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                                                      Calendar No. 370
                                                      
114th Congress   }                                       {     REPORT
                                 SENATE
 2d Session      }                                       {     114-209
_______________________________________________________________________





  SECURING AMERICA'S FUTURE ENERGY: PROTECTING OUR INFRASTRUCTURE OF 
                   PIPELINES AND ENHANCING SAFETY ACT

                               __________

                              R E P O R T

                                 of the

           COMMITTEE ON COMMERCE, SCIENCE, AND TRANSPORTATION

                                   on

                                S. 2276

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]


               February 24, 2016.--Ordered to be printed
               
                                   ______

                         U.S. GOVERNMENT PUBLISHING OFFICE 

59-010                         WASHINGTON : 2016                
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
       SENATE COMMITTEE ON COMMERCE, SCIENCE, AND TRANSPORTATION
                    one hundred fourteenth congress
                             second session

                   JOHN THUNE, South Dakota, Chairman
 ROGER F. WICKER, Mississippi         BILL NELSON, Florida
 ROY BLUNT, Missouri                  MARIA CANTWELL, Washington
 MARCO RUBIO, Florida                 CLAIRE McCASKILL, Missouri
 KELLY AYOTTE, New Hampshire          AMY KLOBUCHAR , Minnesota
 TED CRUZ, Texas                      RICHARD BLUMENTHAL, Connecticut
 DEB FISCHER, Nebraska                BRIAN SCHATZ, Hawaii
 JERRY MORAN, Kansas                  ED MARKEY, Massachusetts
 DAN SULLIVAN, Alaska                 CORY BOOKER, New Jersey
 RON JOHNSON, Wisconsin               TOM UDALL, New Mexico
 DEAN HELLER, Nevada                  JOE MANCHIN, West Virginia
 CORY GARDNER, Colorado               GARY PETERS, Michigan
 STEVE DAINES, Montana
                       Nick Rossi, Staff Director
                 Adrian Arnakis, Deputy Staff Director
                    Rebecca Seidel, General Counsel
                 Kim Lipsky, Democratic Staff Director
           Christopher Day, Democratic Deputy Staff Director
                 Clint Odom, Democratic General Counsel
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                                                      Calendar No. 370
114th Congress     }                                    {       Report
                                 SENATE
 2d Session        }                                    {      114-209

======================================================================



 
  SECURING AMERICA'S FUTURE ENERGY: PROTECTING OUR INFRASTRUCTURE OF 
                   PIPELINES AND ENHANCING SAFETY ACT

                                _______
                                

               February 24, 2016.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Thune, from the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                         [To accompany S. 2276]

    The Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, to 
which was referred the bill (S. 2276) to amend title 49, United 
States Code, to provide enhanced safety in pipeline 
transportation, and for other purposes, having considered the 
same, reports favorably thereon with an amendment (in the 
nature of a substitute) and recommends that the bill (as 
amended) do pass.

                          Purpose of the Bill

    The purpose of S. 2276, is to reauthorize pipeline safety 
programs at the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety 
Administration (PHMSA) of the Department of Transportation 
(DOT).

                          Background and Needs

    Pipeline safety reauthorizations authorize appropriations 
for the Office of Pipeline Safety (OPS), one of the two 
operating elements of PHMSA.\1\ The previous pipeline safety 
authorization, the Pipeline Safety, Regulatory Certainty, and 
Job Creation Act of 2011,\2\ (2011 Act) expired on September 
30, 2015, but absent authorization, the agency retains 
operating authority.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\The Division of Hazardous Materials Safety of PHMSA was 
reauthorized in the Fixing America's Surface Transportation Act, (P.L. 
114-94).
    \2\P.L. 112-90.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The OPS has exclusive jurisdiction to regulate key aspects 
of interstate pipeline safety, including pipeline design, 
construction, operation and maintenance, and emergency response 
planning.\3\ The OPS is fully funded by a user fee assessed on 
a per-mile basis and oversees the pipeline inspection process, 
which is largely conducted by State officials via delegated 
authorities. The office is authorized to have 311 positions, 
and 103 remain unfilled as of September 1, 2015. PHMSA has 
suggested that filling inspector positions that require 
technical backgrounds is difficult due to competition with 
industry for qualified staff.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \3\PHMSA does not have jurisdiction over pipeline siting. Siting of 
gas transmission pipelines is under the jurisdiction of the Federal 
Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). Jurisdiction over the siting of 
oil pipelines rests with the States.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Nation's energy pipelines consist of three primary 
types: (1) approximately 300,000 miles of gas transmission 
pipelines, including 180,000 miles of interstate pipelines, 
which transport natural gas from producing regions to consuming 
regions\4\; (2) over 2.1 million miles of gas distribution 
pipelines, which distribute gas to homes and businesses from a 
connection with a gas transmission pipeline; and (3) 
approximately 199,000 miles of liquid pipelines, which 
transport crude oil, refined petroleum products, propane, 
anhydrous ammonia, biofuels, carbon dioxide, and other 
hazardous liquid chemical products.\5\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \4\www.NaturalGas.org.
    \5\Statistics on gas distribution and liquid pipelines courtesy of 
PHMSA.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The natural gas industry consists of more than 6,300 
producers of natural gas, 160 pipeline companies, and 1,200 
natural gas distribution companies.\6\ Natural gas transmission 
pipelines are generally only in the business of transportation, 
and are not associated with producers or distributors. The map 
below shows gas transmission pipelines, but does not show the 
extensive network of distribution pipelines that carry natural 
gas products to homes and businesses.\7\ Additional information 
on the location of both liquid and gas pipelines is available 
through the PHMSA National Pipeline Mapping Service.\8\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \6\NaturalGas.org.
    \7\Energy Information Administration.
    \8\PHMSA. National Pipeline Mapping Service https://
www.npms.phmsa.dot.gov/PublicViewer.


[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]


    Oil pipeline companies also are generally separate from oil 
production companies, with the pipeline company only providing 
transportation services. Crude oil transmission pipeline 
deliveries are up 1.35 billion barrels over the last 5 years, 
an increase of almost 20 percent from 2009 to 2013. Hazardous 
liquid pipelines deliver approximately two-thirds of the oil 
transported in the United States.\9\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \9\Association of Oil Pipelines. http://www.aopl.org/pipeline-
basics/about-pipelines/ (Accessed September 14, 2015).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Pipeline Inspection

    PHMSA requires that pipelines be periodically inspected in 
order to identify any possible defects, such as corrosion, 
cracks, or manufacturing defects that would adversely affect 
their integrity. The pipeline operator chooses the inspection 
technique that it believes to be the most appropriate for a 
particular pipeline segment.\10\ The selected method may be 
based upon known or perceived threats or the specific 
characteristics of a pipeline.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \10\National Transportation Safety Board. (2015). Safety Study: 
Integrity Management of Gas Transmission Pipelines in High Consequence 
Areas. Report PB2015-102735. Retrieved from http://www.ntsb.gov/safety/
safety-studies/Documents/SS1501.pdf. (Accessed on September 9, 2015).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         Summary of Provisions

    If enacted, S. 2276 would do the following:

     Require PHMSA to conduct a workforce analysis, and 
provide limited direct hire authority to PHMSA for the term of 
the authorization fiscal year (FY) 2016 to 2019.

     Require PHMSA to develop safety regulations for 
underground natural gas storage facilities.

     Require the Comprtoller General to conduct reviews 
of the Gas and Liquid Integrity Management programs.

                          Legislative History

    The Committee held two hearings on reauthorization of 
pipeline safety programs on September 18, 2015, and September 
29, 2015.\11\ The Committee also held a July 22, 2015, 
nomination hearing for PHMSA Administrator Marie Therese 
Dominguez, who was confirmed by the Senate on August 5, 2015.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \11\Pipeline Safety: State and Local Perspectives held on September 
18, 2015, accessed at: http://www.commerce.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/
hearings?ID=D7D78250-62BD-4AA9-9FD7-09303D6179D0; Pipeline Safety: 
Oversight of Our Nation's Pipeline Network held on September 29, 2015, 
accessed at : http://www.commerce.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/
hearings?ID=B120A00A-D4A8-44F9-8300-6A23C6305F76.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    S. 2276 was introduced by Senators Fischer, Booker, Daines, 
and Peters on November 10, 2015. On December 9, 2015, the 
Committee met in open Executive Session to consider the bill. A 
substitute amendment was offered by Senator Fischer and adopted 
by voice vote. Further amendments were offered by Senators 
Ayotte and Markey and accepted by unanimous consent. The 
Committee, by a voice vote, ordered S. 2276, as amended, 
reported favorably.

                            Estimated Costs

    In accordance with paragraph 11(a) of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate and section 403 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the Committee provides the 
following cost estimate, prepared by the Congressional Budget 
Office:

S. 2276--SAFE PIPES Act

    Summary: The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety 
Administration (PHMSA) oversees the safety of pipelines that 
transport natural gas or hazardous liquids and provides grants 
to states for programs to ensure pipeline safety. S. 2276 would 
require PHMSA to pursue a variety of regulatory and 
administrative activities related to such programs and would 
authorize appropriations for those purposes. The bill also 
would authorize PHMSA to establish safety standards for certain 
underground natural gas storage facilities, assess fees on 
entities that operate such facilities, and spend such fees--
subject to authority provided in advance in appropriation 
acts--to ensure that such facilities meet those standards.
    CBO estimates that implementing S. 2276 would require gross 
appropriations totaling $525 million over the 2017-2021 period. 
CBO also estimates that those appropriations would be offset by 
$462 million in fees paid by pipeline owners, which are 
considered offsets to discretionary spending. Assuming 
appropriation of amounts specified and estimated to be 
necessary, CBO estimates that the resulting net outlays would 
total $50 million over the 2017-2021 period.
    In addition, CBO estimates that enacting S. 2276 would 
increase revenues from assessments on entities that operate 
certain underground natural gas storage facilities by $17 
million over the 2017-2026 period. Pay-as-you-go procedures 
apply because enacting the legislation would affect revenues. 
Enacting S. 2276 would not affect direct spending.
    CBO estimates that enacting the legislation would not 
increase net direct spending or on-budget deficits in any of 
the four consecutive 10-year periods beginning in 2027.
    S. 2276 would impose intergovernmental and private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) 
by establishing new safety standards on storage facilities for 
natural gas and imposing new fees. Based on information from 
PHMSA and industry sources, CBO estimates the aggregate cost of 
the mandates would fall below the annual thresholds established 
in UMRA for intergovernmental and private-sector mandates ($77 
million and $154 million in 2016, respectively, adjusted 
annually for inflation).
    Estimated cost to the Federal government: The estimated 
budgetary effect of S. 2276 is shown in the following table. 
The costs of this legislation fall within budget function 400 
(transportation).

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 By fiscal year, in millions of dollars--
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
                                                            2017     2018     2019     2020     2021   2017-2021
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  CHANGES IN SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION
 
Spending for Pipeline Safety and Related Activities:
    Estimated Authorization Level.......................      168      174      177        3        3       525
    Estimated Outlays...................................       82      147      168       90       25       512
Offsetting Collections from User Fees:
    Estimated Authorization Level.......................     -151     -154     -157        0        0      -462
    Estimated Outlays...................................     -151     -154     -157        0        0      -462
Estimated Net Changes:
    Estimated Authorization Level.......................       17       20       20        3        3        63
    Estimated Outlays...................................      -69       -7       11       90       25        50
 
                                              CHANGES IN REVENUES1
 
Assessments for Underground Natural Gas Storage                 0        0        2        2        2         7
 Facilities.............................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1CBO estimates that enacting S. 2276 would increase revenues by $17 million over the 2019-2026 period.
Note: Components may not sum to totals because of rounding.

    Basis of estimate: For this estimate, CBO assumes that S. 
2276 will be enacted near the start of fiscal year 2017 and the 
amounts authorized and estimated to be necessary over the 2017-
2021 period will be appropriated each year. Estimates of 
outlays are based on historical spending patterns for pipeline 
safety programs.

Spending subject to appropriation

    S. 2276 would reauthorize the laws that govern PHMSA's role 
in pipeline safety. The bill would specify new administrative 
requirements and authorize the agency to establish and enforce 
safety standards for certain underground natural gas storage 
facilities. The bill also would require the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) and other agencies to conduct a 
variety of studies and reports related to pipeline safety and 
related activities.
    CBO estimates that implementing the bill would require 
appropriations totaling $168 million in 2017 and $525 million 
over the 2017-2021 period. (By comparison, CBO estimates that 
funding related to PHMSA's pipeline safety programs in 2016 
totals $147 million.) The amounts authorized by the bill 
include:
           $513 million specifically authorized for 
        PHMSA's pipeline safety programs;
           $9 million in estimated authorizations 
        stemming from PHMSA's authority to spend, subject to 
        authority provided in advance in appropriation acts, 
        proposed assessments on entities that operate certain 
        underground natural gas storage facilities; and
           $3 million for GAO and other agencies to 
        carry out various reporting and administrative 
        requirements.
    Assuming appropriation of the authorized and estimated 
amounts, CBO estimates that resulting discretionary outlays 
would total $512 million over the 2017-2021 period, and $13 
million in later years. CBO also estimates that those outlays 
would be offset by $462 million in fees paid by entities that 
operate pipelines and related facilities regulated by PHMSA. 
Under current law, such annual fees are based on appropriations 
provided for pipeline safety and related activities and are 
recorded as discretionary offsetting collections.

Revenues

    S. 2276 would authorize PHMSA to regulate the safety of 
certain underground natural gas storage facilities. To cover 
the cost of regulating such facilities, the bill would direct 
the Secretary of Transportation to impose fees on entities that 
operate such facilities. In CBO's view, such regulatory fees 
should be recorded as revenues because of their compulsory 
nature. Under the bill, PHMSA's authority to spend those fees 
would be subject to appropriation.
    Based on information from PHMSA and the natural gas 
industry about the anticipated costs to establish and implement 
the proposed safety standards, CBO estimates gross revenues 
from such fees would total about $3 million annually starting 
in 2019 (the year when CBO expects PHMSA would issue 
regulations as required by the bill) and $24 million through 
2026. Because excise taxes and other indirect business taxes 
(such as the proposed assessment under S. 2276) reduce the base 
of income and payroll taxes, higher amounts of those indirect 
business taxes would lead to reductions in revenues from income 
and payroll taxes. As a result, gross assessments would be 
partially offset by a loss of receipts of about 25 percent each 
year. Thus, CBO estimates that enacting S. 2276 would increase 
net revenues by $17 million over the 2019-2026 period.
    Pay-As-You-Go considerations: The Statutory Pay-As-You-Go 
Act of 2010 establishes budget-reporting and enforcement 
procedures for legislation affecting direct spending or 
revenues. The net changes in revenues that are subject to those 
pay-as-you-go procedures are shown in the following table.

 CBO ESTIMATE OF PAY-AS-YOU-GO EFFECTS FOR S. 2276, AS ORDERED REPORTED BY THE SENATE COMMITTEE ON COMMERCE, SCIENCE, AND TRANSPORTATION ON DECEMBER 9,
                                                                          2015
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                              By fiscal year, in millions of dollars--
                                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                             2016    2017    2018    2019    2020    2021    2022    2023    2024    2025    2026   2016-2021  2016-2026
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                       NET INCREASE OR DECREASE (-) IN THE DEFICIT
 
Statutory Pay-As-You-Go Impact............       0       0       0      -2      -2      -2      -2      -2      -2      -2      -2        -7        -17
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note: Components may not sum to totals because of rounding.

    Increase in long term direct spending and deficits: CBO 
estimates that enacting the legislation would not increase net 
direct spending or on-budget deficits in any of the four 
consecutive 10-year periods beginning in 2027.
    Intergovernmental and private-sector impact: S. 2276 would 
impose intergovernmental and private-sector mandates as defined 
in UMRA by establishing new safety standards for storage 
facilities for natural gas and by imposing new fees. Because 
the majority of pipelines and facilities that would be affected 
are owned by private entities, CBO estimates that the aggregate 
cost of the mandates on public entities would fall below the 
annual threshold established in UMRA for intergovernmental 
mandates ($77 million in 2016, adjusted annually for 
inflation). Based on information from PHMSA and industry 
sources, CBO estimates the aggregate cost of the mandates on 
private entities also would fall below the annual threshold 
established in UMRA for private-sector mandates ($154 million 
in 2016, adjusted annually for inflation).

Mandates that apply to both public and private entities

    The bill would impose a mandate on operators of underground 
natural gas storage facilities by directing the Secretary of 
Transportation to establish safety standards for those 
facilities. According to the Department of Energy, there are 
about 400 underground natural gas storage facilities in the 
United States, and the vast majority of the facilities are 
operated by private entities. The industry recently issued 
voluntary standards for ensuring the safety and integrity of 
natural gas storage facilities. CBO estimates that the 
incremental cost of the mandate would be minimal for facilities 
that are currently working to comply with those industry 
standards. Moreover, based on information from industry 
sources, CBO estimates that the aggregate cost of the mandate 
on all private facilities could total tens of millions of 
dollars annually.
    The bill also would impose a mandate on operators of 
underground natural gas storage facilities by requiring those 
operators to pay fees to the Secretary of Transportation. The 
fees would be used to offset the cost of establishing and 
implementing the safety standards for those facilities. CBO 
estimates that those fees would total $3 million annually 
beginning in 2019.

Mandate that applies to private entities only

    The bill would impose a mandate on operators of oil 
pipelines by requiring those operators, when preparing an oil 
spill response plan, to take into consideration discharges of 
oil into navigable water or on adjoining shorelines that may be 
covered in whole or in part by ice. Operators of oil pipelines 
must prepare response plans pursuant to current law. The cost 
of the mandate would depend on whether operators need to amend 
current plans to address discharges onto ice. Based on 
information from PHMSA and industry sources, CBO estimates that 
the cost of the mandate would not be substantial.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal costs and revenues: Megan 
Carroll; Impact on State, local, and tribal governments: Jon 
Sperl; Impact on the private sector: Amy Petz.
    Estimate approved by: H. Samuel Papenfuss, Deputy Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

                           Regulatory Impact

    In accordance with paragraph 11(b) of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee provides the 
following evaluation of the regulatory impact of the 
legislation, as reported:

                       number of persons covered

    S. 2276, as reported, would require the establishment of 
minimum safety standards for underground natural gas storage 
facilities, a new regulatory requirement. It is expected that 
the underground storage facilities regulated by the new 
standard would, in most cases, be owned and managed by parties 
currently subject to PHMSA regulation.

                            economic impact

    Enactment of this legislation is not expected to have any 
inflationary or adverse impact on the Nation's economy.

                                privacy

    The bill would not impact the personal privacy of 
individuals.

                               paperwork

    S. 2276 would require reports from the Federal Government. 
The PHMSA Administrator would be required to provide regular 
updates on the status of outstanding rulemakings. The PHMSA 
Administrator would be further required to provide a report on 
staff management practices, including any critical hiring 
needs. The PHMSA Administrator also would be required to submit 
a report on natural gas loss reporting standards.
    In addition, the Comptroller General would be required to 
produce reports on the status of the hazardous liquid and gas 
integrity management programs, State policies that encourage 
the repair or replacement of leaking pipes, and provide a 
review of the feasibility of odorizing all gas in 
transportation.

                   Congressionally Directed Spending

    In compliance with paragraph 4(b) of rule XLIV of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee provides that no 
provisions contained in the bill, as reported, meet the 
definition of congressionally directed spending items under the 
rule.

                      Section-by-Section Analysis


Section 1. Short title; references

    This section would designate the short title of this bill 
as the, ``Securing America's Future Energy: Protecting our 
Infrastructure of Pipelines and Enhancing Safety Act of 2015'' 
or the ``SAFE PIPES Act.''

Section 2. Authorization of appropriations

    This section would authorize appropriations for FY 2016 
through FY 2019 at levels consistent with current 
appropriations, with approximately $147 million in FY 2016, and 
$156 million in FY 2019.
    The Committee is concerned that PHMSA has not yet updated 
emergency response programs with the goal of delivering 
effective emergency response training to the first responders 
who must answer the calls when pipeline emergencies occur. The 
Committee notes that, during the term of the previous 
authorization, appropriations report language was included to 
direct funding of updates for these training programs. In each 
fiscal year, concern was expressed that PHMSA was not taking a 
pro-active role. The Committee notes that, with the Nation's 
aging pipeline infrastructure, and its exposure to future 
emergency incidents, the situation must be aggressively 
addressed by the PHMSA Administrator.
    The Committee believes the the Secretary of Transportation 
should consider upgrading the current pipeline emergencies 
curriculum as part of its Emergency Response Grants in order to 
take a more active role in the upgrade and enhancement of 
emergency training.

Section 3. Regulatory updates

    This section would require the PHMSA Administrator to 
submit a periodic report to Congress on the status of final 
rules for long overdue regulatory requirements.
    The Committee notes that the 2011 Act prescribed a 
significant number of regulations, and the regulations required 
by that law should be completed as quickly as possible.

Section 4. Hazardous materials identification numbers

    This section would rescind a June 26, 2015, PHMSA 
interpretative letter clarifying placarding requirements for 
flammable hazardous materials carriers. Currently, placards are 
required to be mounted on cargo tanks and vehicles carrying 
hazardous materials. The lowest flash point of the flammable 
materials must be included on the placard, even if the carrier 
is shipping multiple flammable materials at one time. Until 
June 2015, as long as carriers did not transport a fuel with a 
lower flash point than the placard, they would not have to 
change the placard or purchase adjustable placards. On June 26, 
2015, PHMSA issued an interpretative letter requiring placards 
to be changed to represent the lowest flash point of the 
particular type of fuel transported during each shipment.

Section 5. Statutory preference

    This section would require the PHMSA Administrator to 
prioritize PHMSA resources dedicated to pipeline safety to 
complete any outstanding pipeline safety statutory requirements 
for a rulemaking before undertaking any new pipeline safety 
rulemakings required in this Act, unless the Secretary of 
Transportation otherwise certifies a need to move forward with 
a new rulemaking.

Section 6. Natural gas integrity management review

    This section would require the Comptroller General to 
report to Congress on the natural gas integrity management 
program within one year of the date of publication of the final 
rule on natural gas transmission.

Section 7. Hazardous liquids integrity management review

    This section would require the Comptroller General, within 
one year of the date of publication of a final rule on 
hazardous liquid pipelines, to report to Congress on the 
hazardous liquid integrity management program.

Section 8. Technical safety standards committees

    This section would provide greater flexibility for the 
Secretary of Transportation to appoint State pipeline safety 
officials to advisory committees.

Section 9. Inspection report information

    This section would require the PHMSA Administrator to 
conduct a post-inspection briefing with the operator or issue 
the final inspection report to the operator within 30 days of a 
pipeline facility inspection.
    PHMSA's internal inspection practices are composed of five 
distinct parts, which typically occur over three to eight 
months. The five parts are: entrance interview; procedure 
interview; records review; field/facility review; and exit 
interview. This section would codify that the PHMSA 
Administration conduct exit interviews within 30 days of 
completion of a pipeline safety inspection.
    Current PHMSA internal performance goals set timeframes for 
completion of inspection paperwork and reports. The goal is to 
complete a preliminary inspection report within 30 days after 
completion of an inspection, and a final report within 60 days 
of completion of an inspection.
    The Committee expects that the report to Congress directed 
by this section would include statistics relating to the 
timeliness of actions, including data on formal letters 
relating to an inspection between PHMSA and pipeline operators.

Section 10. Pipeline odorization study

    This section would require the Comptroller General to 
report on the feasibility of odorizing all combustible gas in 
transportation. The report would include an assessment of the 
impact of odorization on manufacturers, agricultural producers, 
and other end users. The Comprtoller General would also be 
required to report on the benefits and costs of odorization of 
all combustible gas in transportation in comparison with other 
methods to address pipeline leaks.
    The Committee expects that, to the extent practicable, the 
Comptroller General will assess the health and safety benefits 
of odorization of pipelines that are not currently required to 
be odorized.

Section 11. Improving damage prevention technology

    This section would require the Secretary of Transportation 
to conduct a study on technological improvements in location 
and communications practices to prevent accidental excavation 
damage to a pipeline.

Section 12. Workforce of Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety 
        Administration

    This section would require the PHMSA Administrator to 
review PHMSA's current staffing, including hiring challenges, 
geographic allocation plans, and expected retirement rates and 
strategies, and then provide recommendations on how to address 
any hiring or other staff resource challenges.
    This section would also provide the PHMSA Administrator 
with direct hire authority, until September 30, 2019, where a 
severe shortage of candidates or a critical hiring need exists 
for a position or group of positions at the agency.

Section 13. Research and development

    This section would encourage additional collaboration 
between the PHMSA Administrator and stakeholders in setting 
research priorities, leveraging limited Federal research 
dollars to conduct more relevant and timely research.
    The Committee notes that the PHMSA Administrator has 
traditionally worked with operators, the vendor community, and 
research organization to form public-private partnerships to 
develop new technologies to improve pipeline safety. These 
collaborative programs with funding from both the private 
sector and DOT/PHMSA should be renewed and focused on 
developing new technologies to improve safety and reduce 
emissions.
    The Committee expects that the PHMSA Administrator will 
implement and maintain proper protocols to prevent any undue 
influence on the agency's research activities. Nothing in this 
section would prevent the agency from conducting its own 
research that is not co-funded or coordinated with 
stakeholders.

Section 14. Information sharing system

    This section would require the Secretary of Transportation 
to convene a working group to consider developing a no-fault 
information sharing system to facilitate collaborative efforts 
to improve pipeline inspection information sharing. The working 
group would be required to consider and provide recommendations 
to the Secretary on: (1) ways to encourage the exchange of 
pipeline inspection information; (2) opportunities to share dig 
verification data; (3) options to create a secure system which 
safeguards proprietary data; and (4) regulatory and legal 
barriers to sharing information.
    To ensure continued safe operation of both crude and 
natural gas pipelines, it is essential that these assets be the 
subject of inspection on a regular basis. These inspections 
should take full advantage of advances in technology. While 
both visual and hydrostatic inspection of lines have a role in 
an integrity management program, so too does ``in-line'' 
inspection. While executing a PHMSA approved integrity 
management program, each pipeline operator is ultimately 
responsible for the safety of its line. Beyond encouraging the 
use of the best available and most advanced technology to keep 
pipelines safe, the Committee gives no preference to a 
particular type of inspection and believes that visual, 
hydrostatic, and ILI inspection should have equal weight in the 
regulations and corrective action orders and that the pipeline 
operator is in the best position to determine the efficacy of 
each type of inspection for any given situation.

Section 15. Nationwide integrated pipeline database

    This section would require the Secretary of Transportation 
to submit a report on the feasibility of a national integrated 
pipeline database in order to improve communication and 
collaboration between the PHMSA Administrator and State 
pipeline regulators. The report would include efforts currently 
underway to test secure information sharing systems, any 
progress in establishing common standards for collecting and 
presenting pipeline data, any existing gaps in State and 
Federal pipeline data, the potential safety benefits of an 
integrated pipeline database, and recommendations for 
implementing a secure information-sharing system.

Section 16. Underground natural gas storage facilities

    This section would require the PHMSA Administrator to 
develop minimum uniform safety standards for underground 
natural gas storage facilities including wellbores, geologic 
reservoirs, and aquifers.
    In 2010, the United States Court of Appeals for the 10th 
Circuit ruled in Colorado Interstate Gas Co. v. Thomas E. 
Wright, et al. that statutes previously developed by the Kansas 
State Legislature governing natural gas storage violated 
Federal jurisdiction; it is the sense of the Committee that the 
Secretary of Transportation should consider authorizing a State 
authority to take necessary action to provide or participate in 
the oversight of interstate underground natural gas storage 
facilities in the same manner as provided in section 60106 of 
title 49, United States Code.
    This section also would establish a fee to fund the 
oversight of underground natural gas storage facilities that 
shall be imposed on an entity operating an underground natural 
gas storage facility. Any such fee imposed shall be collected 
before the end of the fiscal year to which it applies.
    It is the intent of the Committee that nothing in this 
section shall be construed to prevent States from adopting 
additional or more stringent safety standards, as long as they 
are not in conflict with the Federal standards for intrastate 
facilities.

Section 17. Joint inspection and oversight

    This section would provide certified State authorities with 
the opportunity to accompany Federal inspection teams for 
inspections.

Section 18. Response plans

    This section would require the PHMSA Administrator and an 
operator, in preparing or reviewing a response plan for onshore 
oil pipelines, to consider and include all procedures necessary 
to respond to a worst case discharge of oil into or on any 
waters that may be covered by ice.

Section 19. High consequence areas

    This section would explicitly state that the Great Lakes 
should be considered a high consequence area.

Section 20. Surface transportation security review

    This section would require the Comptroller General to 
submit a report reviewing the Transportation Security 
Administration's surface transportation programs, including 
pipelines. In preparing the report the Comptroller General 
would be required to look at the staffing, resource allocation, 
oversight strategy, and overall management of these programs.

Section 21. Small scale liquefied natural gas facilities

    This section would require the PHMSA Administrator to 
develop minimum safety standards for deciding the location of a 
new permanent Liquefied Natural Gas facility. This section is 
intended to apply to small scale facilities, as defined.

Section 22. Report on natural gas leak reporting

    This section would direct the PHMSA Administrator to study 
the reporting of lost and unaccounted for natural gas from 
distribution pipelines, make recommendations as appropriate, 
and, where appropriate and cost effective, implement 
recommendations that would significantly improve safety.

Section 23. Comptroller General review of State policies relating to 
        natural gas leaks

    This section would direct the Comptroller General to review 
State policies that encourage or may create barriers for 
repairing and replacing leaking natural gas distribution 
pipelines, make recommendations to the PHMSA Administrator and 
Congress, and require the PHMSA Administrator to consider 
rulemaking, where cost effective, on any recommendations that 
would significantly improve pipeline safety.

Section 24. Provision of pipeline oil spill response plans to 
        congressional committees

    This section would codify and expand the practice of 
sharing oil spill response plans with each chairman and ranking 
member of a relevant congressional committee. Under current 
practice, the PHMSA Administrator may provide the chairman of a 
relevant congressional committee the opportunity to review an 
unredacted copy of an oil spill response plan. This section 
would expand the courtesy to the ranking member of a relevant 
congressional committee. The Committee expects that 
confidentiality requirements relating to the protection of 
sensitive security information would be applied in the same 
manner as under current practice, consistent with the 
protection of Security Sensitive Information. Nothing in this 
section is intended to limit the access of other committees of 
Congress to such information, and the Committee expects that 
individuals receiving the unredacted copies of the reports will 
protect the data identified in section 60138 of title 49, 
United States Code, from public disclosure.

Section 25. Consultation with FERC as part of the pre-filing procedures 
        and permitting process for new natural gas pipeline 
        infrastructure

    This section would require PHMSA to consult with the 
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) in the pre-filing 
phase of FERC's permit consideration.

                        Changes in Existing Law

    In compliance with paragraph 12 of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
material is printed in italic, existing law in which no change 
is proposed is shown in roman):

                        TITLE 49. TRANSPORTATION


             SUBTITLE III. GENERAL AND INTERMODAL PROGRAMS

               CHAPTER 61. ONE-CALL NOTIFICATION PROGRAMS

Sec. 6107. Authorization of appropriations

  (a) For Grants to States.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Secretary to provide grants to States under 
section 6106 [$1,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2012 through 
2015] $1,060,000 for each of the fiscal years 2016 through 
2019. Such funds shall remain available until expended.
  (b) For Administration.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Secretary such sums as may be necessary to 
carry out sections 6103, 6104, and 6105 for fiscal years [2012 
through 2015] 2016 through 2019.

                        TITLE 49. TRANSPORTATION


                        SUBTITLE VIII. PIPELINES

                          CHAPTER 601. SAFETY

Sec. 60101. Definitions

  (a) General.--In this chapter--

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (21) ``transporting gas''--
                  (A) means--
                          (i) the gathering, transmission, or 
                        distribution of gas by pipeline, or the 
                        storage of gas, in interstate or 
                        foreign commerce; and
                          (ii) the movement of gas through 
                        regulated gathering lines; but
                  (B) does not include the gathering of gas, 
                other than gathering through regulated 
                gathering lines, in those rural locations that 
                are located outside the limits of any 
                incorporated or unincorporated city, town, or 
                village, or any other designated residential or 
                commercial area (including a subdivision, 
                business, shopping center, or community 
                development) or any similar populated area that 
                the Secretary of Transportation determines to 
                be a nonrural area, except that the term 
                ``transporting gas'' includes the movement of 
                gas through regulated gathering lines[.];
          (22) ``transporting hazardous liquid''--
                  (A) means--
                          (i) the movement of hazardous liquid 
                        by pipeline, or the storage of 
                        hazardous liquid incidental to the 
                        movement of hazardous liquid by 
                        pipeline, in or affecting interstate or 
                        foreign commerce; and
                          (ii) the movement of hazardous liquid 
                        through regulated gathering lines; but
                  (B) does not include moving hazardous liquid 
                through--
                          (i) gathering lines (except regulated 
                        gathering lines) in a rural area;
                          (ii) onshore production, refining, or 
                        manufacturing facilities; or
                          (iii) storage or in-plant piping 
                        systems associated with onshore 
                        production, refining, or manufacturing 
                        facilities;
          (23) ``risk management'' means the systematic 
        application, by the owner or operator of a pipeline 
        facility, of management policies, procedures, finite 
        resources, and practices to the tasks of identifying, 
        analyzing, assessing, reducing, and controlling risk in 
        order to protect employees, the general public, the 
        environment, and pipeline facilities;
          (24) ``risk management plan'' means a management plan 
        utilized by a gas or hazardous liquid pipeline facility 
        owner or operator that encompasses risk management; 
        [and]
          (25) ``Secretary'' means the Secretary of 
        Transportation[.];
          (26) ``small scale liquefied natural gas facility'' 
        means an intrastate liquefied natural gas facility 
        (other than a peak shaving facility) that produces 
        liquefied natural gas for--
                  (A) use as a fuel in the United States; or
                  (B) transportation in the United States by a 
                means other than a pipeline facility; and
          (27) ``underground natural gas storage facility'' 
        means a gas pipeline facility that stores gas in an 
        underground facility, including--
                  (A) a depleted hydrocarbon reservoir;
                  (B) an aquifer reservoir; or
                  (C) a solution mined salt cavern reservoir.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Sec. 60103. Standards for liquefied natural gas pipeline facilities

  [(a) Location Standards.--The Secretary of Transportation 
shall prescribe minimum safety standards for deciding on the 
location of a new liquefied natural gas pipeline facility. In 
prescribing a standard, the Secretary shall consider the--
          [(1) kind and use of the facility;
          [(2) existing and projected population and 
        demographic characteristics of the location;
          [(3) existing and proposed land use near the 
        location;
          [(4) natural physical aspects of the location;
          [(5) medical, law enforcement, and fire prevention 
        capabilities near the location that can cope with a 
        risk caused by the facility; and
          [(6) need to encourage remote siting.]
  (a) Location Standards.--
          (1) In general.--The Secretary of Transportation 
        shall prescribe minimum safety standards for deciding 
        on the location of a new liquefied natural gas pipeline 
        facility or small scale liquefied natural gas facility.
          (2) Liquefied natural gas facilities.--In prescribing 
        a minimum safety standard for deciding on the location 
        of a new liquefied natural gas facility, the Secretary 
        of Transportation shall consider--
                  (A) the kind and use of the facility;
                  (B) the existing and projected population and 
                demographic characteristics of the location;
                  (C) the existing and proposed land uses near 
                the location;
                  (D) the natural physical aspects of the 
                location;
                  (E) medical, law enforcement, and fire 
                prevention capabilities near the location that 
                can cope with a risk caused by the facility; 
                and
                  (F) the need to encourage remote siting.
          (3) Small scale liquefied natural gas facilities.--
                  (A) In general.--Not later than 18 months 
                after the date of the enactment of the SAFE 
                PIPES Act, the Secretary of Transportation 
                shall prescribe minimum safety standards for 
                small scale liquefied natural gas facilities.
                  (B) Considerations.--In prescribing minimum 
                safety standards under this paragraph, the 
                Secretary shall consider--
                          (i) the value of establishing risk-
                        based approaches;
                          (ii) the benefit of incorporating 
                        industry standards and best practices;
                          (iii) the need to encourage the use 
                        of best available technology; and
                          (iv) the factors prescribed in 
                        paragraph (2), as appropriate.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Sec. 60103A. Standards for underground natural gas storage facilities

  (a) Minimum Uniform Safety Standards.--Not later than 2 years 
after the date of the enactment of the SAFE PIPES Act, the 
Secretary of Transportation, in consultation with the heads of 
other relevant Federal agencies, shall issue minimum uniform 
safety standards, incorporating, to the extent practicable, 
consensus standards for the operation, environmental 
protection, and integrity management of underground natural gas 
storage facilities.
  (b) Considerations.--In developing uniform safety standards 
under subsection (a), the Secretary shall--
          (1) consider the economic impacts of the regulations 
        on individual gas customers to the extent practicable;
          (2) ensure that the regulations do not have a 
        significant economic impact on end users to the extent 
        practicable; and
          (3) consider existing consensus standards.
  (c) User Fees.--
          (1) In general.--A fee shall be imposed on an entity 
        operating an underground natural gas storage facility 
        to which this section applies. Any such fee imposed 
        shall be collected before the end of the fiscal year to 
        which it applies.
          (2) Means of collection.--The Secretary shall 
        prescribe procedures to collect fees under this 
        subsection. The Secretary may use a department, agency, 
        or instrumentality of the United States Government or 
        of a State or local government to collect the fee and 
        may reimburse the department, agency, or 
        instrumentality a reasonable amount for its services.
          (3) Use of fees.--
                  (A) Account.--There is established an 
                underground natural gas storage facility safety 
                account in the Pipeline Safety Fund established 
                under section 60301, in the Treasury of the 
                United States.
                  (B) Use of fees.--A fee collected under this 
                subsection--
                          (i) shall be deposited in the 
                        underground natural gas storage 
                        facility safety account; and
                          (ii) if the fee is related to an 
                        underground natural gas storage 
                        facility, may be used only for an 
                        activity related to underground natural 
                        gas storage safety under this section.
                  (C) Limitation.--Amounts collected under this 
                subsection shall be made available only to the 
                extent provided in advance in an appropriation 
                law for an activity related to underground 
                natural gas storage safety.
  (d) Rules of Construction.--
          (1) In general.--Nothing in this section may be 
        construed to affect any Federal regulation relating to 
        gas pipeline facilities that is in effect on the day 
        before the date of enactment of the SAFE PIPES Act.
          (2) Limitations.--Nothing in this section may be 
        construed to authorize the Secretary--
                  (A) to prescribe the location of an 
                underground natural gas storage facility; or
                  (B) to require the Secretary's permission to 
                construct a facility referred to in 
                subparagraph (A).

Sec. 60115. Technical safety standards committees

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


  (b) Composition and Appointment.--
          (1) The Technical Pipeline Safety Standards Committee 
        is composed of 15 members appointed by the Secretary of 
        Transportation after consulting with public and private 
        agencies concerned with the technical aspect of 
        transporting gas or operating a gas pipeline facility. 
        Each member must be experienced in the safety 
        regulation of transporting gas and of gas pipeline 
        facilities or technically qualified, by training, 
        experience, or knowledge in at least one field of 
        engineering applicable to transporting gas or operating 
        a gas pipeline facility, to evaluate gas pipeline 
        safety standards or risk management principles.
          (2) The Technical Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Safety 
        Standards Committee is composed of 15 members appointed 
        by the Secretary after consulting with public and 
        private agencies concerned with the technical aspect of 
        transporting hazardous liquid or operating a hazardous 
        liquid pipeline facility. Each member must be 
        experienced in the safety regulation of transporting 
        hazardous liquid and of hazardous liquid pipeline 
        facilities or technically qualified, by training, 
        experience, or knowledge in at least one field of 
        engineering applicable to transporting hazardous liquid 
        or operating a hazardous liquid pipeline facility, to 
        evaluate hazardous liquid pipeline safety standards or 
        risk management principles.
          (3) The members of each committee are appointed as 
        follows:
                  (A) 5 individuals selected from departments, 
                agencies, and instrumentalities of the United 
                States Government and of the States.
                  (B) 5 individuals selected from the natural 
                gas or hazardous liquid industry, as 
                appropriate, after consulting with industry 
                representatives.
                  (C) 5 individuals selected from the general 
                public.
          (4)(A) Two of the individuals selected for each 
        committee under paragraph (3)(A) of this subsection 
        must be [State commissioners. The Secretary shall 
        consult with the national organization of State 
        commissions before selecting those 2 individuals.] 
        State officials. The Secretary shall consult with 
        national organizations representing State commissioners 
        or governors when making a selection under this 
        subparagraph.
                  (B) At least 3 of the individuals selected 
                for each committee under paragraph (3)(B) of 
                this subsection must be currently in the active 
                operation of natural gas pipelines or hazardous 
                liquid pipeline facilities, as appropriate. At 
                least 1 of the individuals selected for each 
                committee under paragraph (3)(B) shall have 
                education, background, or experience in risk 
                assessment and cost-benefit analysis. The 
                Secretary shall consult with the national 
                organizations representing the owners and 
                operators of pipeline facilities before 
                selecting individuals under paragraph (3)(B).
                  (C) Two of the individuals selected for each 
                committee under paragraph (3)(C) of this 
                subsection must have education, background, or 
                experience in environmental protection or 
                public safety. At least 1 of the individuals 
                selected for each committee under paragraph 
                (3)(C) shall have education, background, or 
                experience in risk assessment and cost-benefit 
                analysis. At least one individual selected for 
                each committee under paragraph (3)(C) may not 
                have a financial interest in the pipeline, 
                petroleum, or natural gas industries.
                  (D) None of the individuals selected for a 
                committee under paragraph (3)(C) may have a 
                significant financial interest in the pipeline, 
                petroleum, or gas industry.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Sec. 60124. Biennial reports

  (a) Submission and Contents.--Not later than August 15, 1997, 
and every 2 years thereafter, the Secretary of Transportation 
shall submit to Congress a report on carrying out this chapter 
for the 2 immediately preceding calendar years for gas and a 
report on carrying out this chapter for such period for 
hazardous liquid. Each report shall include the following 
information about the prior year for gas or hazardous liquid, 
as appropriate:
          (1) a thorough compilation of the leak repairs, 
        accidents, and casualties and a statement of cause when 
        investigated and established by the National 
        Transportation Safety Board.
          (2) a list of applicable pipeline safety standards 
        prescribed under this chapter including identification 
        of standards prescribed during the year.
          (3) a summary of the reasons for each waiver granted 
        under section 60118(c) and (d) of this title.
          (4) an evaluation of the degree of compliance with 
        applicable safety standards, including a list of 
        enforcement actions and compromises of alleged 
        violations by location and company name.
          (5) a summary of outstanding problems in carrying out 
        this chapter, in order of priority.
          (6) an analysis and evaluation of--
                  (A) research activities, including their 
                policy implications, completed as a result of 
                the United States Government and private 
                sponsorship; [and]
                  (B) technological progress in safety 
                achieved[.]; and
                  (C) research activities in collaboration with 
                non-Federal entities, including the intended 
                improvements to safety technology, inspection 
                technology, operator response time, and 
                emergency responder incident response time.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Sec. 60125. Authorization of appropriations

  (a) Gas and Hazardous Liquid.--
          (1) In general.--To carry out the provisions of this 
        chapter related to gas and hazardous liquid and section 
        12 of the Pipeline Safety Improvement Act of 2002 (49 
        U.S.C. 60101 note; Public Law 107-355), [there is 
        authorized to be appropriated to the Department of 
        Transportation for each of fiscal years 2012 through 
        2015, from fees collected under section 60301, 
        $90,679,000, of which $4,746,000 is for carrying out 
        such section 12 and $36,194,000 is for making grants.] 
        there are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        Department of Transportation from fees collected under 
        section 60301--
                  (A) $127,060,000 for fiscal year 2016, of 
                which $9,325,000 shall be expended for carrying 
                out such section 12 and $42,515,000 shall be 
                expended for making grants;
                  (B) $129,671,000 for fiscal year 2017, of 
                which $9,418,000 shall be expended for carrying 
                out such section 12 and $42,941,000 shall be 
                expended for making grants;
                  (C) $132,334,000 for fiscal year 2018, of 
                which $9,512,000 shall be expended for carrying 
                out such section 12 and $43,371,000 shall be 
                expended for making grants; and
                  (D) $135,051,000 for fiscal year 2019, of 
                which $9,607,000 shall be expended for carrying 
                out such section 12 and $43,805,000 shall be 
                expended for making grants.
          (2) Trust fund amounts.--In addition to the amounts 
        authorized to be appropriated by paragraph (1), [there 
        is authorized to be appropriated for each of fiscal 
        years 2012 through 2015 from the Oil Spill Liability 
        Trust Fund to carry out the provisions of this chapter 
        related to hazardous liquid and section 12 of the 
        Pipeline Safety Improvement Act of 2002 (49 U.S.C. 
        60101 note; Public Law 107-355), $18,573,000, of which 
        $2,174,000 is for carrying out such section 12 and 
        $4,558,000 is for making grants.] there are authorized 
        to be appropriated from the Oil Spill Liability Trust 
        Fund to carry out the provisions of this chapter 
        related to hazardous liquid and section 12 of the 
        Pipeline Safety Improvement Act of 2002 (49 U.S.C. 
        60101 note; Public Law 107-355)--
                  (A) $19,890,000 for fiscal year 2016, of 
                which $3,108,000 shall be expended for carrying 
                out such section 12 and $8,708,000 shall be 
                expended for making grants;
                  (B) $20,288,000 for fiscal year 2017, of 
                which $3,139,000 shall be expended for carrying 
                out such section 12 and $8,795,000 shall be 
                expended for making grants;
                  (C) $20,694,000 for fiscal year 2018, of 
                which $3,171,000 shall be expended for carrying 
                out such section 12 and $8,883,000 shall be 
                expended for making grants; and
                  (D) $21,108,000 for fiscal year 2019, of 
                which $3,203,000 shall be expended for carrying 
                out such section 12 and $8,972,000 shall be 
                expended for making grants.
  (b) Emergency Response Grants.--
          (1) In general.--The Secretary may establish a 
        program for making grants to State, county, and local 
        governments in high consequence areas, as defined by 
        the Secretary, for emergency response management, 
        training, and technical assistance. To the extent that 
        such grants are used to train emergency responders, 
        such training shall ensure that emergency responders 
        have the ability to protect nearby persons, property, 
        and the environment from the effects of accidents or 
        incidents involving gas or hazardous liquid pipelines, 
        in accordance with existing regulations.
          (2) Authorization of appropriations.--There is 
        authorized to be appropriated $10,000,000 for each of 
        fiscal years [2012 through 2015] 2016 through 2019 to 
        carry out this subsection.
  (c) Crediting Appropriations for Expenditures for Training.--
The Secretary may credit to an appropriation authorized under 
subsection (a) amounts received from sources other than the 
Government for reimbursement for expenses incurred by the 
Secretary in providing training.

Sec. 60130. Pipeline safety information grants to communities

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


  (c) Authorization of Appropriations.--There is authorized to 
be appropriated to the Secretary of Transportation for carrying 
out this section $1,500,000 for each of fiscal years [2012 
through 2015] 2016 through 2019. Such amounts shall not be 
derived from user fees collected under section 60301.

Sec. 60134. State damage prevention programs

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


  (i) Authorization of Appropriations.--There is authorized to 
be appropriated to the Secretary to provide grants under this 
section $1,500,000 for each of fiscal years [2012 through 2015] 
2016 through 2019. Such funds shall remain available until 
expended.

                PIPELINE SAFETY IMPROVEMENT ACT OF 2002


                  [Public Law 107-355; 116 Stat. 2997]

SEC. 12. PIPELINE INTEGRITY, SAFETY, AND RELIABILITY RESEARCH AND 
                    DEVELOPMENT.

[49 U.S.C. 60101 note]

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


  (f) Pipeline Integrity Program.--Of the amounts available in 
the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund established by section 9509 
of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (26 U.S.C. 9509), 
$3,000,000 shall be transferred to the Secretary of 
Transportation, as provided in appropriation Acts, to carry out 
programs for detection, prevention, and mitigation of oil 
spills for each of the fiscal years [2012 through 2015] 2016 
through 2019.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


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