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                                                      Calendar No. 420
114th Congress    }                                     {       Report
                                 SENATE
 2d Session       }                                     {      114-236

======================================================================
 
         ENERGY AND WATER DEVELOPMENT APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2017

                                _______
                                

                 April 14, 2016.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

  Mr. Alexander, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the 
                               following

                                 REPORT

                         [To accompany S. 2804]

    The Committee on Appropriations reports the bill (S. 2804) 
making appropriations for energy and water development and 
related agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2017, 
and for other purposes, reports favorably thereon and 
recommends that the bill do pass.




New obligational authority

Total of bill as reported to the Senate................. $38,370,741,000
Amount of 2016 appropriations...........................  37,322,990,000
Amount of 2017 budget estimate..........................  37,547,285,000
Bill as recommended to Senate compared to--
    2016 appropriations.................................  +1,047,751,000
    2017 budget estimate................................    +823,456,000








                                CONTENTS

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page

Purpose..........................................................     4
Summary of Estimates and Recommendations.........................     4
Introduction.....................................................     4
Title I:
    Department of Defense--Civil: Department of the Army:
        Corps of Engineers--Civil:
            Investigations.......................................     8
            Construction.........................................    15
            Mississippi River and Tributaries....................    23
            Operations and Maintenance...........................    25
            Regulatory Program...................................    43
            Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program......    43
            Flood Control and Coastal Emergencies................    43
            Expenses.............................................    43
            Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Civil 
              Works).............................................    43
        General Provisions--Corps of Engineers--Civil............    44
Title II:
    Department of the Interior:
        Central Utah Project Completion Account..................    45
        Bureau of Reclamation:
            Water and Related Resources..........................    47
            Central Valley Project Restoration Fund..............    54
            California Bay-Delta Restoration.....................    55
            Policy and Administration............................    55
            Indian Water Rights Settlements......................    55
            San Joaquin Restoration Fund.........................    56
        General Provisions--Department of the Interior...........    56
Title III:
    Department of Energy:
        Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy...................    63
        Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability..............    70
        Nuclear Energy...........................................    73
        Fossil Energy Research and Development...................    76
        Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves...................    80
        Strategic Petroleum Reserve..............................    80
        Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve.......................    81
        Energy Information Administration........................    81
        Non-Defense Environmental Cleanup........................    81
        Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning 
          Fund...................................................    82
        Science..................................................    83
        Advanced Research Projects Agency--Energy................    88
        Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs..............    88
        Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program.............    89
        Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program..    89
        Departmental Administration..............................    90
        Office of the Inspector General..........................    91
        Weapons Activities.......................................    92
        Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation.........................    95
        Naval Reactors...........................................    97
        Federal Salaries and Expenses............................    98
        Defense Environmental Cleanup............................    98
        Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning 
          Federal Contribution...................................   101
        Other Defense Activities.................................   101
        Power Marketing Administrations:
            Operations and Maintenance, Southeastern Power 
              Administration.....................................   101
            Construction, Rehabilitation, Operations and 
              Maintenance, Western Area Power Administration.....   102
            Falcon and Amistad Operating and Maintenance Fund....   102
        Federal Energy Regulatory Commission: Salaries and 
          Expenses...............................................   102
        General Provisions--Department of Energy.................   126
Title IV:
    Independent Agencies:
        Appalachian Regional Commission..........................   127
        Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board..................   127
        Delta Regional Authority.................................   128
        Denali Commission........................................   128
        Northern Border Regional Commission......................   128
        Nuclear Regulatory Commission............................   128
            Office of Inspector General..........................   131
        Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board.....................   132
    General Provisions...........................................   132
Title V: General Provisions......................................   133
Compliance With Paragraph 7, Rule XVI, of the Standing Rules of 
  the 
  Senate.........................................................   134
Compliance With Paragraph 7(c), Rule XXVI, of the Standing Rules 
  of the 
  Senate.........................................................   134
Compliance With Paragraph 12, Rule XXVI, of the Standing Rules of 
  the 
  Senate.........................................................   135
Budgetary Impact of Bill.........................................   137
Comparative Statement of Budget Authority........................   138

                                PURPOSE

    The purpose of this bill is to provide appropriations for 
fiscal year 2017, beginning October 1, 2016, and ending 
September 30, 2017, for energy and water development, and for 
other related purposes. It supplies funds for water resources 
development programs and related activities of the Corps of 
Engineers' civil works program in title I; for the Department 
of the Interior's Bureau of Reclamation and Central Utah 
Project in title II; for the Department of Energy's energy 
research activities, including environmental restoration and 
waste management, and atomic energy defense activities of the 
National Nuclear Security Administration in title III; and for 
independent agencies and commissions, including the Appalachian 
Regional Commission, Delta Regional Authority, Denali 
Commission, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in title IV.

                SUMMARY OF ESTIMATES AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    The fiscal year 2017 budget estimates for the bill total 
$37,547,285,000 in new budget (obligational) authority. The 
recommendation of the Committee totals $38,370,741,000. This is 
$823,456,000 above the budget estimates and $1,047,751,000 
above the enacted appropriation for the current fiscal year.

                         Subcommittee Hearings

    The Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water 
Development held four sessions in connection with the fiscal 
year 2017 appropriations bill. Witnesses included officials and 
representatives of the Federal agencies under the 
subcommittee's jurisdiction.
    The recommendations for fiscal year 2017, therefore, have 
been developed after careful consideration of available data.

                              INTRODUCTION

    The Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water 
Development's allocation totals $37,537,000,000 of net budget 
authority for fiscal year 2017, including adjustments, which 
represents an increase of $355,010,000 over fiscal year 2016. 
Within the amount recommended, $20,023,000,000 is classified as 
defense (050) spending and $17,514,000,000 is classified as 
non-defense (non-050) spending.
    The Committee's constitutional responsibility to oversee 
the Federal Government's expenditure of taxpayer dollars 
requires setting priorities and ensuring these funds are 
executed as Congress has directed. To develop this 
recommendation, the Committee held four budget hearings in 
February and March 2016 to examine the budget requests for the 
Corps of Engineers, Bureau of Reclamation, Department of 
Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, and the 
Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The hearings provided officials 
from the agencies with an opportunity to present the 
administration's most pressing priorities to the Committee. The 
Committee also invited and received recommendations from 
Senators.
    The Committee's recommendation reflects that process, and 
includes funding for the highest priority activities across the 
agencies funded in the bill. The recommendation includes funds 
for critical water infrastructure, including our Nation's 
inland waterways, ports, and harbors; agricultural water supply 
and drought relief in the West; groundbreaking scientific 
research and development, including world-class supercomputing; 
support for the Nation's nuclear weapons, non-proliferation, 
and nuclear Navy programs; and critical economic development. 
The Committee did not recommend funding for low-priority 
programs, and rescinded unused funds from prior years.

                               Oversight

    To ensure appropriate oversight of taxpayer dollars, the 
Committee's recommendation includes financial reporting 
requirements in each title of the bill, and creates additional 
budget control points for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

                                TITLE I

                       CORPS OF ENGINEERS--CIVIL

                         DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

                       Corps of Engineers--Civil

                       OVERVIEW OF RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $6,000,000,000 for the Corps of 
Engineers, an increase of $1,380,000,000 from the budget 
request.
    The Committee recommendation sets priorities by supporting 
our Nation's infrastructure. Specifically, the Committee 
recommendation provides adequate appropriations to utilize all 
of the estimated $106,000,000 of fiscal year 2017 revenues from 
the Inland Waterways Trust Fund and meets the target for Harbor 
Maintenance Trust Fund expenditures prescribed for the Corps of 
Engineers in the Water Resources Reform and Development Act of 
2014 [WRRDA].

                              INTRODUCTION

    The Corps of Engineers' civil works mission is to provide 
quality, responsive engineering services to the Nation in peace 
and war. Approximately 23,000 civilians and about 290 military 
officers are responsible for executing the civil works mission. 
This bill only funds the civil works functions of the Corps of 
Engineers.
    The Corps of Engineers maintains our inland waterways, 
keeps our ports open, manages a portion of our drinking water 
supply, provides emission free electricity from dams, looks 
after many of our recreational waters, helps manage the river 
levels during flooding, provides environmental stewardship, and 
emergency response to natural disasters. The annual net 
economic benefit generated by the Corps of Engineers' civil 
works mission is estimated to be $109,830,000,000, which 
equates to a return of about $16.60 for every $1 expended.
    The Corps of Engineers' responsibilities include:
  --navigation systems, including 13,000 miles of deep draft 
        channels, 12,000 miles of inland waterways, 239 lock 
        chambers, and 1,067 harbors which handle over 2.3 
        billion tons of cargo annually;
  --flood risk management infrastructure, including 709 dams, 
        14,700 miles of levees, and multiple hurricane and 
        storm damage risk reduction projects along the coast;
  --municipal and industrial water supply storage at 136 
        projects spread across 25 States;
  --environmental stewardship, infrastructure, and ecosystem 
        restoration;
  --recreation for approximately 370 million recreation visits 
        per year to Corps of Engineers' projects;
  --regulation of waters under Federal statutes; and
  --maintaining hydropower capacity of nearly 24,000 megawatts 
        at 75 projects.

                       FISCAL YEAR 2017 WORK PLAN

    The Committee has recommended funding above the budget 
request for Investigations, Construction, Operations and 
Maintenance, and Mississippi River and Tributaries. The Corps 
of Engineers is directed to submit to the Committee a work 
plan, not later than 60 days after the date of enactment of 
this act, subject to the Committee's approval, proposing its 
allocation of these additional funds. The Corps of Engineers is 
directed not to obligate any funding above the budget request 
for studies or projects until the Committee has approved the 
work plan for fiscal year 2017. The work plan shall be 
consistent with the following general guidance, as well as the 
specific direction the Committee provides within each account.
  --None of the funds may be used for any item for which the 
        Committee has specifically denied funding.
  --Except for funds proposed for new starts, the additional 
        funds are provided for ongoing studies or projects that 
        were either not included in the budget request or for 
        which the budget request was inadequate.
  --The work plan shall include a single group of new starts 
        for Investigations and Construction.
  --Funding associated with a category may be allocated to 
        eligible studies or projects within that category.
  --Funding associated with a subcategory may be allocated only 
        to eligible studies or projects within that 
        subcategory.
  --The Corps of Engineers may not withhold funding from a 
        study or project because it is inconsistent with the 
        administration's policy.
  --The Committee notes that these funds are in excess of the 
        administration's budget request, and that 
        administration budget metrics should not disqualify a 
        study or project from being funded.

                             REPROGRAMMING

    The Committee is retaining the reprogramming legislation 
provided in the Energy and Water Development and Related 
Agencies Appropriations Act, 2016.

                         AQUACULTURE ACTIVITIES

    Since 2007, shellfish growers in the State of Washington 
have submitted approximately 1,000 requests to initiate or 
expand aquaculture activities. To date, the Corps of Engineers 
has not processed any of these requests and the Committee is 
concerned with this ongoing delay. The Committee directs the 
Corps of Engineers to work with the National Marine Fisheries 
Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to complete 
Endangered Species Act consultations, finalize the associated 
Biological Opinion(s), and process the shellfish growers' 
requests. The Committee further encourages the Corps of 
Engineers to communicate directly with the regulated industry 
and other interested stakeholders to ensure all have clarity on 
permitting requirements.

                    NEW STARTS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2017

    The Committee recommends new starts in both the 
Investigations and Construction accounts for fiscal year 2017. 
The Committee decision is based, in part, on the budget request 
which provides funding to complete 11 feasibility studies, 1 
preconstruction engineering design [PED] studies, and 6 
construction projects.
    Investments in our infrastructure are investments in our 
economy. These investments should be continued even during 
constrained budgets, as the benefits continue to accrue for 
decades. The Committee recommends up to 5 new feasibility study 
starts, and 8 new construction starts.
    The Corps of Engineers is directed to propose, not later 
than 60 days after the date of enactment of this act, a single 
group of new starts to the Committee as a part of the work 
plan, under the direction included above under the heading 
``Fiscal Year 2017 Work Plan''.
    A new start construction shall not be required for work 
undertaken to correct a design deficiency on an existing 
Federal project; it shall be considered ongoing work.

                   CONGRESSIONALLY DIRECTED SPENDING

    The Committee did not accept or include Congressionally 
Directed Spending, as defined in section 5(a) of rule XLIV of 
the Standing Rules of the Senate. However, the Committee has 
recommended additional programmatic funds for Investigations, 
Construction, Operations and Maintenance, and Mississippi River 
and Tributaries to address deficiencies in the budget request. 
In some cases, these additional funds have been included within 
defined categories, as in prior years, and are described in 
more detail in their respective sections, below.

                             INVESTIGATIONS

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $121,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      85,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     126,522,000

    The Committee recommends $126,522,000 for Investigations, 
an increase of $41,522,000 from the budget request. The 
Committee's recommendation allows the Corps of Engineers to 
begin up to 5 new feasibility study starts.

                              INTRODUCTION

    Funding in this account is used to develop feasibility and 
PED studies to address the Nation's water infrastructure needs, 
in support of project authorization. The Committee is very 
concerned that only one-third of the budget request for 
Investigations is directed to specifically authorized studies, 
with the remainder directed to nationwide programs that will 
not result in construction recommendations. The Committee 
recognizes that the administration's budget does not provide 
adequate funding for Investigations, and specifically PED 
funding to allow many of America's most important waterways to 
move efficiently from planning to construction. The Committee 
therefore recommends additional funding to be used to 
seamlessly continue feasibility studies into the PED study 
phase.

                               NEW STARTS

    The Committee's recommendation includes funding for up to 5 
new feasibility study starts. Each new feasibility study shall 
be selected based on the Corps of Engineers' prioritization 
process and included as a part of the Investigations work plan.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The table below displays the budget request and the 
Committee's recommendation for Investigations. Funding is 
classified as either for feasibility or PED studies, as 
indicated in the columns, to provide greater transparency in 
the study phases.

                   CORPS OF ENGINEERS--INVESTIGATIONS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                Budget  estimate          Committee
                             ----------------------    recommendation
        Project title                              ---------------------
                                 FEAS       PED        FEAS       PED
------------------------------------------------------------------------
           ALABAMA
 
MOBILE HARBOR DEEPENING AND       1,246  .........      1,246  .........
 WIDENING, AL (GENERAL
 REEVALUATION REPORT).......
 
           ALASKA
 
LOWELL CREEK TUNNEL FLOOD           500  .........        500  .........
 DIVERSION, AK..............
UNALASKA (DUTCH) HARBOR, AK.        500  .........        500  .........
 
           ARIZONA
 
LOWER SANTA CRUZ RIVER, AZ..        400  .........        400  .........
 
          ARKANSAS
 
THREE RIVERS, AR............        580  .........        580  .........
 
         CALIFORNIA
 
DRY CREEK (WARM SPRINGS)            425  .........        425  .........
 RESTORATION, CA............
LOS ANGELES RIVER ECOSYSTEM   .........        400  .........        400
 RESTORATION, CA............
PORT OF LONG BEACH NAV IMP,         400  .........        400  .........
 CA.........................
SACRAMENTO RIVER BANK               625  .........        625  .........
 PROTECTION (PHASE 3)
 (GENERAL REEVALUATION
 REPORT), CA................
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO BAY       .........        500  .........        500
 SHORELINE, CA..............
YUBA RIVER FISH PASSAGE, CA         590  .........        590  .........
 (ENGLEBRIGHT & DAGUERRE
 POINT DAMS)................
 
          COLORADO
 
ADAMS AND DENVER COUNTIES,          175  .........        175  .........
 CO.........................
 
         CONNECTICUT
 
NEW HAVEN HARBOR DEEPENING,         500  .........        500  .........
 CT.........................
 
          DELAWARE
 
DELAWARE INLAND BAYS AND            300  .........        300  .........
 DELAWARE BAY COAST, DE.....
 
    DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
 
THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, DC        300  .........        300  .........
 
           FLORIDA
 
MANATEE HARBOR IMPROVEMENTS,        275  .........        275  .........
 FL.........................
 
           GEORGIA
 
PROCTOR CREEK WATERSHED,            200  .........        200  .........
 FULTON COUNTY, GA..........
SAVANNAH HARBOR BELOW               500  .........        500  .........
 AUGUSTA ECOSYSTEM
 RESTORATION, GA............
SWEETWATER CREEK, GA........        500  .........        500  .........
 
            IDAHO
 
BOISE RIVER, BOISE, ID......         73  .........         73  .........
 
          ILLINOIS
 
DU PAGE RIVER, IL...........        400  .........        400  .........
INTERBASIN CONTROL OF GREAT       2,600  .........      2,600  .........
 LAKES- MISSISSIPPI RIVER
 AQUATIC NUISANCE SPECIES,
 IL, IN, OH & WI (BRANDON
 ROAD)......................
KASKASKIA RIVER BASIN, IL...        600  .........        600  .........
ST LOUIS MISSISSIPPI          .........  .........  .........  .........
 RIVERFRONT, MO & IL (SEE
 MISSOURI)..................
 
           INDIANA
 
INTERBASIN CONTROL OF GREAT   .........  .........  .........  .........
 LAKES--MISSISSIPPI RIVER
 AQUATIC NUISANCE SPECIES,
 IL, IN, OH & WI (BRANDON
 ROAD) (SEE ILLINOIS).......
 
            IOWA
 
DES MOINES LEVEE SYSTEM, DES        300  .........        300  .........
 MOINES AND RACCOON RIVERS,
 IA.........................
GRAND RIVER BASIN, IA & MO..        500  .........        500  .........
 
          LOUISIANA
 
INNER HARBOR NAVIGATION             550  .........        550  .........
 CANAL LOCK REPLACEMENT, LA
 (GENERAL REEVALUATION
 REPORT)....................
LOUISIANA COASTAL AREA              520  .........        520  .........
 ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION, LA..
MISSISSIPPI RIVER SHIP              450  .........        450  .........
 CHANNEL, GULF TO BATON
 ROUGE, LA (GENERAL
 REEVALUATION REPORT).......
 
          MARYLAND
 
CHESAPEAKE BAY COMPREHENSIVE      1,950  .........      1,950  .........
 PLAN, MD, PA, & VA.........
 
          MINNESOTA
 
MINNESOTA RIVER WATERSHED           873  .........        873  .........
 STUDY, MN & SD (MINNESOTA
 RIVER AUTHORITY)...........
RED RIVER OF THE NORTH        .........  .........  .........  .........
 BASIN, ND, MN, SD &
 MANITOBA, CANADA (SEE NORTH
 DAKOTA)....................
 
          MISSOURI
 
GRAND RIVER BASIN, IA & MO    .........  .........  .........  .........
 (SEE IOWA).................
ST LOUIS MISSISSIPPI                150  .........        150  .........
 RIVERFRONT, MO & IL........
 
         NEW JERSEY
 
NEW JERSEY BACKBAYS, NJ.....        575  .........        575  .........
NEW YORK-NEW JERSEY HARBOR    .........  .........  .........  .........
 AND TRIBUTARIES, NY & NJ
 (SEE NEW YORK).............
RAHWAY RIVER BASIN (UPPER           379  .........        379  .........
 BASIN), NJ.................
 
         NEW MEXICO
 
RIO GRANDE, SANDIA PUEBLO TO        500  .........        500  .........
 ISLETA PUEBLO, NM..........
 
          NEW YORK
 
NASSAU COUNTY BACK BAYS, NY.        300  .........        300  .........
NEW YORK-NEW JERSEY HARBOR          575  .........        575  .........
 AND TRIBUTARIES, NY & NJ...
 
        NORTH DAKOTA
 
RED RIVER OF THE NORTH              496  .........        496  .........
 BASIN, ND, MN, SD &
 MANITOBA, CANADA...........
SOURIS RIVER, ND............        500  .........        500  .........
 
            OHIO
 
INTERBASIN CONTROL OF GREAT   .........  .........  .........  .........
 LAKES-MISSISSIPPI RIVER
 AQUATIC NUISANCE SPECIES,
 IL, IN, OH & WI (BRANDON
 ROAD) (SEE ILLINOIS).......
 
          OKLAHOMA
 
ARKANSAS RIVER CORRIDOR, OK.        415  .........        415  .........
 
        PENNSYLVANIA
 
CHESAPEAKE BAY COMPREHENSIVE  .........  .........  .........  .........
 PLAN, MD, PA, & VA (SEE
 MARYLAND)..................
 
         PUERTO RICO
 
CANO MARTIN PENA, SAN JUAN,   .........        750  .........        750
 PR (ENVIRONMENTAL
 RESTORATION)...............
SAN JUAN HARBOR CHANNEL             730  .........        730  .........
 IMPROVEMENT, PR............
 
            TEXAS
 
COASTAL TEXAS PROTECTION AND      1,825  .........      1,825  .........
 RESTORATION STUDY, TX......
GIWW-BRAZOS RIVER FLOODGATES      1,000  .........      1,000  .........
 & COLORADO RIVER LOCK, TX..
HOUSTON SHIP CHANNEL, TX....      1,750  .........      1,750  .........
MATAGORDA SHIP CHANNEL, TX..        500  .........        500  .........
SPARKS ARROYO COLONIA, EL            47  .........         47  .........
 PASO COUNTY, TX............
 
          VIRGINIA
 
CITY OF NORFOLK, VA.........        575  .........        575  .........
NORFOLK HARBOR AND CHANNELS,        350  .........        350  .........
 VA (55-FOOT DEEPENING)
 (GENERAL REEVALUATION
 REPORT), VA................
 
         WASHINGTON
 
SEATTLE HARBOR, WA..........        500  .........        500  .........
                             -------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL, ITEMS UNDER      27,999      1,650     27,999      1,650
       STATES...............
                             ===========================================
 
       REMAINING ITEMS
 
ADDITIONAL FUNDING FOR
 ONGOING WORK:..............
    FLOOD AND STORM DAMAGE    .........  .........      5,000  .........
     REDUCTION..............
        FLOOD CONTROL.......  .........  .........      4,000  .........
        SHORE PROTECTION....  .........  .........      2,500  .........
    NAVIGATION:.............  .........  .........      5,000  .........
        COASTAL AND DEEP-     .........  .........      5,000  .........
         DRAFT..............
        INLAND..............  .........  .........      5,000  .........
    OTHER AUTHORIZED PROJECT  .........  .........      2,340  .........
     PURPOSES:..............
    ENVIRONMENTAL             .........  .........      1,500  .........
     RESTORATION OR
     COMPLIANCE.............
COORDINATION STUDIES WITH
 OTHER AGENCIES:
    ACCESS TO WATER DATA....        360  .........        360  .........
    COMMITTEE ON MARINE              90  .........         90  .........
     TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS.
    OTHER COORDINATION
     PROGRAMS:
        COORDINATION WITH           455  .........        455  .........
         OTHER WATER
         RESOURCE AGENCIES..
        INTERAGENCY AND             300  .........        300  .........
         INTERNATIONAL
         SUPPORT............
        INTERAGENCY WATER           175  .........        175  .........
         RESOURCE
         DEVELOPMENT........
        INVENTORY OF DAMS...        400  .........        400  .........
        SPECIAL                   1,300  .........      1,300  .........
         INVESTIGATIONS.....
        FERC LICENSING......        100  .........        100  .........
        PLANNING ASSISTANCE       5,500  .........      6,000  .........
         TO STATES..........
 
COLLECTION AND STUDY OF
 BASIC DATA:
    AUTOMATED INFORMATION           251  .........        251  .........
     SYSTEMS SUPPORT TRI-
     CADD...................
    COASTAL FIELD DATA            1,000  .........      1,000  .........
     COLLECTION.............
    FLOOD DAMAGE DATA.......        220  .........        220  .........
    FLOOD PLAIN MANAGEMENT       15,000  .........     16,000  .........
     SERVICES...............
    HYDROLOGIC STUDIES......        500  .........        500  .........
    INTERNATIONAL WATER             125  .........        125  .........
     STUDIES................
    PRECIPITATION STUDIES...        200  .........        200  .........
    REMOTE SENSING/                  75  .........         75  .........
     GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION
     SYSTEM SUPPORT.........
    SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL         47  .........         47  .........
     INFORMATION CENTERS....
    STREAM GAGING...........        550  .........        550  .........
    TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS..        985  .........        985  .........
    WATER RESOURCES               1,000  .........      1,000  .........
     PRIORITIES STUDY.......
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT....     16,818  .........     25,000  .........
 
OTHER-MISC:
    DISPOSITION OF COMPLETED      1,000  .........      1,000  .........
     PROJECTS...............
    NATIONAL FLOOD RISK           5,000  .........      5,000  .........
     MANAGEMENT PROGRAM.....
    NATIONAL SHORELINE              400  .........        400  .........
     MANAGEMENT STUDY.......
    PLANNING SUPPORT PROGRAM      3,000  .........      3,000  .........
    TRIBAL PARTNERSHIP              500  .........      2,000  .........
     PROGRAM................
                             -------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL..............     55,351  .........     96,873  .........
                             ===========================================
      TOTAL.................     83,350      1,650    124,872      1,650
                             ===========================================
      GRAND TOTAL...........  .........     85,000  .........    126,522
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Arctic Deep Draft Port Study.--The Committee encourages the 
Corps of Engineers to continue to thoroughly evaluate the 
proposed deep draft port in Nome, taking into account the wide 
range of economic benefits the project would bring to the 
region, the expansion of search and rescue capabilities it 
would provide, and the national security reasons for its 
construction. The President noted during his visit to Alaska 
that an Arctic port north of Dutch Harbor is needed, and the 
Committee supports that goal.
    Upper Mississippi River-Illinois Waterway System.--In the 
Fiscal Year 2016 Omnibus, the Committee required the Corps of 
Engineers to provide a report detailing the scope, schedule, 
and budget for completing any update or reanalysis of the 
Navigation and Ecosystem Sustainability Program [NESP]. The 
Committee is aware that this report is under review, but the 
Administration has now missed the Committee's deadline by at 
least 3 months. While an updated economic analysis may be 
required, the Administration has failed to tell the Committee 
what it believes is necessary to move forward and complete PED. 
This information is fundamental to the Committee's ability to 
conduct oversight of the program. The Corps of Engineers is 
directed to provide this report to the Committee expeditiously.
    Puget Sound Nearshore Study.--The Committee commends the 
Corps of Engineers for developing an implementation strategy 
for the Puget Sound Nearshore Study with the State of 
Washington in June 2015. The Committee encourages the Corps of 
Engineers to proceed with the tiered implementation strategy by 
advancing four projects through authorities under section 544 
of the Water Resources Development Act of 2000 and an 
additional eight projects through section 206 of the Continuing 
Authorities Program. The Committee directs the Puget Sound 
Nearshore Study to be recognized as the feasibility component 
for the purposes of section 544. The Committee further 
encourages the Corps of Engineers to acknowledge early action 
restoration efforts by the State of Washington as part of the 
overall implementation strategy, including cost share 
obligations.
    Puget Sound Federal Caucus.--The Committee commends the 
Corps of Engineers for signing the Puget Sound Federal Caucus 
Memorandum of Understanding [MOU] on March 23, 2014. The 
recovery and cleanup of Puget Sound is essential to our 
Nation's economy and continued coordination and sharing of 
expertise among Federal partners is critical to furthering 
current efforts. The Committee encourages the Corps of 
Engineers to work with their counterparts in the Puget Sound 
Federal Caucus to renew and strengthen the MOU prior to its 
expiration on March 27, 2017.
    Missouri River Projects.--None of the funds made available 
by this act may be used for the study of the Missouri River 
Projects authorized in section 108 of the Energy and Water 
Development and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2009 
(Public Law 111-8).
    Aquatic Nuisance Species.--The Corps of Engineers is 
directed to expedite authorized actions related to addressing 
the threat Asian carp pose to the Great Lakes basin, including 
the Brandon Road Study. Given the promise Brandon Road Lock and 
Dam holds as a single point to control transfer of invasive 
species, including Asian carp, delays to this study would pose 
an unnecessary threat to the Great Lakes and Mississippi River 
Basin. Upon completion of the study, the Corps of Engineers is 
directed to expeditiously pursue authorization of any proposed 
modification to Brandon Road Lock and Dam through the 
appropriate congressional committees.
    The Corps of Engineers is further directed to establish 
formal emergency procedures under the authorities provided 
under section 1039 of the Water Resources Reform and 
Development Act of 2014 (Public Law 113-121), including rapid 
response protocols, monitoring, and other countermeasures, that 
are appropriate to prevent Asian carp from passing beyond the 
Brandon Road Lock and Dam while still complying with the Lock's 
existing authorized purposes and the River and Harbor Act of 
1899 (33 U.S.C. 401 et seq.). These procedures shall be 
established in coordination with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service and the Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee.
    Research and Development, Additional Topic--Urban Flood 
Damage Reduction and Stream Restoration in Arid Regions.--The 
Committee recommendation includes $2,500,000 for the Corps of 
Engineers' research and development [R&D;] program to continue 
its focus on the management of water resources projects that 
promote public safety; reduce risk; improve operational 
efficiencies; reduce flood damage in arid and semi-arid 
regions; sustain the environment; and position our water 
resource systems to be managed as systems and adaptable due to 
the implications of a changing climate. The R&D; program should 
also continue its focus on science and technology efforts to 
address needs for resilient water resources infrastructure.
    Export Terminals.--The Committee strongly encourages the 
Corps of Engineers to complete environmental review for export 
terminal projects as expeditiously as possible, in a 
transparent manner, and in a reasonable timeframe. In addition, 
the Committee directs the Corps of Engineers to thoroughly 
consult with the Secretary of the Interior, and all affected 
tribal nations regarding the environmental and economic impacts 
as well as treaty rights of all tribes affected by export 
terminal projects undergoing environmental review.
    Disposition of Completed Projects.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $1,000,000 for disposition of completed 
projects to be administered as provided in the budget request. 
The Corps of Engineers is encouraged to work with State and 
local stakeholders on these projects.
    Coastal Resiliency Projects.--In the Consolidated and 
Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015 (Public Law 113-
235), the Committee directed the Corps of Engineers and the 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to work 
collaboratively to identify projects that would enhance the 
resiliency of ocean and coastal ecosystems, communities, and 
economies. With this initial phase of identification now 
complete, the Committee expects the Corps of Engineers to begin 
implementation of these projects through the Continuing 
Authorities Program or other Corps of Engineers authorities, as 
required by WRRDA section 4014. The Committee also urges the 
Corps of Engineers to complete its Implementation Guidance for 
WRRDA Section 4014 as soon as practicable.
    San Francisquito.--The Committee is concerned by repeated 
delays with the San Francisquito Creek flood control study, 18 
years after a significant flood event. The Committee urges the 
Corps of Engineers to proceed at an expeditious pace to achieve 
a Chief's Report by early 2018 and involve other Federal 
agencies so as to avoid future permitting delays.
    Hydraulic Modeling.--The Committee recommends $1,000,000 to 
develop a hydraulic model to assist in the regional strategic 
flood risk management decisions of at least five States along a 
major navigable waterway.
    Oyster Reefs.--The Committee encourages the Corps of 
Engineers when conducting or reviewing environmental 
assessments or impact statements for navigation or coastal 
restoration projects in areas where oyster reefs exist to 
consider water quality impacts on those reefs and where 
feasible mitigate any negative impacts.
    Additional Funding for Ongoing Work.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $30,340,000 in additional funds for 
Investigations. From these additional funds, the Corps of 
Engineers is authorized to begin up to 5 new feasibility 
studies. The Corps of Engineers is directed to allocate these 
additional funds in accordance with the direction in the front 
matter under the heading ``Fiscal Year 2017 Work Plan''. 
Additionally, the Corps of Engineers shall comply with the 
following direction in allocating funds made available for 
Investigations:
  --Allocating funds for PED and new feasibility studies shall 
        take priority over allocating funds for ongoing 
        feasibility studies.
  --The Corps of Engineers shall not apply new start criteria 
        to studies moving from the feasibility phase to the PED 
        phase.
  --The Corps of Engineers shall consider PED phase work as a 
        continuation of the investigations and by definition, a 
        study is not completed until PED is completed.
  --When evaluating proposals for new feasibility studies, the 
        Corps of Engineers is encouraged to give priority to 
        those studies with executed Feasibility Cost Sharing 
        Agreements and a sponsor with the ability to provide 
        any necessary cost share for the study phase. The Corps 
        of Engineers is encouraged to support opportunities to 
        restore critical habitat and enhance the Nation's 
        economic development, job growth, and international 
        competitiveness.
  --When evaluating ongoing studies to propose for funding, the 
        Corps of Engineers shall consider completing or 
        accelerating ongoing studies which will enhance the 
        Nation's economic development, job growth, and 
        international competitiveness; studies located in areas 
        that have suffered recent natural disasters; or studies 
        for areas where revisions to flood frequency flow lines 
        may result in existing infrastructure failing to meet 
        the requirements under the National Flood Insurance 
        Program.
  --The Corps of Engineers shall include appropriate requests 
        for funding in future budget submissions for PED and 
        new feasibility studies initiated in fiscal year 2017.
  --Funding shall be available for existing studies, including 
        studies in the PED phase, that were either not included 
        in the budget request or for which the recommendation 
        in the budget request was inadequate. Ongoing studies 
        that are actively progressing and can utilize the 
        funding in a timely manner are eligible for these 
        additional funds.
  --The Corps of Engineers, in future fiscal years, shall 
        prepare the budget to reflect study completions, 
        defined as completion of PED.

                              CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $1,862,250,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   1,090,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,813,649,000

    The Committee recommends $1,813,649,000 for Construction, 
an increase of $723,649,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee's recommendation allows the Corps of Engineers to 
select up to 8 new construction starts to begin in fiscal year 
2017.

                              INTRODUCTION

    Funding in this account is used for construction, major 
rehabilitation, and related activities for water resources 
development projects having navigation, flood and storm damage 
reduction, water supply, hydroelectric, environmental 
restoration, and other attendant benefits to the Nation. Funds 
to be derived from the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund will be 
applied to cover the Federal share of the Dredged Material 
Disposal Facilities Program.
    The Committee is concerned that the budget request is 
inadequate to meet the needs of projects that depend on funding 
from this account. Consequently, the recommendation includes 
$696,649,000 in additional funding for ongoing work.

                               NEW STARTS

    The Committee recommends up to 8 new construction starts. 
Of the new construction starts, at least one shall be for an 
environmental infrastructure project with priority given to 
projects that use advanced technologies to diversify and 
improve the efficiency of water supplies, and at least one 
navigation project. The Committee considers the Mud Mountain 
Dam project--proposed in the budget request as a new start--to 
be ongoing construction and therefore not subject to a new 
start determination.

                      INLAND WATERWAYS TRUST FUND

    The Committee notes that the budget request only proposed 
to spend $33,750,000 of the estimated $106,000,000 deposits for 
fiscal year 2017 into the Inland Waterways Trust Fund [IWTF]. 
This would leave an estimated $72,250,000 of fiscal year 2017 
IWTF deposits unspent. Congress has taken several steps in 
recent years to provide additional funding to our Nation's 
inland waterways. First, Congress passed WRRDA 2014, which 
reduced the amount of money that is required from the IWTF to 
replace Olmsted Lock. Second, Congress worked with the 
commercial waterways industry to establish a priority list for 
projects that needed to be funded. Third, in 2014, Congress 
enacted the bipartisan Able Act, which increased the user fee 
that commercial barge owners had asked to pay in order to 
provide more money to replace locks and dams across the 
country. These steps increased the amount of funding that was 
available annually for inland waterways projects from the IWTF 
from about $85,000,000 in fiscal year 2014 to now $106,000,000 
this year. Unfortunately, the President's budget request 
severely underfunds inland waterways projects, and in fact, 
only proposes to fund a single project, the Olmsted Locks and 
Dam project, and providing no funding for the other three 
ongoing construction projects, the Locks and Dams 2, 3, and 4, 
Monongahela River Navigation Project, the Kentucky Lock 
Addition, and the Chickamauga Lock. The Committee recommends 
using an additional $75,325,000 of IWTF deposits above the 
budget request to address this deficiency.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The table below displays the budget request and Committee's 
recommendation for Construction:

                                        CORPS OF ENGINEERS--CONSTRUCTION
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                     Committee
                                                                                                  recommendation
                              Item                                    Budget         Committee      compared to
                                                                     estimate     recommendation      budget
                                                                                                     estimate
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                           CALIFORNIA
 
AMERICAN RIVER COMMON FEATURES, NATOMAS BASIN, CA...............          21,150          21,150  ..............
AMERICAN RIVER WATERSHED (FOLSOM DAM MODIFICATIONS), CA.........          20,740          20,740  ..............
AMERICAN RIVER WATERSHED (FOLSOM DAM RAISE), CA.................          21,040          21,040  ..............
HAMILTON CITY, CA...............................................           8,500           8,500  ..............
ISABELLA LAKE, CA (DAM SAFETY)..................................          70,500          70,500  ..............
OAKLAND HARBOR (50 FOOT PROJECT), CA............................           1,056           1,056  ..............
SACRAMENTO RIVER BANK PROTECTION PROJECT, CA....................           8,000           8,000  ..............
SANTA ANA RIVER MAINSTEM, CA....................................          37,200          37,200  ..............
YUBA RIVER BASIN, CA............................................           7,000           7,000  ..............
 
                            DELAWARE
 
DELAWARE RIVER MAIN CHANNEL, NJ, PA, & DE (SEE NEW JERSEY)......  ..............  ..............  ..............
 
                             FLORIDA
 
HERBERT HOOVER DIKE, FL (SEEPAGE CONTROL).......................          49,500          49,500  ..............
SOUTH FLORIDA ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION (EVERGLADES), FL............         106,000         106,000  ..............
 
                             GEORGIA
 
RICHARD B RUSSELL DAM AND LAKE, GA & SC.........................             930             930  ..............
SAVANNAH HARBOR EXPANSION, GA...................................          42,700          42,700  ..............
 
                              IDAHO
 
COLUMBIA RIVER FISH MITIGATION, WA, OR & ID (CRFM) (SEE           ..............  ..............  ..............
 WASHINGTON)....................................................
 
                            ILLINOIS
 
OLMSTED LOCKS AND DAM, OHIO RIVER, IL & KY......................         225,000         225,000  ..............
UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER RESTORATION, IL, IA, MN, MO & WI........          20,000          20,000  ..............
 
                              IOWA
 
MISSOURI RIVER FISH AND WILDLIFE RECOVERY, IA, KS, MO, MT, NE,            18,000          18,000  ..............
 ND & SD........................................................
UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER RESTORATION, IL, IA, MN, MO & WI (SEE     ..............  ..............  ..............
 ILLINOIS)......................................................
 
                             KANSAS
 
MISSOURI RIVER FISH AND WILDLIFE RECOVERY, IA, KS, MO, MT, NE,    ..............  ..............  ..............
 ND & SD (SEE IOWA).............................................
TOPEKA, KS......................................................           8,034           8,034  ..............
 
                            KENTUCKY
 
OLMSTED LOCKS AND DAM, OHIO RIVER, IL & KY (SEE ILLINOIS).......  ..............  ..............  ..............
 
                            LOUISIANA
 
LOUISIANA COASTAL AREA ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION, LA................           9,000           9,000  ..............
 
                            MARYLAND
 
ASSATEAGUE, MD..................................................             600             600  ..............
POPLAR ISLAND, MD...............................................          62,300          62,300
 
                            MINNESOTA
 
UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER RESTORATION, IL, IA, MN, MO & WI (SEE     ..............  ..............  ..............
 ILLINOIS)......................................................
 
                            MISSOURI
 
MISSOURI RIVER FISH AND WILDLIFE RECOVERY, IA, KS, MO, MT, NE,    ..............  ..............  ..............
 ND & SD (SEE IOWA).............................................
MONARCH- CHESTERFIELD, MO.......................................           7,000           7,000  ..............
UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER RESTORATION, IL, IA, MN, MO & WI (SEE     ..............  ..............  ..............
 ILLINOIS)......................................................
 
                             MONTANA
 
MISSOURI RIVER FISH AND WILDLIFE RECOVERY, IA, KS, MO, MT, NE,    ..............  ..............  ..............
 ND & SD (SEE IOWA).............................................
 
                            NEBRASKA
 
MISSOURI RIVER FISH AND WILDLIFE RECOVERY, IA, KS, MO, MT, NE,    ..............  ..............  ..............
 ND & SD (SEE IOWA).............................................
 
                           NEW JERSEY
 
DELAWARE RIVER MAIN CHANNEL, NJ, PA, & DE.......................          33,125          33,125  ..............
RARITAN RIVER BASIN, GREEN BROOK SUB-BASIN, NJ..................          10,000          10,000  ..............
 
                          NORTH DAKOTA
 
MISSOURI RIVER FISH AND WILDLIFE RECOVERY, IA, KS, MO, MT, NE,    ..............  ..............  ..............
 ND & SD (SEE IOWA).............................................
 
                              OHIO
 
BOLIVAR DAM, OH (SEEPAGE CONTROL)...............................           5,000           5,000  ..............
 
                             OREGON
 
COLUMBIA RIVER AT THE MOUTH, OR & WA............................          21,900          21,900  ..............
COLUMBIA RIVER FISH MITIGATION, WA, OR & ID (CRFM) (SEE           ..............  ..............  ..............
 WASHINGTON)....................................................
 
                          PENNSYLVANIA
 
DELAWARE RIVER MAIN CHANNEL, NJ, PA, DE (SEE NEW JERSEY)........  ..............  ..............  ..............
EAST BRANCH CLARION RIVER LAKE, PA..............................          56,250          56,250  ..............
 
                         SOUTH CAROLINA
 
RICHARD B RUSSELL DAM AND LAKE, GA & SC (SEE GEORGIA)...........  ..............  ..............  ..............
 
                          SOUTH DAKOTA
 
MISSOURI RIVER FISH AND WILDLIFE RECOVERY, IA, KS, MO, MT, NE,    ..............  ..............  ..............
 ND & SD (SEE IOWA).............................................
 
                            TENNESSEE
 
CENTER HILL LAKE, TN............................................          40,000          40,000  ..............
 
                              TEXAS
 
BUFFALO BAYOU AND TRIBUTARIES, TX...............................          13,300          13,300  ..............
 
                            VIRGINIA
 
ATLANTIC INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY BRIDGE REPLACEMENT AT DEEP CREEK,          12,000          12,000  ..............
 CHESAPEAKE, VA.................................................
 
                           WASHINGTON
 
COLUMBIA RIVER AT THE MOUTH, OR & WA (SEE OREGON)...............  ..............  ..............  ..............
COLUMBIA RIVER FISH MITIGATION, WA, OR & ID (CRFM)..............          84,000          84,000  ..............
MUD MOUNTAIN DAM, WA............................................          22,350          22,350  ..............
 
                          WEST VIRGINIA
 
BLUESTONE LAKE, WV..............................................           4,000           4,000  ..............
 
                            WISCONSIN
 
UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER RESTORATION, IL, IA, MN, MO & WI (SEE     ..............  ..............  ..............
 ILLINOIS)......................................................
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
    SUBTOTAL, ITEMS UNDER STATES................................       1,046,175       1,046,175  ..............
                                                                 ===============================================
 
                         REMAINING ITEMS
 
ADDITIONAL FUNDING FOR ONGOING WORK FLOOD AND STORM DAMAGE        ..............          62,000         +62,000
 REDUCTION......................................................
    FLOOD CONTROL...............................................  ..............         125,000        +125,000
    SHORE PROTECTION............................................  ..............          50,000         +50,000
    NAVIGATION..................................................  ..............         227,374        +227,374
    INLAND WATERWAYS TRUST FUND PROJECTS........................  ..............          75,325         +75,325
    OTHER AUTHORIZED PROJECT PURPOSES...........................  ..............          48,000         +48,000
    ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION OR COMPLIANCE.....................  ..............          40,000         +40,000
    ENVIRONMENTAL INFRASTRUCURE PROJECTS........................  ..............          68,950         +68,950
AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL PROGRAM...................................  ..............           9,000          +9,000
    CONTINUING AUTHORITIES PROJECTS NOT REQUIRING SPECIFIC
     LEGISLATION:...............................................
    NAVIGATION PROGRAM (SECTION 107)............................  ..............           7,000          +7,000
    BENEFICIAL USES OF DREDGED MATERIAL (SECTION 204)...........           1,000           1,000  ..............
    FLOOD CONTROL PROJECTS (SECTION 205)........................             500             500  ..............
    AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION (SECTION 206).................           1,000           8,000          +7,000
    PROJECT MODIFICATIONS FOR IMPROVEMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT               1,000           3,000          +2,000
     (SECTION 1135).............................................
DAM SAFETY AND SEEPAGE/STABILITY CORRECTION PROGRAM.............          21,000          21,000  ..............
EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION.........................................          19,000          19,000  ..............
INLAND WATERWAYS USERS BOARD - BOARD EXPENSE....................              50              50  ..............
INLAND WATERWAYS USERS BOARD--CORPS EXPENSE.....................             275             275  ..............
RESTORATION OF ABANDONED MINES..................................  ..............           2,000          +2,000
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL, REMAINING ITEMS.................................          43,825         767,474        +723,649
                                                                 ===============================================
      TOTAL.....................................................       1,090,000       1,813,649        +723,649
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal Dispersal Barrier, 
Illinois.--The issue of hydrologic separation shall be fully 
studied by the Corps of Engineers and vetted by the appropriate 
congressional authorizing committees and specifically enacted 
into law. No funds provided in this act may be used for 
construction of hydrologic separation measures.
    Aquatic Plant Control Program.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $9,000,000 for the Aquatic Plant 
Control Program. Within available funds, $4,000,000 is 
recommended for nationwide research and development to address 
invasive aquatic plants; $4,000,000 is for watercraft 
inspection stations, as authorized by section 1039(d) of WRRDA; 
and $1,000,000 is for monitoring and contingency planning 
associated with watercraft inspection stations as authorized by 
section 1039(e) of WRRDA. The Corps of Engineers is encouraged 
to support cost-shared aquatic plant management programs.
    Continuing Authorities Program.--The Committee recommends 
$19,500,000 for the Continuing Authorities Program [CAP], an 
increase of $16,000,000 from the budget request. CAP is a 
useful tool for the Corps of Engineers to undertake small 
localized projects without being encumbered by the lengthy 
study and authorization phases typical of most Corps of 
Engineers projects. The standing CAP authorities are: flood 
control (section 205), emergency streambank and shoreline 
protection (section 14), beach erosion control (section 103), 
mitigation of shore damages (section 111), navigation projects 
(section 107), snagging and clearing (section 208), aquatic 
ecosystem restoration (section 206), beneficial uses of dredged 
material (section 204), and project modifications for 
improvement of the environment (section 1135). The Committee 
has chosen to fund five of the nine sections rather than only 
the four sections proposed in the budget request.
    The Committee urges the administration to execute the CAP 
program laid out by the Committee and include sufficient 
funding for this program in future budget requests. The Corps 
of Engineers shall continue the ongoing processes for 
initiating, suspending, and terminating projects. Suspended 
projects shall not be reactivated or funded unless the sponsor 
reaffirms in writing its support for the project and 
establishes its willingness and capability to execute its 
project responsibilities. The Chief of Engineers shall provide 
an annual report within 60 days of the end of each fiscal year 
detailing the progress made on the backlog of projects. The 
report shall include the completions and terminations as well 
as progress of ongoing work.
    Hawaii Water Management, Oahu, Hawaii.--The Committee is 
encouraged by the progress of the Hawaii Water Management 
Project, and encourages the Corps of Engineers to utilize funds 
appropriated in prior years to this project to continue 
progress in rehabilitating aged Hawaii irrigation 
infrastructure.
    Public-Private Partnerships.--The Committee notes that the 
Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works and the Chief 
of Engineers have expressed strong support for public-private 
partnerships as a method to reduce the Federal cost of future 
construction projects, and selected one such project as a new 
start in the fiscal year 2016 workplan. The Committee continues 
to support the idea of partnerships and recommends that the 
Corps of Engineers identify new construction starts that 
leverage the private sector through partnerships in fiscal year 
2017.
    Reimbursements.--The Committee directs the Secretary to 
prioritize the Corps of Engineers' reimbursement obligations 
based on projects with signed Project Partnership Agreements. 
The Secretary shall demonstrate plans for the additional 
funding provided by Congress to meet the Project Partnership 
Agreement and Federal Government's fiscal responsibilities. The 
Committee encourages the Corps of Engineers to consider 
prioritizing projects where non-Federal sponsors intend to use 
the funds for additional water resources development 
activities.
    McCook and Thornton Reservoirs, Illinois.--The Committee is 
disappointed by the Corps of Engineer's failure to provide 
funding for McCook Reservoir, and concerned by the Corps of 
Engineers' decision to reject congressional intent and its own 
history on this project. Congressional intent has been clear 
since its authorization in 1988, and in subsequent 
modification; the project is 75 percent complete and the 
Committee urges the Corps of Engineers to complete the project. 
The McCook Reservoir was authorized for flood risk management 
and constructed to help alleviate flooding problems in the 
Metropolitan area of Chicago, Illinois.
    Melvin Price Lock and Dam, Illinois and Missouri.--The 
length of time it is taking the Corps of Engineers to rectify 
the seepage problems that the impoundment of the navigation 
pool is causing to the Wood River Levee, as well as escalating 
cost estimates, continues to be troublesome. The Corps of 
Engineers is encouraged to ensure that the Independent External 
Peer Review and oversight of this project continues and is 
conducted in a manner that will not lengthen an already long 
schedule.
    Metro East Saint Louis, Illinois.--The Committee is 
disappointed by the lack of funding provided to the Metro East 
levee system, which is critical to protecting 288,000 residents 
and employees, 111,700 acres and more than $7,000,000,000 in 
property and infrastructure in the Metro East region from 
rising waters on the Mississippi River. These levees are more 
than 70 years old, in need of repair, and have been prioritized 
by the Corps of Engineers in the past. Further, the Committee 
urges the Corps of Engineers to engage in heightened 
cooperation with non-Federal sponsors. The Committee urges the 
Corps of Engineers to enter a cost share agreement with the 
non-Federal sponsors.
    Mud Mountain Dam.--The Committee commends the Corps of 
Engineers and the National Marine Fisheries Service for 
reaching agreement on a biological opinion [BiOp] to mitigate 
the impact of the ongoing operation of Mud Mountain Dam on 
species listed under the Endangered Species Act [ESA] by 
replacing the barrier structure and building a new fish trap 
facility. The Committee directs that a new construction start 
shall not be required for the Mud Mountain fish passage project 
based on how the Corps of Engineers has treated this and 
similar projects in the past. First, this project has received 
funding from the Construction account in prior years, and has 
received more than $13,000,000 during just the last two fiscal 
years. Second, the Corps of Engineers has not considered 
similar projects associated with BiOp compliance as requiring 
new start determinations. Finally, this project is replacing 
existing infrastructure. Accordingly, no new start 
determination shall be required for this project. The Committee 
further encourages the Corps of Engineers to uphold the 
agency's ESA and tribal treaty responsibilities by requesting 
sufficient funding in future budgets to implement the BiOp 
requirements and complete construction by 2020.
    Additional Funding for Ongoing Work.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $696,649,000 in additional funds for 
Construction. From these additional funds, the Corps of 
Engineers is authorized to begin up to eight new construction 
starts. The Corps of Engineers is directed to allocate these 
additional funds in accordance with the direction in the front 
matter under the heading ``Fiscal Year 2017 Work Plan''. 
Additionally, the Corps of Engineers shall comply with the 
following direction in allocating funds made available for 
Construction:
  --Of the additional funds provided in this account for flood 
        and storm damage reduction and flood control, the Corps 
        of Engineers shall allocate not less than $20,000,000 
        to continue construction of projects which principally 
        address drainage in urban areas.
  --Additional considerations include whether the project is 
        positioned to permit award of significant items of 
        construction, achieve necessary milestones, or 
        otherwise realize notable construction progress in 
        fiscal year 2017; and the project sponsor expended 
        funds under an existing Project Partnership Agreement 
        for creditable work, including acquisition of rights-
        of-way.
  --None of these funds shall be used for projects in the 
        Continuing Authorities Program.
  --Funding may be for all categories including periodic beach 
        renourishments and reimbursements.
  --Funding may be made available to projects for which the 
        sponsor is awaiting reimbursement from the Federal 
        Government to continue with construction of remaining 
        authorized project features.
    When allocating the additional funding provided in this 
account, the Corps of Engineers shall consider giving priority 
to the following:
  --the benefits of the funded work to the national economy;
  --extent to which the work will enhance national, regional, 
        or local economic development;
  --number of jobs created directly by the funded activity;
  --ability to obligate the funds allocated within the fiscal 
        year, including consideration of the ability of the 
        non-federal sponsor to provide any required cost-share;
  --ability to complete the project, separable element, or 
        project phase with the funds allocated;
  --for flood and storm damage reduction projects (including 
        authorized nonstructural measures and periodic beach 
        renourishments),
    --population, economic activity, or public infrastructure 
            at risk, as appropriate; and
    --the severity of risk of flooding or the frequency with 
            which an area has experienced flooding;
  --for navigation projects, the number of jobs or level of 
        economic activity to be supported by completion of the 
        project, separable element, or project phase;
  --for projects cost shared with the Inland Waterways Trust 
        Fund [IWTF], the economic impact on the local, 
        regional, and national economy if the project is not 
        funded, as well as discrete elements of work that can 
        be completed within the funding provided in this line 
        item;
  --for other authorized project purposes and environmental 
        restoration or compliance projects, to include the 
        beneficial use of dredged material; and
  --for environmental infrastructure, projects with the greater 
        economic impact, projects in rural communities, and 
        projects that benefit counties or parishes with high 
        poverty rates.
    Environmental Infrastructure.--The Committee recommends an 
additional $68,950,000 in the Construction account for 
environmental infrastructure. The Corps of Engineers is 
encouraged to give priority to projects that could be completed 
in fiscal year 2017; projects in rural areas; and projects 
located in towns, cities, and municipalities experiencing 
compliance difficulties with Federal environmental regulations. 
Within available funds, $10,000,000 is for projects authorized 
under section 595 of the Water Resources Development Act of 
1999, as amended.
    Prioritization of Corps of Engineers Projects in Drought 
Stricken Areas.--The Committee urges the Corps of Engineers to 
prioritize any authorized projects that would alleviate water 
supply issues in areas that have been afflicted by severe 
droughts in the last three fiscal years, to include projects 
focused on the treatment of brackish water.
    Efficiency Review.--The Corps of Engineers is directed to 
initiate the efficiency review required by WRRDA section 1012 
and the evaluation of project partnership agreements required 
by WRRDA section 1013.

                   MISSISSIPPI RIVER AND TRIBUTARIES

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $345,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     222,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     368,000,000

    The Committee recommends $368,000,000 for Mississippi River 
and Tributaries, an increase of $146,000,000 over the budget 
request. Funds recommended in this account are for planning, 
construction, and operations and maintenance activities 
associated with water resource projects located in the lower 
Mississippi River Valley from Cape Girardeau, Missouri to the 
Gulf of Mexico.
    The table below displays the budget request and Committee's 
recommendation:

                                        MISSISSIPPI RIVER AND TRIBUTARIES
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                     Committee
                                                                                                  recommendation
                              Item                                    Budget         Committee      compared to
                                                                     estimate     recommendation      budget
                                                                                                     estimate
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          CONSTRUCTION
 
CHANNEL IMPROVEMENT, REVETMENTS, AR, IL, KY, LA, MS, MO & TN....          36,669          36,669  ..............
MISSISSIPPI RIVER LEVEES, AR, IL, KY, LA, MS, MO &TN............;          21,600          21,600  ..............
CHANNEL IMPROVEMENT, DIKES, AR, IL, KY, LA, MS, MO &TN..........;           3,100           3,100  ..............
ATCHAFALAYA BASIN, LA...........................................           2,505           2,505  ..............
ATCHAFALAYA BASIN FLOODWAY SYSTEM, LA...........................             400             400  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL, CONSTRUCTION....................................          64,274          64,274  ..............
                                                                 ===============================================
                    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
 
CHANNEL IMPROVEMENT, REVETMENTS, AR, IL, KY, LA, MS, MO & TN....          45,605          45,605  ..............
CHANNEL IMPROVEMENT, DREDGING, AR, IL, KY, LA, MS, MO & TN......          15,370          15,370  ..............
CHANNEL IMPROVEMENT, DIKES, AR, IL, KY, LA, MS, MO & TN.........           2,515           2,515  ..............
MISSISSIPPI RIVER LEVEES, AR, IL, KY, LA, MS, MO &TN............;           9,795           9,795  ..............
HELENA HARBOR, PHILLIPS COUNTY, AR..............................              15              15  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, AR...............................             532             532  ..............
LOWER ARKANSAS RIVER, NORTH BANK, AR............................             294             294  ..............
LOWER ARKANSAS RIVER, SOUTH BANK, AR............................             198             198  ..............
ST FRANCIS BASIN, AR & MO.......................................           5,900           5,900  ..............
TENSAS BASIN, BOEUF AND TENSAS RIVERS, AR & LA..................           2,579           2,579  ..............
WHITE RIVER BACKWATER, AR.......................................           1,000           1,000  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, IL...............................              38              38  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, KY...............................              28              28  ..............
ATCHAFALAYA BASIN, LA...........................................          12,898          12,898  ..............
ATCHAFALAYA BASIN FLOODWAY SYSTEM, LA...........................           1,692           1,692  ..............
BATON ROUGE HARBOR, DEVIL SWAMP, LA.............................              55              55  ..............
BAYOU COCODRIE AND TRIBUTARIES, LA..............................              48              48  ..............
BONNET CARRE, LA................................................           2,331           2,331  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, LA...............................           1,106           1,106  ..............
LOWER RED RIVER, SOUTH BANK LEVEES, LA..........................             498             498  ..............
MISSISSIPPI DELTA REGION, LA....................................             496             496  ..............
OLD RIVER, LA...................................................           8,086           8,086  ..............
TENSAS BASIN, RED RIVER BACKWATER, LA...........................           3,345           3,345  ..............
GREENVILLE HARBOR, MS...........................................              24              24  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, MS...............................              67              67  ..............
VICKSBURG HARBOR, MS............................................              42              42  ..............
YAZOO BASIN, ARKABUTLA LAKE, MS.................................           5,483           5,483  ..............
YAZOO BASIN, BIG SUNFLOWER RIVER, MS............................             185             185  ..............
YAZOO BASIN, ENID LAKE, MS......................................           5,024           5,024  ..............
YAZOO BASIN, GREENWOOD, MS......................................             807             807  ..............
YAZOO BASIN, GRENADA LAKE, MS...................................           5,487           5,487  ..............
YAZOO BASIN, MAIN STEM, MS......................................           1,344           1,344  ..............
YAZOO BASIN, SARDIS LAKE, MS....................................           6,668           6,668  ..............
YAZOO BASIN, TRIBUTARIES, MS....................................             967             967  ..............
YAZOO BASIN, WILL M WHITTINGTON AUX CHAN, MS....................             384             384  ..............
YAZOO BASIN, YAZOO BACKWATER AREA, MS...........................             544             544  ..............
YAZOO BASIN, YAZOO CITY, MS.....................................             731             731  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, MO...............................             237             237  ..............
WAPPAPELLO LAKE, MO.............................................           4,912           4,912  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, TN...............................              47              47  ..............
MEMPHIS HARBOR, MCKELLAR LAKE, TN...............................           2,132           2,132  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL, OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE.......................         149,509         149,509  ..............
                                                                 ===============================================
                         REMAINING ITEMS
 
ADDITIONAL FUNDING FOR ONGOING WORK
    CONSTRUCTION: CHANNEL IMPROVEMENT, AR, IL, KY, LA, MS, MO &   ..............          15,462         +15,462
     TN.........................................................
    O & M: CHANNEL IMPROVEMENT, AR, IL, KY, LA, MS, MO & TN.....  ..............          13,634         +13,634
 
CONSTRUCTION: MISSISSIPPI RIVER MAIN STEM :
    MISSISSIPPI RIVER LEVEES....................................  ..............           3,400          +3,400
O & M: LMRMS PROJECT; MISSISSIPPI RIVER LEVEES..................  ..............           1,381          +1,381
    DREDGING....................................................  ..............           8,090          +8,090
    FLOOD CONTROL...............................................  ..............          64,033         +64,033
    OTHER AUTHORIZED PURPOSES...................................  ..............          40,000         +40,000
COLLECTION AND STUDY OF BASIC DATA..............................           7,000           7,000  ..............
MAPPING.........................................................           1,127           1,127  ..............
MISSISSIPPI RIVER COMMISSION....................................              90              90  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL, REMAINING ITEMS.................................           8,217         154,217        +146,000
                                                                 ===============================================
REDUCTION FOR SAVINGS AND SLIPPAGE..............................  ..............  ..............  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, MISSISSIPPI RIVER AND TRIBUTARIES..................         222,000         368,000        +146,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Additional Funding for Ongoing Work--Flood Control.--Of the 
additional funds provided in this account, the Corps of 
Engineers shall allocate not less than $30,000,000 for 
additional flood control construction projects outside of the 
Lower Mississippi River Main Stem.
    Additional Funding for Ongoing Work--Other Authorized 
Purposes.--Of the additional funds provided in this account for 
other authorized project purposes, the Corps of Engineers shall 
allocate not less than $5,000,000 for operation and maintenance 
of facilities that are educational or to continue land 
management of mitigation features.
    Additional Funding for Ongoing Work--Dredging.--Of the 
additional funds provided in this account for dredging, the 
Corps of Engineers shall allocate not less than $7,000,000 for 
maintenance dredging of ports and harbors. Within that amount, 
no port or harbor funded by this account shall receive less 
than $900,000 unless such sums exceed a port's fiscal year 2017 
total capability.

                       OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $3,137,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   2,705,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,173,829,000

    The Committee recommends $3,173,829,000 for Operation and 
Maintenance, an increase of $468,829,000 over the budget 
request.

                              INTRODUCTION

    Funding in this account is used to fund operation, 
maintenance, and related activities at water resource projects 
that the Corps of Engineers operates and maintains. These 
activities include dredging, repair, and operation of 
structures and other facilities, as authorized in the various 
river and harbor, flood control, and water resources 
development acts. Related activities include aquatic plant 
control, monitoring of completed projects where appropriate, 
removal of sunken vessels, and the collection of domestic 
waterborne commerce statistics.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The table below displays the budget request and Committee's 
recommendation for Operation and Maintenance.

                                  CORPS OF ENGINEERS--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                     Committee
                                                                                                  recommendation
                              Item                                    Budget         Committee      compared to
                                                                     estimate     recommendation      budget
                                                                                                     estimate
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                             ALABAMA
 
ALABAMA--COOSA COMPREHENSIVE WATER STUDY, AL....................             176             176  ..............
ALABAMA RIVER LAKES, AL.........................................          14,080          14,080  ..............
BLACK WARRIOR AND TOMBIGBEE RIVERS, AL..........................          24,101          24,101  ..............
GULF INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY, AL..................................           6,075           6,075  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, AL...............................             215             215  ..............
MOBILE HARBOR, AL...............................................          23,389          23,389  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, AL...................................             190             190  ..............
SCHEDULING RESERVOIR OPERATIONS, AL.............................             100             100  ..............
TENNESSEE--TOMBIGBEE WATERWAY WILDLIFE MITIGATION, AL & MS......           1,700           1,700  ..............
TENNESSEE--TOMBIGBEE WATERWAY, AL & MS..........................          29,218          29,218  ..............
WALTER F GEORGE LOCK AND DAM, AL & GA...........................          11,930          11,930  ..............
WATER/ENVIRONMENTAL CERTIFICATION, AL...........................              20              20  ..............
 
                             ALASKA
 
ANCHORAGE HARBOR, AK............................................          11,868          11,868  ..............
CHENA RIVER LAKES, AK...........................................           9,663           9,663  ..............
CHIGNIK HARBOR, AK..............................................             200             200  ..............
DILLINGHAM HARBOR, AK...........................................           1,050           1,050  ..............
HOMER HARBOR, AK................................................             462             462  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, AK...............................             225             225  ..............
KETCHIKAN, THOMAS BASIN, AK.....................................           3,100           3,100  ..............
LOWELL CREEK TUNNEL (SEWARD) AK.................................             591             591  ..............
NINILCHIK HARBOR, AK............................................             345             345  ..............
NOME HARBOR, AK.................................................           2,920           2,920  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, AK...................................             700             700  ..............
 
                             ARIZONA
 
ALAMO LAKE, AZ..................................................           1,260           1,260  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, AZ...............................              96              96  ..............
PAINTED ROCK DAM, AZ............................................             830             830  ..............
SCHEDULING RESERVOIR OPERATIONS, AZ.............................             102             102  ..............
WHITLOW RANCH DAM, AZ...........................................             317             317  ..............
 
                            ARKANSAS
 
BEAVER LAKE, AR.................................................           9,019           9,019  ..............
BLAKELY MT DAM, LAKE OUACHITA, AR...............................           8,157           8,157  ..............
BLUE MOUNTAIN LAKE, AR..........................................           1,908           1,908  ..............
BULL SHOALS LAKE, AR............................................           8,305           8,305  ..............
DEGRAY LAKE, AR.................................................           6,121           6,121  ..............
DEQUEEN LAKE, AR................................................           1,780           1,780  ..............
DIERKS LAKE, AR.................................................           1,768           1,768  ..............
GILLHAM LAKE, AR................................................           1,556           1,556  ..............
GREERS FERRY LAKE, AR...........................................           9,403           9,403  ..............
HELENA HARBOR, PHILLIPS COUNTY, AR..............................              15              15  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, AR...............................             490             490  ..............
MCCLELLAN-KERR ARKANSAS RIVER NAVIGATION SYSTEM, AR.............          42,464          42,464  ..............
MILLWOOD LAKE, AR...............................................           2,631           2,631  ..............
NARROWS DAM, LAKE GREESON, AR...................................           4,912           4,912  ..............
NIMROD LAKE, AR.................................................           2,163           2,163  ..............
NORFORK LAKE, AR................................................           5,098           5,098  ..............
OSCEOLA HARBOR, AR..............................................             515             515  ..............
OUACHITA AND BLACK RIVERS, AR & LA..............................           8,445           8,445  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, AR...................................               1               1  ..............
WHITE RIVER, AR.................................................              25              25  ..............
YELLOW BEND PORT, AR............................................             115             115  ..............
 
                           CALIFORNIA
 
BLACK BUTTE LAKE, CA............................................           3,040           3,040  ..............
BODEGA BAY, CA..................................................           4,285           4,285  ..............
BUCHANAN DAM, HV EASTMAN LAKE, CA...............................           2,078           2,078  ..............
CHANNEL ISLANDS HARBOR, CA......................................           7,980           7,980  ..............
COYOTE VALLEY DAM, LAKE MENDOCINO, CA...........................           4,284           4,284  ..............
DRY CREEK (WARM SPRINGS) LAKE AND CHANNEL, CA...................           6,888           6,888  ..............
FARMINGTON DAM, CA..............................................             478             478  ..............
HIDDEN DAM, HENSLEY LAKE, CA....................................           2,377           2,377  ..............
HUMBOLDT HARBOR AND BAY, CA.....................................           3,000           3,000  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED ENVIRONMENTAL PROJECTS, CA..............               6               6  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, CA...............................           3,588           3,588  ..............
ISABELLA LAKE, CA...............................................           1,582           1,582  ..............
LOS ANGELES COUNTY DRAINAGE AREA, CA............................          17,447          17,447  ..............
MERCED COUNTY STREAMS, CA.......................................             484             484  ..............
MOJAVE RIVER DAM, CA............................................             375             375  ..............
MORRO BAY HARBOR, CA............................................           4,400           4,400  ..............
NAPA RIVER, CA..................................................             350             350  ..............
NEW HOGAN LAKE, CA..............................................           3,058           3,058  ..............
NEW MELONES LAKE, DOWNSTREAM CHANNEL, CA........................           2,695           2,695  ..............
OAKLAND HARBOR, CA..............................................          17,155          17,155  ..............
OCEANSIDE HARBOR, CA............................................           2,275           2,275  ..............
PINE FLAT LAKE, CA..............................................           3,440           3,440  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, CA...................................           1,698           1,698  ..............
REDWOOD CITY HARBOR, CA.........................................           4,201           4,201  ..............
RICHMOND HARBOR, CA.............................................           8,132           8,132  ..............
SACRAMENTO RIVER (30 FOOT PROJECT), CA..........................           1,600           1,600  ..............
SACRAMENTO RIVER AND TRIBUTARIES (DEBRIS CONTROL), CA...........           1,548           1,548  ..............
SACRAMENTO RIVER SHALLOW DRAFT CHANNEL, CA......................             175             175  ..............
SALINAS DAM, CA.................................................               1               1  ..............
SAN FRANCISCO BAY DELTA MODEL STRUCTURE, CA.....................           1,096           1,096  ..............
SAN FRANCISCO BAY LONG TERM MANAGEMENT STRATEGY, CA.............             600             600  ..............
SAN FRANCISCO HARBOR AND BAY, CA (DRIFT REMOVAL)................           3,870           3,870  ..............
SAN FRANCISCO HARBOR, CA........................................           3,220           3,220  ..............
SAN JOAQUIN RIVER, PORT OF STOCKTON, CA.........................           3,242           3,242  ..............
SAN PABLO BAY AND MARE ISLAND STRAIT, CA........................           2,025           2,025  ..............
SANTA ANA RIVER BASIN, CA.......................................           4,871           4,871  ..............
SANTA BARBARA HARBOR, CA........................................           2,695           2,695  ..............
SCHEDULING RESERVOIR OPERATIONS, CA.............................           1,198           1,198  ..............
SUCCESS LAKE, CA................................................           2,509           2,509  ..............
SUISUN BAY CHANNEL, CA..........................................           4,031           4,031  ..............
TERMINUS DAM, LAKE KAWEAH, CA (DAM SAFETY)......................           2,227           2,227  ..............
VENTURA HARBOR, CA..............................................           4,300           4,300  ..............
YUBA RIVER, CA..................................................           1,422           1,422  ..............
 
                            COLORADO
 
BEAR CREEK LAKE, CO.............................................             437             437  ..............
CHATFIELD LAKE, CO..............................................           1,702           1,702  ..............
CHERRY CREEK LAKE, CO...........................................           1,159           1,159  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, CO...............................             376             376  ..............
JOHN MARTIN RESERVOIR, CO.......................................           2,951           2,951  ..............
SCHEDULING RESERVOIR OPERATIONS, CO.............................             576             576  ..............
TRINIDAD LAKE, CO...............................................           1,565           1,565  ..............
 
                           CONNECTICUT
 
BLACK ROCK LAKE, CT.............................................             601             601  ..............
COLEBROOK RIVER LAKE, CT........................................             709             709  ..............
HANCOCK BROOK LAKE, CT..........................................             448             448  ..............
HOP BROOK LAKE, CT..............................................           1,203           1,203  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, CT...............................             345             345  ..............
MANSFIELD HOLLOW LAKE, CT.......................................             605             605  ..............
NORTHFIELD BROOK LAKE, CT.......................................             491             491  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, CT...................................             850             850  ..............
STAMFORD HURRICANE BARRIER, CT..................................             626             626  ..............
THOMASTON DAM, CT...............................................             800             800  ..............
WEST THOMPSON LAKE, CT..........................................             661             661  ..............
 
                            DELAWARE
 
HARBOR OF REFUGE, DELAWARE BAY, DE..............................              45              45  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, DE...............................              58              58  ..............
INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY, DELAWARE RIVER TO CHESAPEAKE BAY, DE & MD          21,622          21,622  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, DE...................................             200             200  ..............
WILMINGTON HARBOR, DE...........................................           4,355           4,355  ..............
 
                      DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
 
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, DC...............................              72              72  ..............
POTOMAC AND ANACOSTIA RIVERS, DC (DRIFT REMOVAL)................             875             875  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, DC...................................              25              25  ..............
WASHINGTON HARBOR, DC...........................................              25              25  ..............
 
                             FLORIDA
 
CANAVERAL HARBOR, FL............................................           4,069           4,069  ..............
CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN FLORIDA, FL................................          14,889          14,889  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, FL...............................           1,272           1,272  ..............
INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY, JACKSONVILLE TO MIAMI, FL................             850             850  ..............
JACKSONVILLE HARBOR, FL.........................................           7,280           7,280  ..............
JIM WOODRUFF LOCK AND DAM, LAKE SEMINOLE, FL, AL & GA...........           6,506           6,506  ..............
MANATEE HARBOR, FL..............................................             500             500  ..............
MIAMI HARBOR, FL................................................             100             100  ..............
OKEECHOBEE WATERWAY, FL.........................................           2,790           2,790  ..............
PALM BEACH HARBOR, FL...........................................           3,330           3,330  ..............
PENSACOLA HARBOR, FL............................................           1,915           1,915  ..............
PORT EVERGLADES HARBOR, FL......................................             300             300  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, FL...................................           1,425           1,425  ..............
REMOVAL OF AQUATIC GROWTH, FL...................................           3,130           3,130  ..............
SCHEDULING RESERVOIR OPERATIONS, FL.............................              33              33  ..............
SOUTH FLORIDA ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION, FL.........................             299             299  ..............
TAMPA HARBOR, FL................................................           8,715           8,715  ..............
WATER / ENVIRONMENTAL CERTIFICATION, FL.........................             165             165  ..............
 
                             GEORGIA
 
ALLATOONA LAKE, GA..............................................           7,925           7,925  ..............
APALACHICOLA, CHATTAHOOCHEE AND FLINT RIVERS, GA, AL & FL.......           1,026           1,026  ..............
ATLANTIC INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY, GA..............................             181             181  ..............
BRUNSWICK HARBOR, GA............................................           4,528           4,528  ..............
BUFORD DAM AND LAKE SIDNEY LANIER, GA...........................           9,823           9,823  ..............
CARTERS DAM AND LAKE, GA........................................           7,724           7,724  ..............
HARTWELL LAKE, GA & SC..........................................          11,343          11,343  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, GA...............................             227             227  ..............
J STROM THURMOND LAKE, GA & SC..................................          18,399          18,399  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, GA...................................             128             128  ..............
RICHARD B RUSSELL DAM AND LAKE, GA & SC.........................           7,842           7,842  ..............
SAVANNAH HARBOR, GA.............................................          23,527          23,527  ..............
SAVANNAH RIVER BELOW AUGUSTA, GA................................             137             137  ..............
WEST POINT DAM AND LAKE, GA & AL................................           8,450           8,450  ..............
 
                             HAWAII
 
BARBERS POINT HARBOR, HI........................................             319             319  ..............
HILO HARBOR, HI.................................................             400             400  ..............
HONOLULU HARBOR, HI.............................................             400             400  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, HI...............................             600             600  ..............
NAWILIWILI HARBOR, HI...........................................             400             400  ..............
PORT ALLEN HARBOR, KAUAI, HI....................................             275             275  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, HI...................................             706             706  ..............
 
                              IDAHO
 
ALBENI FALLS DAM, ID............................................           1,274           1,274  ..............
DWORSHAK DAM AND RESERVOIR, ID..................................           2,862           2,862  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, ID...............................             361             361  ..............
LUCKY PEAK LAKE, ID.............................................           4,405           4,405  ..............
SCHEDULING RESERVOIR OPERATIONS, ID.............................             640             640  ..............
 
                            ILLINOIS
 
CALUMET HARBOR AND RIVER, IL & IN...............................           2,827           2,827  ..............
CARLYLE LAKE, IL................................................           6,287           6,287  ..............
CHICAGO HARBOR, IL..............................................           2,824           2,824  ..............
CHICAGO RIVER, IL...............................................             572             572  ..............
CHICAGO SANITARY AND SHIP CANAL DISPERSAL BARRIER, IL...........          12,000          12,000  ..............
FARM CREEK RESERVOIRS, IL.......................................             446             446  ..............
ILLINOIS WATERWAY (MVR PORTION), IL & IN........................          34,059          34,059  ..............
ILLINOIS WATERWAY (MVS PORTION), IL & IN........................           1,847           1,847  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, IL...............................           2,560           2,560  ..............
KASKASKIA RIVER NAVIGATION, IL..................................           2,093           2,093  ..............
LAKE MICHIGAN DIVERSION, IL.....................................             800             800  ..............
LAKE SHELBYVILLE, IL............................................           5,975           5,975  ..............
MISSISSIPPI RIVER BETWEEN MISSOURI RIVER AND MINNEAPOLIS (MVR             84,666          84,666  ..............
 PORTION), IL...................................................
MISSISSIPPI RIVER BETWEEN MISSOURI RIVER AND MINNEAPOLIS (MVS             21,968          21,968  ..............
 PORTION), IL...................................................
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, IL...................................             105             105  ..............
REND LAKE, IL...................................................           5,655           5,655  ..............
SURVEILLANCE OF NORTHERN BOUNDARY WATERS, IL....................             719             719  ..............
WAUKEGAN HARBOR, IL.............................................           1,580           1,580  ..............
 
                             INDIANA
 
BROOKVILLE LAKE, IN.............................................           1,357           1,357  ..............
BURNS WATERWAY HARBOR, IN.......................................           3,034           3,034  ..............
CAGLES MILL LAKE, IN............................................           1,074           1,074  ..............
CECIL M HARDEN LAKE, IN.........................................           1,180           1,180  ..............
INDIANA HARBOR, IN..............................................          11,795          11,795  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, IN...............................           1,316           1,316  ..............
J EDWARD ROUSH LAKE, IN.........................................           1,136           1,136  ..............
MISSISSINEWA LAKE, IN...........................................           1,168           1,168  ..............
MONROE LAKE, IN.................................................           1,324           1,324  ..............
PATOKA LAKE, IN.................................................           1,136           1,136  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, IN...................................             185             185  ..............
SALAMONIE LAKE, IN..............................................           1,253           1,253  ..............
SURVEILLANCE OF NORTHERN BOUNDARY WATERS, IN....................             143             143  ..............
 
                              IOWA
 
CORALVILLE LAKE, IA.............................................           4,326           4,326  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED ENVIRONMENTAL PROJECTS, IA..............              21              21  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, IA...............................           1,370           1,370  ..............
MISSOURI RIVER--SIOUX CITY TO THE MOUTH, IA, KS, MO & NE........           9,049           9,049  ..............
MISSOURI RIVER FISH AND WILDLIFE RECOVERY, IA, KS, MO, MT, NE,             2,810           2,810  ..............
 ND & SD........................................................
RATHBUN LAKE, IA................................................           2,484           2,484  ..............
RED ROCK DAM AND LAKE RED ROCK, IA..............................           4,711           4,711  ..............
SAYLORVILLE LAKE, IA............................................           5,526           5,526  ..............
 
                             KANSAS
 
CLINTON LAKE, KS................................................           2,953           2,953  ..............
COUNCIL GROVE LAKE, KS..........................................           1,535           1,535  ..............
EL DORADO LAKE, KS..............................................             801             801  ..............
ELK CITY LAKE, KS...............................................             970             970  ..............
FALL RIVER LAKE, KS.............................................           1,581           1,581  ..............
HILLSDALE LAKE, KS..............................................             891             891  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED ENVIRONMENTAL PROJECTS, KS..............               4               4  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, KS...............................           1,206           1,206  ..............
JOHN REDMOND DAM AND RESERVOIR, KS..............................           1,565           1,565  ..............
KANOPOLIS LAKE, KS..............................................           4,968           4,968  ..............
MARION LAKE, KS.................................................           4,482           4,482  ..............
MELVERN LAKE, KS................................................           2,490           2,490  ..............
MILFORD LAKE, KS................................................           2,549           2,549  ..............
PEARSON--SKUBITZ BIG HILL LAKE, KS..............................           1,392           1,392  ..............
PERRY LAKE, KS..................................................           2,845           2,845  ..............
POMONA LAKE, KS.................................................           2,480           2,480  ..............
SCHEDULING RESERVOIR OPERATIONS, KS.............................             369             369  ..............
TORONTO LAKE, KS................................................           1,191           1,191  ..............
TUTTLE CREEK LAKE, KS...........................................           7,464           7,464  ..............
WILSON LAKE, KS.................................................           1,711           1,711  ..............
 
                            KENTUCKY
 
BARKLEY DAM AND LAKE BARKLEY, KY & TN...........................          11,404          11,404  ..............
BARREN RIVER LAKE, KY...........................................           2,754           2,754  ..............
BIG SANDY HARBOR, KY............................................           1,908           1,908  ..............
BUCKHORN LAKE, KY...............................................           1,693           1,693  ..............
CARR CREEK LAKE, KY.............................................           1,882           1,882  ..............
CAVE RUN LAKE, KY...............................................           1,094           1,094  ..............
DEWEY LAKE, KY..................................................           1,749           1,749  ..............
ELVIS STAHR (HICKMAN) HARBOR, KY................................             925             925  ..............
FALLS OF THE OHIO NATIONAL WILDLIFE, KY & IN....................             223             223  ..............
FISHTRAP LAKE, KY...............................................           2,190           2,190  ..............
GRAYSON LAKE, KY................................................           1,525           1,525  ..............
GREEN AND BARREN RIVERS, KY.....................................           2,180           2,180  ..............
GREEN RIVER LAKE, KY............................................           2,575           2,575  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, KY...............................           1,301           1,301  ..............
KENTUCKY RIVER, KY..............................................              10              10  ..............
LAUREL RIVER LAKE, KY...........................................           2,173           2,173  ..............
MARTINS FORK LAKE, KY...........................................           1,193           1,193  ..............
MIDDLESBORO CUMBERLAND RIVER BASIN, KY..........................             264             264  ..............
NOLIN LAKE, KY..................................................           2,709           2,709  ..............
OHIO RIVER LOCKS AND DAMS, KY, IL, IN & OH......................          30,930          30,930  ..............
OHIO RIVER OPEN CHANNEL WORK, KY, IL, IN, OH, PA & WV...........           5,600           5,600  ..............
PAINTSVILLE LAKE, KY............................................           1,263           1,263  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, KY...................................               1               1  ..............
ROUGH RIVER LAKE, KY............................................           3,116           3,116  ..............
TAYLORSVILLE LAKE, KY...........................................           1,096           1,096  ..............
WOLF CREEK DAM, LAKE CUMBERLAND, KY.............................           9,195           9,195  ..............
YATESVILLE LAKE, KY.............................................           1,279           1,279  ..............
 
                            LOUISIANA
 
ATCHAFALAYA RIVER AND BAYOUS CHENE, BOEUF & BLACK, LA...........           6,645           6,645  ..............
BARATARIA BAY WATERWAY, LA......................................             100             100  ..............
BAYOU BODCAU RESERVOIR, LA......................................           1,471           1,471  ..............
BAYOU LAFOURCHE AND LAFOURCHE JUMP WATERWAY, LA.................             911             911  ..............
BAYOU PIERRE, LA................................................              23              23  ..............
BAYOU SEGNETTE WATERWAY, LA.....................................              20              20  ..............
BAYOU TECHE AND VERMILION RIVER, LA.............................              12              12  ..............
BAYOU TECHE, LA.................................................              50              50  ..............
CADDO LAKE, LA..................................................             209             209  ..............
CALCASIEU RIVER AND PASS, LA....................................          21,393          21,393  ..............
FRESHWATER BAYOU, LA............................................           1,424           1,424  ..............
GULF INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY, LA..................................          32,844          32,844  ..............
HOUMA NAVIGATION CANAL, LA......................................           1,057           1,057  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, LA...............................             962             962  ..............
J BENNETT JOHNSTON WATERWAY, LA.................................           8,714           8,714  ..............
LAKE PROVIDENCE HARBOR, LA......................................              14              14  ..............
MADISON PARISH PORT, LA.........................................             150             150  ..............
MERMENTAU RIVER, LA.............................................           1,297           1,297  ..............
MISSISSIPPI RIVER OUTLETS AT VENICE, LA.........................           1,449           1,449  ..............
MISSISSIPPI RIVER, BATON ROUGE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO, LA........          82,885          82,885  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, LA...................................              54              54  ..............
REMOVAL OF AQUATIC GROWTH, LA...................................             200             200  ..............
WALLACE LAKE, LA................................................             226             226  ..............
WATERWAY FROM EMPIRE TO THE GULF, LA............................               8               8  ..............
WATERWAY FROM INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY TO BAYOU DULAC, LA..........              22              22  ..............
 
                              MAINE
 
DISPOSAL AREA MONITORING, ME....................................           1,050           1,050  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, ME...............................             104             104  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, ME...................................           1,100           1,100  ..............
SURVEILLANCE OF NORTHERN BOUNDARY WATERS, ME....................              25              25  ..............
 
                            MARYLAND
 
BALTIMORE HARBOR AND CHANNELS (50 FOOT), MD.....................          20,575          20,575  ..............
BALTIMORE HARBOR, MD (DRIFT REMOVAL)............................             325             325  ..............
CUMBERLAND, MD AND RIDGELEY, WV.................................             186             186  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, MD...............................             119             119  ..............
JENNINGS RANDOLPH LAKE, MD & WV.................................           2,151           2,151  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, MD...................................             450             450  ..............
SCHEDULING RESERVOIR OPERATIONS, MD.............................              78              78  ..............
WICOMICO RIVER, MD..............................................           2,000           2,000  ..............
 
                          MASSACHUSETTS
 
BARRE FALLS DAM, MA.............................................           1,081           1,081  ..............
BIRCH HILL DAM, MA..............................................             926             926  ..............
BOSTON HARBOR, MA...............................................          12,000          12,000  ..............
BUFFUMVILLE LAKE, MA............................................             740             740  ..............
CAPE COD CANAL, MA..............................................          10,552          10,552  ..............
CHARLES RIVER NATURAL VALLEY STORAGE AREA, MA...................             332             332  ..............
CHATHAM (STAGE) HARBOR, MA......................................             470             470  ..............
CONANT BROOK LAKE, MA...........................................             703             703  ..............
EAST BRIMFIELD LAKE, MA.........................................             687             687  ..............
GLOUCESTER HARBOR AND ANNISQUAM RIVER, MA.......................             150             150  ..............
GREEN HARBOR, MA................................................             350             350  ..............
HODGES VILLAGE DAM, MA..........................................             609             609  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, MA...............................             328             328  ..............
KNIGHTVILLE DAM, MA.............................................           1,019           1,019  ..............
LITTLEVILLE LAKE, MA............................................             742             742  ..............
NEW BEDFORD FAIRHAVEN AND ACUSHNET HURRICANE BARRIER, MA........             489             489  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, MA...................................             900             900  ..............
TULLY LAKE, MA..................................................             911             911  ..............
WEST HILL DAM, MA...............................................             727             727  ..............
WESTVILLE LAKE, MA..............................................             572             572  ..............
 
                            MICHIGAN
 
CHANNELS IN LAKE ST CLAIR, MI...................................           1,580           1,580  ..............
DETROIT RIVER, MI...............................................           5,241           5,241  ..............
GRAND HAVEN HARBOR, MI..........................................             511             511  ..............
HOLLAND HARBOR, MI..............................................             650             650  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, MI...............................             215             215  ..............
KEWEENAW WATERWAY, MI...........................................             906             906  ..............
MONROE HARBOR, MI...............................................             500             500  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, MI...................................             720             720  ..............
SAGINAW RIVER, MI...............................................           3,973           3,973  ..............
SEBEWAING RIVER, MI.............................................              52              52  ..............
ST CLAIR RIVER, MI..............................................             680             680  ..............
ST JOSEPH HARBOR, MI............................................             750             750  ..............
ST MARYS RIVER, MI..............................................          31,549          31,549  ..............
SURVEILLANCE OF NORTHERN BOUNDARY WATERS, MI....................           2,825           2,825  ..............
 
                            MINNESOTA
 
BIGSTONE LAKE--WHETSTONE RIVER, MN & SD.........................             257             257  ..............
DULUTH--SUPERIOR HARBOR, MN & WI................................           7,166           7,166  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, MN...............................             408             408  ..............
LAC QUI PARLE LAKES, MINNESOTA RIVER, MN........................             891             891  ..............
MINNESOTA RIVER, MN.............................................             260             260  ..............
MISSISSIPPI RIVER BETWEEN MISSOURI RIVER AND MINNEAPOLIS (MVP             66,866          66,866  ..............
 PORTION), MN...................................................
ORWELL LAKE, MN.................................................             475             475  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, MN...................................              93              93  ..............
RED LAKE RESERVOIR, MN..........................................             165             165  ..............
RESERVOIRS AT HEADWATERS OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER, MN...............           3,648           3,648  ..............
SURVEILLANCE OF NORTHERN BOUNDARY WATERS, MN....................             490             490  ..............
 
                           MISSISSIPPI
 
BILOXI HARBOR, MS...............................................           1,812           1,812  ..............
CLAIBORNE COUNTY PORT, MS.......................................               1               1  ..............
EAST FORK, TOMBIGBEE RIVER, MS..................................             285             285  ..............
GULFPORT HARBOR, MS.............................................           5,222           5,222  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, MS...............................             110             110  ..............
MOUTH OF YAZOO RIVER, MS........................................              34              34  ..............
OKATIBBEE LAKE, MS..............................................           2,150           2,150  ..............
PASCAGOULA HARBOR, MS...........................................           1,360           1,360  ..............
PEARL RIVER, MS & LA............................................             150             150  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, MS...................................             151             151  ..............
ROSEDALE HARBOR, MS.............................................               9               9  ..............
WATER/ENVIRONMENTAL CERTIFICATION, MS...........................              20              20  ..............
YAZOO RIVER, MS.................................................              21              21  ..............
 
                            MISSOURI
 
CARUTHERSVILLE HARBOR, MO.......................................             815             815  ..............
CLARENCE CANNON DAM AND MARK TWAIN LAKE, MO.....................           6,994           6,994  ..............
CLEARWATER LAKE, MO.............................................           3,328           3,328  ..............
HARRY S TRUMAN DAM AND RESERVOIR, MO............................          11,087          11,087  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED ENVIRONMENTAL PROJECTS, MO..............               2               2  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, MO...............................           1,606           1,606  ..............
LITTLE BLUE RIVER LAKES, MO.....................................             879             879  ..............
LONG BRANCH LAKE, MO............................................             733             733  ..............
MISSISSIPPI RIVER BETWEEN THE OHIO AND MISSOURI RIVERS (REG               24,608          24,608  ..............
 WORKS), MO & IL................................................
NEW MADRID COUNTY HARBOR, MO....................................              10              10  ..............
NEW MADRID HARBOR, MO (MILE 889)................................              15              15  ..............
POMME DE TERRE LAKE, MO.........................................           3,327           3,327  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, MO...................................               1               1  ..............
SCHEDULING RESERVOIR OPERATIONS, MO.............................             169             169  ..............
SMITHVILLE LAKE, MO.............................................           1,551           1,551  ..............
SOUTHEAST MISSOURI PORT, MISSISSIPPI RIVER, MO..................             401             401  ..............
STOCKTON LAKE, MO...............................................           5,857           5,857  ..............
TABLE ROCK LAKE, MO & AR........................................           8,638           8,638  ..............
 
                             MONTANA
 
FT PECK DAM AND LAKE, MT........................................           5,535           5,535  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, MT...............................             274             274  ..............
LIBBY DAM, MT...................................................           2,025           2,025  ..............
SCHEDULING RESERVOIR OPERATIONS, MT.............................              95              95  ..............
 
                            NEBRASKA
 
GAVINS POINT DAM, LEWIS AND CLARK LAKE, NE & SD.................           9,306           9,306  ..............
HARLAN COUNTY LAKE, NE..........................................           4,393           4,393  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED ENVIRONMENTAL PROJECTS, NE..............              33              33  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, NE...............................           1,213           1,213  ..............
MISSOURI RIVER--KENSLERS BEND, NE TO SIOUX CITY, IA.............              90              90  ..............
PAPILLION CREEK, NE.............................................             880             880  ..............
SALT CREEKS AND TRIBUTARIES, NE.................................           2,934           2,934  ..............
 
                             NEVADA
 
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, NV...............................              77              77  ..............
MARTIS CREEK LAKE, NV & CA......................................           1,132           1,132  ..............
PINE AND MATHEWS CANYONS LAKES, NV..............................             333             333  ..............
 
                          NEW HAMPSHIRE
 
BLACKWATER DAM, NH..............................................             860             860  ..............
EDWARD MACDOWELL LAKE, NH.......................................             563             563  ..............
FRANKLIN FALLS DAM, NH..........................................             809             809  ..............
HOPKINTON--EVERETT LAKES, NH....................................           1,625           1,625  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, NH...............................              71              71  ..............
OTTER BROOK LAKE, NH............................................             775             775  ..............
PORTSMOUTH HARBOR AND PISCATAQUA RIVER, NH......................           1,100           1,100  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, NH...................................             250             250  ..............
SURRY MOUNTAIN LAKE, NH.........................................             810             810  ..............
 
                           NEW JERSEY
 
BARNEGAT INLET, NJ..............................................             425             425  ..............
COLD SPRING INLET, NJ...........................................             375             375  ..............
DELAWARE RIVER AT CAMDEN, NJ....................................              15              15  ..............
DELAWARE RIVER, PHILADELPHIA TO THE SEA, NJ, PA & DE............          28,455          28,455  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED ENVIRONMENTAL PROJECTS, NJ..............              15              15  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, NJ...............................             339             339  ..............
MANASQUAN RIVER, NJ.............................................             420             420  ..............
NEW JERSEY INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY, NJ............................             960             960  ..............
NEWARK BAY, HACKENSACK AND PASSAIC RIVERS, NJ...................           3,635           3,635  ..............
PASSAIC RIVER FLOOD WARNING SYSTEMS, NJ.........................             600             600  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, NJ...................................           1,944           1,944  ..............
SHARK RIVER, NJ.................................................             420             420  ..............
 
                           NEW MEXICO
 
ABIQUIU DAM, NM.................................................           3,263           3,263  ..............
COCHITI LAKE, NM................................................           3,452           3,452  ..............
CONCHAS LAKE, NM................................................           3,137           3,137  ..............
GALISTEO DAM, NM................................................             772             772  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, NM...............................             650             650  ..............
JEMEZ CANYON DAM, NM............................................           1,085           1,085  ..............
MIDDLE RIO GRANDE ENDANGERED SPECIES COLLABORATIVE PROGRAM, NM..           2,367           2,367  ..............
SANTA ROSA DAM AND LAKE, NM.....................................           1,712           1,712  ..............
SCHEDULING RESERVOIR OPERATIONS, NM.............................             213             213  ..............
TWO RIVERS DAM, NM..............................................             599             599  ..............
UPPER RIO GRANDE WATER OPERATIONS MODEL STUDY, NM...............           1,300           1,300  ..............
 
                            NEW YORK
 
ALMOND LAKE, NY.................................................             437             437  ..............
ARKPORT DAM, NY.................................................             305             305  ..............
BLACK ROCK CHANNEL AND TONAWANDA HARBOR, NY.....................           1,785           1,785  ..............
BUFFALO HARBOR, NY..............................................           2,650           2,650  ..............
EAST ROCKAWAY INLET, NY.........................................           7,000           7,000  ..............
EAST SIDNEY LAKE, NY............................................             652             652  ..............
FIRE ISLAND INLET TO JONES INLET, NY............................              50              50  ..............
HUDSON RIVER, NY (MAINT)........................................           1,600           1,600  ..............
HUDSON RIVER, NY (O & C)........................................           2,600           2,600  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, NY...............................           1,011           1,011  ..............
MOUNT MORRIS DAM, NY............................................           3,575           3,575  ..............
NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY HARBOR, NY & NJ.........................           5,650           5,650  ..............
NEW YORK HARBOR, NY.............................................           5,977           5,977  ..............
NEW YORK HARBOR, NY & NJ (DRIFT REMOVAL)........................           9,300           9,300  ..............
NEW YORK HARBOR, NY (PREVENTION OF OBSTRUCTIVE DEPOSITS)........           1,200           1,200  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, NY...................................           2,252           2,252  ..............
SOUTHERN NEW YORK FLOOD CONTROL PROJECTS, NY....................             702             702  ..............
SURVEILLANCE OF NORTHERN BOUNDARY WATERS, NY....................             610             610  ..............
WHITNEY POINT LAKE, NY..........................................             792             792  ..............
 
                         NORTH CAROLINA
 
ATLANTIC INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY, NC..............................           1,750           1,750  ..............
B EVERETT JORDAN DAM AND LAKE, NC...............................           1,719           1,719  ..............
CAPE FEAR RIVER ABOVE WILMINGTON, NC............................             931             931  ..............
FALLS LAKE, NC..................................................           2,000           2,000  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, NC...............................             200             200  ..............
MANTEO (SHALLOWBAG) BAY, NC.....................................           1,876           1,876  ..............
MASONBORO INLET AND CONNECTING CHANNELS, NC.....................              26              26  ..............
MOREHEAD CITY HARBOR, NC........................................           5,950           5,950  ..............
NEW RIVER INLET, NC.............................................             220             220  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, NC...................................             700             700  ..............
ROLLINSON CHANNEL, NC...........................................             765             765  ..............
SILVER LAKE HARBOR, NC..........................................             580             580  ..............
W KERR SCOTT DAM AND RESERVOIR, NC..............................           3,376           3,376  ..............
WILMINGTON HARBOR, NC...........................................          13,400          13,400  ..............
 
                          NORTH DAKOTA
 
BOWMAN HALEY, ND................................................             195             195  ..............
GARRISON DAM, LAKE SAKAKAWEA, ND................................          14,913          14,913  ..............
HOMME LAKE, ND..................................................             285             285  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, ND...............................             375             375  ..............
LAKE ASHTABULA AND BALDHILL DAM, ND.............................           1,510           1,510  ..............
PIPESTEM LAKE, ND...............................................             597             597  ..............
SCHEDULING RESERVOIR OPERATIONS, ND.............................              95              95  ..............
SOURIS RIVER, ND................................................             357             357  ..............
SURVEILLANCE OF NORTHERN BOUNDARY WATERS, ND....................              30              30  ..............
 
                              OHIO
 
ALUM CREEK LAKE, OH.............................................           1,553           1,553  ..............
ASHTABULA HARBOR, OH............................................           2,315           2,315  ..............
BERLIN LAKE, OH.................................................           2,681           2,681  ..............
CAESAR CREEK LAKE, OH...........................................           2,061           2,061  ..............
CLARENCE J BROWN DAM, OH........................................           1,232           1,232  ..............
CLEVELAND HARBOR, OH............................................           5,855           5,855  ..............
DEER CREEK LAKE, OH.............................................           1,451           1,451  ..............
DELAWARE LAKE, OH...............................................           1,508           1,508  ..............
DILLON LAKE, OH.................................................           1,519           1,519  ..............
FAIRPORT HARBOR, OH.............................................           1,700           1,700  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, OH...............................             836             836  ..............
MASSILLON LOCAL PROTECTION PROJECT, OH..........................              86              86  ..............
MICHAEL J KIRWAN DAM AND RESERVOIR, OH..........................           1,390           1,390  ..............
MOSQUITO CREEK LAKE, OH.........................................           1,222           1,222  ..............
MUSKINGUM RIVER LAKES, OH.......................................          11,281          11,281  ..............
NORTH BRANCH KOKOSING RIVER LAKE, OH............................             517             517  ..............
OHIO-MISSISSIPPI FLOOD CONTROL, OH..............................           1,840           1,840  ..............
PAINT CREEK LAKE, OH............................................           1,403           1,403  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, OH...................................             305             305  ..............
ROSEVILLE LOCAL PROTECTION PROJECT, OH..........................              35              35  ..............
SANDUSKY HARBOR, OH.............................................           1,618           1,618  ..............
SURVEILLANCE OF NORTHERN BOUNDARY WATERS, OH....................             255             255  ..............
TOLEDO HARBOR, OH...............................................           5,905           5,905  ..............
TOM JENKINS DAM, OH.............................................             774             774  ..............
WEST FORK OF MILL CREEK LAKE, OH................................             858             858  ..............
WILLIAM H HARSHA LAKE, OH.......................................           1,314           1,314  ..............
 
                            OKLAHOMA
 
ARCADIA LAKE, OK................................................           3,122           3,122  ..............
BIRCH LAKE, OK..................................................             674             674  ..............
BROKEN BOW LAKE, OK.............................................           2,788           2,788  ..............
CANTON LAKE, OK.................................................           2,341           2,341  ..............
COPAN LAKE, OK..................................................           1,053           1,053  ..............
EUFAULA LAKE, OK................................................           6,158           6,158  ..............
FORT GIBSON LAKE, OK............................................           6,024           6,024  ..............
FORT SUPPLY LAKE, OK............................................           1,072           1,072  ..............
GREAT SALT PLAINS LAKE, OK......................................             340             340  ..............
HEYBURN LAKE, OK................................................             638             638  ..............
HUGO LAKE, OK...................................................           1,813           1,813  ..............
HULAH LAKE, OK..................................................           1,857           1,857  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, OK...............................             221             221  ..............
KAW LAKE, OK....................................................           2,000           2,000  ..............
KEYSTONE LAKE, OK...............................................           4,793           4,793  ..............
MCCLELLAN-KERR ARKANSAS RIVER NAVIGATION SYSTEM, OK.............          17,161          17,161  ..............
OOLOGAH LAKE, OK................................................           2,485           2,485  ..............
OPTIMA LAKE, OK.................................................             112             112  ..............
PENSACOLA RESERVOIR, LAKE OF THE CHEROKEES, OK..................             163             163  ..............
PINE CREEK LAKE, OK.............................................           6,535           6,535  ..............
SARDIS LAKE, OK.................................................             889             889  ..............
SCHEDULING RESERVOIR OPERATIONS, OK.............................           1,200           1,200  ..............
SKIATOOK LAKE, OK...............................................           4,843           4,843  ..............
TENKILLER FERRY LAKE, OK........................................           4,953           4,953  ..............
WAURIKA LAKE, OK................................................           1,561           1,561  ..............
WISTER LAKE, OK.................................................             849             849  ..............
 
                             OREGON
 
APPLEGATE LAKE, OR..............................................           1,180           1,180  ..............
BLUE RIVER LAKE, OR.............................................           4,189           4,189  ..............
BONNEVILLE LOCK AND DAM, OR & WA................................           8,346           8,346  ..............
CHETCO RIVER, OR................................................             734             734  ..............
COLUMBIA RIVER AT THE MOUTH, OR & WA............................          18,118          18,118  ..............
COOS BAY, OR....................................................           6,523           6,523  ..............
COTTAGE GROVE LAKE, OR..........................................           1,332           1,332  ..............
COUGAR LAKE, OR.................................................           2,330           2,330  ..............
DETROIT LAKE, OR................................................           1,007           1,007  ..............
DORENA LAKE, OR.................................................           1,324           1,324  ..............
ELK CREEK LAKE, OR..............................................             390             390  ..............
FALL CREEK LAKE, OR.............................................           1,158           1,158  ..............
FERN RIDGE LAKE, OR.............................................           1,622           1,622  ..............
GREEN PETER--FOSTER LAKES, OR...................................           2,497           2,497  ..............
HILLS CREEK LAKE, OR............................................           3,775           3,775  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, OR...............................           1,066           1,066  ..............
JOHN DAY LOCK AND DAM, OR & WA..................................           4,901           4,901  ..............
LOOKOUT POINT LAKE, OR..........................................           1,937           1,937  ..............
LOST CREEK LAKE, OR.............................................           4,269           4,269  ..............
MCNARY LOCK AND DAM, OR & WA....................................           8,252           8,252  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, OR...................................             400             400  ..............
ROGUE RIVER AT GOLD BEACH, OH...................................             673             673  ..............
SCHEDULING RESERVOIR OPERATIONS, OR.............................              98              98  ..............
SUISLAW RIVER, OR...............................................             746             746  ..............
SURVEILLANCE OF NORTHERN BOUNDARY WATERS, OR....................           5,300           5,300  ..............
WILLAMETTE RIVER AT WILLAMETTE FALLS, OR........................              63              63  ..............
WILLAMETTE RIVER BANK PROTECTION, OR............................             200             200  ..............
WILLOW CREEK LAKE, OR...........................................             977             977  ..............
YAQUINA BAY AND HARBOR, OR......................................           2,806           2,806  ..............
 
                          PENNSYLVANIA
 
ALLEGHENY RIVER, PA.............................................           5,009           5,009  ..............
ALVIN R BUSH DAM, PA............................................             627             627  ..............
AYLESWORTH CREEK LAKE, PA.......................................             278             278  ..............
BELTZVILLE LAKE, PA.............................................           1,410           1,410  ..............
BLUE MARSH LAKE, PA.............................................           2,981           2,981  ..............
CONEMAUGH RIVER LAKE, PA........................................           1,346           1,346  ..............
COWANESQUE LAKE, PA.............................................           2,113           2,113  ..............
CROOKED CREEK LAKE, PA..........................................           1,900           1,900  ..............
CURWENSVILLE LAKE, PA...........................................             876             876  ..............
DELAWARE RIVER, PHILADELPHIA, PA TO TRENTON, NJ.................          11,985          11,985  ..............
EAST BRANCH CLARION RIVER LAKE, PA..............................           1,408           1,408  ..............
FOSTER JOSEPH SAYERS DAM, PA....................................           1,148           1,148  ..............
FRANCIS E WALTER DAM, PA........................................           1,140           1,140  ..............
GENERAL EDGAR JADWIN DAM AND RESERVOIR, PA......................             380             380  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED ENVIRONMENTAL PROJECTS, PA..............              10              10  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, PA...............................             932             932  ..............
JOHNSTOWN, PA...................................................              46              46  ..............
KINZUA DAM AND ALLEGHENY RESERVOIR, PA..........................           1,695           1,695  ..............
LOYALHANNA LAKE, PA.............................................           1,588           1,588  ..............
MAHONING CREEK LAKE, PA.........................................           1,449           1,449  ..............
MONONGAHELA RIVER, PA...........................................          17,905          17,905  ..............
OHIO RIVER LOCKS AND DAMS, PA, OH & WV..........................          33,197          33,197  ..............
OHIO RIVER OPEN CHANNEL WORK, PA, OH & WV.......................             800             800  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, PA...................................             170             170  ..............
PROMPTON LAKE, PA...............................................             655             655  ..............
PUNXSUTAWNEY, PA................................................              48              48  ..............
RAYSTOWN LAKE, PA...............................................           4,522           4,522  ..............
SCHEDULING RESERVOIR OPERATIONS, PA.............................              35              35  ..............
SHENANGO RIVER LAKE, PA.........................................           2,303           2,303  ..............
STILLWATER LAKE, PA.............................................             503             503  ..............
SURVEILLANCE OF NORTHERN BOUNDARY WATERS, PA....................             105             105  ..............
TIOGA--HAMMOND LAKES, PA........................................           2,784           2,784  ..............
TIONESTA LAKE, PA...............................................           2,080           2,080  ..............
UNION CITY LAKE, PA.............................................             404             404  ..............
WOODCOCK CREEK LAKE, PA.........................................           1,120           1,120  ..............
YORK INDIAN ROCK DAM, PA........................................             735             735  ..............
YOUGHIOGHENY RIVER LAKE, PA & MD................................           2,523           2,523  ..............
 
                           PUERTO RICO
 
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, PR...............................             281             281  ..............
SAN JUAN HARBOR, PR.............................................           2,300           2,300  ..............
 
                          RHODE ISLAND
 
BLOCK ISLAND HARBOR OF REFUGE, RI...............................             350             350  ..............
FOX POINT BARRIER, NARRANGANSETT BAY, RI........................           1,067           1,067  ..............
GREAT SALT POND, BLOCK ISLAND, RI...............................             350             350  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, RI...............................              52              52  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, RI...................................             350             350  ..............
PROVIDENCE RIVER AND HARBOR, RI.................................             200             200  ..............
WOONSOCKET, RI..................................................             544             544  ..............
 
                         SOUTH CAROLINA
 
ATLANTIC INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY, SC..............................             100             100  ..............
CHARLESTON HARBOR, SC...........................................          13,920          13,920  ..............
COOPER RIVER, CHARLESTON HARBOR, SC.............................           6,370           6,370  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, SC...............................              65              65  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, SC...................................             875             875  ..............
 
                          SOUTH DAKOTA
 
BIG BEND DAM, LAKE SHARPE, SD...................................          10,393          10,393  ..............
COLD BROOK LAKE, SD.............................................             346             346  ..............
COTTONWOOD SPRINGS LAKE, SD.....................................             258             258  ..............
FORT RANDALL DAM, LAKE FRANCIS CASE, SD.........................          11,139          11,139  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, SD...............................             325             325  ..............
LAKE TRAVERSE, SD & MN..........................................             579             579  ..............
OAHE DAM, LAKE OAHE, SD & ND....................................          12,128          12,128  ..............
SCHEDULING RESERVOIR OPERATIONS, SD.............................             107             107  ..............
 
                            TENNESSEE
 
CENTER HILL LAKE, TN............................................           6,675           6,675  ..............
CHEATHAM LOCK AND DAM, TN.......................................           7,787           7,787  ..............
CORDELL HULL DAM AND RESERVOIR, TN..............................           7,255           7,255  ..............
DALE HOLLOW LAKE, TN............................................           7,255           7,255  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, TN...............................             309             309  ..............
J PERCY PRIEST DAM AND RESERVOIR, TN............................           5,244           5,244  ..............
NORTHWEST TENNESSEE REGIONAL HARBOR, LAKE COUNTY, TN............              10              10  ..............
OLD HICKORY LOCK AND DAM, TN....................................           9,636           9,636  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, TN...................................               1               1  ..............
TENNESSEE RIVER, TN.............................................          23,386          23,386  ..............
WOLF RIVER HARBOR, TN...........................................           1,366           1,366  ..............
 
                              TEXAS
 
AQUILLA LAKE, TX................................................           1,093           1,093  ..............
ARKANSAS--RED RIVER BASINS CHLORIDE CONTROL--AREA VIII, TX......           1,575           1,575  ..............
BARDWELL LAKE, TX...............................................           1,629           1,629  ..............
BELTON LAKE, TX.................................................           4,135           4,135  ..............
BENBROOK LAKE, TX...............................................           2,582           2,582  ..............
BRAZOS ISLAND HARBOR, TX........................................           2,700           2,700  ..............
BUFFALO BAYOU AND TRIBUTARIES, TX...............................           2,912           2,912  ..............
CANYON LAKE, TX.................................................           3,711           3,711  ..............
CHANNEL TO HARLINGEN, TX........................................           1,395           1,395  ..............
CHANNEL TO PORT BOLIVAR, TX.....................................              50              50  ..............
CORPUS CHRISTI SHIP CHANNEL, TX.................................           7,400           7,400  ..............
DENISON DAM, LAKE TEXOMA, TX....................................          17,854          17,854  ..............
ESTELLINE SPRINGS EXPERIMENTAL PROJECT, TX......................              35              35  ..............
FERRELLS BRIDGE DAM, LAKE O' THE PINES, TX......................           4,210           4,210  ..............
FREEPORT HARBOR, TX.............................................           8,300           8,300  ..............
GALVESTON HARBOR AND CHANNEL, TX................................          10,350          10,350  ..............
GIWW, CHANNEL TO VICTORIA, TX...................................           2,700           2,700  ..............
GRANGER DAM AND LAKE, TX........................................           2,877           2,877  ..............
GRAPEVINE LAKE, TX..............................................           3,045           3,045  ..............
GULF INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY, TX..................................          21,871          21,871  ..............
HORDS CREEK LAKE, TX............................................           1,734           1,734  ..............
HOUSTON SHIP CHANNEL, TX........................................          30,000          30,000  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, TX...............................           1,701           1,701  ..............
JIM CHAPMAN LAKE, TX............................................           1,624           1,624  ..............
JOE POOL LAKE, TX...............................................           1,602           1,602  ..............
LAKE KEMP, TX...................................................             277             277  ..............
LAVON LAKE, TX..................................................           3,579           3,579  ..............
LEWISVILLE DAM, TX..............................................           4,639           4,639  ..............
MATAGORDA SHIP CHANNEL, TX......................................           5,200           5,200  ..............
NAVARRO MILLS LAKE, TX..........................................           3,072           3,072  ..............
NORTH SAN GABRIEL DAM AND LAKE GEORGETOWN, TX...................           2,355           2,355  ..............
O C FISHER DAM AND LAKE, TX.....................................           1,167           1,167  ..............
PAT MAYSE LAKE, TX..............................................           1,287           1,287  ..............
PROCTOR LAKE, TX................................................           2,603           2,603  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, TX...................................             224             224  ..............
RAY ROBERTS LAKE, TX............................................           1,530           1,530  ..............
SABINE--NECHES WATERWAY, TX.....................................          13,625          13,625  ..............
SAM RAYBURN DAM AND RESERVOIR, TX...............................           6,769           6,769  ..............
SCHEDULING RESERVOIR OPERATIONS, TX.............................             281             281  ..............
SOMERVILLE LAKE, TX.............................................           3,420           3,420  ..............
STILLHOUSE HOLLOW DAM, TX.......................................           2,448           2,448  ..............
TEXAS CITY SHIP CHANNEL, TX.....................................           4,000           4,000  ..............
TOWN BLUFF DAM, B A STEINHAGEN LAKE, TX.........................           2,968           2,968  ..............
WACO LAKE, TX...................................................           3,717           3,717  ..............
WALLISVILLE LAKE, TX............................................           2,175           2,175  ..............
WHITNEY LAKE, TX................................................           6,419           6,419  ..............
WRIGHT PATMAN DAM AND LAKE, TX..................................           3,371           3,371  ..............
 
                              UTAH
 
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, UT...............................              40              40  ..............
SCHEDULING RESERVOIR OPERATIONS, UT.............................             506             506  ..............
 
                             VERMONT
 
BALL MOUNTAIN, VT...............................................           1,158           1,158  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, VT...............................              88              88  ..............
NARROWS OF LAKE CHAMPLAIN, VT & NY..............................              45              45  ..............
NORTH HARTLAND LAKE, VT.........................................             963             963  ..............
NORTH SPRINGFIELD LAKE, VT......................................             923             923  ..............
TOWNSHEND LAKE, VT..............................................             910             910  ..............
UNION VILLAGE DAM, VT...........................................           1,029           1,029  ..............
 
                         VIRGIN ISLANDS
 
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, VI...............................             170             170  ..............
 
                            VIRGINIA
 
ATLANTIC INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY--ACC, VA.........................           2,650           2,650  ..............
ATLANTIC INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY--DSC, VA.........................           1,380           1,380  ..............
CHINCOTEAGUE INLET, VA..........................................             511             511  ..............
GATHRIGHT DAM AND LAKE MOOMAW, VA...............................           2,223           2,223  ..............
HAMPTON ROADS, NORFOLK & NEWPORT NEWS HARBOR, VA (DRIFT REMOVAL)           1,500           1,500  ..............
HAMPTON ROADS, VA (PREVENTION OF OBSTRUCTIVE DEPOSITS)..........             114             114  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, VA...............................             372             372  ..............
JAMES RIVER CHANNEL, VA.........................................           4,100           4,100  ..............
JOHN H KERR LAKE, VA & NC.......................................          16,940          16,940  ..............
JOHN W FLANNAGAN DAM AND RESERVOIR, VA..........................           2,292           2,292  ..............
LYNNHAVEN INLET, VA.............................................             300             300  ..............
NORFOLK HARBOR, VA..............................................          10,390          10,390  ..............
NORTH FORK OF POUND RIVER LAKE, VA..............................             619             619  ..............
PHILPOTT LAKE, VA...............................................           4,615           4,615  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, VA...................................           1,163           1,163  ..............
RUDEE INLET, VA.................................................             350             350  ..............
TANGIER CHANNEL, VA.............................................             500             500  ..............
WATER AND ENVIRONMENTAL CERTIFICATIONS, VA......................             135             135  ..............
WATERWAY ON THE COAST OF VIRGINIA, VA...........................             100             100  ..............
 
                           WASHINGTON
 
CHIEF JOSEPH DAM, WA............................................             628             628  ..............
COLUMBIA AND LOWER WILLAMETTE RIVERS BELOW VANCOUVER, WA &                38,181          38,181  ..............
 PORTLAND, OR...................................................
COLUMBIA RIVER AT BAKER BAY, WA & OR............................           1,959           1,959  ..............
COLUMBIA RIVER BETWEEN VANCOUVER, WA AND THE DALLES, OR.........           1,371           1,371  ..............
COLUMBIA RIVER FISH MITIGATION, WA, OR & ID.....................           2,194           2,194  ..............
EVERETT HARBOR AND SNOHOMISH RIVER, WA..........................           1,638           1,638  ..............
GRAYS HARBOR(38-F00T DEEPENING), WA.............................           9,998           9,998  ..............
HOWARD HANSON DAM, WA...........................................           3,822           3,822  ..............
ICE HARBOR LOCK AND DAM, WA.....................................           4,760           4,760  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, WA...............................           1,150           1,150  ..............
LAKE WASHINGTON SHIP CANAL, WA..................................          12,325          12,325  ..............
LITTLE GOOSE LOCK AND DAM, WA...................................           2,741           2,741  ..............
LOWER GRANITE LOCK AND DAM, WA..................................           3,218           3,218  ..............
LOWER MONUMENTAL LOCK AND DAM, WA...............................           2,860           2,860  ..............
MILL CREEK LAKE, WA.............................................           2,490           2,490  ..............
MOUNT SAINT HELENS SEDIMENT CONTROL, WA.........................             399             399  ..............
MUD MOUNTAIN DAM, WA............................................          12,106          12,106  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, WA...................................             612             612  ..............
PUGET SOUND AND TRIBUTARY WATERS, WA............................           1,240           1,240  ..............
QUILLAYUTE RIVER, WA............................................           1,619           1,619  ..............
SCHEDULING RESERVOIR OPERATIONS, WA.............................             423             423  ..............
SEATTLE HARBOR, WA..............................................           1,547           1,547  ..............
STILLAGUAMISH RIVER, WA.........................................             292             292  ..............
SURVEILLANCE OF NORTHERN BOUNDARY WATERS, WA....................              64              64  ..............
SWINOMISH CHANNEL, WA...........................................             436             436  ..............
TACOMA, PUYALLUP RIVER, WA......................................             155             155  ..............
THE DALLES LOCK AND DAM, WA & OR................................           4,206           4,206  ..............
 
                          WEST VIRGINIA
 
BEECH FORK LAKE, WV.............................................           1,386           1,386  ..............
BLUESTONE LAKE, WV..............................................           2,000           2,000  ..............
BURNSVILLE LAKE, WV.............................................           2,768           2,768  ..............
EAST LYNN LAKE, WV..............................................           2,564           2,564  ..............
ELKINS, WV......................................................              46              46  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, WV...............................             466             466  ..............
KANAWHA RIVER LOCKS AND DAMS, WV................................           8,927           8,927  ..............
OHIO RIVER LOCKS AND DAMS, WV, KY & OH..........................          31,867          31,867  ..............
OHIO RIVER OPEN CHANNEL WORK, WV, KY & OH.......................           2,822           2,822  ..............
R D BAILEY LAKE, WV.............................................           2,183           2,183  ..............
STONEWALL JACKSON LAKE, WV......................................           1,405           1,405  ..............
SUMMERSVILLE LAKE, WV...........................................           2,653           2,653  ..............
SUTTON LAKE, WV.................................................           2,525           2,525  ..............
TYGART LAKE, WV.................................................           1,453           1,453  ..............
 
                            WISCONSIN
 
EAU GALLE RIVER LAKE, WI........................................             804             804  ..............
FOX RIVER, WI...................................................           2,378           2,378  ..............
GREEN BAY HARBOR, WI............................................           3,895           3,895  ..............
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, WI...............................              54              54  ..............
KEWAUNEE HARBOR, WI.............................................              11              11  ..............
MILWAUKEE HARBOR, WI............................................           1,250           1,250  ..............
PROJECT CONDITION SURVEYS, WI...................................             310             310  ..............
STURGEON BAY HARBOR AND LAKE MICHIGAN SHIP CANAL, WI............             819             819  ..............
SURVEILLANCE OF NORTHERN BOUNDARY WATERS, WI....................             575             575  ..............
 
                             WYOMING
 
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED WORKS, WY...............................             118             118  ..............
JACKSON HOLE LEVEES, WY.........................................           1,617           1,617  ..............
SCHEDULING RESERVOIR OPERATIONS, WY.............................              85              85  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL, PROJECTS LISTED UNDER STATES....................       2,536,111       2,536,111  ..............
 
                         REMAINING ITEMS
 
ADDITIONAL FUNDING FOR ONGOING WORK:
    NAVIGATION MAINTENANCE......................................  ..............          23,528         +23,528
        DEEP-DRAFT HARBOR AND CHANNEL...........................  ..............         250,000        +250,000
        DONOR AND ENERGY TRANSFER PORTS.........................  ..............          50,000         +50,000
        INLAND WATERWAYS........................................  ..............          45,000         +45,000
        SMALL, REMOTE, OR SUBSISTENCE HARBORS AND CHANNELS......  ..............          48,000         +48,000
    OTHER AUTHORIZED PURPOSES...................................  ..............          35,100         +35,100
AQUATIC NUISANCE CONTROL RESEARCH...............................             675             675  ..............
ASSET MANAGEMENT/FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT MANAGEMENT [FEM]......           3,250           3,250  ..............
 
BUDGET/MANAGEMENT SUPPORT FOR O&M; BUSINESS PROGRAMS:
    STEWARDSHIP SUPPORT PROGRAM.................................             950             950  ..............
    PERFORMANCE-BASED BUDGETING SUPPORT PROGRAM.................           4,200           4,200  ..............
    RECREATION MANAGEMENT SUPPORT PROGRAM.......................           1,550           1,550  ..............
    OPTIMIZATION TOOLS FOR NAVIGATION...........................             322             322  ..............
CIVIL WORKS WATER MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (CWWMS).....................          10,000          10,000  ..............
COASTAL DATA INFORMATION PROGRAM (CDIP).........................           2,500           6,000          +3,500
COASTAL INLET RESEARCH PROGRAM..................................           2,700           2,700  ..............
RESPONSE TO CLIMATE CHANGE AT CORPS PROJECTS....................           6,000           6,000  ..............
CULTURAL RESOURCES..............................................           1,500           1,500  ..............
DREDGE MCFARLAND READY RESERVE..................................          11,690          11,690  ..............
DREDGE WHEELER READY RESERVE....................................          15,000          15,000  ..............
DREDGING DATA AND LOCK PERFORMANCE MONITORING SYSTEM............           1,119           1,119  ..............
DREDGING OPERATIONS AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH (DOER)...........           6,450           6,450  ..............
DREDGING OPERATIONS TECHNICAL SUPPORT PROGRAM (DOTS)............           2,820           2,820  ..............
EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION PROGRAM............................             100             100  ..............
FACILITY PROTECTION.............................................           3,500           3,500  ..............
FISH & WILDLIFE OPERATING FISH HATCHERY REIMBURSEMENT...........           5,400           5,400  ..............
GREAT LAKES TRIBUTARY MODEL.....................................             600             600  ..............
INLAND WATERWAY NAVIGATION CHARTS...............................           4,500           4,500  ..............
INTERAGENCY PERFORMANCE EVALUATION TASK FORCE/HURRICANE                    2,000           2,000  ..............
 PROTECTION DECISION CHRONOLOGY (IPET/HPDC) LESSONS LEARNED
 IMPLEMENTATION.................................................
INSPECTION OF COMPLETED FEDERAL FLOOD CONTROL PROJECTS..........          30,500          30,500  ..............
MONITORING OF COMPLETED NAVIGATION PROJECTS.....................           2,300           8,000          +5,700
NATIONAL (LEVEE) FLOOD INVENTORY................................           5,000           5,000  ..............
NATIONAL (MULTIPLE PROJECT) NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT                   5,000           5,000  ..............
 ACTIVITIES.....................................................
NATIONAL COASTAL MAPPING PROGRAM................................           6,300           9,300          +3,000
NATIONAL DAM SAFETY PROGRAM (PORTFOLIO RISK ASSESSMENT).........          10,000          10,000  ..............
NATIONAL EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PROGRAM (NEPP)..................           4,500           4,500  ..............
NATIONAL PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT FOR REALLOCATIONS.................             800             800  ..............
SUSTAINABLE RIVERS PROGRAM (SRP)................................             400             400  ..............
VETERAN'S CURATION PROGRAM AND COLLECTIONS MANAGEMENT...........           6,500           6,500  ..............
WATERBORNE COMMERCE STATISTICS..................................           4,669           4,669  ..............
HARBOR MAINTENANCE FEE DATA COLLECTION..........................             795             795  ..............
REGIONAL SEDIMENT MANAGEMENT PROGRAM............................           1,800           1,800  ..............
REVIEW OF NON-FEDERAL ALTERATIONS OF CIVIL WORKS PROJECTS                  3,000           3,000  ..............
 (SECTION 408)..................................................
WATER OPERATIONS TECHNICAL SUPPORT (WOTS).......................             500           5,500          +5,000
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL, REMAINING ITEMS.................................         168,890         637,718        +468,828
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE..........................       2,705,001       3,173,829        +468,828
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Monitoring of Completed Navigation Projects.--Of the 
funding provided, $4,000,000 shall be for continued development 
and field-testing of platforms to enable scalable, cost 
effective structural health monitoring of critical civil 
infrastructure.
    Operations and Maintenance--Fisheries.--The Committee is 
concerned that a reduction in or elimination of navigational 
lock operations on the Nation's inland waterways is having a 
negative impact on river ecosystems, particularly the ability 
of a number of endangered, threatened and game fish species to 
migrate through waterways, particularly during critical 
spawning periods. The Committee is aware of preliminary 
research that indicates reduced lock operations on certain 
Corps of Engineers designated low-use waterways is directly 
impacting migration and that there are effective means to 
mitigate the impacts. The Committee believes maximizing the 
ability of fish to use these locks to move past the dams has 
the potential to restore natural and historic long-distance 
river migrations that may well be critical to species survival. 
In fiscal year 2016, the Committee provided funding to continue 
preliminary research on the impact of reduced lock operations 
on riverine fish. The Committee understands the research 
underway is proving valuable and, within available funds for 
ongoing work, directs the Corps of Engineers to continue this 
research at no less than the 2016 level. The goal of the 
continued funding is to support the continuing research and, 
where appropriate, expand the work to look at ecosystem level 
impacts and additional waterways, lock structures, lock 
operation methods and fish species that will more fully inform 
the Corps of Engineers operations.
    Dam Optimization.--The Corps of Engineers is urged not to 
carry out any reservoir reoperation or reallocation for 
authorized purposes at Corps of Engineers' facilities in the 
Southwestern Division with funds from any non-Federal entity 
other than the non-Federal sponsor until the Corps of Engineers 
has completed all public outreach and coordination, and 
submitted to the relevant authorizing and appropriations 
Committees, and the Congressional delegation representing such 
facility, a detailed analysis of the change in operations of 
the reservoir, and specific information on whether the 
activities would alter availability of water for existing 
authorized purposes at such facility, as well as compensation 
for lost water that would be necessary to make users whole if 
such activities were carried out.
    Dam Operations Manual Updates.--In the South Pacific 
Division, the Corps of Engineers may accept and expend 
contributions from non-Federal entities and other Federal 
agencies to fund all or a portion of the cost of carrying out a 
review or revision of operational documents, including water 
control plans, water control manuals, water control diagrams, 
release schedules, rule curves, operational agreements with 
non-Federal entities, and any associated environmental 
documentation for any Corps of Engineers project, non-Federal 
projects regulated for flood control by the Secretary, or 
Bureau of Reclamation transferred works regulated for flood 
control by the Secretary.
    The Dalles Dam.--The Committee is aware of a Corps of 
Engineers legal analysis which finds that a new tribal village 
can be constructed pursuant to section 204 of the Flood Control 
Act authorizing construction of The Dalles Dam. The Corps of 
Engineers is encouraged to complete a development plan for a 
new tribal village at The Dalles Dam in consultation with 
affected Columbia River tribes and the Bureau of Indian 
Affairs.
    WRRDA Section 6002.--The Committee supports the Corps of 
Engineers performing a review of their inventory, in accordance 
with section 6002 of the Water Resources Reform and Development 
Act of 2014, not later than 1 year after the date of enactment 
of this Act.
    WRRDA Section 4001.--The Congress has made clear its intent 
that the Susquehanna, Delaware, and Potomac River Basin 
Commissions be supported, and the Corps of Engineers is 
encouraged to budget accordingly.
    Isle of Shoals North and Cape Arundel Dredged Material 
Placement Site.--The Cape Arundel Disposal Site in the State of 
Maine selected by the Department of the Army as an alternative 
dredged material disposal site under section 103(b) of the 
Marine Protection Research and Sanctuaries Act of 1972, shall 
remain open until April, 15 2024, until the remaining disposal 
capacity of the site has been utilized, or until final 
designation of an Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site for 
southern Maine under section 102(c) of the Marine Protection 
Research and Sanctuaries Act of 1972, whichever first occurs, 
provided that the site conditions remain suitable for such 
purpose and that the site may not be used for disposal of more 
than 80,000 cubic yards from any single dredging project.
    Donor Ports and Energy Transfer Ports.--The Committee 
provides $50,000,000 for eligible donor ports and energy 
transfer ports in accordance with WRRDA section 2106. The 
Committee notes the Corps of Engineers has failed to issue 
implementation guidance for section 2106 as directed by the 
Committee. With respect to eligible donor ports, the Committee 
directs 50 percent of such funds be equally divided between the 
eligible donor ports; and the remaining 50 percent of such 
funds be divided between the eligible donor ports based on each 
eligible donor port's percentage of the total Harbor 
Maintenance Tax revenues generated at such ports, in accordance 
with WRRDA section 2101. Funds recommended for section 2106 
shall be used at the discretion of each eligible donor port and 
energy transfer port in accordance with section 2106.
    Additional Funding for Ongoing Work.--The fiscal year 2017 
budget request does not fund operations, maintenance, and 
rehabilitation of our Nation's aging infrastructure 
sufficiently to ensure continued competitiveness in a global 
marketplace. Federal navigation channels maintained at only a 
fraction of authorized dimensions, and navigation locks and 
hydropower facilities, well beyond their design life, result in 
economic inefficiencies. The Committee believes that investing 
in operations, maintenance, and rehabilitation of 
infrastructure today will save taxpayers money in the future.
    The Committee recommendation includes additional funds to 
continue ongoing projects and activities, including periodic 
dredging of ports and harbors. The Committee directs that 
priority in allocating these funds be given to completing 
ongoing work maintaining authorized depths and widths of 
harbors and shipping channels, including where contaminated 
sediments are present, and for addressing critical maintenance 
backlog. Particular emphasis should be placed on projects where 
there is a U.S. Coast Guard presence; that will enhance 
national, regional, or local economic development; or that will 
promote job growth or international competitiveness.
    The Committee is concerned that the administration's 
criteria for navigation maintenance do not allow small, remote, 
or subsistence harbors and waterways to properly compete for 
scarce navigation maintenance funds. The Committee urges the 
Corps of Engineers to revise the criteria used for determining 
which navigation maintenance projects are funded in order to 
develop a reasonable and equitable allocation under this 
account. The Committee supports including criteria to evaluate 
the economic impact that these projects provide to local and 
regional economies.
    Water Operations Technical Support.--Funding in addition to 
the budget request is included to continue research into 
atmospheric rivers funded in fiscal year 2015.
    Additional Funding for Ongoing Work--Deep Draft Harbor and 
Channel.--The Committee recommendation includes $250,000,000 in 
additional funding for deep-draft harbor and channel 
maintenance. Within the amounts available, the Committee urges 
the Corps of Engineers to give priority to funding strategic 
commercial ports, as designated by the Department of Defense, 
in the fiscal year 2017 work plan if their additional 
maintenance dredging capability for fiscal year 2017 exceeds 
the amount included in the budget request.
    Additional Funding for Navigation Maintenance on Great 
Lakes Navigation System.--The Committee encourages the Corps of 
Engineers to direct additional funding for ongoing work under 
O&M; to navigation maintenance, specifically deep-draft harbor 
and channel projects as well as small navigation projects 
essential to the Great Lakes Navigation System.

                           REGULATORY PROGRAM

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $200,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     200,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     200,000,000

    The Committee recommends $200,000,000 for the Regulatory 
Program of the Corps of Engineers, the same as the budget 
request.

            FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $112,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     103,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     103,000,000

    The Committee recommends $103,000,000 for the Formerly 
Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, the same as the budget 
request.

                 FLOOD CONTROL AND COASTAL EMERGENCIES

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $28,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      30,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      30,000,000

    The Committee recommends $30,000,000 for Flood Control and 
Coastal Emergencies, the same as the budget request.

                                EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $179,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     180,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     180,000,000

    The Committee recommends $180,000,000 for Expenses, the 
same as the budget request. This appropriation finances the 
expenses for the Office of the Chief of Engineers, the Division 
Offices, and certain research and statistical functions of the 
Corps of Engineers. No funding is recommended for creation of 
an Office of Congressional Affairs.

      OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF THE ARMY (CIVIL WORKS)

Appropriations, 2016....................................      $4,750,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................       5,000,000
Committee recommendation................................       5,000,000

    The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for the Office of the 
Assistant Secretary of the Army (Civil Works), the same as the 
budget request.

             GENERAL PROVISIONS--CORPS OF ENGINEERS--CIVIL

    Section 101. The bill includes language concerning 
reprogramming guidelines.
    Section 102. The bill includes language concerning funding 
transfers requested by the Administration related to fish 
hatcheries.
    Section 103. The bill includes language concerning the 
definitions ``fill material'' or ``discharge of fill material'' 
for purposes of the Federal Pollution Control Act.
    Section 104. The bill includes language concerning the open 
lake placement of dredged material.

                                TITLE II

                       DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

                CENTRAL UTAH PROJECT COMPLETION ACCOUNT

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $10,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................       5,600,000
Committee recommendation................................      10,000,000

    The Committee recommends $10,000,000 for the Central Utah 
Project Completion account which includes $7,350,000 for 
Central Utah Project construction, $1,300,000 for transfer to 
the Utah Reclamation Mitigation and Conservation Account for 
use by the Utah Reclamation Mitigation and Conservation 
Commission, $1,350,000 for necessary expenses of the Secretary 
of the Interior, and up to $1,500,000 for the Commission's 
administrative expenses. This allows Reclamation to develop 
water supply facilities that will continue to sustain economic 
growth and an enhanced quality of life in the western States, 
the fastest growing region in the United States. The Committee 
remains committed to complete the Central Utah Project, which 
would enable the project to initiate repayment to the Federal 
Government.

                         Bureau of Reclamation


                       OVERVIEW OF RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $1,265,000,000 for the Bureau of 
Reclamation [Reclamation], an increase of $158,841,000 from the 
budget request. The Committee recommendation sets priorities by 
supporting our Nation's infrastructure.

                              INTRODUCTION

    In addition to the traditional missions of bringing water 
and power to the West, Reclamation continues to develop 
programs, initiatives, and activities that will help meet new 
water needs and balance the multitude of competing uses of 
water in the West. Reclamation is the largest wholesaler of 
water in the country, operating 348 reservoirs with a total 
storage capacity of 245 million acre-feet. Reclamation projects 
deliver 10 trillion gallons of water to more than 31 million 
people each year, and provide 1 out of 5 western farmers with 
irrigation water for 10 million acres of farmland that produce 
60 percent of the Nation's vegetables and 25 percent of its 
fruits and nuts. Reclamation manages, with partners, 289 
recreation sites that have 90 million visits annually.

                       FISCAL YEAR 2017 WORK PLAN

    The Committee has recommended funding above the budget 
request for Water and Related Resources. Reclamation is 
directed to submit a work plan, not later than 60 days after 
the date of enactment of this act, to the Committee proposing 
its allocation of these additional funds. Reclamation is 
directed not to obligate any funding above the budget request 
for studies or projects until the Committee has approved the 
work plan for fiscal year 2017. The work plan shall be 
consistent with the following general guidance.
  --None of the funds may be used for any item for which the 
        Committee has specifically denied funding.
  --The additional funds are provided for ongoing studies or 
        projects that were either not included in the budget 
        request or for which the budget request was inadequate.
  --Funding associated with a category may be allocated to 
        eligible studies or projects within that category.
  --Reclamation may not withhold funding from a study or 
        project because it is inconsistent with administration 
        policy. The Committee notes that these funds are in 
        excess of the administration's budget request, and that 
        administration budget metrics should not disqualify a 
        study or project from being funded.

                             REPROGRAMMING

    The Committee is retaining the reprogramming legislation 
provided in the Energy and Water Development and Related 
Agencies Appropriations Act, 2016.

                                DROUGHT

    The Committee is particularly concerned about the continued 
drought in the West. The U.S. Drought Monitor for May 12, 2016, 
shows that all Reclamation States are currently suffering from 
drought conditions. Ten of the seventeen Reclamation States are 
suffering from severe to exceptional drought over large 
portions of the individual States. Nearly all of California, 
one-half of Nevada, one-half of Oregon, and some areas of the 
southern Great Plains are suffering from extreme to exceptional 
drought.
    The Committee notes that although this year's El Nino 
weather system resulted in increased precipitation overall, one 
El Nino event is not sufficient to alleviate the severe drought 
conditions facing Reclamation states. The State of California, 
for example, estimates that the state would have needed a 
snowpack total of 150 percent of the historical average by 
April 1, 2016 in order to be able to consider the drought at an 
end. However, California's snowpack, which supplies 
approximately 30 percent of California's water needs in normal 
years, is only at 87 percent of its historical average, despite 
significant El Nino storms.
    In order to address the continued drought in the West, the 
Committee directs Reclamation and the Department of the 
Interior to use all of the flexibility and tools at their 
disposal to mitigate the impacts of this drought. In 
particular, the Committee directs Reclamation to work with the 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Marine Fisheries 
Service, and relevant state agencies to undertake 
comprehensive, around the clock, real-time monitoring of 
drought conditions and their impact on endangered species and 
rely upon the best available science. The Committee also 
directs Reclamation to work with the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture to expand efforts to supply small rural communities 
with water during the current drought.
    The Committee is pleased to see that Reclamation has 
increased the funding for WaterSmart grants that increase 
efficiencies in current water uses. The Committee also 
appreciates Reclamation including a line in the budget request 
under WaterSmart to provide Drought Response and Comprehensive 
Drought Plans.
    However, these efforts are insufficient to address the 
current scope of this drought and do nothing to address future 
droughts. The Committee believes that the only answer to these 
chronic droughts is a combination of additional storage, 
substantial investments in desalination and recycling, improved 
conveyance, and increased efficiencies in the uses of water 
both for agriculture and potable purposes. As the West has 
consistently been the fastest growing part of the country, it 
is incumbent on Reclamation to lead the way in increasing the 
water that is available from year to year and to incentivize 
more efficient use of the water that is available.

                   CONGRESSIONALLY DIRECTED SPENDING

    The Committee did not accept or include Congressionally 
Directed Spending, as defined in section 5(a) of rule XLIV of 
the Standing Rules of the Senate. However, the Committee has 
recommended additional programmatic funds for the Water and 
Related Resources account. In some cases, these additional 
funds have been included within defined categories, as in prior 
years, and are described in more detail in their respective 
sections, below.

                      WATER AND RELATED RESOURCES

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $1,118,972,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     813,402,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,114,394,000

    The Committee recommends $1,114,394,000 for Water and 
Related Resources, an increase of $158,841,000 when accounting 
for the budget structure, which includes funding in this 
account for Indian Water Rights Settlements and the San Joaquin 
River Restoration Fund, as in prior years.

                              INTRODUCTION

    The Water and Related Resources account supports the 
development, management, and restoration of water and related 
natural resources in the 17 western States. The account 
includes funds for operating and maintaining existing 
facilities to obtain the greatest overall level of benefits, to 
protect public safety, and to conduct studies on ways to 
improve the use of water and related natural resources. Work 
will be done in partnership and cooperation with non-Federal 
entities and other Federal agencies.
    The Committee has increased funding in the Water and 
Related Resources account on a number of line items to better 
allow Reclamation to address the immediate impacts of the 
drought. These funds may be used for environmental restoration 
and compliance activities; water conservation and delivery; 
increased operations and maintenance funding; drought emergency 
assistance planning; WaterSmart grants; and drought response 
and comprehensive drought assistance. The Committee notes that 
Reclamation included more funds in its fiscal year 2017 budget 
request to address the continuing impacts from this drought. 
The Committee encourages Reclamation to maintain or increase 
these levels in the development of its fiscal year 2018 budget 
request.

                               BUREAU OF RECLAMATION--WATER AND RELATED RESOURCES
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          Budget estimate            Committee recommendation
                                                 ---------------------------------------------------------------
                  Project title                      Resources      Facilities       Resources      Facilities
                                                    management         OM&R;         management         OM&R;
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
                     ARIZONA
 
AK CHIN INDIAN WATER RIGHTS SETTLEMENT ACT        ..............          15,735  ..............          15,735
 PROJECT........................................
COLORADO RIVER BASIN--CENTRAL ARIZONA PROJECT...           6,272             648           6,272             648
COLORADO RIVER FRONT WORK AND LEVEE SYSTEM......           2,303  ..............           2,303  ..............
SALT RIVER PROJECT..............................             649             250             649             250
SAN CARLOS APACHE TRIBE WATER SETTLEMENT ACT               1,550  ..............           1,550  ..............
 PROJECT........................................
YUMA AREA PROJECTS..............................           1,315          24,999           1,315          24,999
 
                   CALIFORNIA
 
CACHUMA PROJECT.................................             647             674             647             674
CENTRAL VALLEY PROJECTS.........................  ..............  ..............  ..............  ..............
    AMERICAN RIVER DIVISION, FOLSOM DAM UNIT/              1,577           8,888           1,577           8,888
     MORMON ISLAND..............................
    AUBURN-FOLSOM SOUTH UNIT....................              35           2,056              35           2,056
    DELTA DIVISION..............................           5,468           5,511           5,468           5,511
    EAST SIDE DIVISION..........................           1,290           2,644           1,290           2,644
    FRIANT DIVISION.............................           2,192           3,273           2,192           3,273
        SAN JOAQUIN RIVER RESTORATION SETTLEMENT  ..............  ..............  ..............          36,000
    MISCELLANEOUS PROJECT PROGRAMS..............           8,589             454           8,589             454
    REPLACEMENTS, ADDITIONS, AND EXTRAORDINARY    ..............          16,362  ..............          16,362
     MAINT. PROGRAM.............................
    SACRAMENTO RIVER DIVISION...................           1,307             694           1,307             694
    SAN FELIPE DIVISION.........................             271              75             271              75
    SAN JOAQUIN DIVISION........................              52  ..............              52  ..............
    SHASTA DIVISION.............................             720           8,530             720           8,530
    TRINITY RIVER DIVISION......................          12,178           5,177          12,178           5,177
    WATER AND POWER OPERATIONS..................           3,989          10,543           3,989          10,543
    WEST SAN JOAQUIN DIVISION, SAN LUIS UNIT....           2,957           5,915           2,957           5,915
ORLAND PROJECT..................................  ..............             930  ..............             930
SALTON SEA RESEARCH PROJECT.....................             300  ..............             300  ..............
SOLANO PROJECT..................................           1,329           2,367           1,329           2,367
VENTURA RIVER PROJECT...........................             313              33             313              33
 
                    COLORADO
 
ANIMAS-LA PLATA PROJECT.........................             669           1,983             669           1,983
ARMEL UNIT, P-SMBP..............................               5             480               5             480
COLLBRAN PROJECT................................             229           1,960             229           1,960
COLORADO-BIG THOMPSON PROJECT...................             732          16,024             732          16,024
FRUITGROWERS DAM PROJECT........................             101             136             101             136
FRYINGPAN-ARKANSAS PROJECT......................             141          12,574             141          12,574
FRYINGPAN-ARKANSAS PROJECT--ARKANSAS VALLEY                3,000  ..............           3,000  ..............
 CONDUIT........................................
GRAND VALLEY UNIT, CRBSCP, TITLE II.............             260           1,691             260           1,691
LEADVILLE/ARKANSAS RIVER RECOVERY PROJECT.......  ..............           1,914  ..............           1,914
MANCOS PROJECT..................................              61             237              61             237
NARROWS UNIT, P-SMBP............................  ..............              36  ..............              36
PARADOX VALLEY UNIT, CRBSCP, TITLE II...........             399           3,000             399           3,000
PINE RIVER PROJECT..............................             123             321             123             321
SAN LUIS VALLEY PROJECT, CLOSED BASIN...........             267           3,656             267           3,656
SAN LUIS VALLEY PROJECT, CONEJOS DIVISION.......              23              54              23              54
UNCOMPAHGRE PROJECT.............................             838             159             838             159
UPPER COLORADO RIVER OPERATIONS PROGRAM.........             270  ..............             270  ..............
 
                      IDAHO
 
BOISE AREA PROJECTS.............................           2,741           1,930           2,741           1,930
COLUMBIA AND SNAKE RIVER SALMON RECOVERY PROJECT          18,000  ..............          18,000  ..............
LEWISTON ORCHARDS PROJECTS......................           3,578              27           3,578              27
MINIDOKA AREA PROJECTS..........................           2,631           2,169           2,631           2,169
PRESTON BENCH PROJECT...........................               4               8               4               8
 
                     KANSAS
 
ALMENA UNIT, P-SMBP.............................              43             471              43             471
BOSTWICK UNIT, P-SMBP...........................             365             894             365             894
CEDAR BLUFF UNIT, P-SMBP........................              40             541              40             541
GLEN ELDER UNIT, P-SMBP.........................              65           1,238              65           1,238
KANSAS RIVER UNIT, P-SMBP.......................  ..............             100  ..............             100
KIRWIN UNIT, P-SMBP.............................              37             472              37             472
WEBSTER UNIT, P-SMBP............................              15             490              15             490
WICHITA PROJECT--CHENEY DIVISION................             147             384             147             384
 
                     MONTANA
 
CANYON FERRY UNIT, P-SMBP.......................             246           5,442             246           5,442
EAST BENCH UNIT, P-SMBP.........................             202             652             202             652
FORT PECK RESERVATION / DRY PRAIRIE RURAL WATER            4,625  ..............           4,625  ..............
 SYSTEM.........................................
HELENA VALLEY UNIT, P-SMBP......................              19             155              19             155
HUNGRY HORSE PROJECT............................  ..............             508  ..............             508
HUNTLEY PROJECT.................................              12              51              12              51
LOWER MARIAS UNIT, P-SMBP.......................             102           1,636             102           1,636
LOWER YELLOWSTONE PROJECT.......................             364              16             364              16
MILK RIVER PROJECT..............................             548           1,148             548           1,148
MISSOURI BASIN O&M;, P-SMBP......................           1,028             273           1,028             273
ROCKY BOYS/NORTH CENTRAL MT RURAL WATER SYSTEM..           3,700  ..............           3,700  ..............
SUN RIVER PROJECT...............................             153             260             153             260
YELLOWTAIL UNIT, P-SMBP.........................              22           6,780              22           6,780
 
                    NEBRASKA
 
AINSWORTH UNIT, P-SMBP..........................              70             103              70             103
FRENCHMAN-CAMBRIDGE UNIT, P-SMBP................             325           1,842             325           1,842
MIRAGE FLATS PROJECT............................              13              98              13              98
NORTH LOUP UNIT, P-SMBP.........................              89             121              89             121
 
                     NEVADA
 
LAHONTAN BASIN PROJECT..........................           6,325           3,526           6,325           3,526
LAKE TAHOE REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM.........             115  ..............             115  ..............
LAKE MEAD /LAS VEGAS WASH PROGRAM...............             700  ..............             700  ..............
 
                   NEW MEXICO
 
CARLSBAD PROJECT................................           2,915           1,224           2,915           1,224
EASTERN NEW MEXICO RURAL WATER SUPPLY...........           1,000  ..............           1,000  ..............
MIDDLE RIO GRANDE PROJECT.......................          14,329          11,536          14,329          11,536
RIO GRANDE PROJECT..............................           1,399           4,007           1,399           4,007
RIO GRANDE PEUBLOS PROJECT......................             300  ..............             300  ..............
TUCUMCARI PROJECT...............................              18               5              18               5
 
                  NORTH DAKOTA
 
DICKINSON UNIT, P-SMBP..........................             212             569             212             569
GARRISON DIVERSION UNIT, P-SMBP.................          16,406           7,122          16,406           7,122
HEART BUTTE UNIT, P-SMBP........................              82             947              82             947
 
                    OKLAHOMA
 
ARBUCKLE PROJECT................................              67             171              67             171
MCGEE CREEK PROJECT.............................             189             795             189             795
MOUNTAIN PARK PROJECT...........................              84             602              84             602
NORMAN PROJECT..................................              71             298              71             298
WASHITA BASIN PROJECT...........................             244           1,006             244           1,006
W.C. AUSTIN PROJECT.............................              59             539              59             539
 
                     OREGON
 
CROOKED RIVER PROJECT...........................             284             516             284             516
DESCHUTES PROJECT...............................             367             205             367             205
EASTERN OREGON PROJECTS.........................             536             222             536             222
KLAMATH PROJECT.................................          11,379           4,621          11,379           4,621
ROGUE RIVER BASIN PROJECT, TALENT DIVISION......           1,601           1,236           1,601           1,236
TUALATIN PROJECT................................             367             223             367             223
UMATILLA PROJECT................................             503           2,347             503           2,347
 
                  SOUTH DAKOTA
 
ANGOSTURA UNIT, P-SMBP..........................             249             719             249             719
BELLE FOURCHE UNIT, P-SMBP......................             270           1,025             270           1,025
KEYHOLE UNIT, P-SMBP............................             198             577             198             577
LEWIS AND CLARK RURAL WATER SYSTEM..............           2,775  ..............           2,775  ..............
MID-DAKOTA RURAL WATER PROJECT..................  ..............              15  ..............              15
MNI WICONI PROJECT..............................  ..............          12,200  ..............          12,200
OAHE UNIT, P-SMBP...............................              36              71              36              71
RAPID VALLEY PROJECT............................  ..............              69  ..............              69
RAPID VALLEY UNIT, P-SMBP.......................  ..............             195  ..............             195
SHADEHILL UNIT, P-SMBP..........................              75             456              75             456
 
                      TEXAS
 
BALMORHEA PROJECT...............................              27              13              27              13
CANADIAN RIVER PROJECT..........................              84             135              84             135
LOWER RIO GRANDE WATER RESOURCES CONSERVATION                 50  ..............              50  ..............
 PROGRAM........................................
NUECES RIVER PROJECT............................             108             708             108             708
SAN ANGELO PROJECT..............................              38             597              38             597
 
                      UTAH
 
HYRUM PROJECT...................................             178             176             178             176
MOON LAKE PROJECT...............................               9              84               9              84
NEWTON PROJECT..................................              29              95              29              95
OGDEN RIVER PROJECT.............................             218             256             218             256
PROVO RIVER PROJECT.............................           1,293             458           1,293             458
SANPETE PROJECT.................................              60              10              60              10
SCOFIELD PROJECT................................             529              86             529              86
STRAWBERRY VALLEY PROJECT.......................             505             100             505             100
WEBER BASIN PROJECT.............................           1,135             925           1,135             925
WEBER RIVER PROJECT.............................              60              86              60              86
 
                   WASHINGTON
 
COLUMBIA BASIN PROJECT..........................           4,273           9,989           4,273           9,989
WASHINGTON AREA PROJECTS........................             459              64             459              64
YAKIMA PROJECT..................................           1,104           5,240           1,104           5,240
YAKIMA RIVER BASIN WATER ENHANCEMENT PROJECT....          15,799  ..............          15,799  ..............
 
                     WYOMING
 
BOYSEN UNIT, P-SMBP.............................             231           1,872             231           1,872
BUFFALO BILL DAM, DAM MODIFICATION, P-SMBP......              32           2,747              32           2,747
KENDRICK PROJECT................................             106           3,692             106           3,692
NORTH PLATTE PROJECT............................             205           1,153             205           1,153
NORTH PLATTE AREA, P-SMBP.......................             109           5,120             109           5,120
OWL CREEK UNIT, P-SMBP..........................               6             105               6             105
RIVERTON UNIT, P-SMBP...........................               8             566               8             566
SHOSHONE PROJECT................................              76             753              76             753
                                                 ---------------------------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL, ITEMS UNDER STATES..............         191,491         279,866         191,491         315,866
                                                 ===============================================================
                 REMAINING ITEMS
 
ADDITIONAL FUNDING FOR ONGOING WORK:
    RURAL WATER.................................  ..............  ..............          43,841  ..............
    FISH PASSAGE AND FISH SCREENS...............  ..............  ..............           5,000  ..............
    WATER CONSERVATION AND DELIVERY.............  ..............  ..............          10,000  ..............
    WESTERN DROUGHT REPONSE.....................  ..............  ..............         100,000  ..............
COLORADO RIVER BASIN SALINITY CONTROL PROJECT,    ..............          15,453  ..............          15,453
 TITLE I........................................
COLORADO RIVER BASIN SALINITY CONTROL PROJECT,             8,162  ..............           8,162  ..............
 TITLE II.......................................
COLORADO RIVER STORAGE PROJECT (CRSP), SECTION 5           3,935           6,500           3,935           6,500
COLORADO RIVER STORAGE PROJECT (CRSP), SECTION 8           2,765  ..............           2,765  ..............
COLORADO RIVER WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PROJECT             620  ..............             620  ..............
 
DAM SAFETY PROGRAM:
    DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR DAM SAFETY         ..............           1,300  ..............           1,300
     PROGRAM....................................
    INITIATE SAFETY OF DAMS CORRECTIVE ACTION...  ..............          64,500  ..............          64,500
    SAFETY EVALUATION OF EXISTING DAMS..........  ..............          20,284  ..............          20,284
EMERGENCY PLANNING & DISASTER RESPONSE PROGRAM..  ..............           1,250  ..............           1,250
ENDANGERED SPECIES RECOVERY IMPLEMENTATION                27,305  ..............          27,305  ..............
 PROGRAM........................................
ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION............           1,828  ..............           1,828  ..............
EXAMINATION OF EXISTING STRUCTURES..............  ..............           8,854  ..............           8,854
GENERAL PLANNING ACTIVITIES.....................           2,000  ..............           2,000  ..............
 
INDIAN WATER RIGHTS SETTLEMENTS:
    AAMODT LITIGATION SETTLEMENT ACT............  ..............  ..............           6,379  ..............
    CROW TRIBE WATER RIGHTS SETTLEMENT ACT OF     ..............  ..............          12,772  ..............
     2010.......................................
    NAVAJO-GALLUP WATER SUPPLY PROJECT..........  ..............  ..............          87,000  ..............
LAND RESOURCES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM...............           9,813  ..............           9,813  ..............
LOWER COLORADO RIVER OPERATIONS PROGRAM.........          27,433  ..............          27,433  ..............
MISCELLANEOUS FLOOD CONTROL OPERATIONS..........  ..............             819  ..............             819
NATIVE AMERICAN AFFAIRS PROGRAM.................          10,425  ..............          10,425  ..............
NEGOTIATION & ADMINISTRATION OF WATER MARKETING.           1,764  ..............           1,764  ..............
OPERATION & PROGRAM MANAGEMENT..................           1,132           1,656           1,132           1,656
POWER PROGRAM SERVICES..........................           2,391             307           2,391             307
PUBLIC ACCESS AND SAFETY PROGRAM................             593             206             593             206
RECLAMATION LAW ADMINISTRATION..................           2,189  ..............           2,189  ..............
RECREATION & FISH & WILDLIFE PROGRAM                       2,189  ..............           2,189  ..............
 ADMINISTRATION.................................
 
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT:
    DESALINATION AND WATER PURIFICATION PROGRAM.           4,653           1,150           4,653           1,150
    SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM..............          22,765  ..............          22,765  ..............
SITE SECURITY ACTIVITIES........................  ..............          26,220  ..............          26,220
UNITED STATES/MEXICO BORDER ISSUES--TECHNICAL                 90  ..............              90  ..............
 SUPPORT........................................
 
WATERSMART PROGRAM:
    WATERSMART GRANTS...........................          23,365  ..............          23,365  ..............
    WATER CONSERVATION FIELD SERVICES PROGRAM...           4,179  ..............           4,179  ..............
    COOPERATIVE WATERSHED MANAGEMENT............           1,750  ..............           1,750  ..............
    BASIN STUDIES...............................           5,200  ..............           5,200  ..............
    DROUGHT RESPONSE & COMPREHENSIVE DROUGHT               4,000  ..............           4,000  ..............
     PLANS......................................
    RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENTS........  ..............           1,500  ..............           1,500
    TITLE XVI WATER RECLAMATION & REUSE PROGRAM.          21,500  ..............          21,500  ..............
                                                 ---------------------------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL, REMAINING ITEMS.................         192,046         149,999         457,038         149,999
                                                 ===============================================================
UNDERFINANCING..................................  ..............  ..............  ..............  ..............
                                                 ---------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL.....................................         383,537         429,865         648,529         465,865
                                                 ===============================================================
      GRAND TOTAL, WATER AND RELATED RESOURCES..  ..............         813,402  ..............       1,114,394
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    CALFED Water Storage Feasibility Studies.--The Committee 
notes that with the passage of California Proposition 1 in 
2014, the California Water Commission is expected to begin 
allocating $2,700,000,000 for the public benefits of water 
storage projects in 2017. To ensure that the CALFED water 
supply projects are able to compete for the available State 
funding, the Committee directs Reclamation to take such steps 
as are necessary to ensure that each of the authorized CALFED 
water storage feasibility studies, and associated environmental 
impact statements, are completed as soon as practicable, and 
that, at a minimum, publicly available drafts of such studies 
and environmental reviews are completed expeditiously in 
accordance with Congressional direction.
    Scoggins Dam, Tualatin Project, Oregon.--The Committee 
recommends $2,000,000 for Safety of Dams preconstruction 
activities at Scoggins Dam as requested. Consistent with the 
Tualatin Project Water Supply Feasibility Study authorized in 
Public Law 108-137 and statutory authority granted in the 
fiscal year 2016 Omnibus Appropriation allowing for additional 
benefits, such as storage, to be conducted simultaneously with 
dam safety improvements for new or supplementary works, the 
Committee directs the Bureau to evaluate alternatives, 
including new or supplementary works provided that safety 
remains the paramount consideration, to address dam safety 
modifications and additional benefits. The Committee directs 
Reclamation to prioritize this joint project including 
commencement of feasibility and environmental review of the 
preferred alternative in fiscal year 2017. The Committee 
understands that a replacement structure downstream could 
significantly reduce project costs for both the Federal 
Government and local stakeholders. The Secretary may accept 
contributed funds from non-Federal contractors to expedite 
completion of any level of review.
    Rural Water Projects.--When allocating resources for rural 
water projects, the Committee prohibits Reclamation from using 
the ability of a non-Federal sponsor to contribute funds in 
excess of the authorized non-Federal cost share as a criterion 
for prioritizing these funds.
    The Committee also directs Reclamation to work with the 
United States Department of the Interior, the Senate Energy and 
Natural Resources Committee, and House Natural Resources 
Committee on legislative solutions to funding authorized 
Reclamation Rural Water Projects.
    WaterSMART Program.--The Committee recommends that grants 
funded under the WaterSMART Program have a near-term impact on 
water and energy conservation and improved water management. 
Reclamation is urged to prioritize funding for projects in 
regions most stricken by drought. The Committee urges 
Reclamation to provide additional funds for the WaterSmart 
program to fund projects that address water challenges in the 
West, including projects that address drought or help 
agricultural water users comply with the Endangered Species 
Act, and projects that support collaborative approaches and 
reduce conflict, including litigation, over water management.
    Additional Funding for Water and Related Resources Work.--
The Committee recommendation includes an additional 
$158,841,000 above the budget request for Water and Related 
Resources studies, projects, and activities. Priority in 
allocating these funds should be given to advance and complete 
ongoing work; improve water supply reliability; improve water 
deliveries; enhance national, regional, or local economic 
development; promote job growth; advance tribal and non-tribal 
water settlement studies and activities; or address critical 
backlog maintenance and rehabilitation activities. Funding 
provided under the heading Additional Funding for Ongoing Work 
may be utilized for pre-construction activities and on projects 
which provide new or existing water supplies through additional 
infrastructure. Reclamation should give priority in allocating 
funds to on-going work on authorized projects for which 
environmental compliance has been completed.
    Buried Metallic Water Pipe.--The Bureau of Reclamation has 
repeatedly disregarded congressional directives related to 
Technical Memorandum No. 8140-CC-2004-1 and the assembly and 
analysis of data on pipeline reliability. Due to this repeated 
pattern for a number of years and failure to meet congressional 
deadlines, Reclamation shall treat the Technical Memorandum as 
a set of non-binding guidelines, instead of a set of 
requirements, as it has repeatedly told Congress. As a set of 
non-binding guidelines, deviations from the Technical 
Memorandum may occur without review and/or approval by any 
Federal entity if the water project has been designed and 
approved by a duly licensed and registered professional 
engineer.
    Water Pumping in California.--The Committee notes that 
water pumping restrictions intended to protect endangered smelt 
in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta have resulted in 
roughly the same amount of water being pumped to Central and 
Southern California during the beginning of 2016, an El Nino 
year, than was pumped during the same period of 2015, an 
extreme drought year. The Committee is deeply concerned that 
Federal agencies responsible for determining when to restrict 
water pumping are relying too heavily on assumptions and 
intuition rather than actual and regular monitoring of water 
conditions and Delta Smelt populations. In an effort to better 
understand the exact impact of pumping operations on the 
ability of Delta Smelt to survive, the Committee directs 
Reclamation to coordinate with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service to determine additional real-time monitoring is 
necessary to accurately identify the effects of pumping on 
smelt, specifically, whether Delta Smelt are capable of 
migrating back out to the Central Delta when found further 
south of Prisoner's Point, approximately 17 miles from the 
water pumps. If the Department of the Interior finds that 
additional monitoring or expeditious scientific study is 
necessary to make this determination, the Department shall 
promptly implement the necessary monitoring or study. The 
Bureau of Reclamation shall brief the Committee on the results 
of this coordinated inquiry with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
not later than 60 days after enactment of this act.
    Fish monitoring.--The Committee notes that the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has made significant 
progress in deploying acoustic tags to monitor the migration 
and survival of salmonids between spawning areas and the 
Pacific Ocean. In 2013, tags became small enough to implant in 
endangered winter-run Chinook. The Committee also notes that 
the Corps of Engineers is currently working on a prototype tag 
small and flexible enough for injection into juvenile Pacific 
Lamprey in the Columbia River Basin. The Committee directs 
Reclamation to work with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 
the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the 
Corps of Engineers to coordinate and expand upon real time fish 
monitoring programs, including the potential deployment of new 
technology. The Bureau of Reclamation shall brief the Committee 
on its efforts not later than 60 days after enactment of this 
act.
    Long-term Stewardship.--Walker Basin Restoration Program 
funds awarded by Reclamation to the National Fish and Wildlife 
Foundation may be used to establish long-term stewardship 
accounts to assist with the long-term management and 
disposition of land, water and related interests acquired from 
willing sellers, with continuing assistance from Reclamation 
under new or extended grant agreements until all Program funds 
have been expended.

                CENTRAL VALLEY PROJECT RESTORATION FUND

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $49,528,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      55,606,000
Committee recommendation................................      55,606,000

    The Committee recommends $55,606,000 for the Central Valley 
Project Restoration Fund, the same as the budget request. This 
appropriation is fully offset by a scorekeeping adjustment from 
revenues.
    The Central Valley Project Restoration Fund was authorized 
in the Central Valley Project Improvement Act, title 34 of 
Public Law 102-575. This fund uses revenues from payments by 
project beneficiaries and donations for habitat restoration, 
improvement and acquisition, and other fish and wildlife 
restoration activities in the Central Valley project area of 
California. Payments from project beneficiaries include several 
required by the act (Friant Division surcharges, higher charges 
on water transferred to non-Central Valley Project users, and 
tiered water prices) and, to the extent required in 
appropriations acts, additional annual mitigation and 
restoration payments.

                    CALIFORNIA BAY-DELTA RESTORATION

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $37,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      36,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      36,000,000

    The Committee recommends $36,000,000 for California Bay-
Delta Restoration, the same as the budget request.
    This account funds activities that are consistent with the 
CALFED Bay-Delta Program, a collaborative effort involving 18 
State and Federal agencies and representatives of California's 
urban, agricultural, and environmental communities. The goals 
of the program are to improve fish and wildlife habitat, water 
supply reliability, and water quality in the San Francisco Bay-
San Joaquin River Delta, the principle hub of California's 
water distribution system.

                       POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $59,500,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      59,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      59,000,000

    The Committee recommends $59,000,000 for Policy and 
Administration, the same as the request.
    This account funds the executive direction and management 
of all Reclamation activities, as performed by the 
Commissioner's offices in Washington, DC; Denver, Colorado; and 
five regional offices. The Denver office and regional offices 
charge individual projects or activities for direct beneficial 
services and related administrative and technical costs. These 
charges are covered under other appropriations.

                    INDIAN WATER RIGHTS SETTLEMENTS

Appropriations, 2016....................................................
Budget estimate, 2017...................................    $106,151,000
Committee recommendation................................................

    The Committee recommends no funds for Indian Water Rights 
Settlements in this account.
    This account was proposed as a part of the administration 
request to cover expenses associated with four Indian water 
rights settlements contained in the Claims Resolution Act of 
2010 (Public Law 111-291), title X of the Omnibus Public Lands 
Management Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-11), and the White 
Mountain Apache Tribe Rural Water System Loan Authorization Act 
(Public Law 110-390). Rather than create a new account as 
proposed, the Committee has recommended funding under the Water 
and Related Resources account as similar work and funding has 
been previously provided in that account.

                      SAN JOAQUIN RESTORATION FUND

Appropriations, 2016....................................................
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     $36,000,000
Committee recommendation................................................

    The Committee recommends no funds for the San Joaquin 
Restoration Fund in this account.
    The Committee has provided this funding request under the 
Central Valley Project, Friant Division of the Water and 
Related Resources account as similar work and funding has been 
provided in that account in prior years.

             GENERAL PROVISIONS--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

    Section 201. The bill includes a provision regarding 
reprogramming and transfer of funds.
    Section 202. The bill includes a provision regarding the 
San Luis Unit.
    Section 203. The bill includes a provision regarding Calfed 
Bay-Delta.
    Section 204. The bill includes a provision regarding the 
Secure Water Act.

                               TITLE III

                          DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

                       Overview of Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $30,741,296,000 for the Department 
of Energy, a decrease of $762,607,000 from the budget request. 
Within the funding recommendation, $19,889,000,000 is 
classified as defense and $10,852,296,000 is classified as non-
defense.
    The Committee recommendation sets priorities by supporting 
basic energy research; reducing spending of mature 
technologies; leading the world in scientific computing; 
addressing the Federal Government's responsibility for 
environmental cleanup and disposal of used nuclear fuel; 
keeping large construction projects on time and on budget; 
effectively maintaining our nuclear weapons stockpile; and 
supporting our nuclear Navy.

                              Introduction

    The mission of the Department of Energy [Department] is to 
ensure America's security and prosperity by addressing its 
energy, environmental, and nuclear challenges through 
transformative science and technology solutions. To accomplish 
this mission, the Secretary of Energy [Secretary] relies on a 
world-class network of national laboratories, private industry, 
universities, States, and Federal agencies, which allows our 
brightest minds to solve our Nation's most important 
challenges.
    The Committee's recommendation for the Department includes 
funding in both defense and non-defense budget categories. 
Defense funding is recommended for atomic energy defense 
activities, including the National Nuclear Security 
Administration, which manages our Nation's stockpile of nuclear 
weapons, and prevents proliferation of dangerous nuclear 
materials, and supports the Navy's nuclear fleet; defense 
environmental cleanup to remediate the former nuclear weapons 
complex; and safeguards and security for Idaho National 
Laboratory. Non-defense funding is recommended for the 
Department's energy research and development programs 
(including nuclear, fossil, and renewable energy, energy 
efficiency, grid modernization and resiliency, and the Office 
of Science), power marketing administrations, the Federal 
Energy Regulatory Commission, and administrative expenses.

                        Reprogramming Guidelines

    The Committee's recommendation includes control points to 
ensure that the Secretary spends taxpayer funds in accordance 
with congressional direction. The Committee's recommendation 
also includes reprogramming guidelines to allow the Secretary 
to request permission from the Committee for certain 
expenditures, as defined below, which would not otherwise be 
permissible. The Secretary's execution of appropriated funds 
should be fully consistent with the direction provided under 
this heading and in section 301 of the bill, unless the 
Committee includes separate guidelines for specific actions in 
this report.
    Prior to obligating any funds for an action defined below 
as a reprogramming, the Secretary shall notify and obtain 
approval of the Committee. The Secretary should submit a 
detailed reprogramming request in accordance with section 301 
of the bill, which should, at a minimum, justify the deviation 
from prior congressional direction and describe the proposed 
funding adjustments with specificity. The Secretary shall not, 
pending approval from the Committee, obligate any funds for the 
action described in the reprogramming proposal.
    The Secretary is also directed to inform the Committee 
promptly and fully when a change in program execution and 
funding is required during the fiscal year.
    Definition.--A reprogramming includes:
  --the reallocation of funds from one activity to another 
        within an appropriation;
  --any significant departure from a program, project, 
        activity, or organization described in the agency's 
        budget justification as presented to and approved by 
        Congress;
  --for construction projects, the reallocation of funds from 
        one construction project identified in the agency's 
        budget justification to another project or a 
        significant change in the scope of an approved project;
  --adoption of any reorganization proposal which includes 
        moving prior appropriations between appropriations 
        accounts; and
  --any reallocation of new or prior year budget authority, or 
        prior year deobligations.

                        Crosscutting Initiatives

    The budget request proposes several crosscutting 
initiatives that span several program offices. The Committee 
supports the Secretary's efforts to reach outside of individual 
program offices to draw on the diverse disciplines within the 
agency as a whole. These initiatives, which address the Energy-
Water Nexus; Exascale computing; the Grid Modernization 
Initiative; subsurface science, technology and engineering 
research, development, and deployment; supercritical carbon 
dioxide; cybersecurity; and advanced materials, would allow for 
a more comprehensive review of complex issues. Budgetary 
constraints do not allow the Committee to recommend full 
funding for these initiatives at this time, but the Committee 
directs the Secretary to prioritize funds that are provided 
within this recommendation to support these crosscutting 
initiatives to the maximum extent possible.
    Grid Modernization.--The Committee remains encouraged by 
the Secretary's efforts toward grid modernization research and 
development planning that will ensure a path toward an 
integrated, secure, clean, and reliable electricity 
infrastructure while remaining affordable to consumers. The 
Committee recognizes the strategic goals of the grid 
modernization crosscut activity and is supportive of the 
valuable role of the Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium, 
which consists of 14 National Laboratories that work in concert 
to address grid modernization challenges across the Department, 
and looks forward to execution of the first year of the Grid 
Multi-Year Program Plan. The Committee supports the continued 
implementation of a comprehensive, multi-disciplinary research 
and development program managed through the consortium of the 
National Laboratories and cost-shared with non-Federal partners 
to focus on six technical areas: institutional support; design 
and planning tools; system operations, power flow, and control; 
sensing and measurement; devices and integrated system testing; 
and security and resilience. The Committee also encourages the 
Department's continued coordination to ensure grid-related 
research across the Department complex is not duplicative.
    The Committee directs the Department of Energy to conduct a 
study to determine the costs and benefits of net-metering and 
distributed solar generation to the electrical grid, utilities 
and ratepayers, no later than 180 days after the date of 
enactment of this act.
    The Committee encourages the Department to support 
partnership efforts involving an institution of higher 
education, a National Laboratory, a State or local government, 
a regional transmission organization or independent system 
operator, technology provider, an electric utility or 
cooperative in projects designed to improve the performance or 
efficiency of the grid, including integration of distributed 
generation, microgrids, energy storage, electric vehicles, 
energy efficiency, demand response, intelligent loads, and 
combined heat and power systems.
    Energy-Water Nexus.--The Committee recognizes water and 
energy are critical resources that are reciprocally linked. The 
Energy-Water Nexus crosscut consists of a collaboration of 
agencies, national laboratories, state and local governments, 
utilities, industry, and the science community working 
collectively to address energy and water resource challenges, 
specifically as they relate to energy security and energy 
sector water needs.
    The Committee is aware that since the Energy Policy Act of 
2005 was signed into law, the Government Accountability Office 
issued a series of reports calling for improved information and 
coordination from the Department at the energy-water nexus, 
including improving federal data for power plant water use 
(2009), improving information on water produced during oil and 
gas production (2012), and increasing federal coordination to 
better manage energy and water tradeoffs (2012). In response, 
the Secretary hosted a series of roundtables to plan and 
prioritize leveraging basic science, applied research, policy, 
and outreach to move towards a more resilient and sustainable 
coupled energy-water system. Additionally, the Department 
established a domestic energy and water research investment as 
part of a bilateral collaboration with China.
    The Committee supports areas where innovative technology 
advances could address the challenges faced in the energy-water 
nexus, as highlighted in the 2015 Quadrennial Technology 
Review. The Committee further supports an advanced, integrated 
data, modeling, and analysis platform to improve understanding 
and inform decision-making for a broad range of users and at 
multiple scales, as well as investments in targeted technology 
research opportunities within the system of water-energy flows 
that offer the greatest potential for positive impact.
    Advanced Materials.--The Committee supports the first year 
for the Department-wide crosscut on advanced materials, with 
focuses on lightweight materials and composites and corrosion 
and materials under extremes. The Committee understands in 
previous years, other program offices independently had 
standalone existing materials programs, and supports formal 
coordination across offices through the Materials Working 
Group. This is an unprecedented opportunity to impact the 
materials development cycle from scientific discovery to 
technological innovation and deployment. The Committee directs 
the Department to seek community input to further define the 
highest priority research areas and critical funding 
modalities, as well as provide updates on future identified 
topics.
    Cybersecurity.--The Cybersecurity Crosscut has clearly 
defined objectives to protect the Department's enterprise 
against cybersecurity threats and improve cybersecurity in the 
electric power sector and the oil and natural gas sector. The 
Committee acknowledges the paramount function of protecting the 
Department's enterprise, which entails, among other things; 
cybersecurity programs centralized within the Office of the 
Chief Information Officer; situational awareness and incident 
response; identity credential and access management; protection 
of national laboratories; and oversight of classified and 
unclassified systems.
    The Committee also acknowledges the growing threat to the 
critical infrastructure of the power grid that is primarily 
owned and operated by the private sector. The Department, 
through the Office of Electricity and Energy Delivery, 
facilitates information sharing between the Federal Government 
and the private sector to enhance situational awareness. The 
Department of Energy has worked with the Department of Homeland 
Security, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, 
and industry to develop a set of best practices to assist 
owners and operators of the grid who are making investments in 
cybersecurity. The Department funds research and development 
that aims to build security into energy delivery systems to 
make the future grid more resilient to cyber threats. The 
Committee supports the increasingly important role of the 
Department in carrying out these activities, among many others, 
to help develop the modernized power grid that the public and 
private sectors seek to build in the coming decades.
    The Committee supports the Department's cross-program 
partnership on seismic simulation and recommends funds within 
the National Nuclear Security Administration, the Office of 
Science, Office of Nuclear Energy, and in-kind support provided 
by the Associate Under Secretary for Environment, Health, 
Safety and Security.

                         REGIONAL PARTNERSHIPS

    The Committee urges the Department to utilize investments 
through existing regional capabilities that include industry, 
universities, and State and regional economic development 
assets. The Committee further encourages the national 
laboratories to expand their geographic outreach through people 
and access to specialized equipment and user facilities in 
order to contribute to the success of these regional 
initiatives.

                           Mission Innovation

    The Committee supports the premise and goals set out by 
Mission Innovation: to support innovative clean energy research 
and development to accelerate access to affordable, deployable, 
and transformative technologies. The Committee also supports 
the goal to double Federal clean energy investment over the 
next 5 years. The recommendations in this bill take the first 
step in this effort, while working within the constraints on 
discretionary funding.
    It is imperative this effort have the support and 
commitment of private industry as well, and the Breakthrough 
Energy Coalition has provided that opportunity through a 
separate, but parallel multinational initiative. Government 
investment in research alone is not enough, but by providing 
that public research pipeline, is integral to support a broad 
partnership of private investors and entrepreneurs to take 
risks to support innovative ideas in science and energy. 
Accelerated and aggressive investment in basic research, 
complimented with private sector investment, will provide 
breakthrough technologies to support energy independence, as 
well as drive those technologies to be affordable, resilient, 
and reliable systems.
    The Committee on Appropriations does not address mandatory 
funding proposals requested by the administration.
    The Committee believes the Secretary should focus more 
investment to support the goals of Mission Innovation through 
the national laboratory system, the Office of Science, and 
ARPA-E. This is reflected in the funding provided to Department 
of Energy programs.

     Committee to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy 
                              Laboratories

    The Committee appreciates the work of the Committee to 
Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories 
[CRENEL]. CRENEL made recommendations to rebuild trust between 
the Department and the national laboratories, maintaining the 
focus and quality of the laboratory system, maximizing the 
scientific and economic impact of the laboratories, and 
increasing the effectiveness and efficiency of laboratory 
operations. The Committee urges the Secretary to take these 
recommendations seriously, particularly those regarding 
repairing the relationship between the Department and the 
national laboratories by increasing accountability and 
transparency and reducing transactional oversight. The 
Committee directs the Secretary to submit a report to the 
Senate and House Committees on Appropriations within 180 days 
of enactment on the progress made in implementing those CRENEL 
recommendations directed to the Department.

                        Commonly Recycled Paper

    The Secretary shall not expend funds for projects that 
knowingly use as a feedstock commonly recycled paper that is 
segregated from municipal solid waste or collected as part of a 
collection system that commingles commonly recycled paper with 
other solid waste at any point from the time of collection 
through materials recovery.

                         Social Cost of Carbon

    The Secretary should not promulgate any regulations in 
fiscal year 2017 using the May 2013 estimates for the social 
cost of carbon until a new working group is convened. The 
working group should include the relevant agencies and affected 
stakeholders, re-examine the social cost of carbon using the 
best available science, and revise the estimate using an 
accurate discount rate and domestic estimate in accordance with 
Executive Order 12866 and OMB Circular A-4. To increase 
transparency, the working group should solicit public comments 
prior to finalizing any updates.

                              5 Year Plan

    The Secretary is required by section 7279-a of title 42 
U.S.C., enacted by the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2012, 
to include in the Department's annual budget request proposed 
funding levels for the request year and 4 subsequent years, at 
a level of detail commensurate with the current budget 
justification documents. This requirement is to ensure that the 
Secretary is proposing a current budget that takes into account 
realistic budget constraints in future years, and that Congress 
has full visibility into the future implications of current 
budget decisions across the Department's energy programs.
    Unfortunately, the Secretary has chosen not to comply by 
omitting any meaningful 5-year budgeting from its four budget 
requests since enactment of this legal requirement. The 
Committee directs the Secretary to submit a report, not later 
than September 30, 2017, to the Committees on Appropriations of 
both the House of Representatives and Senate, on the plan to 
comply with section 7279a of title 42 in its fiscal year 2018 
budget request. Failure to provide this report may result in 
more directive measures to ensure the Secretary complies with 
the law and engages in practices that safeguard taxpayer 
dollars.

                 Timely Apportionment of Appropriations

    The Committee understands delays in the apportionment of 
appropriated budget authority from the Office of Management 
Budget to the Department are leading to program and project 
management inefficiencies both at Department headquarters and 
at the national laboratories. Monthly apportionments slow and 
delay procurements, increase administrative costs for the 
program and support staff allocating the funding, and lead to 
uncertainty and disruption of annual planning. Once the 
appropriation is signed into law, the Committee expects the 
budget authority to be apportioned in a reasonable, timely 
manner to maximize the efficient use of taxpayer dollars in 
executing the Department's mission.

              LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee directs the Department to ensure that 
laboratory operating contractors do not allocate costs of 
general and administrative overhead to laboratory directed 
research and development.

                            ENERGY PROGRAMS

                 Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $2,073,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   2,898,400,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,073,000,000

    The Committee recommends $2,073,000,000 for Energy 
Efficiency and Renewable Energy [EERE], a decrease of 
$825,400,000 from the budget request. Within available funds, 
the Committee recommends $153,500,000 for program direction.
    The Committee encourages the Department to continue the 
progress being made on the Sustainable Transportation, 
Renewable Power, and Energy Efficiency initiatives. These 
investments are critical to expanding U.S. energy security and 
global leadership, options for consumers, reducing the cost of 
U.S.-generated energy, and job creation.
     The Committee recommends that funding within EERE programs 
be allocated to facilitate the development and management of 
training and workforce development programs that assist and 
support workers in trades and activities required for the 
continued growth of the U.S. energy efficiency and clean energy 
sectors.

                          VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES

    The Committee recommends $308,300,000 for Vehicle 
Technologies. Within this amount, the Committee recommends not 
less than $32,000,000 for Electric Drive Technologies Research 
and Development, $37,141,000 for Advanced Combustion Engine 
Research and Development, $26,959,000 for Materials Technology, 
and $40,000,000 for Vehicle Systems.
    The Committee encourages the Department, when making grants 
through the Vehicle Technologies Program, to expand 
opportunities for the demonstration of zero-emissions 
technologies that will be of practical use in areas of extreme 
non-attainment with national ambient air quality standards.
    The Committee is supportive of the Department's efforts in 
the Co-optimization of Fuels and Engines activities in 
coordination with the Bioenergy Technologies Program. 
Establishing a link across fuels and engines early in the 
research and development cycle will enable a new, synergistic, 
and complete systems-based approach to creating optimized 
powertrains.
    Within available funds, the Committee recommends 
$20,000,000 for the SuperTruck II program to further improve 
the efficiency of heavy-duty class 8 long- and regional-haul 
vehicles and continue support of the fiscal year 2016 
SuperTruck II awards. The Department is directed to continue 
with four awards using the multi-year allocation process that 
was used successfully by the SuperTruck I program.
    Within available funds, the Committee recommends not less 
than $10,000,000 for continued funding of section 131 of the 
2007 Energy Independence and Security Act for transportation 
electrification.
    Within available funds, the Committee recommends 
$40,700,000 for Outreach, Deployment, and Analysis to support 
the Clean Cities Alternative Fuels and Vehicles Deployment 
Program. Within this amount, $34,000,000 is provided for 
Deployment through the Clean Cities Program. The Department is 
encouraged to ensure balance in the award of funds to achieve 
varied aims in fostering broader adoption of clean vehicles and 
installation of supporting infrastructure.
    The Committee supports the EcoCAR 3 competition, which 
provides hands-on, real-world experience to demonstrate a 
variety of advanced technologies and designs, and supports 
development of a workforce trained in advanced vehicles. The 
Committee recommends $2,500,000 for year three of a 4-year 
collegiate engineering competition, EcoCAR 3.
    The Committee recognizes that the commercial off-road 
vehicle sector, including industrial, mining, and farm 
equipment, consumes over 2 Quads of energy per year and directs 
the Department to establish a dedicated activity to reduce the 
energy consumption of commercial off-road vehicles. The 
Committee recommends not less than $5,000,000 to support 
improving the energy efficiency of fluid power systems for 
commercial off-road vehicles.

                         BIOENERGY TECHNOLOGIES

    The Committee recommends $218,100,000 for Bioenergy 
Technologies.
    Within available funds, the Committee directs the Secretary 
to provide a total of $30,000,000 for algal biofuels, and 
expects the Department to sustain the investment in development 
of algal biofuels.
    The Committee also recommends $35,000,000, as requested, to 
support the development of a Synthetic Biology Foundry to 
leverage recently developed synthetic biology tools to enable 
the biotechnology industry to achieve substantial improvements 
in conversion efficiencies and the scale-up of biological 
processes with lower development costs and lead times.
    The Committee continues to support the Secretary's 
participation in the Farm to Fly 2 Initiative with the Federal 
Aviation Administration's Center of Excellence for Alternative 
Jet Fuels and the Environment. The Committee reiterates to the 
Federal entities involved that this is a cost-sharing research 
partnership among academia, industry, and the Federal 
government, and urges full collaboration between the 
Departments of Energy and Agriculture and other Federal 
agencies in the Initiative.
    Within available funds, the Committee recommends 
$10,000,000 to establish a research, development, and 
demonstration biopower program that makes full and innovative 
use of biomass, municipally-derived biosolids, and municipal 
solid waste.
    The Committee further encourages the Bioenergy Technologies 
Office to use its existing authorities to fund activities that 
support the development and testing of new low-emission, high 
efficiency, residential wood heaters that supply easily 
accessed and affordable renewable energy and have the potential 
to reduce the national costs associated with thermal energy.

                  HYDROGEN AND FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES

    The Committee recommends $92,000,000 for Hydrogen and Fuel 
Cell Technologies.
    The Committee continues to support fuel cell and hydrogen 
energy systems for stationary, vehicle, motive, and portable 
power applications. Within available funds, the Committee 
recommends not less than $7,000,000 to demonstrate an 
integrated hydrogen renewable energy production, storage, and 
transportation fuel distribution and retailing system.
    Within Hydrogen Fuel research and development, the 
Committee recommends $3,000,000 for carbon-free production of 
hydrogen using new chemical synthesis methods that break apart 
natural gas to solid carbon and hydrogen.
    The Committee recommends $7,000,000 for Safety, Codes, and 
Standards.

                              SOLAR ENERGY

    The Committee recommends $222,400,000 for solar energy.
    The Committee supports the Secretary's emphasis on 
advancing integration of distributed solar generation with the 
existing power grid and on lowering the soft costs of solar 
installations for residential and small-scale commercial 
customers. The Secretary's efforts to develop the workforce, 
regulatory and legal expertise, and information technology 
tools are needed to drive down costs for solar technology for 
every day consumers.
    The Committee recognizes that solar energy is one of the 
fastest growing industries in the United States, and employs 
174,000 workers today. Within available funds, the Committee 
recommends $1,000,000 for the Secretary's contribution to the 
joint Solar Ready Vets program with the Department of Defense 
as a way to train America's veterans to fill this growing skill 
need.
    Within available funds, the Committee recommends 
$55,000,000 for concentrating solar power research, 
development, and demonstration of technologies that reduce 
overall system costs, better integrate subsystem components, 
develop higher-temperature receivers, and improve the design of 
solar collection and thermal energy storage. Within this amount 
$15,000,000 is provided for competitively selected projects 
focused on advanced thermal desalination techniques.
    Research programs for high efficiency thin-film 
photovoltaics and processes are encouraged to include 
cooperation between industry and academia, and to include 
advanced optical characterization that enables development of 
strong correlations between materials and cell optical 
properties, and the photovoltaic power performance of the 
working solar cells.
    The Committee encourages the Department of Energy to find 
ways to expand access to solar energy to residences and 
businesses in low-income communities. These efforts should 
build upon lessons learned in earlier grants under the Solar 
Market Pathways program.
    No funds are provided for the Next Generation Renewable 
Fuels and Chemicals Research and Development program.

                              WIND ENERGY

    The Committee recommends $80,000,000 for Wind Energy.
    The Committee directs the advancement of innovative 
technologies for offshore wind development, including 
freshwater, deepwater, shallow water, and transitional depth 
installations. Within these funds, the Committee recommends 
$40,000,000 for offshore wind demonstration projects, and 
$10,000,000 to further substantiate the design and economic 
value proposition of alternative project designs for offshore 
wind power. The Committee expects funds for the offshore wind 
demonstration projects be awarded for new and innovative 
technologies, including for deepwater technologies that have 
wide applications throughout the U.S. and have not yet been 
demonstrated elsewhere in the world. The Committee further 
directs the Department to support the deployment and testing of 
scale floating wind turbines designed to further reduce energy 
costs. The Committee also continues to support the Department's 
efforts to competitively award funding for innovative 
distributed wind projects.
    Within available funds, the Committee directs the 
Department to prioritize early stage research on materials and 
manufacturing methods and advanced components that will enable 
accessing high-quality wind resources, and on development that 
will enable these technologies to compete in the marketplace 
without the need for subsidies. The Committee supports research 
using high-performance computing, modeling and simulation, 
including the Atmosphere to Electrons initiative program, 
reliability, and grid integration efforts. Further, the 
Department is urged to give priority to stewarding the assets 
and optimizing the operations of the Department-owned wind 
research and testing facilities and provides no less than 
$30,000,000 for the National Wind Technology Center.
    No additional funding is recommended for Wind Energy.

                              WATER POWER

    The Committee recommends $84,000,000 for Water Power.
    Within available funds, the Committee recommends 
$25,000,000 for conventional hydropower and pumped storage 
activities, including up to $3,900,000 for the purposes of 
section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-
58).
    Of the amount provided, $3,000,000 shall be used for a 
thorough techno-economic analysis of the value of pumped 
storage hydro at two sites with high-levels of intermittent 
renewable energy generation in the United States to be 
determined by the Secretary of Energy, and building off the 
Department of Energy's pumped storage hydro work initiated in 
fiscal year 2016. The techno-economic analysis shall include 
sub-hourly economic analysis and accounting of the full range 
of market-based revenue streams, regional cost savings and 
environmental benefits pumped storage hydropower provides both 
as a generation and transmission asset. Funding shall also be 
provided for a National Association of Regulatory Utility 
Commissioners committee to advise the Department's work in the 
area of pumped hydro storage. Funding may also be used for 
research and analysis that will improve the pumped storage 
industry more broadly, building off the Department of Energy's 
existing pumped storage hydro work initiated in fiscal year 
2016.
    Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Research, Development, 
and Deployment.--The Committee recommends $59,000,000 for 
marine and hydrokinetic technology research, development, and 
deployment activities. The Committee rejects the Department's 
request to limit future competitive solicitations only to 
projects that would at least double the energy capture per unit 
of structural cost of wave energy convertor systems. Rather, 
selected projects should maintain a robust technology support 
pipeline from both advanced and low technology readiness level 
marine energy conversion systems and components. Therefore, the 
Committee recommends $25,000,000 for a balanced portfolio of 
competitive solicitations to support industry-led research, 
development, and demonstrations of wave and current (ocean, 
river, tidal) technologies to increase energy capture, 
reliability, and survivability at lower costs.
    The Committee finds that the proposed open-water, fully-
energetic, grid-connected wave energy facility is a test 
facility with the capability of evaluating a range of emerging 
marine hydrokinetic components and systems. Therefore, the 
Secretary is directed to utilize a 20 percent non-Federal 
project construction cost share. With the funds provided in 
fiscal year 2016, the Committee provides $35,000,000 in fiscal 
year 2017 to complete construction of the test facility.
    The Committee provides $4,000,000 to support collaborations 
between universities and the National Laboratories, including 
personnel exchanges, to support industry by conducting research 
and testing of marine energy systems at facilities previously 
designated by the Department as National Marine Renewable 
Energy Centers. In addition, the Department is directed to 
continue its coordination with the U.S. Navy on marine energy 
technology demonstration.

                        GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES

    The Committee recommends $70,500,000 for Geothermal 
Technologies. Funds made available by this section shall be 
disbursed to the full spectrum of geothermal technologies, as 
authorized by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 
(Public Law 110-140). The Secretary is encouraged to continue 
to support comprehensive programs that foster academic and 
professional development initiatives.
    To facilitate necessary technology development and expand 
understanding of subsurface dynamics, the Committee recommends 
$35,000,000 for the continuation of activities of the Frontier 
Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy [FORGE], with 
activities to include ongoing novel subsurface 
characterization, full-scale well drilling, and technology 
research and development to accelerate the commercial pathway 
to large-scale enhanced geothermal systems power generation.
    The Committee directs the Department to continue its 
efforts to identify prospective geothermal resources in areas 
with no obvious surface expressions.

                         ADVANCED MANUFACTURING

    The Committee recommends $254,200,000 for Advanced 
Manufacturing. The Committee recognizes the importance of the 
manufacturing sector to the U.S. economy, which directly 
generates 12 percent of the gross domestic product and employs 
nearly 12 million people.
    Within available funds, the Committee recommends 
$70,000,000 to support the existing 5 Clean Energy 
Manufacturing Institutes [CEMI], including $14,000,000 each for 
wide bandgap power electronics institute, the advanced 
composites institute, and the smart manufacturing institute, 
and two to-be-announced Institutes from prior year funding 
opportunities. The Committee is pleased with the ongoing work 
to support innovative advanced manufacturing opportunities 
through the Clean Energy Manufacturing Institutes. The 
Committee recognizes the important role additive manufacturing 
can play in helping to advance the deployment of clean energy 
technologies. The Committee encourages the Department to 
further foster the partnership between the National 
Laboratories and industry to use 3D printing for renewable 
energy to include overcoming challenges to the development and 
implementation of innovative offshore wind technologies.
    The Committee supports the Department's efforts to launch 
the Energy-Water Desalination Hub to lower the cost and energy 
intensity of technologies to provide clean, safe water. The 
Committee recommends $20,000,000 for this effort.
    The Committee recommends $25,000,000 for the Critical 
Materials Hub. This is the first year of support for the second 
5-year phase. The Committee supports the Hub's continued focus 
on technologies that will enable domestic manufacturers to make 
better use of the critical materials to which they have access, 
as well as to reduce or eliminate the need for materials that 
are subject to supply disruptions. The Committee notes that the 
Hub has focused on high-priority problems and has developed 
strong milestones. The Committee supports the Hub's goal of 
developing at least one technology adopted by U.S. companies 
within each of its three focus areas: diversifying and 
expanding production; reducing wastes; and developing 
substitutes.
    The Committee recommends $3,000,000 for the final year of 
focus on developing new nanostructured metals with direct 
relevance to advanced energy technologies.
    The Committee recommends $20,000,000 for development of 
additive manufacturing processes, low-cost carbon fiber, and 
other manufacturing technologies at the Manufacturing 
Demonstration Facility [MDF]. The Committee notes the ongoing 
emphasis on assisting small- and medium-sized businesses to 
overcome the risks and challenges of investing in specialized, 
high-technology equipment at the MDF. The Secretary is 
encouraged to continue this emphasis in the coming year.
    The Committee recommends $1,500,000 for the joint additive 
manufacturing pilot institute with the Department of Defense.
    Within the funds provided for the Industrial Assessment 
Centers, the Committee provides $1,500,000 for the expansion of 
wastewater treatment technical assistance.
    The Committee supports efforts to research, develop and 
demonstrate micro-combined heat and power in residential and 
light commercial applications in coordination with industry to 
reduce emissions and improve resilient infrastructure.

                         BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES

    The Committee recommends $203,400,000 for Building 
Technologies. The Committee supports ongoing efforts to work 
with State and local agencies to incorporate the latest 
technical knowledge and best practices into construction 
requirements.
    Within available funds, the Committee recommends 
$23,000,000 for the Residential Building Integration Program. 
Within this amount, funding should be concentrated on Industry 
Teams to facilitate research, demonstrate and test new systems, 
and facilitate widespread deployment through direct engagement 
through direct engagement with builders, the construction 
trades, equipment manufacturers, smart grid technology and 
systems suppliers, integrators, and State and local 
governments.
    Within available funds, the Committee recommends 
$28,000,000 for Commercial Buildings Integration. The Committee 
recommends a program of core research and development of more 
cost-effective integration techniques and technologies that 
could help the transition towards deep retrofits. In addition, 
the Committee recommends that DOE increase engagement with 
private sector stakeholders to develop market transforming 
policies and investments in commercial building retrofits.
    The Committee recommends $98,400,000 for the Emerging 
Technologies subprogram. Within available funds, the Committee 
recommends not less than $23,000,000 for transactive controls 
research and development. Within funds available for 
transactive controls research and development, the Committee 
recommends $5,000,000 to promote regional demonstrations of 
new, utility-led, residential Connected Communities advancing 
smart grid systems. Within available funds, the Committee 
recommends $25,000,000 for solid-state lighting technology 
development to focus on reducing the cost of organic light-
emitting diodes and other technologies. If the Secretary finds 
solid-state lighting technology eligible for the Bright 
Tomorrow Lighting Prize, specified under section 655 of the 
Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, $5,000,000 is 
included in addition to funds for solid-state lighting research 
and development.
    The Committee is concerned with the lack of funding for 
natural gas research and development within the Buildings 
Technology Program. Within available funds, the Committee 
provides $10,000,000 for research and development for energy 
efficiency efforts related to the direct use of natural gas in 
residential applications, including gas heat pump heating and 
water heating, on-site combine heat and power, and natural gas 
appliance venting.
    The Committee recommends $54,000,000 for Equipment and 
Buildings Standards.

                   FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

    The Committee encourages the Secretary of Energy, in 
consultation with the Department of Defense, to create a pilot 
program that would determine the potential for the use of 
Energy Savings Performance Contracts to reduce energy 
consumption and provide energy cost savings in non-building 
applications.

              WEATHERIZATION AND INTERGOVERNMENTAL PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends $264,600,000 for the 
Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program. Within this 
amount, $214,600,000 is for the Weatherization Assistance 
Program, and $50,000,000 is for State Energy Program Grants. No 
funding is recommended for the Cities, Counties, and 
Communities Energy Program proposed in the budget request.
    Weatherization Assistance Program grant funds are to be 
allocated and on a statutory formula basis.

                       CORPORATE SUPPORT PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends $264,500,000 for Corporate 
Support, including $2,000,000 for the United States-Israel 
energy cooperative agreement within Strategic Programs.

              Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $206,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     262,300,000
Committee recommendation................................     206,000,000

    The Committee recommends $206,000,000 for Electricity 
Delivery and Energy Reliability, a decrease of $56,300,000 from 
the budget request. Within available funds, the Committee 
recommends $28,500,000 for program direction. The Committee 
directs the Secretary to provide regular updates of reported 
data on the status of energy infrastructure and concerns 
impacting the energy sector as they become available.
    The modernization of the electrical grid is critical to 
ensuring national security, sustaining our Nation's economic 
growth, and maintaining our way of life. The electrical grid is 
a complex system, owned and operated by numerous regulated and 
non-regulated private and public entities. To maximize the 
value of taxpayer investment in the grid modernization 
strategy, the Committee suggests that the Secretary's 
initiatives be fairly and equitably competed to ensure the best 
ideas, technologies, and teams are brought together to develop 
the best solutions for the electric grid of the future.
    To ensure our energy systems are safe, secure, reliable, 
sustainable, and cost-effective, the Committee supports a 
strategy that involves extensive partnerships between 
government, academia, and industry to undertake the transition 
and modernization of the electrical grid to address our major 
energy issues. The Committee understands an independent, third-
party assessment of the United States' capabilities to perform 
multi-megawatt testing that meets the goals supporting the Grid 
Modernization Multi-Year Program Plan is currently ongoing, per 
direction in the fiscal year 2016 report. Following the 
completion of the assessment and if the Secretary deems 
appropriate, the Committee urges the Secretary to establish 
through a competitive bid process, a national user center 
capable of operating in the multi-megawatt range, above 2 MW, 
to support the Nation's grid modernization efforts to advance 
utility scale technologies like energy storage. World-class 
testing facilities that can replicate real world conditions, 
without risks to the existing grid, are needed at the 
residential, commercial, and distribution level to test and 
validate these innovations. The Committee is aware the 
Secretary has invested in testing facilities of 2 MW and below, 
and facilities are needed at the multi-megawatt level above 2 
MW for technologies at the distribution level.

               CLEAN ENERGY TRANSMISSION AND RELIABILITY

    The Committee recommends $36,000,000 for Clean Energy 
Transmission and Reliability.
    The Committee believes that the integration of distributed 
and intermittent renewable sources of generation into existing 
infrastructure and transmission and distribution networks is 
critical to the effective deployment of clean energy sources. 
Developing the analytical and modeling tools in collaboration 
with utilities, grid operators, and universities will lay the 
foundation for risk assessment.

                  SMART GRID RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee recommends $35,000,000 for Smart Grid 
Research and Development.
    Within available funding, $5,000,000 is recommended for 
development of advanced, secure, low-cost sensors that measure, 
analyze, predict, and control the future grid during steady 
state and under extreme conditions.
    The Committee supports the promotion of regional 
demonstrations of new, utility-led, residential Connected 
Communities advancing smart grid systems.
    The Committee recognizes the opportunities presented by the 
application, integration, and investment in grid technologies 
across all sectors of the economy. The Committee encourages the 
Secretary to ensure that efforts in these areas are coordinated 
and focused on the evolution to the grid of the future.
    The Committee recommends that funds provided for the 
Advanced Grid Integration Division should focus on identifying 
and addressing technical and regulatory barriers impeding grid 
integration of distributed energy systems to reduce energy 
costs and improve the resiliency and reliability of the 
electric grid.

               CYBER SECURITY FOR ENERGY DELIVERY SYSTEMS

    The Committee recommends $50,500,000 for Cyber Security for 
Energy Delivery Systems.
    Within available funds, the Committee recommends not less 
than $5,000,000 to develop cyber and cyber-physical solutions 
for advanced control concepts for distribution and municipal 
utility companies. The potential threat posed by cyber security 
attacks on our critical energy infrastructure cannot be 
overemphasized and must be appropriately guarded against.

                             ENERGY STORAGE

    The Committee recommends $29,500,000 for Energy Storage.
    Within available funds, the Committee supports developing 
an operational energy storage test facility capable of 
performance-driven data in a utility environment.
    For energy storage systems to be supported and accepted by 
industry, they must be validated and demonstrated to be safe 
and reliable. The Committee is aware the utility sector is 
concerned there is a disincentive for utilities to deploy 
battery storage on a utility scale, as these technologies are 
largely untested, and companies are risk-adverse to providing 
access to their systems. In addition, regulated utilities have 
difficulty convincing regulators that assets will live out 
their expected life. Thus, the Committee directs the Department 
to submit a report to the Committee, no later than 90 days 
after enactment, detailing how investments in these 
demonstrations address these concerns and will lead to broader 
adoption and acceptance by the utility sector of commercial 
scale energy storage in the U.S. In addition, the Committee 
directs the Department to submit within this report, how 
existing programs can be used to mitigate challenges for 
deployment of utility scale projects by regulated utilities.
    Offshore wind has tremendous capacity to generate 
electricity. Ensuring that the power generated can be harnessed 
and reserved for use during periods of peak demand would extend 
the reach of this renewable resource. The Committee encourages 
the Department to partner with leaders in the energy storage 
industry to establish a pilot project in order to demonstrate 
how energy storage technology can reserve electricity generated 
offshore for use in meeting peak demand.
    The Committee encourages the Secretary to consider 
expanding research and development partnerships related to the 
development and deployment of energy storage, with stakeholders 
in diverse geographic regions with unique market dynamics and 
policy challenges that can help to inform nationwide efforts to 
improve grid resiliency, reliability, and security, empower 
consumers, and increase integration of a broad range of 
generation sources.
    Within available funding, the Committee encourages the 
Department to further the development and demonstration of non-
battery advanced storage components, including compressed air 
energy storage development and demonstration to enable 
efficiency improvements for utility-scale, bulk energy storage 
solutions.

             TRANSFORMER RESILIENCE AND ADVANCED COMPONENTS

    The Committee recommends $8,500,000 for Transformer 
Resilience and Advanced Components. Within available funds, the 
Committee directs the Secretary to support research and 
development on low-cost, power flow control devices, including 
both solid state and hybrid concepts that use power electronics 
to control electromagnetic devices and enable improved 
controllability, flexibility, and resiliency.

                     NATIONAL ELECTRICITY DELIVERY

    The Committee recommends $7,500,000 for National 
Electricity Delivery.

             INFRASTRUCTURE SECURITY AND ENERGY RESTORATION

    The Committee recommends $10,500,000 for Infrastructure 
Security and Energy Restoration.
    The Committee supports further development of energy sector 
situational awareness capabilities, and the work of Eagle-I, 
the Federal Government's situational awareness tool for 
national power outages. The Committee encourages the Department 
to further illustrate how to benefit from increased access to 
more varied sources of data.
    The Committee also encourages the Department to continue to 
develop implementation strategies and analysis with industry to 
address potential impacts of geomagnetic disturbances and 
electromagnetic pulse threats to the electric grid.
    The Committee is supportive of proposed regional and State 
activities to improve capabilities to characterize energy 
sector supply disruptions, communication among local, State, 
regional, Federal, and industry partners, and the 
identification of gaps for use in energy planning and emergency 
response training programs. The Committee encourages the 
Department to support these efforts within Infrastructure 
Security and Energy Restoration.

                             Nuclear Energy

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $986,161,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     993,896,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,057,903,000

    The Committee recommends $1,057,903,000 for Nuclear Energy, 
an increase of $64,007,000 from the budget request. The 
Committee's recommendation for nuclear power prioritizes 
funding for programs, projects and activities that will ensure 
a strong future for nuclear power in the United States.
    Nuclear power provides more than 20 percent of our Nation's 
electricity and more than 60 percent of our emissions-free 
electricity. Electricity generation from our Nation's 99 
operating nuclear power plants is critical to our national 
security, economy, and way of life.
    The most cost-effective way for the United States to 
maintain low-cost, carbon-free electricity is to safely extend 
the lives of our Nation's existing nuclear reactors from 60 to 
80 years. The Committee supports the Department's efforts to 
conduct high-priority research and development in this area and 
its cooperation with industry, but also recognizes that some 
operating reactors will not be extended, while others have 
already shut down. When power plants shut down, the social and 
economic impacts to surrounding communities can be significant. 
Communities often lack information and resources to assist with 
the economic transition. The Committee is aware that the 
Department is planning to convene a summit to address the early 
closure of nuclear power plants later this spring. While the 
summit will focus on stopping early plant closures, the 
Committee urges the Secretary to also address the impact of 
plants that have already shut down on communities, and ways the 
communities can mitigate the impacts.
    Within available funds, $600,000 is provided for the cross-
program partnership on seismic simulation.

                        Research and Development


                     INTEGRATED UNIVERSITY PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for the Integrated 
University Program, $5,000,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee notes the administration repeatedly attempts to 
defund this program, despite continued success in developing 
highly qualified nuclear specialists to meet national needs.

           SMALL MODULAR REACTOR LICENSING TECHNICAL SUPPORT

    The Committee recommends $95,000,000 for Small Modular 
Reactor Licensing Technical Support, $5,400,000 above the 
request. Within this amount, $23,000,000 shall be for the first 
award for design certification application development, siting 
preparation, and combined operating license application 
development. Further, $72,000,000 shall be for the second 
awardee for design certification application development, 
siting preparation, and combined operating license application 
development. Small modular reactors have the potential to 
provide reliable electricity generation to replace retiring 
fossil plants and meet domestic clean power needs. The 
Committee directs the Department to submit a report evaluating 
and prioritizing government and private sector actions needed 
for development and deployment of small modular reactors. The 
report should evaluate completion of design and licensing of 
small modular reactors, and licensing of deployment sites for 
small modular reactors. The report should include advanced 
manufacturing and supply chain development opportunities. The 
report should also evaluate public and private sector 
facilities that could be powered by small modular reactors.

       REACTOR CONCEPTS RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND DEMONSTRATION

    The Committee recommends $129,760,000 for Reactor Concepts 
Research, Development, and Demonstration. The Committee directs 
the Nuclear Energy Program to focus funding for Reactor 
Concepts Research, Development and Demonstration, which 
includes funding for Advanced SMRs and Advanced Reactor 
Concepts, on technologies that show clear potential to be 
safer, less waste producing, more cost competitive, and more 
proliferation-resistant than existing nuclear power 
technologies. Within available amounts, the Committee 
recommends up to $18,000,000 for the second year of the 
advanced reactor concepts program and $3,000,000 for testing 
and development of dynamic convection technology. The dynamic 
convection technology work should include a business case 
analysis that addresses cost, schedule, licensing, and other 
risks of implementation in a commercial nuclear plant.
    Light Water Reactor Sustainability.--Within available 
funds, the Committee recommends $35,260,000. The most cost 
effective way for the United States to maintain low-cost, 
carbon-free electricity is to safely extend the lives of our 
Nation's existing nuclear reactors from 60 to 80 years. 
Therefore, the Committee recommends additional funding for this 
activity as a priority. The Committee directs the Secretary to 
use funding in this activity to continue research and 
development work on the technical basis for subsequent license 
renewal. The Secretary should focus funding in this program on 
materials aging and degradation, advanced instrumentation and 
control technologies, and component aging modeling and 
simulation. The Secretary shall also coordinate with industry 
to determine other areas of high-priority research and 
development in this area.

                  FUEL CYCLE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee recommends $219,730,000 for Fuel Cycle 
Research and Development. No Defense function funds are 
provided.
    The Committee continues to strongly support the 
recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's 
Nuclear Future and believes that near-term action is needed to 
address this important national issue, and recommends 
$61,040,000 for Integrated Waste Management System activities. 
Funding should be used to advance plans to consolidate spent 
nuclear fuel from around the United States to an interim 
central storage facility(s), with priority given to shutdown 
reactors, and to accelerate the development of a transportation 
capability to move the commercial spent fuel from its current 
storage locations.
    The Committee supports the Department's efforts develop a 
process for consent-based siting by engaging State, local, and 
tribal government entities on the possible conditions under 
which an interim storage facility could be sited within their 
jurisdictions. Further, the Committee supports ongoing 
coordination between the Department and the Nuclear Regulatory 
Commission to clarify the regulatory framework under which 
transportation and centralized interim storage of spent fuel 
could occur. However, The Committee directs the Department to 
take a more active role in future consent-based siting 
processes for spent nuclear fuel or any other high level waste 
than it has demonstrated in the deep borehole demonstration 
project in North Dakota. The Department cannot avoid its 
responsibilities of working with State and local communities by 
hiring a contractor to oversee and execute the work. The 
Secretary is encouraged to ensure lessons learned from the 
demonstration project in North Dakota are incorporated into its 
plan to develop a process for future consent-based siting.
    Research and development activities on behavior of spent 
fuel in long-term storage, under transportation conditions, and 
in various geologic media will continue to be important to 
developing a new solution to the waste problem. Within the 
amounts recommended for used nuclear fuel disposition, 
$14,250,000 shall be for continuance of these activities. 
Priority should be placed on the ongoing study of the 
performance of high-burnup fuel in dry storage and on the 
potential for direct disposal of existing spent fuel dry 
storage canister technologies.
    The Committee recommends $69,390,000 for the Advanced Fuels 
program. The Department is directed to continue implementation 
of the accident tolerant fuels development program, the goal of 
which remains development of accident tolerant nuclear fuels 
leading to commercial reactor fuel assembly testing by 2022. 
The Secretary is directed to share with the Committee the 
outcome of the consultation required in fiscal year 2016 with 
industry, universities and other interested organizations on a 
commercialization roadmap for these technologies, including new 
ceramic cladding material. While the benefit of incremental 
improvements to existing commercially available fuels is 
acknowledged, there is concern that the Department's ongoing 
activities on accident tolerant fuels will not ultimately lead 
to meaningful reductions in the consequences of unexpected 
severe accidents in nuclear power plants. Therefore, not less 
than $19,300,000 is provided to initiate Phase 2 of the 
industry-led, appropriately cost-shared basic research program 
on Accident Tolerant Fuels, and $3,000,000 is provided for 
continuation of the previously competitively awarded Small 
Business projects to develop ceramic cladding for Accident 
Tolerant Fuels.

                  NUCLEAR ENERGY ENABLING TECHNOLOGIES

    The Committee recommends $83,925,000 for Nuclear Energy 
Enabling Technologies. The Committee recommends $24,300,000 for 
the Energy Innovation Hub for Modeling and Simulation.

                             Infrastructure


                   RADIOLOGICAL FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

    The Committee recommends $17,000,000 for Radiological 
Facilities Management, including $10,000,000 for the 
development of a radioactive liquid waste capability at Oak 
Ridge National Laboratory.

                      IDAHO FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

    The Committee recommends $295,185,000 for Idaho Facilities 
Management, which includes $141,000,000 for operations and 
maintenance of the Advanced Test Reactor. The Advanced Test 
Reactor is a vital asset that provides research capability 
across the Department. In order to provide better budget 
clarity and consistency appropriate for an operating reactor 
facility, a new control point for the Advanced Test Reactors 
Operations and Maintenance is established that consolidates all 
funding for the Advanced Test Reactor in the Nuclear Energy 
account.

                 Fossil Energy Research and Development

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $632,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     360,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     632,000,000

    The Committee recommends $632,000,000 for Fossil Energy 
Research and Development, an increase of $272,000,000 above the 
budget request. Within available funds, the Committee 
recommends $60,000,000 for program direction. The Committee 
does not adopt the proposed changes to the budget structure for 
Fossil Energy Research and Development.
    The Committee recognizes that this program supports vital 
research on clean coal technologies, and has accordingly 
provided significant funds above the budget request to 
accelerate these activities. The Committee notes that clean 
coal technology affords our Nation the ability to respond to 
environmental challenges by improving the performance of our 
coal-based electricity fleet, while also allowing for continued 
utilization of abundant and affordable U.S. coal.
    Fossil fuels support the activities of a modern economy, 
and will continue to supply our Nation's energy needs for the 
foreseeable future. Approximately 67 percent of the electricity 
generated in the United States is from coal, natural gas, and 
petroleum, and fossil fuel generation is and will continue 
expanding across the world. The Committee notes that the 
Department should allocate sufficient resources to support 
fossil energy research, development, and demonstrations to 
improve both existing technologies and develop the next 
generation of clean, affordable, and safe systems.
    The Committee is aware of Department's participation within 
the Propulsion Instrumentation Working Group. Innovative 
research is underway on dynamic sensors for turbine engines, 
including for fossil-fuel fired power plants, which have the 
potential to increase safety and fuel efficiency and decrease 
costs. The Committee encourages the Department to continue to 
support innovative research being carried out by the national 
labs and universities on engine sensor technology, with the 
goal of improving performance, safety, and fuel efficiency.
    The Committee includes funding levels for the Department of 
Energy's National Carbon Capture Center consistent with the 
budget request. The Committee continues to encourage the 
Department to establish university partnerships to support 
ongoing fossil energy programs, to promote broader research 
into CCS technologies, and to expand its technology transfer 
efforts. The Department has previously funded several 
university-based CCS projects and is encouraged to build on an 
established research base to support ongoing research and to 
address the wider implementation of CCS technologies.

                      COAL, CCS AND POWER SYSTEMS

    The Committee recommends $377,000,000 for CCS and Power 
Systems.
    The Committee recommends $30,000,000 to support a new 
solicitation for two awards for post-combustion carbon capture 
retrofits to existing coal plants greater than 350 MWe.
    Carbon Capture.--Within the recommendation, $101,000,000 is 
for Carbon Capture to support the R&D; and scale-up of 2nd 
generation and transformational technologies for capturing 
CO2 from new and existing industrial and power-
producing plants.
    Carbon Storage.--Within the recommendation, $106,000,000 is 
for Carbon Storage. Within available funds, the Committee 
recommends $10,000,000 for Carbon Use and Reuse to continue 
research and development activities to support valuable and 
innovative uses for carbon. The Committee recognizes that 
finding new commercial uses for captured carbon could 
significantly offset the costs of capturing and sequestering 
carbon from our Nation's coal-fired power plants. The Committee 
encourages the Secretary to use its existing authorities to 
fund activities that promote the reuse of captured carbon from 
coal and other sources in the production of fuels and other 
products. The Committee is concerned that the Office of Fossil 
Energy has not prioritized non-enhanced oil recovery 
utilization of carbon dioxide since 2010. The Committee 
believes the potential for carbon dioxide utilization 
technologies to become economically viable has improved in 
recent years and these technologies should receive renewed 
attention from the Office of Fossil Energy. The Committee 
encourages the Office of Fossil Energy to support other carbon 
dioxide utilization technologies in addition to enhanced oil 
recovery, including using carbon dioxide to produce algae. The 
Committee further encourages the Office of Fossil Energy to 
collaborate with the Bioenergy Technologies program within the 
Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to support 
projects that utilize carbon dioxide in the production of 
algae.
    Advanced Energy Systems.--Within the recommendation, 
$105,000,000 is for Advanced Energy Systems, which supports 
improving the efficiency of coal-based power systems, enabling 
affordable CO2 capture, increasing plant 
availability, and maintaining the highest environmental 
standards. The Committee supports and encourages the Secretary 
to fund research and development of Gasification Systems, which 
focuses on technology developments to reduce the cost of coal 
gasification and facilitates co-feeding of coal with biomass or 
waste; Advanced Combustion Systems, which focuses on the 
development of oxy-combustion and chemical looping processes 
that are applicable to new and existing power plants; Coal and 
Coal-Biomass to Liquids, which the Secretary did not include in 
its budget request, and Solid Oxide Fuel Cells, which focuses 
on research and development to enable efficient, cost-effective 
electricity generation from coal and natural gas with near-zero 
atmospheric emissions of CO2 and pollutants, as well 
as minimal water use in central power generation applications 
that can be integrated with carbon capture and storage. The 
Committee recommends $30,000,000 for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells. 
The Committee encourages the Secretary to promote and assist in 
the research and development of new higher efficiency gas 
turbines used in power generation systems in order to upgrade 
and increase the resiliency of the Nation's electrical grid 
system, while reducing the cost of electricity and emissions. 
This includes awarding grants and contract proposals from 
industry, small businesses, universities and other appropriate 
parties. The Committee encourages the Department to support a 
pilot program to advance the application of solid state 
reforming technology to commercial success.

                        NATURAL GAS TECHNOLOGIES

    The Committee recommends $46,000,000 for Natural Gas 
Technologies.
    Risk-Based Data Management System.--Within available funds, 
the Committee recommends $5,200,000 to continue the Risk Based 
Data Management System [RBDMS] and supports including water 
tracking in pre-and post-drilling applications where required 
by States. The Committee also directs the Department to provide 
these funds to integrate FracFocus and RBDMS for improved 
public access to State oil and gas related data, as well as for 
State regulatory agencies to support electronic permitting for 
operators, eForms for improved processing time for new permits, 
operator training from the improved FracFocus 3.0, and 
additional reports. The Committee supports the continued 
efforts to provide public transparency, while protecting 
proprietary information.
    Methane Hydrate Activities.--The Committee recommends 
$19,800,000 for methane hydrates, and notes that the request 
again does not include funding for methane hydrate research on 
the methods for producing methane hydrates, only funding for a 
fuel supply impact mitigation subprogram that will conduct 
investigations to confirm the nature and regional context of 
gas hydrate deposits in the Gulf of Mexico in conjunction with 
the U.S. Geological Survey. The Committee rejects the 
Secretary's approach to limit spending to such research and 
encourages the Secretary to perform a long-term methane 
hydrates production test in the Arctic, as proposed in the 
Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee's May 21, 2014 
recommendations to the Secretary.
    The Committee encourages coordination with industry and 
U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous 
Materials Safety Administration on leak detection technology 
development. The Committee remains supportive of investment in 
smart pipeline sensors and controls, internal pipeline 
inspection and repair, and composite and advanced material 
science technologies. The Committee encourages the Secretary to 
consider acoustic monitoring that can use ultrasonic sensors to 
detect leaks based on changes in background noise patterns to 
determine if acoustic sensors will respond to the sound 
generated by escaping gas at ultrasonic frequencies.
    Environmentally Prudent Development.--The Committee 
recommends $9,000,000 for Environmentally Prudent Development 
subprogram.
    Emissions Mitigations from Midstream Infrastructure.--The 
Committee recommends $7,000,000 for Emissions Mitigation from 
Midstream Infrastructure subprogram.
    Emissions Quantification from Natural Gas Infrastructure.--
The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for Emissions 
Quantification from Natural Gas Infrastructure research 
subprogram.

               UNCONVENTIONAL FOSSIL ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES

    The Committee recommends $23,245,000 for Unconventional 
Fossil Energy Technologies. The Secretary did not include any 
funding in the fiscal year 2017 budget request, and the 
Committee notes the importance of providing research support 
that will assure sustainable, reliable, affordable, and 
environmentally sound supplies of domestic unconventional 
fossil energy resources.
    Prior Federal and private investment in research led to the 
current shale gas revolution, and continued research and 
development is vital for the environmentally responsible 
development of this resource. Within available funds, the 
Committee directs the Department to support additional research 
efforts, with priority given to continue the successful work at 
the existing competitively awarded Unconventional Field Test 
Sites.
    The Secretary is encouraged to fund high-priority research, 
development, and deployment activities for unconventional oil, 
gas, and coal resources, including oil shale, as outlined in 
the September 2011 ``Domestic Unconventional Fossil Energy 
Resource Opportunities and Technology Applications'' report.
    The Committee expects Tasks 1-4 of the joint Department of 
Energy and Department of Transportation crude oil 
characterization study to be complete and formalized by the end 
of calendar year 2017. Both DOE and DOT shall use allocated 
resources to meet funding obligations to complete the study.
    Within available funds, the Committee encourages the 
Secretary to support efforts to increase production of 
unconventional fossil fuels through advanced technology and 
modeling, including optimizing high resolution and time-lapse 
geophysical methods for improved resource detection and better 
rock characterization at the micro- and nano-scale. The 
Committee also encourages the Secretary to examine the 
feasibility of utilizing geothermal energy from produced fluids 
for in-field energy requirements.

                 NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY

    Fossil energy is the backbone of the United States' energy 
future, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory [NETL] 
focuses on this critical national priority. The Committee 
supports NETL's mission to discover, develop, and deploy new 
technologies to support a strong domestic fossil energy path.
    The Committee is supportive of the reorganization and 
budget restructuring of NETL, as it increases consistency with 
other National Laboratories. The new structure highlighting 
research and operations, as well as infrastructure funding 
requirements, reflects increased transparency in how funds are 
utilized, promoting enhanced visibility and oversight into cost 
drivers and more efficient resource allocation decisions.
    Within NETL Infrastructure, the Committee directs the 
Department to prioritize funds to provide site-wide upgrades 
for safety, avoid an increase in deferred maintenance, and 
provide for an update and refresh of a subset of the processing 
units in the Joule high performance computer to upgrade the 
processing speed to five PFLOPS, a tenfold increase, financed 
through a 3-year lease. The Committee is aware that high 
performance computing is an essential element of mission-
relevant research, development, and demonstration, and is 
supportive of maintaining a world-class supercomputer to enable 
key energy research.

                 Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $17,500,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      14,950,000
Committee recommendation................................      14,950,000

    The Committee recommends $14,950,000 for Naval Petroleum 
and Oil Shale Reserves, the same as the budget request.

                      Strategic Petroleum Reserve

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $212,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     257,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     200,000,000

    The Committee recommends $200,000,000 for the Strategic 
Petroleum Reserve, a decrease of $57,000,000 from the budget 
request.
    The Committee recognizes the work the Secretary is 
undertaking to conduct a long-term strategic review of the 
Strategic Petroleum Reserve. The Committee looks forward to the 
results of the review, and the Secretary's recommendations on 
future investments in infrastructure and associated 
maintenance.
    The Committee understands the importance of the Major 
Maintenance Projects and preventive/corrective maintenance 
activities needed at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage 
facilities and related facilities, and encourages the 
Department, when carrying out these maintenance and other 
construction projects to use as much American-made iron, steel, 
and other manufactured goods as possible. American 
manufacturers are most suited, for national and economic 
security reasons, to supply the materials for these critical 
infrastructure improvements at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve.

                   Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve

Appropriations, 2016....................................      $7,600,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................       6,500,000
Committee recommendation................................       6,500,000

    The Committee recommends $6,500,000 for the Northeast Home 
Heating Oil Reserve, the same as the request.

                   Energy Information Administration

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $122,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     131,125,000
Committee recommendation................................     122,000,000

    The Committee recommends $122,000,000 for the Energy 
Information Administration [EIA], a decrease of $9,125,000 from 
the budget request.
    The Committee supports the EIA's efforts to expand its 
monthly State-level estimates of generation and capacity of 
small-scale distributed generation systems.
    The Committee is aware that EIA has not kept pace with 
State-run databases and interfaces to provide near real-time 
statistics on production of oil and natural gas and well 
integrity. The EIA has initiated work with State agencies to 
explore connecting State databases to create a national gateway 
that would allow the public to easily access information in a 
user-friendly manner. Accurate and accessible information about 
oil and gas production and well integrity is a national 
imperative. A National Oil and Gas Gateway that works in 
concert with State-run databases is an essential component for 
achieving this important objective. Within available funds, the 
Committee recommends $1,500,000 for the creation that Gateway.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of building energy 
information and the opportunity for better data collection 
presented by new technologies. The Secretary is encouraged to 
upgrade the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Surveys to 
a real-time data collection system with rapid reporting of 
results, without compromising statistical validity or data 
security.

                   Non-Defense Environmental Cleanup

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $255,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     218,400,000
Committee recommendation................................     255,000,000

    The Committee recommends $255,000,000 for Non-Defense 
Environmental Cleanup, an increase of $36,600,000 from the 
budget request.
    Small Sites.--The Committee recommends $85,043,000 for 
Small Sites. Within the available funds, the Committee 
recommends $6,000,000 to complete the design and initiate 
construction of facilities pursuant to the agreement reached in 
2012 between the Department of Energy, the Advisory Council on 
Historic Preservation, and State and local governments to 
complete the demolition of K-25 in exchange for preserving the 
historic contributions made by the K-25 site to the Manhattan 
Project. Last year, the Committee directed the Secretary to 
request appropriate funding to satisfy the requirements of the 
National Historic Preservation Act in future budget requests, 
including the regulatory requirements agreed to by the 
Department of Energy, the Advisory Council on Historic 
Preservation, and State and local governments regarding the K-
25 site. The Manhattan Project National Historical Park tells 
an important story in our Nation's history: the development and 
production of the technology and materials necessary to create 
the world's first atomic bomb. The new Park has locations in 
Hanford, Washington, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and Oak Ridge, 
Tennessee. It is administered and operated by the National Park 
Service in conjunction with the Department of Energy, which is 
working towards cleanup of these nuclear waste sites. The 
Committee directs the Department of Energy to submit an 
implementation plan to Committees on Appropriations of the 
House and the Senate no later than 180 after enactment of this 
act that details infrastructure needs, transition activities, 
schedule, and funding requirements to make these sites fully 
available to the public under the auspices of the National Park 
Service.
    Within available funds, the Committee recommends $9,200,000 
to continue to deactivate, decommission, and demolish 
facilities at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.
    The budget request did not include funding for the 
decommissioning and decontamination of the Southwest 
Experimental Fast Oxide Reactor, despite that facility being 
constructed for, and used by, the Atomic Energy Commission. 
Within available funds, the Committee recommends $16,600,000 
for the decommissioning and decontamination of the Southwest 
Experimental Fast Oxide Reactor. Combined with previously 
provided funding, this amount is sufficient to complete the 
decommissioning and decontamination of the site, and the 
Department will not provide any additional funding for this 
purpose.

      Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $673,749,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................................
Committee recommendation................................     717,741,000

    The Committee recommends $717,741,000 for Uranium 
Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning [UED&D;] 
activities, an increase of $717,741,000 from the budget 
request.
    The Committee recommendation includes $194,673,000 for East 
Tennessee Technology Park [ETTP], $205,530,000 for Paducah, and 
$264,585,000 for Portsmouth. Within available funds for ETTP, 
the Committee recommendation includes funding for preparation 
and demolition of the buildings in the K-1200 Complex. These 
funding levels are adequate to maintain current manpower levels 
for decontamination and disposal work at all three sites based 
on current forecasts. The Department is directed to use any 
unexpended funds at the respective sites, if necessary, to 
maintain current manpower levels.
    The Committee directs the Department to develop long-term 
plans to adequately clean up sites exclusively through the 
annual appropriations process.
    The Committee recommends $30,000,000 for the Title X 
Uranium and Thorium Reimbursement Program. Title X of the 
Energy Policy Act of 1992 authorizes the Secretary to reimburse 
eligible licensees for the Federal Government's share of the 
cost associated with cleaning up former uranium and thorium 
processing sites across the country. The Committee continues to 
be concerned about the accumulating balances and liabilities 
owed to private licensees for the Department's failure to 
address the Federal Government's cost share. Fulfilling the 
obligation to fully reimburse licensees is important to the 
health and safety of the impacted communities. Moving forward, 
the Committee expects the Secretary to request sufficient 
resources within its annual budget request to reimburse 
licensees for approved claim balances.
    The budget request included no discretionary funding for 
Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning [UED&D;] 
activities. Instead, the Department recommended using mandatory 
funding that is not authorized for these activities. The 
Committee is concerned that such irresponsible budgeting 
practices demonstrate the Department's lack of commitment to 
the cleanup of the former enrichment sites in Kentucky, 
Tennessee and Ohio. Going forward, the Department is directed 
to request discretionary funding for this work unless they have 
already obtained authorization for use of mandatory funds.

                                Science

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $5,350,200,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   5,572,069,000
Committee recommendation................................   5,400,000,000

    The Committee recommends $5,400,000,000 for Science, a 
decrease of $172,069,000 from the budget request.
    Distinguished Scientist Program.--The Committee recommends 
directing up to $2,000,000 to support the Department's 
Distinguished Scientist Program, as authorized in section 5011 
of Public Law 110-69 to promote scientific and academic 
excellence through collaborations between institutions of 
higher education and National laboratories to be funded from 
across all Office of Science programs.
    Brain Research through Advancing Innovative 
Neurotechnologies [BRAIN] Initiative.--The Committee is aware 
of the Department's partnership with the National Institutes of 
Health [NIH] and coordination with the interagency BRAIN 
initiative. The Committee supports the Department's 
contributions to the BRAIN initiative through the development 
of imaging and sensing tools and technologies at x-ray light 
sources and nanoscale research centers, as well as 
computational expertise, high performance computing, and data 
management. This complementary, multi-agency initiative is 
encouraged to take advantage of existing investments and 
infrastructure while engaging closely with the neuroscience 
community to accelerate our understanding of the brain. In 
addition, the Committee also encourages and supports the use of 
national laboratory system's user facilities for the National 
Cancer Moonshot Initiative.

                 ADVANCED SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING RESEARCH

    The Committee recommends $656,180,000 for Advanced 
Scientific Computing Research. The Committee believes its 
recommendation would allow the Department to develop and 
maintain world-class computing and network facilities for 
science and deliver the necessary research in applied 
mathematics, computer science, and advanced networking to 
support the Department's missions.
    The Committee is supportive of the coordinated Federal 
strategy in high performance computing research, development, 
and deployment through the National Strategic Computing 
Initiative. The Committee encourages further coordination 
between the Office of Science and National Nuclear Security 
Administration to support the Exascale Computing Initiative in 
development of a long range plan. The Committee strongly 
supports the Initiative, which is critical to maintaining our 
Nation's global competitiveness and ensuring American 
technology outpaces rivals like China to support our national 
security. Exascale computers will be capable of a hundred-fold 
increase in sustained performance over today's computing 
capabilities. The Initiative is also a critical tool to 
advancing energy technologies. In fiscal year 2017, the ASCR 
portion of the Exascale Initiative is incorporated into a new 
budget line listed as the Office of Science Exascale Computing 
Project [SC-ECP] for activities required for the delivery of 
exascale computers. The SC-ECP will be managed following the 
principles of Order 413.3B, and a project management office has 
been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which has 
expertise in developing computational science and engineering 
applications, as well as managing high performance computing 
facilities and large scale scientific research projects. The 
Committee recommends including $154,000,000 for SC-ECP. This 
funding will support hardware and software research and 
development, including applications software, for the 
development and deployment of a capable exascale system to meet 
the scientific and national security mission needs of the 
Nation by the mid-2020s.
    The Committee recommends $110,000,000 for the Oak Ridge 
Leadership Computing Facility to ensure that it is the most 
capable, open computational system for science and maintains 
U.S. leadership in supercomputing. The Committee also 
recommends $80,000,000 for the Argonne Leadership Computing 
Facility, $92,145,000 for the National Energy Research 
Scientific Computing Center facility at Lawrence Berkeley 
National Laboratory, and $45,000,000 for ESnet. The Committee 
recommends $10,000,000 for the Computational Sciences Graduate 
Program. Within available funds, the Committee recommends 
$2,500,000 for the cross-program partnership on seismic 
simulation.

                         BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES

    The Committee recommends $1,912,630,000 for Basic Energy 
Sciences [BES]. Of these funds, $1,722,630,000 is for research. 
The Committee is aware the Basic Sciences Advisory Committee 
will provide an updated assessment and prioritization of the 
next three to five projects by June, and will take into account 
for a finalized fiscal year 2017 agreement. The Committee 
recommends funding for optimal operations $489,059,000 for the 
five BES light sources to fully support research and allow the 
facilities to proceed with necessary maintenance, routine 
accelerator and instrumentation improvements, and crucial staff 
hires or replacements. The Committee recognizes the critical 
role that light sources play in the Nation's innovation 
ecosystem, and the growing reliance on them by U.S. researchers 
and industry. In light of increased international investment in 
these unique scientific resources and the consequences for U.S. 
innovation leadership, the Committee supports the Secretary's 
efforts to upgrade and renew these facilities across the full 
spectrum of x-ray capabilities. Within available funds for 
operations and maintenance of scientific user facilities, the 
Committee recommends $265,000,000 for high-flux neutron 
sources, which will allow for both Spallation Neutron Source 
[SNS] and High Flux Isotope Reactor [HFIR] to proceed with the 
most critical deferred repairs, replace outdated instruments, 
and make essential machine improvements. Further, the Committee 
recommends optimal funding for the Nanoscale Science Research 
Centers, and supports the development of capabilities with co-
located facilities.
    The Committee recommends $190,000,000 to support the 
continuation of the construction effort for LCLS-II. In 
addition, the Committee is aware the Department did not provide 
adequate funding within Major Items of Equipment for the 
Advanced Photon Source Upgrade, which received approval for CD-
1 in January 2016, and is ready to move ahead with design and 
procurement. The Committee rejects this approach, and provides 
$50,000,000 for construction, as previously recommended by the 
Department.
    The Committee recommends $26,000,000 for exascale systems, 
the same as the crosscut request for fiscal year 2017.
    The Committee recommends within the funds provided, 
$3,000,000 to continue to work on a new generation of 
nanostructured catalysts that can be used to synthesize 
fertilizer and ammonia without any secondary greenhouse gases.
    The Committee recommends $24,088,000 for the Batteries and 
Energy Storage Hub, the Joint Center for Energy Storage 
Research [JCESR]. This is the last year of the first award 
period, and the Committee is encouraged by the work of JCESR to 
develop energy storage research prototypes for transportation 
and grid applications based on beyond lithium ion concepts. 
These protoypes will demonstrate the potential to scale up 
manufacturing prototype batteries to deliver five times the 
energy density of 2011 battery systems and one-fifth the cost. 
The Committee supports the continued research and development 
for JCESR, to ensure the outcome of basic research leads to 
practical solutions that are competitive in the marketplace. 
The Committee commends JCESR for expanding it partnership of 
national laboratories, academia, and industry to additional 
members outside their region.
    The Committee recommends $15,000,000 for the Fuels from 
Sunlight Hub, the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis 
[JCAP] which was established in fiscal year 2010, and in 
September 2015 was renewed for a second award term of up to 5 
years. The JCAP will continue to perform research on the 
fundamental science of carbon dioxide reduction needed to 
enable efficient, sustainable solar-driven production of liquid 
transportation fuels, and will undergo a scientific and merit 
review in fiscal year 2017 to assess progress towards meeting 
project milestones and goals.
    The Committee recommends $20,000,000 for the Experimental 
Program to Stimulate Competitive Research [EPSCoR]. The 
Committee recognizes the importance of supporting basic 
research, spanning the broad range of the Department's science 
and technology programs in States that have historically 
received disproportionate Federal research funding grants. The 
Committee encourages the Secretary to undertake additional 
efforts to include EPSCoR States in energy research activities 
related to the energy production and output contribution of 
their State.
    The Committee further encourages the Secretary to undertake 
additional efforts to perform energy research activities 
related to enhanced efficiency in energy conversion and 
utilization, including emergent polymer technologies, with a 
focus on infrared optoelectronic devices to ensure continued 
competitiveness in a global marketplace.
    The Committee encourages the Secretary to continue funding 
to support research and development needs of graduate and post-
graduate science programs at Historically Black Colleges and 
Universities.

                 BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH

    The Committee recommends $637,000,000 for Biological and 
Environmental Research. Within available funds, the Committee 
recommends $10,000,000 for exascale computing, the same as the 
request for fiscal year 2017 crosscut. The Department is urged 
to give priority to optimizing the operation of Biological and 
Environmental Research User Facilities.
    Within available funds, the Committee recommends not less 
than $75,000,000 for three Bioenergy Research Centers for the 
final year of their funding period. The Committee recognizes 
the unique and beneficial role that the Department plays for 
the Nation in the advancement of biosciences to address core 
departmental missions in energy and the environment.
    The Committee encourages the Department to increase funding 
for academia to perform climate model studies that include the 
collection and evaluation of atmospheric data sets from 
satellite observations obtained in cooperation with NASA. 
Satellite observations of the atmosphere, within the context of 
the Earth as a global system, provide information that is 
critical in the interpretation of Earth-based observations.
    As other nations have launched research programs on albedo 
modification, the Committee recommends the Department review 
the findings of the National Academy of Sciences report 
entitled, ``Climate Intervention: Reflecting Sunlight to Cool 
Earth,'' and leverage existing computational and modeling 
capabilities to explore the potential impacts of albedo 
modification.

                         FUSION ENERGY SCIENCES

    The Committee recommends $280,110,000 for Fusion Energy 
Sciences. The Committee directs the Department to provide a 
prioritization and long-range plan for domestic Fusion Energy 
Sciences research and development program.
    U.S. Contribution to ITER.--The Committee recommends no 
funding for the International Thermonuclear Experimental 
Reactor [ITER] project. The Committee has previously expressed 
and continues to remain concerned about the rising cost of the 
United States' participation in ITER under construction in St. 
Paul-lez-Durance, France. Funding for the contribution to ITER 
continues to crowd out other Federal science investments, 
including domestic fusion research, as well as high performance 
computing and materials science, where the United States has 
maintained leadership. The Fiscal Year 2016 Omnibus 
Appropriations Act directed a report from the Secretary of 
Energy recommending either the United States to continue its 
participation in the ITER project or terminate participation, 
and that recommendation is expected not later than May 2, 2016. 
The Committee is aware an updated project cost and long term 
schedule are also under review by an independent panel, and 
will be provided to the ITER Organization in April 2016.

                          HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS

    The Committee recommends $832,997,000 for High Energy 
Physics.
    The Committee strongly supports the Secretary's efforts to 
advance the recommendations of the Particle Physics Project 
Prioritization Panel Report, which established clear priorities 
for the domestic particle physics program over the next 10 
years under realistic budget scenarios. Within available funds, 
the Committee recommends $55,000,000 for the Long Baseline 
Neutrino Facility/Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment to 
ensure the United States meets its commitments to support joint 
DUNE detector design and prototyping in partnership with CERN, 
to complete site preparation and begin excavation for the far 
detector site, and to secure and define technical contributions 
from other international partners.
    The Committee recommendation provides Cosmic Frontier 
Experimental Physics an additional $5,000,000 to fund the Dark 
Energy Spectroscopic Instrument at $12,000,000 and the G2 Dark 
Matter Experiment LUX ZEPLIN at $12,500,000. The Committee 
recommends $45,000,000 for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope 
Camera, the same as the request.

                            NUCLEAR PHYSICS

    The Committee recommends $635,658,000 for Nuclear Physics. 
The Committee is supportive of the 2015 Long Range Plan for 
Nuclear Science released in October 2015 to address important 
scientific questions with modest or constrained growth in the 
nuclear science budgets, while still maintaining a strong, 
vital and world leading program. Within these funds, the 
Committee recommends $100,000,000 for the Facility for Rare 
Isotope Beams and the budget request for the Relativistic Heavy 
Ion Collider.

           WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT FOR TEACHERS AND SCIENTISTS

    The Committee recommends $20,925,000 for Workforce 
Development for Teachers and Scientists.

                  SCIENCE LABORATORIES INFRASTRUCTURE

    The Committee recommends $130,000,000 for Science 
Laboratories Infrastructure consistent with the budget request. 
Within these funds, the Committee recommends $26,000,000 for 
nuclear operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In future 
budget requests, the Committee directs the Office of Science to 
work with the Office of Nuclear Energy to demonstrate a 
commitment to operations and maintenance of nuclear facilities 
at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that supports multiple 
critical missions.

               Advanced Research Projects Agency--Energy

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $291,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     350,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     292,669,000

    The Committee recommends $292,669,000 for the Advanced 
Research Projects Agency--Energy [ARPA-E], a decrease of 
$57,331,000 from the request. Within available funds, the 
Committee recommends $29,250,000 for program direction. Since 
receiving its first funding in fiscal year 2009, ARPA-E 
continues to catalyze and support the development of 
transformational, high-impact energy technologies to ensure the 
Nation's economic and energy security and technological lead. 
Project sponsors continue to form strategic partnerships and 
new companies, as well as securing private sector funding to 
help move ARPA-E technologies closer to the market. ARPA-E has, 
in total, invested in more than 400 projects in 25 focused 
program areas. The Committee supports the program's focus for 
fiscal year 2017 on transportation fuels and feedstocks; energy 
materials and processes; dispatchable energy; and sensors, 
information and integration.

              Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs

Appropriations, 2016....................................................
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     $22,930,000
Committee recommendation................................      20,000,000

    The Committee recommends $20,000,000 for the Office of 
Indian Energy. The activities of this office have previously 
been funded through the Department of Administration 
appropriation. The Committee notes that the Department did not 
repeat its request to initiate a Tribal Indian Energy Loan 
Guarantee Program for fiscal year 2017. Within available funds, 
the Committee encourages the Office of Indian Energy to 
facilitate the utilization of existing loan programs by tribal 
governments, including the title 17 Innovative Technology Loan 
Guarantee Program and the Transmission Infrastructure Program. 
The Committee encourages the Office of Indian Energy to 
facilitate better communication among different Federal 
agencies regarding rules, regulations issued, and actions taken 
by other Federal agencies impacting energy development on 
Indian lands.

              Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program


                        ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

                          GROSS APPROPRIATION

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $42,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   1,057,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      37,000,000

                          OFFSETTING RECEIPTS

Appropriations, 2016....................................    -$25,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     -30,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     -30,000,000

                           NET APPROPRIATION

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $17,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   1,027,000,000
Committee recommendation................................       7,000,000

    The Committee recommends $37,000,000 in funding for the 
Loan Guarantee Program, the same as the request. This funding 
is offset by $30,000,000 in receipts from loan guarantee 
applicants, for a net appropriation of $7,000,000. An 
additional $37,000,000 in prior receipts from loan guarantee 
applicants is credited to the bill as a scorekeeping 
adjustment. The Committee does not recommend any new loan 
authority, as proposed in the budget request.
    Not later than 45 days after the date of enactment of this 
Act, the Secretary shall provide the Committees on 
Appropriations of both Houses of Congress with a report that 
includes the following information: (1) a list of each 
conditional commitment the Secretary has offered and which has 
not been closed or withdrawn as of the date of enactment of 
this Act; (2) a status of each project listed under (1); and 
(3) a justification by the Secretary as to why each conditional 
commitment should continue to be pending and not withdrawn; and 
(4) any specific legal hindrances to withdrawing conditional 
commitments once the Secretary has offered them. The Committee 
encourages the Department to make $9,000,000 of the current 
renewable energy credit subsidy available for Indian Energy 
proposals.

        Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program

Appropriations, 2016....................................      $6,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................       5,000,000
Committee recommendation................................       5,000,000

    The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for the Advanced 
Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program, the same as the 
request.

                      Departmental Administration


                                (GROSS)

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $248,142,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     270,037,000
Committee recommendation................................     232,142,000

                        (MISCELLANEOUS REVENUES)

Appropriations, 2016....................................   -$117,171,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................    -103,000,000
Committee recommendation................................    -103,000,000

                           NET APPROPRIATION

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $130,971,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     167,037,000
Committee recommendation................................     129,142,000

    The Committee recommends $232,142,000 in funding for 
Departmental Administration. Included within such amounts is 
funding for the Department's activities related to 
implementation of the Digital Accountability and Transparency 
Act. This funding offset by $103,000,000 in revenue for a net 
appropriation of $129,142,000.
    The Committee has reduced the number of control points in 
this account in order to provide flexibility to the Department 
in its management and funding of its support functions. The 
Department is directed to continue to submit its budget request 
for this account in its current structure. The Other 
Departmental Administration activity now includes Management, 
Chief Human Capital Officer, Chief Information Officer, Office 
of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization, General 
Counsel, Energy Policy and Systems Analysis, International 
Affairs, Public Affairs, Economic Impact and Diversity, and 
Office of Energy Jobs Development. The Office of Indian Energy 
Programs is funded in a separate account for the first time 
this year.
    The Committee encourages the Secretary to provide technical 
assistance, including studies or analysis, at the request of 
State energy regulatory authorities, which capture the known 
and measureable current and future benefits and costs of 
distributed energy resources (such as distributed generation, 
demand response, storage, and energy efficiency) to the 
customers they serve and the utilities they regulate. The 
studies may include, but are not limited to, the following 
variables: (1) avoided energy, (2) line losses, (3) avoided 
capacity, (4) ancillary services, (5) transmission and 
distribution capacity, (6) avoided criteria pollutant costs, 
(7) avoided carbon dioxide emission cost, (8) fuel hedging, (9) 
utility integration and interconnection costs, (10) utility 
administration costs, (11) environmental costs.
    The Committee directs the Secretary to complete a survey of 
previous energy plants that have shutdown, how communities 
adapted, the opportunities and challenges facing these 
communities, and resources available to assist with the 
economic transition. Such a report is to be submitted to the 
Senate Committee on Appropriations and the Senate Committee on 
Energy and Natural Resources no later than 180 days after the 
enactment of this act.
    Technology Transfer.--In awarding funding from the 
Technology Commercialization Fund, the Department shall assure 
cost match with private partners is in accordance with cost 
sharing in section 988 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (42 
U.S.C. 16352).
    The Committee directs the Department to submit a report, no 
later than 30 days after enactment of this act, detailing 
projects approved under 42 U.S.C. 16421 and the Department's 
efforts to ensure compliance with State laws, as applicable 
under 42 U.S.C. 16421(d)(2).
    Nonprofit Cost Share.--The Committee notes that the 
Secretary may reduce or eliminate the research and development 
match requirement established in section 988 of the Energy 
Policy Act of 2005, where necessary and appropriate. The 
Committee encourages the Secretary to consider the use of this 
discretion if the research goals of the Department of Energy 
would be advanced by reducing or eliminating the match 
requirement for nonprofit organizations and institutions.
    Small Refinery Exemption.--The Committee directs the 
Secretary to continue to follow the direction included under 
this heading in fiscal year 2016.

                    Office of the Inspector General

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $46,424,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      44,424,000
Committee recommendation................................      44,424,000

    The Committee recommends $44,424,000 for the Office of the 
Inspector General, the same as the request.

                    ATOMIC ENERGY DEFENSE ACTIVITIES


                NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION

    The Committee recommends $12,867,186,000 for the National 
Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]. The Committee continues 
funding for recapitalization of our nuclear weapons 
infrastructure, while modernizing and maintaining a safe, 
secure, and credible nuclear deterrent without testing. This is 
among our most important national security priorities.
    At the same time, the Committee supports continuing 
important efforts to secure and permanently eliminate remaining 
stockpiles of nuclear and radiological materials overseas and 
in the United States that can be used for nuclear or 
radiological weapons. In addition, the Committee supports Naval 
Reactors and the important role they play in enabling the 
Navy's nuclear fleet.

                     INTEGRATED UNIVERSITY PROGRAM

    The Committee directs the Secretary to carry out the 
requirements of 42 U.S.C. 16274a in support of university 
research and development in areas relevant to the NNSA's 
mission. Within available funds, the Committee recommends not 
less than $5,000,000 for the Integrated University Program to 
cultivate the next generation of leaders in nonproliferation, 
nuclear security, and international security. Together with 
funds from the Office of Nuclear Energy and the Nuclear 
Regulatory Commission, this program ensures highly qualified 
nuclear specialists will be available to meet national needs. 
The Committee directs the Secretary to request funding for this 
program in future budget years, and specifically highlight the 
source of funds within the budget request. Further, funding for 
this program shall not come from prior year funds.

                           PROJECT MANAGEMENT

    The Committee is concerned about NNSA's ability to properly 
estimate costs and timelines for large projects. The NNSA is 
encouraged to assess current performance on projects costing 
more than $750,000,000, and make appropriate project management 
changes. The Committee encourages the NNSA to identify problems 
in cost and schedule estimates early, and provide updated 
information to the Committee in a timely manner.

                           Weapons Activities

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $8,846,948,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   9,285,147,000
Committee recommendation................................   9,285,147,000

    The Committee recommends $9,285,147,000 for Weapons 
Activities, the same as the budget request to ensure the 
safety, security, reliability, and effectiveness of the 
Nation's nuclear weapons stockpile without the need for nuclear 
testing.

                        Directed Stockpile Work

    The Committee recommends $3,321,011,000 for Directed 
Stockpile Work.
    Life Extension Programs.--The Committee recommends 
$1,340,341,000 for Life Extension Programs and Major 
Alterations, which fully funds all life extension programs and 
major alterations in the budget request, consistent with the 
plan of record approved by the Nuclear Weapons Council. NNSA 
needs to ensure that Life Extension Programs are completed on 
time and on budget to prevent impact on other high priorities, 
such as modernizing aging infrastructure, critical 
nonproliferation activities to combat nuclear terrorism, and 
naval nuclear propulsion.
    W76 Life Extension Program.--The Committee recommends 
$222,880,000 for the W76 Life Extension Program. Completing the 
W76 Life Extension Program, which makes up the largest share of 
the country's nuclear weapon deterrent on the most survivable 
leg of the Triad, is this Committee's highest priority for life 
extension programs.
    B61 Life Extension Program.--The Committee recommends 
$616,079,000 for the B61 Life Extension Program. The Committee 
supports the Nuclear Weapons Council plan to retire the B83, 
the last megaton class weapon in the stockpile, by 2025.
    W88 Alt 370.--The Committee recommends $281,129,000 for the 
W88 Alt 370.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of Energy, in 
conjunction with the Nuclear Weapons Council, to submit a 
report to the Committees on Appropriations of both the House 
and Senate, no later than 180 days after enactment of this act, 
to include: a military justification for the Long Range Stand-
Off missile and its operational capabilities; whether the 
Nuclear Weapons Council has directed the study of additional 
operational capabilities for the W80-4 relative to the W80-1 
warhead; a detailed explanation of the extent to which 
conventional explosive systems can meet the same or similar 
military objectives as the Long Range Standoff weapon; a 
description of the blast, thermal and radiation spread of an 
atmospheric W80-4 nuclear explosion in representative 
operational employment conditions; a description of 
alternatives leading to the August, 2014 Nuclear Weapons 
Council decision to use the W80 warhead for the Long Range 
Standoff weapon; and a comprehensive description and 
justification of all design options and associated systems and 
subsystems under evaluation in Phase 6.2, including whether the 
system or subsystem option is driven by aging, safety, 
security, or use control concerns.
    Weapons Dismantlement and Disposition.--The Committee 
supports the administration's efforts to accelerate the 
dismantlement of retired nuclear weapons removed from the 
stockpile prior to 2009. Further, the Committee supports 
accelerated dismantlements now as a way of preparing its 
workforce for necessary stockpile production work beginning 
later this decade.
    Stockpile Services.--The Committee recommends $890,173,000 
for stockpile services. Within Stockpile Services, the Nuclear 
Materials Management Safeguards System [NMMSS] tracks 
movements, uses, inventories, and locations of all nuclear 
materials, including plutonium and high enriched uranium, 
domestically and internationally. The Committee supports the 
maintenance and expansion of NMMSS and encourages NNSA to 
ensure that NMMSS receives the management visibility and 
support needed to ensure technical and organizational 
sustainability. Further, the Committee directs the Department 
to submit a report to the Committees on Appropriations of both 
the Senate and House no later than 90 days after enactment on 
the activities and funding needed to enhance or expand the 
system to provide greater transparency to in-transit materials, 
delivery confirmation, excess materials awaiting disposal, and 
historical information.
    Strategic Materials.--The Committee recommends $577,837,000 
for Strategic Materials.

           RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TECHNOLOGY, AND ENGINEERING

    The Committee recommends $1,839,130,000 for Research, 
Development, Technology, and Engineering.
    Science.--The Committee commends NNSA for completing the 
Dynamic Compression Sector experiment at the Advanced Photon 
Source at the Argonne National Laboratory on time and on 
budget. This first of its kind experimental facility will help 
address gaps in understanding materials at extreme conditions 
that directly support the Stockpile Stewardship Mission and 
train the next generation of researchers. The Committee 
encourages NNSA to maximize the use of this new capability. As 
the first successful collaboration between NNSA, the Office of 
Science, and an academic institution, the Committee believes 
this project should serve as a model for future scientific 
collaborations between NNSA and the Office of Science to 
address long-standing scientific challenges of stockpile 
stewardship in a cost effective manner.
    Current world events confirm the dynamic nature of the 
global threats we face today and confirm the need for a safe, 
secure, and effective nuclear deterrent. Central to this 
priority is recruiting and retaining a world-class workforce 
consisting of scientists, engineers, and technicians to sustain 
the Nation's deterrent without nuclear explosive testing. The 
nuclear security enterprise must be able to effectively respond 
to emerging threats, unanticipated events, and technological 
innovation through science and engineering--all while 
continuing to carry out the necessary activities in support of 
the stockpile. The Committee notes NNSA's successes in this 
regard and encourages NNSA to continue to prioritize efforts 
within Research, Development, Test & Evaluation to improve 
certification capabilities. As such, within the funds available 
for Advanced Certification, the Committee recommends 
$10,000,000 above the budget request for NNSA to carry out 
section 3112 of the fiscal year 2016 National Defense 
Authorization Act.
    Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High-Yield 
Campaign.--The Committee recommends $522,959,000 for the 
inertial confinement fusion ignition and high-yield campaign. 
The Committee supports the recent comprehensive Inertial 
Confinement Fusion Program Framework that details program 
requirements, milestones and metrics, and clear priorities for 
diagnostic investments that advance the three approaches to 
ignition and thermonuclear burning plasma capabilities 
primarily pursued at the National Ignition Facility, Z and 
Omega for the Stockpile Stewardship Program.
    Advanced Simulation and Computing.--The Committee 
recommends $663,184,000 for advanced simulation and computing. 
Within these funds, the Committee recommends no less than 
$95,000,000 for activities associated with the exascale 
initiative, such as advanced system architecture design 
contracts with vendors and advanced weapons code development to 
effectively use new high performance computing platforms. The 
Committee is concerned that there is no clear distinction 
between the efforts within the NNSA and the Office of Science, 
and no way to determine if the work is complementary or 
duplicative. The Secretary is directed to provide a report to 
the Senate and House Appropriations Committees no later than 90 
days after enactment of this act, which describes the roles and 
responsibilities of the NNSA and the Office of Science 
associated with exascale computing.

                     INFRASTRUCTURE AND OPERATIONS

    The Committee recommends $2,731,952,000 for Infrastructure 
and Operations. Within funding for Infrastructure and Safety, 
$2,200,000 is provided for the cross-program partnership on 
seismic simulation.
    Operations.--The Committee recommends $834,000,000 for 
Operations.
    Bannister Road Complex.--The Committee supports NNSA's 
proposal to turn over the Bannister Road Complex to a private 
entity, consistent with section 3143 of the fiscal year 2014 
National Defense Authorization Act. The Committee supports the 
budget request and recommends $200,000,000 for the transfer of 
the Bannister Road Complex, and notes that the transfer will 
save the NNSA over $700,000,000 in cleanup costs.
    Construction.--The Committee recommends $826,670,000 for 
major capital construction projects.
    Project 06-D-141, Uranium Processing Facility, Y-12, Oak 
Ridge, Tennessee.--The Committee recommends $575,000,000 to 
continue design and engineering work as well as site readiness 
and site preparation projects for the Uranium Processing 
Facility.
    The Committee supports efforts to replace existing enriched 
uranium capabilities currently residing in Building 9212 by 
2025 for not more than $6.5 billion. The Committee supports the 
strategy of breaking the project into more manageable sub-
projects. This practice is specifically permitted by DOE Order 
413.3B, and is a practical approach for this project. The 
Committee expects the Secretary to ensure full compliance with 
the Department's requirement to have a design that is at least 
90 percent complete before approving the start of construction 
for the nuclear facilities. The Committee is encouraged that 
the NNSA plans to complete at least 90 percent of the design of 
the project's nuclear facilities by the end of 2017, and 
expects to start construction shortly thereafter. In order to 
make a smooth transition from design to construction, the NNSA 
must have adequate resources available to review Critical 
Decision documents from the contractor. The Committee directs 
the NNSA to provide the plan for reviewing those documents to 
the Senate and House Appropriations Committees with the fiscal 
year 2018 budget request.
    Secure Transportation Asset.--The Committee recommends 
$261,420,000 for Secure Transportation Asset [STA]. The budget 
request for operations and equipment for fiscal year 2017 
through 2020 has grown by more than 33 percent when compared to 
that same timeframe in last year's budget request, but NNSA 
does not explain the reason for the large increase. As such, 
the Committee concludes that the STA program does not have a 
stable procurement plan for replacing its assets.

                        DEFENSE NUCLEAR SECURITY

    The Committee recommends $706,550,000 for Defense Nuclear 
Security.
    The recommendation provides additional funding above the 
budget request to meet shortfalls anticipated for the 
protective forces at Y-12 and other NNSA sites, and the need to 
replace vital security infrastructure. The Committee is 
concerned that NNSA continues to be overly aggressive in 
forecasting savings from the new contract structure at Y-12 and 
Pantex, and has not budgeted for a sufficient protective force 
to support production work required in the life extension 
programs.

                    Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $1,940,302,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   1,821,916,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,821,916,000

    The Committee recommends $1,821,916,000 for Defense Nuclear 
Nonproliferation, the same as the budget request.

                    DEFENSE NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION

    Defense nuclear nonproliferation provides a vitally 
important component of our national security--preventing 
nuclear materials and weapons from falling into the wrong 
hands, including non-weapons nations, terrorist organizations 
and other non-state entities. This mission is challenged by an 
increasingly dangerous world with emerging and evolving 
threats, in addition to the proliferation of technologies that 
simplify production, manufacturing and design of nuclear 
materials and weapons. The Committee is concerned that there is 
a disconnect between real-world threats and the planned work in 
nonproliferation. For example, the administration agreed to the 
Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action last year, but did not 
request sufficient funds that could further directly support 
verification of that agreement. NNSA is directed to provide the 
Senate and House Appropriations Committees with a report that 
prioritizes threats to national security and links the budget 
request to those threats no later than June 30, 2017.
    Global Material Security.--The Committee recommends 
$344,108,000 for Global Material Security to increase the 
security of vulnerable stockpiles of nuclear weapons, weapons-
usable nuclear materials, and radiological materials and to 
improve partner countries' abilities to deter, detect, and 
interdict illicit trafficking. To ensure vital core 
capabilities in this area are maintained, it is imperative that 
the U.S. Government retain requisite expertise in uranium 
science and engineering, with appropriate infrastructure 
(laboratories, small-scale processing capability, and 
equipment), and resources to support nonproliferation and 
counter-proliferation efforts.
    The Committee supports the mission of the Nuclear Smuggling 
Detection and Deterrence program, but is also concerned about 
the cost and pace of the deployment of radiation detection 
equipment as part of this program. Specifically, over the last 
5 years, the program has spent about $1 billion for work 
carried out in the 59 partner countries including deploying 
equipment, conducting training, and performing activities to 
transition operating responsibility to partner countries. 
Meanwhile, target dates for full transition to partner 
countries have been repeatedly delayed, and it is presently 
unclear when this work will be completed. Moreover, it is not 
clear whether NNSA has identified all of the program's goals or 
how and when it will achieve them. Accordingly, the Committee 
directs the Secretary to submit a plan to the Senate and House 
Appropriations Committees within 180 days of enactment for 
completing the deployment and transition of radiation detection 
technologies, including all program goals, meaningful 
performance measures, and major milestones, and the cost, 
scope, and schedule of achieving those goals and milestones for 
all 59 partner countries. The Committee understands that some 
program post-transition activities will continue over the long-
term to assist partner countries in combating nuclear 
smuggling. Nonetheless, such a plan is necessary so NNSA and 
Congress can assess progress in implementing the program.
    Materials Management and Minimization.--The Committee 
recommends $32,744,000 for the U.S. High Performance Research 
Reactor Program, a reduction of $20,000,000 from the budget 
request. Funds and program activities should be focused on fuel 
development for research reactors with lower peak power density 
requirements outside of the Department of Energy.
    Molybdenum-99.--The Committee continues to place a high 
priority on the development of domestic supplies of the medical 
isotope Molybdenum-99 [Moly-99] on a schedule adequate to meet 
public health needs. The Committee is encouraged by the 
progress made in establishing two or more domestic sources of 
Moly-99. NNSA is currently executing three cooperative 
agreements. In addition, there are at least seven other 
companies working to produce non-HEU-based Moly-99 without 
Government support. The Committee directs the Department to 
request funds sufficient to adequately support current and 
future cooperative agreement commitments and urges the 
Department to reconsider cost sharing caps as necessary in 
order to ensure timely supplies of this critical medical 
isotope.
    Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and 
Development.--The Committee recommends $406,922,000 for Defense 
Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development. Within 
available funds, the Committee recommends not less than 
$3,000,000 to be used for Ionizing Radiation Detector 
Development. The Committee supports a robust research and 
development capability to support nonproliferation initiatives, 
and does not support the drastic reductions proposed in the 
budget request. Proliferation of illicit nuclear materials and 
weapons continues to be high-consequence threat, and our 
ability to detect the production and movement of these 
materials is vitally important. Research and development in 
this area is especially important.
    Nuclear Counterterrorism and Incident Response.--The 
Committee recommends $271,881,000, an increase of $37,491,000 
from fiscal year 2016 enacted for Nuclear Counterterrorism and 
Incident Response.
    None of the funds available in this act or any other act 
are available for work under a Technical Engineering and 
Programmatic Support Blanket Purchase Agreement. If the 
Department wishes to place a contract under a Technical 
Engineering and Programmatic Support Blanket Purchase 
Agreement, the Department shall submit a reprogramming request 
in accordance with the reprogramming requirements carried in 
this act.

                             Naval Reactors

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $1,375,496,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   1,420,120,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,351,520,000

    The Committee recommends $1,351,520,000 for Naval Reactors 
equal to the budget request when accounting for the 
programmatic transfer discussed below. The Committee's 
recommendation fully funds important national priorities, 
including the Ohio-class replacement submarine design and the 
prototype refueling. The Committee also recommends full funding 
for Naval Reactors Operations and Infrastructure, recognizing 
the importance of safe operations of the prototype reactors in 
New York and the spent fuel facility in Idaho, while properly 
maintaining overall infrastructure and facilities at four 
sites.

           OHIO-CLASS REPLACEMENT REACTOR SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee recommends $213,700,000 for Ohio-Class 
Replacement Reactor Systems Development.

                       NAVAL REACTORS DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee recommends $451,338,000 for Naval Reactors 
Development. Within the funds provided, the Committee 
recommends $5,000,000 to continue the technical program to 
develop and qualify a low enriched uranium fuel system for 
naval cores.
    Advanced Test Reactor.--The Advanced Test Reactor [ATR] is 
an important research platform for nuclear testing and 
development, and is operated as a User Facility with broad 
applications across multiple programs. Historically, the 
operations and maintenance of the ATR has been funded in both 
the Naval Reactors and the Nuclear Energy accounts. External 
users other than Naval Reactors only pay for the incremental 
costs of their specific tests. The Committee supports adequate 
funding for the operations and maintenance of the ATR, but is 
consolidating the funding within the Nuclear Energy budget. As 
such, no funding is provided within the Naval Reactors account 
for ATR operations and maintenance. Naval Reactors should 
continue to fund NR-specific needs at ATR just like any other 
external user.

                              CONSTRUCTION

    The Committee recommends $134,300,000 for Construction. 
Within available funds, the Committee recommends $86,000,000 
for the Spent Fuel Handling Facility in Idaho and $33,300,000 
for the Engine Room Team Trainer.

                     Federal Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $383,666,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     412,817,000
Committee recommendation................................     408,603,000

    The Committee recommends $408,603,000, a decrease of 
$4,214,000 from the budget request.

                     Defense Environmental Cleanup

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $5,289,742,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   5,235,350,000
Committee recommendation................................   5,379,018,000

    The Committee recommendation for Defense Environmental 
Cleanup is $5,379,018,000, an increase of $143,668,000 from the 
budget request. Within available funds, the Department is 
directed to fund the Hazardous Waste Worker Training Program.
    The Committee rejects the Department's inclusion of a 
single control point for infrastructure recapitalization and 
general plant projects for multiple sites. Further, the Office 
of Environmental Management shall not establish any central or 
consolidated appropriations accounts, or establish any separate 
controls within individual site accounts in any future budget 
request without prior agreement of the Senate and House 
Appropriations Committees.
    Richland.--As a signatory to the Tri-Party Agreement, the 
Department of Energy is required to meet specific compliance 
milestones toward the cleanup of the Hanford site. Among other 
things, the Department committed to provide the funding 
necessary to enable full compliance with its cleanup 
milestones. Unfortunately, if the Department's fiscal year 2017 
budget request were enacted, several future fiscal year Tri-
Party Agreement milestones could be at risk, threatening high 
risk cleanup projects near the city of Richland, Washington and 
the economically and environmentally important Columbia River. 
The Committee recognizes that significant progress has been 
made at the Hanford Site. However, because the Department's 
budget request could slow or halt critical cleanup work and 
threaten the Department's compliance with its legal obligations 
under the Tri-Party Agreement, the Committee recommends 
$839,760,000 for Richland Operations. Additional funding is 
provided for cleanup of the 300-296 waste site, continued 
remediation of the 618-10 burial ground, groundwater treatment, 
site-wide infrastructure, and community and regulatory support. 
Within available funds in the River Corridor control point, the 
Department is directed to carry out maintenance and public 
safety efforts at the B Reactor, the Manhattan Project National 
Historical Park, and the Hazardous Materials Management and 
Emergency Response facilities.
    NNSA Sites.--The Committee recommends $270,387,000 for NNSA 
sites.
    Oak Ridge Reservation.--The Committee recommends 
$263,219,000 for Oak Ridge Reservation. Within the funds 
available for Nuclear Facility D&D;, the Committee recommends 
$45,400,000 to continue to support characterization and 
demolition of excess contaminated facilities and $6,000,000 to 
support preliminary design of a new landfill for the Oak Ridge 
Reservation. The existing on-site disposal facility is expected 
to reach capacity before all cleanup activities are completed. 
Planning for a new landfill is necessary to ensure that there 
is no interruption of cleanup activities. Within funds 
available for Cleanup and Waste Disposition, the Committee 
recommends $48,600,000 for continuing transuranic waste 
processing and storage to meet contractual and regulatory 
commitments.
    U-233 Disposition Program.--The Committee recommends 
$43,311,000 for the cleanup of Building 3019. Removal of legacy 
material from this building, an aging facility in the heart of 
the Oak Ridge National Laboratory central campus, must remain a 
high priority for the Department. Timely completion of this 
effort will enable the overall security posture at the 
laboratory to be relaxed, which will reduce costs and eliminate 
nuclear safety issues, and make the campus more conducive to 
collaborative science.
    Mercury Treatment Facility.--The Committee recommends 
$5,100,000 to complete the design of the Outfall 200 Mercury 
Treatment Facility. Remediation of mercury contamination at the 
Oak Ridge Reservation is an important precursor to full site 
remediation. Reducing the mercury being released into the East 
Fork of Poplar Creek continues to be a high priority for the 
Environmental Management program.
    Office of River Protection.--The Committee recommends 
$1,499,965,000 for the Office of River Protection.
    The Committee is aware of a recent ruling by the U.S. 
District Court for the Eastern District of Washington amending 
the 2010 Consent Decree between the Department of Energy and 
State of Washington, setting new deadlines and requirements for 
the construction and operation of the Waste Treatment and 
Immobilization Plant and tank waste retrievals. The Committee 
directs the Department to request sufficient funding in future 
budgets to ensure compliance with the 2016 Consent Decree. 
Furthermore, the Committee encourages the Department to use all 
means necessary to procure a spare A-E-1 reboiler for the 242-A 
Evaporator by December 31, 2016 as required by the Consent 
Decree.
    Savannah River Site.--The Committee recommends 
$1,268,668,000 for the Savannah River site. Within the funds 
provided, $3,000,000 is provided for disposition of spent fuel 
from the High Flux Isotope Reactor.
    Idaho.--The Committee is concerned about the lack of 
progress in starting operations at the Integrated Waste 
Treatment Unit. Completed in 2012 at a cost of $571,000,000, 
the facility is intended to treat 900,000 gallons of sodium-
bearing radioactive waste. Unfortunately, design flaws and 
other problems have led to another $140,000,000 being spent 
without startup of the facility. Treating this waste is 
necessary for cleanup of the Idaho site and to meet regulatory 
commitments to the State. The Committee appreciates the efforts 
of the Department and its contractors to address the challenges 
associated with the current waste treatment approach. However, 
a new approach using different facilities may be necessary. The 
Department is directed to submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations of both the House and Senate within 60 days of 
enactment on the viability of the current approach and 
alternative approaches for treating the sodium-bearing waste in 
a timely manner.
    Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.--The Committee recommends 
$274,540,000 for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, including a 
total of $26,800,000 for settlement costs associated with the 
February 2014 incidents.
    The Committee encourages the Secretary to take all 
appropriate actions to reopen the facility on schedule at the 
end of this year and demonstrate the ability operate in a safe 
manner. Worker safety must continue to be a priority for the 
Department and its contractors. The Committee also encourages 
the Secretary to ensure that, once the site reopens and resumes 
emplacement of waste, adequate funding is requested for longer-
term work required to return the site to its full operational 
capability.
    Technology Development and Demonstration.--The Committee 
supports the Department's efforts to expand technology 
development and demonstration to address its long-term and 
technically complex cleanup challenges. Further, the Committee 
supports the Department's efforts to award merit-based research 
at the national laboratories to address long-term cleanup 
mission needs. The Committee believes it is in the best 
interest of all sites that these funds are competitively 
awarded and managed by Department of Energy Headquarters. The 
Committee directs the Department to submit a report to the 
Committees on Appropriations of both the Senate and House 
outlining its plans for cleanup technology development and 
demonstration, including technical focus areas, intended 
outcomes and performance measures, out-year funding needs, and 
how the Department intends to use the broad technical expertise 
of the national laboratories.
    The Committee supports the Department's work to assess the 
current status and long term requirements for the extended 
storage and final disposition of spent fuel and high-level 
wastes through Technology Development and National Spent 
Nuclear Fuel programs. These programs are of vital importance, 
especially given the Department's commitments to remove all 
spent fuel from Idaho by 2035.

    Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Federal 
                              Contribution

Appropriations, 2016....................................................
Budget estimate, 2017...................................    $155,100,000
Committee recommendation................................     717,741,000

    The Committee recommends $717,741,000 to fully offset the 
fiscal year 2017 appropriation for the Uranium Enrichment 
Decontamination and Decommissioning account. The Committee 
recommendation does not include authorization of a legislative 
proposal to reinstate a tax on nuclear utilities.

                        Other Defense Activities

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $776,425,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     791,552,000
Committee recommendation................................     791,552,000

    The Committee recommends $791,552,000 for Other Defense 
Activities, the same as the budget request. Within the funds 
provided, the Committee recommends $239,912,000 for Specialized 
Security Activities, and $63,698,000 for Environment, Health 
and Safety. Within the funds available for Environment, Health 
and Safety, the Committee recommends $50,510,000 for Health 
Programs, including $1,000,000 for the Epidemiologic Study of 
One Million U.S. Radiation Workers and Veterans, which was 
originally approved by the Office of Science in 2012.

                    POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS


     Operations and Maintenance, Southwestern Power Administration

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $11,400,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      11,057,000
Committee recommendation................................      11,057,000

    The Committee recommends a net appropriation of $11,057,000 
for the Southwestern Power Administration.

Construction, Rehabilitation, Operations and Maintenance, Western Area 
                          Power Administration

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $93,372,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      95,581,000
Committee recommendation................................      95,581,000

    The Committee recommends a net appropriation of $95,581,000 
for the Western Area Power Administration.

           Falcon and Amistad Operating and Maintenance Fund

Appropriations, 2016....................................        $228,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................         232,000
Committee recommendation................................         232,000

    The Committee recommends a net appropriation of $232,000 
for the Falcon and Amistad Operating and Maintenance Fund.

                  Federal Energy Regulatory Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $319,800,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     346,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     346,000,000

                             REVENUES APPLIED

Appropriations, 2016....................................   -$319,800,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................    -346,000,000
Committee recommendation................................    -346,000,000

    The Committee recommends a net appropriation of $0 for the 
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.
    The Committee expects FERC to adhere to the schedule for 
environmental review for the projects in Docket Nos. CP14-517-
000 and CP14-518-000 noticed by the agency on June 26, 2015.
    The Committee encourages FERC, in accordance with Executive 
Order 13604 (5 U.S.C. 601 note; relating to improving 
performance of Federal permitting and review of infrastructure 
projects), to prioritize meaningful opportunities for public 
engagement and coordination with State and local governments in 
the Federal permitting and review processes of energy 
infrastructure proposals. Specifically, review processes should 
remain transparent and consistent, and ensure the health, 
safety, and security of the environment and each affected 
community.
    The Committee believes FERC should reopen its Rulemaking 
Regarding Annual Charges for Use of Government Lands in Docket 
No. RM11-6-000 and adopt a single per-acre rate to access 
Federal land use fees in the State of Alaska.

                                                                  DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY
                                                                [In thousands of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                            Committee recommendation
                                                                                                          Committee               compared to--
                                                                         Enacted      Budget estimate   recommendation ---------------------------------
                                                                                                                            Enacted      Budget estimate
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          ENERGY PROGRAMS
 
               ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY
 
Sustainable Transportation:
    Vehicle technologies...........................................         310,000          468,500          308,300           -1,700         -160,200
    Bioenergy technologies.........................................         225,000          278,900          218,100           -6,900          -60,800
    Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies............................         100,950          105,500           92,000           -8,950          -13,500
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Sustainable Transportation.........................         635,950          852,900          618,400          -17,550         -234,500
 
Renewable Energy:
    Solar energy...................................................         241,600          285,100          222,400          -19,200          -62,700
    Wind energy....................................................          95,450          156,000           80,000          -15,450          -76,000
    Water power....................................................          70,000           80,000           84,000          +14,000           +4,000
    Geothermal technologies........................................          71,000           99,500           70,500             -500          -29,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Renewable Energy...................................         478,050          620,600          456,900          -21,150         -163,700
 
Energy Efficiency:
    Advanced manufacturing.........................................         228,500          261,000          254,200          +25,700           -6,800
    Building technologies..........................................         200,500          289,000          203,400           +2,900          -85,600
    Federal energy management program..............................          27,000           43,000           27,000   ...............         -16,000
    Weatherization and intergovernmental:
        Weatherization:
            Weatherization assistance program......................         211,600          225,000          211,600   ...............         -13,400
            Training and technical assistance......................           3,000            5,000            3,000   ...............          -2,000
            NREL Site-Wide Facility Support........................             400   ...............  ...............            -400   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, Weatherization.............................         215,000          230,000          214,600             -400          -15,400
 
    State energy program grants....................................          50,000           70,000           50,000   ...............         -20,000
    Cities, counties and communities energy program................  ...............          26,000   ...............  ...............         -26,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Weatherization and intergovernmental program.......         265,000          326,000          264,600             -400          -61,400
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Energy Efficiency..................................         721,000          919,000          749,200          +28,200         -169,800
 
Crosscutting Innovation Initiatives................................  ...............         215,000   ...............  ...............        -215,000
 
Corporate Support:
    Facilities and infrastructure:
        National Renewable Energy Laboratory [NREL]................          62,000           92,000           90,000          +28,000           -2,000
    Program direction..............................................         155,000          170,900          153,500           -1,500          -17,400
    Strategic programs.............................................          21,000           28,000           21,000   ...............          -7,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Corporate Support..................................         238,000          290,900          264,500          +26,500          -26,400
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Energy efficiency and renewable energy.............       2,073,000        2,898,400        2,089,000          +16,000         -809,400
 
Use of Prior Year Balances.........................................  ...............  ...............         -16,000          -16,000          -16,000
Rescissions........................................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
Floor amendments...................................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, ENERGY EFFICENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY.................       2,073,000        2,898,400        2,073,000   ...............        -825,400
                                                                    ====================================================================================
            ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY
 
Research and development:
    Clean energy transmission and reliability......................          39,000           30,300           36,000           -3,000           +5,700
    Smart grid research and development............................          35,000           30,000           35,000   ...............          +5,000
    Cyber security for energy delivery systems.....................          62,000           45,500           50,500          -11,500           +5,000
    Energy storage.................................................          20,500           44,500           29,500           +9,000          -15,000
    Transformer resilience and advanced components.................           5,000           15,000            8,500           +3,500           -6,500
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         161,500          165,300          159,500           -2,000           -5,800
 
National electricity delivery......................................           7,500            6,500            7,500   ...............          +1,000
State Distribution-level Reform Program............................  ...............          15,000   ...............  ...............         -15,000
Infrastructure security and energy restoration.....................           9,000           17,500           10,500           +1,500           -7,000
State energy reliability and assurance.............................  ...............          15,000   ...............  ...............         -15,000
Program direction..................................................          28,000           29,000           28,500             +500             -500
Grid Institute.....................................................  ...............          14,000   ...............  ...............         -14,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability........         206,000          262,300          206,000   ...............         -56,300
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY...........         206,000          262,300          206,000   ...............         -56,300
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                           NUCLEAR ENERGY
 
Research and development:
    Integrated university program..................................           5,000   ...............           5,000   ...............          +5,000
    STEP R&D.......................................................;           5,000   ...............  ...............          -5,000   ...............
    Small modular reactor licensing technical support..............          62,500           89,600           95,000          +32,500           +5,400
    Nuclear energy enabling technologies...........................         111,600           89,510           83,925          -27,675           -5,585
    Reactor concepts RD&D..........................................;         141,718          108,760          129,760          -11,958          +21,000
    Fuel cycle research and development............................         203,800          249,938          219,730          +15,930          -30,208
    International nuclear energy cooperation.......................           3,000            4,500            3,000   ...............          -1,500
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         532,618          542,308          536,415           +3,797           -5,893
 
Infrastructure:
    Radiological facilities management:
        Space and defense infrastructure...........................          18,000   ...............          10,000           -8,000          +10,000
        Research reactor infrastructure............................           6,800            7,000            7,000             +200   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................          24,800            7,000           17,000           -7,800          +10,000
 
    INL facilities management:
        INL operations and infrastructure..........................         220,582          220,585          220,585               +3   ...............
        ATR Defense contribution...................................  ...............  ...............          68,600          +68,600          +68,600
        Construction:
            16-E-200 Sample preparation laboratory.................           2,000            6,000            6,000           +4,000   ...............
            13-D-905 Remote-handled low level waste disposal         ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
             project, INL..........................................
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, Construction...............................           2,000            6,000            6,000           +4,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, INL facilities management..................         222,582          226,585          295,185          +72,603          +68,600
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, Infrastructure.............................         247,382          233,585          312,185          +64,803          +78,600
 
Idaho sitewide safeguards and security.............................         126,161          129,303          129,303           +3,142   ...............
Program direction..................................................          80,000           88,700           80,000   ...............          -8,700
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Nuclear Energy.....................................         986,161          993,896        1,057,903          +71,742          +64,007
 
Rescission.........................................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, NUCLEAR ENERGY........................................         986,161          993,896        1,057,903          +71,742          +64,007
                                                                    ====================================================================================
               FOSSIL ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
 
Coal CCS and power systems:
    Carbon capture.................................................         101,000          109,200          101,000   ...............          -8,200
    Carbon storage.................................................         106,000           90,875          106,000   ...............         +15,125
    Advanced energy systems........................................         105,000           53,652          105,000   ...............         +51,348
    Cross cutting research.........................................          50,000           58,650           50,000   ...............          -8,650
    NETL coal research and development.............................          53,000           35,000   ...............         -53,000          -35,000
    STEP (Supercritical CO2).......................................          15,000           24,300           15,000   ...............          -9,300
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, CCS and power systems..............................         430,000          371,677          377,000          -53,000           +5,323
 
Natural Gas Technologies:
    Research.......................................................          43,000           26,500           46,000           +3,000          +19,500
 
CCS:
    Natural gas carbon capture.....................................  ...............          31,000   ...............  ...............         -31,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Natural gas technologies...........................          43,000           57,500           46,000           +3,000          -11,500
 
Unconventional fossil energy technologies..........................          20,321   ...............          23,245           +2,924          +23,245
Program direction..................................................         114,202           60,998           60,000          -54,202             -998
Plant and capital equipment........................................          15,782   ...............  ...............         -15,782   ...............
Fossil energy environmental restoration............................           7,995   ...............  ...............          -7,995   ...............
Super computer.....................................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
Special recruitment programs.......................................             700              700              700   ...............  ...............
NETL Research and Operations.......................................  ...............          44,984           73,000          +73,000          +28,016
NETL Infrastructure................................................  ...............          64,141           52,055          +52,055          -12,086
    Use of prior year balances.....................................  ...............        -240,000   ...............  ...............        +240,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, FOSSIL ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT................         632,000          360,000          632,000   ...............        +272,000
                                                                    ====================================================================================
NAVAL PETROLEUM AND OIL SHALE RESERVES.............................          17,500           14,950           14,950           -2,550   ...............
STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE........................................         212,000          257,000          200,000          -12,000          -57,000
 
                 NORTHEAST HOME HEATING OIL RESERVE
 
NORTHEAST HOME HEATING OIL RESERVE.................................           7,600           10,500           10,500           +2,900   ...............
Use of prior year balances.........................................  ...............          -4,000           -4,000           -4,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, NORTHEAST HOME HEATING OIL RESERVE....................           7,600            6,500            6,500           -1,100   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION..................................         122,000          131,125          122,000   ...............          -9,125
 
                 NON-DEFENSE ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANUP
 
Fast Flux Test Reactor Facility (WA)...............................           2,562            2,240            2,240             -322   ...............
Gaseous Diffusion Plants...........................................         104,403          101,304          101,304           -3,099   ...............
Small sites........................................................          87,522           53,243           85,043           -2,479          +31,800
West Valley Demonstration Project..................................          59,213           61,613           66,413           +7,200           +4,800
Mercury storage facility...........................................           1,300   ...............  ...............          -1,300   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, NON-DEFENSE ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANUP.....................         255,000          218,400          255,000   ...............         +36,600
                                                                    ====================================================================================
    URANIUM ENRICHMENT DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING FUND
 
Oak Ridge..........................................................         194,673   ...............         194,673   ...............        +194,673
 
Paducah:
    Nuclear facility D&D;, Paducah..................................         198,729   ...............         203,093           +4,364         +203,093
    Construction:
    15-U-407 On-site waste disposal facility, Paducah..............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
    16-U-401 Solid waste management units 5&6......................           1,196   ...............           2,437           +1,241           +2,437
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Paducah...............................................         199,925   ...............         205,530           +5,605         +205,530
 
Portsmouth:
    Nuclear facility D&D;, Portsmouth...............................         203,417   ...............         223,417          +20,000         +223,417
    Construction:
        15-U-408 On-site waste disposal facility, Portsmouth.......          21,749   ...............          41,168          +19,419          +41,168
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Portsmouth............................................         225,166   ...............         264,585          +39,419         +264,585
 
Pension and community and regulatory support.......................          21,026   ...............          22,953           +1,927          +22,953
Title X uranium/thorium reimbursement program......................          32,959   ...............          30,000           -2,959          +30,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, UED&D; FUND............................................         673,749   ...............         717,741          +43,992         +717,741
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                              SCIENCE
 
Advanced scientific computing research.............................         621,000          509,180          502,180         -118,820           -7,000
    Construction:
    17-SC-20 SC Exascale Computing Project.........................  ...............         154,000          154,000         +154,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Advanced scientific computing research.............         621,000          663,180          656,180          +35,180           -7,000
 
Basic energy sciences:
    Research.......................................................       1,648,700        1,746,730        1,722,630          +73,930          -24,100
    Construction:
        13-SC-10 LINAC coherent light source II, SLAC..............         200,300          190,000          190,000          -10,300   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Construction...................................         200,300          190,000          190,000          -10,300   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Basic energy sciences..........................       1,849,000        1,936,730        1,912,630          +63,630          -24,100
 
Biological and environmental research..............................         609,000          661,920          637,000          +28,000          -24,920
 
Fusion energy sciences:
    Research.......................................................         323,000          273,178          280,110          -42,890           +6,932
    Construction:
        14-SC-60 ITER..............................................         115,000          125,000   ...............        -115,000         -125,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Fusion energy sciences.........................         438,000          398,178          280,110         -157,890         -118,068
 
High energy physics:
    Research.......................................................         728,900          729,476          734,476           +5,576           +5,000
    Construction:
        11-SC-40 Project engineering and design [PED] long baseline          26,000           45,021           55,021          +29,021          +10,000
         neutrino experiment, FNAL.................................
        11-SC-41 Muon to electron conversion experiment, FNAL......          40,100           43,500           43,500           +3,400   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Construction...................................          66,100           88,521           98,521          +32,421          +10,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, High energy physics............................         795,000          817,997          832,997          +37,997          +15,000
 
Nuclear physics:
    Operations and maintenance.....................................         509,600          535,658          535,658          +26,058   ...............
    Construction:
        14-SC-50 Facility for rare isotope beams, Michigan State            100,000          100,000          100,000   ...............  ...............
         University................................................
        06-SC-01 12 GeV continuous electron beam facility upgrade,            7,500   ...............  ...............          -7,500   ...............
         TJNAF.....................................................
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Construction...................................         107,500          100,000          100,000           -7,500   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Nuclear physics................................         617,100          635,658          635,658          +18,558   ...............
 
Workforce development for teachers and scientists..................          19,500           20,925           20,925           +1,425   ...............
 
Science laboratories infrastructure:
    Infrastructure support:
        Payment in lieu of taxes...................................           1,713            1,764            1,764              +51   ...............
        Oak Ridge landlord.........................................           6,177            6,182            6,182               +5   ...............
        Facilities and infrastructure..............................          24,800           32,603           32,603           +7,803   ...............
        Oak Ridge nuclear operations...............................          12,000           26,000           26,000          +14,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................          44,690           66,549           66,549          +21,859   ...............
 
    Construction:
        17-SC-71 Integrated Engineering Research Center, FNAL......  ...............           2,500            2,500           +2,500   ...............
        17 SC-73 Core Facility Revitalization, BNL.................  ...............           1,800            1,800           +1,800   ...............
        15-SC-78 Integrative genomics building, LBNL...............          20,000           19,561           19,561             -439   ...............
        15-SC-77 Photon science laboratory building, SLAC..........          25,000           20,000           20,000           -5,000   ...............
        15-SC-76 Materials design laboratory, ANL..................          23,910           19,590           19,590           -4,320   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................          68,910           63,451           63,451           -5,459   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Science laboratories infrastructure................         113,600          130,000          130,000          +16,400   ...............
 
Safeguards and security............................................         103,000          103,000          103,000   ...............  ...............
Science program direction..........................................         185,000          204,481          191,500           +6,500          -12,981
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Science............................................       5,350,200        5,572,069        5,400,000          +49,800         -172,069
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, SCIENCE...............................................       5,350,200        5,572,069        5,400,000          +49,800         -172,069
                                                                    ====================================================================================
NUCLEAR WASTE DISPOSAL.............................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
 
             ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY--ENERGY
 
ARPA-E projects....................................................         261,750          318,000          263,419           +1,669          -54,581
Program direction..................................................          29,250           32,000           29,250   ...............          -2,750
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, ARPA-E................................................         291,000          350,000          292,669           +1,669          -57,331
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                       INDIAN ENERGY PROGRAMS
 
Program direction..................................................  ...............           4,800            4,800           +4,800   ...............
Tribal energy program..............................................  ...............          18,130           15,200          +15,200           -2,930
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, INDIAN ENERGY PROGRAMS................................  ...............          22,930           20,000          +20,000           -2,930
                                                                    ====================================================================================
         TITLE 17--INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY LOAN GUARANTEE PGM
 
Administrative expenses............................................          42,000           37,000           37,000           -5,000   ...............
Offsetting collection..............................................         -25,000          -30,000          -30,000           -5,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, TITLE 17--INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY LOAN GUARANTEE PROGRAM          17,000            7,000            7,000          -10,000   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
        ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY VEHICLES MANUFACTURING LOAN PGM
 
Administrative expenses............................................           6,000            5,000            5,000           -1,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY VEHICLES MANUFACTURING LOAN                  6,000            5,000            5,000           -1,000   ...............
       PROGRAM.....................................................
 
OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSITIONS...................................  ...............           8,400   ...............  ...............          -8,400
 
                    DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATION
 
Administrative operations:
    Salaries and expenses:
        Office of the Secretary:
        Program direction..........................................           5,008            5,300            5,300             +292   ...............
        Chief Financial Officer....................................          47,024           53,084           53,084           +6,060   ...............
        Management.................................................          65,000           59,114   ...............         -65,000          -59,114
        Project Management Oversight and Assessments...............  ...............          18,000   ...............  ...............         -18,000
        Cost Estimating and Program Evaluation.....................  ...............           5,000   ...............  ...............          -5,000
        Office Of Energy jobs development..........................  ...............           3,700   ...............  ...............          -3,700
        Chief human capital officer................................          24,500           25,424   ...............         -24,500          -25,424
        Chief Information Officer..................................          31,988           93,074   ...............         -31,988          -93,074
        Office of Indian energy policy and programs................          16,000   ...............  ...............         -16,000   ...............
        Congressional and intergovernmental affairs................           6,300            6,200            6,200             -100   ...............
        Office Of Small and disadvantaged business utilization.....           3,000            3,300   ...............          -3,000           -3,300
        Economic impact and diversity..............................          10,000           11,319   ...............         -10,000          -11,319
        General Counsel............................................          33,000           33,000   ...............         -33,000          -33,000
        Energy policy and systems analysis.........................          31,297           31,000   ...............         -31,297          -31,000
        International Affairs......................................          18,000           19,107   ...............         -18,000          -19,107
        Public affairs.............................................           3,431            3,431   ...............          -3,431           -3,431
        Office of Technology transitions...........................  ...............  ...............           8,400           +5,157           +5,157
        Other Departmental Administration..........................  ...............  ...............         259,174         +262,417         +262,417
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Salaries and expenses..........................         294,548          370,053          332,158          +37,610          -37,895
 
    Program support:
        Economic impact and diversity..............................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
        Policy analysis and system studies.........................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
        Environmental policy studies...............................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
        Climate change technology program (prog. supp).............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
        Cybersecurity and secure communications....................          21,006   ...............  ...............         -21,006   ...............
        Corporate IT program support (CIO).........................          20,224   ...............  ...............         -20,224   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Program support....................................          41,230   ...............  ...............         -41,230   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Administrative operations..........................         335,778          370,053          332,158           -3,620          -37,895
 
    Strategic partnership projects.................................          40,000           40,000           40,000   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Departmental administration........................         375,778          410,053          372,158           -3,620          -37,895
 
Use of prior-year balances.........................................          -8,800          -20,300          -20,300          -11,500   ...............
Digital service team--CIO..........................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
Funding from other defense activities..............................        -118,836         -119,716         -119,716             -880   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Departmental administration (gross)...................         248,142          270,037          232,142          -16,000          -37,895
 
Miscellaneous revenues.............................................        -117,171         -103,000         -103,000          +14,171   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATION (net).....................         130,971          167,037          129,142           -1,829          -37,895
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                  OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL
 
Office of the inspector general....................................          46,424           44,424           44,424           -2,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL.......................          46,424           44,424           44,424           -2,000   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      TOTAL, ENERGY PROGRAMS.......................................      11,026,605       11,319,431       11,183,329         +156,724         -136,102
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                  ATOMIC ENERGY DEFENSE ACTIVITIES
 
              NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION
 
                         WEAPONS ACTIVITIES
 
Directed stockpile work:
    B61 Life extension program.....................................         643,300          616,079          616,079          -27,221   ...............
    W76 Life extension program.....................................         244,019          222,880          222,880          -21,139   ...............
    W88 Alteration 370.............................................         220,176          281,129          281,129          +60,953   ...............
    W80-4 Life extension program...................................         195,037          220,253          220,253          +25,216   ...............
    Stockpile systems:
        B61 Stockpile systems......................................          52,247           57,313           57,313           +5,066   ...............
        W76 Stockpile systems......................................          50,921           38,604           38,604          -12,317   ...............
        W78 Stockpile systems......................................          64,092           56,413           56,413           -7,679   ...............
        W80 Stockpile systems......................................          68,005           64,631           64,631           -3,374   ...............
        B83 Stockpile systems......................................          42,177           41,659           41,659             -518   ...............
        W87 Stockpile systems......................................          89,299           81,982           81,982           -7,317   ...............
        W88 Stockpile systems......................................         115,685          103,074          103,074          -12,611   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................         482,426          443,676          443,676          -38,750   ...............
 
    Weapons dismantlement and disposition..........................          52,000           68,984           68,984          +16,984   ...............
    Stockpile services:
        Production support.........................................         447,527          457,043          447,527   ...............          -9,516
        Research and Development support...........................          41,059           34,187           34,187           -6,872   ...............
        R and D certification and safety...........................         185,000          156,481          156,481          -28,519   ...............
        Management, technology, and production.....................         264,994          251,978          251,978          -13,016   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................         938,580          899,689          890,173          -48,407           -9,516
 
    Strategic materials:
        Uranium sustainment........................................          32,916           20,988           20,988          -11,928   ...............
        Plutonium sustainment......................................         174,698          184,970          184,970          +10,272   ...............
        Tritium sustainment........................................         104,600          109,787          109,787           +5,187   ...............
        Domestic uranium enrichment................................          50,000           50,000           50,000   ...............  ...............
        Strategic materials sustainment............................         250,040          212,092          212,092          -37,948   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         612,254          577,837          577,837          -34,417   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Directed stockpile work............................       3,387,792        3,330,527        3,321,011          -66,781           -9,516
 
Research, Development, Test and Evaluation (RDT&E;):
    Science:
        Advanced certification.....................................          58,747           58,000           68,000           +9,253          +10,000
        Primary assessment technologies............................          95,512           99,000           99,000           +3,488   ...............
        Dynamic materials properties...............................         100,400          106,000          106,000           +5,600   ...............
        Advanced radiography.......................................          45,700           50,500           50,500           +4,800   ...............
        Secondary assessment technologies..........................          72,900           76,000           76,000           +3,100   ...............
        Academic alliances and partnerships........................          49,800           52,484           40,000           -9,800          -12,484
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................         423,059          441,984          439,500          +16,441           -2,484
 
    Engineering:
        Enhanced surety............................................          50,821           37,196           37,196          -13,625   ...............
        Weapons system engineering assessment technology...........          17,371           16,958           16,958             -413   ...............
        Nuclear survivability......................................          24,461           43,105           30,000           +5,539          -13,105
        Enhanced surveillance......................................          38,724           42,228           42,228           +3,504   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................         131,377          139,487          126,382           -4,995          -13,105
 
    Inertial confinement fusion ignition and high yield:
        Ignition...................................................          76,334           75,432           75,432             -902   ...............
        Support of other stockpile programs........................          22,843           23,363           23,363             +520   ...............
        Diagnostics, cryogenics and experimental support...........          58,587           68,696           68,696          +10,109   ...............
        Pulsed power inertial confinement fusion...................           4,963            5,616            5,616             +653   ...............
        Joint program in high energy density laboratory plasmas....           8,900            9,492            9,492             +592   ...............
        Facility operations and target production..................         339,423          340,360          340,360             +937   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................         511,050          522,959          522,959          +11,909   ...............
 
    Advanced simulation and computing..............................         623,006          663,184          663,184          +40,178   ...............
 
Advanced manufacturing development:
    Additive manfacturing..........................................          12,600           12,000           12,000             -600   ...............
    Component manufacturing development............................          99,656           46,583           46,583          -53,073   ...............
    Process technology development.................................          17,800           28,522           28,522          +10,722   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         130,056           87,105           87,105          -42,951   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, RDT&E..............................................;       1,818,548        1,854,719        1,839,130          +20,582          -15,589
 
Infrastructure and Operations (formerly RTBF):
    Operations of facilities:
        Kansas City Plant..........................................         100,250          101,000          101,000             +750   ...............
        Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.....................          70,671           70,500           70,500             -171   ...............
        Los Alamos National Laboratory.............................         196,460          196,500          196,500              +40   ...............
        Nevada Test Site...........................................          89,000           92,500           92,500           +3,500   ...............
        Pantex.....................................................          58,021           55,000           55,000           -3,021   ...............
        Sandia National Laboratory.................................         115,300          118,000          118,000           +2,700   ...............
        Savannah River Site........................................          80,463           83,500           83,500           +3,037   ...............
        Y-12 National Security Complex.............................         120,625          107,000          117,000           -3,625          +10,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................         830,790          824,000          834,000           +3,210          +10,000
 
    Safety and environmental operations............................         107,701          110,000          110,000           +2,299   ...............
    Maintenance and repair of facilities...........................         277,000          294,000          294,000          +17,000   ...............
 
Recapitalization:
    Infrastructure and safety......................................         253,724          554,643          554,643         +300,919   ...............
    Capability based investments...................................          98,800          112,639          112,639          +13,839   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Recapitalization...................................         352,524          667,282          667,282         +314,758   ...............
 
    Construction:
        17-D-640, U1a Complex Enhancements Project, NNSS...........  ...............          11,500           11,500          +11,500   ...............
        17-D-630, Electrical Distribution System, LLNL.............  ...............          25,000           25,000          +25,000   ...............
        16-D-515 Albuquerque Complex project.......................           8,000           15,047           15,047           +7,047   ...............
        16-D-621 TA-3 Substation replacement, LANL.................          25,000   ...............  ...............         -25,000   ...............
        15-D-613 Emergency Operations Center, Y-12.................          17,919            2,000            2,000          -15,919   ...............
        15-D-301 HE Science & Engineering Facility, PX.............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
        15-D-302 TA-55 Reinvestment project III, LANL..............          18,195           21,455           21,455           +3,260   ...............
        12-D-301 TRU waste facility project, LANL..................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
        11-D-801 TA-55 Reinvestment project II, LANL...............           3,903   ...............  ...............          -3,903   ...............
        07-D-220 Radioactive liquid waste treatment facility, LANL.          11,533   ...............  ...............         -11,533   ...............
        07-O-220-04 TRU liquid waste facility, LANL................          40,949           17,053           17,053          -23,896   ...............
        06-D-141 Uranium Processing Facility, Y-12.................         430,000          575,000          575,000         +145,000   ...............
    Chemistry and metallurgy replacement (CMRR):
        04-D-125 Chemistry and metallurgy replacement project, LANL  ...............         159,615          159,615         +159,615   ...............
        04-D-125-04 RLUOB equipment installation, phase 2..........         117,000   ...............  ...............        -117,000   ...............
        04-D-125-05 PF-4 equipment installation....................          38,610   ...............  ...............         -38,610   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, CMRR...............................................         155,610          159,615          159,615           +4,005   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Construction.......................................         711,109          826,670          826,670         +115,561   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Infrastructure and Operations......................       2,279,124        2,721,952        2,731,952         +452,828          +10,000
 
Secure transportation asset:
    Operations and equipment.......................................         140,000          179,132          157,820          +17,820          -21,312
    Program direction..............................................          97,118          103,600          103,600           +6,482   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Secure transportation asset........................         237,118          282,732          261,420          +24,302          -21,312
 
Site stewardship...................................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
 
Defense nuclear security:
    Defense nuclear security.......................................         639,891          657,133          673,550          +33,659          +16,417
    Security improvements program..................................          30,000   ...............          20,000          -10,000          +20,000
    Construction:
        14-D-710 Device assembly facility argus installation                 13,000           13,000           13,000   ...............  ...............
         project, NV...............................................
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Defense nuclear security...........................         682,891          670,133          706,550          +23,659          +36,417
 
Information technology and cyber security..........................         157,588          176,592          176,592          +19,004   ...............
Legacy contractor pensions.........................................         283,887          248,492          248,492          -35,395   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Weapons Activities.................................       8,846,948        9,285,147        9,285,147         +438,199   ...............
 
Rescission.........................................................  ...............         -50,400   ...............  ...............         +50,400
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, WEAPONS ACTIVITIES....................................       8,846,948        9,234,747        9,285,147         +438,199          +50,400
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                  DEFENSE NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION
 
Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs:
 
Global material security:
    International nuclear security.................................         130,527           46,027           46,027          -84,500   ...............
    Radiological security..........................................         153,749          146,106          153,106             -643           +7,000
    Nuclear smuggling detection....................................         142,475          144,975          144,975           +2,500   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Global material security...........................         426,751          337,108          344,108          -82,643           +7,000
 
Material management and minimization:
    HEU reactor conversion.........................................         115,000          128,359          108,359           -6,641          -20,000
    Nuclear material removal.......................................         115,000           68,902           68,902          -46,098   ...............
    Material disposition...........................................          86,584          143,833          143,833          +57,249   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Material management and minimization...............         316,584          341,094          321,094           +4,510          -20,000
 
Nonproliferation and arms control..................................         130,203          124,703          124,703           -5,500   ...............
Defense nuclear nonproliferation R&D...............................;         419,333          393,922          406,922          -12,411          +13,000
 
Nonproliferation construction:
        99-D-143 Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility, SRS..         340,000          270,000          270,000          -70,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Nonproliferation construction..................         340,000          270,000          270,000          -70,000   ...............
 
Legacy contractor pensions.........................................          94,617           83,208           83,208          -11,409   ...............
Nuclear counterterrorism and incident response program.............         234,390          271,881          271,881          +37,491   ...............
Use of prior-year balances.........................................         -21,576   ...............  ...............         +21,576   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation...................       1,940,302        1,821,916        1,821,916         -118,386   ...............
 
Rescission.........................................................  ...............         -14,000   ...............  ...............         +14,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, DEFENSE NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION......................       1,940,302        1,807,916        1,821,916         -118,386          +14,000
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                           NAVAL REACTORS
 
Naval reactors development.........................................         446,896          437,338          451,338           +4,442          +14,000
OHIO replacement reactor systems development.......................         186,800          213,700          213,700          +26,900   ...............
S8G Prototype refueling............................................         133,000          124,000          124,000           -9,000   ...............
Naval reactors operations and infrastructure.......................         445,196          449,682          381,082          -64,114          -68,600
 
Construction:
    17-D-911 BL Fire System Upgrade................................  ...............           1,400            1,400           +1,400   ...............
    15-D-904 NRF Overpack Storage Expansion 3......................             900              700              700             -200   ...............
    15-D-903 KL Fire System Upgrade................................             600   ...............  ...............            -600   ...............
    15-D-902 KS Engineroom team trainer facility...................           3,100           33,300           33,300          +30,200   ...............
    14-D-902 KL Materials characterization laboratory expansion,             30,000   ...............  ...............         -30,000   ...............
     KAPL..........................................................
    14-D-901 Spent fuel handling recapitalization project, NRF.....          86,000          100,000           86,000   ...............         -14,000
    10-D-903, Security upgrades, KAPL..............................             500           12,900           12,900          +12,400   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Construction.......................................         121,100          148,300          134,300          +13,200          -14,000
 
Program direction..................................................          42,504           47,100           47,100           +4,596   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Naval Reactors.....................................       1,375,496        1,420,120        1,351,520          -23,976          -68,600
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, NAVAL REACTORS........................................       1,375,496        1,420,120        1,351,520          -23,976          -68,600
                                                                    ====================================================================================
FEDERAL SALARIES AND EXPENSES......................................         383,666          412,817          408,603          +24,937           -4,214
Rescission.........................................................         -19,900   ...............  ...............         +19,900   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, FEDERAL SALARIES AND EXPENSES.........................         363,766          412,817          408,603          +44,837           -4,214
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      TOTAL, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION..............      12,526,512       12,875,600       12,867,186         +340,674           -8,414
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                   DEFENSE ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANUP
 
Closure sites......................................................           4,889            9,389            9,389           +4,500   ...............
 
Richland:
    River corridor and other cleanup operations....................         270,710           69,755          143,755         -126,955          +74,000
    Central plateau remediation....................................         555,163          620,869          650,869          +95,706          +30,000
    RL community and regulatory support............................          19,701           14,701           24,701           +5,000          +10,000
    RL infrastructure recapitalization.............................  ...............  ...............           8,949           +8,949           +8,949
    Construction:
        15-D-401 Containerized sludge removal annex, RL............          77,016           11,486           11,486          -65,530   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Richland...........................................         922,590          716,811          839,760          -82,830         +122,949
 
Office of River Protection:
    Waste treatment and immobilization plant operations............  ...............           3,000            3,000           +3,000   ...............
    Construction:
        15-D-409 Low activity waste pretreatment sysem, ORP........          75,000           73,000           73,000           -2,000   ...............
        01-D-16 A-D, Waste treatment and immobilization plant, ORP.         595,000          593,000          593,000           -2,000   ...............
        01-D-16 E, Waste treatment and immobilization plant,                 95,000           97,000           97,000           +2,000   ...............
         Pretreatment facility, ORP................................
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Construction..........................................         765,000          763,000          763,000           -2,000   ...............
 
    Tank farm activities:
        Rad liquid tank waste stabilization and disposition........         649,000          721,456          721,456          +72,456   ...............
        ORP infrastructure recapitalization........................  ...............  ...............          12,509          +12,509          +12,509
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Office of river protection.........................       1,414,000        1,487,456        1,499,965          +85,965          +12,509
 
Idaho National Laboratory:
    Idaho cleanup and waste disposition............................         393,000          359,088          359,088          -33,912   ...............
    Idaho community and regulatory support.........................           3,000            3,000            3,000   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Idaho National Laboratory.............................         396,000          362,088          362,088          -33,912   ...............
 
NNSA sites and Nevada offsites:
    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.........................           1,366            1,396            1,396              +30   ...............
    Separations Process Research Unit..............................  ...............           3,685            3,685           +3,685   ...............
    Nevada.........................................................          62,385           62,176           62,176             -209   ...............
    Sandia National Laboratory.....................................           2,500            4,130            4,130           +1,630   ...............
    Los Alamos National Laboratory.................................         185,000          189,000          199,000          +14,000          +10,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, NNSA sites and Nevada off-sites.......................         251,251          260,387          270,387          +19,136          +10,000
 
Oak Ridge Reservation:
    OR Nuclear facility D&D........................................;         111,958           93,851          131,851          +19,893          +38,000
    U233 disposition program.......................................          35,895           37,311           43,311           +7,416           +6,000
    OR cleanup and waste disposition...............................          74,597           54,557           68,457           -6,140          +13,900
    Construction:
        14-D-403 Outfall 200 mercury treatment facility............           9,400            5,100            5,100           -4,300   ...............
        16-D-401 onsite displosal facility.........................  ...............  ...............           6,000           +6,000           +6,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Construction...................................           9,400            5,100           11,100           +1,700           +6,000
 
    OR community & regulatory support..............................           4,400            4,400            5,500           +1,100           +1,100
    OR Technology development and deployment.......................           2,800            3,000            3,000             +200   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Oak Ridge Reservation.................................         239,050          198,219          263,219          +24,169          +65,000
 
Savannah River Site:
    SR site risk management operations.............................         413,652   ...............  ...............        -413,652   ...............
    Nuclear Material Management....................................  ...............         311,062          311,062         +311,062   ...............
    Environmental Cleanup..........................................  ...............         152,504          152,504         +152,504   ...............
    SR community and regulatory support............................          11,249           11,249           11,249   ...............  ...............
    SR radioactive liquid tank waste stabilization and disposition.         554,878          645,332          600,000          +45,122          -45,332
    SR infrastructure recapitalization.............................  ...............  ...............          16,547          +16,547          +16,547
    Construction:
        17-D-402 Saltstone disposal Unit #7, SRS...................  ...............           9,729            9,729           +9,729   ...............
        15-D-402 Saltstone disposal Unit #6, SRS...................          34,642            7,577            7,577          -27,065   ...............
        05-D-405 Salt waste processing facility, SRS...............         194,000          160,000          160,000          -34,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Total, Savannah River Site...............................       1,208,421        1,297,453        1,268,668          +60,247          -28,785
 
Waste Isolation Pilot Plant:
    Waste Isolation Pilot Plant....................................         269,260          265,588          265,588           -3,672   ...............
    Operations and maintenance.....................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
    Recovery activities............................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
    Central characterization project...............................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
    Transportation.................................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
    Carlsbad infrastructure recapitalization.......................  ...............  ...............           3,887           +3,887           +3,887
    Construction:
        15-D-411 Safety significant confinement ventilation system,          23,218            2,532            2,532          -20,686   ...............
         WIPP......................................................
        15-D-412 Exhaust shaft, WIPP...............................           7,500            2,533            2,533           -4,967   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Waste isolation pilot plant...........................         299,978          270,653          274,540          -25,438           +3,887
 
Program direction..................................................         281,951          290,050          290,050           +8,099   ...............
Program support....................................................          14,979           14,979           14,979   ...............  ...............
Safeguards and Security:...........................................         236,633   ...............  ...............        -236,633   ...............
    Carlsbad.......................................................  ...............           4,860            4,860           +4,860   ...............
    Oak Ridge......................................................  ...............          15,000           15,000          +15,000   ...............
    Paducah........................................................  ...............          14,049           14,049          +14,049   ...............
    Portsmouth.....................................................  ...............          14,049           14,049          +14,049   ...............
    Richland.......................................................  ...............          72,000           72,000          +72,000   ...............
    Savannah River.................................................  ...............         134,000          134,000         +134,000   ...............
    West Valley....................................................  ...............           2,015            2,015           +2,015   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         236,633          255,973          255,973          +19,340   ...............
 
Technology development.............................................          20,000           30,000           30,000          +10,000   ...............
Infrastructure recapitalization....................................  ...............          41,892   ...............  ...............         -41,892
Defense Uranium enrichment D&D.....................................;  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Defense Environmental Cleanup......................       5,289,742        5,235,350        5,379,018          +89,276         +143,668
 
Rescission.........................................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, DEFENSE ENVIRONMENTAL CLEAN UP........................       5,289,742        5,235,350        5,379,018          +89,276         +143,668
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Defense Environmental Cleanup (Legislative proposal)...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
DEFENSE URANIUM ENRICHMENT DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING.....  ...............         155,100          717,741         +717,741         +562,641
 
                      OTHER DEFENSE ACTIVITIES
 
Environment, health, safety and security:
    Environment, health, safety and security.......................         118,763          130,693          128,693           +9,930           -2,000
    Program direction..............................................          62,235           66,519           66,519           +4,284   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Environment, Health, safety and security...........         180,998          197,212          195,212          +14,214           -2,000
 
Independent enterprise assessments:
    Independent enterprise assessments.............................          24,068           24,580           24,580             +512   ...............
    Program direction..............................................          49,466           51,893           51,893           +2,427   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Independent enterprise assessments.................          73,534           76,473           76,473           +2,939   ...............
 
Specialized security activities....................................         230,377          237,912          239,912           +9,535           +2,000
 
Office of Legacy Management:
    Legacy management..............................................         154,080          140,306          140,306          -13,774   ...............
    Program direction..............................................          13,100           14,014           14,014             +914   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Office of Legacy Management........................         167,180          154,320          154,320          -12,860   ...............
 
Defense related administrative support.............................         118,836          119,716          119,716             +880   ...............
Office of hearings and appeals.....................................           5,500            5,919            5,919             +419   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, OTHER DEFENSE ACTIVITIES..............................         776,425          791,552          791,552          +15,127   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      TOTAL, ATOMIC ENERGY DEFENSE ACTIVITIES......................      18,592,679       19,057,602       19,755,497       +1,162,818         +697,895
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS (1)
 
                 SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMINISTRATION
 
Operation and maintenance:
    Purchase power and wheeling....................................          83,600           78,929           78,929           -4,671   ...............
    Program direction..............................................           6,900            6,000            6,000             -900   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operation and maintenance..........................          90,500           84,929           84,929           -5,571   ...............
 
Less alternative financing [PPW]...................................         -17,100          -18,169          -18,169           -1,069   ...............
Offsetting collections (for PPW)...................................         -66,500          -60,760          -60,760           +5,740   ...............
Offsetting collections (PD)........................................          -6,900           -1,000           -1,000           +5,900   ...............
Use of prior-year balances.........................................  ...............          -5,000           -5,000           -5,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMINISTRATION.....................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                 SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMINISTRATION
 
Operation and maintenance:
    Operating expenses.............................................          19,279           13,896           13,896           -5,383   ...............
    Purchase power and wheeling....................................          73,000           83,000           83,000          +10,000   ...............
    Program direction..............................................          31,932           31,516           31,516             -416   ...............
    Construction...................................................          12,012           12,486           12,486             +474   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operation and maintenance..........................         136,223          140,898          140,898           +4,675   ...............
 
Less alternative financing (for O&M;)...............................          -8,288           -6,269           -6,269           +2,019   ...............
Less alternative financing (for PPW)...............................         -10,000          -10,000          -10,000   ...............  ...............
Less alternative financing (Const).................................          -7,574           -5,986           -5,986           +1,588   ...............
Offsetting collections (PD)........................................         -29,938          -29,271          -29,271             +667   ...............
Offsetting collections (for O&M;)...................................          -6,023           -5,315           -5,315             +708   ...............
Offsetting collections (for PPW)...................................         -63,000          -73,000          -73,000          -10,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMINISTRATION.....................          11,400           11,057           11,057             -343   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                 WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION
 
Operation and maintenance:
    Construction and rehabilitation................................          58,374           62,442           62,442           +4,068   ...............
    Operation and maintenance......................................          80,901           76,697           76,697           -4,204   ...............
    Purchase power and wheeling....................................         565,927          581,634          581,634          +15,707   ...............
    Program direction..............................................         236,398          226,497          226,497           -9,901   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operation and maintenance..........................         941,600          947,270          947,270           +5,670   ...............
 
Less alternative financing (for O&M;)...............................          -1,757   ...............  ...............          +1,757   ...............
Less alternative financing (for Construction)......................         -53,585          -43,884          -43,884           +9,701   ...............
Less alternative financing (for Program Dir.)......................          -5,273           -6,343           -6,343           -1,070   ...............
Less alternative financing (for PPW)...............................        -213,114         -214,625         -214,625           -1,511   ...............
Offsetting collections (for program direction).....................        -177,697         -178,441         -178,441             -744   ...............
Offsetting collections (for O&M;)...................................         -36,645          -33,122          -33,122           +3,523   ...............
Offsetting collections (Public Law 108-477, Public Law 109-103)....        -352,813         -367,009         -367,009          -14,196   ...............
Offsetting collections (Public Law 98-381).........................          -7,344           -8,265           -8,265             -921   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION.....................          93,372           95,581           95,581           +2,209   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
         FALCON AND AMISTAD OPERATING AND MAINTENANCE FUND
 
Operation and maintenance..........................................           4,950            4,393            4,393             -557   ...............
Offsetting collections.............................................          -4,262           -3,838           -3,838             +424   ...............
Less alternative financing.........................................            -460             -323             -323             +137   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, FALCON AND AMISTAD O&M; FUND...........................             228              232              232               +4   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      TOTAL, POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS.......................         105,000          106,870          106,870           +1,870   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION
 
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission...............................         319,800          346,800          346,800          +27,000   ...............
FERC revenues......................................................        -319,800         -346,800         -346,800          -27,000   ...............
 
                         General Provisions
 
Title III Rescissions:
    Department of Energy:
        Energy Efficiency and Energy Reliability...................          -3,806   ...............  ...............          +3,806   ...............
        Science....................................................          -3,200   ...............  ...............          +3,200   ...............
        Nuclear Energy.............................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
        Fossil Energy Research and Development.....................  ...............  ...............        -240,000         -240,000         -240,000
        Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability......  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
        Advanced Research Projects Agency--Energy..................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
        Construction, Rehabilitation, Operation and Maintenance,     ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
         Western Area Power Administration.........................
        Weapons activities (050) (rescission)......................  ...............  ...............         -50,400          -50,400          -50,400
        Office of the Administrator (050) (rescission).............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
        Departmental Administration................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
        Defense Environmental Cleanup (050)........................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
        Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (050).....................  ...............  ...............         -14,000          -14,000          -14,000
        Naval Reactors (050).......................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
        Other Defense Activities (050).............................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, General Provisions....................................          -7,006   ...............        -304,400         -297,394         -304,400
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      GRAND TOTAL, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY............................      29,717,278       30,483,903       30,741,296       +1,024,018         +257,393
      (Total amount appropriated)..................................     (29,744,184)     (30,548,303)     (31,045,696)     (+1,301,512)       (+497,393)
              (Rescissions)........................................        (-26,906)        (-64,400)       (-304,400)       (-277,494)       (-240,000)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                        SUMMARY OF ACCOUNTS
 
Energy efficiency and renewable energy.............................       2,073,000        2,898,400        2,073,000   ...............        -825,400
Electricity delivery and energy reliability........................         206,000          262,300          206,000   ...............         -56,300
Nuclear energy.....................................................         986,161          993,896        1,057,903          +71,742          +64,007
Fossil Energy Research and Development.............................         632,000          360,000          632,000   ...............        +272,000
Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves...............................          17,500           14,950           14,950           -2,550   ...............
Strategic petroleum reserves.......................................         212,000          257,000          200,000          -12,000          -57,000
Northeast home heating oil reserve.................................           7,600            6,500            6,500           -1,100   ...............
Energy Information Administration..................................         122,000          131,125          122,000   ...............          -9,125
Non-Defense Environmental Cleanup..................................         255,000          218,400          255,000   ...............         +36,600
Uranium enrichment D&D; fund........................................         673,749   ...............         717,741          +43,992         +717,741
Nuclear Waste Disposal.............................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
Science............................................................       5,350,200        5,572,069        5,400,000          +49,800         -172,069
Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy...........................         291,000          350,000          292,669           +1,669          -57,331
Departmental administration........................................         130,971          167,037          129,142           -1,829          -37,895
Indian energy program..............................................  ...............          22,930           20,000          +20,000           -2,930
Office of the Inspector General....................................          46,424           44,424           44,424           -2,000   ...............
Title 17 Innovative technology loan guarantee program..............          17,000            7,000            7,000          -10,000   ...............
Advanced technology vehicles manufacturing loan pgm................           6,000            5,000            5,000           -1,000   ...............
Office of the technology transitions...............................  ...............           8,400   ...............  ...............          -8,400
Clean coal technology..............................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
 
Atomic energy defense activities:
    National Nuclear Security Administration:
          Weapons activities.......................................       8,846,948        9,234,747        9,285,147         +438,199          +50,400
          Defense nuclear nonproliferation.........................       1,940,302        1,807,916        1,821,916         -118,386          +14,000
          Naval reactors...........................................       1,375,496        1,420,120        1,351,520          -23,976          -68,600
          Federal Salaries and Expenses............................         363,766          412,817          408,603          +44,837           -4,214
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal, National Nuclear Security Admin..............      12,526,512       12,875,600       12,867,186         +340,674           -8,414
 
    Defense environmental cleanup..................................       5,289,742        5,235,350        5,379,018          +89,276         +143,668
    Defense environmental cleanup (legislative proposal)...........  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
    Defense uranium enrichment decontamination and decommissioning.  ...............         155,100          717,741         +717,741         +562,641
    Other defense activities.......................................         776,425          791,552          791,552          +15,127   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Atomic Energy Defense Activities......................      18,592,679       19,057,602       19,755,497       +1,162,818         +697,895
 
Power marketing administrations:
    Southeastern Power Administration..............................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
    Southwestern Power Administration..............................          11,400           11,057           11,057             -343   ...............
    Western Area Power Administration..............................          93,372           95,581           95,581           +2,209   ...............
    Falcon and Amistad operating and maintenance fund..............             228              232              232               +4   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Power Marketing Administrations.......................         105,000          106,870          106,870           +1,870   ...............
 
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission:
    Salaries and expenses..........................................         319,800          346,800          346,800          +27,000   ...............
    Revenues.......................................................        -319,800         -346,800         -346,800          -27,000   ...............
General Provisions.................................................          -7,006   ...............        -304,400         -297,394         -304,400
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total Summary of Accounts, Department of Energy..............      29,717,278       30,483,903       30,741,296       +1,024,018         +257,393
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Totals include alternative financing costs, reimbursable agreement funding, and power purchase and wheeling expenditures. Offsetting collection
  totals reflect funds collected for annual expenses, including power purchase and wheeling

                GENERAL PROVISIONS--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    Section 301. Language is included on the execution of 
appropriations, including reprogramming, and congressional 
notification.
    Section 302. Language is included rescinding unobligated 
balances.
    Section 303. Language is included specifically authorizing 
intelligence activities pending enactment of the fiscal year 
2016 Intelligence Authorization Act.
    Section 304. The Committee has included a provision related 
to nuclear safety requirements.
    Section 305. The Committee has included language related to 
independent cost estimates.
    Section 306. The Committee has included a provision on a 
pilot program related to consolidated storage of spent nuclear 
fuel.

                                TITLE IV

                          INDEPENDENT AGENCIES

                    Appalachian Regional Commission

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $146,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     120,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     151,000,000

    The Committee recommends $151,000,000 for the Appalachian 
Regional Commission [ARC], an increase of $31,000,000 above the 
budget request. Established in 1965, the Appalachian Regional 
Commission is an economic development agency composed of 13 
Appalachian States and a Federal co-chair appointed by the 
President. Within available funding, $75,000,000 if provided 
for base funds; and $20,000,000 is recommended for a program of 
industrial site and workforce development in Southern and South 
Central Appalachia, focused primarily on the automotive 
supplier sector and the aviation sector. Up to $16,000,000 of 
that amount is recommended for activities in South Central 
Appalachia. The funds shall be distributed according to the 
Commission's Distressed Counties Formula, which is comprised of 
land area, population estimates, and a proportion of the number 
of distressed counties. Within available funding, the Committee 
recommends $6,000,000 for a program of basic infrastructure 
improvements in distressed counties in Central Appalachia. 
Funds shall be distributed according to ARC's distressed 
counties formula and shall be in addition to the regular 
allocation to distressed counties.
    Within available funds, the Committee recommends 
$50,000,000, the same as the budget request, for the POWER 
Initiative to support communities, primarily in Appalachia, 
that have been adversely impacted by the closure of coal-
powered generating plants and a declining coal industry by 
providing resources for economic diversification, job creation, 
job training, and other employment services.

                Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $29,150,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      31,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      31,000,000

    The Committee recommends $31,000,000 for the Defense 
Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, the same as the budget 
request. The Committee recognizes the important role of the 
Board in continued safe operations of the Department of 
Energy's nuclear facilities. The highly-skilled men and women 
that comprise the Board's technical staff, along with the 
current Board leadership, provide the Department of Energy and 
Congress with valuable advice and recommendations. Congress 
permanently authorized the Inspector General for the Nuclear 
Regulatory Commission to serve as the Inspector General for the 
Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. The Committee 
recommendation includes $969,000 within the Office of Inspector 
General of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to perform these 
services.

                        Delta Regional Authority

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $25,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      15,936,000
Committee recommendation................................      25,000,000

    The Committee recommends $25,000,000 for the Delta Regional 
Authority, an increase of $9,064,000 from the request. The 
Delta Regional Authority is a Federal-State partnership that is 
designed to assist the eight-State Mississippi Delta Region in 
developing basic infrastructure, transportation, skill 
training, and opportunities for economic development for 
distressed counties and parishes. Within available funds, not 
less than $10,000,000 shall be used for flood control, basic 
public infrastructure development and transportation 
improvements, which shall be allocated separate from the State 
formula funding method. The Committee did not retain statutory 
language in Public Law 114-113 waiving the requirements under 
sections 382C(b)(2), 382F(d) and 382M of the Delta Regional 
Authority Act of 2000. The Committee directs the Delta Regional 
Authority to prioritize and allocate funding consistent with 
its authorized purposes, and prevent administrative expenses 
from exceeding 5 percent of the amount appropriated by this 
act.

                           Denali Commission

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $11,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      15,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      15,000,000

    The Committee recommends $15,000,000 for the Denali 
Commission, the same as the budget request. The Denali 
Commission is a Federal-State partnership responsible for 
promoting infrastructure development, job training, and other 
economic support services in rural areas throughout Alaska.

                  Northern Border Regional Commission

Appropriations, 2016....................................      $7,500,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................       5,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      10,000,000

    The Committee recommends $10,000,000 for the Northern 
Border Regional Commission, an increase of $5,000,000 from the 
budget request. The Northern Border Regional Commission is a 
Federal-State partnership intended to promote transportation, 
basic public infrastructure, job skills training and business 
development in areas of persistent economic distress in the 
northern border region, which covers portions of Maine, New 
Hampshire, New York, and Vermont.

                     Nuclear Regulatory Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $990,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     970,163,000
Committee recommendation................................     939,000,000

                                REVENUES

Appropriations, 2016....................................   -$872,864,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................    -851,161,000
Committee recommendation................................    -822,240,000

                           NET APPROPRIATION

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $117,136,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     119,002,000
Committee recommendation................................     116,760,000

    The Committee recommends $939,000,000 for the Nuclear 
Regulatory Commission [Commission], a decrease of $31,163,000 
from the budget request. This amount is offset by estimated 
revenues of $822,240,000, resulting in a net appropriation of 
$116,760,000. In developing this recommendation, the Committee 
has consulted with the Commission to ensure it maintains its 
gold-standard health and safety mission while reducing low-
priority work.
    Budget Execution Plan.--The Commission is directed to 
provide the Committee with a specific budget execution plan no 
later than 30 days after the enactment of this act. This plan 
shall provide details at the product line level within each of 
the control points, as applicable, included in the table after 
the Office of Inspector General heading below.
    Realignment of Overhead Activities.--The recommendation 
adopts the Commission's proposed realignment of overhead 
activities, which makes the Commission's accounting for these 
activities more consistent with other Federal agencies. The 
Commission is directed to execute the appropriations provided 
for fiscal year 2017 consistent with the realignment as 
proposed in the budget request without deviation, except as 
authorized under section 401 of the bill. Any additional 
realignments shall be proposed in subsequent budget requests 
after consultation with the Committee.
    Budget Control Points.--The recommendation includes 
additional budget control points for fiscal year 2017 to ensure 
the Commission's budget execution follows congressional intent. 
These budget control points are included in the table following 
the heading of Office of Inspector General. The Committee notes 
that the Commission's initial execution plan for fiscal year 
2016 did not comply with the budget control points included in 
the explanatory statement accompanying the Energy and Water 
Appropriations Act, 2016, and directs the Commission to execute 
funds provided herein in accordance with the new control 
points. Although the Commission subsequently realigned its 
execution plan to comply with the budget control points, the 
Committee's oversight responsibilities of taxpayer funds 
requires additional safeguards. Accordingly, the Committee 
includes statutory language incorporating the new control 
points by reference into law, and notes that any breaches are 
now subject to the reporting requirements and remedies of the 
Antideficiency Act contained in title 31 of the United States 
Code.
    Reprogramming Authority.--Section 401 continues 
reprogramming authority included in the Energy and Water 
Development Appropriations Act, 2016, for the Commission 
between the budget control points, subject to prior 
congressional approval, with a provision made for emergency 
circumstances. This reprogramming authority supersedes the 
Commission's existing guidance on internal reprogrammings.
    Unobligated Balances from Prior Appropriations.--The 
Committee notes that the Commission carries unobligated 
balances from appropriations received prior to fiscal year 
2016. The Committee's recommendation requires the use of 
$15,100,000 of these balances, derived from fee-based 
activities. Because the Commission has already collected fees 
corresponding to these activities in prior years, the Committee 
does not include these funds within the fee base calculation 
for determining authorized revenues, and does not provide 
authority to collect additional offsetting receipts for their 
use. The Committee notes that any remaining unobligated 
balances carried forward from prior years are now subject to 
the reprogramming guidelines in section 401, and shall not only 
be used to supplement appropriations consistent with those 
guidelines.
    Advanced Nuclear Reactor Technologies.--The Committee 
recommends $5,000,000 for activities related to the development 
of regulatory infrastructure for advanced nuclear reactor 
technologies, as requested. These funds are not subject to the 
Commission's general fee recovery collection requirements.
    Reductions from Efficiencies.--The recommendation includes 
reductions to the budget request of $31,100,000 that were 
identified as potential savings by the Commission's staff due 
to discontinuation, de-prioritization, or incremental 
reductions of activities. According to the Commission's staff, 
including these savings would not adversely affect the 
Commission's safety mission, and the Committee therefore adopts 
these proposed reductions in their entirety. The Committee 
applauds the Commission's reviews of its programs to find these 
efficiencies, and urges the Commission to identify additional 
efficiencies.
    Integrated University Program.--The Committee recommends 
$15,000,000 for the Integrated University Program, of which not 
less than $5,000,000 is for grants to support research projects 
that do not align with programmatic missions but are critical 
to maintaining the discipline of nuclear science.
    Rulemaking.--The Committee directs the Commission to 
provide within 90 days after the enactment of this act, and 
quarterly thereafter, an update of appendix G of the budget 
request regarding planned rulemakings.
    Reporting Requirement.--The Committee directs the 
Commission to continue the reporting required in the 
explanatory statement for the Energy and Water Development 
Appropriations Act, 2016, relating to progress against the 
Commission's licensing goals and right-sizing commitments.
    Subsequent License Renewal.--The Committee continues to 
encourage the Commission to act expeditiously to ensure that a 
fair, effective, predictable, and efficient process for 
subsequent licensing is available for licensees actively 
planning to pursue second license renewal, including timely 
issuance of updated regulatory guidance to support receipt of 
the lead application in the 2018 timeframe.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL


                          GROSS APPROPRIATION

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $12,136,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      12,129,000
Committee recommendation................................      12,129,000

                                REVENUES

Appropriations, 2016....................................    -$10,060,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     -10,044,000
Committee recommendation................................     -10,044,000

                           NET APPROPRIATION

Appropriations, 2016....................................      $2,076,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................       2,085,000
Committee recommendation................................       2,085,000

    The Committee recommends $12,129,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General, the same as the budget request, which is 
offset by revenues estimated at $10,044,000, for a net 
appropriation of $2,085,000. The Office of Inspector General 
serves both the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Defense 
Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, and the recommendation 
includes $969,000 for that purpose that is not available from 
fee revenues.
    The Committee encourages the Office of Inspector General to 
examine, through its audit program, additional savings and 
efficiencies at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission that could be 
realized through consolidations or other streamlining.

                                  COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET AUTHORITY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                     Committee
                                                                                                  recommendation
                              Item                                    Budget         Committee      compared to
                                                                     estimate     recommendation      budget
                                                                                                     estimate
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                       OPERATING REACTORS
 
OPERATING REACTORS..............................................         393,600         375,400         -18,200
CORPORATE SUPPORT...............................................         193,900         192,700          -1,200
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL, OPERATING REACTORS..............................         587,500         568,100         -19,400
 
                          NEW REACTORS
 
NEW REACTORS....................................................         113,200         107,900          -5,300
CORPORATE SUPPORT...............................................          56,600          54,800          -1,800
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL, NEW REACTORS....................................         169,800         162,700          -7,100
 
                         FUEL FACILITIES
 
FUEL FACILITIES.................................................          27,000          24,900          -2,100
CORPORATE SUPPORT...............................................          14,500          13,600            -900
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL, FUEL FACILITIES.................................          41,500          38,500          -3,000
 
                     NUCLEAR MATERIALS USERS
 
NUCLEAR MATERIALS USERS.........................................          64,200          63,900            -300
CORPORATE SUPPORT...............................................          28,400          28,600            +200
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL, NUCLEAR MATERIALS USERS.........................          92,600          92,500            -100
 
              SPENT FUEL STORAGE AND TRANSPORTATION
 
SPENT FUEL STORAGE AND TRANSPORTATION...........................          25,300          24,800            -500
CORPORATE SUPPORT...............................................          11,900          12,000            +100
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL, SPENT FUEL STORAGE AND TRANSPORTATION...........          37,200          36,800            -400
 
               DECOMMISSIONING AND LOW-LEVEL WASTE
 
DECOMMISSIONING AND LOW-LEVEL WASTE.............................          27,800          26,700          -1,100
CORPORATE SUPPORT...............................................          13,800          13,800  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL, DECOMMISSIONING AND LOW-LEVEL WASTE.............          41,600          40,500          -1,100
 
                  INTEGRATED UNIVERSITY PROGRAM
 
INTEGRATED UNIVERSITY PROGRAM...................................  ..............          15,000         +15,000
USE OF PRIOR YEAR BALANCES......................................  ..............         -15,100         -15,100
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL.....................................................         970,200         939,000         -31,200
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                  Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board

Appropriations, 2016....................................      $3,600,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................       3,600,000
Committee recommendation................................       3,600,000

    The Committee recommends $3,600,000 for the Nuclear Waste 
Technical Review Board, the same as the budget request.

                           GENERAL PROVISION

    Section 401. The Committee includes reprogramming language 
for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

                                TITLE V

    The Committee is aware that agencies funded through this 
bill do a variety of different types of advertising. The 
Committee directs the agencies to clearly state within the 
text, audio, or video used for advertising or educational 
purposes, including emails or advertising/posting on the 
Internet, that the communications is printed, published, or 
produced and disseminated at U.S. taxpayer expense.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    The following list of general provisions is recommended by 
the Committee:
    Section 501. The provision prohibits the use of any funds 
provided in this bill from being used to influence 
congressional action.
    Section 502. The provision addresses transfer authority 
under this act.

                     Program, Project, and Activity

    In fiscal year 2017, for purposes of the Balanced Budget 
and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-177), 
as amended, the following information provides the definition 
of the term ``program, project or activity'' for departments 
and agencies under the jurisdiction of the Energy and Water 
Development Appropriation bill. The term ``program, project or 
activity'' shall include the most specific level of budget 
items identified in the Energy and Water Development 
Appropriations Bill, 2017 and the report accompanying the bill.
    If a sequestration order is necessary, in implementing the 
Presidential order, departments and agencies shall apply any 
percentage reduction required for fiscal year 2017 pursuant to 
the provisions of Public Law 99-177 to all items specified in 
the report accompanying the bill by the Senate Committee on 
Appropriations in support of the fiscal year 2017 budget 
estimates as modified by congressional action.

  COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI, OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 7 of rule XVI requires that Committee reports on 
general appropriations bills identify each Committee amendment 
to the House bill ``which proposes an item of appropriation 
which is not made to carry out the provisions of an existing 
law, a treaty stipulation, or an act or resolution previously 
passed by the Senate during that session.''
    The Committee is filing an original bill, which is not 
covered under this rule, but reports this information in the 
spirit of full disclosure.
    The Committee recommends funding for the following programs 
or activities which currently lack authorization for fiscal 
year 2017:

                             APPROPRIATIONS NOT AUTHORIZED BY LAW--FISCAL YEAR 2017
                                             [Dollars in thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                    Appropriation
                                                       Last Year of  Authorization   in Last Year       Net
                   Agency/Program                     Authorization      Level            of       Appropriation
                                                                                    Authorization   in this Bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Corps FUSRAP........................................  .............          \(1)\  .............        103,000
EERE Program Direction..............................           2006        110,500        164,198        153,500
EERE Weatherization Activities......................           2012      1,400,000         68,000        214,600
EERE State Energy Programs..........................           2012        125,000         50,000         50,000
Nuclear Energy......................................           2009        495,000        792,000      1,057,903
Fossil Energy.......................................           2009        641,000        727,320        632,000
Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves..............           2014         20,000         20,000         14,950
Office of Science...................................           2013      6,007,000      4,876,000      5,400,000
Advanced Research Projects Agency--Energy...........           2013        312,000        265,000        292,669
Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Program...           2012  not specified          6,000          5,000
Non-Defense Environment Cleanup:
    West Valley Demonstration.......................           1981          5,000          5,000         66,413
Departmental Administration.........................           1984        246,963        185,682        129,142
Atomic Energy Defense Activities:
    National Nuclear Security Administration:
        Weapons Activities..........................           2015      8,210,560      8,231,770      9,285,147
        Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation............           2015      1,774,758      1,641,369      1,821,916
        Naval Reactors..............................           2015      1,377,100      1,238,500      1,351,520
        Federal Salaries and Expenses...............           2015        386,863        370,000        408,603
Defense Environmental Cleanup.......................           2015      4,884,538      5,010,830      5,379,018
Other Defense Activities............................           2015        754,000        754,000        791,552
Power Marketing Administrations:
    Southwestern....................................           1984         40,254         36,229         11,057
    Western Area....................................           1984        259,700        194,630         95,581
Appalachian Regional Commission.....................           2013        110,000         68,263        151,000
Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board.............           2015         30,150         28,500         31,000
Nuclear Regulatory Commission.......................           1985        460,000        448,200        118,845
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Program was initiated in 1972 and has never received a separate authorization.

COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(c), RULE XXVI, OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, on April 14, 2016, 
the Committee ordered favorably reported a bill (S. 2804) 
making appropriations for energy and water development and 
related agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2017, 
and for other purposes, provided, that the bill be subject to 
amendment and that the bill be consistent with its budget 
allocation, by a recorded vote of 30-0, a quorum being present. 
The vote was as follows:
        Yeas                          Nays
Chairman Cochran
Mr. McConnell
Mr. Shelby
Mr. Alexander
Ms. Collins
Ms. Murkowski
Mr. Graham
Mr. Kirk
Mr. Blunt
Mr. Moran
Mr. Hoeven
Mr. Boozman
Mrs. Capito
Mr. Cassidy
Mr. Lankford
Mr. Daines
Ms. Mikulski
Mr. Leahy
Mrs. Murray
Mrs. Feinstein
Mr. Durbin
Mr. Reed
Mr. Tester
Mr. Udall
Mrs. Shaheen
Mr. Merkley
Mr. Coons
Mr. Schatz
Ms. Baldwin
Mr. Murphy

 COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI, OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 12 of rule XXVI requires that Committee reports 
on a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any statute 
or part of any statute include ``(a) the text of the statute or 
part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and (b) a 
comparative print of that part of the bill or joint resolution 
making the amendment and of the statute or part thereof 
proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through type and 
italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate typographical 
devices the omissions and insertions which would be made by the 
bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form recommended by 
the Committee.''
    In compliance with this rule, changes in existing law 
proposed to be made by the bill are shown as follows: existing 
law to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets; new matter is 
printed in italic; and existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman.

                TITLE 42--THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND WELFARE


                       CHAPTER 109B--SECURE WATER


Sec. 10364. Water management improvement

(a) Authorization of grants and cooperative agreements

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

(e) Authorization of appropriations

    There is authorized to be appropriated to carry out this 
section [$350,000,000] $400,000,000, to remain available until 
expended.
                                ------                                


  WATER SUPPLY, RELIABILITY, AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENT ACT, 2005, 
                           PUBLIC LAW 108-361


    TITLE I--CALIFORNIA WATER SECURITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENHANCEMENT

SEC. 101. SHORT TITLE.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 103. BAY DELTA PROGRAM.

    (a) In General.--

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (e) New and Expanded Authorizations for Federal Agencies.--

            (1) In general.--The heads of the Federal agencies 
        described in this subsection are authorized to carry 
        out the activities described in subsection (f) during 
        each of fiscal years 2005 through [2017] 2019, in 
        coordination with the Governor.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (f) Description of Activities Under New and Expanded 
Authorizations.--

            (1) Conveyance.-- * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (3) Levee stability.--

                    (A) In general.-- * * *

                    (B) Report.--Not later than 180 days after 
                the date of enactment of this Act, the 
                Secretary of the Army shall submit to the 
                appropriate authorizing and appropriating 
                committees of the Senate and the House of 
                Representatives a report that describes the 
                levee stability reconstruction projects and 
                priorities that will be carried out under this 
                title during each of fiscal years 2005 through 
                [2017] 2019.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 107. FEDERAL SHARE OF COSTS.

    (a) In General.--The Federal share of the cost of 
implementing the Calfed Bay-Delta Program for fiscal years 2005 
through [2017] 2019 in the aggregate, as set forth in the 
Record of Decision, shall not exceed 33.3 percent.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 109. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATION.

    There are authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary 
and the heads of the Federal agencies to pay the Federal share 
of the cost of carrying out the new and expanded authorities 
described in subsections (e) and (f) of section 103 
$389,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2005 through [2017] 
2019, to remain available until expended.
                                ------                                


                        BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL


  PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(A), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS
                                                     AMENDED
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                   Budget authority                         Outlays
                                         -----------------------------------------------------------------------
                                              Committee                           Committee
                                              guidance       Amount in bill       guidance       Amount in bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with
 Committee guidance to its subcommittees
 of amounts for 2017: Subcommittee on
 Energy and Water Development:
    Mandatory...........................  ................  ................  ................  ................
    Discretionary.......................            37,537            37,537            37,561         \1\37,560
        Security........................            20,023            20,023                NA                NA
        Nonsecurity.....................            17,514            17,514                NA                NA
Projections of outlays associated with
 the recommendation:
    2017................................  ................  ................  ................         \2\21,874
    2018................................  ................  ................  ................            10,818
    2019................................  ................  ................  ................             3,724
    2020................................  ................  ................  ................               820
    2021 and future years...............  ................  ................  ................               451
Financial assistance to State and local                 NA               176                NA             \2\33
 governments for 2017...................
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
\2\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
 
NA: Not applicable.
 
NOTE.--The Committee guidance will be considered favorably reported as the fiscal year 2017 section 302(b)
  budget allocations upon the filing by the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of an allocation pursuant to
  section 102 of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 to serve as a section 302(a) allocation for purposes of
  budget enforcement in the Senate.


  COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET (OBLIGATIONAL) AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2016 AND BUDGET ESTIMATES AND AMOUNTS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL FOR FISCAL
                                                                        YEAR 2017
                                                                [In thousands of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                         Senate Committee recommendation
                                                                                                                             compared with (+ or -)
                                Item                                       2016       Budget estimate     Committee    ---------------------------------
                                                                      appropriation                     recommendation        2016
                                                                                                                         appropriation   Budget estimate
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
               TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE--CIVIL
 
                       DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
 
                     Corps of Engineers--Civil
 
Investigations.....................................................         121,000           85,000          126,522           +5,522          +41,522
Construction.......................................................       1,862,250        1,090,000        1,813,649          -48,601         +723,649
Mississippi River and Tributaries..................................         345,000          222,000          368,000          +23,000         +146,000
Operation and Maintenance..........................................       3,137,000        2,705,000        3,173,829          +36,829         +468,829
Regulatory Program.................................................         200,000          200,000          200,000   ...............  ...............
Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)...........         112,000          103,000          103,000           -9,000   ...............
Flood Control and Coastal Emergencies..............................          28,000           30,000           30,000           +2,000   ...............
Expenses...........................................................         179,000          180,000          180,000           +1,000   ...............
Office of Assistant Secretary of the Army (Civil Works)............           4,750            5,000            5,000             +250   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title I, Department of Defense--Civil.................       5,989,000        4,620,000        6,000,000          +11,000       +1,380,000
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
 
              Central Utah Project Completion Account
 
Central Utah Project Completion Account............................          10,000            5,600           10,000   ...............          +4,400
 
                       Bureau of Reclamation
 
Water and Related Resources........................................       1,118,972          813,402        1,114,394           -4,578         +300,992
Central Valley Project Restoration Fund............................          49,528           55,606           55,606           +6,078   ...............
California Bay-Delta Restoration...................................          37,000           36,000           36,000           -1,000   ...............
Policy and Administration..........................................          59,500           59,000           59,000             -500   ...............
Indian Water Rights Settlements....................................  ...............         106,151   ...............  ...............        -106,151
San Joaquin River Restoration Fund.................................  ...............          36,000   ...............  ...............         -36,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Bureau of Reclamation.................................       1,265,000        1,106,159        1,265,000   ...............        +158,841
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title II, Department of the Interior..................       1,275,000        1,111,759        1,275,000   ...............        +163,241
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                  TITLE III--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY
 
                          Energy Programs
 
Energy efficiency and renewable energy.............................       2,073,000        2,898,400        2,073,000   ...............        -825,400
Electricity delivery and energy reliability........................         206,000          262,300          206,000   ...............         -56,300
Nuclear Energy.....................................................         860,000          842,020          860,000   ...............         +17,980
    Defense function...............................................         126,161          151,876          197,903          +71,742          +46,027
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         986,161          993,896        1,057,903          +71,742          +64,007
 
Fossil Energy Research and Development.............................         632,000          360,000          632,000   ...............        +272,000
Office of Technology Transitions...................................  ...............           8,400   ...............  ...............          -8,400
Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves.............................          17,500           14,950           14,950           -2,550   ...............
Strategic Petroleum Reserve........................................         212,000          257,000          200,000          -12,000          -57,000
Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve.................................           7,600            6,500            6,500           -1,100   ...............
Energy Information Administration..................................         122,000          131,125          122,000   ...............          -9,125
Non-defense environmental cleanup..................................         255,000          218,400          255,000   ...............         +36,600
Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund........         673,749   ...............         717,741          +43,992         +717,741
Science............................................................       5,350,200        5,572,069        5,400,000          +49,800         -172,069
Nuclear waste disposal.............................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy...........................         291,000          350,000          292,669           +1,669          -57,331
Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs........................  ...............          22,930           20,000          +20,000           -2,930
Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program..............          42,000           37,000           37,000           -5,000   ...............
    Offsetting collection..........................................         -25,000          -30,000          -30,000           -5,000   ...............
    Proposed change in subsidy cost................................  ...............       1,020,000   ...............  ...............      -1,020,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................          17,000        1,027,000            7,000          -10,000       -1,020,000
 
Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loans program...........           6,000            5,000            5,000           -1,000   ...............
Departmental administration........................................         248,142          270,037          232,142          -16,000          -37,895
    Miscellaneous revenues.........................................        -117,171         -103,000         -103,000          +14,171   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Net appropriation..........................................         130,971          167,037          129,142           -1,829          -37,895
Office of the Inspector General....................................          46,424           44,424           44,424           -2,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Energy programs.......................................      11,026,605       12,339,431       11,183,329         +156,724       -1,156,102
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                  Atomic Energy Defense Activities
 
              National Nuclear Security Administration
 
Weapons activities.................................................       8,846,948        9,285,147        9,285,147         +438,199   ...............
    Rescission.....................................................  ...............         -50,400   ...............  ...............         +50,400
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................       8,846,948        9,234,747        9,285,147         +438,199          +50,400
 
Defense nuclear nonproliferation...................................       1,940,302        1,821,916        1,821,916         -118,386   ...............
    Rescission.....................................................  ...............         -14,000   ...............  ...............         +14,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................       1,940,302        1,807,916        1,821,916         -118,386          +14,000
 
Naval reactors.....................................................       1,375,496        1,420,120        1,351,520          -23,976          -68,600
Federal salaries and expenses......................................         383,666          412,817          408,603          +24,937           -4,214
    Rescission.....................................................         -19,900   ...............  ...............         +19,900   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         363,766          412,817          408,603          +44,837           -4,214
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Nuclear Security Administration..............      12,526,512       12,875,600       12,867,186         +340,674           -8,414
                                                                    ====================================================================================
             Environmental and Other Defense Activities
 
Defense environmental cleanup......................................       5,289,742        5,235,350        5,379,018          +89,276         +143,668
Defense Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning.....  ...............         155,100          717,741         +717,741         +562,641
Other Defense activities...........................................         776,425          791,552          791,552          +15,127   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Environmental and other defense activities............       6,066,167        6,182,002        6,888,311         +822,144         +706,309
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, Atomic Energy Defense Activities......................      18,592,679       19,057,602       19,755,497       +1,162,818         +697,895
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                 Power Marketing Administrations\1\
 
Operation and maintenance, Southeastern Power Administration.......           6,900            1,000            1,000           -5,900   ...............
      Offsetting collections.......................................          -6,900           -1,000           -1,000           +5,900   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
 
Operation and maintenance, Southwestern Power Administration.......          47,361           45,643           45,643           -1,718   ...............
      Offsetting collections.......................................         -35,961          -34,586          -34,586           +1,375   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................          11,400           11,057           11,057             -343   ...............
 
Construction, rehabilitation, operation and maintenance, Western            307,714          307,144          307,144             -570   ...............
 Area Power Administration.........................................
      Offsetting collections.......................................        -214,342         -211,563         -211,563           +2,779   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................          93,372           95,581           95,581           +2,209   ...............
 
Falcon and Amistad Operating and Maintenance Fund..................           4,490            4,070            4,070             -420   ...............
    Offsetting collections.........................................          -4,262           -3,838           -3,838             +424   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................             228              232              232               +4   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Power Marketing Administrations.......................         105,000          106,870          106,870           +1,870   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
 
Salaries and expenses..............................................         319,800          346,800          346,800          +27,000   ...............
Revenues applied...................................................        -319,800         -346,800         -346,800          -27,000   ...............
 
                         General Provisions
 
Title III Rescissions:
    Department of Energy:
    Energy efficiency and energy reliability.......................          -3,806   ...............  ...............          +3,806   ...............
    Science........................................................          -3,200   ...............  ...............          +3,200   ...............
    Fossil Energy Research and Development.........................  ...............  ...............        -240,000         -240,000         -240,000
    Weapons activities.............................................  ...............  ...............         -50,400          -50,400          -50,400
    Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation...............................  ...............  ...............         -14,000          -14,000          -14,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................          -7,006   ...............        -304,400         -297,394         -304,400
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title III, Department of Energy.......................      29,717,278       31,503,903       30,741,296       +1,024,018         -762,607
          Appropriations...........................................     (29,744,184)     (31,568,303)     (31,045,696)     (+1,301,512)       (-522,607)
          Rescissions..............................................        (-26,906)        (-64,400)       (-304,400)       (-277,494)       (-240,000)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                   TITLE IV--INDEPENDENT AGENCIES
 
Appalachian Regional Commission....................................         146,000          120,000          151,000           +5,000          +31,000
Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board............................          29,150           31,000           31,000           +1,850   ...............
Delta Regional Authority...........................................          25,000           15,936           25,000   ...............          +9,064
Denali Commission..................................................          11,000           15,000           15,000           +4,000   ...............
Northern Border Regional Commission................................           7,500            5,000           10,000           +2,500           +5,000
Southeast Crescent Regional Commission.............................             250   ...............  ...............            -250   ...............
 
Nuclear Regulatory Commission:
    Salaries and expenses..........................................         990,000          970,163          939,000          -51,000          -31,163
    Revenues.......................................................        -872,864         -851,161         -822,240          +50,624          +28,921
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         117,136          119,002          116,760             -376           -2,242
 
    Office of Inspector General....................................          12,136           12,129           12,129               -7   ...............
    Revenues.......................................................         -10,060          -10,044          -10,044              +16   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................           2,076            2,085            2,085               +9   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Nuclear Regulatory Commission.........................         119,212          121,087          118,845             -367           -2,242
 
Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board...............................           3,600            3,600            3,600   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title IV, Independent agencies........................         341,712          311,623          354,445          +12,733          +42,822
          Appropriations...........................................        (341,712)        (311,623)        (354,445)        (+12,733)        (+42,822)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Grand total..................................................      37,322,990       37,547,285       38,370,741       +1,047,751         +823,456
          Appropriations...........................................     (37,349,896)     (37,611,685)     (38,675,141)     (+1,325,245)     (+1,063,456)
          Rescissions..............................................        (-26,906)        (-64,400)       (-304,400)       (-277,494)       (-240,000)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Totals adjusted to net out alternative financing costs, reimbursable agreement funding, and power purchase and wheeling expenditures. Offsetting
  collection totals only reflect funds collected for annual expenses, excluding power purchase wheeling.
 
   
                                        [all]