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                                                   Union Calendar No. 68
114th Congress  }                                         {      Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session    }                                         {      114-97
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     

                                     

                                                  

                                     

                              R E P O R T

                                 on the

                  SUBALLOCATION OF BUDGET ALLOCATIONS

                          FOR FISCAL YEAR 2016

                   SUBMITTED BY MR. ROGERS, CHAIRMAN,

                      COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS

                             together with

                             MINORITY VIEWS


[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]



 April 29, 2015.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed
                                   ______

                    U.S. GOVERNMENT PUBLISHING OFFICE 

49-006                     WASHINGTON : 2015           SBDV 2016-1










                      COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS

                                ----------                              
                   HAROLD ROGERS, Kentucky, Chairman


  RODNEY P. FRELINGHUYSEN, New Jersey   NITA M. LOWEY, New York  
  ROBERT B. ADERHOLT, Alabama           MARCY KAPTUR, Ohio     
  KAY GRANGER, Texas                    PETER J. VISCLOSKY, Indiana     
  MICHAEL K. SIMPSON, Idaho             JOSE E. SERRANO, New York     
  JOHN ABNEY CULBERSON, Texas           ROSA L. DeLAURO, Connecticut       
  ANDER CRENSHAW, Florida               DAVID E. PRICE, North Carolina       
  JOHN R. CARTER, Texas                 LUCILLE ROYBAL-ALLARD, California    
  KEN CALVERT, California               SAM FARR, California        
  TOM COLE, Oklahoma                    CHAKA FATTAH, Pennsylvania      
  MARIO DIAZ-BALART, Florida            SANFORD D. BISHOP, Jr., Georgia      
  CHARLES W. DENT, Pennsylvania         BARBARA LEE, California      
  TOM GRAVES, Georgia                   MICHAEL M. HONDA, California     
  KEVIN YODER, Kansas                   BETTY McCOLLUM, Minnesota       
  STEVE WOMACK, Arkansas                STEVE ISRAEL, New York  
  JEFF FORTENBERRY, Nebraska            TIM RYAN, Ohio     
  THOMAS J. ROONEY, Florida             C.A.DUTCH RUPPERSBERGER,Maryland  
  CHARLES J. FLEISCHMANN, Tennessee     DEBBIE WASSERMAN SCHULTZ, Florida
  JAIME HERRERA BEUTLER, Washington     HENRY CUELLAR, Texas   
  DAVID P. JOYCE, Ohio                  CHELLIE PINGREE, Maine
  DAVID G. VALADAO, California          MIKE QUIGLEY, Illinois               
  ANDY HARRIS, Maryland                 DEREK KILMER, Washington    
  MARTHA ROBY, Alabama
  MARK E. AMODEI, Nevada
  CHRIS STEWART, Utah
  E. SCOTT RIGELL, Virginia
  DAVID W. JOLLY, Florida
  DAVID YOUNG, Iowa
  EVAN H. JENKINS, West Virginia
  STEVEN M. PALAZZO, Mississippi
  
                William E. Smith, Clerk and Staff Director

                                   (ii)

  
  
  
  

                          LETTER OF SUBMITTAL

                              ----------                              

                          House of Representatives,
                               Committee on Appropriations,
                                    Washington, DC, April 29, 2015.
Hon. John A. Boehner,
The Speaker, U.S. House of Representatives,
Washington, DC.

    Dear Mr. Speaker: By direction of the Committee on 
Appropriations, I submit herewith the Committee's report on the 
suballocation of budget allocations for fiscal year 2016.
    This report follows the requirements of section 302(b) of 
the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 by providing a subdivision 
of fiscal year 2016 spending authority consistent with the 
levels of discretionary budget authority assumed in the House-
passed concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2016 
(H. Con. Res. 27) and its accompanying report (House Report 
114-047) as well as the current law levels for discretionary 
spending required by the Budget Control Act of 2011 (P.L. 112-
25).
            Sincerely,
                                             Harold Rogers,
                                                          Chairman.

                                 (iii)
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  

                                                  Union Calendar No. 68
114th Congress  }                                         {      Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session    }                                         {      114-97

======================================================================



 
 REPORT ON THE SUBALLOCATION OF BUDGET ALLOCATIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2016

                                _______
                                

 April 29, 2015.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

    Mr. Rogers, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the 
                               following

                                 REPORT

        SUBALLOCATION OF BUDGET ALLOCATIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2016

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report on the suballocation of budget allocations for fiscal 
year 2016 based on the requirements of section 302(b) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974.
    At the time the Committee drafted this report a conference 
report on the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal 
year 2016 had not been adopted. However, this report follows 
the requirements of section 302(b) of the Congressional Budget 
Act of 1974 by providing a subdivision of fiscal year 2016 
spending authority consistent with the levels of discretionary 
budget authority assumed in the concurrent resolution on the 
budget for fiscal year 2016 (H. Con. Res. 27) and its 
accompanying report (House Report 114-047) as passed by the 
House on March 25, 2015 as well as the current law levels for 
discretionary spending required by the Budget Control Act of 
2011 (P.L. 112-25) and enforced through sequestration.
    The Committee, in distributing the allocation among the 12 
regular appropriations bills, has remained within the 
allocation's
totals.

                  SUBALLOCATIONS TO SUBCOMMITTEES FISCAL YEAR 2016 BUDGET AUTHORITY AND OUTLAYS
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                    Discretionary
                                                             --------------------------
                        Subcommittee                            General     Global War   Mandatory      Total
                                                                Purpose     on Terror
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug
 Administration:
    Budget authority........................................       20,650  ...........      120,076      140,726
    Outlays.................................................       20,513  ...........      108,703      129,216
Commerce, Justice, Science:
    Budget authority........................................       51,378  ...........          343       51,721
    Outlays.................................................       62,400  ...........          343       62,743
Defense:
    Budget authority........................................      490,235       88,421          514      579,170
    Outlays.................................................      519,579       43,780          514      563,873
Energy and Water Development:
    Budget authority........................................       35,403  ...........  ...........       35,403
    Outlays.................................................       36,186  ...........  ...........       36,186
Financial Services and General Government:
    Budget authority........................................       20,249  ...........       21,527       41,776
    Outlays.................................................       21,092  ...........       21,520       42,612
Homeland Security:
    Budget authority........................................       39,320  ...........        1,517       40,837
    Outlays.................................................       43,661  ...........        1,514       45,175
Interior, Environment:
    Budget authority........................................       30,170  ...........           62       30,232
    Outlays.................................................       30,882  ...........           62       30,944
Labor, Health and Human Services, Education:
    Budget authority........................................      153,050  ...........      713,481      866,531
    Outlays.................................................      156,193  ...........      713,523      869,716
Legislative Branch:
  All except Senate:
    Budget authority........................................        3,341  ...........          109        3,450
    Outlays.................................................        3,540  ...........          108        3,648
  Senate items:
    Budget authority........................................          959  ...........           26          985
    Outlays.................................................          728  ...........           26          754
  Total Legislative:
    Budget authority........................................        4,300  ...........          135        4,435
    Outlays.................................................        4,268  ...........          134        4,402
Military Construction, Veterans Affairs:
    Budget authority........................................       76,057          532       94,766      171,355
    Outlays.................................................       78,244            2       94,521      172,767
State, Foreign Operations:
    Budget authority........................................       40,500        7,047          159       47,706
    Outlays.................................................       47,055        1,660          159       48,874
Transportation, HUD:
    Budget authority........................................       55,270  ...........  ...........       55,270
    Outlays.................................................      119,818  ...........  ...........      119,818
      Grand total:
          Budget authority..................................    1,016,582       96,000      952,580    2,065,162
          Outlays...........................................    1,139,891       45,442      940,993    2,126,326
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SBDV 2016-1

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]


                             MINORITY VIEWS

    The Majority's budget allocations are based on the House 
budget resolution which passed on a party-line vote in the full 
House. No member of the Democratic side of the aisle supported 
it.
    Our markup occurred against a backdrop of news articles 
about efforts to craft a new budget agreement, one that would 
replace the sequester and allow higher funding levels for our 
twelve spending bills. It seems many Members on both sides of 
the aisle agree in principle that the House budget resolution 
and subsequent 302(a) allocation given to this Committee are 
unworkable and hope that a new ``Murray-Ryan'' plan is 
possible.
    Yet, our Committee voted along partisan lines to reject the 
Democratic alternative based largely on the approach taken by 
the President in his budget request and approved the Chairman's 
allocations that will fail to adequately invest in initiatives 
that will create jobs, train a 21st century workforce, and give 
hardworking Americans more economic security.
    For example, the Republican allocation for programs in the 
Labor, HHS bill will cut more than $3.7 billion from programs 
that fund critical areas such as biomedical research, public 
health, early childhood education, education for children with 
special needs, and job training programs.
    Further, it will result in cuts to NIH research grants; 
fewer kids enrolled in high-quality early learning programs; 
reduced support for Pell Grants; and a public health system 
that is less prepared for the next infectious disease outbreak.
    In contrast, the President's budget includes a number of 
increases in important investments that the majority's proposal 
won't be able to fund, including: $1 billion for biomedical 
research at the NIH with $200 million for a Precision Medicine 
Initiative; $2.4 billion for early education programs that 
would benefit Head Start, Child Care and Development Block 
Grants, and Preschool Development Grants; $1 billion for Title 
I to support our nation's highest-need schools; and more than 
$600 million for advanced research and development of medical 
countermeasures to prepare the nation for public health threats 
such as Ebola or Pandemic Influenza.
    The Transportation, Housing and Urban Development bill 
would be equally hard hit under the Chairman's proposal. If the 
past is a guide, capital programs will be grossly underfunded 
at this allocation. Specifically, it is likely that CDBG and 
HOME will be reduced to the lowest levels in the history of the 
program, progress on transit programs funded through Capital 
Investment Grants will stall, and there will be nothing done to 
alleviate the shortage of affordable and appropriate housing 
for the elderly and disabled.
    The President's budget request and the Democratic 
alternative for the THUD bill would fully fund Capital 
Improvement Grants at $3.2 billion, expand housing 
opportunities for the elderly and disabled, and increase 
affordable housing construction through the HOME program.
    The Interior bill's allocation paints a similar picture 
with an allocation that is $246 million below the FY 2015 
enacted level. Interior will still have to meet expanded needs: 
new preparations for the Centennial anniversary of the National 
Park Service; rising costs of combatting deadly wild fires; 
increased contract support costs in the Indian Health Service 
and Bureau of Indian Affairs, and all from an allocation below 
last year. The Democratic alternative would provide for these 
predictable needs.
    The President's budget blueprint calls for an end to the 
mindless austerity of sequestration, instead replacing it with 
more targeted spending cuts, program integrity measures, and 
the closure of some outdated tax loopholes.
    I think my colleagues on the other side generally agree 
that sequestration was a failure, and a return to sequester-
level caps threatens important defense and non-defense 
priorities alike. The responsible course of action would be to 
reach agreement now on allocations that are more similar to the 
President's, which would protect key investments and meet the 
needs of an economy that has just begun to bounce back, so that 
we can fulfill our duty to enact spending bills for FY2016 
before the end of this fiscal year.

                                                     Nita M. Lowey.

                                  [all]