 years, respectively, to reflect 
the impact of the Budget Control Act [BCA] on non-defense and 
non-Medicare spending. The following two components are 
included in the baseline:
      1. A reduction of $383.4 billion in budget authority and 
$342.4 billion in outlays for non-defense activities, needed to 
comply with the discretionary spending caps set by section 101 
of the BCA;
      2. A $22.3 billion and $15.5 billion reduction in budget 
authority and outlays, respectively, to non-Medicare and non-
defense direct spending programs necessary to comply with the 
automatic-enforcement procedure (the direct spending sequester) 
mandated by the BCA.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement calls for $25.3 billion in 
budget authority and $45.5 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2016. Discretionary budget authority in fiscal year 2016 totals 
-$5.4 billion, with $14.9 billion in related outlays. Direct 
spending budget authority and outlays each total $30.7 billion. 
Over 10 years, total budget authority is -$908.2 billion, and 
outlays are -$798.6 billion.

                 Government-Wide Savings: Function 930

                            FUNCTION SUMMARY

      This House category includes various policies that 
produce government-wide savings in multiple categories rather 
than in a single, specific budget function.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate resolution does not contain a Function 930.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The resolution calls for spending of $27.5 billion and 
$18.4 billion in budget authority and outlays, respectively, in 
fiscal year 2016. The 10-year totals for budget authority and 
outlay savings are -$496.9 billion and -$418.2 billion, 
respectively. (The figures appear in Function 930 in the 
summary tables.) As is true elsewhere, specific policies will 
be determined by the appropriate committees of jurisdiction.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement does not contain a Function 930.

            Undistributed Offsetting Receipts: Function 950

                            FUNCTION SUMMARY

      The Undistributed Offsetting Receipts function comprises 
major offsetting receipts items that would distort the funding 
levels of other functional categories if they were distributed 
to them.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      All funding in this function is direct spending. The 
Senate budget resolution calls for -$86.0 billion in budget 
authority and outlays in fiscal year 2016 (The minus sign 
indicates receipts flowing into the Treasury.). Over 10 years, 
budget authority totals -$1,102.6 billion, with -$1,102.8 
billion in outlays. These figures reflect the combined on- and 
off-budget amounts associated with this function.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment examines the management of Federal 
fleet vehicles, real-property, and lands among other assets in 
an effort to help taxpayers recoup billions of dollars devoted 
to unused government property. The House amendment calls for 
-$90.1 billion in budget authority and outlays in fiscal year 
2016, all of which is direct spending. Over 10 years, budget 
authority and outlays total -$1,154.6 billion.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement calls for -$99.2 billion in 
budget authority and outlays for fiscal year 2016. The negative 
figures reflect receipts flowing into the Treasury. Over 10 
years, budget authority and outlays each total -$1,292.4 
billion. These figures reflect the combined on- and off-budget 
amounts associated with this function.

 Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism: Function 970

                            FUNCTION SUMMARY

      This function includes funding for the prosecution of 
Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism and 
other closely related activities.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate resolution does not have a Function 970.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The amendment assumes $90.0 billion as a placeholder 
estimate of the budgetary resources necessary to fulfill the 
Department of Defense's war policy, with final decisions still 
pending assessment. Combined with the base resources for 
National Defense, the fiscal year 2016 budget provides more 
than $613 billion in total defense spending for the Global War 
on Terrorism. The House amendment provides for higher total 
defense resources than the President's request in fiscal year 
2016, the President's 5-year plan, and the President's 10-year 
levels.
      This function also estimates $6 billion in funding for 
the activities of civilian agencies--primarily the State 
Department and USAID--as part of the integrated civil-military 
strategy for securing American objectives in the frontline 
states.
      The House amendment provides $96.0 billion in budget 
authority and $45.4 billion in outlays for fiscal year 2016. 
The 10-year totals for budget authority and outlays are $229.3 
billion and $196.6 billion, respectively.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The agreement supports overseas contingency operations 
funding at a level appropriate to meet the challenges posed by 
an increasingly dangerous security environment, and reflects a 
realistic ramp-down path for this funding over the budget 
window. Funding in this function will provide support for 
military and diplomatic operations to counter the danger from 
growing global instability and threats posed by those who 
challenge U.S. security interests at home and abroad. The 
agreement sets the overall allocation for overseas contingency 
operations funding. The committees of jurisdiction will 
determine the specific policies.
      The conference agreement calls for $96.3 billion in 
budget authority and $48.8 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2016. There is no direct spending in this function. Over 10 
years, budget authority totals $378.2 billion, and outlays are 
$373.8 billion.

               Across-the-Board Adjustment: Function 990

                            FUNCTION SUMMARY

      This House function reflects the impact of an across-the-
board rescission affecting the Department of Homeland Security 
that was included in the Consolidated and Further Continuing 
Appropriations Act, 2015 (Public Law 113-235).

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate resolution does not contain a Function 990.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The CBO baseline for Function 990 includes reductions of 
$241 million in budget authority and $226 million in outlays 
over 10 years. The resolution recommends retaining the baseline 
levels.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement does not contain a separate 
Function 990.

                                Revenues

                            FUNCTION SUMMARY

      Federal revenues are comprised of taxes and other 
collections from the public that result from the Government's 
sovereign powers to impose levies under Article I, section 8, 
clause I of the U.S. Constitution. Federal revenues include 
individual and corporate incomes taxes, social insurance taxes, 
excise taxes, estate and gift taxes, customs duties, and 
miscellaneous receipts.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate budget resolution calls for $3,459.5 billion 
in revenues in fiscal year 2016 ($2,666.8 billion on-budget, 
$792.8 billion off-budget) and $41,669.7 billion over 10 years 
($32,170.6 billion on-budget, $9,499.1 billion off-budget).

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The U.S. tax code is notoriously complex, patently 
unfair, and highly inefficient. Its complexity distorts 
decisions to work, save, and invest, which leads to slower 
economic growth, lower wages, and less job creation. The House 
amendment proposes to correct the notorious complexity, 
unfairness, and inefficiency of U.S. taxes by calling for a 
reformed tax code that is simpler and fairer and promotes 
growth. A revamped tax code could raise just as much revenue as 
the system in place today, but without the harmful tax policies 
embedded in current law, such as the Affordable Care Act. A 
restructured and more efficient tax code with a broader tax 
base and lower tax rates also would spark greater economic 
growth and create more jobs.
      The amendment's revenue projections--$3.459.5 billion in 
fiscal year 2016 and $41.669.7 billion through fiscal year 
2025--are built on such a tax reform model.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The U.S. tax code is overly complicated, inefficient, and 
archaic. The current structure hurts economic growth, 
frustrates working Americans, and pushes American businesses 
overseas. The conference agreement assumes that the tax-writing 
committees will adopt a tax reform proposal that reduces 
marginal rates but broadens the tax base to create a fair, 
efficient, competitive, and pro-growth tax regime that is 
revenue neutral. Any revenue-neutral tax reform would include a 
repeal of the harmful tax increases in the President's health 
care law.
      The conference agreement calls for revenues of $3,470.7 
billion in fiscal year 2016 ($2,676.7 billion on-budget, $794.0 
billion off-budget) and $41,750.5 billion over 10 years 
($32,237.4 billion on-budget, $9,513.1 billion off-budget). The 
difference between the conference agreement revenues and those 
of the Senate resolution and House amendment is due to CBO's 
March reestimate at projected revenues. The conference 
agreement contains no tax increases.
                 RECONCILIATION AND REPORT SUBMISSIONS

      The budget resolution conference agreement provides a 
path for the committees of jurisdiction in the House and Senate 
through reconciliation to repeal the Affordable Care Act with 
its burdensome mandates and restrictions, a first step toward 
introducing real, patient-centered health care reform.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      Section 201 of the Senate resolution instructs the 
Finance Committee and the Committee on Health, Education, 
Labor, and Pensions each to report, by July 31, 2015, changes 
in laws within their jurisdictions to reduce the deficit by no 
less than $1 billion over the 10-year period of fiscal years 
2016 through 2025.
      Section 202 of the resolution prohibits a reconciliation 
bill reported under section 201 from including a provision that 
would increase the statutory debt limit. The prohibition is 
enforced with a point of order that, if raised, would require 
an affirmative vote of two-thirds of the Senate to waive.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      Section 201 of the House amendment instructs 13 
authorizing committees to achieve specified amounts of deficit 
reduction by a deadline of July 15, 2015.
      While the amendment instruction provides flexibility as 
to how the authorizing committees may achieve these savings, it 
assumes savings will be achieved through reductions in direct 
spending. The amounts reconciled are intended to serve as a 
floor on required savings, not a ceiling. The targets are for 
the total of the 10-year period of fiscal years 2016 through 
2025. These targets will provide the committees maximum 
flexibility in their savings while ensuring the budget is 
balanced within the 10-year window.
      Each reconciled authorizing committee is directed to mark 
up legislation meeting its reconciliation target and submit 
legislation to the Committee of the Budget, consistent with 
section 310 of the Budget Act, instead of reporting it directly 
to the House. Other than submitting legislation to the 
Committee on the Budget, committees are expected to follow 
regular order in complying with House and Committee rules 
related to markup procedures and reporting requirements. The 
Committee on the Budget will then combine all submissions and 
report the legislation, without substantive revision, to the 
House.
      Section 202 of the House amendment authorizes the Chair 
of the Committee on the Budget to: (1) use the baseline 
underlying the Congressional Budget Office's [CBO's] Budget and 
Economic Outlook: 2015 to 2025 (January 2015) when making 
estimates of any bill or joint resolution, or any amendment 
thereto or conference report thereon and (2) determine whether 
to use any adjustments to the baseline, if made subsequent to 
the adoption of this concurrent resolution, when making such 
estimates. When making such estimates and determining 
compliance of measures, the Chair of the Committee on the 
Budget should only exercise this authority if such estimates 
are inaccurate because the adjustments made to the baseline are 
inconsistent with the assumptions underlying the budgetary 
levels set forth in this concurrent resolution. Inaccurate 
adjustments may include selected adjustments for rulemaking, 
judicial actions, adjudication, and interpretative rules that 
have major budgetary effects and are inconsistent with the 
assumptions underlying the budgetary levels set forth in this 
concurrent resolution. CBO shall, upon the request of the Chair 
of the Committee on the Budget, prepare an estimate based on 
the baseline determination made by such Chair.
      Section 202 also stipulates that the authorizing 
committees instructed to submit reconciliation legislation 
pursuant to this concurrent resolution shall, in preparing 
submissions, note and determine the most effective methods by 
which the President's health care law shall be repealed.
      Additionally, section 202 authorizes the Chair of the 
Committee on the Budget to file with the House appropriately 
revised allocations under section 302(a) of the Budget Act and 
revised functional levels and aggregates upon: (1) an 
authorizing committee's submission to the Committee on the 
Budget of legislation complying with its reconciliation 
instructions pursuant to section 310(b) of the Budget Act and 
(2) the submission of a conference report to the House. Section 
202 further stipulates that these revised aggregates and 
allocations shall be considered to be the allocations and 
aggregates established by the concurrent resolution on the 
budget pursuant to section 310 of the Budget Act.
      Section 203 of the House amendment authorizes the Chair 
of the Committee on the Budget to submit additional information 
to help guide the authorizing committees, including suggested 
increases in the amount of deficit reduction reconciled to each 
authorizing committee.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement affirms the use of 
reconciliation for the sole purpose of repealing the 
President's job-killing health care law by instructing only 
those committees with jurisdiction over the health-care-related 
provisions in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 
2010 (Public Law 111-148) and the Health Care and Education 
Reconciliation Act of 2010 (Public Law 111-152). Specifically, 
the Senate Committees on Finance and Health, Education, Labor, 
and Pensions, and the House Committees on Ways and Means, 
Education and the Workforce, and Energy and Commerce all 
received instructions to report changes in laws within their 
jurisdictions to reduce the deficit by no less than $1 billion 
over the 10-year period of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.
      The instructions for Senate committees are as follows:

                         [Fiscal years 2016-25]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 Committee                    10-Year deficit reduction
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Finance...................................                $1,000,000,000
Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions....                $1,000,000,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

      The Senate retains the Senate-only rule against a 
reconciliation measure that increases the public debt limit. 
The provision applies to reconciliation bills pursuant to this 
concurrent resolution, and any amendment, amendments between 
the Houses, and conference report thereon. The rule may only be 
waived by two-thirds of the Senate.
      The instructions for the House are as follows:

                         [Fiscal years 2016-25]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 Committee                    10-Year deficit reduction
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Education and the Workforce...............                $1,000,000,000
Energy and Commerce.......................                $1,000,000,000
Ways and Means............................                $1,000,000,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Reconciled committees in the Senate and the House of 
Representatives are instructed to submit their recommendations 
to their respective Budget Committees no later than July 24, 
2015.
      The House retains the House-passed provision clarifying 
that in the House, for purposes of budget enforcement, the 
Chairman shall use the baseline underlying the March 2015 
update to CBO's Budget and Economic Outlook: 2015 to 2025. It 
further grants the Chairman of the Budget Committee the 
authority to determine whether to reflect CBO's ad hoc 
adjustments to the baseline subsequent to the adoption of this 
concurrent resolution.
      While committees determine the policies used to meet 
their reconciliation targets, the conference report retains the 
House position that the committees take note of the policy 
statement in the conference report relating to the repeal of 
the President's health care law.
      The conference report provides authority to the Chairman 
of the Committee on the Budget of the House of Representatives 
to make adjustments in this concurrent resolution for 
committees that submit reconciliation recommendations and meet 
their respective reconciliation targets.
                           BUDGET ENFORCEMENT


             Subtitle A--Budget Enforcement in Both Houses


Point of Order against Legislation Increasing Long-Term Deficits or 
        Direct Spending

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      Section 402 of the Senate resolution extends the current 
Senate point of order prohibiting the consideration of 
legislation that would increase the on-budget deficit by more 
than $5 billion in any of the 4 consecutive 10-year periods 
beginning after the last year covered in the most recently 
agreed to budget resolution. The prohibition is enforced with a 
point of order that, if raised, could be waived with the 
affirmative vote of three-fifths of Members, duly chosen and 
sworn. Paragraph (d) provides an exception for any legislation 
considered under the reserve fund in section 303(1)--repeal of 
the President's health care law.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      Section 407 of the House amendment prohibits the 
consideration of any measure reported by an authorizing 
committee that increases direct spending by $5 billion over the 
long-term. The prohibition is enforced with a point of order. 
Subsection (b) states the applicable periods for this section 
are any of the 4 consecutive 10 fiscal year periods beginning 
in fiscal year 2026.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      Section 3101 of the conference agreement extends the 
Senate-passed provision to the House and includes an exception 
in paragraph (d) for reserve funds in sections 4303(1), 4501, 
4502, and 4503 of the conference agreement relating to repeal 
of the President's health care law. In the House the point of 
order lies against the bill increasing direct spending over the 
period.

Allocation for Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      Section 409 of the Senate resolution establishes a 
mechanism allowing the Senate to review the designation for 
overseas contingency operations [OCO] in fiscal years 2016 and 
2017. Designations that would cause the total amount of OCO 
spending in those years to exceed $58 billion and $59.5 
billion, respectively, would be subject to a point of order, 
which--if raised--would require 60 votes to waive. If 
sustained, the offending provision of budget authority would be 
stricken from the text, but the rest of the measure would 
remain standing.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      Subsection 408(a) of the House amendment provides the 
Committee on Appropriations with two separate OCO/GWOT 
allocations for the purposes of Overseas Contingency 
Operations/Global War on Terrorism under section 302(a) of the 
Budget Act, which are included in this report in the allocation 
tables.
      Subsection (b) stipulates that, for purposes of enforcing 
the point of order under section 302(f) of the Budget Act, the 
``first fiscal year'' and the ``total of fiscal years'' refer 
to fiscal year 2016 only. This separate allocation is the 
exclusive allocation for OCO/GWOT under section 302(a) of the 
Budget Act. It also stipulates that section 302(c) of the 
Budget Act does not apply to this separate allocation. 
Subsection (c) stipulates that new budget authority or outlays 
counting toward the allocation established by subsection (a) 
shall be designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the 
Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
      Subsection (d) prohibits any adjustment under section 
314(a) of the Budget Act if an adjustment would be made under 
section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of BBEDCA for fiscal year 2016.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      Section 3102 of the conference agreement adopts an 
approach to Overseas Contingency Operations [OCO] funding 
similar to the House amendment. A separate 302(a) allocation is 
provided to each of the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations for the OCO/Global War on Terrorism. Any 
appropriation designated for OCO under Section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) 
of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
1985 would be scored against the 302(a) allocation to the 
Committees on Appropriations. The OCO allocation may be 
subdivided into 302(b) sub-allocations and is enforceable under 
section 302(f) on the Congressional Budget Act.

Point of Order against Certain Changes in Mandatory Programs

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      Section 406 of the Senate resolution phases out the use 
of certain ``CHIMPs'' (changes in mandatory programs) in 
appropriation bills that reduce budget authority but do not 
result in any net outlay savings. For fiscal year 2016, the 
limit on this type of CHIMP is $19 billion, the amount 
contained in fiscal year 2015 appropriations measures. 
Thereafter, the limit is reduced by 20 percent per year until 
fiscal year 2021, when CHIMPs that fail to reduce net outlays 
are no longer to be permitted in appropriation measures. The 
limit is enforced with a point of order that, if raised, would 
require the affirmative vote of three-fifths of Members, duly 
chosen and sworn.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment does not contain any provisions 
relating to CHIMPs.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      Section 3103 of the conference agreement gradually 
reduces the amount of certain changes in mandatory programs 
[CHIMPs] permitted in appropriations bills from a total of 
$19.1 billion in fiscal year 2016 to $15 billion in fiscal year 
2019. This reduction would apply only to those CHIMPs that (a) 
would have been classified as affecting direct spending or 
receipts under section 252 of BBEDCA (as in effect prior to 
September 30, 2002) if the provision was included in 
legislation other than an appropriations bill or joint 
resolution, and (b) reduce budget authority but do not result 
in any net outlay savings over the 10-year budget enforcement 
window. The reduction in this type of CHIMP is enforced in the 
Senate with a point of order prohibiting consideration of a 
bill or joint resolution making appropriations for a full 
fiscal year, (or an amendment thereto or conference report 
thereon that would cause the total amount of this type of CHIMP 
enacted in a fiscal year to exceed a specific amount:
      Fiscal year 2016  $19,100,000,000
      Fiscal year 2017  $19,100,000,000
      Fiscal year 2018  $17,000,000,000
      Fiscal year 2019  $15,000,000,000
      The Senate point of order, if raised, would require the 
affirmative vote of three-fifths of the Members, duly chosen 
and sworn, to waive. In the House the point of order lies 
against the individual provision except for an amendment or 
conference report in which case it lies against the entire 
amendment or conference report. For purposes of this section, 
the total budget authority of CHIMPs shall be determined on the 
basis of estimates provided by the Chairman of the Committee on 
the Budget of the applicable House of Congress.

Point of Order against Provisions that Constitute Changes in Mandatory 
        Programs Affecting the Crime Victims Fund

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      Section 410 of the Senate resolution prohibits Senate 
consideration of any measure that includes CHIMPs that affect 
the Crime Victims Fund [CVF]. The prohibition would be enforced 
with a point of order that, if raised, would require the 
affirmative vote of three-fifth of Members, duly chose and 
sworn, to waive. If sustained, the offending provision(s) would 
be stricken, but the rest of the measure would remain standing.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment does not contain any provisions 
relating to CHIMPs affecting the Crime Victims Fund.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      Section 3104 of the conference agreement limits the use 
of CHIMPs that affect the CVF to $10.8 billion in fiscal year 
2016. This rule only applies to appropriations measures that 
provide full-year funding for a fiscal year. The reduction in 
the CVF CHIMP is enforced with a ``surgical strike'' point of 
order. If a point of order is raised and sustained against a 
provision containing a CHIMP affecting the CVF that would cause 
the total value of all such CHIMPS enacted in relation to a 
fiscal year to exceed the limit, the provision would be 
stricken from the measure, but the rest of the bill would 
remain standing. In the House, in the case of an amendment or 
conference report, the point of order would lie against the 
entire measure.
      For purposes of this section, the absolute of the total 
budget authority of CHIMPs shall be determined on the basis of 
estimates provided by the Chairman of the Committee on the 
Budget of the applicable House of Congress.
      Section 3104 of the conference agreement also directs the 
Committees on the Budget and Committees on Appropriations of 
the House and Senate to work with other committees of 
jurisdiction to review the enforcement procedures for CHIMPs in 
appropriations bills--especially those affecting the CVF--and 
to make a joint recommendation that can be included in 
subsequent concurrent resolutions on the budget.
Fair-Value Credit Estimates

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      For legislation affecting Federal direct loan and loan-
guarantee programs, section 412 of the Senate resolution 
directs CBO to provide in its cost estimates an assessment 
using fair-value--alongside those estimates prepared under the 
Federal Credit Reform Act. In the Senate, cost estimates 
prepared using fair-value would be provided for informational 
purposes only.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      Subsection 406(a) of the House amendment requires, upon 
the request of the Chairman or Ranking Member of the Committee 
on the Budget, that CBO estimates for any measure under the 
terms of Title V of the Budget Act to include an estimate of 
the current actual or estimated market values representing the 
``fair value'' of assets and liabilities affected by such 
measure.
      Subsection (b) requires that, whenever CBO prepares an 
estimate of the cost of legislation with a cost related to 
housing, residential mortgage, or student loan programs, under 
the Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990, the estimate include an 
estimate of the ``fair value'' of the assets and liabilities 
affected.
      Subsection (c) permits the Chair of the Committee on the 
Budget to use these supplemental estimates to determine whether 
legislation is within the levels of the budget resolution and 
complies with other budgetary controls.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      Section 3105 of the conference agreement adopts an 
approach to fair-value estimates similar to the House 
amendment. At the request of the Chairman of the Budget 
Committee of the applicable House, CBO shall prepare, when 
practicable, a fair-value estimate of measures providing or 
modifying loan and loan guarantee programs scored under the 
Federal Credit Reform Act. Under this section, CBO is required 
to provide these fair-value estimates for housing, residential 
mortgage, and student loan programs. This scoring rule applies 
to bills, joint resolutions, motions, amendments, amendments 
between the Houses, and conference reports. Section 3105(c) 
authorizes the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the 
House of Representatives to use these supplemental estimates 
for the purposes of determining budget-related points of order. 
In the Senate, any fair-value estimates produced under this 
section may be used for informational purposes only.
Scoring Rule for Currency Modernization

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      Section 414 of the Senate resolution requires CBO to 
estimate the cost of transitioning from the dollar bill to the 
dollar coin using net present value and to incorporate the 
behavioral effects of that transition in its estimate.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment does not contain any provisions 
relating to currency modernization.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      In section 3106 of the conference agreement, the House 
joins the Senate in adopting the Senate-passed scoring rule 
relating to currency modernization.
Long-Term Scoring of Changes in Spending Limits and Extension of 
        Highway Programs

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      Section 416 of the Senate resolution directs CBO to 
provide long-term cost estimates for: (1) legislation that 
would increase the statutory discretionary spending limits, and 
(2) legislation that would transfer amounts from the General 
Fund of the Treasury to the Highway Trust Fund. Under this 
rule, CBO would provide estimates of the increased spending--
and the offsets--for the scoring window (fiscal years 2016 
through 2025) as well as the 20 years beyond (fiscal years 2026 
through 2045).

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment does not contain any provisions 
relating to long-term scoring of changes in spending limits and 
extension of highway programs.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      In section 3107 of the conference agreement, the House 
joins the Senate in adopting the Senate-passed rule.
Requiring Clearer Reporting of Projected Federal Spending and Deficits

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      Section 417 of the Senate resolution requires CBO to 
provide 30-year projections of three key budget aggregates--
revenues, outlays, and deficits--in current dollars and as a 
percent of GDP when CBO publishes its annual Budget and 
Economic Outlook.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment does not contain any provisions 
relating to clearer reporting of projected Federal spending and 
deficits.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      In section 3108 of the conference agreement, the House 
joins the Senate in adopting the reporting requirement.
Congressional Budget Office Estimates of Measures with Significant 
        Outlay Effects

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      Section 419 of the Senate resolution requires CBO to 
provide outyear estimates of legislation that would (1) 
increase or decrease outlays by more than 0.25 percent of GDP 
over the 10-year period of the enforcement window, or (2) that 
would have the same significant impact on outlays, but in the 
10th year alone. In the event that the budgetary effects of a 
measure are not sufficient to automatically trigger the outyear 
cost estimates, the Chairman of the Budget Committee has the 
authority to request an estimate.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment does not contain any provisions 
relating to CBO estimates of measures with significant outlay 
effects.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      In section 3109 of the conference agreement, the House 
joins the Senate-passed rule regarding supplemental estimates.
Prohibiting the Use of Guarantee Fees as an Offset

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      Section 421 of the Senate resolution prohibits 
consideration of legislation that increases or extends an 
increase of any guarantee fees of the Federal National Mortgage 
Association [FNMA] and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage 
Corporation [FHLMC]. Guarantee fees are collected to offset 
prospective FNMA and FHLMC credit losses, and using these fees 
as an offset merely double-counts the funds collected.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment does not contain any provisions 
relating to CBO estimates of measures with significant outlay 
effects.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      In section 3110 of the conference agreement, the House 
joins the Senate rule prohibiting the use of guarantee fees as 
an offset.
Information for Congress and the Public about Projected Federal 
        Outlays, Revenues, and Deficits

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      Section 423 of the Senate resolution directs CBO to 
produce a one-page executive summary of its annual Budget and 
Economic Outlook that includes current-year and future-year 
projections of key budget aggregates (total outlays, tax 
expenditures, receipts, surpluses/deficits) and categories of 
spending (total mandatory spending and total discretionary 
spending; Social Security outlays, revenues, and surpluses/
deficits; and Medicare outlays, revenues, and surpluses/
deficits.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment does not contain any provisions 
relating to information for Congress and the public about 
projected Federal outlays, revenue and deficits.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      In section 3111 of the conference agreement, the House 
joins the Senate rule directing CBO to provide additional 
information in its annual Budget and Economic Outlook report to 
Congress.
Honest Accounting: Cost Estimates for Major Legislation to Incorporate 
        Macroeconomic Effects

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      Section 413 of the Senate resolution directs the Joint 
Committee on Taxation and CBO to produce, alongside CBO's 
conventional estimates, cost estimates that incorporate the 
macroeconomic effects of major policy changes. These estimates 
would be provided for informational purposes only.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      Sections 401(a) and (b) of the House amendment directs 
CBO and the Joint Committee on Taxation, as applicable, to 
incorporate in the cost estimates for major legislation, to the 
extent practicable, the macroeconomic effects of such 
legislation during fiscal year 2016.
      Subsection (c) stipulates that the macroeconomic 
estimates include, to the extent practicable, a qualitative 
assessment of the budgetary effects (including the variables 
referred to above) of major legislation in the 20-fiscal-year 
period beginning after the last fiscal year of the most 
recently agreed-to budget resolution and an identification of 
the assumptions and source data underlying the estimate.
      Subsection (d) defines major legislation to include 
legislation that causes a gross budgetary effect in any fiscal 
year covered by the budget resolution equal to or greater than 
0.25 percent of the current projected GDP of the United States 
for that fiscal year. Under this subsection, the Chairman of 
the Committee on the Budget of the House or Senate and the 
Chair of the Joint Committee on Taxation, as applicable, may 
designate bills providing direct spending as major legislation 
for which estimates would incorporate macroeconomic effects.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      Section 3112 of the conference agreement directs the 
Joint Committee on Taxation and CBO to produce, alongside CBO's 
conventional estimates, cost estimates that incorporate the 
macroeconomic effects of major policy changes. Subsection (c) 
defines major legislation as a bill, resolution, conference 
report, or treaty causing an increase or decrease in revenues, 
direct spending, or deficits in any fiscal year covered by the 
budget resolution equal to or greater than 0.25 percent of the 
projected GDP for that year or equal to or greater than $15 
billion for that year for treaties. In applying these 
thresholds, CBO and JCT are required to look at the gross 
budgetary effects of the legislation before incorporating 
macroeconomic effects and not including timing shifts.
      In carrying out this requirement, the managers intend 
that CBO and JCT review provisions that have a significant 
budgetary effect. Thus, the test is whether the absolute value 
of the effect of any provision in the legislation has a 
budgetary effect larger than the threshold, or if the sum of 
the absolute values of the effects of the provisions on 
revenues and on direct spending exceeds the threshold, rather 
than whether the legislation taken as a whole equals or exceeds 
such threshold values when all of the conventionally estimated 
costs of the provisions are netted out.
      In the Senate, these estimates would be provided for 
informational purposes only. In the House, the Chair of the 
Committee on the Budget shall exercise the authority granted 
under subsection (c)(1)(B)(ii), in collaboration with the 
appropriate Chair or Vice Chair of the Joint Committee on 
Taxation, to designate a revenue measure as major legislation.

              Subtitle B--Budget Enforcement in the Senate

Extension of Enforcement of Budgetary Points of Order in the Senate

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      Section 401(a) of the Senate resolution extends several 
supermajority points of order created in the Congressional 
Budget Act. These provisions will expire at the end of fiscal 
year 2016. Subsection (b) repeals the sunset of the Senate Pay-
As-You-Go point of order established in section 201 S. Con. 
Res. 21 (110th Congress), the fiscal year 2008 concurrent 
resolution on the budget. Subsection (c) repeals the sunset of 
the short-term deficits point of order established in section 
404 of S. Con. Res. 13 (111th Congress), the fiscal year 2010 
concurrent resolution on the budget.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House-passed resolution does not contain a comparable 
provision on Senate enforcement of supermajority points of 
order.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      Section 3201 of the conference agreement adopts the 
Senate language as a Senate-only provision.
Point of Order against Advance Appropriations

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      As in past years, section 403 of the Senate resolution 
provides a supermajority point of order in the Senate against 
appropriations in fiscal year 2016 bills that would become 
effective in any year after fiscal year 2016, and against 
appropriation bills in fiscal year 2017 that would first become 
available in any year after fiscal year 2017. It does not apply 
to appropriations for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting 
or Department of Veterans Affairs for the Medical Services, 
Medical Support and Compliance, and Medical Facilities accounts 
of the Veterans Health Administration. It provides an exemption 
up to $28.852 billion (the same level as provided for fiscal 
years 2014 and 2015 in the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013, P.L. 
113-67) for accounts identified in the joint explanatory 
statement of managers.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      Section 405 of the House amendment provides a limit on 
appropriations that would become effective in fiscal year 2017. 
Subsection (a) prohibits the consideration of any general or 
continuing appropriations measure from making advance 
appropriations unless the appropriation is included in a list 
of exceptions.
      Subsection (b) specifies the list of excluded accounts, 
which may receive advance appropriations, are referred to in 
this report or joint explanatory statement, as applicable, in 
the section designated as ``Accounts Identified for Advance 
Appropriations.''
      Subsection (c) sets an overall limit for allowable 
advance appropriations for fiscal year 2017. It permits advance 
appropriations of up to $63.271 billion for fiscal year 2017 
for the veterans accounts referenced in subsection (b) and 
referred to in this report. It also allows up to $28.852 
billion in advance appropriations for other accounts referenced 
in subsection (b) and referred to in this report.
      Subsection (d) defines an advance appropriation as any 
new discretionary budget authority provided in a bill, joint 
resolution, amendment, or conference report making general or 
continuing appropriations for a fiscal year following fiscal 
year 2016.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      Under the conference agreement, the Senate (in section 
3202) and the House (in section 3304) retain their respective 
limits on advance appropriations.

                             IN THE SENATE

      ACCOUNTS IDENTIFIED FOR ADVANCE APPROPRIATIONS IN THE SENATE

               Financial Services and General Government

Payment to Postal Service

            Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education

Employment and Training Administration
Job Corps
Education for the Disadvantaged
School Improvement
Special Education
Career, Technical, and Adult Education

             Transportation, Housing, and Urban Development

Tenant-based Rental Assistance
  Project-based Rental Assistance

                    IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

  ACCOUNTS IDENTIFIED FOR ADVANCE APPROPRIATIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2017 
             SUBJECT TO A GENERAL LIMIT OF $28,852,000,000

                           Financial Services

Postal Service

            Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education

Employment and Training Administration
Education for the Disadvantaged
School Improvement
Career, Technical, and Adult Education
Special Education

             Transportation, Housing and Urban Development

Tenant-based Rental Assistance
Project-based Rental Assistance

VETERANS ACCOUNTS IDENTIFIED FOR ADVANCE APPROPRIATIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR 
          2017 SUBJECT TO A SEPARATE LIMIT OF $63,271,000,000

                Military Construction, Veterans Affairs

Veterans Medical Services
Veterans Medical Support and Compliance
Veterans Medical Facilities
Supermajority Enforcement of Unfunded Mandates

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      Section 425(a) of the Congressional Budget Act prohibits 
the consideration of legislation in the Senate that would 
impose unfunded Federal mandates on State and local governments 
above a certain limit, enforced with a point of order. Section 
404 of the Senate resolution increases the vote threshold 
needed to waive that point of order from a simple majority to 
three-fifths of Members, duly chosen and sworn.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment does not contain a comparable 
provision relating to unfunded mandates.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      Section 3203 of the conference agreement adopts the 
Senate language relating to unfunded mandates as a Senate-only 
provision.
Point of Order against Certain Reconciliation Legislation

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      Section 405 of the Senate resolution restores the equal 
treatment of all reconciliation bills consistent with budget 
law prior to 2008 by repealing the point of order prohibiting 
consideration of reconciliation bills that increase the deficit 
found in section 202(a) of S. Con. Res. 21, the fiscal year 
2008 budget resolution.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      Section 410(a)(3) of the House amendment would--for 
purposes of a reconciliation bill reported pursuant to this 
concurrent resolution on the budget--temporarily suspend the 
application of the point of order prohibiting consideration of 
reconciliation bills that increase the deficit, found in 
section 202(a) of S. Con. Res. 21, the fiscal year 2008 budget 
resolution.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      Section 3204 of the conference agreement adopts the 
Senate language relating to the point of order against certain 
reconciliation bills.
Prohibition on Agreeing to Legislation without a Score

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      Section 407 of the Senate resolution prohibits a vote on 
passage of a bill or resolution unless the CBO cost estimate 
required for that measure (pursuant to section 402 of the 
Congressional Budget Act) is available on CBO's website at 
least 28 hours before a vote on final passage. The prohibition 
is enforced with point of order that, if raised, would require 
the affirmative vote of three-fifths of Members, duly chosen 
and sworn, to waive.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment does not contain a comparable 
provision relating to agreeing to legislation without a score.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      Section 3205 of the conference agreement adopts the 
Senate language relating to agreeing to legislation without a 
score as a Senate-only provision.
Protecting the Savings in Reported Reconciliation Bills

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      In the House, amendments to a reconciliation bill must be 
deficit-neutral with respect to the reported savings in the 
bill, not the instructed savings in the affiliated budget 
resolution. The House rule ensures that if a reconciliation 
bill exceeds its fiscal target, those ``extra'' savings will be 
used for deficit reduction, not to increase spending. Section 
408 of the Senate resolution applies the House rule in the 
Senate.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House does not have a comparable provision relating 
to the reported savings in a reconciliation bill (the rule 
already applies in the House).

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      Section 3206 of the conference agreement adopts the 
Senate language relating to the reported savings in a 
reconciliation bill as a Senate-only provision.
Scoring Rule for Certain Energy Contracts

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      Section 415 of the Senate resolution directs CBO to score 
energy savings performance contracts using net present value--a 
method that more accurately represents the economic value of 
these transactions.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment does not have a comparable provision 
relating to scoring energy savings performance contracts.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      Section 3207 of the conference agreement adopts the 
Senate language on energy savings performance contracts as a 
Senate-only provision.
      In section 3305 of the conference agreement, the House 
agrees to assess the implementation of section 3207 through a 
collaborative assessment, in conjunction with the Senate and 
CBO, of the appropriate scorekeeping methodology for evaluating 
the budgetary effects of this type of energy contract.
Adjustment for Wildfire Suppression Funding

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      If a bill becomes law that provides a new discretionary 
spending cap adjustment for wildfire suppression, section 424 
of the Senate resolution gives the Senate Budget Committee 
Chairman the authority to adjust the 302(a) allocation to the 
Appropriations Committee accordingly.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment does not have a comparable provision 
relating to wildfire suppression funding.

                         CONFERENCE AGREEEMENT

      Section 3208 of the conference agreement adopts the 
Senate language as a Senate-only provision.

                 Subtitle C--Budget Enforcement in the
                        House of Representatives

Limitation on Measures Affecting Social Security Solvency

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate resolution does not have a comparable 
provision relating to Social Security (a Senate point of order 
already exists in section 311(a)(3) of the Congressional Budget 
Act).

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      Subsection 402(a) prohibits, during fiscal year 2016, 
consideration in the House of Representatives or the Senate of 
any legislation that reduces the actuarial balance of the 
Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance [OASI] Trust Fund by at 
least .01 percent of the present value of future taxable 
payroll for the 75-year period included in the most recent 
annual report of the board of trustees.
      Subsection (b) provides an exception if such legislation 
would improve the actuarial balance of the combined balance in 
the OASI Trust Fund and the Federal Disability Insurance Trust 
Fund for the 75-year period utilized in the most recent annual 
report of the board of trustees.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The House point of order is not germane to a budget 
resolution in the Senate. Section 3301 of the conference 
agreement adopts the language of the House amendment as a 
House-only provision.
Limitation on Transfers from the General Fund to the Highway Trust Fund

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The reserve fund in section 309 of the Senate resolution 
allows the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget in the 
Senate to revise the allocations of one or more committees, the 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments 
between Houses, or motions relating to Federal investment in 
the infrastructure of the United States, provided that such 
legislation shall not include transfers from other trust funds 
but may include transfers from the general fund that are 
offset, provided further that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit either over the period of the total of the 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020, or the period of the total of 
the fiscal years 2016 through 2025.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      Section 404 of the House amendment stipulates that, for 
purposes of budget enforcement, transfers of funds from the 
general fund of the Treasury to the Highway Trust Fund shall be 
counted as new budget authority and outlays equal to the amount 
of the transfer in the fiscal year in which the transfer 
occurs.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      Under the conference agreement, the Senate (in section 
4309) and the House (in section 3302) retain their respective 
language on general fund transfers to the Highway Trust Fund.
Adjustments for the Improved Control of Budgetary Resources

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate resolution does not have a comparable 
provision relating to the improved control of budgetary 
resources.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      Subsection 409(a) of the House amendment authorizes the 
chairman of the Budget Committee to reduce a committee's 
allocation (other than the Committee on Appropriations) and 
increase the Committee on Appropriations allocation of 
discretionary spending for fiscal year 2016 if a committee 
(other than Appropriations) reports legislation that decreases 
direct spending in any fiscal year and authorizes 
appropriations for the same purpose. Subsection (b) provides 
the Chair of the Committee on the Budget with the authority to 
determine and adjust, as applicable, the budgetary levels of 
this concurrent resolution on the budget.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      Section 3303 of the conference agreement adopts the House 
amendment language as a House-only provision.
Point of Order against Advance Appropriations

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      As in past years, section 403 of the Senate resolution 
provides a supermajority point of order in the Senate against 
appropriations in fiscal year 2016 bills that would become 
effective in any year after fiscal year 2016, and against 
appropriation bills in fiscal year 2017 that would first become 
available in any year after fiscal year 2017. It does not apply 
to appropriations for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting 
or Department of Veterans Affairs for the Medical Services, 
Medical Support and Compliance, and Medical Facilities accounts 
of the Veterans Health Administration. It provides an exemption 
up to $28.852 billion (the same level as provided for fiscal 
years 2014 and 2015 in the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013, P.L. 
113-67) for accounts identified in the joint explanatory 
statement of managers.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      Section 405 of the House amendment provides a limit on 
appropriations that would become effective in fiscal year 2017. 
Subsection (a) prohibits the consideration of any general or 
continuing appropriations measure from making advance 
appropriations unless the appropriation is included in a list 
of exceptions.
      Subsection (b) specifies the list of excluded accounts, 
which may receive advance appropriations, are referred to in 
this report or joint explanatory statement, as applicable, in 
the section designated as ``Accounts Identified for Advance 
Appropriations.''
      Subsection (c) sets an overall limit for allowable 
advance appropriations for fiscal year 2017. It permits advance 
appropriations of up to $63.271 billion for fiscal year 2017 
for the veterans accounts referenced in subsection (b) and 
referred to in this report. It also allows up to $28.852 
billion in advance appropriations for other accounts referenced 
in subsection (b) and referred to in this report.
      Subsection (d) defines an advance appropriation as any 
new discretionary budget authority provided in a bill, joint 
resolution, amendment, or conference report making general or 
continuing appropriations for a fiscal year following fiscal 
year 2016.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      Under the conference agreement, the Senate (in section 
3202) and the House (in section 3304) retain their respective 
limits on advance appropriations.

                             IN THE SENATE

      ACCOUNTS IDENTIFIED FOR ADVANCE APPROPRIATIONS IN THE SENATE

               Financial Services and General Government

Payment to Postal Service

            Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education

Employment and Training Administration
Job Corps
Education for the Disadvantaged
School Improvement
Special Education
Career, Technical, and Adult Education

             Transportation, Housing and Urban Development

Tenant-based Rental Assistance
Project-based Rental Assistance

                    IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

  ACCOUNTS IDENTIFIED FOR ADVANCE APPROPRIATIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2017 
             SUBJECT TO A GENERAL LIMIT OF $28,852,000,000

                           Financial Services

Postal Service

            Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education

Employment and Training Administration
Education for the Disadvantaged
School Improvement
Career, Technical, and Adult Education
Special Education

             Transportation, Housing and Urban Development

Tenant-based Rental Assistance
Project-based Rental Assistance

VETERANS ACCOUNTS IDENTIFIED FOR ADVANCE APPROPRIATIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR 
          2017 SUBJECT TO A SEPARATE LIMIT OF $63,271,000,000

                Military Construction, Veterans Affairs

Veterans Medical Services
Veterans Medical Support and Compliance
Veterans Medical Facilities

                      Subtitle D--Other Provisions

Submission of Findings for the Elimination of Waste, Fraud, and Abuse

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      Section 431 of the Senate resolution directs Senate 
committees to identify waste, fraud, abuse, and duplication in 
Federal programs and to review matters identified by the 
Government Accountability Office, or GAO (in GAO's annual 
duplication report or its High Risk list) for consideration by 
Congress. In addition, the resolution asks committees to 
provide recommendations for improved governmental performance 
in their annual views and estimates reports.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      Section 301 of the House amendment includes 
reconciliation-like instructions to named House committees to 
submit to the Committee on the Budget of the House of 
Representatives no later than October 1, 2015, changes in laws 
within their jurisdiction that would achieve a targeted amount 
of savings from the elimination of waste, fraud, and abuse. 
Savings targets for each committee would be published in the 
Congressional Record by the Chairman of the Committee on the 
Budget of the House.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      Section 3401 of the conference agreement adopts the 
language in the Senate resolution with some modifications. 
Subsection (a) of the conference agreement directs all 
committees of the Senate and House of Representatives to review 
programs within their jurisdiction and identify waste, fraud, 
abuse, or duplication, and increase the use of performance data 
to inform each committee's work.
      Section 3401(b) also directs all committees of the Senate 
and House of Representatives to review applicable matters for 
congressional consideration identified in the Office of 
Inspector General semiannual reports and the Office of 
Inspector General's list of unimplemented recommendations and 
on the Government Accountability Office's High Risk list and 
annual report to reduce program duplication.
      Section 3401(c) further directs all committees of the 
Senate and House of Representatives, after completing the 
oversight and performance reviews required under this section, 
to include recommendations for improved governmental 
performance in their annual views and estimates reports 
submitted by the committees to the Committees on the Budget of 
the Senate and House of Representatives, as applicable, under 
section 301(d) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 
U.S.C. 632(d)).
Budgetary Treatment of Administrative Expenses

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      Section 432 of the Senate resolution requires the joint 
explanatory statement accompanying the conference report on the 
budget resolution to include amounts for the discretionary 
administrative expenses of the Social Security Administration 
and the United States Postal Service--which are subject to the 
discretionary spending caps--in the allocation to the 
Appropriations Committee.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      Section 403(a) of the House amendment declares that the 
administrative expenses of the Social Security Administration 
and the United States Postal Service are reflected in the 
allocation to the Committee on Appropriations even though both 
are technically off-budget. This language is necessary to 
ensure the Committee on Appropriations retains control over 
administrative expenses through the annual appropriations 
process. This budgetary treatment of administrative expenses is 
based on the long-term practice of the House and Senate Budget 
Committees.
      Subsection (b) requires the administrative expenses to be 
included in the cost estimates for the relevant appropriations 
measure, which are used to determine if a measure exceeds the 
spending limits in the budget resolution and, as a result, 
subject to points of order.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      Section 3402 of the conference agreement adopts the 
language in the House resolution with a minor modification that 
strikes the reference to the point of order in section 311 of 
the Congressional Budget Act.
Application and Effect of Changes in Allocations and Aggregates

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      Section 433 of the Senate resolution directs that (1) 
adjustments of allocations and aggregates made under the 
authority of a reserve fund or other directive will apply while 
a measure is under consideration, take effect once the measure 
is enacted, and be published in the Congressional Record; (2) 
revisions to allocations and aggregates will be considered as 
if contained in this budget resolution, for enforcement 
purposes; and (3) Budget Committee estimates will serve as the 
basis for determining new levels of budget authority, outlays, 
direct spending, new entitlement authority, revenues, deficits, 
and surpluses.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      Section 410(a) of the House-passed resolution sets forth 
allocation and adjustment procedures required to accommodate 
legislation provided for in this concurrent resolution. It 
declares that these adjustments apply while the legislation is 
under consideration and become permanent upon enactment of the 
legislation. These adjustments must be printed in the 
Congressional Record.
      Paragraph 410(a)(3) includes a provision temporarily 
suspending the Senate point of order against certain 
reconciliation bills.
      Section 410(b) stipulates that in the House of 
Representatives, for purposes of this concurrent resolution and 
budget enforcement, any legislation for which the Chair of the 
Committee on the Budget of the House of Representatives makes 
an adjustment or revision in the allocations, aggregates, and 
other budgetary levels of this concurrent resolution shall not 
be subject to the points of order set forth in clause 10 of 
rule XXI of the Rules of the House of Representatives (CUT-GO).

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      Section 3403 retains the Senate language but adopts House 
subsection 410(b) pertaining to Rule XXI of the House of 
Representatives (CUT-GO).
Adjustments to Reflect Changes in Concepts and Definitions

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      Section 434 of the Senate resolution declares that in the 
event Congress enacts a bill or joint resolution that changes 
concepts or definitions, the Senate resolution provides the 
Budget Committee Chairman with the authority to change levels 
and allocations in this resolution, accordingly.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      Section 410(a) of the House amendment declares that in 
the event Congress enacts a bill or joint resolution that 
changes concepts or definitions, the Senate resolution provides 
the Budget Committee Chairman with the authority to change 
levels and allocations in this resolution, accordingly.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      Both the Senate and House resolutions include traditional 
language giving the Chairman of the Budget Committee the 
authority to make changes to the level and committee 
allocations in the event legislation becomes law that changes 
key budgetary concepts or definitions. In section 3404 of the 
conference agreement, the House joins the Senate language 
relating to changes in concepts and definitions.
Exercise of Rulemaking Powers

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      Section 435 of the Senate resolution declares that the 
provisions in Title III of the resolution are promulgated under 
the Senate's rulemaking power and shall be considered part of 
the rules of the Senate.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      Section 411 of the House amendment affirms that the 
adoption of the budget resolution is an exercise of the House's 
rulemaking power and that the House has the constitutional 
right to change these rules.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      In section 3405 of the conference agreement, the House 
joins the Senate language relating to rulemaking powers of this 
resolution.

   PAY-AS-YOU-GO SCORECARD FOR THE SENATE REFLECTING LEVELS FOR THE 
                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      Period of the current fiscal year, the budget year, and 
the 4 fiscal years following the budget year: $0.
      Period of the current fiscal year, the budget year, and 
the 9 fiscal years following the budget year: $0.
                             RESERVE FUNDS

      The Budget Committee does not have the authority to 
authorize policy changes--that is the role of the authorizing 
committees. Committees often make some of their policy 
priorities known in their views and estimates letters, and 
reserve funds are a way to accommodate those requests when the 
specific spending and revenue contours of those policies are 
unknown.
      Operatively, a reserve fund allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise committee allocations, budgetary 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in the budget 
resolution to accommodate legislation described in the reserve 
fund, provided the budgetary effects of that legislation 
satisfy the requirements enumerated.

                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      Section 301. Spending-neutral reserve fund to increase 
the pace of economic growth and private sector job creation in 
the United States.
      Section 302. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to strengthen 
America's priorities.
      Section 303. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to protect 
flexible and affordable health care choices for all.
      Section 304. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for improving 
access to the children's health insurance program.
      Section 305. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for other 
health reforms.
      Section 306. Spending-neutral reserve fund for child 
welfare.
      Section 307. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for veterans 
and servicemembers.
      Section 308. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for tax reform 
and administration.
      Section 309. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to invest in 
the infrastructure in America.
      Section 310. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for air 
transportation.
      Section 311. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to promote jobs 
in the United States through international trade.
      Section 312. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to increase 
employment opportunities for disabled workers.
      Section 313. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for higher 
education act reform.
      Section 314. Spending-neutral reserve fund for energy 
legislation.
      Section 315. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to reform 
environmental statutes.
      Section 316. Spending-neutral reserve fund for water 
resources legislation.
      Section 317. Spending-neutral reserve fund on mineral 
security and mineral rights.
      Section 318. Spending-neutral reserve fund to reform the 
abandoned mine lands program.
      Section 319. Spending-neutral reserve fund to improve 
forest health.
      Section 320. Spending-neutral reserve fund to reauthorize 
funding for payments in lieu of taxes to counties and other 
units of local government.
      Section 321. Spending-neutral reserve fund for financial 
regulatory system reform.
      Section 322. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to improve 
Federal program administration.
      Section 323. Spending-neutral reserve fund to implement 
agreements with freely associated states.
      Section 324. Spending-neutral reserve fund to protect 
payments to rural hospitals and create sustainable access for 
rural communities.
      Section 325. Spending-neutral reserve fund to encourage 
State Medicaid demonstration programs to promote independent 
living and integrated work for the disabled.
      Section 326. Spending-neutral reserve fund to allow 
pharmacists to be paid for the provision of services under 
Medicare.
      Section 327. Spending-neutral reserve fund to improve our 
Nation's community health centers.
      Section 328. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to 
the funding of independent agencies, which may include 
subjecting the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to the 
regular appropriations process.
      Section 329. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for export 
promotion.
      Section 330. Spending-neutral reserve fund to reform, 
improve, and enhance section 529 college savings plans.
      Section 331. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
securing overseas diplomatic facilities of the United States.
      Section 332. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to achieve 
savings by helping struggling Americans on the road to personal 
and financial independence.
      Section 333. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
conserving Federal land, enhancing access to Federal land for 
recreational opportunities, and making investments in counties 
and schools.
      Section 334. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to protect 
taxpayers from identity fraud.
      Section 335. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
career and technical education.
      Section 336. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
FEMA preparedness.
      Section 337. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
expanding, enhancing, or otherwise improving science, 
technology, engineering, and mathematics.
      Section 338. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to promote the 
next generation of NIH researchers in the United States.
      Section 339. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
promoting manufacturing in the United States.
      Section 340. Spending-neutral reserve fund to prohibit 
aliens without legal status in the United States from 
qualifying for a refundable tax credit.
      Section 341. Deficit-reduction reserve fund for report 
elimination or modification.
      Section 342. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to address 
heroin and prescription opioid abuse.
      Section 343. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to strengthen 
Department of Defense civilian workforce.
      Section 344. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for Department 
of Defense reform.
      Section 345. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to improve 
Federal workforce development, job training, and reemployment 
programs.
      Section 346. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to provide 
energy assistance and invest in energy efficiency and 
conservation.
      Section 347. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to enable 
greater collaboration between the Department of Veterans 
Affairs and law school clinics serving veterans.
      Section 348. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to increase 
funding for Department of Energy nuclear waste cleanup.
      Section 349. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
Department of Defense initiatives to bolster resilience of 
mission-critical department infrastructure to impacts from 
climate change and associated events.
      Section 350. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to end 
Operation Choke Point and protect the Second Amendment.
      Section 351. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to prevent the 
use of Federal funds for the bailout of improvident State and 
local governments.
      Section 352. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to protect 
Medicaid beneficiaries from benefit cuts.
      Section 353. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to improve 
health outcomes and lower the costs of caring for medically 
complex children in Medicaid.
      Section 354. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to protect and 
strengthen the Department of Veterans Affairs, hire more health 
care professionals for the department, and ensure quality and 
timely access to health care for all veterans.
      Section 355. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to maintain and 
enhance access, choice, and accountability in veterans care 
through the Veterans Choice Card program.
      Section 356. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
promoting equal pay.
      Section 357. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
legislation submitted to Congress by the President of the 
United States to protect and strengthen Social Security.
      Section 358. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to a 
simplified income-driven student loan repayment option.
      Section 359. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to the 
protection of clean water using scientific standards while 
maintaining the traditional role of agriculture.
      Section 360. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to 
keeping the Federal Water Pollution Control Act focused on the 
protection of water quality.
      Section 361. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
saving Medicare.
      Section 362. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
supporting Israel.
      Section 363. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for legislation 
to allow Americans to earn paid sick time.
      Section 364. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
providing health care to veterans who have geographic 
inaccessibility to care.
      Section 365. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
increasing access to higher education for low-income Americans 
through the Federal Pell Grant program.
      Section 366. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
consumer price transparency.
      Section 367. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
transparency in health premium billing.
      Section 368. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
carbon emissions.
      Section 369. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to 
requiring the Federal Government to allow States to opt out of 
Common Core without penalty.
      Section 370. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
small business tax relief.
      Section 371. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to 
the disposal of certain Federal land.
      Section 372. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to 
prohibiting funding of international organizations during the 
implementation of the United Nations Arms Trade Treaty prior to 
Senate ratification and adoption of implementing legislation.
      Section 373. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
reimposing waived sanctions and imposing new sanctions against 
Iran for violations of the Joint Plan of Action or a 
comprehensive nuclear agreement.
      Section 374. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
supporting United States citizens held hostage in the United 
States Embassy in Tehran, Iran, between November 3, 1979, and 
January 20, 1981.
      Section 375. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
reasonable accommodations for pregnant workers.
      Section 376. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to permanently 
eliminate the Federal estate tax.
      Section 377. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
addressing climate change.
      Section 378. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
regulation by the Environmental Protection Agency of greenhouse 
gas emissions.
      Section 379. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
protecting privately held water rights and permits.
      Section 380. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to 
prohibiting awarding of construction contracts based on 
awardees entering or not entering into agreements with labor 
organizations.
      Section 381. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
strengthening the United States Postal Service.
      Section 382. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to prevent 
American jobs from being moved overseas by reducing the 
corporate income tax rate.
      Section 383. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
ensuring equal treatment of married couples under the Social 
Security program and by the Department of Veterans Affairs.
      Section 384. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to increase 
wages for American workers.
      Section 385. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
deterring the migration of unaccompanied children from El 
Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras.
      Section 386. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
middle class tax relief.
      Section 387. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to 
ensuring proper economic consideration in designation of 
critical habitat.
      Section 388. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to strengthen 
the national do-not-call registry.
      Section 389. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to end ``too-
big-to-fail'' bailouts for Wall Street mega-banks (over $500 
billion in total assets).
      Section 390. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
ending Washington's illegal exemption from the Patient 
Protection and Affordable Care Act.
      Section 391. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to 
increasing funding for the relocation of the United States 
Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.
      Section 392. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to revise or 
repeal sequestration.
      Section 393. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
promoting the return of children who have been legally adopted 
by United States citizens from the Democratic Republic of 
Congo.
      Section 394. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
development of a new nuclear-capable cruise missile by the 
Department of Defense and the National Nuclear Security 
Administration.
      Section 395. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to provide 
equity in the tax treatment of public safety officer death 
benefits.
      Section 396. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
eliminating the backlog of sexual assault evidence kits.
      Section 397. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
mixed oxide fuel fabrication.
      Section 398. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
reforming Offices of Inspectors General and preventing extended 
vacancies.
      Section 399. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
improving retirement security.
      Section 399a. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to improve the 
competitiveness of the United States.
      Section 399b. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
ensuring that the conservation of northern long-eared bat 
populations and local economic development are compatible.
      Section 399c. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to improve 
cybersecurity.
      Section 399d. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to allow the 
Drug Enforcement Administration and Federal Bureau of 
Investigation to enter into joint task forces with tribal and 
local law enforcement agencies.
      Section 399e. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
encouraging cost savings in office space used by Federal 
agencies.
      Section 399f. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
providing technical assistance to small businesses and aspiring 
entrepreneurs through small business development centers.
      Section 399g. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
ensuring that medical facilities of the Department of Veterans 
Affairs meet the needs of women veterans.
      Section 399h. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
supporting efficient resourcing for the Asia rebalance policy.
      Section 399i. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
preventing access to marijuana edibles by children in States 
that have decriminalized marijuana.
      Section 399j. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
providing mortgage lending to rural areas.
      Section 399k. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
the construction of Arctic polar icebreakers.
      Section 399l. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
researching health conditions of the descendants of veterans 
exposed to toxic substances during service in the Armed Forces.
      Section 399m. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
raising the Family of Funds limit of the Small Business 
Investment Company Program.
      Section 399n. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
detection, investigation, and prosecution of the owners and 
operators of websites who knowingly allow such websites to be 
used to advertise commercial sex with children over the 
Internet.
      Section 399o. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to support 
State drought prevention plans.
      Section 399p. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
protecting the reliability of the electricity grid.
      Section 399q. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to preserve 
and protect the open Internet.
      Section 399r. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to 
reforming the Federal regulatory process.
      Section 399s. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
providing coverage of virtual colonoscopies as a colorectal 
cancer screening test under the Medicare program.
      Section 399t. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
strengthening waterborne commerce in our ports and harbors.
      Section 399u. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
the modernization of the nuclear command, control, and 
communications architecture of the United States.
      Section 399v. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
BARDA and the BioShield Special Reserve Fund.
      Section 399w. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
improving the nuclear forces and missions of the Air Force.
      Section 399x. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
promoting economic growth and job creation for small 
businesses.
      Section 399y. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
the definition of full-time employee.
      Section 399z. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the Federal 
regulatory process.
      Section 399aa. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to expedite 
awards under the Internal Revenue Service whistleblower 
program.
      Section 399bb. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
encouraging the increased use of performance contracting in 
Federal facilities.
      Section 399cc. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
improving information sharing by the Inspector General of the 
Department of Veterans Affairs with respect to investigations 
relating to substandard health care, delayed and denied health 
care, patient deaths, other findings that directly relate to 
patient care, and other management issues of the department.
      Section 399dd. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to address 
the disproportionate regulatory burdens of community banks and 
credit unions.
      Section 399ee. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to protect 
the Corporation for National and Community Service.
      Section 399ff. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
ensuring that Department of Justice attorneys comply with 
disclosure obligations in criminal prosecutions.
      Section 399gg. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to promote 
biomedical research.
      Section 399hh. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to address 
the heroin and methamphetamine abuse epidemic in the United 
States.
      Section 399ii. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
providing access to necessary equipment for Medicare 
beneficiaries.
      Section 399jj. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to 
prioritizing the construction of infrastructure projects that 
are of national and regional significance and projects in high 
priority corridors.
      Section 399kk. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
encouraging the United States' NATO allies to reverse declines 
in defense spending and bear a more proportionate burden for 
ensuring the security of NATO.
      Section 399ll. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
the investigation and recovery of missing weapons and military 
equipment provided to the Government of Yemen by the United 
States Government.
      Section 399mm. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
improving higher education data and transparency.
      Section 399mm. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
supporting programs funded by the Older Americans Act of 1965.
      Section 399oo. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
native children.
      Section 399pp. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
protecting the personal information of consumers from data 
breaches.
      Section 399qq. Deficit-reduction reserve fund for 
government reform and efficiency.
      Section 399rr. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
medical treatment and compensation for first responders, 
survivors, and their families injured and made ill by the 9/11 
attacks.
      Section 399ss. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
construction of Native American schools.
      Section 399tt. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
increasing the guarantee threshold for Surety Bond Guarantee 
Program.
      Section 399uu. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
Indo-Pacific partner capacity building and strategy.
      Section 399vv. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
addressing methamphetamine abuse in the United States.
      Section 399ww. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
the National Guard State Partnership Program.
      Section 399xx. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
improving the prevention and treatment of agricultural virus 
outbreaks.
      Section 399yy. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
the importance of financial literacy education to allow 
individuals to make informed and effective decisions with their 
financial resources.
      Section 399zz. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
comprehensive mental health reform.
      Section 399aaa. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
improving oral health care for children and pregnant women 
under Medicaid.
      Section 399bbb. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
the National Park Service Centennial.
      Section 399ccc. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
increasing college completion.
      Section 399ddd. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
encouraging freight planning and investment that incorporates 
all modes of transportation, including rail, waterways, ports, 
and highways.
      Section 399eee. Deficit-neutral reserve fund related to 
providing for full funding for at-sea and dockside monitoring 
for certain fisheries.
      Section 399fff. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
training and resources for first responders responding to 
hazardous materials incidents on railroads.
      Section 399ggg. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
enhancing and improving the United States Patent and Trademark 
Office in order to reduce the application backlog.
      Section 399hhh. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
providing additional funding for international strategic 
communications.
      Section 399iii. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for 
elementary and secondary education.
      Section 399jjj. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
investing in rural and tribal water infrastructure.
      Section 399kkk. Deficit-neutral reserve fund related to 
sexual assault at institutions of higher education.
      Section 399lll. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
simplifying and expanding tax incentives for higher education.
      Section 399mmm. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
authorizing children eligible for health care under laws 
administered by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to retain 
such eligibility until age 26.
      Section 399nnn. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
supporting workforce development through apprenticeship 
programs.
      Section 399ooo. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
the prioritization of broad-based criminal justice reform.
      Section 399ppp. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
strengthening the economy by accelerating the transfer of 
technologies from laboratories of the Department of Energy and 
the Department of Defense to the marketplace.
      Section 399qqq. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
supporting trade and travel at ports of entry.
      Section 399rrr. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
imposing sanctions with respect to foreign persons responsible 
for gross violations of internationally recognized human rights 
or significant acts of corruption.
      Section 399sss. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
reforming student loan programs.
      Section 399ttt. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
increasing funding for the TIGER discretionary grant program of 
the Department of Transportation.
      Section 399uuu. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
promoting the use of college savings accounts.
      Section 399vvv. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
establishing a new outcome-based process for authorizing 
innovative higher education providers.
      Section 399www. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
improving community relations with law enforcement officers.
      Section 399xxx. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to support 
research.
      Section 399yyy. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
support for Ukraine, which should include the provision of 
lethal defensive articles.
      Section 399zzz. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
providing funding to combat anti-Semitism in Europe.
      Section 399aaaa. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to provide 
students and families with transparent, easily understood 
postsecondary education financial aid information.
      Section 399bbbb. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
providing adequate funding for the Contract Tower Program of 
the Federal Aviation Administration.
      Section 399cccc. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
underground and surface mining safety and health research.
      Section 399dddd. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
investing in advanced fossil energy technology research and 
development.
      Section 399eeee. Deficit-neutral reserve funds relating 
to foreign persons.
      Section 399ffff. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
special treatment of the income tax credit for research 
expenditures for startup companies.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      Section 501. Reserve fund for the repeal of the 
President's health care law. Section 501 permits the Chair of 
the Committee on the Budget to revise allocations of spending 
authority and other budgetary levels for a measure that fully 
repeals the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Public 
Law 111-148) and the health care-related provisions of the 
Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 [HCERA 
2010] (Public Law 111-152). These are the health care bills 
enacted into law in 2010.
      Legislation repealing the health care laws must solely 
achieve that purpose and may not include extraneous language, 
whether such language has a budgetary effect or not. These 
adjustments would not be available for legislation that only 
partially repeals these laws. The reserve fund is intended to 
only apply to the health care provisions and would not apply to 
the repeal of the education-related provisions of HCERA 2010. 
The adjustments may be made for bills, amendments thereto, or 
conference reports. Multiple measures may take advantage of the 
reserve fund, as long as each is for the specified purpose.
      An amendment (or a motion to recommit), if it qualifies 
under the terms of this reserve fund, may be offered to an 
unrelated measure, but should such a measure, as amended, be 
returned to the House as a conference report or an amendment 
between the Houses, no adjustments would be made if that 
measure contained text unrelated to the purpose of this reserve 
fund. Adjustments may be made for amendments meeting the 
criteria, but the adjustment would not cover provisions in the 
underlying bill unrelated to repealing these laws.
      A measure receiving an adjustment under the terms of this 
reserve fund may be open for amendment, subject to the special 
rule providing for its consideration, but the amendment, if it 
does not meet the terms outlined in this section, must be 
compliant with the Budget Act and the Rules of the House 
without regard to the adjustments made to the underlying 
measure.
      Section 502. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for promoting 
real health care reform. Section 502 permits the Chair of the 
Committee on the Budget to revise allocations of spending 
authority, provided to committees of the House, and to adjust 
other budgetary levels for a measure that promotes real health 
care reform as long as the measure is deficit-neutral for the 
period of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.
      Section 503. Deficit-neutral reserve fund related to the 
Medicare provisions of the President's health care law. Section 
503 permits the Chair of the Committee on the Budget to revise 
allocations of spending authority provided to committees of the 
House, and to adjust other budgetary levels for a measure that 
repeals the Medicare spending cuts in the Patient Protection 
and Affordable Care Act (Public Law 111-148) or the Health Care 
and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (Public Law 111-152), 
as long as the measure is deficit-neutral for the period of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025.
      A measure that repeals only part of these Medicare 
spending reductions is also eligible for these adjustments. A 
series of bills, joint resolutions, amendments, or conference 
reports may receive adjustments under this section, only 
limited by the cumulative amount of the Medicare spending 
reductions included in the public laws referenced, as estimated 
by the Chair of the Committee on the Budget. Once the limit is 
reached through enacted measures, no more adjustments may be 
made under this reserve fund. The amount necessary to repeal 
the Medicare spending cuts is a limit on the adjustments that 
may be made under this reserve fund, but as the House considers 
measures that meet these terms, the amount is not reduced until 
the enactment of such measure fulfilling this purpose.
      Section 504. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for the State 
Children's Health Insurance Program. Section 504 permits the 
Chair of the Committee on the Budget to revise the allocations 
of spending authority provided to applicable committees and 
adjust other budgetary levels in this resolution for a measure 
that extends the State Children's Health Insurance Program as 
long as such measure does not increase the deficit over the 
period of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.
      Section 505. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for graduate 
medical education. Section 505 permits the Chair of the 
Committee on the Budget to revise the allocations of spending 
authority provided to applicable committees and adjust other 
budgetary levels in this resolution for a measure that reforms, 
expands, access to, and improves, as determined by such Chair, 
graduate medical education programs as long as such measure 
does not increase the deficit over the period of fiscal years 
2016 through 2025.
      Section 506. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for trade 
agreements. Section 506 permits the Chair of the Committee on 
the Budget to revise the allocations of spending authority 
provided to the Committee on Ways and Means and to adjust other 
budgetary levels in this resolution for legislation that 
implements a trade agreement, as long as such a measure does 
not increase the deficit in the period of fiscal years 2016 
through 2025.
      Section 507. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for reforming 
the tax code. Section 507 permits the Chair of the Committee on 
the Budget to revise the allocations of spending authority 
provided to the Committee on Ways and Means and to adjust other 
budgetary levels in this resolution for legislation that 
reforms the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 as long as such 
legislation is deficit-neutral for the period of fiscal years 
2016 through 2025.
      Section 508. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for revenue 
measures. Section 508 permits the Chair of the Committee on the 
Budget to revise the allocations of spending authority provided 
to the Committee on Ways and Means for legislation that causes 
a decrease in revenue. The Chair of the Committee on the Budget 
may adjust the allocations and aggregates in this resolution if 
the measure does not increase the deficit over the period of 
fiscal years 2016 through 2025. This allows the Committee on 
Ways and Means to report legislation that reduces revenue below 
the level provided for in this resolution but only if it 
decreases outlays by an equal or greater amount in the 
applicable period.
      Section 509. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to reduce 
poverty and increase opportunity and upward mobility. Section 
509 permits the Chair of the Committee on the Budget to revise 
the allocations of spending authority provided to applicable 
committees and adjust other budgetary levels in this resolution 
for a measure reforming policies and programs to reduce poverty 
and increase opportunity and upward mobility as long as such a 
measure neither adversely impacts job creation nor increases 
the deficit in the period of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.
      Section 510. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for 
transportation. Section 510 permits the Chair of the Committee 
on the Budget to revise the allocations of spending authority 
and to adjust other budgetary enforcement levels in this 
resolution for any bill or joint resolution to maintain the 
solvency of the Highway Trust Fund, as long as such a measure 
does not increase the deficit in the period of fiscal years 
2016 through 2025.
      Section 511. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for Federal 
retirement reform. Section 511 permits the Chair of the 
Committee on the Budget to revise the allocations of spending 
authority provided to applicable committees and adjust other 
budgetary levels in this resolution for a measure that reforms, 
improves and updates, as determined by such Chair, the Federal 
retirement system as long as such measure does not increase the 
deficit over the period of fiscal years 2016 through 2025.
      Section 512. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for national 
defense. Section 512 permits the Chair of the Committee on the 
Budget to revise the allocations of spending authority provided 
to applicable committees and adjust other budgetary levels in 
this resolution for any legislation that supports the 
activities specified below as long as such legislation is 
deficit-neutral (without counting any net revenue increases in 
that measure) for the periods of fiscal years 2016 through 2021 
or fiscal years 2016 through 2025. The activities that may be 
supported in legislation under this reserve fund include 
Department of Defense training and maintenance associated with 
combat readiness, modernization of equipment, auditability of 
financial statements, or military compensation recommendations.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement contains the following reserve 
funds applicable in the Senate and the House:
      Section 4101. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to reduce 
poverty and increase opportunity and upward mobility for 
struggling Americans.
      The agreement contains the following reserve funds 
applicable in the Senate:
      Section 4301. Spending-neutral reserve fund to increase 
the pace of economic growth and private sector job creation in 
the United States.
      Section 4302. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to strengthen 
America's priorities.
      Section 4303. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to protect 
flexible and affordable health care choices for all.
      Section 4304. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for improving 
access to the State Children's Health Insurance Program.
      Section 4305. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for other 
health reforms.
      Section 4306. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for child 
welfare.
      Section 4307. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for veterans 
and servicemembers.
      Section 4308. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for tax reform 
and administration.
      Section 4309. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to invest in 
the infrastructure in America.
      Section 4310. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for air 
transportation.
      Section 4311. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to promote 
jobs in the United States through international trade.
      Section 4312. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to increase 
employment opportunities for disabled workers.
      Section 4313. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for higher 
education act reform.
      Section 4314. Spending-neutral reserve fund for energy 
legislation.
      Section 4315. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to reform 
environmental statutes.
      Section 4316. Spending-neutral reserve fund for water 
resources legislation.
      Section 4317. Spending-neutral reserve fund on mineral 
security and mineral rights.
      Section 4318. Spending-neutral reserve fund to reform the 
abandoned mine lands program.
      Section 4319. Spending-neutral reserve fund to improve 
forest health.
      Section 4320. Spending-neutral reserve fund to 
reauthorize funding for payments in lieu of taxes to counties 
and other units of local government.
      Section 4321. Spending-neutral reserve fund for financial 
regulatory system reform.
      Section 4322. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to improve 
Federal program administration.
      Section 4323. Spending-neutral reserve fund to implement 
agreements with freely associated states.
      Section 4324. Spending-neutral reserve fund to protect 
payments to rural hospitals and create sustainable access for 
rural communities.
      Section 4325. Spending-neutral reserve fund to encourage 
state Medicaid demonstration programs to promote independent 
living and integrated work for the disabled.
      Section 4326. Spending-neutral reserve fund to allow 
pharmacists to be paid for the provision of services under 
Medicare.
      Section 4327. Spending-neutral reserve fund to improve 
our Nation's community health centers.
      Section 4328. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to 
the funding of independent agencies, which may include 
subjecting the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to the 
regular appropriations process.
      Section 4329. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to reform, 
improve, and enhance section 529 college savings plans.
      Section 4330. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
securing overseas diplomatic facilities of the United States.
      Section 4331. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
expanding, enhancing, or otherwise improving science, 
technology, engineering, and mathematics.
      Section 4332. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
promoting manufacturing in the United States.
      Section 4333. Spending-neutral reserve fund to prohibit 
aliens without legal status in the United States from 
qualifying for a refundable tax credit.
      Section 4334. Deficit-reduction reserve fund for report 
elimination or modification.
      Section 4335. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to address 
heroin, methamphetamine, and prescription opioid abuse.
      Section 4336. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to strengthen 
our Department of Defense civilian workforce.
      Section 4337. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for Department 
of Defense reform.
      Section 4338. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to improve 
Federal workforce development, job training, and reemployment 
programs.
      Section 4339. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to provide 
energy assistance and invest in energy efficiency and 
conservation.
      Section 4340. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to end 
Operation Choke Point and protect the Second Amendment.
      Section 4341. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to prevent the 
use of Federal funds for the bailout of improvident State and 
local governments.
      Section 4342. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to improve 
health outcomes and lower the costs of caring for medically 
complex children in Medicaid.
      Section 4343. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to maintain 
and enhance access, choice, and accountability in veterans care 
through the Veterans Choice Card program.
      Section 4344. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
promoting equal pay.
      Section 4345. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
legislation submitted to Congress by the President of the 
United States to protect and strengthen Social Security.
      Section 4346. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to a 
simplified, income-driven student loan repayment option.
      Section 4347. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to 
keeping the Federal Water Pollution Control Act focused on the 
protection of water quality.
      Section 4348. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
supporting Israel.
      Section 4349. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for 
legislation regarding family and medical leave.
      Section 4350. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
providing health care to veterans who have geographic 
inaccessibility to care.
      Section 4351. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
increasing access to higher education for low-income Americans 
through the Federal Pell Grant program.
      Section 4352. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
transparency in health premium billing.
      Section 4353. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
carbon emissions.
      Section 4354. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to 
requiring the Federal Government to allow States to opt out of 
Common Core without penalty.
      Section 4355. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to 
the disposal of certain Federal land.
      Section 4356. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to 
prohibiting funding of international organizations during the 
implementation of the United Nations Arms Trade Treaty prior to 
Senate ratification and adoption of implementing legislation.
      Section 4357. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
reimposing waived sanctions and imposing new sanctions against 
Iran for violations of the Joint Plan of Action or a 
comprehensive nuclear agreement.
      Section 4358. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
supporting United States citizens held hostage in the United 
States Embassy in Tehran, Iran, between November 3, 1979, and 
January 20, 1981.
      Section 4359. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
reasonable accommodations for pregnant workers.
      Section 4360. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to permanently 
eliminate the Federal estate tax.
      Section 4361. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
regulation by the Environmental Protection Agency of greenhouse 
gas emissions.
      Section 4362. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
protecting privately held water rights and permits.
      Section 4363. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to 
prohibiting awarding of construction contracts based on 
awardees entering or not entering into agreements with labor 
organizations.
      Section 4364. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to prevent 
American jobs from being moved overseas by reducing the 
corporate income tax rate.
      Section 4365. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to increase 
wages for American workers.
      Section 4366. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
deterring the migration of unaccompanied children from El 
Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras.
      Section 4367. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to 
ensuring proper economic consideration in designation of 
critical habitat.
      Section 4368. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to end ``too 
big to fail'' bailouts for Wall Street mega-banks (over $500 
billion in total assets).
      Section 4369. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
ending Washington's illegal exemption from the Patient 
Protection and Affordable Care Act.
      Section 4370. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to 
increasing funding for the relocation of the United States 
Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.
      Section 4371. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
promoting the return of children who have been legally adopted 
by United States citizens from the Democratic Republic of the 
Congo.
      Section 4372. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
development of a new nuclear-capable cruise missile by the 
Department of Defense and the National Nuclear Security 
Administration.
      Section 4373. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to provide 
equity in the tax treatment of public safety officer death 
benefits.
      Section 4374. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
eliminating the backlog of sexual assault evidence kits.
      Section 4375. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
mixed oxide fuel fabrication.
      Section 4376. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
reforming Offices of Inspectors General and preventing extended 
vacancies.
      Section 4377. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
improving retirement security.
      Section 4378. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to improve the 
competitiveness of the United States.
      Section 4379. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
ensuring that the conservation of northern long-eared bat 
populations and local economic development are compatible.
      Section 4380. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to improve 
cybersecurity.
      Section 4381. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to allow the 
Drug Enforcement Administration and Federal Bureau of 
Investigation to enter into joint task forces with tribal and 
local law enforcement agencies.
      Section 4382. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
encouraging cost savings in office space used by Federal 
agencies.
      Section 4383. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
providing technical assistance to small businesses and aspiring 
entrepreneurs through small business development centers.
      Section 4384. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
ensuring that medical facilities of the Department of Veterans 
Affairs meet the needs of women veterans.
      Section 4385. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
supporting efficient resourcing for the Asia rebalance policy.
      Section 4386. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
preventing access to marijuana edibles by children in states 
that have decriminalized marijuana.
      Section 4387. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
providing mortgage lending to rural areas.
      Section 4388. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
the construction of Arctic polar icebreakers.
      Section 4389. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
researching health conditions of the descendants of veterans 
exposed to toxic substances during service in the Armed Forces.
      Section 4390. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
raising the family of funds limit of the Small Business 
Investment Company program.
      Section 4391. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
detection, investigation, and prosecution of the owners and 
operators of websites who knowingly allow such websites to be 
used to advertise commercial sex with children over the 
Internet.
      Section 4392. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
protecting the reliability of the electricity grid.
      Section 4393. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to preserve 
and protect the open Internet.
      Section 4394. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to 
reforming the Federal regulatory process.
      Section 4395. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
providing coverage of virtual colonoscopies as a colorectal 
cancer screening test under the Medicare program.
      Section 4396. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
the modernization of the nuclear command, control, and 
communications architecture of the United States.
      Section 4397. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
BARDA and the BioShield special reserve fund.
      Section 4398. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
improving the nuclear forces and missions of the Air Force.
      Section 4399. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
promoting economic growth and job creation for small businesses 
and full funding for at-sea and dockside monitoring for certain 
fisheries.
      Section 4400. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
the definition of full-time employee.
      Section 4401. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the Federal 
regulatory process.
      Section 4402. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to expedite 
awards under the Internal Revenue Service whistleblower 
program.
      Section 4403. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
encouraging the increased use of performance contracting in 
Federal facilities.
      Section 4404. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
improving information sharing by the Inspector General of the 
Department of Veterans Affairs with respect to investigations 
relating to substandard health care, delayed and denied health 
care, patient deaths, other findings that directly relate to 
patient care, and other management issues of the department.
      Section 4405. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to address the 
disproportionate regulatory burdens on community banks and 
credit unions.
      Section 4406. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to protect the 
Corporation for National and Community Service.
      Section 4407. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
ensuring that Department of Justice attorneys comply with 
disclosure obligations in criminal prosecutions.
      Section 4408. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to promote 
biomedical research.
      Section 4409. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
providing access to necessary equipment for Medicare 
beneficiaries.
      Section 4410. Spending-neutral reserve fund relating to 
prioritizing the construction of infrastructure projects that 
are of national and regional significance and projects in high-
priority corridors.
      Section 4411. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
encouraging the United States' NATO allies to reverse declines 
in defense spending and bear a more proportionate burden for 
ensuring the security of NATO.
      Section 4412. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
the investigation and recovery of missing weapons and military 
equipment provided to the Government of Yemen by the United 
States Government.
      Section 4413. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
improving higher education data and transparency.
      Section 4414. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
native children.
      Section 4415. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
provide additional funding for international strategic 
communications.
      Section 4416. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for elementary 
and secondary education.
      Section 4417. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to support 
research.
      Section 4418. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
support for Ukraine.
      Section 4419. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
underground and surface mining safety research.
      Section 4420. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
saving Medicare.
      The agreement contains the following reserve funds 
applicable in the House:
      Section 4501. Reserve fund for the repeal of the 
President's health care law.
      Section 4502. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for promoting 
real health care reform.
      Section 4503. Deficit-neutral reserve fund related to the 
Medicare provisions of the President's health care law.
      Section 4504. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for improving 
access to the State Children's Health Insurance Program.
      Section 4505. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for graduate 
medical education.
      Section 4506. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for trade 
agreements.
      Section 4507. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for reforming 
the tax code.
      Section 4508. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for revenue 
measures.
      Section 4509. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for 
transportation.
      Section 4510. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for Federal 
retirement reform.
      Section 4511. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for national 
defense.
               ESTIMATES OF DIRECT SPENDING IN THE HOUSE


                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      No provision.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      This section is required under the Separate Orders of H. 
Res. 5 (114th Congress), which implements the Rules of the 
House of Representatives and is a requirement for the 
consideration of a concurrent resolution on the budget in the 
114th Congress. It provides the average and estimated average 
rate of growth in means-tested and non-means-tested direct 
spending for the 10-year periods before and after fiscal year 
2016, respectively, and proposes reforms of these two 
categories and direct spending.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement includes the House provision for 
the House.

                                         TABLE 11.--HISTORICAL MEANS-TESTED AND NON MEANS-TESTED DIRECT SPENDING
                                                      [Outlays by fiscal year, billions of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                               Estimated       Average
                                                                                                                          ------------------    annual
                                            2005     2006     2007     2008     2009     2010     2011     2012     2013                        growth
                                                                                                                             2014     2015  ------------
                                                                                                                                              2006-2015
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Means-Tested Programs:
  Health Care Programs:
    Medicaid............................      182      181      191      201      251      273      275      251      265      301      335         6.3%
    Medicare Part D Low-Income Subsidies        0       11       17       17       19       21       24       20       22       22       24      (a)8.9%
    Health insurance subsidiesb,c.......        0        0        0        0        0        0        0        0        0       13       28         n.a.
    Children's Health Insurance Program.        5        5        6        7        8        8        9        9        9        9       10         7.3%
                                         ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal........................      187      197      213      225      277      302      308      279      297      346      397         7.8%
  Income Security:
    SNAP................................       33       35       35       39       56       70       77       80       83       76       78         9.1%
    Supplemental Security Income........       38       37       36       41       45       47       53       47       53       54       55         3.7%
    Earned income and child tax creditsc       49       52       54       75       67       77       78       77       79       82       83         5.3%
    Family support and foster cared.....       31       30       31       32       33       35       33       30       32       31       31         0.3%
    Child nutrition.....................       13       14       14       15       16       17       18       19       20       20       21         5.1%
                                         ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal........................      163      168      170      202      217      247      260      254      266      263      268         5.1%
  Veterans' pensions....................        4        4        3        4        4        4        5        5        5        6        6         5.0%
    Pell Grantse........................        0        0        0        1        2        4       14       12       16        8       11         n.a.
        Subtotal, Means-Tested Programs.      354      369      386      431      501      557      587      550      584      623      683         6.8%
Non-Means-Tested Programsf..............    1,094    1,188    1,242    1,349    1,787    1,553    1,648    1,710    1,752    1,757    1,847         5.4%
      Total Mandatory Outlaysg..........    1,448    1,556    1,628    1,780    2,288    2,110    2,236    2,260    2,336    2,380    2,530         5.7%
Memorandum:
Pell Grants (Discretionary).............       13       13       13       15       13       20       21       21       17       23       20         4.3%
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source: Congressional Budget Office; staff of the Joint Committee on Taxation.
 
Notes: The average annual growth rate over the 2006-2015 period encompasses growth in outlays from the amount recorded in 2005 through the amount
  projected for 2015.
Data on spending for benefit programs in this table exclude administrative costs that are classified as discretionary but generally include
  administrative costs classified as mandatory.
SNAP = Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program; n.a. = not applicable.
Because October 1 fell on a weekend in 2006, 2007, and 2012, certain federal payments that were due on that date were instead made at the end of the
  preceding September and thus shifted into the previous fiscal year. Those shifts primarily affected outlays for Supplemental Security Income,
  veterans' compensation benefits and pensions, and Medicare.
 
a. The average annual growth rate reflects the program's growth from its inception in 2006 through 2015.
b. Differs from the amounts reported in Table 3-2 from The Budget and Economic Outlook: Fiscal Years 2015 to 2025 because it does not include payments
  to health insurance plans for risk adjustment (amounts paid to plans that attract less healthy enrollees) and reinsurance (amounts paid to plans that
  enroll individuals who end up with high costs). Spending for grants to states to establish exchanges is also excluded.
c. Does not include amounts that reduce tax receipts.
d. Includes the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program, the Child Support Enforcement program, the Child Care Entitlement program, and other
  programs that benefit children.
e. Includes mandatory spending designed to reduce the discretionary budget authority needed to support the maximum award level set in the appropriation
  act plus mandatory spending that, by formula, increases the total maximum award above the amount set in the appropriation act.
f. Does not include offsetting receipts.
g. Does not include outlays associated with federal interest payments, which are not considered part of mandatory spending


                                         TABLE 12.--PROJECTED MEANS-TESTED AND NON MEANS-TESTED DIRECT SPENDING
                                                      [Outlays by fiscal year, billions of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                                               Average
                                                                                                                                                annual
                                            2015     2016     2017     2018     2019     2020     2021     2022     2023     2024     2025      growth
                                                                                                                                            ------------
                                                                                                                                              2016-2025
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Means-Tested Programs:
  Health Care Programs:
    Medicaid............................      335      360      384      405      428      452      477      503      530      558      588         5.8%
    Medicare Part D Low-Income Subsidies       24       28       28       28       32       34       37       44       46       46       54         8.4%
    Health insurance subsidiesa,b.......       28       55       75       86       89       91       97      102      105      109      112        15.1%
    Children's Health Insurance Program.       10       11        6        6        6        6        6        6        6        6        6        -5.9%
                                         ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal..........................      397      454      493      524      555      584      617      656      687      719      760         6.7%
  Income Security:
    SNAP................................       78       78       76       75       74       74       74       73       74       74       75        -0.4%
    Supplemental Security Income........       55       60       57       54       61       63       64       71       68       65       72         2.7%
    Earned income and child tax                83       85       86       87       75       76       77       78       79       80       82        -0.1%
     creditsb,c.........................
    Family support and foster cared.....       31       32       32       32       33       33       33       34       34       34       35         1.0%
    Child nutrition.....................       21       22       23       24       25       26       27       28       29       31       32         4.3%
                                         ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal..........................      268      277      274      273      267      271      275      285      284      284      295         1.0%
  Veterans' pensions                            6        7        6        6        7        7        7        8        7        7        7         2.0%
  Pell Grantse                                 11        6        7        9        9        9        9        9       10       10       10        -1.3%
      Subtotal, Means-Tested Programs...      683      744      781      811      838      871      909      957      988    1,019    1,072         4.6%
Non-Means-Tested Programsf                  1,847    1,947    2,018    2,094    2,241    2,370    2,516    2,708    2,820    2,933    3,165         5.5%
      Total Mandatory Outlaysg..........    2,530    2,691    2,799    2,905    3,079    3,241    3,425    3,666    3,808    3,952    4,237         5.3%
Memorandum:
Pell Grants (Discretionary)h............       20       27       27       23       24       24       25       25       26       26       27         3.0%
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Source: Congressional Budget Office; staff of the Joint Committee on Taxation.
 
Notes: The projections shown here are the same as those reported in Congressional Budget Office, The Budget and Economic Outlook: Fiscal Years 2015 to
  2025 (January 2015). CBO recently updated its baseline projections as reported in Congressional Budget Office, Updated Budget Projections: 2015 to
  2025 (March 2015). Some of the projections are different in the March baseline, but at the request of the committee staff, the projections shown are
  from the January baseline.
The average annual growth rate over the 2016-2025 period encompasses growth in outlays from the amount projected for 2015 through the amount projected
  for 2025.
Projections of spending for benefit programs in this table exclude administrative costs that are classified as discretionary but generally include
  administrative costs classified as mandatory.
SNAP = Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.
Because October 1 will fall on a weekend in 2016, 2017, 2022, and 2023, certain federal payments that are due on that date will instead be made at the
  end of the preceding September and thus be shifted into the previous fiscal year.
Those shifts primarily affect outlays for Supplemental Security Income, veterans' compensation benefits and pensions, and Medicare.
 
a. Differs from the amounts reported in Table 3-2 from The Budget and Economic Outlook: Fiscal Years 2015 to 2025 because it does not include payments
  to health insurance plans for risk adjustment (amounts paid to plans that attract less healthy enrollees) and reinsurance (amounts paid to plans that
  enroll individuals who end up with high costs). Spending for grants to states to establish exchanges is also excluded.
b. Does not include amounts that reduce tax receipts.
c. Differs from the amounts reported on Table 3-2 from The Budget and Economic Outlook: Fiscal Years 2015 to 2025 because it does not include other tax
  credits that were included in that table.
d. Includes the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program, the Child Support Enforcement program, the Child Care Entitlement program, and other
  programs that benefit children.
e. Includes mandatory spending designed to reduce the discretionary budget authority needed to support the maximum award level set in the appropriation
  act plus mandatory spending that, by formula, increases the total maximum award above the amount set in the appropriation act.
f. Does not include offsetting receipts.
g. Does not include outlays associated with federal interest payments, which are not considered part of mandatory spending.
h. The discretionary baseline does not represent a projection of expected costs for the discretionary portion of the Pell Grant program. As with all
  other discretionary programs, the budget authority is calculated by inflating the budget authority appropriated for fiscal year 2015. Outlays for
  future years are based on those amounts of budget authority and also reflect a temporary surplus of budget authority provided in 2015.

                           POLICY STATEMENTS


                           SENATE RESOLUTION

      The Senate resolution contains no policy statements.

                            HOUSE AMENDMENT

      The House amendment contains the following policy 
statements:
      Section 801. Policy statement on balanced budget 
amendment.
      Section 802. Policy statement on budget process and 
baseline reform.
      Section 803. Policy statement on economic growth and job 
creation.
      Section 804. Policy statement on tax reform.
      Section 805. Policy statement on trade.
      Section 806. Policy statement on Social Security.
      Section 807. Policy statement on repealing the 
President's health care law and promoting real health care 
reform.
      Section 808. Policy statement on Medicare.
      Section 809. Policy statement on medical discovery, 
development, delivery and innovation.
      Section 810. Policy statement on Federal regulatory 
reform.
      Section 811. Policy statement on higher education and 
workforce development opportunity.
      Section 812. Policy statement on Department of Veterans 
Affairs.
      Section 813. Policy statement on Federal accounting 
methodologies.
      Section 814. Policy statement on scorekeeping for outyear 
budgetary effects in appropriation acts.
      Section 815. Policy statement on reducing unnecessary, 
wasteful, and unauthorized spending.
      Section 816. Policy statement on deficit reduction 
through the cancellation of unobligated balances.
      Section 817. Policy statement on agency fees and 
spending.
      Section 818. Policy statement on responsible stewardship 
of taxpayer dollars.
      Section 819. Policy statement on ``No Budget, No Pay.''
      Section 820. Policy statement on national security 
funding.

                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      The conference agreement contains the following policy 
statements of the House and Senate:
      Section 6101. Policy statement on a balanced budget 
amendment.
      Section 6102. Policy statement on Social Security.
      The conference agreement also contains the following 
policy statements of the House:
      Section 6201. Policy statement on budget process and 
baseline reform.
      Section 6202. Policy statement on economic growth and job 
creation.
      Section 6203. Policy statement on tax reform.
      Section 6204. Policy statement on trade.
      Section 6205. Policy statement on repealing the 
President's health care law and promoting real health care 
reform.
      Section 6206. Policy statement on Medicare.
      Section 6207. Policy statement on medical discovery, 
development, delivery, and innovation.
      Section 6208. Policy statement on Federal regulatory 
reform.
      Section 6209. Policy statement on higher education and 
workforce development opportunity.
      Section 6210. Policy statement on the Department of 
Veterans Affairs.
      Section 6211. Policy statement on Federal accounting 
methodologies.
      Section 6212. Policy statement on reducing unnecessary, 
wasteful, and unnecessary spending.
      Section 6213. Policy statement on deficit reduction 
through the cancellation of unobligated balances.
      Section 6214. Policy statement on agency fees and 
spending.
      Section 6215. Policy statement on responsible stewardship 
of taxpayer dollars.
      Section 6216. Policy statement on ``No Budget, No Pay.''
      Section 6217. Policy statement on national security 
funding.
                              ALLOCATIONS

      As required under section 302 of the Congressional Budget 
Act of 1974, the joint statement of managers includes 
allocations of budget authority and outlays, based on the 
conference agreement, to each of the authorizing committees and 
the Committee on Appropriations of the House and Senate. This 
joint statement allocates to the Committee on Appropriations of 
the House and Senate a lump sum of discretionary budget 
authority assumed in the concurrent resolution and 
corresponding outlays for a single fiscal year. It also 
provides allocations for each of the authorizing committees in 
the House and Senate for fiscal year 2016, commencing on 
October 1, 2015, and the 9 ensuing fiscal years, fiscal years 
2017 through 2025. These allocations are as follows:

    TABLE 13.--ALLOCATION OF SPENDING AUTHORITY TO HOUSE COMMITTEE ON
                             APPROPRIATIONS
                        [In millions of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 2016
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Base Discretionary Action:
    BA.....................................................    1,016,582
    OT.....................................................    1,156,644
Global War on Terrorism:
    BA.....................................................       96,287
    OT.....................................................       48,798
Current Law Mandatory:
    BA.....................................................      960,295
    OT.....................................................      952,912
------------------------------------------------------------------------


          TABLE 14.--ALLOCATION BY HOUSE AUTHORIZING COMMITTEE
               [On-budget amounts in millions of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                               2016          2016-2025
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Agriculture:
  Current Law:
    BA..................................          12,473         646,262
    OT..................................          12,775         640,246
  Resolution Change:
    BA..................................          -1,645        -302,149
    OT..................................            -347        -300,020
                                         -------------------------------
    Total:
      BA................................          10,828         344,113
      OT................................          12,428         340,226
                                         ===============================
Armed Services:
  Current Law:
    BA..................................         155,312       1,806,198
    OT..................................         159,556       1,804,314
  Resolution Change:
    BA..................................               0               0
    OT..................................               0               0
                                         -------------------------------
    Total:
        BA..............................         155,312       1,806,198
        OT..............................         159,556       1,804,314
                                         ===============================
Financial Services:
  Current Law:
    BA..................................          15,120         113,877
    OT..................................           4,182         -44,506
  Resolution Change:
    BA..................................          -7,334         -62,254
    OT..................................          -6,712         -62,056
                                         -------------------------------
    Total:
        BA..............................           7,786          51,623
        OT..............................          -2,530        -106,562
                                         ===============================
Education & Workforce:
  Current Law:
    BA..................................          -3,756          40,769
    OT..................................          -6,552          25,954
  Resolution Change:
    BA..................................         -10,633        -249,574
    OT..................................          -5,017        -229,658
                                         -------------------------------
    Total:
        BA..............................         -14,389        -208,805
        OT..............................         -11,569        -203,704
                                         ===============================
Energy & Commerce:
  Current Law:
    BA..................................         444,289       5,721,695
    OT..................................         441,174       5,715,531
  Resolution Change:
    BA..................................         -54,654      -1,379,704
    OT..................................         -49,173      -1,369,488
                                         -------------------------------
    Total:
        BA..............................         389,635       4,341,991
        OT..............................         392,001       4,346,043
                                         ===============================
Foreign Affairs:
  Current Law:
    BA..................................          28,183         232,212
    OT..................................          27,177         230,830
  Resolution Change:
    BA..................................               0               0
    OT..................................               0               0
                                         -------------------------------
    Total:
        BA..............................          28,183         232,212
        OT..............................          27,177         230,830
                                         ===============================
Oversight & Government Reform:
  Current Law:
    BA..................................         113,380       1,339,277
    OT..................................         112,234       1,320,222
  Resolution Change:
    BA..................................          -9,188        -193,961
    OT..................................          -9,026        -193,896
                                         -------------------------------
    Total:
        BA..............................         104,192       1,145,316
        OT..............................         103,208       1,126,326
                                         ===============================
Homeland Security:
  Current Law:
    BA..................................           1,988          23,061
    OT..................................           1,973          23,206
  Resolution Change:
    BA..................................            -180         -19,470
    OT..................................            -180         -19,470
                                         -------------------------------
    Total:
        BA..............................           1,808           3,591
        OT..............................           1,793           3,736
                                         ===============================
House Administration:
  Current Law:
    BA..................................              41             353
    OT..................................              12             108
  Resolution Change:
    BA..................................             -31            -298
    OT..................................              -2             -53
                                         -------------------------------
    Total:
        BA..............................              10              55
        OT..............................              10              55
                                         ===============================
Natural Resources:
  Current Law:
    BA..................................           5,392          58,170
    OT..................................           6,020          60,458
  Resolution Change:
    BA..................................            -569         -32,678
    OT..................................            -261         -32,483
                                         -------------------------------
    Total:
        BA..............................           4,823          25,492
        OT..............................           5,759          27,975
                                         ===============================
Judiciary:
  Current Law:
    BA..................................          22,544         116,624
    OT..................................          13,185         122,005
  Resolution Change:
    BA..................................         -14,419         -24,949
    OT..................................            -868         -23,055
                                         -------------------------------
    Total:
        BA..............................           8,125          91,675
        OT..............................          12,317          98,950
                                         ===============================
Transportation & Infrastructure:
  Current Law:
    BA..................................          70,089         718,468
    OT..................................          16,407         184,208
  Resolution Change:
    BA..................................         -12,114        -197,706
    OT..................................               0               0
                                         -------------------------------
    Total:
      BA................................          57,975         520,762
      OT................................          16,407         184,208
                                         ===============================
Science, Space & Technology:
  Current Law:
    BA..................................             101           1,017
    OT..................................             101           1,017
  Resolution Change:
    BA..................................               0               0
    OT..................................               0               0
                                         -------------------------------
    Total:
      BA................................             101           1,017
      OT................................             101           1,017
                                         ===============================
Small Business:
  Current Law:
    BA..................................               0               0
    OT..................................               0               0
  Resolution Change:
    BA..................................               0               0
    OT..................................               0               0
                                         -------------------------------
    Total:
      BA................................               0               0
      OT................................               0               0
                                         ===============================
Veterans Affairs:
  Current Law:
    BA..................................           3,094          96,599
    OT..................................           9,188         109,687
  Resolution Change:
    BA..................................             -31          -1,925
    OT..................................             -31          -1,925
                                         -------------------------------
    Total:
      BA................................           3,063          94,674
      OT................................           9,157         107,762
                                         ===============================
Ways & Means:
  Current Law:
    BA..................................       1,022,809      14,818,985
    OT..................................       1,021,784      14,817,368
  Resolution Change:
    BA..................................         -60,004      -1,594,908
    OT..................................         -59,704      -1,594,408
                                         -------------------------------
    Total:
      BA................................         962,805      13,224,077
      OT................................         962,080      13,222,960
------------------------------------------------------------------------


     TABLE 15.--ALLOCATION OF SPENDING AUTHORITY SENATE COMMITTEE ON
                             APPROPRIATIONS
                     [Fiscal year 2016, $ billions]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                              Budget
             Appropriations                  authority        Outlays
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Revised Security Category Discretionary          523.091             n/a
 Budget Authority\1\....................
Revised Nonsecurity Category                     493.491             n/a
 Discretionary Budget Authority\1\......
General Purpose Outlays\1\..............             n/a       1,156.644
Memorandum:.............................
    Subtotal............................       1,016.582       1,156.644
    On-budget...........................       1,011.307       1,151.295
    Off-budget..........................           5.275           5.349
Overseas Contingency Operations/Global            96.287          48.798
 War on Terrorism\2\....................
Mandatory...............................         964.049         956.128
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\The allocation will be adjusted following the reporting of bills,
  offering of amendments, or submission of conference reports that
  qualify for adjustments to the discretionary spending limits as
  outlined in sections 251(b)(2)(A)(i), 251(b)(2)(B), 251(b)(2)(C), and
  251(b)(2)(D) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act
  of 1985.
\2\The allocation may be adjusted pursuant to section 3102 of the
  conference report to accompany S. Con. Res. 11, the concurrent
  resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2016.


             TABLE 16.--ALLOCATION OF SPENDING AUTHORITYPSENATE COMMITTEES OTHER THAN APPROPRIATIONS
                                         [Fiscal year 2016, $ billions]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            2016             2016-2020             2016-2025
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry:
    Budget Authority...............................          128.680            654.944             1,322.686
    Outlays........................................          121.723            606.817             1,228.931
Armed Services:
    Budget Authority...............................          159.207            848.760             1,851.710
    Outlays........................................          163.446            848.187             1,849.802
Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs:
    Budget Authority...............................           24.680            116.744               214.389
    Outlays........................................            3.848             -7.666               -42.938
Commerce, Science, and Transportation:
    Budget Authority...............................           17.905            100.960               205.334
    Outlays........................................           14.188             77.987               154.802
Energy and Natural Resources:
    Budget Authority...............................            4.454             24.474                48.985
    Outlays........................................            4.465             24.478                49.211
Environment and Public Works:
    Budget Authority...............................           41.672            211.645               420.414
    Outlays........................................            2.543             13.680                30.750
Finance:
    Budget Authority...............................        2,179.304         12,340.566            29,433.590
    Outlays........................................        2,169.584         12,321.005            29,408.581
Foreign Relations:
    Budget Authority...............................           28.342            125.601               233.802
    Outlays........................................           27.336            124.464               232.420
Homeland Security and Government Affairs:
    Budget Authority...............................          134.948            729.195             1,577.588
    Outlays........................................          133.802            720.862             1,558.533
Judiciary:
    Budget Authority...............................           24.816             79.449               143.856
    Outlays........................................           15.443             81.087               149.155
Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions:
    Budget Authority...............................           12.137             87.301               174.372
    Outlays........................................           14.271             87.783               182.631
Rules and Administration:
    Budget Authority...............................            0.067              0.334                 0.666
    Outlays........................................            0.038              0.197                 0.421
Intelligence:
    Budget Authority...............................            0.514              2.570                 5.140
    Outlays........................................            0.514              2.570                 5.140
Veterans' Affairs:
    Budget Authority...............................           97.631            483.601             1,026.432
    Outlays........................................          103.480            494.772             1,037.000
Indian Affairs:
    Budget Authority...............................            0.491              2.191                 4.741
    Outlays........................................            0.942              3.551                 5.982
Small Business:
    Budget Authority...............................            0.000              0.000                 0.000
    Outlays........................................            0.000              0.000                 0.000
Unassigned to Committee:
    Budget Authority...............................         -930.099         -6,014.283           -15,268.775
    Outlays........................................         -884.618         -5,887.158           -14,949.026
                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------
    Total:
        Budget Authority...........................        1,924.749          9,794.052            21,394.930
        Outlays....................................        1,891.005          9,512.616            20,901.395
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Includes entitlements funded in annual appropriations acts.

                                   Tom Price,
                                   Todd Rokita,
                                   Mario Diaz-Balart,
                                   Diane Black,
                                   John R. Moolenaar,
                                 Managers on the Part of the House.

                                   Michael B. Enzi,
                                   Chuck Grassley,
                                   Jeff Sessions,
                                   Mike Crapo,
                                   Lindsey Graham,
                                   Rob Portman,
                                   Patrick J. Toomey,
                                   Ron Johnson,
                                   Kelly Ayotte,
                                   Roger F. Wicker,
                                   Bob Corker,
                                   David Perdue,
                                Managers on the Part of the Senate.

                                  [all]