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                                                      Calendar No. 424
114th Congress      }                                   {       Report
                                 SENATE
 2d Session         }                                   {      114-237

======================================================================
 
     MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, VETERANS AFFAIRS, AND RELATED AGENCIES 
                        APPROPRIATION BILL, 2017
                                _______
                                

                April  18, 2016.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

           Mr. Kirk,  from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                                 REPORT

                         [To accompany S. 2806]

    The Committee on Appropriation reports the bill (S. 2806) 
making appropriations for military construction, the Department 
of Veterans Affairs, and related agencies for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2017, and for other purposes, reports 
favorably thereon and recommends that the bill do pass.




Amounts in new budget authority

Total of bill as reported to the Senate.................$190,096,633,000
Amount of 2016 appropriations........................... 278,249,736,000
Amount of 2017 budget estimate.......................... 189,937,038,000
Bill as recommended to Senate compared to--
    2016 appropriations................................. -88,153,103,000
    2017 budget estimate................................    +159,595,000










                                CONTENTS

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
Background:
    Purpose of the Bill..........................................     4
    Committee Recommendation.....................................     4
    Overview and Summary of Bill.................................     4
Title I:
    Military Construction:
        Items of Special Interest:
            Hearings.............................................     6
            Summary of Committee Recommendations.................     6
            Reprogramming Guidelines.............................     6
            Real Property Maintenance............................     7
            Incremental Funding..................................     7
            Missile Defense......................................     7
            Other Matters........................................     8
        Military Construction Overview...........................    12
        Military Construction, Army..............................    12
        Military Construction, Navy and Marine Corps.............    13
        Military Construction, Air Force.........................    13
        Military Construction, Defense-Wide......................    16
        Military Construction, Army National Guard...............    17
        Military Construction, Air National Guard................    17
        Military Construction, Army Reserve......................    18
        Military Construction, Navy Reserve......................    18
        Military Construction, Air Force Reserve.................    18
        North Atlantic Treaty Organization Security Investment 
          Program................................................    18
        Department of Defense Base Closure Account...............    19
        Family Housing Overview..................................    19
        Family Housing Operation and Maintenance, Army...........    20
        Family Housing Operation and Maintenance, Navy and Marine 
          Corps..................................................    20
        Family Housing Operation and Maintenance, Air Force......    20
        Family Housing Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide...    20
        Department of Defense Family Housing Improvement Fund....    20
        Family Housing Construction, Army........................    21
        Family Housing Construction, Navy and Marine Corps.......    21
        Family Housing Construction, Air Force...................    21
        Administrative Provisions................................    21
Title II:
    Department of Veterans Affairs:
        Items of Special Interest:
            Hearings.............................................    24
            Summary of Committee Recommendations.................    24
            Department Overview..................................    24
        Veterans Benefits Administration.........................    29
            Compensation and Pensions............................    29
            Readjustment Benefits................................    30
            Veterans Insurance and Indemnities...................    31
            Veterans Housing Benefit Program Fund................    32
            Vocational Rehabilitation Loans Program Account......    32
            Native American Veteran Housing Loan Program Account.    33
            General Operating Expenses, Veteran Benefits 
              Administration.....................................    33
        Veterans Health Administration...........................    35
            Medical Services.....................................    38
            Medical Community Care...............................    55
            Medical Support and Compliance.......................    55
            Medical Facilities...................................    56
            Medical and Prosthetic Research......................    56
            Medical Care Cost Recovery Collections...............    59
        National Cemetery Administration.........................    60
        Departmental Administration..............................    60
            General Administration...............................    61
            Board of Veterans Appeals............................    62
            Information Technology Systems.......................    62
            Office of Inspector General..........................    65
            Construction, Major Projects.........................    66
            Construction, Minor Projects.........................    67
            Grants for Construction of State Extended Care 
              Facilities.........................................    67
            Grants for Construction of Veterans Cemeteries.......    68
        Administrative Provisions................................    68
Title III:
    Related Agencies:
        American Battle Monuments Commission:
            Salaries and Expenses................................    72
            Foreign Currency Fluctuations........................    72
        United States Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims: 
          Salaries and Expenses..................................    73
        Department of Defense--Civil: Cemeterial Expenses, Army:
            Salaries and Expenses................................    73
        Armed Forces Retirement Home: Trust Fund.................    74
        Administrative Provisions................................    75
Title IV: General Provisions.....................................    76
Program, Project, and Activity...................................    77
Compliance With Paragraph 7, Rule XVI, of the Standing Rules of 
  the 
  Senate.........................................................    77
Compliance With Paragraph 7(c), Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules 
  of the Senate..................................................    78
Compliance With Paragraph 12, Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................    79
Budgetary Impact of Bill.........................................    89
Military Construction Project Listing by Location................    90
Overseas Contingency Operations..................................   106
Comparative Statement of Budget Authority........................   108


                               BACKGROUND

                          Purpose of the Bill

    The Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related 
Agencies appropriations bill provides necessary funding for the 
planning, design, construction, alteration, and improvement of 
military facilities worldwide. It also finances the cost of 
military family housing and the U.S. share of the NATO Security 
Investment Program. In addition, the bill provides funding, 
including environmental remediation, for base closures and 
realignments authorized by law. The bill provides resources to 
the Department of Veterans Affairs for veterans benefits and 
healthcare and funding for U.S. cemeteries and battlefield 
monuments both in the United States and abroad, including the 
American Battle Monuments Commission and Arlington National 
Cemetery. Additionally, the bill funds the U.S. Court of 
Appeals for Veterans Claims and the Armed Forces Retirement 
Homes.

                        Committee Recommendation

    The Committee recommends new budget authority totaling 
$190,096,633,000 for fiscal year 2017 military construction, 
family housing, base closure, veterans healthcare and benefits, 
including fiscal year 2018 advance appropriations for veterans 
medical care and appropriated mandatories, and related 
agencies. This includes $103,952,601,000 in mandatory funding 
and $86,144,032,000 in discretionary funding. The table at the 
end of the report displays the Committee recommendation in 
comparison with the current fiscal year and the President's 
fiscal year 2017 request.

                   APPROPRIATIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2017
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Senate
                                 Budget request        recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
New budget authority........      $189,937,038,000      $190,096,633,000
Previous advances provided          63,271,000,000        63,271,000,000
 for fiscal year 2017 for
 medical care...............
Previous advances provided         102,515,876,000       102,515,876,000
 for fiscal year 2017 for
 appropriated mandatories...
Less advances provided for         -66,385,032,000       -66,385,032,000
 fiscal year 2018 for
 medical care...............
Less advances provided for        -103,935,996,000      -103,935,996,000
 fiscal year 2018 for
 appropriated mandatories...
                             -------------------------------------------
      Total appropriations         185,402,886,000       185,562,481,000
       for fiscal year 2017.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      Overview and Summary of Bill

    The Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related 
Agencies appropriations bill funds an array of programs that 
are vital to America's military personnel and their families, 
and to the Nations' veterans. For U.S. military forces and 
their families worldwide, the bill funds critical 
infrastructure, ranging from mission essential operational and 
training facilities to key quality-of-life facilities, 
including barracks, family housing, child care centers, schools 
and hospitals.
    For America's 21.7 million veterans, the bill provides the 
necessary funding for veterans benefits and healthcare, from 
prescription drugs and clinical services to the construction of 
hospitals and other medical facilities throughout the Nation.
    The bill also funds veterans cemeteries in the United 
States and provides funding for four independent agencies--the 
American Battle Monuments Commission, the U.S. Court of Appeals 
for Veterans Claims, Arlington National Cemetery, and the Armed 
Forces Retirement Homes.
    Printing Efficiency.--The Committee is concerned about the 
millions of taxpayer dollars spent on wasteful printing 
practices each year and the lack of clear printing policies 
within each Agency. While progress has been made to better 
utilize the cloud and digitize records, little progress has 
been made to reform in-house printing practices. The Committee 
directs each Agency to work with Office of Management and 
Budget to reduce printing and reproduction by 34 percent and 
report to the Committee within 60 days after enactment of this 
act on what steps have been taken to reduce printing volume and 
costs. The report should specifically identify how much money 
each Agency will be saving.

                                TITLE I

                         MILITARY CONSTRUCTION

                       Items of Special Interest

                                HEARINGS

    The Subcommittee on Military Construction, Veterans 
Affairs, and Related Agencies held one hearing related to the 
fiscal year 2017 military construction budget request. 
Witnesses included representatives of the Army, Navy, Marine 
Corps, Air Force, and the Office of the Secretary of Defense.

                  SUMMARY OF COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The fiscal year 2017 budget request for military 
construction and family housing totals $7,444,056,000. The 
Committee recommends $7,930,000,000, which is $485,944,000 
above the President's budget request. This includes 
$172,449,000 requested by the President in a separate Overseas 
Contingency Operations title.

                        REPROGRAMMING GUIDELINES

    The following reprogramming guidelines apply for all 
military construction and family housing projects. A project or 
account (including the sub-elements of an account) which has 
been specifically reduced by the Congress in acting on the 
budget request is considered to be a congressional interest 
item and as such, prior approval is required. Accordingly, no 
reprogrammings to an item specifically reduced below the 
threshold by the Congress are permitted.
    The reprogramming criteria that apply to military 
construction projects (25 percent of the funded amount or 
$2,000,000, whichever is less) continue to apply to new housing 
construction projects and to improvements over $2,000,000. To 
provide the services the flexibility to proceed with 
construction contracts without disruption or delay, the costs 
associated with environmental hazard remediation such as 
asbestos removal, radon abatement, lead-based paint removal or 
abatement, and any other legislated environmental hazard 
remediation may be excluded, provided that such remediation 
requirements could not be reasonably anticipated at the time of 
the budget submission. This exclusion applies to projects 
authorized in this budget year, as well as projects authorized 
in prior years for which construction has not been completed.
    Furthermore, in instances where prior approval of a 
reprogramming request for a project or account has been 
received from the Committee, the adjusted amount approved 
becomes the new base for any future increase or decrease via 
below-threshold reprogrammings (provided that the project or 
account is not a congressional interest item as defined above).
    In addition to these guidelines, the services are directed 
to adhere to the guidance for military construction 
reprogrammings and notifications, including the pertinent 
statutory authorities contained in Department of Defense [DOD] 
Financial Management Regulation 7000.14-R and relevant updates 
and policy memoranda.

                       REAL PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

    The Committee recommends a continuation of the following 
general rules for repairing a facility under ``Operation and 
Maintenance'' account funding:
  --Components of the facility may be repaired by replacement, 
        and such replacement may be up to current standards or 
        code.
  --Interior arrangements and restorations may be included as 
        repair, but additions, new facilities, and functional 
        conversions must be performed as military construction 
        projects.
  --Such projects may be done concurrent with repair projects, 
        as long as the final conjunctively funded project is a 
        complete and usable facility.
  --The appropriate Service Secretary shall submit a 21-day 
        notification prior to carrying out any repair project 
        with an estimated cost in excess of $7,500,000.
    The Department is directed to continue to report on the 
real property maintenance backlog at all installations for 
which there is a requested construction project in future 
budget requests. This information is to be provided on the form 
1390. In addition, for all troop housing requests, the form 
1391 is to continue to show all real property maintenance 
conducted in the past 2 years and all future requirements for 
unaccompanied housing at that installation.

                          INCREMENTAL FUNDING

    In general, the Committee supports full funding for 
military construction projects. However, it continues to be the 
practice of the Committee to provide incremental funding for 
certain large projects, despite administration policy to the 
contrary, to enable the services to more efficiently allocate 
military construction dollars among projects that can be 
executed in the year of appropriation.

                            MISSILE DEFENSE

    The Committee remains committed to rapidly implementing the 
European Phased Adaptive Approach [EPAA]. Construction of the 
first Aegis Ashore missile defense site in Deveselu, Romania is 
complete and the site is operational. The Committee fully 
funded construction of the second site at Redzikowo, Poland in 
fiscal year 2016, and expects the Missile Defense Agency to 
pursue an aggressive construction schedule to bring this 
critical asset online. Additionally, the Committee fully funds 
the request for the first phase of the Long Range 
Discrimination Radar at Clear, Alaska. This radar will 
dramatically improve our ability to effectively target 
ballistic missile threats to the homeland coming from the 
Pacific. As the missile threat continues to evolve, the 
Committee remains strongly supportive of the expeditionary 
deployment of a Terminal High Altitude Area Defense battery on 
Guam. The Committee encourages the Department to consider 
making this deployment permanent and requesting appropriate 
military construction projects in support of this critical 
mission.

                             OTHER MATTERS

    Asia-Pacific Realignment and Infrastructure.--The Committee 
remains interested in infrastructure requirements driven by 
force structure changes in the Pacific Command [PACOM] Area of 
Responsibility. The relocation of Marines from Okinawa, 
recapitalization of bases on Guam, rotational deployments in 
Australia, and the movement of forces in Korea are initiatives 
that require significant military construction. In light of 
these investments and the developing threat, the Committee 
remains supportive of a strong U.S. strategic presence, 
including missile defense capabilities, throughout the region.
    Recent Chinese land reclamation projects in the South China 
Sea, apparently military in nature, are indicative of the need 
for properly located, forward deployed U.S. forces in the 
region. The Committee is closely monitoring developments in the 
South China Sea and is encouraged by progress with the Enhanced 
Defense Cooperation Agreement with the Philippines, which will 
expand access for U.S. forces at five locations throughout the 
country. The Committee expects to be kept fully apprised of 
military construction requirements resulting from this and 
other enhanced partnerships in the region, including projects 
utilizing foreign financing and cost-sharing agreements.
    The Committee remains concerned about the status of the 
Futenma Replacement Facility [FRF] in Okinawa. Continuous local 
protests, current and anticipated lawsuits, local government 
opposition, and repeated delays in construction paint a very 
bleak picture for the future of this project. In testimony 
before the Senate Armed Services Committee on February 23, 
2016, PACOM Commander Admiral Harry Harris noted that these 
factors have already led to a 2 year delay in completion of the 
project, which will not be complete until 2025 under the best 
of circumstances. The Committee continues to urge the 
Department to consider potential alternatives to the FRF that 
already exist on Okinawa, including facilities at Marine Corps 
Air Station Futenma and Kadena Air Base.
    The FRF delays combined with severely constrained military 
construction budget requests leaves the Committee concerned 
that the overall relocation of Marines under the Defense Policy 
Review Initiative will be delayed as a result. At the 
Committee's request, the Government Accountability Office [GAO] 
is conducting a comprehensive review of force realignment and 
posture in the Pacific. The Committee expects the Department to 
take GAO's findings into consideration as it builds its future 
budgets.
    Energy Policy.--The Department of Defense [DOD] is the 
largest consumer of energy in the Federal Government, 
accounting for nearly 80 percent of the Government's total 
energy consumption. The Committee commends the Department for 
its efforts to improve the energy efficiency of its facilities 
and installations, reduce its energy consumption, and invest in 
renewable energy projects and energy security. The Committee 
continues to support the Department's efforts to incorporate 
green building technologies into new facility construction and 
into the renovation of existing buildings, including leading-
edge technologies that can minimize life-cycle costs. The DOD 
and the services should engage with government, industry, and 
academia to identify and utilize innovative technologies to 
reduce long-term energy costs, limit the constraints of energy 
and water resources on military mission capabilities and 
readiness, and meet congressional and DOD mandated goals for 
renewable energy generation and energy and water efficiency. 
Military installations in Hawaii are among those at the 
forefront of the military's efforts to address these issues, 
including the development of net-zero energy military housing 
and installation facilities, upgrades and retrofits for 
improved energy and water efficiency, and microgrid 
demonstrations. The Committee supports the Department's 
investments in microgrid energy security and encourages the 
Department to continue to explore ways to mitigate the risk to 
mission critical assets and promote energy independence at 
military installations through the Energy Conservation 
Investment Program [ECIP].
    Al Udeid Air Base Mold Contamination.--The Committee is 
concerned about reports that airmen serving at Al Udeid Air 
Base in Qatar were living in dangerously contaminated barracks. 
On social media and later in the press, reports detailed 
collapsing ceilings, contaminated water, and toxic black mold 
found throughout the facility. The Committee has raised 
concerns in the past about low levels of funding for facility 
sustainment, restoration and modernization, and if the black 
mold issues at Al Udeid were a result of a lack of funding for 
maintenance, that is unacceptable. Also, the Committee is aware 
that the Department of Defense Inspector General released a 
report in September, 2014 [DODIG-2014-121] that identified 
1,057 deficiencies and code violations ``that could affect the 
health, safety, and well-being of warfighters and their 
families'' stationed in Japan. Included among the deficiencies 
were elevated levels of radon and excessive mold growth. In 
light of the Inspector General report and the reports from Al 
Udeid, the Committee directs the Department to submit a report 
not later than 180 days after enactment of this act detailing 
global military housing locations with mold contamination, 
mitigation strategies implemented or expected to be in place, 
and any new construction standards designed to prevent mold 
contamination.
    Water Conservation on Military Installations.--The 
Committee recognizes that the Department of Defense [DOD] has 
the opportunity to play a key role in advancing our Nation's 
water security by implementing water conservation, reuse, and 
recharge practices on military installations. This should 
include efforts to incorporate water conservation technologies 
into new infrastructure design, as well as to update existing 
infrastructure to make it more water efficient.
    The Committee also recognizes that many technologies that 
increase water efficiency do not result in competitive returns 
on investment. Therefore, the Department is encouraged to 
implement water conservation projects that are not solely 
contingent on cost savings performance, but also take into 
account reduced water use. To assess the current status of 
water demand and potential water conservation opportunities 
across U.S. military installations, the Secretary of Defense is 
directed to report to the Committees on Appropriations of both 
Houses of Congress within 180 days of enactment of this act the 
following: (1) the current water usage on military 
installations; (2) the vulnerability of each military 
installation to water scarcity; and, (3) the water conservation 
potential according to (a) reduced water use and (b) cost 
savings if current water conservation technologies and 
efficient design were implemented at military installations.
    Energy Conservation and Investment Program.--On January 29, 
2016 the U.S. Government Accountability Office [GAO] released a 
report (GAO-16-162) regarding the DOD's Energy Conservation 
Investment Program (ECIP). GAO recommended that DOD improve 
reporting on both expected and actual savings of selected 
projects as well as update guidance on selecting projects to 
receive program funding. Currently, ECIP is focused primarily 
on energy conservation projects that yield returns on 
investment. Recognizing that energy resiliency should also be a 
strategic aim of the program, the Committee urges the 
Department to consider ECIP project selection criteria that 
also prioritizes installations' energy resiliency and security.
    Defense Workplace Facilities Improvements.--The Committee 
is concerned that continued constraints on the Defense budget 
in the face of increasing operational requirements is taking a 
serious toll on the Department's aging and structurally 
deficient workplace facilities inventory. According to recent 
facility condition assessment data, roughly one in four Defense 
facilities are rated as being in poor or failing condition. In 
testimony presented to the Committee on April 7, 2016, Mr. Pete 
Potochney, performing the duties of Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Energy, Installations and Environment, noted that, 
``Our limited MilCon budget for fiscal year 2017 leaves limited 
room for projects that would improve aging workplaces, and 
therefore, could adversely impact routine operations and the 
quality of life for our personnel.''
    A prime example of deteriorating infrastructure that is 
adversely impacting Defense Department personnel is the parking 
garage at the National Maritime Intelligence Center [NMIC] in 
Suitland, MD, which has been certified as unsafe and 
structurally deficient by professional engineers. The garage, 
which serves a workforce of approximately 3,700 personnel, is 
no longer fully operational due to structural concerns despite 
the fact that $12,000,000 has already been spent on repairs in 
an effort to maintain the facility. A Navy-commissioned 
engineering analysis has validated that the repairs are only a 
stopgap measure because of the severity of the structural 
flaws, but due to competition for scarce military construction 
dollars, an urgently needed replacement project has been 
repeatedly delayed and is currently not projected to be 
programmed for funding until fiscal year 2019. As the 
engineering analysis noted, ``The longer it takes to replace 
the parking structure the more severe the impact to NMIC 
operations.''
    In recognition of the fact that aging and structurally 
deficient workplace and support facility infrastructure has a 
significant impact on personnel safety and operational 
readiness, the Committee urges the Department and the services 
to prioritize needed workplace replacement projects, including 
the NMIC parking structure, in the fiscal year 2018 and future 
budget submissions.
    Coastal Erosion.--Senate Report 114-67 accompanying the 
fiscal year 2016 Military Construction, Veterans Affairs and 
Related Agencies appropriations bill included language 
directing the Department of Defense [DOD] to include an 
assessment of coastal erosion and potential flooding risks in 
the siting of proposed military construction projects. In a 
July 23, 2015, report to Congress regarding the security 
implications of climate-related risks, the Department noted 
that is has directed a global screening level assessment to 
determine installation vulnerabilities to climate-related 
security risks with the goal of identifying serious 
vulnerabilities and developing necessary adaptation strategies. 
The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 120 days after 
enactment of this act, describing the results or the status of 
the vulnerability assessment, the adaptation strategies 
developed for vulnerable installations, and the estimated costs 
associated with implementing these strategies.
    Utilization of the Alaska Workforce in Military 
Construction.--The Committee encourages the Department of 
Defense and the Armed Services to conduct proactive outreach to 
contractors located in Alaska and experienced in Arctic 
construction techniques and constraints in the execution of the 
military construction program for Alaska provided in this bill. 
The Committee urges the Department to conduct such outreach as 
near to the construction location as possible to maximize local 
participation. The Committee further encourages the Department 
to coordinate its outreach with the Alaska Department of Labor 
and Workforce Development, local colleges and universities, 
vocational and technical training providers and other 
organizations involved in Alaska workforce development to 
ensure that an experienced workforce is available for the 
execution of these critical national security projects.
    Military Construction Funding Initiatives.--The bill 
includes funding for military construction initiatives to 
address important unfunded priorities included in the 
Department of Defense's unfunded priority lists provided to 
Congress. The Committee notes that in recent years the military 
construction budget requests have been at historically low 
levels. Amounts budgeted for facility sustainment, restoration, 
and modernization are similarly low. The infrastructure 
initiatives in unfunded priority lists would ordinarily appear 
as part of the annual budget request, but were not included as 
the military construction budget remains severely constrained.
    For this reason, the Committee includes an additional 
$40,500,000 for the Army, $143,000,000 for the Navy and Marine 
Corps, $195,465,000 for the Air Force, $64,364,000 for Defense-
Wide, $16,500,000 for the Army National Guard, $34,200,000 for 
the Army Reserve, and $14,400,000 for Family Housing 
Construction, Army. All additional funding is reserved for 
projects that were included in the unfunded priority lists 
submitted to Congress.
    Rescissions.--The Committee recommends an administrative 
provision rescinding prior year unobligated funds due primarily 
to project bid savings and the slow execution of projects.
    Overseas Contingency Operations.--The Committee does not 
include funds requested by the President designated as Overseas 
Contingency Operations in title IV. Instead, the Committee 
fully funds these requested projects in the base military 
construction accounts in title I.

                     Military Construction Overview

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $6,916,539,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   6,124,204,000
Committee recommendation................................   6,294,542,000

          MILITARY CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNTS--PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    The military construction appropriation provides for 
acquisition, construction, installation, and equipment of 
temporary or permanent public works, military installations, 
facilities, and real property for the Department of Defense. 
This appropriation also provides for facilities required as 
well as funds for infrastructure projects and programs required 
to support bases and installations around the world.

                      Military Construction, Army

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $663,245,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     503,459,000
Committee recommendation................................     532,359,000

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $532,359,000 for the Army for 
fiscal year 2017. This amount is $130,886,000 below the fiscal 
year 2016 enacted level and $28,900,000 above the budget 
request. Further detail of the Committee's recommendation is 
provided in the State table at the end of this report.
    Defense Laboratory Enterprise Facilities and 
Infrastructure.--The Committee notes that DOD investments in 
Defense laboratories has been lacking, resulting in negative 
impacts on the ability of the military to develop new 
acquisition programs or perform cutting-edge research. At the 
same time, the Nation's near-peer competitors are making 
significant new investments in their research and development 
capabilities as part of the effort to close the technology gap 
with the U.S. military. Of additional concern, aging lab 
infrastructure also creates a disincentive to attracting new 
employees as DOD tries to rebuild its technical workforce.
    One of the tools that Congress has provided to incentivize 
DOD lab investment is the establishment of a higher threshold 
for unspecified minor military construction [UMMC] for 
laboratories to enable the services to keep up with a threat 
that evolves faster than the normal planning process. However, 
the Committee is concerned that the services are not 
programming sufficient UMMC to take full advantage of the 
laboratory revitalization initiative. For example, in fiscal 
year 2016, the Army, which operates an extensive network of DOD 
labs, did not allocate any minor military construction funding 
for necessary laboratory revitalization projects, and the 
request for UMMC in the Army has remained flat at $25,000,000. 
Therefore, the Committee recommends an additional $10,000,000 
to supplement unspecified minor construction, and the Army is 
encouraged to pursue opportunities to use the additional 
funding for lab revitalization.
    Major Range and Test Facility Bases.--The Committee is 
concerned about the lack of investment and sustainment of Major 
Range and Test Facility Bases. In the past 5 years, only seven 
military construction projects have been requested in direct 
support of test and evaluation missions at these bases 
nationwide. For example, White Sands Missile Range, which is 
the Nation's largest overland testing facility, has not 
received a military construction project in support of test and 
evaluation missions in over a decade. As a result, support for 
critical testing on missile systems such as the Standard 
Missile-2, Patriot Missile system, Joint Air to Surface 
Standoff Missile, Cruise Missile, and others may be adversely 
impacted. The lack of military construction investment at these 
test and evaluation facilities places future technology 
development at risk and threatens the ability to counter 
emerging threats. Therefore, the Committee directs the Defense 
Department to submit a report within 90 days after enactment of 
this act outlining its plan to address military construction 
requirements at Major Range and Test facilities.

              Military Construction, Navy and Marine Corps

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $1,669,239,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   1,027,763,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,087,572,000

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $1,087,572,000 for Navy and Marine 
Corps military construction for fiscal year 2017. This amount 
is $581,667,000 below the fiscal year 2016 enacted level and 
$59,809,000 above the budget request. Further detail of the 
Committee's recommendation is provided in the State table at 
the end of this report.

                    Military Construction, Air Force

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $1,389,185,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   1,481,058,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,579,798,000

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $1,579,798,000 for the Air Force 
in fiscal year 2017. This amount is $190,613,000 above the 
fiscal year 2016 enacted level and $98,740,000 above the budget 
request. Further detail of the Committee's recommendation is 
provided in the State table at the end of this report.
    Air Force Ballistic Missile Facilities.--The Committee is 
aware that ground-based intercontinental ballistic missile 
[ICBM] facilities at Malmstrom Air Force Base [AFB], Montana; 
Minot AFB, North Dakota; and F. E. Warren AFB, Wyoming, are 
aging and in urgent need of replacement. The Air Force has 
developed a funding roadmap to replace the Weapons Storage 
Facilities [WSFs] at each of the bases, beginning with the 
construction of a prototype facility at F. E. Warren AFB, which 
was funded in fiscal year 2016. A replacement WSF at Malmstrom, 
programmed for fiscal year 2019, will be based on the F. E. 
Warren prototype. A replacement facility for Minot AFB is also 
planned but is not programmed for funding in the current Future 
Years Defense Program [FYDP].
    Given the failing condition of the weapons storage 
facilities due to decades of wear-and-tear and a lack of 
sufficient maintenance and sustainment funding, the Committee 
urges the Air Force to prioritize replacement of not only the 
WSFs but also other aging facilities at these installations, 
which are the only Air Force bases in the Nation to have 
Minuteman-III ICBM launch capability, and to accelerate funding 
of both the Malmstrom and Minot WSFs within the current FYDP. 
As an Air Force analysis of the WSFs at Malmstrom earlier this 
year documented, continued deferral of replacing these 
facilities carries risks far beyond bricks-and-mortar 
deterioration, including the following impacts on operating 
costs and operational readiness:
  --Day-to-day operations, maintenance and labor costs have 
        increased 280 percent over the past 5 years while 
        engineers have executed patchwork repairs on existing 
        infrastructure.
  --An additional 3,000 man-hours of human surveillance is 
        required annually due to security system inadequacies.
  --Recent flooding and fire suppression issues cancelled 
        training and certification operations for 6 months 
        resulting in 4,000 lost man-hours.
  --Munitions experts are required to work extra shifts, which 
        likely contributed to a drop in retention from 75 
        percent to 20 percent in the last 5 years.
    As the Air Force analysis confirms, military construction 
is a key component of readiness. Failure to invest in needed 
military construction projects does not just impact the cost of 
trying to maintain a deteriorating facility, which in itself is 
substantial, but it also impacts training, readiness and 
retention of personnel--the very areas that the Department of 
Defense is focused on reinforcing in a time of severe budget 
constraints. Nowhere is this more important than in the 
Nation's nuclear deterrence efforts. As Secretary of the Air 
Force Deborah Lee James noted in testimony presented to the 
Senate Defense Appropriations Subcommittee on the fiscal year 
2017 Air Force budget request, ``There is no mission more 
critical than maintaining our Nation's nuclear capability.''
    It is clear from the analysis of the weapons storage 
facilities at Malmstrom AFB that adequate infrastructure is a 
key component of maintaining nuclear capability. Unfortunately, 
WSFs are not the only example of crumbling infrastructure at 
the Air Force ballistic missile fields. The Missile Alert 
Facilities at Malmstrom, which house the ICBM mission support 
personnel, are also in an advanced state of disrepair. Like the 
MSFs, the Missile Alert Facilities date to the early 1960s. The 
power, communications and air supply systems for the Launch 
Control Center are housed in unhardened rooms. The underground 
utilities have deteriorated to the point that they require 
extensive maintenance but remain subject to frequent water and 
sewage disruptions. According to officials at Malmstrom, the 
primary Missile Alert Facility structures are often infested 
with rodents, rattlesnakes and mold due to gaps between the 
foundation and wall structures as a result of the facilities 
settling. Of extreme concern to the Committee is that a 
military construction project for the first phase of 
construction to replace the Missile Alert Facilities at 
Malmstrom, which was programmed for fiscal year 2019 in the 
fiscal year 2016 Air Force FYDP, was eliminated from the fiscal 
year 2017-2021 FYDP due to budget constraints.
    Strategic nuclear deterrence capabilities cannot be 
sustained with third-rate support infrastructure. To assess the 
impact of indefinitely deferring replacement of the Missile 
Alert Facilities at Malmstrom and other ballistic missile 
bases, the Committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force to 
undertake an analysis of the cost of maintaining the existing 
Missile Alert Facilities at these bases including: (a) an 
assessment of day-to-day operations, maintenance and labor cost 
increases over the past 5 years; (b) annual personnel hours and 
costs required to maintain human security surveillance; (c) 
lost training and certification man-hours due to safety 
hazards; (d) estimated impact of increased workloads and 
substandard working conditions on personnel retention over the 
past 5 years; and (e) other factors impacting operational costs 
and readiness. The Secretary is directed to provide a report to 
the Committees on Appropriations of both Houses of Congress 
within 90 days of enactment of this act on the findings of the 
analysis and a projected cost and timeline for replacing the 
Weapons Alert Facilities at each of these bases.
    Air Force Facility Security Requirements.--The Committee is 
concerned with the Department's funding recommendation for the 
Air Force's unspecified minor construction account. An 
additional $10,000,000 is provided to assist installations in 
the continental U.S. with significant facility entry and exit 
point concerns. Priority should be given to installations with 
access control points that present safety, security and traffic 
hazards.
    Software Sustainment Infrastructure.--The Committee notes 
the growing demand for software sustainment resulting from the 
deployment of new, technologically advanced weapons systems. 
For example, the F-35 has more than 8 million lines of code, 
roughly four times as many as the F-22. As a result, the 
existing software sustainment infrastructure is under 
increasing stress. The Committee encourages the Air Force to 
prioritize the capitalization of its software sustainment 
infrastructure and to utilize all its authorities to ensure 
mission critical software needs are met.
    Physical Fitness Centers.--Physical fitness is a core 
requirement of military readiness, and the Committee commends 
the Air Force for programming the construction of multiple 
physical fitness centers over the fiscal year 2017 Future Years 
Defense Program [FYDP]. However, the Air Force program is still 
small, with only eight physical fitness centers programmed over 
the FYDP, and all but one--a fiscal year 2021 project for the 
Niagara Falls, NY, Air Reserve Station--are active Air Force 
projects. Physical fitness is equally important to members of 
the Air Guard and Air Force Reserve, who regularly train and 
serve alongside active duty airmen and women. Access to 
physical fitness centers such as the one proposed for the 
Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station will increase the readiness 
of Guard and reserve personnel to ensure they are adequately 
trained at the highest readiness level to be ready to deploy. 
The Committee therefore urges the Air Force to prioritize 
construction of the Niagara Falls facility within the FYDP and 
to program additional Guard and reserve physical fitness 
facilities in the fiscal year 2018 FYDP.
    KC-46 Strategic Basing.--The Committee supports the Air 
Force's long-term effort to recapitalize the United States' 
aging Air Force aerial refueling tanker fleet and has supported 
the beddown of the KC-46A with appropriations for Military 
Construction at the KC-46A Formal Training Unit, Main Operating 
Base 1, Main Operating Base 2, and Main Operating Base 3. The 
Committee is aware that the Air Force is currently developing a 
list of candidate installations through the strategic basing 
process for KC-46A Main Operating Base 4. The Committee is also 
aware that through this process, the Air Force is considering a 
possible reduction in the number of Primary Assigned Aircraft 
from 36 to 24 for this location. As the Air Force has proposed 
Main Operating Base 4 as the second and final Active Component 
KC-46A Main Operating Base in the continental United States, a 
reduction of a full squadron of Primary Assigned Aircraft in 
this laydown could have significant long-term impacts for the 
operations, training, and readiness of the KC-46A fleet. The 
KC-46A represents the future of the Air Force's aerial 
refueling capability which is an integral component of all air 
operations for the Air Force and the other services. 
Understanding the gravity of this decision, the Committee 
directs the Secretary of the Air Force to submit a report 
within 60 days of enactment of this act detailing the 
operational planning factors, operational risk, manpower 
efficiencies, maintenance efficiencies, and implications for 
National Guard and Reserve end strength.

                  Military Construction, Defense-Wide


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $2,242,867,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   2,056,091,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,038,980,000

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $2,038,980,000 for projects 
considered within the Defense-Wide account in fiscal year 2017. 
This amount is $203,887,000 below the fiscal year 2016 enacted 
level and $17,111,000 below the budget request. Further detail 
of the Committee's recommendation is provided in the State 
table at the end of this report.
    Medical Military Construction.--The Committee provides 
funding for eight projects to renovate or build new medical 
treatment facilities within the Department of Defense. Medical 
military construction budget submissions remain at historically 
low levels, forcing necessary projects to be deferred in the 
Future Years Defense Program [FYDP]. For example, the General 
Leonard Wood Army Community Hospital [GLWACH] replacement 
originally planned for fiscal year 2016 is once again deferred, 
now planned for fiscal year 2021. The Committee notes the 
Surgeon General of the United States Army testified before the 
Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Defense on March 9, 2016, 
that this hospital replacement project remains the Army's top 
medical military construction priority. The existing hospital 
last underwent a major renovation nearly 40 years ago. The 
Committee recognizes that the GLWACH serves a large population 
with few alternatives military health system providers in the 
surrounding area. Due to the quality of life importance of this 
and other medical facilities like it, the Committee strongly 
encourages the Department to prioritize and restore medical 
military construction projects within the FYDP submitted for 
fiscal year 2018. In addition, the Committee encourages the 
Department to continue collaborating with the Department of 
Veterans Affairs to pursue Joint DOD/VA medical facility 
projects.

               Military Construction, Army National Guard

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $197,237,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     232,930,000
Committee recommendation................................     232,930,000

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $232,930,000 for Military 
Construction, Army National Guard for fiscal year 2017. This 
amount is $35,693,000 above the fiscal year 2016 enacted level 
and equal to the budget request. Further detail of the 
Committee's recommendation is provided in the State table at 
the end of this report.
    Army National Guard Readiness Center Transformation Plan.--
Army National Guard Readiness Centers are integral to the 
Guard's mission. They provide critical operational training and 
administrative space, sensitive equipment storage, family and 
community support, and a base from which to stage emergency 
responses. However, the Army National Guard's 2014 Readiness 
Center Transformation Master Plan's findings report that the 
inventory's condition is deteriorating, and facilities have 
obsolete space configurations, insufficient emergency 
communication infrastructure, and deficient storage space. The 
report also outlined the staggering cost to address these 
failing facilities and the consequences of allowing them to 
continue to deteriorate. The Committee is concerned by the 
current state of the portfolio, and supports increased 
investments in National Guard Readiness Centers in accordance 
with the Readiness Center Transformation Master Plan so that 
they can better meet the needs of the Army Guard. Therefore, 
the Committee encourages the Department to prioritize 
investment in Readiness Center facilities with low readiness 
ratings, and to examine where efficiencies and cost-sharing can 
be achieved by co-locating Readiness Centers with other public 
facilities. The Committee further directs the Army to provide a 
report no later than 120 days after enactment of this Act on a 
plan to implement, as a first step, the National Guard's 
``Affordable Readiness'' Transformation Plan, including an 
annual investment estimate based on the proposed 15-year 
implementation timeline.

               Military Construction, Air National Guard

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $138,738,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     143,957,000
Committee recommendation................................     143,957,000

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $143,957,000 for Military 
Construction, Air National Guard for fiscal year 2017. This 
amount is $5,219,000 above the fiscal year 2016 enacted level 
and equal to the budget request. Further detail of the 
Committee's recommendation is provided in the State table at 
the end of this report.

                  Military Construction, Army Reserve

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $113,595,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      68,230,000
Committee recommendation................................      68,230,000

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $68,230,000 for Military 
Construction, Army Reserve for fiscal year 2017. This amount is 
$45,365,000 below the fiscal year 2016 enacted level and equal 
to the budget request. Further detail of the Committee's 
recommendation is provided in the State table at the end of 
this report.

                  Military Construction, Navy Reserve

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $36,078,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      38,597,000
Committee recommendation................................      38,597,000

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $38,597,000 for Military 
Construction, Navy Reserve for fiscal year 2017. This amount is 
$2,519,000 above the fiscal year 2016 enacted level and equal 
to the budget request. Further detail of the Committee's 
recommendation is provided in the State table at the end of 
this report.

                Military Construction, Air Force Reserve

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $65,021,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     188,950,000
Committee recommendation................................     188,950,000

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $188,950,000 for Military 
Construction, Air Force Reserve for fiscal year 2017. This 
amount is $123,929,000 above the fiscal year 2016 enacted level 
and equal to the budget request. Further detail of the 
Committee's recommendation is provided in the State table at 
the end of this report.

                   North Atlantic Treaty Organization


                      SECURITY INVESTMENT PROGRAM

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $135,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     177,932,000
Committee recommendation................................     177,932,000

                          PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    The North Atlantic Treaty Organization [NATO] appropriation 
provides for the U.S. cost share of the NATO Security 
Investment Program for the acquisition and construction of 
military facilities and installations (including international 
military headquarters) and for related expenses for the 
collective defense of the NATO Treaty area.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $177,932,000 for the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization Security Investment Program [NSIP] 
for fiscal year 2017 as requested. This amount is $42,932,000 
above the fiscal year 2016 enacted level and equal to the 
budget request.

               Department of Defense Base Closure Account

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $266,334,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     205,237,000
Committee recommendation................................     205,237,000

                          PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    Section 2711 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2014 (Public Law 112-239) consolidated the Base 
Closure Account 1990 and the Base Closure Account 2005 into a 
single Department of Defense Base Closure Account. The Base 
Closure Account provides for cleanup and disposal of property 
consistent with the four closure rounds required by the base 
closure acts of 1988 and 1990, and with the 2005 closure round 
required by the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Act of 
1990 (10 U.S.C. 2687 note).

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends a total of $205,237,000 for the 
Department of Defense Base Closure Account for fiscal year 
2017. This amount is $61,097,000 below the fiscal year 2016 
enacted level and equal to the budget request. Funds provided 
for fiscal year 2017 are for environmental cleanup and ongoing 
operations and maintenance.

                        Family Housing Overview

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $1,404,281,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   1,319,852,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,319,852,000

              FAMILY HOUSING ACCOUNTS--PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    The Family Housing appropriation provides funds for 
military family housing construction activities, operation and 
maintenance, the Family Housing Improvement Fund, and the 
Homeowners Assistance Program. Construction accounts provide 
funding for new construction, improvements and the Federal 
Government share of housing privatization. Operation and 
maintenance accounts fund costs associated with the maintenance 
and leasing of military family housing, including utilities, 
services, management, and furnishings.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $1,319,852,000 for Family Housing 
Construction, Operations and Maintenance, and the Department's 
family housing improvement fund for fiscal year 2017. This 
amount is $84,429,000 below the fiscal year 2016 enacted level 
and equal to the budget request.

             Family Housing Operation and Maintenance, Army

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $375,611,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     325,995,000
Committee recommendation................................     325,995,000

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $325,995,000 for family housing 
operation and maintenance, Army for fiscal year 2017. This 
amount is $49,616,000 below the fiscal year 2016 enacted level 
and equal to the budget request.

    Family Housing Operation and Maintenance, Navy and Marine Corps

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $353,036,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     300,915,000
Committee recommendation................................     300,915,000

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $300,915,000 for family housing 
operation and maintenance, Navy and Marine Corps, in fiscal 
year 2017. This amount is $52,121,000 below the fiscal year 
2016 enacted level and equal to the budget request.

          Family Housing Operation and Maintenance, Air Force

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $331,232,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     274,429,000
Committee recommendation................................     274,429,000

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $274,429,000 for family housing 
operation and maintenance, Air Force, in fiscal year 2017. This 
amount is $56,803,000 below the fiscal year 2016 enacted level 
and equal to the budget request.

         Family Housing Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $58,668,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      59,157,000
Committee recommendation................................      59,157,000

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $59,157,000 for family housing 
operation and maintenance, Defense-Wide, for fiscal year 2017. 
This amount is $489,000 above the fiscal year 2016 enacted 
level and equal to the budget request.

         Department of Defense Family Housing Improvement Fund

Appropriations, 2016....................................................
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      $3,258,000
Committee recommendation................................       3,258,000

                          PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    The Family Housing Improvement Fund appropriation provides 
for the Department of Defense to undertake housing initiatives 
and to provide an alternative means of acquiring and improving 
military family housing and supporting facilities. This account 
provides seed money for housing privatization initiatives.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $3,258,000 for the Family Housing 
Improvement Fund in fiscal year 2017. This amount is equal to 
the budget request.

                   Family Housing Construction, Army

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $108,695,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     200,735,000
Committee recommendation................................     200,735,000

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $200,735,000 for Army Family 
Housing Construction in fiscal year 2017. This amount is 
$92,040,000 above the fiscal year 2016 enacted level and equal 
to the budget request. Further detail of the Committee's 
recommendation is provided in the State table at the end of 
this report.

           Family Housing Construction, Navy and Marine Corps

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $16,541,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      94,011,000
Committee recommendation................................      94,011,000

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $94,011,000 for Family Housing 
Construction, Navy and Marine Corps. This amount is $77,470,000 
above the fiscal year 2016 enacted level and equal to the 
budget request. Further detail of the Committee's 
recommendation is provided in the State table at the end of 
this report.

                 Family Housing Construction, Air Force

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $160,498,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      61,352,000
Committee recommendation................................      61,352,000

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $61,352,000 for Family Housing 
Construction, Air Force, in fiscal year 2017. This amount is 
$99,146,000 below the fiscal year 2016 enacted level and equal 
to the budget request. Further detail of the Committee's 
recommendation is provided in the State table at the end of 
this report.

                       Administrative Provisions

    Sec. 101. The Committee includes a provision that restricts 
payments under a cost-plus-a-fixed-fee contract for work, 
except in cases of contracts for environmental restoration at 
base closure sites.
    Sec. 102. The Committee includes a provision that permits 
the use of funds for the hire of passenger motor vehicles.
    Sec. 103. The Committee includes a provision that permits 
the use of funds for defense access roads.
    Sec. 104. The Committee includes a provision that prohibits 
construction of new bases inside the continental United States 
for which specific appropriations have not been made.
    Sec. 105. The Committee includes a provision that limits 
the use of funds for purchase of land or land easements.
    Sec. 106. The Committee includes a provision that prohibits 
the use of funds to acquire land, prepare a site, or install 
utilities for any family housing except housing for which funds 
have been made available.
    Sec. 107. The Committee includes a provision that limits 
the use of minor construction funds to transfer or relocate 
activities among installations.
    Sec. 108. The Committee includes a provision that prohibits 
the procurement of steel unless American producers, 
fabricators, and manufacturers have been allowed to compete.
    Sec. 109. The Committee includes a provision that prohibits 
payments of real property taxes in foreign nations.
    Sec. 110. The Committee includes a provision that prohibits 
construction of new bases overseas without prior notification.
    Sec. 111. The Committee includes a provision that 
establishes a threshold for American preference of $500,000 
relating to architect and engineering services for overseas 
projects.
    Sec. 112. The Committee includes a provision that 
establishes preference for American contractors for military 
construction in the United States territories and possessions 
in the Pacific, and on Kwajalein Atoll, or in countries 
bordering the Arabian Gulf.
    Sec. 113. The Committee includes a provision that requires 
notification of military exercises involving construction in 
excess of $100,000.
    Sec. 115. The Committee includes a provision that permits 
funds appropriated in prior years to be available for 
construction authorized during the current session of Congress.
    Sec. 116. The Committee includes a provision that permits 
the use of expired or lapsed funds to pay the cost of 
supervision for any project being completed with lapsed funds.
    Sec. 117. The Committee includes a provision that permits 
obligation of funds from more than 1 fiscal year to execute a 
construction project, provided that the total obligation for 
such project is consistent with the total amount appropriated 
for the project.
    Sec. 118. The Committee includes a provision that permits 
the transfer of funds from Family Housing Construction accounts 
to the DOD Family Housing Improvement Fund and from Military 
Construction accounts to the DOD Military Unaccompanied Housing 
Improvement Fund.
    Sec. 119. The Committee includes a provision that provides 
transfer authority to the Homeowners Assistance Fund.
    Sec. 120. The Committee includes a provision that requires 
all acts making appropriations for military construction be the 
sole funding source of all operation and maintenance for family 
housing, including flag and general officer quarters, and 
limits the repair on flag and general officer quarters to 
$35,000 per unit per year without prior notification to the 
congressional defense committees.
    Sec. 121. The Committee includes a provision that provides 
authority to expend funds from the ``Ford Island Improvement'' 
account.
    Sec. 122. The Committee includes a provision that allows 
the transfer of expired funds to the Foreign Currency 
Fluctuation, Construction, Defense Account.
    Sec. 123. The Committee includes a provision that allows 
the reprogramming of military construction and family housing 
construction funds among projects and activities within the 
account in which they are funded.
    Sec. 124. The Committee includes a provision that prohibits 
the use of funds in this title for planning and design and 
construction of projects at Arlington National Cemetery.
    Sec. 125. The Committee includes a provision providing 
additional funds for unfunded military construction priorities.
    Sec. 126. The Committee includes a provision rescinding 
unobligated balances from various military construction 
accounts.
    Sec. 127. The Committee includes a provision regarding the 
consolidation or relocation of a U.S. Air Force RED HORSE 
Squadron outside of the United States.
    Sec. 128. The Committee includes a provision prohibiting 
the use of funds in this title to close or realign Naval 
Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The provision is intended to 
prevent the closure or transfer of the installation out of the 
possession of the United States, and maintain the Naval 
Station's long-standing regional security and migrant 
operations missions.

                                TITLE II

                     DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS

                       Items of Special Interest

                                HEARINGS

    The Subcommittee on Military Construction, Veterans 
Affairs, and Related Agencies held two hearings related to the 
fiscal year 2017 and 2018 Department of Veterans Affairs [VA] 
budget request. The subcommittee heard testimony from the 
Honorable David J. Shulkin, Under Secretary for Health, Mr. 
Danny G. I. Pummill, Acting Under Secretary for Benefits, and 
the Honorable Robert A. McDonald, Secretary of the Department 
of Veterans Affairs.

                  SUMMARY OF COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommendation includes $177,391,336,000 for 
the Department of Veterans Affairs for fiscal year 2017, 
including $102,532,481,000 in mandatory spending and 
$74,858,855,000 in discretionary spending. The Committee also 
recommends $66,385,032,000 in advance appropriations for 
veterans medical care for fiscal year 2018 and $103,935,996,000 
in advance appropriations for appropriated mandatories for 
fiscal year 2018.

                          DEPARTMENT OVERVIEW

    The Veterans Administration was established on July 21, 
1930, as an independent agency by Executive Order 5398, in 
accordance with the Act of July 3, 1930 (46 Stat. 1016). This 
act authorized the President to consolidate and coordinate 
Federal agencies specially created for or concerned with the 
administration of laws providing benefits to veterans, 
including the Veterans' Bureau, the Bureau of Pensions, and the 
National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers. On March 15, 
1989, the Veterans Administration was elevated to Cabinet-level 
status as the Department of Veterans Affairs.
    VA's mission is to serve America's veterans and their 
families as their principal advocate in ensuring they receive 
the care, support, and recognition they have earned in service 
to the Nation. As of September 30, 2015, there were an 
estimated 21.7 million living veterans, with 21.6 million of 
them residing in the United States and Puerto Rico. There were 
an estimated 26.1 million dependents (spouses and dependent 
children) of living veterans in the United States and Puerto 
Rico, and there were 594,000 survivors of deceased veterans 
receiving VA survivor benefits in the United States and Puerto 
Rico. Thus, approximately 48.3 million people, or 14.8 percent 
of the total estimated resident population of the United States 
and Puerto Rico, were recipients or potential recipients of 
veterans benefits from the Federal Government. VA's operating 
units include the Veterans Benefits Administration, Veterans 
Health Administration, National Cemetery Administration, and 
staff support offices.
    The Veterans Benefits Administration [VBA] provides an 
integrated program of nonmedical veterans benefits. VBA 
administers a broad range of benefits to veterans and other 
eligible beneficiaries through 56 regional offices and a 
records processing center in St. Louis, Missouri. The benefits 
provided include: compensation for service-connected 
disabilities; pensions for wartime, needy, and totally disabled 
veterans; vocational rehabilitation assistance; educational and 
training assistance; home buying assistance; estate protection 
services for veterans under legal disability; information and 
assistance through personalized contacts; and six life 
insurance programs.
    The Veterans Health Administration [VHA] develops, 
maintains, and operates a national healthcare delivery system 
for eligible veterans; carries out a program of education and 
training of healthcare personnel; conducts medical research and 
development; and furnishes health services to members of the 
Armed Forces during periods of war or national emergency. A 
system of 167 medical centers, 1,018 community-based outpatient 
clinics, 300 vet centers, and 135 community living centers is 
maintained to meet the VA's medical mission.
    The National Cemetery Administration [NCA] provides for the 
interment of the remains of eligible deceased servicemembers 
and discharged veterans in any national cemetery with available 
grave space; permanently maintains these graves; provides 
headstones and markers for the graves of eligible persons in 
national and private cemeteries; administers the grant program 
for aid to States in establishing, expanding, or improving 
State veterans cemeteries; and provides certificates to 
families of deceased veterans recognizing their contributions 
and service to the Nation. In 2017, cemetery activities will 
encompass 133 national cemeteries, one national veterans' 
burial ground, and 33 soldiers' lots and monument sites.
    Staff support offices include the Office of Inspector 
General, Boards of Contract Appeals and Veterans Appeals, and 
General Administration offices, which support the Secretary, 
Deputy Secretary, Under Secretary for Benefits, Under Secretary 
for Health, Under Secretary for Memorial Affairs, and General 
Counsel.
    Whistleblower Protection.--The Committee remains concerned 
about unacceptable retaliation against whistleblowers within 
the Department across the Nation. The Department has made many 
promises to foster a culture of openness by encouraging VA 
employees to report cases of wrongdoing, yet the Committee 
continues to hear reports that once reporting cases of 
wrongdoing, the whistleblowers become subjects of retaliation. 
For example, on February 25, 2016, the Office of Special 
Counsel revealed OIG's actions regarding complaints filed by 
whistleblowers in Illinois and Louisiana were ``incomplete'' 
and ``inadequate,'' and on September 17, 2015, OSC also 
reported to the President documented instances of whistleblower 
retaliation in Pennsylvania, Delaware, Missouri, Maryland, and 
Puerto Rico. The Committee finds such actions reprehensible, 
and the Committee continues to direct the Department to send a 
clear and unequivocal message throughout the VA system that 
retaliation against whistleblowers will not stand, and those in 
leadership who condone or ignore such retaliation will be held 
accountable. The Committee will continue to advocate on behalf 
of those employees who receive unfair retribution for reporting 
wrongdoing at VA facilities and will bring to the Department's 
attention every instance of whistleblower retaliation brought 
to its attention.
    As such, the Committee directs VA to create a formal 
process for whistleblowers to file complaints within VA that 
begins a paper trail for management to be held accountable for 
ignoring or mistreating whistleblowers. Specifically, the 
Department is directed to establish a Central Whistleblower 
Office that is not connected with VA General Counsel's office 
to investigate all whistleblower complaints at VA. This office 
will specialize in investigating whistleblower complaints, with 
all resources being allocated to protecting the rights on VA 
whistleblowers.
    Further, the Secretary shall carry out specified adverse 
actions against a supervisor who commits a prohibited personnel 
action relating to a whistleblower complaint. A supervisor who 
commits a prohibited personnel action shall not be paid any 
award or bonus for a 1 year period, and any award or bonus paid 
during that period shall be recouped. Retaliation includes, but 
is not limited to, taking a prohibited personnel action against 
a whistleblower for (1) filing a complaint, (2) providing 
information or participating as a witness in a whistleblower 
complaint investigation, (3) refusing to perform an action that 
is unlawful, and/or (4) engaging in protected communications 
that are related to the employee's duties. The Committee 
directs the Department to produce an annual report to Congress 
on how many whistleblower complaints were filed with VA, the 
location at which the alleged misconduct occurred, and the 
outcome of VA's investigation, including the length of time 
needed to reach a resolution, and a list of any personnel 
disciplinary actions taken.
    For purposes of testifying in an official capacity in front 
of either House of Congress, a Committee of either House of 
Congress, or a joint or select Committee of Congress regarding 
whistleblower complaints, an employee of the Department should 
be considered as performing an official duty, and as such, the 
Department shall provide travel expenses, including per diem in 
lieu of subsistence, to any such VA employee.
    The Committee is also concerned there is no proper 
mechanism at the Department to inform employees of their rights 
under the law with regards to reporting wrongdoing and 
whistleblower protection. The Committee is aware there is no 
whistleblower protection training for employees mandated within 
the Department, and there is not an official handbook or 
orientation outlining and explaining employee rights and 
responsibilities in this area, to include management and their 
role and responsibilities either when reporting wrongdoing 
themselves or supervising someone who has blown the whistle on 
misconduct, waste, fraud, or poor patient care. Therefore, the 
Department is directed to ensure all employees are educated on: 
their rights from retaliation, existing whistleblower 
protections, and resources available to them, to include the VA 
Office of the Inspector General [OIG], Office of Special 
Counsel, and the Merit System Protection Board and the location 
of such resources on the OIG Web site. The Department is 
directed to implement education for all employees on these 
issues through employee orientation, employee manuals, and 
periodic briefings. Additionally, employees must be educated on 
exemptions from privacy laws, specifically that healthcare 
providers are exempted from the Health Insurance Portability 
and Accountability Act [HIPAA] privacy rules when disclosing to 
OIG allegations of problems with patient care. Further, any VA 
employee who discloses HIPAA and Privacy Act information to OIG 
for purposes of providing such information for an OIG 
investigation is not in violation of these laws. The law shall 
be clearly communicated by the investigator prior to any 
investigative interview with a VA employee. Currently, the law 
is not clearly stated on the OIG Web site nor regularly 
communicated to VA employees. It is critical all employees 
understand their protections under the law and are encouraged 
to report misconduct, waste, fraud, and poor patient care so 
those engaging in wrongdoing may be held accountable. The 
Department is directed to submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations of both Houses of Congress no later than 90 days 
after enactment of this act detailing how VA is complying with 
the directives listed above.
    Electronic Health Record.--Achieving interoperability 
between the health records of the Department of Veterans 
Affairs and the Department of Defense remains one of the 
highest priorities of the Committee. The Committee believes 
from a servicemember's initial military entrance physical to 
their final interaction with VA, a seamless health record 
should follow the individual. VA's current VistA Evolution 
program and DOD's acquisition of an electronic health record 
are two separate and distinct programs, yet the Departments 
have a mandate from Congress to ensure the records are able to 
transmit computable data that can be used by clinicians on 
either side. The Committee also notes the increased utilization 
of medical care in the community by enrolled veterans makes it 
incumbent upon the Department to ensure medical information 
from outside VA can be easily brought into the VA's health 
record system. The Committee continues to expect the electronic 
health record [EHR] will be developed with an open architecture 
to best leverage the innovation of the private sector.
    Although the Committee was under the impression the 
decision to evolve VistA was final, in 2015, VA began a 
business case analysis to review the options available to the 
Department regarding purchasing a commercial-off-the-shelf 
product. The business case is also reviewing the current plan 
to evolve VistA. While the Committee supports this prudent 
decision to proceed forward with all available information, the 
Department is directed to make a decision about the future of 
the EHR as soon as possible. The development of other 
Information systems technology programs hinge on the decision 
regarding the EHR platform, including the replacement of the 
legacy scheduling system, and the Committee expects a decision 
from the Chief Information Officer of the Department no later 
than the end of the summer 2016.
    In fiscal years 2013, 2014, 2015, and 2016, Congress 
required the Department to provide information on the cost, 
timeline, performance benchmarks, and interoperability capacity 
of VistA Evolution before releasing 75 percent of the funds 
appropriated. Even though the future of VistA is uncertain, the 
Committee maintains in this act its oversight authority by 
placing similar constraints on the obligation or expenditure of 
funding for the development of VistA Evolution until certain 
conditions are met. As the decision over the EHR progresses 
this year, the Committee will inform VA of any changes to this 
constraint. Further explanation of the Committee's intent is 
included in the appropriate section of the report.
    Disability Claims Backlog.--The Committee commends the 
Department on its efforts to reduce the disability claims 
backlog and increase the accuracy of claims decisions, yet the 
processing of disability claims remains a major concern of the 
Committee. The Committee is committed to ensuring the 
Department maintains its goal of processing all claims over 125 
days with 98 percent accuracy.
    The Committee has not only fully funded the request for 
claims processing in recent years, but has provided increases 
above the budget requests for hiring and training claims 
processors, bolstering the migration to electronic claims 
processing systems, and addressing the increasing backlog of 
appeals at the Board of Veterans Appeals. As a result of these 
funding levels and the specific measures intended to bring the 
backlog down included in the fiscal year 2014 and 2015 Military 
Construction and Veterans Affairs and Related Agencies 
appropriations bill and report, VBA has made significant and 
notable progress in reducing the number of backlogged claims 
from a high of 611,000 in March 2013 to fewer than 77,483 as of 
April 2, 2016.
    The Committee is also committed to ensuring there is not a 
recurrence of any sizeable backlog or a reduction in accuracy. 
To that end, the Committee will continue to host reoccurring 
meeting of the disability claims interagency working group that 
began in May 2013. This group includes the Under Secretary of 
Benefits and representatives from the Department of Defense, 
the Social Security Administration, and the Internal Revenue 
Service. The Committee will continue to assert its oversight 
ability by monitoring these agencies as they work to better 
expedite the flow of interagency information needed to process 
claims in a timely manner. The Committee will continue to 
require the Department provide monthly updates on performance 
measures for each Regional Office.
    The Committee will continue to monitor VBA as it is making 
the shift from crisis-mode to maintenance-mode in the area of 
claims processing. Given the goal of ending the backlog at the 
end of 2016 was not met, the Committee directs VBA to continue 
working towards that goal. The Department must consider 
processing all claims within 125 days with 98 percent accuracy 
a mandate of VBA, and the Department should fund and staff this 
agency accordingly. The Committee is also focused on the next 
assumed issue for disability claims: the backlog at the 
appellate level.
    The fiscal year 2017 justification accompanying the budget 
request states appeals received by the Board of Veterans 
Appeals are projected to increase 57 percent, from 66,778 in 
2014 to 105,012 by the end of 2016. The Committee notes the 
Department is aware the appeals process needs reform and 
resources, and to that end, the Department is directed to 
submit a report no later than 180 days after enactment of this 
act on the actions VBA is taking to reduce the backlog of 
appeals and streamline the appeals process.

                    Veterans Benefits Administration

Appropriations, 2016.................................... $94,129,886,000
Advance Appropriations, 2017............................ 102,515,876,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   3,043,209,000
Committee recommendation, 2017..........................   3,073,209,000
Budget estimate, advance appropriations, 2018........... 103,935,996,000
Committee recommendation, advance appropriations, 2018.. 103,935,996,000

*The Committee notes the totals above reflect the shift of GOE, VBA from 
Departmental Administration to the Veterans Benefits Administration.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                        ADMINISTRATION OVERVIEW

    The Veterans Benefits Administration [VBA] is responsible 
for the payment of compensation and pension benefits to 
eligible service-connected disabled veterans, as well as 
education benefits and housing loan guarantees.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    In fiscal year 2016, the Committee provided 
$102,515,876,000 in advance for the Veterans Benefits 
Administration for fiscal year 2017. This included 
$86,083,128,000 for Compensation and pensions; $16,340,828,000 
for Readjustment benefits; and $91,920,000 for Veterans 
insurance and indemnities. For fiscal year 2017, the Committee 
recommends an additional $16,605,000 for Veterans insurance and 
indemnities. Additionally, the Committee recommendation 
includes $198,856,000 for the Veterans Housing Benefit Program 
Fund administrative expenses; $36,000 for the Vocational 
Rehabilitation Loans Program account, with $389,000 for 
administrative expenses; $1,163,000 for the Native American 
Veteran Housing Loan Program account; $2,856,160,000 for 
General Operating Expenses, Veterans Benefits Administration 
account; and an advance appropriation of $103,935,996,000 for 
fiscal year 2018.
    The Committee also notes the move of the General Operating 
Expenses, Veterans Benefits Administration account from 
Departmental Administration to the Veterans Benefits 
Administration with the fiscal year 2017 recommendation. This 
move puts GOE,VBA back under its appropriate section within the 
act, and the Committee instructs the Department to place 
GOE,VBA in this location with the fiscal year 2018 request.

                       COMPENSATION AND PENSIONS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2016.................................... $76,865,545,000
Advance Appropriations, 2017............................  86,083,128,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................  86,083,128,000
Committee recommendation, 2017..........................  86,083,128,000
Budget estimate, advance appropriations, 2018...........  90,119,449,000
Committee recommendation, advance appropriations, 2018..  90,119,449,000

                          PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    Compensation is payable to living veterans who have 
suffered impairment of earning power from service-connected 
disabilities. The amount of compensation is based upon the 
impact of disabilities on a veteran's earning capacity. Death 
compensation or dependency and indemnity compensation is 
payable to the surviving spouses and dependents of veterans 
whose deaths occur while on active duty or result from service-
connected disabilities. A clothing allowance may also be 
provided for service-connected veterans who use a prosthetic or 
orthopedic device. In fiscal year 2017, the Department 
estimates it will obligate $79,677,123,000 for payments to 
4,427,225 veterans, 405,014 survivors, and 1,140 dependents 
receiving special benefits.
    Pensions are an income security benefit payable to needy 
wartime veterans who are precluded from gainful employment due 
to nonservice-connected disabilities which render them 
permanently and totally disabled. Public Law 107-103, the 
Veterans Education and Benefits Expansion Act of 2001, restored 
the automatic presumption of permanent and total nonservice 
connected disability for purposes of awarding a pension to 
veterans age 65 and older, subject to the income limitations 
that apply to all pensioners. Death pensions are payable to 
needy surviving spouses and children of deceased wartime 
veterans. The rate payable for both disability and death 
pensions is determined on the basis of the annual income of the 
veteran or their survivors. In fiscal year 2017, the Department 
estimates that the Pensions program will provide benefits to 
297,093 veterans and 209,606 survivors totaling $6,087,586,000.
    The Compensation and Pensions program funds certain burial 
benefits on behalf of eligible deceased veterans. These 
benefits provide the purchase and transportation costs for 
headstones and markers, graveliners, and pre-placed crypts; and 
provide partial reimbursement for privately purchased outer 
burial receptacles. In fiscal year 2017, the Department 
estimates the Compensation and Pensions program will obligate 
$225,525,000 providing burial benefits. This funding will 
provide 45,065 burial allowances, 23,138 burial plot 
allowances, 24,810 service-connected death awards, 497,644 
burial flags, 368,059 headstones or markers, 44,063 graveliners 
or reimbursement for privately purchased outer burial 
receptacles, and 635 caskets and urns for the internment of the 
remains of veterans without next of kin.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    In fiscal year 2016, the Committee provided an advance 
appropriation of $86,083,128,000 for fiscal year 2017. The 
Committee recommendation includes an advance appropriation of 
$90,119,449,000 for Compensation and pensions for fiscal year 
2018. This is $4,036,321,000 above the fiscal 2017 request and 
equal to the fiscal year 2018 budget request.

                         READJUSTMENT BENEFITS

Appropriations, 2016.................................... $14,313,357,000
Advance Appropriations, 2017............................  16,340,828,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................  16,340,828,000
Committee recommendation, 2017..........................  16,340,828,000
Budget estimate, advance appropriations, 2018...........  13,708,648,000
Committee recommendation, advance appropriations, 2018..  13,708,648,000

                          PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    The Readjustment benefits appropriation finances the 
education and training of veterans and servicemembers under 
chapters 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 39, 41, 42 and 43 of 
title 38, United States Code. These benefits include the All-
Volunteer Force Educational Assistance Program (Montgomery GI 
bill) and the Post 9/11 Educational Assistance Program. Basic 
benefits are funded through appropriations made to the 
readjustment benefits appropriation and by transfers from the 
Department of Defense. This account also finances vocational 
rehabilitation, specially adapted housing grants, specially 
adapted automobile grants for certain disabled veterans, and 
educational assistance allowances for eligible dependents of 
those veterans who died from service-connected causes or who 
have a total permanent service-connected disability, as well as 
dependents of servicemembers who were captured or missing in 
action.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    In fiscal year 2016, the Committee provided an advance 
appropriation of $16,340,828,000 for Readjustment benefits 
fiscal year 2017. The Committee recommendation includes an 
advance appropriation of $13,708,648,000 for Readjustment 
benefits for fiscal year 2018. This is $2,632,180,000 below the 
fiscal year 2017 request and equal to the fiscal year 2018 
budget request.

                   VETERANS INSURANCE AND INDEMNITIES

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $77,160,000
Advance Appropriations, 2017............................      91,920,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      16,605,000
Committee recommendation, 2017..........................      16,605,000
Budget estimate, advance appropriations, 2018...........     107,899,000
Committee recommendation, advance appropriations, 2018..     107,899,000

                          PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    The Veterans insurance and indemnities appropriation 
consists of the former appropriations for military and naval 
insurance, applicable to World War I veterans; National Service 
Life Insurance, applicable to certain World War II veterans; 
servicemen's indemnities, applicable to Korean conflict 
veterans; and veterans mortgage life insurance to individuals 
who have received a grant for specially adapted housing.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    In fiscal year 2016, the Committee provided an advance 
appropriation of $91,920,000 for Veterans insurance and 
indemnities for fiscal year 2017. The Committee recommendation 
includes an advance appropriation of $107,899,000 for Veterans 
insurance and indemnities for fiscal year 2018. This is 
$15,979,000 above the fiscal year 2017 advanced request and 
equal to the fiscal year 2018 budget request.

                 VETERANS HOUSING BENEFIT PROGRAM FUND

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                         Administrative
                                       Program account      expenses
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Appropriations, 2016................  ................      $164,558,000
Budget estimate, 2017...............  ................       198,856,000
Committee recommendation............  ................       198,856,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    The Veterans housing benefit program fund provides for all 
costs associated with VA's direct and guaranteed housing loan 
programs, with the exception of the Native American veteran 
housing loan program.
    VA loan guaranties are made to servicemembers, veterans, 
reservists, and unremarried surviving spouses for the purchase 
of homes, condominiums, and manufactured homes, and for 
refinancing loans. VA guarantees part of the total loan, 
permitting the purchaser to obtain a mortgage with a 
competitive interest rate, even without a downpayment, if the 
lender agrees. VA requires a downpayment be made for a 
manufactured home. With a VA guaranty, the lender is protected 
against loss up to the amount of the guaranty if the borrower 
fails to repay the loan.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends such sums as may be necessary for 
funding subsidy payments, and $198,856,000 for administrative 
expenses for fiscal year 2017. Bill language limits gross 
obligations for direct loans for specially adapted housing to 
$500,000.

            VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                         Administrative
                                       Program account      expenses
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Appropriations, 2016................           $31,000          $367,000
Budget estimate, 2017...............            36,000           389,000
Committee recommendation............            36,000           389,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    The Vocational Rehabilitation Loans Program account covers 
the cost of direct loans for vocational rehabilitation of 
eligible veterans and, in addition, includes administrative 
expenses necessary to carry out the direct loan program. Loans 
of up to $2,517,000 (based on the indexed chapter 31 
subsistence allowance rate) are currently available to service-
connected disabled veterans enrolled in vocational 
rehabilitation programs, as provided under 38 U.S.C. chapter 
31, when the veteran is temporarily in need of additional 
assistance. Repayment is made in monthly installments, without 
interest, through deductions from future payments of 
compensation, pension, subsistence allowance, educational 
assistance allowance, or retirement pay. Virtually all loans 
are repaid in full and most in less than one year.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $36,000 for program costs and 
$389,000 for administrative expenses for the Vocational 
Rehabilitation Loans Program account. The administrative 
expenses may be paid to the General Operating Expenses, 
Veterans Benefits Administration account. Bill language is 
included limiting program direct loans to $2,517,000. It is 
estimated VA will make 2,618 loans in fiscal year 2017, with an 
average amount of $962.

          NATIVE AMERICAN VETERAN HOUSING LOAN PROGRAM ACCOUNT

Appropriations, 2016....................................      $1,134,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................       1,163,000
Committee recommendation................................       1,163,000

                          PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    The Native American veteran housing loan program is 
authorized by 38 U.S.C. chapter 37, section 3761 to provide 
direct loans to Native American veterans living on trust lands. 
The loans are available to purchase, construct, or improve 
homes to be occupied as veteran residences or to refinance a 
loan previously made under this program in order to lower the 
interest rate. The principal amount of a loan under this 
authority generally may not exceed $417,000 however, in some 
locations this limit may be higher depending on median area 
home prices. Veterans pay a funding fee of 1.25 percent of the 
loan amount, although veterans with a service-connected 
disability are exempt from paying the fee. Before a direct loan 
can be made, the veteran's tribal organization must sign a 
memorandum of understanding with VA regarding the terms and 
conditions of the loan. The Native American Veteran Housing 
Loan Program began as a pilot program in 1993 and was made 
permanent by Public Law 109-233, the Veterans Housing 
Opportunity and Benefits Act of 2006.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $1,163,000 for administrative 
expenses associated with this program. This is $29,000 below 
the fiscal year 2016 enacted level and equal to the budget 
request.

      GENERAL OPERATING EXPENSES, VETERANS BENEFITS ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $2,707,734,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   2,826,160,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,856,160,000

                          PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    The General Operating Expenses, Veterans Benefits 
Administration account provides funding for the Veterans 
Benefits Administration to administer entitlement programs such 
as service-connected disability compensation, education 
benefits, and vocational rehabilitation services.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $2,856,160,000 for the General 
Operating Expenses, Veterans Benefits Administration account, 
which is $148,426,000 above the fiscal year 2016 enacted level 
and $30,000,000 above the budget request. The Committee has 
included bill language to make available through September 30, 
2018, up to 5 percent of the General Operating Expenses, 
Veterans Benefits Administration account.
    Disability Claims Processing.--The Committee remains 
concerned over the growing backlog of disability claims at all 
stages of the appeals process. The fiscal year 2017 
justification accompanying the Department's budget submission 
notes the number of cases received by the Board of Veterans 
[BVA] appeals increased 57 percent, from 66,778 in 2014 to 
105,012 in 2016. Each year since 1996, the volume of appeals 
received by VBA equated to 9 to 15 percent of the total claims 
completed in those years. The Board notes that it expects the 
backlog to increase dramatically over the coming years without 
additional resources and legislative reform. The Committee has 
repeatedly expressed its concern over the backlog and provided 
additional resources beyond the President's request to help 
address the issue. To date, funding has largely been directed 
at increasing capacity at Board of Veterans Appeals, including 
hiring an additional 242 full-time employees since 2015.
    The Committee recommends the Department consider a more 
comprehensive approach to increasing capacity in the appeals 
process, specifically hiring additional BVA Members as well as 
Decision Review Officers. Since 2011, the Board of Veterans 
Appeals has added more than 250 new staff; however, the number 
of Board Members has increased only slightly from 60 to 64. 
Given the dramatic increase in workload, additional Board 
Members may be necessary. In addition, despite pending appeals 
exceeding several years, some Regional Offices employ two or 
fewer Decision Review Officers. To begin to fully address the 
rapidly expanding backlog of appeals claims, VA should consider 
increasing its capacity at all stages of the appeals process.
    VBA Staffing Levels.--The Committee remains concerned about 
the Department's staffing and production model and directs VA 
to conduct an assessment of the VBA staffing and production 
models, including its resource allocation model. This 
assessment shall include discussion on efforts by the VBA 
Office of Strategic Planning to develop a workforce capacity 
model and a discussion of how the National Work Queue 
initiative will impact staffing throughout VBA. The Department 
is directed to submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations of both Houses of Congress no later than 180 
days after enactment of this act detailing its findings.
    Women Veteran Participation Rates.--The Committee directs 
the Department to include an analysis of trends and 
satisfaction rates among women veterans participating in the 
Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment program in the annual 
report to Congress to ensure these services are adapting to the 
changing demographics of veterans and the needs of women 
veterans with disabilities.
    Gulf War Veterans Claims for Service-Connected Disability 
Compensation.--The Committee is concerned by the Department's 
rates of denial of Gulf War veterans' claims for undiagnosed 
illnesses and chronic multi-symptom illnesses. The Department 
is directed to provide the Committees on Appropriations of both 
Houses of Congress with a finalized Disability Benefits 
Questionnaire [DBQ] within 180 days of the enactment of this 
act for each of these types of claims for which a DBQ does not 
currently exist. The Committee urges the Department to make 
permanent the period for filing Gulf War presumptive claims 
under 38 CFR 3.317. While the Committee commends VA on its 
efforts to revise the Compensation and Pension manual for 
``Service Connection for Certain Disabilities Associated with 
Gulf War Service,'' concern remains that VA claims adjudicators 
are not consistently following these changes.
    Work-Study Program.--The VA work-study program allows 
veterans and eligible dependents who are in school to be paid 
for working up to 20 hours a week on a job that is directly 
related to Department activities. These activities could be 
part-time work at a local VA hospital, benefits office, Vet 
Center, or at the school handling VA-related work. The program 
not only helps the student cover school-related expenses, it 
also gives them work experience that can help bolster their 
resume as they search for employment after graduation. The 
Committee supports this program and is very concerned about 
recent reports of delays in the VA processing of work-study 
participants pay. The Committee is aware that in some locations 
it is taking as long as 40 days for the pay to be processed. 
This is unacceptable, and the Department is directed to report 
to the Committees on Appropriations of both Houses of Congress 
within 60 days on steps it is taking to better monitor the time 
it takes to process pay for work-study participants and to 
address any identified delays in the process.

                     Veterans Health Administration

Appropriations, 2016.................................... $61,767,227,000
Advance appropriations, 2017............................  63,271,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   2,391,359,000
Committee recommendation, 2017..........................   2,249,459,000
Budget estimate, advance appropriations, 2018...........  66,385,032,000
Committee recommendation, advance appropriations, 2018..  66,385,032,000

                        ADMINISTRATION OVERVIEW

    The Veterans Health Administration [VHA] is home to the 
United States' largest integrated healthcare system consisting 
of 167 medical centers, 1,018 community-based outpatient 
clinic, 300 vet centers, and 135 community living centers.
    The Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Care Collections 
Fund [MCCF] was established by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 
(Public Law 105-33). In fiscal year 2004, Public Law 108-199 
allowed the Department to deposit first-party and 
pharmaceutical co-payments, third-party insurance payments and 
enhanced-use collections, long-term care co-payments, 
Compensated Work Therapy Program collections, Compensation and 
Pension Living Expenses Program collections, and Parking 
Program fees into the MCCF.
    The Parking Program provides funds for the construction, 
alteration, and acquisition (by purchase or lease) of parking 
garages at VA medical facilities authorized by 38 U.S.C. 8109. 
The Secretary is required under certain circumstances to 
establish and collect fees for the use of such garages and 
parking facilities. Receipts from the parking fees are to be 
deposited into the MCCF and are used for medical services 
activities.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    In fiscal year 2016, the Committee provided $63,271,000,000 
in advance appropriations for VA's medical care accounts for 
fiscal year 2017. This included $51,673,000,000 for Medical 
services, $6,524,000,000 for Medical support and compliance, 
and $5,074,000,000 for Medical facilities. The Committee also 
includes an Administrative Provision allowing the Department to 
carry forward into fiscal year 2017 certain amounts provided as 
an advance for fiscal year 2016. For fiscal year 2017, the 
Committee recommends an additional $1,078,993,000 for Medical 
services. Additionally, the Committee recommendation includes 
$663,366,000 for Medical and prosthetic research. Medical care 
collections are expected to be $2,637,000. The Committee 
recommendation also includes an advance appropriation of 
$63,499,914,000 for veterans medical care for fiscal year 2018.
    Vet Centers.--The Committee recommendation includes the 
full budget request for readjustment counseling at Vet Centers. 
Vet Centers are community-based counseling centers that provide 
a wide range of social and psychological services. These 
services include: professional readjustment counseling to 
veterans and active duty servicemembers, counseling for the 
victims of military sexual trauma, bereavement counseling for 
families who experience an active duty death, substance abuse 
assessments and referrals, VBA benefit information and 
referrals to Regional Offices, and employment counseling. 
Certain services also extend to the family members as a means 
to assist in the readjustment for veterans and active duty 
servicemembers. The Department is directed to continue to build 
the necessary readjustment counseling capacity across the 
country in order to address the continued growth in workload.
    Female Veterans.--The Committee continues to believe that 
VA must be poised to address the changing demographic of 
today's and tomorrow's veterans in order to fulfill its 
mission. Toward this end, the Committee recommendation includes 
$535,400,000 for gender-specific healthcare. This is 
$20,000,000 over the budget estimate for fiscal year 2017. The 
Committee also encourages the Department to consider a mobile 
healthcare pilot program to provide gender specific services, 
awareness of benefits, and outreach to women veterans utilizing 
mobile healthcare infrastructure. This innovative model is 
designed to fill the current gap in VA gender-specific services 
as VA works to expand infrastructure and hire the needed staff 
for specialty care. Additionally, the Committee is concerned 
with the Department's research, testing, development, and 
treatment capabilities with regards to women veterans and their 
specific prosthetic needs; including medically prescribed 
prosthetic and sensory aids, medical devices, assistive aids, 
repairs, and services which maximize independence and enhance 
quality of life. The Committee urges an aggressive and targeted 
women veterans' prosthetic program. In order to ensure proper 
care and to better meet the needs of women veterans, the 
Department is directed to prioritize the acquisition of gender 
specific prosthetics with the funds appropriated to ensure 
every eligible woman veteran receives high-quality 
comprehensive care including specific treatment and long-term 
services. Furthermore, the Committee directs VA to meet all of 
its commitments to treat and provide continuum care for women 
veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom [OEF], Operating Iraqi 
Freedom [OIF], and Operation New Dawn [OND] and servicemembers 
in 2016 and 2017. The Department is directed to submit the 
specific funding amounts allocated for women veterans 
prosthetics in fiscal year 2017 to the Committees on 
Appropriations of both Houses of Congress no later than 180 
days after enactment of this act.
    Domiciliary Program.--The Committee notes recent reports of 
safety gaps in the VA domiciliary program. Therefore, the 
Committee directs the Department to address security concerns 
and assess whether the current program can meet the needs of 
veterans who are at heightened risk for overdose or suicide. 
The Department's assessment should include alternatives to the 
domiciliary program if it finds the current program cannot meet 
the needs of these veterans.
    Capacity Need.--In order for the Committee to better 
understand capacity needs across the Veterans Health 
Administration, particularly for those critical services that 
have no private or community sector alternatives, the 
Department is directed to submit a report annually to the 
Committees on Appropriations of both Houses of Congress on 
bedding and staffing capacities in mental health, amputations, 
spinal cord injury, and blinded rehabilitation. The first 
report shall be delivered to the Committees no later than 1 
year after enactment of this act.
    Education Debt Reduction Program.--The Department is 
directed provide a breakdown of spending by VA in connection 
with the education debt reduction program of the Department 
under subchapter VII of chapter 76 of title 38, United States 
Code. The breakout shall include the following elements: (1) 
the amount spent by the Department in debt reduction payments 
during the three year period preceding the submittal of the 
report disaggregated by the medical profession of the 
individual receiving the payments; (2) a description of how the 
Department prioritizes such spending by medical profession, 
including an assessment of whether such priority reflects the 
five occupations identified in the most recent determination by 
VA OIG as having the largest staffing shortages in VHA; and (3) 
a description of the actions taken by the Secretary to increase 
the effectiveness of such spending for purposes of recruitment 
of healthcare providers to the Department, including efforts to 
more consistently include eligibility for the education debt 
reduction program in vacancy announcements of positions for 
healthcare providers at VA.
    Promotion of Federal Burn Pits Registry.--The Committee 
directs the Department to work with State Governors and State 
veterans affairs agencies to promote and educate State 
officials about the Federal Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit 
Registry. The Committee is concerned that efforts by the States 
have led to confusion among veterans about which registry is 
the official registry of the U.S. Department of Veterans 
Affairs. The Committee urges the Department to increase 
outreach to veterans and State governments to communicate the 
existence and purpose of the Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit 
Registry.

                            MEDICAL SERVICES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2016.................................... $49,972,360,000
Advance appropriations, 2017............................  51,673,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   1,078,993,000
Committee recommendation, 2017..........................   1,078,993,000
Budget estimate, advance appropriations, 2018...........  44,886,554,000
Committee recommendations, advance appropriations, 2018.  44,886,554,000

                          PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    The Medical Services account provides for medical services 
for eligible enrolled veterans and other beneficiaries in VA 
healthcare facilities, including VA medical centers and VA 
outpatient clinics.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    In fiscal year 2016, the Committee provided an advance 
appropriation of $51,673,000,000 for fiscal year 2017. The 
recommendation for fiscal year 2017 includes an additional 
$1,078,993,000 as included in the budget request. In addition, 
VA has the authority to retain co-payments and third-party 
collections, estimated to total $2,637,000,000 in fiscal year 
2017.
    The Committee recommendation also includes an advance 
appropriation of $44,886,554,000 for Medical services for 
fiscal year 2018. This is $6,786,446,000 below the level for 
fiscal year 2017 and equal to the fiscal year 2018 budget 
request.
    Stroke Telemedicine.--Stroke is a leading cause of serious, 
long-term disability and dementia in the U.S. More than half of 
veterans are over age 65 putting them at an increased risk of 
stroke. Fast care is critical in treating stroke. Research 
shows for every 15 minute reduction in the time from symptom 
onset to treatment, 5.1 percent more patients are able to 
return home. The Committee is aware stroke telemedicine, or 
telestroke, has proven to be tremendously beneficial in 
improving access to high quality stroke care in rural and 
neurologically-underserved areas and in reducing disability and 
the need for long-term care following a stroke. The Committee 
urges the Department to consider the significant potential 
benefits of implementing a telestroke program for both veterans 
and their families as well as to the VA healthcare system and 
taxpayers. The Department is directed to submit a report to the 
Committees on Appropriations of both Houses of Congress no 
later than 90 days after enactment of this act detailing the 
status of its plans to implement telestroke within VA medical 
centers that do not currently have around-the-clock 
neurological expertise available to veterans who suffer a 
stroke.
    Manipulation of Appointment Scheduling.--In the wake of the 
high-profile scandal involving manipulation of veterans' 
healthcare appointment scheduling, which served to artificially 
suppress excessive wait times for veterans to receive health 
services, the Committee remains concerned about VA's handling 
of allegations made by whistleblowers that VA officials 
manipulated scheduling processes, in violation of the 
Department's own directive. In fact, when reviewing a summary 
of an investigation into allegations of scheduling protocol 
violations conducted by the VA OIG, the Office of Special 
Counsel [OSC] found the ``focus and tone of the OIG 
investigations appear to be intended to discredit the 
whistleblowers by focusing on the word `secret' rather than 
reviewing the access to care issues identified by the 
whistleblowers and in the OSC referrals.'' Moreover, while OIG 
has uncovered indications of access to care challenges at 
several VA facilities, according to OSC, OIG did not analyze 
the wait-time information or provide recommendations for 
improvement. In the case of the Edward J. Hines, Jr. VA Medical 
Center in Chicago, IL, OSC found whistleblower allegations 
regarding improper scheduling protocols that created the false 
appearance of acceptable wait times while masking significant 
delays in veterans' access to care have never been sufficiently 
investigated. As a result, by OIG's own admission, scheduling 
protocol violations occurred at VA facilities in at least seven 
States (Arkansas, California, Delaware, Illinois, New York, 
Texas, and Vermont). As such, the Department is directed to 
submit a report to the Committees on Appropriations of both 
Houses of Congress no later than 180 days after enactment of 
this act detailing the administrative actions taken in response 
to substantiated claims of scheduling protocol violations by VA 
employees, including specific employee disciplinary actions, as 
well as a description of corrective actions VA has implemented 
or plans to implement, to ensure veterans receive quality, 
timely access to health services.
    Compliance with Reviews of Healthcare Providers.--The 
Committee is concerned VHA employees accused of wrongdoing are 
routinely transferred to other VA facilities or leave the 
Department while accusations of misconduct against them remain 
unresolved. In the case of the VA Illiana Health System in 
Danville, IL, as recently as April 2015, a physician whose 
medical license had previously been suspended, and against whom 
criminal charges were later filed, was hired as a result of 
insufficient screening processes at VA. The Department is 
directed to submit a report to the Committees on Appropriations 
of both Houses of Congress no later than 180 days after 
enactment of this act on the compliance by the Department with 
its policy to conduct a review of each VA healthcare provider 
who transfers to another medical facility within VHA or leaves 
the Department to determine whether there are any concerns, 
complaints, or allegations of violations relating to the 
medical practice of the healthcare provider in order to combat 
the trend within VA of simply transferring poor performing 
providers to other facilities where they may continue to 
jeopardize patient health.
    Curing Hepatitis C Within the Veteran Population.--Last 
year, the Committee included language in the act that funds the 
treatment of Hepatitis C within the VA system at no less than 
$1.5 billion in fiscal year 2017. Given the fluidity of drug 
availability and drug pricing, the Committee directs VA to keep 
it apprised of changes in this area, including changes related 
to funding needs. The Committee directs VA to continue funding 
the treatment of Hepatitis C aggressively with the objective of 
treating and curing as many veterans as possible in the 
shortest amount of time. The Department is directed to continue 
its quarterly updates to the Committees on Appropriations of 
both Houses of Congress detailing the expenditures and 
obligations of funding Hepatitis C treatment, the number of 
veterans treated, the number of veterans deemed cured, and the 
projection of spending, new starts for drug treatment, and 
number of veterans who will be cured in the next quarter.
    Service Dogs for Veterans.--The Committee is concerned by 
the significant delays with VA research efforts associated with 
service dogs, and the resulting impact on VA policy decisions 
with respect to the placement of service dogs for psychological 
injuries, including PTSD. The Committee authorized VA to 
provide service dogs for veterans with mental illnesses in 
Section 229 of the 2010 Military Construction, Veterans Affairs 
& Related Agencies Appropriations Act (Public Law 111-117). 
However, VA maintains it will not support the provision of 
service dogs for psychological injuries until the VA research 
study is complete and provides scientific evidence of the 
benefits of such placement. With the high suicide rate among 
veterans and almost daily reports from veterans that service 
dogs are saving their lives, it is concerning VA continues to 
indicate its research results are still years away, and there 
will be no revision of its policy with respect to service dogs 
for psychological illnesses. To help in the research effort, VA 
is encouraged to create a VA-Department of Defense working 
group to collaborate on the use of service dogs for 
psychological injuries, align related research efforts, 
identify best practices, and develop a strategy and process to 
provide service dogs to veterans who need them. This working 
group may include representatives from the VA Office of 
Prosthetics and Sensory Aids, VA Mental Health Services, the VA 
Office of Patient Centered Care and Cultural Transformation, 
Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, the Uniformed 
Services University of the Health Sciences, and Assistance Dog 
International service dog organizations with significant 
experience in working with and placing service dogs with 
veterans.
    VEO Reimbursements.--Within the General Administration 
account, the budget request includes an appropriation of 
$72,600,000 for the Veterans Experience Office [VEO]. VEO is a 
cornerstone element of the Secretary's reform initiatives. 
VEO's mission is ``building trusted, lifelong relationships 
with Veterans, their families, and supporters.'' VEO was 
established in 2016 as part of the MyVA Taskforce and was 
funded through reimbursements from VA's three administrations 
and various staff offices. Fiscal Year 2017 is the first year 
appropriated funds were requested directly for VEO. In fiscal 
year 2016, the Medical Care accounts provided an estimate of 
$68,700,000 to fund VEO through a reimbursable arrangement 
(other accounts provided $7,600,000, for a total of $76,300,000 
for VEO). Typically, when an office or function moves from 
reimbursable authority to budget authority through a direct 
appropriation, the funding is reduced in the offices providing 
the reimbursable funding. This avoids double budgeting for the 
same office or function. VA's 2017 budget justifications do not 
show where a $72,600,000 reduction was taken to offset the 
direct appropriation to VEO. The Committee considered reducing 
VA's request by $72,600,000 to correct for this double 
budgeting. Instead, the Committee has taken and reapplied these 
resources to high priority programs funded in the Medical 
Services account, as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Program               Requested    Additional       Total
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Womens Veterans (gender         $515,000,000   $20,000,000  $535,000,000
 specific health care)........
Caregivers....................   725,000,000    10,000,000   735,000,000
Homelessness: Grand & Per Diem   216,068,000    10,000,000   226,068,000
 Program [GPD]................
Homelessness: Supportive         300,000,000    20,000,000   320,000,000
 Services for Veterans and
 Families.....................
Veterans Crisis Line..........    38,645,000     8,700,000    47,345,000
                                             --------------
                                ............    68,700,000  ............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Therapeutic Benefits of Farming.--The Committee notes over 
800,000 servicemembers will transition out of the military in 
the next decade and a half, and the Department has a 
responsibility to provide healthcare, educational benefits, and 
transition assistance as servicemembers transition into 
civilian life. The Committee recognizes 40 percent of the 
Nation's farms are operated and owned by farmers over the age 
of 65, and there will be a demand for 1 million new farmers 
over the next 15 years. The Committee encourages the Department 
to provide opportunities for veterans and transitioning 
servicemembers in vocational agriculture programs to fill this 
growing gap. In addition, veterans face obstacles accessing 
behavioral healthcare in rural and highly rural areas. The 
Committee encourages the Department to assess the therapeutic 
benefits of farming and agricultural work to treat the 
behavioral health conditions of veterans and the ability to 
partner with programs that provide training in agriculture. The 
Committee urges the Department to coordinate with the 
Department of Agriculture and the Department of Defense in 
identifying and promoting vocational programs that provide the 
following: educational or vocational training in agriculture 
related fields, behavioral health services on site through 
licensed providers, and a pathway to employment in agriculture 
related fields.
    Agritherapy.--An increasing number of States now have 
programs that assist veterans in starting farms, and many 
veterans turning to farming also suffer from Post-Traumatic 
Stress Disorder [PTSD]. The benefits of agritherapy have been 
reported in the news media; however, no research has yet been 
conducted to confirm the benefits of agritherapy to those 
suffering from PTSD. Therefore, the Department is urged to 
consider agritherapy for inclusion among VA's Complementary and 
Alternative Medicine therapies. The Department is urged to 
establish a pilot study through the National Center for PTSD no 
later than 180 days after enactment of this act to determine if 
research supports the benefits of agritherapy as it relates to 
PTSD.
    Access to Care in Alaska.--The Committee continues to be 
concerned about the access of Alaska veterans to the full 
spectrum of medical and surgical services available to veterans 
living in the 48 contiguous States. The Committee has 
championed VA's efforts to provide care to Alaska veterans 
residing in rural and roadless areas of the State through 
partnerships with the Alaska Native Healthcare System. It has 
also criticized VA's practice of requiring veterans travel 
thousands of miles outside of Alaska to receive care VA could 
not provide in its Alaska facilities even when the care was 
available in the veteran's community or elsewhere in the State 
of Alaska. In response, the Alaska VA Healthcare System 
developed a model system of integrated care partnering for the 
first time with the Alaska Native Healthcare System and 
Community Health Centers to fill coverage gaps in urban Alaska 
and rural Alaska. It also implemented the ``Care Closer to Home 
Program'' to ensure Alaska veterans requiring medical specialty 
and surgical services not available directly from VA could 
receive those services from community providers in the State of 
Alaska. This system seems to have broken down following 
enactment of the Veterans Access Choice and Accountability Act 
[VACAA]. Implementation of VACAA in Alaska was flawed from the 
start and remains severely problematic. VACAA did not prohibit 
VA from continuing to operate the system of integrated care 
that existed in Alaska prior to its enactment. The Committee 
remains committed to ensuring Alaska's veterans enjoy their 
earned healthcare benefits on a par with veterans residing in 
the 48 contiguous States. It continues to believe no veteran 
should be required to travel to a VA facility outside of Alaska 
for care that can be purchased by VA from a community provider 
in Alaska. The Committee urges VA to execute funds made 
available under this act for the delivery of healthcare 
services in Alaska in accordance with these principles.
    Staffing of the Alaska VA Healthcare System.--For the past 
2 years, the Committee has called attention to VA's failure to 
address a longstanding physician vacancy in the Wasilla 
Community Based Outpatient Clinic. That physician vacancy still 
exists. Over the past year the Committee has become aware of 
reports that inaccurate information about relocation benefits 
may be driving providers who are willing to relocate to abandon 
their interest in serving VA. The Department is directed to 
investigate the failure to meet its recruiting objectives for 
the Alaska VA Healthcare System, to include an assessment of 
whether misinformation about compensation and benefits has 
resulted in the loss of qualified candidates, and report back 
to the Committee on its plans to remedy this issue. The 
Department is further directed to inform the Committees on 
Appropriations of both Houses of Congress 90 days in advance of 
a decision by the Alaska VA Healthcare System to discontinue 
utilizing VA staff providers to deliver any of its medical or 
surgical services.
    Access Received Closer to Home.--Funding for the Rural 
Health Initiative includes support for the Access Received 
Closer to Home program [ARCH]. The Committee notes ARCH has 
been highly successful in providing healthcare services to 
veterans who live in the rural and highly rural States in which 
it operates. Current VISN analysis demonstrates that more than 
90 percent of veterans who received medical care through ARCH 
were ``completely satisfied'' with their care and cited 
significantly shortened travel and wait times to receive care. 
Given ARCH's proven track record, the Committee supports the 
extension of this program to sustain continuity of care for 
veterans served by ARCH until VAs community care programs are 
consolidated.
    Anchorage VA Outpatient Clinic.--The Anchorage VA 
Outpatient Clinic and Regional Office Building opened in May 
2010 at an expense of $76,000,000. In May 2015, VA acknowledged 
it was required to shutter two operating rooms in the facility 
due to dust and ventilation issues. These operating rooms 
remained shuttered as VA has shifted procedures to the Joint 
Venture Hospital on Joint Base Elmendorf Richardson. The 
Department is directed to submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations of both Houses of Congress no later than 90 days 
after enactment of this act detailing its reasons for not 
placing the operating rooms back in service, including the 
advantages and disadvantages of moving surgical services to the 
Joint Venture Hospital, and whether VA intends to repair the 
operating room in fiscal year 2017 or subsequent years.
    Natural Resource Conservation Management.--The Committee 
includes language giving the Department the authority to 
administer financial assistance grants and enter into 
cooperative agreements in fiscal year 2017. The Committee is 
aware there are a number of non-profit, local, and State-based 
organizations capable of providing veterans with job training 
and employment opportunities in the area of natural resource 
conservation management. The Committee is further aware there 
has been broad support to end veterans homelessness and 
encourages VA to utilize the authority provided in this section 
in a way that combines job training and employment 
opportunities with the Department's continued commitment to 
mitigate homelessness among at-risk veterans. Before entering 
into any agreement, the Department is directed to create 
metrics for the program to ensure success can be clearly 
demonstrated and provide a report to the Committees of 
jurisdiction of both Houses of Congress detailing this program.
    Nursing Handbook.--The Committee is aware the VHA Nursing 
Handbook is under review at OMB as part of a VHA proposed rule. 
The Committee understands this proposed rule will directly 
conflict with the anesthesia team-based care language as set 
forth in the current VHA Anesthesia Service Handbook. The 
Committee strongly encourages VHA to carefully and thoughtfully 
seek additional input from internal and external stakeholders 
prior to any VHA final rule that would seek to dismantle team-
based anesthesia care. The Committee believes all possible 
outreach efforts should be used to communicate the changes 
contained in the proposed rule, gather public comment, and 
collaborate with Congress, affected stakeholders, VA physician 
and nursing staffs, and external organizations. The VA should 
also consider the benefits to veterans of having more VA 
healthcare staff able to provide services at the full scope of 
their training and how this will affect veterans, particularly 
in rural communities. The Committee also requests VHA ensure 
any VHA handbooks and policies adopted by rule not conflict 
with other handbooks and policies already in place within VHA.
    DOD/VA Joint Formulary.--The Committee remains committed to 
ensuring VA has the resources it needs to support transitioning 
veterans as they leave military service. The Committee notes 
the Department's statutorily-required report, due July 1, 2016, 
regarding ongoing efforts to develop a strategic joint uniform 
formulary between the Department of Defense and VA, with 
particular focus on medications to treat psychiatric 
conditions, sleep disorders, and pain management. The 
Department is directed to submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations of both Houses of Congress no later than 180 
days after enactment of this act assessing costs and savings 
associated with such a strategic joint uniform formulary.
    Orthotics and Prosthetics Workforce.--The Committee is 
concerned about the sustainability of the orthotics and 
prosthetics workforce treating veterans, particularly given an 
aging workforce with imminent retirements as well as a lack of 
availability of advanced degree programs necessary to train new 
professionals. Reports indicate up to 20 percent of the 7,100 
clinicians nationwide are either past retirement age or within 
5 years of retiring. The Committee recognizes the contributions 
made by the VHA's Orthotic and Prosthetic Residency Program to 
provide rotation opportunities through the VA system but 
acknowledges this program alone is inadequate to ensure a 
sustainable workforce for the future, especially in light of 
the skill set necessary to provide the increasingly complex, 
state-of-the-art orthotics and prosthetics care for OEF/OIF 
veterans. The Department is directed to explore cost effective 
opportunities to grow the workforce pipeline in order to ensure 
the future orthotic and prosthetic workforce required by the 
Nation's new generation of veterans. The Department is directed 
to submit a report to the Committees on Appropriations of both 
Houses of Congress no later than 180 days after enactment of 
this act detailing the findings.
    Home and Community Based Services.--The Committee supports 
the Department's efforts to broaden veterans' options regarding 
long-term care support and services. As the Department realigns 
these programs under the medical community care account, the 
Committee encourages VA to continue to prioritize veterans' 
preferences in receiving home based services. The Committee 
notes the positive results of pilot programs such as the 
Veterans Independence Program, a veterans-directed Home and 
Community Based Services [HCBS] grant program originally 
created as a pilot administered jointly by VA and the 
Department of Health and Human Services [HHS]. The Committee 
encourages enhanced cooperation with HHS to expand and grow 
these programs. The Department is directed to submit a report 
to the Committees on Appropriations of both Houses of Congress 
no later than 180 days after enactment of this act on the cost 
avoidance associated with various non-institutional care 
programs. The report should include information on the demand 
for HCBS among the veteran population, the number of veterans 
currently being served by each program under HCBS, and the 
Department's plans to expand the size and scope of HCBS. Given 
the success of current HCBS pilot programs, the Department 
should include a cost analysis of growing the existing pilot 
programs prior to national expansion to leverage coordination 
with HHS, in addition to detail regarding the Department's 
efforts to coordinate with HHS on HCBS in future years. Given 
that mandatory eligibility for certain types of care is 
associated with disability levels adjudicated by VBA, this 
report should also include recommendations for modernizing the 
claims process for veterans requiring long-term care.
    Veteran Suicide.--According to data compiled by VA in 2015, 
veterans experience a suicide rate 50 percent higher than the 
general population, and female veterans commit suicide at a 
rate 6 times that of their civilian counterparts. The Committee 
notes 20 percent of veterans with PTSD have a substance abuse 
disorder, and substance abuse is proven to lead to increased 
suicidal tendencies. The Committee encourages the 
prioritization of funding for substance abuse counseling based 
treatment for veterans in order to decrease suicide rates among 
veterans suffering from PTSD. The Committee remains concerned 
about the alarming prevalence of suicide among rural veterans 
as they are more likely than urban veterans to commit suicide. 
The Committee urges VA to prioritize suicide prevention within 
rural communities and increase the availability of mental 
health resources available within States with great geographic 
barriers. The Department is directed to conduct a new study on 
the prevalence of suicide among veterans, which shall include 
an assessment of the data provided by each State and an 
identification of which States should increase or improve data 
reporting to the Department and submit a report to the 
Committees on Appropriations of both Houses of Congress no 
later than 180 days after enactment of this act detailing its 
findings.
    Veterans Crisis Line.--One tool VA has to combat high 
suicide rates and help those who are considering suicide is the 
Veterans Crisis Line [VCL], a 24-hour, toll-free hotline that 
veterans across the United States can call to connect to a 
responder trained in crisis management. VCL is invaluable, but 
it is not without shortcomings. An OIG investigation was 
initiated in 2015 after complaints that phone calls to the 
center were routed to voicemails and left unanswered. The OIG 
published its final report February 11, 2016, which 
substantiated the allegation that some calls were not answered 
in an appropriate amount of time. One potential reason for 
these unanswered calls was inadequate staffing levels. The 
Committee is aware changes were implemented to VCL before 
publication of the OIG report, including hiring a new director 
of the facility and improving tracking of quality assurance 
indicators. The Committee notes plans are underway to move VCL 
to a new state-of-the-art facility, and VA hopes to hire 100 
additional employees at the call center, plus an additional 40 
employees for quality assurance purposes. To ensure veterans 
receive the care they need and deserve, especially in times of 
crisis, the Committee provides $8,700,000 above the budget 
request for VCL so the Department can hire, train, and staff 
the call center to an appropriate level and ensure its 
facilities and technologies remain up-to-date.
    Infectious Disease Screening.--The Committee remains 
concerned about the high rates of HIV/AIDS and viral hepatitis 
among veterans. The Department is directed to submit a report 
to the Committees on Appropriations of both Houses of Congress 
no later than 180 days after enactment of this act detailing 
its efforts to improve HIV/AIDS and hepatitis screening rates 
in traditional and non-traditional settings and the utilization 
of innovative strategies like point-of-care testing and public 
health outreach.
    Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders and Gulf War 
Illness.--The Committee continues to monitor the Department's 
plan to address Gulf War Illness and encourages the Department 
to include research on early intervention for functional 
gastrointestinal disorders related to Gulf War Illness in 
veterans and military personnel.
    Opioid Safety Initiative Update.--The Committee fully 
supports VA's efforts to reduce the misuse and abuse of 
prescription opioids and notes the progress being made by 
individual facilities, including the Tomah VA Medical Center in 
Wisconsin, where VA's dangerous opioid prescription practices 
led to the tragic death of Marine veteran Jason Simcakoski in 
2014. But more must be done to address VA's prescription drug 
abuse epidemic and to improve appropriate pain care for 
veterans who have a higher risk of opioid-related overdose than 
the general population. As such, the Department is directed to 
continue to comply with the instructions included under the 
paragraph titled Opioid Safety Initiative in last year's 
Committee report and includes a number of provisions in this 
year's bill, including the elimination of copayments for opioid 
antagonists like naloxone and related education.
    Furthermore, to ensure transparency and accountability, the 
Department is directed to make public the findings of the 
Office of Accountability Review's investigation of accusations 
of widespread retaliation against whistleblowers and the 
culture of fear at the Tomah VA Medical Center as well as the 
outside clinical review, which is being done in follow-up to 
VA's initial review of the incidents at the facility. The 
Committee is disappointed with the pace of these reviews and 
expects VA to make the findings public without further delay.
    Medication-Assisted Opioid Dependence Treatment.--The 
Committee is pleased the Department has established and is 
implementing the VA Opioid Safety Initiative and the results it 
is producing in reducing the dependence of veterans on 
prescription opioids. However, the Committee is concerned VA is 
not utilizing the full spectrum of treatment options for 
dealing with opioid addiction recommended by the Substance 
Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration [SAMHSA]. The 
Committee encourages VA to expand the use of medication-
assisted treatment and other clinically appropriate services to 
achieve and maintain abstinence from all opioids and heroin and 
prioritize treatment regimens that are less susceptible to 
diversion for illicit purposes.
    Participation in Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs.--
Abuse of prescription opioids is a critical issue that affects 
all demographics in the United States, including veterans. As 
such, the Committee believes it is critical to the health and 
wellbeing of America's veterans for VA to report necessary 
information to State-run prescription drug monitoring programs 
[PDMPs] about the prescribing of controlled substances. Full 
participation by VA in State-run PDMPs will ensure VA providers 
have the tools they need to better identify patients at-risk of 
accidentally or intentionally misuse prescription drugs.
    Caregivers.--The Committee notes the robust usage of the 
post-9/11 Caregiver program with its more than 23,000 approved 
applications, as well as the consistent reviews by caregiver 
families noting the program's stipend, respite care, formal 
training, and support structure are critical components to its 
success. Given the demonstrated success of the program, the 
Committee encourages VA to ensure the caregiver coordinators at 
each medical center are fully resourced and, to the maximum 
extent possible, assigned designated caregiver duties as their 
chief and only responsibility. To that end, the Committee 
provides $10,000,000 above the budget request for fiscal year 
2017, bringing the total amount available to $734,628,000. The 
funding will support stipends paid directly to family 
caregivers of post-9/11 veterans seriously injured in the line 
of duty, as well as the national caregiver support line and 
increased support for caregiver support coordinators. In 
addition, the Committee encourages VA to examine expansion of 
the program beyond the post-9/11 population. The Committee also 
encourages VA to work with the Department of Defense in order 
to develop and share best practices. The Committee recognizes 
many caregivers for severely wounded veterans are working 
dramatically reduced hours outside the home or have left the 
workforce completely leading to financial hardship. This 
reduction in outside earnings results in difficulties meeting 
financial obligations including student loan debt held by the 
caregiver. VA is directed to survey all caregivers currently in 
the program to identify the number possessing outstanding 
student loan debt, develop a plan to monitor this issue, 
including future data collection and regular reports, and 
submit a report to the Committees on Appropriations of both 
Houses of Congress no later than 180 days after enactment of 
this act detailing the report survey findings and details of 
the plan.
    Vehicle Transportation Drivers.--The Committee is concerned 
with the Department's prioritization of effort to recruit 
vehicle transportation drivers for purposes of transporting 
veterans to and from medical appointments. The Committee notes 
veterans in large States with geographic barriers and veterans 
living in rural tribal communities have decreased access to 
public transportation. VA should prioritize funding for 
recruitment of vehicle transportation drivers for veterans in 
rural and tribal areas in order to ensure positions are not 
left vacant.
    Community Care Provider Payment.--The Committee remains 
committed to helping VA in its efforts to ensure timely 
reimbursement for non-VA care providers and care facilities who 
participate in providing necessary care for our veterans. The 
Committee is encouraged VA announced the elimination of 
burdensome administrative requirements to facilitate timely 
payments for medical care and to use additional contracted 
resources, when necessary, to accomplish this goal.
    Homeless Veterans.--According to data collected during the 
annual Point in Time Count, there were 48,000 homeless veterans 
on a single night in January 2015, a decline of more than 
26,360 veterans since 2010. This includes a nearly 50 percent 
drop in the number of unsheltered veterans sleeping on the 
street. While the Point in Time Count is a snapshot of 
homelessness on a specific date and provides a measure of 
progress on the overall direction of homelessness, it does not 
reflect the effort and number of veterans prevented from 
becoming homeless or veterans who have found permanent housing. 
As a direct result of VA's homeless programs, more than 365,000 
veterans and their family members have been permanently housed, 
rapidly rehoused, or prevented from falling into homelessness. 
In 2015, through the Supportive Services for Veteran Families 
[SSVF] program alone, more than 36,000 veterans and their 
family members were prevented from becoming homeless, including 
6,555 children. The Committee strongly supports VA's homeless 
prevention programs; two of the most effective are the SSVF 
program and the Grant and Per Diem program. These two unique 
programs support community-based organizations to provide 
critical services and transitional housing for veterans and 
their families. These programs provide important lifelines to 
veterans in need and their families. Therefore, the Committee 
recommendation includes increases for both of these programs 
above the request.
    Office of Rural Health.--The Committee recommendation 
includes the full budget request of $250,000,000 for the Office 
Rural Health [ORH] and the Rural Health Initiative. When 
established by the Committee in 2009, the intent of the Rural 
Health Initiative was to give the VA flexibility to develop 
unique and innovative programs to help close gaps in services 
which face veterans who reside in rural and highly rural areas. 
Through collaborations with other VA program offices, Federal 
partners, State partners, and rural communities, ORH works to 
optimize the use of available and emerging technologies, 
establish new access points to care, and employ strategies to 
increase healthcare options for all rural veterans. Currently, 
ORH identifies and implements initiatives that support rural 
clinics and rural home-based primary care, address barriers to 
access and quality of healthcare delivery in rural areas, 
develop workforce recruitment and retention initiatives, and 
accelerate and expand telehealth. ORH also operates Rural 
Health Resource Centers and works with Federal and non-Federal 
community partners to share resources and expand access to care 
for rural veterans. The Committee commends this effort and 
encourages ORH to establish relationships with institutions of 
higher education in rural States in order to develop best 
practices in the delivery of healthcare in rural areas.
    Homeless Veterans in Rural Areas.--Concern remains about 
the Department's efforts to combat homelessness among rural 
veterans. The Committee directs VA to identify ways to obtain 
more accurate data on homeless and at-risk veterans in rural 
areas, especially by determining whether changes to the 
universal homeless screening clinical reminder would result in 
more accurate identification of these veterans, and report 
actions VA is taking to reduce homelessness among the rural 
veteran population.
    Rural Veterans Health.--The Committee notes persistent 
issues for VA health facilities in rural areas to recruit and 
retain health providers in the face of national provider 
shortages and a highly competitive environment. The Committee 
encourages the Department to consider the expanded use of 
doctors of osteopathic medicine [DOs] and physician assistants 
[PAs] through physical facilities and expanded access to 
telehealth services to address the rural health provider gap. 
The Department is directed to review and report to Congress a 
plan to improve recruitment and retention initiatives for 
healthcare providers in rural and highly rural areas, including 
expansion of the Locality Pay System, implementing recruitment 
and retention tools targeting the Education Debt Reduction 
Program and the Employee Incentive Scholarship Program for 
medical doctors, DOs, and PAs. Furthermore, the Committee is 
concerned about lack of mental healthcare providers, 
counselors, and caseworkers in rural areas. The criteria used 
by the Department in establishing the priority of hiring and 
placement of mental healthcare providers, counselors, and 
caseworkers should take into consideration the higher rate of 
facility-use in rural States due to lower numbers of facilities 
and the increased amount of outreach they must do with 
geographical barriers.
    Fee Basis Claims System.--The Committee recognizes the 
critical importance of veterans and their community care 
providers having access to the accurate and timely processing 
of veterans and vendor claims for medical services. The 
Committee is aware the current Fee Basis Claims System [FBCS] 
has processed more than 72 million claims to date, and industry 
standard modernization upgrades, including centralization of 
claims processing and auto-adjudication, could enable an even 
more efficient processing of claims. The Committee is concerned 
this system is scheduled to cease operation on November 30, 
2016, with no other system scheduled to come on line to 
continue processing claims. The Committee directs the 
Department, if it plans to continue the use of FBCS, to upgrade 
the system to provide the latest software advancements to 
facilitate the submission of electronic claims, the auto 
adjudication of claims, and a centralized claims intake 
capability for veterans and their providers. The Department is 
directed to submit a report to the Committees on Appropriations 
of both Houses of Congress no later than 30 days after 
enactment of this act detailing the status of this system, the 
potential of a gap in service, and the plans to upgrade the 
system.
    Medical School Affiliations with VA Health Care 
Facilities.--For many years, the Committee has encouraged 
improved collaboration between VA healthcare facilities and 
historically black health professions schools. The Committee 
acknowledges the progress made but recognizes almost all 
improvements have been with smaller community-based outpatient 
clinics, not larger, urban VA hospitals. The Committee 
encourages the Department to convene national and VISN VA 
health leaders and leaders of the historically black health 
professions schools to discuss and address minority 
collaboration concerns. The Department is directed to report to 
the Committees on Appropriations of both Houses of Congress no 
later than 180 after enactment of this act on the relationship 
VA has with historically black health professions schools and 
its plan to convene national and VISN VA health leaders and 
leaders of the historically black health professions schools.
    Partnerships with Academic Medical Institutions.--Last 
year, the Committee included report language encouraging the 
Department to seek out public-private partnerships, 
particularly with research universities, those with and without 
medical schools, to expand its efforts related to suicide 
prevention, post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain 
injury, and substance abuse disorders. The Committee continues 
to believe the Department should make broader use of existing 
partnering authority to collaborate with academic institutions, 
and further encourages VA to enter into partnerships with 
accredited medical schools and teaching hospitals for the 
mutually beneficial coordination, use, or exchange of health-
care resources with the goal of improving access to and quality 
of the hospital care and medical services furnished by the 
Department.
    Encouraging Public-Private Partnerships.--The Committee is 
aware of private-sector solutions that can effectively and 
efficiently leverage innovations in healthcare delivery, 
information technology, and data interoperability capabilities 
to eliminate existing silos and better coordinate and integrate 
health services for our Nation's veterans across care settings. 
These solutions hold particular potential to improve care for 
veterans residing in rural areas and veterans served by 
community providers under the Choice program. The Committee 
directs VA to implement public-private pilot projects within 
one or more VISNs to adopt a delivery model that fosters a 
culture of patient-centered care and utilizes a collaborative, 
integrated team approach to focus on care planning and 
coordination; patient education, management, and self-
compliance; service integration and data sharing; monitoring 
protocols; performance metrics and trend analysis; predictive 
analytics; and systems improvement. The pilots should employ 
effective models of care that hold the promise of improving 
patient outcomes and reducing costs by avoiding re-
hospitalizations and by enabling clinicians to: (1) use data to 
develop personalized care plans for medical and behavioral 
health services, reduce missed visits, avoid delayed services 
and long waits, and identify medical trends; (2) access systems 
that standardize clinical workflow and provide real-time 
transparency for care management; and (3) monitor patients 
outside of the clinical care setting. The Department is 
directed to submit a report to the Committees on Appropriations 
of both Houses of Congress no later than 180 days after 
enactment of this act evaluating the effectiveness of the 
pilots and providing an assessment regarding the potential for 
broader adoption of the solutions within VA's healthcare 
programs.
    Agent Orange Registry.--VA maintains an Agent Orange 
Registry for veterans who served in Vietnam. The Committee is 
aware, however, of a number of instances where U.S. veterans 
may have been exposed to chemicals including Agent Orange 
during training activities and missions outside of Vietnam. The 
Department is directed to submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations of both Houses of Congress no later than 180 
days after enactment of this act on the feasibility of 
establishing a registry of U.S. veterans who served or trained 
outside of Vietnam and have subsequently experienced health 
issues, which may have resulted from exposure to these 
chemicals.
    Sleep Disorders.--The Committee recommends the Department 
assign a program manager for sleep disorders, including sleep 
apnea, which affects at least 200,000 veterans of the Persian 
Gulf War and Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom.
    Magnetic EEG/EKG-guided Resonance Therapy.--The Committee 
understands Magnetic EEG/EKG-guided Resonance Therapy [MERT] 
has successfully treated veterans with Post Traumatic Stress 
Disorder [PTSD], Traumatic Brain Injuries [TBI], chronic pain, 
and opiate addiction. Recent non-significant risk and non-
invasive clinical trials and pilot studies have produced 
promising results in the evolution of MERT treatment. The 
Committee encourages VA to undertake MERT pilot programs at up 
to five VA facilities of its determining to create access to 
MERT in treating larger populations of veterans suffering from 
PTSD/TBI, chronic pain, and addiction.
    Healthcare Providers.--The Committee encourages VA to 
establish relationships with the appropriate personnel 
divisions dealing with departing military personnel at the 
Department of Defense and Department of Homeland Security (for 
the U.S. Coast Guard), as well as establish a formal system for 
receiving advanced notice of separating members of the Armed 
Forces who served in the healthcare field in order to actively 
recruit such individuals directly into the VA workforce. 
Additionally, the Committee directs VHA to conduct an internal 
audit of its procedures for the re-credentialing of providers 
when transferring within the VHA system and to institute such 
policies and procedures to ensure the speedy and timely 
transfer of licensed personnel between facilities.
    Prosthetic Digital Health Technology.--Advanced, proven 
lower limb prosthetic digital health technology can provide 
real-world data documenting activity and function for veterans 
with lower limb prostheses. Accurate activity data which 
documents how veterans function with their prosthetic devices 
offers new opportunities to improve outcomes, increase 
activity, and improve the quality of life for veterans who have 
lost limbs. To better understand the degree to which this 
technology is utilized by VA, the VA's Prosthetics and Sensory 
Aids Service is directed to submit a report to the Committees 
on Appropriations of both Houses of Congress no later than 180 
days after enactment of this act detailing where within VHA 
this technology is available, the number of veterans utilizing 
this technology, and any plans for increasing the availability 
of this technology, as well as making this outcomes-based data 
collection standard throughout VHA.
    Continuous Health Monitoring Technology.--Increased 
accuracy and reliability in patient health monitoring can 
improve VHA patient outcomes, prevent required return visits, 
and reduce costs. Continuous monitoring technology provides 
constant feedback to doctors, nurses, and health professionals 
on patient status. This allows professionals to make treatment 
decisions based on comprehensive data and assists in detecting 
patient crises quicker, including crises that may not have been 
detected altogether. In order to ensure the entire VHA is 
benefitting from the outcomes achieved at VHA facilities and 
civilian facilities where continuous monitoring technology is 
deployed, the Committee urges VA to expeditiously proceed with 
research surrounding continuous monitoring technologies. The 
Department is directed to report back to the Committee on any 
recommendation for fuller deployment within VHA, including a 
proposed timeline for adoption of proven continuous monitoring 
technologies.
    Three Dimensional Printing and Prosthetics.--Additive 
manufacturing, also known as three dimensional printing, 
continues to revolutionize the development of new procedures 
and therapies for patients suffering from a variety of ailments 
requiring surgery or replacement of lost limbs. In addition to 
prosthetics, three dimensional printing may aid burn victims, 
veterans requiring coronary surgery, and others in need of 
hearing restoration. Three dimensional printing is also a cost 
effective solution which increases precision and can allow VA 
to tailor its manufacturing for veterans. The Committee 
encourages the Department to expand additive manufacturing 
capabilities to Veterans Affairs Medical Centers which lack 
access to tradition manufacturing capabilities in order to 
provide veterans with a cost effective option for treatment of 
a multitude of medical problems. Furthermore, VA is encouraged 
to conduct such research, including medical trials, into three 
dimensional printing of prosthetics for veterans, as well as 
emerging research to print organs such as livers, kidneys, and 
lungs.
    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Consultation Program.--The 
Committee recommendation includes the full budget estimate of 
$19,107,000 for the National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress 
Disorder [NCPTSD] and its mission. The Committee supports the 
NCPTSD's Consultation Program's dissemination of expert, 
evidence-based resources to private providers. With the 
expansion of community-based provider options under the 
Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act, the Department 
is directed to submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations of both Houses of Congress no later than 90 days 
after enactment of this act assessing the program's performance 
in terms of consultations both within the Department and with 
community-based providers, including recommendations for 
additional policy, resource, or staff changes that can be made 
in order to increase the scale of the program.
    Mental Health.--The Committee is concerned by the continued 
high rate of suicide and the growing mental health needs among 
veterans. In particular, the results of the VA Inspector 
General report Veterans Crisis Line Caller Response and Quality 
Assurance Concerns, Canandaigua, NY (14-03540-123) and the 
Comptroller General report VA Mental Health: Clearer Guidance 
on Access Policies and Wait-Time Data Needed [GAO-16-24) are 
deeply troubling. The Committee directs the Department to 
implement the recommendations of the Comptroller General and 
the Inspector General not later than 180 days after the 
enactment of this act. The Committee recognizes the 
Department's efforts to significantly expand mental health 
treatment capacity. In light of projected future growth in 
demand for mental health services among veterans and nationwide 
mental health provider shortages, the Committee urges VHA to 
consider the expanded use of nurse practitioners, physician 
assistants, marriage and family therapists, mental health 
counselors, and peer specialists to close gaps in service and 
reduce wait times. The Committee is aware the Department of 
Defense [DOD] is currently developing a designation system for 
non-Department mental healthcare providers that demonstrate, 
through training or past experience, knowledge and 
understanding of military culture and of evidence-based mental 
health treatments. DOD will also establish and update a 
publicly available list of providers so-designated. The 
Committee notes the potential for shared benefits of such a 
system to veterans seeking non-VA care in their communities. 
Therefore, the Department is directed to coordinate with DOD to 
ensure access to and awareness of the provider list described 
above for veterans. The Committee also encourages the 
Department to consider establishing a veteran's workforce 
training program in which veterans with PTSD or service-related 
mental health conditions learn how to train service dogs for 
use by veterans with physical disabilities.
    Certified Surgical Assistants.--The Committee has become 
aware of data suggesting that wider utilization of full-time 
Certified Surgical Assistants [CSA] at VHA Medical centers 
could reduce surgical operation procedure durations thereby 
reducing costs and recovery times and making possible shorter 
post-operation hospital stays, fewer complications, and fewer 
post-operation admissions. The Committee urges VA to review the 
use of CSAs in surgery where surgical assistants are called for 
to determine whether routine use of CSAs in surgery can achieve 
significant savings throughout the VA healthcare system.
    Health Professional Scholarship Program.--The Health 
Professional Scholarship Program (HPSP) provides scholarships 
to students receiving education or training in a direct or 
indirect healthcare services discipline. Awards are offered on 
a competitive basis and are exempt from Federal taxation. In 
exchange for the award, scholarship program participants agree 
to a service obligation in a VA health care facility. The 
Committee continues to support this program and is concerned VA 
is limiting HPSP awards to only nursing students in fiscal year 
2016. The Committee believes strongly that ample resources 
exist within the Department to ensure hard to fill specialties 
are not excluded from participation. Aside from the Committee 
providing additional funding above what was requested in 
previous years, including over $1,200,000,000 more than the 
requested level for Medical services in fiscal year 2016, 
Congress also gave the Department increased tools to close gaps 
in care and build a strong professional healthcare workforce 
through the Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 
2014. In spite of this, the Committee continues to hear VA is 
not utilizing these tools in the most judicious and efficient 
manner. The Department is directed to report to the Committees 
on Appropriations of both Houses of Congress no later than 
October 30, 2016, each profession eligible to receive HPSP 
scholarship and any limitation VA is placing on awards. In 
addition, VHA is also directed to submit to the Committees on 
Appropriations of both Houses of Congress no later than 90 days 
after enactment of this act a strategic plan which identifies 
difficult to recruit occupations and outlines specific actions 
being taken to address those shortages.
    Medical Facilities Realignment.--Concern remains that VA 
medical care realignments are being approached in an ad hoc 
manner by each individual VISN rather than on a comprehensive 
basis by VA Central Office. Moreover, such an approach may lead 
to inequitable and inefficient distribution of medical 
resources throughout the Nation. Before VA makes any decision 
to relocate, close, or diminish services at an existing 
facility, or proceeds with any such realignment already 
underway, consideration must be given to the impact such action 
would have on veterans, especially tribal veterans or veterans 
in rural or highly rural areas, PTSD programs, and other 
Residential Rehabilitation Treatment Programs [RRTP]. VA must 
adhere to a clear and transparent process that engages all 
parties from the onset and is consistent with a national 
realignment strategy. In title II of division I of the 
Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015 
(Public Law 113-235), the Committees suspended the proposed 
realignment of services in VISN 23 until a report was 
transmitted to the Committees. To date that report has not been 
received. The Department is again directed to comply with the 
request for the report and meanwhile suspend the proposed 
realignment of services in VISN 23 until such time as the 
Department transmits to the Committee the report as outlined in 
Public Law 113-235.
    Medical Consults.--The Committee remains very concerned 
about confirmed reports of large numbers of open consults 
across the country. To date, the Committee is aware of at least 
one specific review underway by OIG regarding consults and the 
length these consults have remained opened. The Committee is 
aware that over the past year VA has instituted a number of 
quality controls to ensure referrals are handled in a timely 
manner and that there is better visibility both at the local 
level and at the national level to ensure consults are 
monitored appropriately. To ensure better accountability and 
transparency, the Department is directed to report to the 
Committees on Appropriations of both Houses of Congress no 
later than 30 days after enactment of this act on specific 
quality controls that have been implemented and new practices 
that have made this process less cumbersome for healthcare 
providers and ensures there are no delays in the delivery of 
care to veterans.
    Mileage Reimbursement.--The Beneficiary Travel program 
provides eligible veterans and other beneficiaries mileage 
reimbursement, common carrier (plane, train, bus, taxi, light 
rail etc.), or when medically indicated, ``special mode'' 
(ambulance, wheelchair van) transport for travel to and from VA 
healthcare, or VA authorized non-VA healthcare for which the 
veteran is eligible. The Committee understands VA has switched 
the reimbursement payment to an electronic funds transfer [EFT] 
and no longer provides reimbursement through check or cash. 
While the Committee understands EFT can be more efficient and 
may help streamline the process, there is concern about the 
length of time it is taking for the transfer to occur. The 
Department is directed to take additional steps to ensure 
veterans are reimbursed in a timelier manner.
    Choice Program.--The Committee directs the Department to 
carry out a survey of VA and private sector medical providers 
to assess the experiences of such providers in using the Choice 
Program, particularly in rural areas. At a minimum, the survey 
should address barriers and obstacles faced by providers in 
using the Choice Program, barriers and obstacles faced by 
veterans in using the Choice Program, whether Department staff 
is sufficiently trained and proficient in administering the 
Choice Program, the role and effectiveness of the third-party 
administrators, and appropriate recommendations for 
improvement. The Department is directed to submit a report to 
the Committees on Appropriations of both Houses of Congress no 
later than 180 days after enactment of this act detailing the 
findings of the survey.
    Therapeutic Listening Devices.--Therapeutic listening 
devices could vastly improve patient outcomes for veterans with 
PTSD or Traumatic Brain Injury, as well as relieve symptoms 
that are integral to a veteran's recovery. The Committee 
encourages the Department to consider returning to its pre-
fiscal year 2013 policy of providing handheld therapeutic 
listening devices to assist veterans suffering from mental 
health related problems or Traumatic Brain Injury.

                         MEDICAL COMMUNITY CARE

Budget estimate, 2017...................................  $7,246,181,000
Committee recommendation, 2017..........................   7,246,181,000
Budget estimate, advance appropriations, 2018...........   9,409,118,000
Committee recommendation, advance appropriations, 2018..   9,409,118,000

                          PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    The Medical Community Care account provides for medical 
services for eligible enrolled veterans and other beneficiaries 
that is purchased from and provided by non-Department of 
Veterans Affairs facilities and providers, including contract 
hospitals, State homes, and outpatient services.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    For fiscal year 2017, the Committee provides $7,246,181,000 
for the Medical Community Care appropriation. The amount is as 
requested in the President's budget. The Committee 
recommendation includes an advance appropriation of 
$9,409,118,000 for Medical community care in fiscal year 2018. 
This is equal to the budget request. The recommendation creates 
the new Medical Community Care account as required by the 
Surface Transportation and Veterans Health Care Choice 
Improvement Act of 2015 (Public Law 114-41). This new account 
will provide the Committee with better oversight of how non-VA 
care funding is budgeted and executed.

                     MEDICAL SUPPORT AND COMPLIANCE

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $6,144,000,000
Advance appropriations, 2017............................   6,524,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................................
Committee recommendation, 2017..........................................
Budget estimate, advance appropriation, 2018............   6,654,480,000
Committee recommendation, advance appropriation, 2018...   6,654,480,000

                          PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    The Medical Support and Compliance account provides funds 
for management, security, and administrative expenses within 
the VA healthcare system, in addition to providing costs 
associated with the operation of VA medical centers and 
clinics, VISN offices, and the VHA Central Office in 
Washington, DC. This appropriation also covers Chief of Staff 
and Facility Director operations, quality of care oversight, 
legal services, billing and coding activities, procurement, 
financial management, security, and human resource management.
    The President's 2017 and 2018 submission for Medical 
support and compliance is based on an actuarial analysis 
founded on the current and projected veteran population, 
enrollment projections of demand, and case mix changes 
associated with current veteran patients.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    In fiscal year 2016, the Committee provided an advance 
appropriation of $6,524,000,000 for fiscal year 2017 for the 
Medical Support and Compliance account. The Committee 
recommendation includes an advance appropriation of 
$6,654,480,000 for Medical support and compliance for fiscal 
year 2018.
    VHA Security.--In each of the past two fiscal years, the 
VA's Office of Security and Law Enforcement has been directed 
to provide to the Committee a physical security assessment of 
VA hospitals nationwide, to include recommendations for 
strengthening security and safety protocols across VHA 
facilities. The Committee understands an assessment of this 
magnitude may take time, but encourages the Department to move 
as expeditiously as possible with the review. In the meantime, 
the Committee encourages VHA after consulting with local VA 
police chiefs to utilize at least $1,000,000 to acquire 
intelligent policing solutions or other technology that is 
readily available to enhance safety across the system.

                           MEDICAL FACILITIES

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $5,020,132,000
Advance appropriations, 2017............................   5,074,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     649,000,000
Committee recommendation, 2017..........................     495,100,000
Budget estimate, advance appropriation, 2018............   5,434,880,000
Committee recommendation, advance appropriation, 2018...   5,434,880,000

                          PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    The Medical Facilities account provides funds for the 
operation and maintenance of the VA healthcare system's vast 
capital infrastructure. This appropriation provides for costs 
associated with utilities, engineering, capital planning, 
leases, laundry, groundskeeping, housekeeping, facility repair, 
and property disposition and acquisition.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    In fiscal year 2016, the Committee provided an advance 
appropriation of $5,074,000,000 for fiscal year 2017 for the 
Medical Facilities account. The Committee recommendation for 
fiscal year 2017 includes an additional $495,100,000 and an 
advance appropriation of $5,434,880,000 for Medical facilities 
for fiscal year 2018.

                    MEDICAL AND PROSTHETIC RESEARCH

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $630,735,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     663,366,000
Committee recommendation................................     675,366,000

                          PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    The Medical and Prosthetic Research account provides funds 
for medical, rehabilitative, and health services research. 
Medical research supports basic and clinical studies that 
advance knowledge leading to improvements in the prevention, 
diagnosis, and treatment of diseases and disabilities. 
Rehabilitation research focuses on rehabilitation engineering 
problems in the fields of prosthetics, orthotics, adaptive 
equipment for vehicles, sensory aids and related areas. Health 
services research focuses on improving the effectiveness and 
economy of the delivery of health services.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $675,366,000 for the Medical and 
Prosthetic Research account. This is $44,631,000 above the 
fiscal year 2016 enacted level and $12,000,000 above the budget 
request.
    The Committee remains highly supportive of this program, 
and recognizes its importance both in improving healthcare 
services to veterans and recruiting and retaining high quality 
medical professionals in the Veterans Health Administration.
    Through the Department's research and development program, 
VA has implemented a comprehensive research agenda to develop 
new treatments and tools for clinicians to ease the physical 
and psychological pain of men and women returning from war 
zones, to improve access to VA healthcare services, and to 
accelerate discoveries and applications, especially for 
neurotrauma, sensory loss, amputation, polytrauma, and related 
prosthetic needs. The Committee encourages VA to continue its 
research into developing novel approaches to restoring veterans 
with amputation, central nervous system injuries, loss of sight 
or hearing, or other physical and cognitive impairments to full 
and productive lives.
    Toxic Exposures.--The Committee wants to ensure VA is 
actively researching the residual impact to veterans of Agent 
Orange and other toxic exposures such as oil well fires and 
burn pits. The Department is directed to submit a report to the 
Committees on Appropriations of both Houses of Congress no 
later than 180 days after enactment of this act detailing 
ongoing activities and future plans for research into residual 
exposure to Agent Orange and other toxins.
    National Academy of Medicine Study on Toxic Exposures.--
Veterans have expressed growing concern that toxic exposure 
during their military service is related to adverse health 
conditions in their children and grandchildren. According to 
the National Academy of Medicine [NAM], scientific data and 
research is extremely limited to determine what exposures may 
cause harm to future generations. The report, ``Veterans and 
Agent Orange: Update 2014'', recommended VA pursue further 
laboratory research to identify toxins and dioxins that may 
cause epigenetic modifications and invest in epidemiologic 
protocols that address the challenges of connecting adverse 
conditions in the children of members of the military with 
toxic exposure. The Committee directs the Department to 
contract with NAM on an assessment that will include a review 
of the scientific literature regarding toxicological and 
epidemiological research on descendants of individuals with 
toxic exposure; an assessment of areas requiring further 
scientific study relating to the descendants of veterans with 
toxic exposure; an assessment of the scope and methodology 
required to conduct adequate scientific research relating to 
the descendants of individuals with toxic exposure; will 
establish categories and provide definitions for categories 
that assess the evidence that a particular health condition is 
related to toxic exposure; an analysis of the feasibility, 
value and relevance, and need for access to additional 
information held by a Federal agency of conducting further 
scientific research; and identification of a research entity or 
entities with expertise and ability to conduct the relevant 
scientific research.
    National Academy of Sciences Study on Gulf War Illness.--
The Committee recommends the Department continue to conduct and 
publish epidemiological studies regarding the prevalence of 
Gulf War illness and disease-specific morbidity and mortality 
in Gulf War veterans and the development of effective 
treatments, preventions, and cures. The Department is directed, 
within 60 days of the enactment of this act, to contract with 
the National Academy of Sciences [NAS] for a study with the NAS 
collecting new data to determine the prevalence of ``diagnosed 
neurological diseases, including multiple sclerosis, 
Parkinson's disease, and brain cancers,'' in Gulf War veterans, 
as directed by Public Law 110-389, section 804 and advised in 
the IOM's 2015 report on the study's design. The Committee is 
concerned by VA's ever-evolving terminology for the signature 
adverse health outcome of the Persian Gulf War as recognized by 
the Institute of Medicine [IOM]--Gulf War illness--and 
encourages the Department to utilize the term, ``Gulf War 
illness,'' as IOM has recommended. The Committee urges the 
Secretary to consider revising and updating the Clinical 
Practice Guideline for Chronic Multisymptom Illness [CMI] 
consistent with the July 2011 Veterans Health Initiative, 
``Caring for Gulf War Veterans,'' that it, ``cannot be reliably 
ascribed to any known psychiatric disorder,'' and to focus on 
recent Gulf War illness treatment research findings and ongoing 
Gulf War illness treatment research direction. Furthermore, the 
Committee encourages VA to strengthen the training of primary, 
specialty, and mental healthcare providers on the Gulf War 
illness case definitions recommended by the IOM. The role of 
the Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses 
[RAC] was intended to provide a meaningful consultative role in 
helping shape the Persian Gulf War research agenda, strengthen 
the process by which the government sets its Persian Gulf War 
research agenda, and lend credibility to future research 
activities. However, concern has been raised that this role has 
been degraded and compromised. The RAC charter no longer 
requires it to assess the effectiveness of Federal Gulf War 
research, no longer contains a requirement for its own staff, 
and its purview is presently limited solely to research 
conducted by the Department. Determinations by the RAC and IOM 
that Gulf War illness is physiological and not psychological 
should be the basis in determining the type of medical 
practitioners and scientific researchers needed to create a 
well-qualified membership. The Committee notes the RAC has 
provided no new recommendations since September 2014 and 
encourages the RAC renew its efforts in studying Gulf War 
Illness. Finally, the Committee urges the Department to restore 
regular reporting throughout the year of healthcare and 
benefits utilization by Gulf War and post-9/11 veterans, to 
publish these reports on the Department's Web site, and to 
consider for adoption the ``Recommendations for New VA Gulf 
War-Era Data Report,'' adopted by the RAC on February 1, 2012.
    Research Reports.--The Committee is aware VA publicly 
reports all of its completed and ongoing VA funded research 
projects through the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting 
Tools
[RePORT]. However, funding information for each project is not 
provided on the site by VA. The Committee directs VA to report 
the total cost of each ongoing project and going forward, 
provide funding information for any new projects, in addition 
to the information which is already publicly reported. 
Additionally, the Committee directs VA to prominently place a 
description and a link to the NIH RePORT Web site on the VA 
Office Research and Development main Web page so that any 
veteran may access this information easily.
    Burn Pits.--The Committee recommends VA continue conducting 
medical trials, using available treatments for pulmonary, 
cardiovascular, and other diseases and conditions related to 
the exposure to open air burn pits. The Department is directed 
to provide an update to the Committees on Appropriations of 
both Houses of Congress no later than 180 days after enactment 
of this act on the status and progress of such medical trials. 
Furthermore, where appropriate, VA is encouraged to work with 
private and public institutions which have already begun to 
research the chronic impacts of exposure to burn pits in order 
to develop treatments for veterans exposed to burn pits. The 
Department is directed to submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations of both Houses of Congress no later than 90 days 
after enactment of this act regarding the feasibility of 
entering into cooperative agreements with institutions engaged 
in the aforementioned research and whether additional 
authorities and funding are needed to pursue such research.

                 MEDICAL CARE COST RECOVERY COLLECTIONS

                      MEDICAL CARE COLLECTION FUND

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $2,445,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   2,637,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,637,000,000

             MEDICAL CARE COLLECTION FUND--REVENUES APPLIED

Appropriations, 2016.................................... -$2,445,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................  -2,637,000,000
Committee recommendation................................  -2,637,000,000

                          PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    The Medical Care Collection Fund [MCCF] was established by 
the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (Public Law 105-33). In fiscal 
year 2004, Public Law 108-199 allowed the Department of 
Veterans Affairs to deposit first-party and pharmacy co-
payments; third-party insurance payments and enhanced-use 
collections; long-term care co-payments; Compensated Work 
Therapy Program collections; and Parking Program fees into the 
MCCF. The Secretary of Veterans Affairs has the authority to 
transfer funds from the MCCF to the Medical Services account.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommendation includes the authority to 
retain co-payments and third-party collections, estimated to 
total $2,637,000,000 in fiscal year 2017.

                    National Cemetery Administration

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $271,220,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     286,193,000
Committee recommendation................................     286,193,000

                        ADMINISTRATION OVERVIEW

    The National Cemetery Administration [NCA] was established 
in accordance with Public Law 93-94, the National Cemeteries 
Act of 1973. It has a four-fold mission: to provide for the 
interment in any national cemetery of the remains of eligible 
deceased servicemembers and discharged veterans, together with 
their spouses and certain dependents, and permanently maintain 
their graves; to provide headstones for, and to mark graves of, 
eligible persons in national, State, and private cemeteries; to 
administer the grant program for aid to States in establishing, 
expanding, or improving State veterans cemeteries; and to 
administer the Presidential Memorial Certificate Program.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $286,193,000 for the National 
Cemetery Administration. This is an increase of $14,973,000 
above the fiscal year 2016 enacted level and equal to the 
budget request.
    The Committee has included bill language to make available 
through September 30, 2018, up to 10 percent of the National 
Cemetery Administration appropriation.

                      Departmental Administration

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $6,532,672,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   6,037,599,000
Committee recommendation................................   6,047,599,000

*The Committee notes the totals above reflect the shift of GOE,VBA from 
Departmental Administration to the Veterans Benefits Administration.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                        ADMINISTRATION OVERVIEW

    Departmental Administration provides for the administration 
of veterans benefits through the Veterans Benefits 
Administration [VBA], the executive direction of the 
Department, several top level supporting offices, the Board of 
Contract Appeals, and the Board of Veterans Appeals.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $6,047,599,000 for Departmental 
Administration. The amount is composed of $417,959,000 for 
General administration; $156,096,000 for the Board of Veterans 
Appeals; $4,278,259,000 for Information technology systems; 
$160,106,000 for the Office of the Inspector General; 
$528,110,000 for Construction, major projects; $372,069,000 for 
Construction, minor projects; $90,000,000 for Grants for 
construction of State extended care facilities; and $45,000,000 
for Grants for the construction of State veterans cemeteries.
    The Committee also notes the move of the General Operating 
Expenses, Veterans Benefits Administration account from 
Departmental Administration to the Veterans Benefits 
Administration with the fiscal year 2017 recommendation. This 
move puts GOE,VBA back under its appropriate section within the 
act, and the Committee instructs the Department to place 
GOE,VBA in this location with the fiscal year 2018 request.

                         GENERAL ADMINISTRATION

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $336,659,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     417,959,000
Committee recommendation................................     417,959,000

                          PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    The General Administration account provides funding for the 
Office of the Secretary, six assistant secretaries, and three 
independent staff offices.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $417,959,000 for General 
Administration. This amount is $81,300,000 above the fiscal 
year 2016 enacted level and equal to the budget request. The 
Committee has included bill language to make available through 
September 30, 2018, up to 5 percent of the General 
Administration appropriation.
    The Committee recommends $9,208,000 for the Office of 
Government Relations, to include $3,246,000 for functions 
previously conducted by the Office of Intergovernmental Affairs 
and $5,962,000 for functions previously conducted by the Office 
of Congressional and Legislative Affairs [OCLA], and 
$10,593,000 is for the Office of the Secretary, to include 
$7,348,000 for the immediate Office of the Secretary to support 
not more than 45 FTE. The recommendation fully supports and 
provides the requested amounts in fiscal year 2017 for the 
Center for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, the 
Center for Minority Veterans, the Center for Women Veterans, 
and the Office of Survivors Assistance. In addition, the 
recommendation includes $3,532,000 in reimbursable authority 
for the Office of the Secretary to be used solely for the 
Office of Employment Discrimination Complaint Adjudication.
    The Committee notes approximately 40 percent of the VA's 
VISN director positions remain unfilled as of the writing of 
this report. Within available balances for OCLA and for the 
immediate Office of the Secretary, including any prior-year 
carryover available to their respective offices, the Committee 
directs $1,500,000 be transferred to VHA and be used 
exclusively to accelerate the hiring of these positions. These 
amounts shall supplement and not supplant any amounts 
previously dedicated for this purpose in the fiscal year 2017 
budget request for VHA.
    The Committee's concern remains high regarding the number 
of vacancies within VHA. The Secretary is directed to develop 
and implement succession planning policies to address the 
prevalence of vacancies in positions in VHA of more than 180 
days, including the development of an enterprise position 
management system to more effectively identify, track, and 
resolve such vacancies and submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations of both Houses of Congress no later than 180 
days after enactment of this act detailing its findings.

                       BOARD OF VETERANS APPEALS

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $109,884,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     156,096,000
Committee recommendation................................     156,096,000

                          PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    As set forth in section 7101(a) of title 38 United States 
Code, the Board of Veterans Appeals is responsible for making 
final decisions on claims for veterans benefits presented to 
the Board for appellate review. The vast majority of the 
Board's workload derives from benefit claims initiated by the 
Veterans Benefits Administration's Regional Offices. The 
appellate process has multiple steps, most of which occur at 
the local Regional Office level. If a veteran is not satisfied 
with the Regional Office determination, he or she may appeal to 
the Board for a final agency decision. The Board adjudicates 
appeals covering all areas of veterans benefits, including: 
service connection, increased disability ratings, total 
disability ratings, pensions, insurance benefits, educational 
benefits, home loan guaranties, vocational rehabilitation, 
waivers of indebtedness, fee basis medical care, and dependency 
and indemnity compensation.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $156,096,000 for the Board of 
Veterans Appeals, which is $46,212,000 above fiscal year 2016 
enacted level and equal to the budget request. The Committee 
has included bill language to make available through September 
30, 2018, up to 10 percent of the Board of Veterans Appeals 
appropriation.

                     INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $4,133,363,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   4,278,259,000
Committee recommendation................................   4,278,259,000

                          PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    The Information Technology [IT] Systems appropriation, 
along with reimbursements, funds the costs of all IT staff 
salaries and expenses, the operations and maintenance of all 
existing information technology systems, and the development of 
new projects and programs designed to improve the delivery of 
service to veterans. This appropriation also funds the costs 
associated with the Office of Information and Technology which 
oversees the functions highlighted above.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $4,278,259,000 for the Information 
Technology Systems account. This amount is $144,896,000 above 
the fiscal year 2016 enacted level and equal to the budget 
request. The Committee recommendation includes $1,272,548,000 
for staff salaries and expenses, $2,534,442,000 for operation 
and maintenance of existing programs, and $471,269,000 for 
program development.
    The Committee has appropriated the Information Technology 
Systems account as three subaccounts. This funding structure 
enhances the Committee's ability to ensure funds are executed 
in a manner consistent with the Department's budget submission. 
The Committee has provided sufficient flexibility within the 
subaccounts by way of authorized carryover amounts and 
reprogramming authority to give the Office of Information 
Technology as much flexibility as possible to accomplish its 
mission and goals, while ensuring proper accountability and 
oversight. The Committee will continue to work with the 
Department to ensure the IT projects currently underway, as 
well as the projects planned for the future, have the resources 
needed for success.
    The Committee has included bill language restricting the 
obligation of development funds until the Secretary of Veterans 
Affairs or the Chief Information Officer submits to the 
Committees on Appropriations of both Houses of Congress a 
certification of the amounts, in parts or in full, that will be 
obligated and expended for each development project. Further, 
the Office of Information Technology is directed to provide an 
IT expenditure report, by project, to the Committees on 
Appropriations of both Houses of Congress on a monthly basis.
    The chart below reflects the Administration's budget 
request for development projects and includes the Committee 
recommendation for each. This chart will serve as the 
Department's approved list of development projects, and all 
requested changes are subject to the reprogramming guidelines 
as outlined in the accompanying act.

               INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Fiscal year 2017      Committee
               Project                 budget request    recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Electronic Health Record [EHR]                  17,322            17,322
 Interoperability and VLER Health...
VistA Evolution.....................            63,339            63,339
Veterans Benefits Management System             85,288            85,288
 [VBMS].............................
Virtual Lifetime Electronic Record              17,857            17,857
 [VLER].............................
Veterans Customer Experience........            73,624            73,624
VHA Research IT Support Development.            15,066            15,066
Other IT Systems Development........           198,773           198,773
                                     -----------------------------------
      Total Development.............           471,269           471,269
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Electronic Health Records.--As mentioned previously in the 
report, the Committee remains concerned about the development 
of VA's electronic health record [EHR] and believes it 
necessary to monitor VA's progress, including its obligations 
and expenditures, as it pursues its EHR program. The Committee 
again includes language in the act limiting obligation or 
expenditure of information technology development funding for 
the EHR program to 25 percent of funds provided until the 
Department:
    (1) certifies in writing to the Committees on 
Appropriations of both Houses of Congress that VA has met the 
requirements contained in the National Defense Authorization 
Act of Fiscal Year 2014 (Public Law 113-66) which require that 
electronic health record systems of DOD and VA have reached 
interoperability, comply with national standards and 
architectural requirements identified by the DOD/VA Interagency 
Program Office in collaboration with the Office of National 
Coordinator for Health Information Technology;
    (2) submits to the Committees on Appropriations of both 
Houses of Congress the VistA Evolution Business Case and 
supporting documents regarding continuation of VistA Evolution 
or alternatives to VistA Evolution, including an analysis of 
necessary or desired capabilities, technical and security 
requirements, the plan for modernizing the platform framework, 
and all associated costs;
    (3) submits to the Committees on Appropriations of both 
Houses of Congress, and such Committees approve, the following: 
a report that describes a strategic plan for VistA Evolution, 
or any successor program, and the associated implementation 
plan including metrics and timelines; a master schedule and 
lifecycle cost estimate for VistA Evolution or any successor; 
and an implementation plan for the transition from the Project 
Management Accountability System to a new project delivery 
framework, the Veteran-focused Integration Process, that 
includes the methodology by which projects will be tracked, 
progress measured, and deliverables evaluated;
    (4) submits to the Committees on Appropriations of both 
Houses of Congress a report outlining the strategic plan to 
reach interoperability with private sector healthcare 
providers, the timeline for reaching ``meaningful use'' as 
defined by the Office of National Coordinator for Health 
Information Technology for each data domain covered under the 
VistA Evolution program, and the extent to which the Department 
leverages the State Health Information Exchanges to share 
health data with private sector providers; and
    (5) submits to the Committees on Appropriations of both 
Houses of Congress, and such Committees approve, the following: 
a report that describes the extent to which VistA Evolution, or 
any successor program, maximizes the use of commercially 
available software used by DOD and the private sector, requires 
an open architecture that leverages best practices and rapidly 
adapts to technologies produced by the private sector, enhances 
full interoperability between VA and DOD and between VA and the 
private sector, and ensures the security of personally 
identifiable information of veterans and beneficiaries.
    Additionally, the Department is directed to continue to 
provide quarterly briefings to the Committees on Appropriations 
of both Houses of Congress regarding schedule, milestones, and 
obligations. The DOD/VA Interagency Program Office is directed 
to continue to provide briefings to the Committees on a 
quarterly basis regarding standards development and how those 
standards are being incorporated by both Departments. In an 
effort to ensure government-wide accountability, the Committee 
also directs VA, in coordination with DOD, to provide the 
Federal Chief Information Officer of the United States with 
monthly updates on progress made by the two Departments to 
reach interoperability and modernize their respective 
electronic health records.
    Cybersecurity.--The Committee recommends the full budget 
request of $370,067,000 for the VA's information security 
program. This amount includes $125,000,000 for VA's 
Cybersecurity Strategy Implementation program. In fiscal year 
2017, the Department will execute an enterprise-wide 
cybersecurity strategy, which will define a comprehensive set 
of actions, processes, and emerging security technologies that 
will further enhance the cybersecurity of VA's information and 
assets and improve the resilience of VA networks. This effort 
is aligned with the Federal Government-wide cybersecurity 
strategy efforts and was developed to identify and address 
critical cybersecurity gaps and emerging priorities, with 
specific recommendations to address those gaps and priorities. 
The Committee supports the Department's efforts to strengthen 
IT security and directs VA to provide quarterly briefings to 
the Committee on these efforts.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $136,766,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     160,106,000
Committee recommendation................................     160,106,000

                          PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    The Office of Inspector General [OIG] was established by 
the Inspector General Act of 1978 and is responsible for the 
audit, investigation, and inspection of all Department of 
Veterans Affairs programs and operations.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $160,106,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General. This is $23,340,000 above the fiscal year 
2016 enacted level and equal to the budget request. The 
Committee has included bill language to make available through 
September 30, 2018, up to 10 percent of the Office of the 
Inspector General appropriation.
    Transparency and Communication.--The Committee recognizes 
the critical role OIG plays in overseeing the fulfillment of 
the Department's mission to care for our Nation's veterans. 
Public Law 114-113, the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016, 
included language intended to increase OIG's transparency and 
communication with Congress. The Committee is concerned by 
OIG's interpretation of that language, which at times has been 
overly technical and inconsistent with the spirit of the law. 
The Committee strongly believes OIG must make its work products 
available to Congress, and in fact, OIG's default position 
should be to share all work with Congress, unless otherwise 
explicitly prohibited by law. While redaction of information 
protected by law should be applied, it should not preclude the 
sharing of the work in which such protected information is 
located. Specifically, not later than 3 days after any report 
or audit (or portion of any report of audit) is submitted in 
final form to the Secretary, OIG should post that report or 
audit (or portion of that report or audit) on the OIG Web site 
excluding the public disclosure of information prohibited from 
disclosure by law. As OIG executes its oversight 
responsibility, it should make considerable efforts to increase 
its transparency, accountability, and collaboration with key 
stakeholders including Congress, other Federal agencies, and 
the veteran community.

                      CONSTRUCTION, MAJOR PROJECTS

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $1,243,800,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     528,110,000
Committee recommendation................................     528,110,000

                          PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    The Construction, Major Projects account provides for 
constructing, altering, extending, and improving any of the 
facilities (including parking projects) under the jurisdiction 
or for the use of VA, including planning, architectural and 
engineering services, needs assessment, and site acquisition 
where the estimated cost of a project is more than the amount 
set forth in 38 U.S.C. 8104(a)(3)(A). Proceeds realized from 
Enhanced Use Lease activities may be deposited into the 
Construction, Major Projects and Construction, Minor Projects 
accounts.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $528,110,000 
for the construction of major projects. This is $715,690,000 
below the fiscal year 2016 enacted level and equal the budget 
request.
    The following table reflects the President's budget request 
for major construction projects and the corresponding Committee 
recommendations.

                       MAJOR CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                            Fiscal year
        Location and description            2017 budget      Committee
                                              request     recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Veterans Health Administration [VHA]:
    Long Beach, California: Seismic               30,200          30,200
     Corrections--Mental Health and
     Community Living Center............
    Reno, Nevada: Upgrade B1 Seismic,            192,420         192,420
     Life Safety, Utility Correction and
     Expand Clinical Services...........
    Advance Planning and Design Fund:             65,000          65,000
     Various Locations..................
    Major Construction Staff: Various             24,000          24,000
     Locations..........................
    Claims Analysis: Various Locations..           5,000           5,000
    Hazardous Waste: Various Locations..          10,000          10,000
    Judgement Fund......................           9,000           9,000
    Non-Departmental Federal Entity               49,490          49,490
     Project Management Support.........
                                         -------------------------------
      Total, VHA........................         385,110         385,110
                                         ===============================
National Cemetery Administration [NCA]:
    Elmira, New York: New York National           36,000          36,000
     Cemetery--Western New York.........
    Las Animas, Colorado: New National            36,000          36,000
     Cemetery--Southern Colorado........
    Jacksonville, Florida: Gravesite              24,000          24,000
     Expansion..........................
    South Florida: Gravesite Expansion..          31,000          31,000
    Advance Planning and Design Fund....          10,000          10,000
                                         -------------------------------
      Total, NCA........................         137,000         137,000
                                         ===============================
General Administration--Staff Offices,             6,000           6,000
 Advance Planning Fund..................
                                         ===============================
      Total Construction, Major Projects         528,110         528,110
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    VA/Army Corps of Engineers.--The Committee directs the 
Department of Veterans Affairs and the U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers to ensure there are no unnecessary delays in 
completing major Veterans Heath Administration [VHA] 
construction projects. The Committee is particularly concerned 
about delays affecting VHA projects to retrofit or replace 
seismically deficient buildings, which put veterans, Federal 
employees, and the public at significant risk. The Department 
in conjunction with the Corps is directed to provide quarterly 
updates to the Committee on all major VHA construction projects 
managed by the Corps.

                      CONSTRUCTION, MINOR PROJECTS

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $406,200,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     372,069,000
Committee recommendation................................     372,069,000

                          PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    The Construction, Minor Projects account provides for 
constructing, altering, extending, and improving any of the 
facilities (including parking) under the jurisdiction or for 
the use of VA, including planning, assessment of needs, 
architectural and engineering services, and site acquisition, 
where the estimated cost of a project is equal to or less than 
$10,000,000. Public Law 106-117, the Veterans Millennium Health 
Care and Benefits Act of 1999, gave VA authority to make 
capital contributions from minor construction in enhanced-use 
leases. Proceeds realized from enhanced-use lease activities 
may be deposited into the Construction, Major Projects and 
Construction, Minor Projects accounts.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $372,069,000 for minor 
construction. This is $34,131,000 below the fiscal year 2016 
enacted level and equal to the budget request.
    The recommendation includes $285,000 for the Veterans 
Health Administration, $56,890 for the National Cemetery 
Administration, and $20,000 for the Veterans Benefits 
Administration. The Department is directed to provide an 
expenditure plan to the Committees on Appropriations of both 
Houses of Congress no later than 30 days after enactment of 
this act for the amount appropriated for minor construction.

       GRANTS FOR CONSTRUCTION OF STATE EXTENDED CARE FACILITIES

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $120,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      80,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      90,000,000

                          PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    This account is used to provide grants to assist States in 
acquiring or constructing State home facilities for furnishing 
domiciliary or nursing home care to veterans, and to expand, 
remodel, or alter existing buildings for furnishing 
domiciliary, nursing home, or hospital care to veterans in 
State homes. The grant may not exceed 65 percent of the total 
cost of the project. Public Law 102-585 granted permanent 
authority for this program, and Public Law 106-117 provided 
greater specificity in directing VA to prescribe regulations 
for the number of beds for which grant assistance may be 
furnished. This program has been a successful partnership 
between States and VA in meeting the long-term care needs of 
elderly veterans for decades.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $90,000,000 for Grants for 
construction of State extended care facilities. This is 
$10,000,000 above the budget request.
    Funding Prioritization.--The Committee is concerned about 
the prioritization of funding for new State veterans homes. The 
criteria used by the Department when making funding decisions 
for new facilities should take into account the profound 
geographical barriers facing large rural States.
    In addition, it should also consider the unique needs of 
geographically small States and should reflect that many do not 
have alternative facilities to care for veterans while their 
projects are pending.

             GRANTS FOR CONSTRUCTION OF VETERANS CEMETERIES

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $46,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      45,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      45,000,000

                          PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

    Public Law 105-368 amended title 38 U.S.C. 2408 and 
established authority to provide aid to States for 
establishment, expansion, and improvement of State veterans 
cemeteries, which are operated and permanently maintained by 
the States. This statutory change increased the maximum Federal 
share from 50 percent to 100 percent in order to fund 
construction costs and initial equipment expenses when the 
cemetery is established. States remain responsible for 
providing the land and for paying all costs related to 
operation and maintenance of the cemeteries, including the 
costs for subsequent equipment purchases.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $45,000,000 for Grants for 
construction of State veterans cemeteries. This is equal to the 
budget request.

                       Administrative Provisions


             (INCLUDING TRANSFERS AND RESCISSIONS OF FUNDS)

    Sec. 201. The Committee includes a provision which outlines 
transfer authority and responsibilities for the Veterans 
Benefits Administration.
    Sec. 202. The Committee includes a provision which outlines 
transfer authority and responsibilities for the Veterans Health 
Administration.
    Sec. 203. The Committee includes a provision which outlines 
the use of funds appropriated for salaries and expenses.
    Sec. 204. The Committee includes a provision mandating that 
only construction funds may be used for land procurement or the 
construction of any new hospital or home.
    Sec. 205. The Committee includes a provision allowing for 
reimbursements to the Medical Services account.
    Sec. 206. The Committee includes a provision allowing for 
payments of prior year obligations.
    Sec. 207. The Committee includes a provision which allows 
for the use of funds for prior year obligations.
    Sec. 208. The Committee includes a provision which allows 
for payments from the National Service Life Insurance Fund.
    Sec. 209. The Committee includes a provision which outlines 
the use of funds from enhanced-use lease proceeds.
    Sec. 210. The Committee includes a provision which provides 
for funds for the Office of Resolution Management and the 
Office of Employment Discrimination Complaint Adjudication.
    Sec. 211. The Committee includes a provision restricting 
funds from being used to close certain medical facilities in 
the absence of a national realignment strategy.
    Sec. 212. The Committee includes a provision which requires 
disclosure of third-party reimbursement information.
    Sec. 213. The Committee includes a provision which allows 
for the transfer of revenue derived from enhanced-use leases 
into the construction accounts.
    Sec. 214. The Committee includes a provision which outlines 
authorized uses for medical services funds.
    Sec. 215. The Committee includes a provision which allows 
funds in the Medical Care Collection Fund to be transferred 
into the Medical Services and Medical Community Care accounts.
    Sec. 216. The Committee includes a provision which allows 
eligible veterans in the State of Alaska to obtain medical care 
services.
    Sec. 217. The Committee includes a provision which allows 
for the transfer of funds into the construction accounts.
    Sec. 218. The Committee includes a provision rescinding 
funds from Medical services to enable the establishment of the 
Medical Community Care account.
    Sec. 219. The Committee includes a provision requiring the 
Secretary of Veterans Affairs to submit quarterly financial 
reports on the Veterans Health Administration.
    Sec. 220. The Committee includes a provision outlining 
transfer authority for the Information Technology Systems 
account.
    Sec. 221. The Committee includes a provision prohibiting 
any funds to be used to contract out any functions performed by 
more than 10 employees without a fair competition process.
    Sec. 222. The Committee includes a provision allowing for 
the transfer of funds from certain accounts to the Joint 
Department of Defense/Department of Veterans Affairs Medical 
Facility Demonstration Fund, as authorized by Public Law 111-
84.
    Sec. 223. The Committee includes a provision allowing for 
the transfer of funds from certain advance appropriation 
accounts to the Joint Department of Defense/Department of 
Veterans Affairs Medical Facility Demonstration Fund, as 
authorized by Public Law 111-84.
    Sec. 224. The Committee includes a provision allowing for 
the transfer of certain funds deposited in the Medical Care 
Collections Fund to the Joint Department of Defense/Department 
of Veterans Affairs Medical Facility Demonstration Fund, as 
authorized by Public Law 111-84.
    Sec. 225. The Committee includes a provision directing a 
minimum of $15,000,000 be transferred from Medical Services, 
Medical Support and Compliance, and Medical Facilities to the 
Department of Defense/Department of Veterans Affairs Health 
Care Sharing Incentive Fund, as authorized by section 8111 of 
title 38, United States Code.
    Sec. 226. The Committee includes a provision prohibiting 
the Department from replacing the current system by which 
diabetes monitoring equipment and supplies are contracted.
    Sec. 227. The Committee includes a provision requiring 
notification of all bid savings for major construction 
projects.
    Sec. 228. The Committee includes a provision restricting 
scope increases for major construction projects above that 
specified in the original project justification.
    Sec. 229. The Committee includes a provision requiring the 
Department to submit reports relating to the Veterans Benefits 
Administration on claims processing at Regional Offices.
    Sec. 230. The Committee includes a provision limiting the 
funding from the Medical Support and Compliance account for the 
VistA Evolution and electronic health record interoperability 
projects.
    Sec. 231. The Committee includes a provision requiring VA 
to notify the Committee 15 days prior to any organizational 
changes within VA of 25 or more FTE.
    Sec. 232. The Committee includes a provision permitting the 
transfer of funds between GOE,VBA and BVA.
    Sec. 233. The Committee includes a provision rescinding 
unobligated balances from the DOD-VA Health Care Sharing 
Incentive Fund.
    Sec. 234. The Committee includes a provision prohibiting 
the reprogramming of funds in excess of $5,000,000 among major 
construction projects or programs.
    Sec. 235. The Committee includes a provision prohibitions 
the transfer of funds from the Filipino Veterans Equity 
Compensation Fund to any other VA account.
    Sec. 236. The Committee includes a provision providing for 
the extension of a purchased care program.
    Sec. 237. The Committee includes a provision regarding 
copayments for opioid antagonists and education on the use of 
opioid antagonists.
    Sec. 238. The Committee includes a provision regarding 
access to Office of Inspector General reports.
    Sec. 239. The Committee includes a provision allowing for 
grants to train and employ at-risk veterans.
    Sec. 240. The Committee includes a provision regarding a 
study on toxic exposure.
    Sec. 241. The Committee includes a provision regarding a 
childcare program.
    Sec. 242. The Committee includes a provision requiring the 
reporting to State prescription drug monitoring programs.
    Sec. 243. The Committee includes a provision regarding the 
hiring of medical providers.
    Sec. 244. The Committee includes a provision regarding the 
reporting of information to State medical boards.
    Sec. 245. The Committee includes a provision granting the 
Secretary transfer authority between any discretionary 
appropriations accounts and limiting the total transfer to 2 
percent of the total discretionary appropriations made 
available to the Department in this act.
    Sec. 246. The Committee includes a provision protecting 
whistleblowers from retaliation.
    Sec. 247. The Committee includes a provision on fertility 
treatment and counseling for service-connected disabled 
veterans.
    Sec. 248. The Committee includes a provision prohibiting 
the Appraisal Value Offer Program or the Home Marketing 
Incentive Program with a waiver.
    Sec. 249. The Committee includes a provision prohibiting 
the use of funds to interfere with the ability of veterans to 
participate in State-approved medicinal marijuana programs or 
deny services to such veterans.
    Sec. 250. The Committee includes a provision on coastwise 
merchant seamen.

                               TITLE III

                            RELATED AGENCIES

                  American Battle Monuments Commission

                                OVERVIEW

    The American Battle Monuments Commission was established by 
Congress in 1923 and is responsible for the following: 
designing, constructing, operating, and maintaining permanent 
American cemeteries in foreign countries; establishing and 
maintaining U.S. military memorials, monuments, and markers 
where American Armed Forces have served overseas since April 6, 
1917, the date of the United States entry into World War I, and 
within the United States when directed by public law; and 
controlling the design and construction of permanent U.S. 
military monuments and markers by other U.S. citizens and 
organizations, both public and private, and encouraging their 
maintenance. ABMC administers, operates, and maintains 25 
permanent American military cemeteries, 27 Federal memorial, 
monuments, and markers, and 8 non-Federal memorials located in 
15 foreign countries, the U.S. Commonwealth of the Northern 
Mariana Islands, the British Dependency of Gibraltar, and the 
United States of America.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $105,100,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      75,100,000
Committee recommendation................................      75,100,000

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $75,100,000 for the Salaries and 
Expenses account. This amount is $32,000,000 below the fiscal 
year 2016 enacted level and equal to the budget request.

                     FOREIGN CURRENCY FLUCTUATIONS

Appropriations, 2016....................................      $2,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................................
Committee recommendation................................................

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee includes in the accompanying act, as proposed 
by the administration, such sums as necessary for the Foreign 
Currency Fluctuations account. Funding the account in this 
manner allows the Commission to maintain cemeteries regardless 
of the volatility of foreign currency fluctuations.

           United States Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims


                                OVERVIEW

    The United States Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims was 
established by the Veterans' Judicial Review Act of 1988. The 
Court is an independent judicial tribunal with exclusive 
jurisdiction to review decisions of the Board of Veterans 
Appeals. It has the authority to decide all relevant questions 
of law; interpret constitutional, statutory, and regulatory 
provisions; and determine the meaning or applicability of the 
terms of an action by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs. It is 
authorized to compel action by the Secretary. It is authorized 
to hold unconstitutional or otherwise unlawful and set aside 
decisions, findings, conclusions, rules, and regulations issued 
or adopted by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, the Board of 
Veterans Appeals, or the Chairman of the Board that are found 
to be arbitrary or capricious. The Court's principal office 
location is Washington, DC; however, it is a national court, 
empowered to sit anywhere in the United States.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $32,141,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      30,945,100
Committee recommendation................................      30,945,100

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $30,945,100 for the U.S. Court of 
Appeals for Veterans Claims. This amount is $1,195,900 below 
the fiscal year 2016 enacted level and equal to the budget 
request.

                      Department of Defense--Civil


                       Cemeterial Expenses, Army


                                OVERVIEW

    The Secretary of the Army is responsible for the 
administration, operation, and maintenance of Arlington 
National Cemetery and the Soldiers' and Airmen's Home National 
Cemetery. In addition to its principal function as a national 
cemetery, Arlington is the site of approximately 3,000 
nonfuneral ceremonies each year and has approximately four 
million visitors annually.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $79,516,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      70,800,000
Committee recommendation................................      70,800,000

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $70,800,000 for Salaries and 
expenses. This amount is $8,716,000 below the fiscal year 2016 
enacted level and equal to the budget request.
    Land Exchange.--The Committee recognizes the future burial 
capacity of Arlington National Cemetery would be dramatically 
increased through a land exchange in the area of the former 
Navy Annex site with Arlington County and the Commonwealth of 
Virginia. The Committee strongly supports this effort and 
understands the Secretary of the Army is working with Arlington 
County and the Virginia Department of Transportation to 
finalize the land exchange agreement. The closure and 
relocation of current State and local roadways in this area 
would facilitate such an exchange. The Committee urges the 
Secretary of the Army to continue to work closely with the 
Virginia Department of Transportation and Arlington County to 
finalize details of the proposed land exchange so that the 
cemetery expansion plans, including the relocation of 
utilities, can move forward as expeditiously as possible.

                      Armed Forces Retirement Home


                               TRUST FUND

                                OVERVIEW

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $64,300,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      64,300,000
Committee recommendation................................      64,300,000

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends authority to expend $64,300,000 
from the Armed Forces Retirement Home [AFRH] Trust Fund to 
operate and maintain the Armed Forces Retirement Home--
Washington, DC, and the Armed Forces Retirement Home--Gulfport, 
Mississippi.
    Trust Fund Solvency.--The Committee is concerned by the 
continued reliance on the General Fund, which the Committee 
views as an emergency measure, to supplement the AFRH Trust 
Fund. The Committee understands AFRH and the Department of 
Defense have undertaken an in-depth study to develop mid-term 
and long-term plans to improve Trust Fund solvency; however, 
the Committee is troubled that the study's statement of work 
seems to be focused on cuts to core AFRH operations as a means 
of achieving solvency within the Trust Fund. The Committee 
reminds the executive branch that reductions in appropriations 
to AFRH, which support certain former members of our Nation's 
Armed Forces, is the sole prerogative of the legislative branch 
and directs AFRH and the Department of Defense to submit by 
September 30, 2016, a proposal that ensures the long-term 
sustainability of the Trust Fund by replenishing the Trust 
Fund's revenues, not by cutting core AFRH operations.
    The Committee is disappointed the Department of Defense did 
not include with the budget request a combination of 
legislative proposals and administrative actions that can be 
taken under current law in order to achieve Trust Fund solvency 
in spite of clear Committee direction to do so in the 
Explanatory Statement accompanying H.R. 2029, the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2016. Instead, the Department of Defense 
proposed a complicated transfer from operation and maintenance 
for Defense-wide activities, which is nothing more than a 
thinly disguised appropriation from the General Fund. Both 
legislative and administrative actions are necessary to improve 
Trust Fund solvency, eliminate AFRH's reliance on the General 
Fund, and maintain the high-quality services provided to AFRH 
residents. The Committee again directs the Department of 
Defense, working with AFRH, to take appropriate administrative 
action and to develop and submit proposed authorizing language 
with the fiscal year 2018 budget request in order to fully 
address the issue of Trust Fund solvency.

                       Administrative Provisions

    Sec. 301. The Committee includes a provision allowing the 
relocation of a federally owned water main.
    Sec. 302. The Committee includes a provision making 
available funds as authorized by 10 U.S.C. 4727.

                                TITLE IV

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Sec. 401. The Committee includes a provision that prohibits 
the obligation of funds beyond the current fiscal year unless 
expressly so provided.
    Sec. 402. The Committee includes a provision that prohibits 
the use of funds for programs, projects, or activities not in 
compliance with Federal law relating to risk assessment, the 
protection of private property rights, or unfunded mandates.
    Sec. 403. The Committee includes a provision that 
encourages the expansion of E-commerce technologies and 
procedures.
    Sec. 404. The Committee includes a provision that specifies 
the congressional committees that are to receive all reports 
and notifications.
    Sec. 405. The Committee includes a provision that limits 
funds from being transferred from this appropriations measure 
to any instrumentality of the United States Government without 
authority from an appropriations act.
    Sec. 406. The Committee includes a provision regarding the 
posting of congressional reports on agency Web sites.
    Sec. 407. The Committee includes a provision prohibiting 
the use of funds to establish or maintain a computer network 
unless such network blocks the viewing, downloading, and 
exchanging of pornography, except for law enforcement 
investigation, prosecution, or adjudication activities.
    Sec. 408. The Committee includes a provision prohibiting 
the use of funds for the payment of first-class travel by an 
employee of the executive branch.
    Sec. 409. The Committee includes a provision limiting the 
construction of facilities for the purposes of housing 
individuals detained at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

                     PROGRAM, PROJECT, AND ACTIVITY

    In fiscal year 2017, for purposes of the Balanced Budget 
and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-177) 
or the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control 
Reaffirmation Act of 1987 (Public Law 100-119), the following 
information provides the definition of the term ``program, 
project, and activity'' for departments, agencies and programs 
under the jurisdiction of the Military Construction and 
Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies subcommittee. The term 
``program, project, and activity'' shall include the most 
specific level of budget items identified in the Military 
Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies 
Appropriations Act, 2017, the House and Senate Committee 
reports, and the conference report and accompanying joint 
explanatory statement of managers of the committee of 
conference.
    If a sequestration order is necessary, in implementing the 
Presidential order, departments, and agencies shall apply any 
percentage reduction required for fiscal year 2017 pursuant to 
the provisions of Public Law 99-177 or Public Law 100-119 to 
all items specified in the justifications submitted to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the Senate and House of 
Representatives in support of the fiscal year 2017 budget 
estimates, as amended, for such departments and agencies, as 
modified by congressional action, and in addition, for the 
Department of Defense, Military Construction, the definition 
shall include specific construction locations as identified in 
the explanatory notes.

  COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI, OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 7 of rule XVI requires that Committee reports 
accompanying general appropriations bills identify each 
recommended amendment which proposes an item of appropriation 
which is not made to carry out the provisions of an existing 
law, a treaty stipulation, or an act or resolution previously 
passed by the Senate during that session.
    The Committee recommends funding for the following programs 
which currently lack authorization:
Title I: Department of Defense
    Military Construction, Army
    Military Construction, Navy and Marine Corps
    Military Construction, Air Force
    Military Construction, Defense-Wide
    Military Construction, Army National Guard
    Military Construction, Air National Guard
    Military Construction, Army Reserve
    Military Construction, Navy Reserve
    Military Construction, Air Force Reserve
    North Atlantic Treaty Organization Security Investment 
Program
    Department of Defense Base Closure Account
    Family Housing Operation and Maintenance, Army
    Family Housing Operation and Maintenance, Navy and Marine 
Corps
    Family Housing Operation and Maintenance, Air Force
    Family Housing Operation and Maintenance, Defense-Wide
    Department of Defense Family Housing Improvement Fund
    Family Housing Construction, Army
    Family Housing Construction, Navy and Marine Corps
    Family Housing Construction, Air Force
Title II: Department of Veterans Affairs
    Veterans Benefits Administration
    Veterans Health Administration
    National Cemetery Administration
    Departmental Administration
Title III: Related Agencies
    American Battle Monuments Commission
    U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims
    Cemeterial Expenses, Army
    Armed Forces Retirement Home

COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(c), RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, on April 14, 2016, 
the Committee ordered favorably reported a bill (S. 2806) 
making appropriations for military construction, the Department 
of Veterans Affairs, and related agencies for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2017, and for other purposes, provided, 
that the bill be subject to amendment and that the bill be 
consistent with its budget allocation, by a recorded vote of 
30-0, a quorum being present. The vote was as follows:
        Yeas                          Nays
Chairman Cochran
Mr. McConnell
Mr. Shelby
Mr. Alexander
Ms. Collins
Ms. Murkowski
Mr. Graham
Mr. Kirk
Mr. Blunt
Mr. Moran
Mr. Hoeven
Mr. Boozman
Mrs. Capito
Mr. Cassidy
Mr. Lankford
Mr. Daines
Ms. Mikulski
Mr. Leahy
Mrs. Murray
Mrs. Feinstein
Mr. Durbin
Mr. Reed
Mr. Tester
Mr. Udall
Mrs. Shaheen
Mr. Merkley
Mr. Coons
Mr. Schatz
Ms. Baldwin
Mr. Murphy

 COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 12 of rule XXVI requires that Committee reports 
on a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any statute 
or part of any statute include ``(a) the text of the statute or 
part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and (b) a 
comparative print of that part of the bill or joint resolution 
making the amendment and of the statute or part thereof 
proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through type and 
italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate typographical 
devices the omissions and insertions which would be made by the 
bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form recommended by 
the committee.''
    In compliance with this rule, changes in existing law 
proposed to be made by the bill are shown as follows: existing 
law to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets; new matter is 
printed in italic; and existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman.

                      TITLE 38--VETERANS' BENEFITS


                       PART I--GENERAL PROVISIONS

               Chapter 3--Department of Veterans Affairs


Sec. 312. Inspector General

    (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (c)(1) Whenever the Inspector General, in carrying out the 
duties and responsibilities established under the Inspector 
General Act of 1978 (5 U.S.C. App.), issues a work product 
[that makes a recommendation or otherwise suggests corrective 
action,] the Inspector General shall--
                                ------                                


                          Chapter 7--Employees


                 subchapter i--general employee matters

Sec.
701. Placement of employees in military installations.
     * * * * * * *
713. Senior executives: removal based on performance or misconduct.
715. Congressional testimony by employees: treatment as official duty.

                 subchapter ii--whistleblower complaints

731. Whistleblower complaint defined.
732. Treatment of whistleblower complaints.
733. Adverse actions against supervisory employees who commit prohibited 
          personnel actions relating to whistleblower complaints.
734. Evaluation criteria of supervisors and treatment of bonuses.
735. Training regarding whistleblower complaints.
736. Reports to Congress.

                 Subchapter I--General Employee Matters

Sec. 701. Placement of employees in military installations

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Sec. 713. Senior executives: removal based on performance or misconduct

    (a) In General.--

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (g) Definitions.--

            (1)* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (3)* * *

                    (A)* * *

                    (B) with respect to an individual appointed 
                under section 7306(a) or section 7401(1) of 
                this title, an administrative or executive 
                position.

Sec. 715. Congressional testimony by employees: treatment as official 
                    duty

    (a) Congressional Testimony.--An employee of the Department 
is performing official duty during the period with respect to 
which the employee is testifying in an official capacity in 
front of either chamber of Congress, a committee of either 
chamber of Congress, or a joint or select committee of 
Congress.
    (b) Travel Expenses.--The Secretary shall provide travel 
expenses, including per diem in lieu of subsistence, in 
accordance with applicable provisions under subchapter I of 
chapter 57 of title 5, to any employee of the Department of 
Veterans Affairs performing official duty described under 
subsection (a).

                Subchapter II--Whistleblower Complaints

Sec. 731. Whistleblower complaint defined

    In this subchapter, the term ``whistleblower complaint'' 
means a complaint by an employee of the Department disclosing, 
or assisting another employee to disclose, a potential 
violation of any law, rule, or regulation, or gross 
mismanagement, gross waste of funds, abuse of authority, or 
substantial and specific danger to public health and safety.

Sec. 732. Treatment of whistleblower complaints

    (a) Filing.--(1) In addition to any other method 
established by law in which an employee may file a 
whistleblower complaint, an employee of the Department may file 
a whistleblower complaint in accordance with subsection (g) 
with a supervisor of the employee.
    (2) Except as provided by subsection (d)(1), in making a 
whistleblower complaint under paragraph (1), an employee shall 
file the initial complaint with the immediate supervisor of the 
employee.
    (b) Notification.--(1)(A) Not later than four business days 
after the date on which a supervisor receives a whistleblower 
complaint by an employee under this section, the supervisor 
shall notify, in writing, the employee of whether the 
supervisor determines that there is a reasonable likelihood 
that the complaint discloses a violation of any law, rule, or 
regulation, or gross mismanagement, gross waste of funds, abuse 
of authority, or substantial and specific danger to public 
health and safety.
    (B) The supervisor shall retain written documentation 
regarding the whistleblower complaint and shall submit to the 
next-level supervisor and the central whistleblower office 
described in subsection (h) a written report on the complaint.
    (2)(A) On a monthly basis, the supervisor shall submit to 
the appropriate director or other official who is superior to 
the supervisor a written report that includes the number of 
whistleblower complaints received by the supervisor under this 
section during the month covered by the report, the disposition 
of such complaints, and any actions taken because of such 
complaints pursuant to subsection (c).
    (B) In the case in which such a director or official 
carries out this paragraph, the director or official shall 
submit such monthly report to the supervisor of the director or 
official and to the central whistleblower office described in 
subsection (h).
    (c) Positive Determination.--If a supervisor makes a 
positive determination under subsection (b)(1) regarding a 
whistleblower complaint of an employee, the supervisor shall 
include in the notification to the employee under such 
subsection the specific actions that the supervisor will take 
to address the complaint.
    (d) Filing Complaint With Next-Level Supervisors.--(1) If 
any circumstance described in paragraph (3) is met, an employee 
may file a whistleblower complaint in accordance with 
subsection (g) with the next-level supervisor who shall treat 
such complaint in accordance with this section.
    (2) An employee may file a whistleblower complaint with the 
Secretary if the employee has filed the whistleblower complaint 
to each level of supervisors between the employee and the 
Secretary in accordance with paragraph (1).
    (3) A circumstance described in this paragraph is any of 
the following circumstances:
            (A) A supervisor does not make a timely 
        determination under subsection (b)(1) regarding a 
        whistleblower complaint.
            (B) The employee who made a whistleblower complaint 
        determines that the supervisor did not adequately 
        address the complaint pursuant to subsection (c).
            (C) The immediate supervisor of the employee is the 
        basis of the whistleblower complaint.
    (e) Transfer of Employee Who Files Whistleblower 
Complaint.--If a supervisor makes a positive determination 
under subsection (b)(1) regarding a whistleblower complaint 
filed by an employee, the Secretary shall--
            (1) inform the employee of the ability to volunteer 
        for a transfer in accordance with section 3352 of title 
        5; and
            (2) give preference to the employee for such a 
        transfer in accordance with such section.
    (f) Prohibition on Exemption.--The Secretary may not exempt 
any employee of the Department from being covered by this 
section.
    (g) Whistleblower Complaint Form.--(1) A whistleblower 
complaint filed by an employee under subsection (a) or (d) 
shall consist of the form described in paragraph (2) and any 
supporting materials or documentation the employee determines 
necessary.
    (2) The form described in this paragraph is a form 
developed by the Secretary, in consultation with the Special 
Counsel, that includes the following:
            (A) An explanation of the purpose of the 
        whistleblower complaint form.
            (B) Instructions for filing a whistleblower 
        complaint as described in this section.
            (C) An explanation that filing a whistleblower 
        complaint under this section does not preclude the 
        employee from any other method established by law in 
        which an employee may file a whistleblower complaint.
            (D) A statement directing the employee to 
        information accessible on the Internet website of the 
        Department as described in section 735(d).
            (E) Fields for the employee to provide--
                    (i) the date that the form is submitted;
                    (ii) the name of the employee;
                    (iii) the contact information of the 
                employee;
                    (iv) a summary of the whistleblower 
                complaint (including the option to append 
                supporting documents pursuant to paragraph 
                (1)); and
                    (v) proposed solutions to the complaint.
            (F) Any other information or fields that the 
        Secretary determines appropriate.
    (3) The Secretary, in consultation with the Special 
Counsel, shall develop the form described in paragraph (2) by 
not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment of this 
section.
    (h) Central Whistleblower Office.--(1) The Secretary shall 
ensure that the central whistleblower office--
            (A) is not an element of the Office of the General 
        Counsel;
            (B) is not headed by an official who reports to the 
        General Counsel;
            (C) does not provide, or receive from, the General 
        Counsel any information regarding a whistleblower 
        complaint except pursuant to an action regarding the 
        complaint before an administrative body or court; and
            (D) does not provide advice to the General Counsel.
    (2) The central whistleblower office shall be responsible 
for investigating all whistleblower complaints of the 
Department, regardless of whether such complaints are made by 
or against an employee who is not a member of the Senior 
Executive Service.
    (3) The Secretary shall ensure that the central 
whistleblower office maintains a toll-free hotline to 
anonymously receive whistleblower complaints.
    (4) The Secretary shall ensure that the central 
whistleblower office has such staff and resources as the 
Secretary considers necessary to carry out the functions of the 
central whistleblower office.
    (5) In this subsection, the term `central whistleblower 
office' means the Office of Accountability Review or a 
successor office that is established or designated by the 
Secretary to investigate whistleblower complaints filed under 
this section or any other method established by law.

Sec. 733. Adverse actions against supervisory employees who commit 
                    prohibited personnel actions relating to 
                    whistleblower complaints

    (a) In General.--(1) In accordance with paragraph (2), the 
Secretary shall carry out the following adverse actions against 
supervisory employees (as defined in section 7103(a) of title 
5) whom the Secretary, an administrative judge, the Merit 
Systems Protection Board, the Office of Special Counsel, an 
adjudicating body provided under a union contract, a Federal 
judge, or the Inspector General of the Department determines 
committed a prohibited personnel action described in subsection 
(c):
            (A) With respect to the first offense, an adverse 
        action that is not less than a 12-day suspension and 
        not more than removal.
            (B) With respect to the second offense, removal.
    (2)(A) An employee against whom an adverse action under 
paragraph (1) is proposed is entitled to written notice.
    (B)(i) An employee who is notified under subparagraph (A) 
of being the subject of a proposed adverse action under 
paragraph (1) is entitled to 14 days following such 
notification to answer and furnish evidence in support of the 
answer.
    (ii) If the employee does not furnish any such evidence as 
described in clause (i) or if the Secretary determines that 
such evidence is not sufficient to reverse the determination to 
propose the adverse action, the Secretary shall carry out the 
adverse action following such 14-day period.
    (C) Paragraphs (1) and (2) of subsection (b) of section 
7513 of title 5, subsection (c) of such section, paragraphs (1) 
and (2) of subsection (b) of section 7543 of such title, and 
subsection (c) of such section shall not apply with respect to 
an adverse action carried out under paragraph (1).
    (b) Limitation on Other Adverse Actions.--With respect to a 
prohibited personnel action described in subsection (c), if the 
Secretary carries out an adverse action against a supervisory 
employee, the Secretary may carry out an additional adverse 
action under this section based on the same prohibited 
personnel action if the total severity of the adverse actions 
do not exceed the level specified in subsection (a).
    (c) Prohibited Personnel Action Described.--A prohibited 
personnel action described in this subsection is any of the 
following actions:
            (1) Taking or failing to take a personnel action in 
        violation of section 2302 of title 5 against an 
        employee relating to the employee--
                    (A) filing a whistleblower complaint in 
                accordance with section 732 of this title;
                    (B) filing a whistleblower complaint with 
                the Inspector General of the Department, the 
                Special Counsel, or Congress;
                    (C) providing information or participating 
                as a witness in an investigation of a 
                whistleblower complaint in accordance with 
                section 732 or with the Inspector General of 
                the Department, the Special Counsel, or 
                Congress;
                    (D) participating in an audit or 
                investigation by the Comptroller General of the 
                United States;
                    (E) refusing to perform an action that is 
                unlawful or prohibited by the Department; or
                    (F) engaging in communications that are 
                related to the duties of the position or are 
                otherwise protected.
            (2) Preventing or restricting an employee from 
        making an action described in any of subparagraphs (A) 
        through (F) of paragraph (1).
            (3) Conducting a negative peer review or opening a 
        retaliatory investigation because of an activity of an 
        employee that is protected by section 2302 of title 5.
            (4) Requesting a contractor to carry out an action 
        that is prohibited by section 4705(b) or section 
        4712(a)(1) of title 41, as the case may be.

Sec. 734. Evaluation criteria of supervisors and treatment of bonuses

    (a) Evaluation Criteria.--(1) In evaluating the performance 
of supervisors of the Department, the Secretary shall include 
the criteria described in paragraph (2).
    (2) The criteria described in this subsection are the 
following:
            (A) Whether the supervisor treats whistleblower 
        complaints in accordance with section 732 of this 
        title.
            (B) Whether the appropriate deciding official, 
        performance review board, or performance review 
        committee determines that the supervisor was found to 
        have committed a prohibited personnel action described 
        in section 733(b) of this title by an administrative 
        judge, the Merit Systems Protection Board, the Office 
        of Special Counsel, an adjudicating body provided under 
        a union contract, a Federal judge, or, in the case of a 
        settlement of a whistleblower complaint (regardless of 
        whether any fault was assigned under such settlement), 
        the Secretary.
    (b) Bonuses.--(1) The Secretary may not pay to a supervisor 
described in subsection (a)(2)(B) an award or bonus under this 
title or title 5, including under chapter 45 or 53 of such 
title, during the one-year period beginning on the date on 
which the determination was made under such subsection.
    (2) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the 
Secretary shall issue an order directing a supervisor described 
in subsection (a)(2)(B) to repay the amount of any award or 
bonus paid under this title or title 5, including under chapter 
45 or 53 of such title, if--
            (A) such award or bonus was paid for performance 
        during a period in which the supervisor committed a 
        prohibited personnel action as determined pursuant to 
        such subsection (a)(2)(B);
            (B) the Secretary determines such repayment 
        appropriate pursuant to regulations prescribed by the 
        Secretary to carry out this section; and
            (C) the supervisor is afforded notice and an 
        opportunity for a hearing before making such repayment.

Sec. 735. Training regarding whistleblower complaints

    (a) Training.--Not less frequently than once each year, the 
Secretary, in coordination with the Whistleblower Protection 
Ombudsman designated under section 3(d)(1)(C) of the Inspector 
General Act of 1978 (5 U.S.C. App.), shall provide to each 
employee of the Department training regarding whistleblower 
complaints, including--
            (1) an explanation of each method established by 
        law in which an employee may file a whistleblower 
        complaint;
            (2) an explanation of prohibited personnel actions 
        described by section 733(c) of this title;
            (3) with respect to supervisors, how to treat 
        whistleblower complaints in accordance with section 732 
        of this title;
            (4) the right of the employee to petition Congress 
        regarding a whistleblower complaint in accordance with 
        section 7211 of title 5;
            (5) an explanation that the employee may not be 
        prosecuted or reprised against for disclosing 
        information to Congress, the Inspector General, or 
        another investigatory agency in instances where such 
        disclosure is permitted by law, including under 
        sections 5701, 5705, and 7732 of this title, under 
        section 552a of title 5 (commonly referred to as the 
        Privacy Act), under chapter 93 of title 18, and 
        pursuant to regulations promulgated under section 
        264(c) of the Health Insurance Portability and 
        Accountability Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-191);
            (6) an explanation of the language that is required 
        to be included in all nondisclosure policies, forms, 
        and agreements pursuant to section 115(a)(1) of the 
        Whistleblower Protection Enhancement Act of 2012 (5 
        U.S.C. 2302 note); and
            (7) the right of contractors to be protected from 
        reprisal for the disclosure of certain information 
        under section 4705 or 4712 of title 41.
    (b) Manner Training Is Provided.--The Secretary shall 
ensure that training provided under subsection (a) is provided 
in person.
    (c) Certification.--Not less frequently than once each 
year, the Secretary shall provide training on merit system 
protection in a manner that the Special Counsel certifies as 
being satisfactory.
    (d) Publication.--(1) The Secretary shall publish on the 
Internet website of the Department, and display prominently at 
each facility of the Department, the rights of an employee to 
file a whistleblower complaint, including the information 
described in paragraphs (1) through (7) of subsection (a).
    (2) The Secretary shall publish on the Internet website of 
the Department, the whistleblower complaint form described in 
section 732(g)(2).

Sec. 736. Reports to Congress

    (a) Annual Reports.--Not less frequently than once each 
year, the Secretary shall submit to the appropriate committees 
of Congress a report that includes--
            (1) with respect to whistleblower complaints filed 
        under section 732 of this title during the year covered 
        by the report--
                    (A) the number of such complaints filed;
                    (B) the disposition of such complaints; and
                    (C) the ways in which the Secretary 
                addressed such complaints in which a positive 
                determination was made by a supervisor under 
                subsection (b)(1) of such section;
            (2) the number of whistleblower complaints filed 
        during the year covered by the report that are not 
        included under paragraph (1), including--
                    (A) the method in which such complaints 
                were filed;
                    (B) the disposition of such complaints; and
                    (C) the ways in which the Secretary 
                addressed such complaints; and
            (3) with respect to disclosures made by a 
        contractor under section 4705 or 4712 of title 41--
                    (A) the number of complaints relating to 
                such disclosures that were investigated by the 
                Inspector General of the Department of Veterans 
                Affairs during the year covered by the report;
                    (B) the disposition of such complaints; and
                    (C) the ways in which the Secretary 
                addressed such complaints.
    (b) Notice of Office of Special Counsel Determinations.--
Not later than 30 days after the date on which the Secretary 
receives from the Special Counsel information relating to a 
whistleblower complaint pursuant to section 1213 of title 5, 
the Secretary shall notify the appropriate committees of 
Congress of such information, including the determination made 
by the Special Counsel.
    (c) Appropriate Committees of Congress.--In this section, 
the term `appropriate committees of Congress' means--
            (1) the Committee on Veterans' Affairs and the 
        Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs 
        of the Senate; and
            (2) the Committee on Veterans' Affairs and the 
        Committee on Oversight and Government Reform of the 
        House of Representatives.
                                ------                                


                       PART II--GENERAL BENEFITS

   Chapter 17--Hospital, Nursing Home, Domiciliary, and Medical Care


Subchapter II--Hospital, Nursing Home, or Domiciliary Care and Medical 
                               Treatment


Sec. 1710. Eligibility for hospital, nursing home, and domiciliary care

    (a)(1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (g)(1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (3) This subsection does not apply [with respect to home 
health services] with respect to the following:

            (A) Home health services under section 1717 of this 
        title to the extent that such services are for 
        improvements and structural alterations.

            (B) Education on the use of opioid antagonists to 
        reverse the effects of overdoses of specific 
        medications or substances.
                                ------                                


   Subchapter III--Miscellaneous Provisions Relating to Hospital and 
          Nursing Home Care and Medical Treatment of Veterans


Sec. 1722A. Copayment for medications

    (a)(1) * * *

    (3) Paragraph (1) does not apply--

            (A)* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (C) to a veteran whose annual income (as determined 
        under section 1503 of this title) does not exceed the 
        maximum annual rate of pension which would be payable 
        to such veteran if such veteran were eligible for 
        pension under section 1521 of this title.

    (4) Paragraph (1) does not apply to opioid antagonists 
furnished under this chapter to a veteran who is at high risk 
for overdose of a specific medication or substance in order to 
reverse the effect of such an overdose.
                                ------                                


               PART IV--GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

                 Chapter 57--Records and Investigations


                         Subchapter I--Records


Sec. 5701. Confidential nature of claims

    (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (l) Under regulations the Secretary shall prescribe, the 
Secretary [may] shall disclose information about a veteran or 
the dependent of a veteran to a State controlled substance 
monitoring program, including a program approved by the 
Secretary of Health and Human Services under section 399O of 
the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 280g-3), to the extent 
necessary to prevent misuse and diversion of prescription 
medicines.
                                ------                                


VETERANS' MENTAL HEALTH AND OTHER CARE IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 2008, PUBLIC 
                              LAW 110-387


                                TITLE IV


HEALTH CARE MATTERS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



SEC. 403. PILOT PROGRAM OF ENHANCED CONTRACT CARE AUTHORITY FOR HEALTH 
                    CARE NEEDS OF VETERANS IN HIGHLY RURAL AREAS.

    (a) Pilot Program Required.--

            (1) In general.--* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            [(3) Termination.--A veteran may receive health 
        services under the pilot program only during the three-
        year period beginning on the date of the commencement 
        of the pilot program under paragraph (2).]

            (3) Duration.--A veteran may receive health 
        services under this section during the period beginning 
        on the date specified in paragraph (2) and ending on 
        September 30, 2018.
                                ------                                


                CONSOLIDATED APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2016, 
                           PUBLIC LAW 114-113


  DIVISION J--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION AND VETERANS AFFAIRS, AND RELATED 
AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2016

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                                TITLE II


DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                     [(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    Sec. 223. Of the amounts appropriated to the Department of 
Veterans Affairs which become available on October 1, 2016, for 
``Medical Services'', ``Medical Support and Compliance'', and 
``Medical Facilities'', up to $265,675,000, plus 
reimbursements, may be transferred to the Joint Department of 
Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Facility 
Demonstration Fund, established by section 1704 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (Public Law 111-
84; 123 Stat. 3571) and may be used for operation of the 
facilities designated as combined Federal medical facilities as 
described by section 706 of the Duncan Hunter National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009 (Public Law 110-417; 122 
Stat. 4500): Provided, That additional funds may be transferred 
from accounts designated in this section to the Joint 
Department of Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs Medical 
Facility Demonstration Fund upon written notification by the 
Secretary of Veterans Affairs to the Committees on 
Appropriations of both Houses of Congress.] Repealed.
                                ------                                


                        BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL


  PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS
                                                     AMENDED
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               Budget authority                 Outlays
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee    Amount  in     Committee    Amount  in
                                                           allocation       bill       allocation       bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with the subcommittee
 allocation for 2017: Subcommittee on Military
 Construction and Veterans Affairs, and Related
 Agencies:
    Mandatory...........................................      101,868       101,868       101,470    \1\101,470
    Discretionary.......................................       83,030        83,030        83,151     \1\83,141
        Security........................................        7,930         7,930            NA            NA
        Nonsecurity.....................................       75,100        75,100            NA            NA
Projections of outlays associated with the
 recommendation:
    2017................................................  ............  ............  ............   \2\109,898
    2018................................................  ............  ............  ............        5,246
    2019................................................  ............  ............  ............        3,686
    2020................................................  ............  ............  ............        2,260
    2021 and future years...............................  ............  ............  ............        1,469
Financial assistance to State and local governments forP           NA           201            NA         \2\37
 2017...................................................
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
\2\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
 
NA: Not applicable.


                                MILITARY CONSTRUCTION PROJECT LISTING BY LOCATION
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                     Committee
                                                                                                  recommendation
                    Installation and project                          Budget         Committee      compared to
                                                                     estimate     recommendation      budget
                                                                                                     estimate
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                             ALASKA
 
ARMY:
    FORT WAINWRIGHT:
        UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE HANGAR..........................          47,000          47,000  ..............
AIR FORCE:
    CLEAR AFS:
        FIRE STATION............................................          20,000          20,000  ..............
    EIELSON AFB:
        F-35A ADAL FIELD TRAINING DETACHMENT FAC................          22,100          22,100  ..............
        F-35A AIRCRAFT WEATHER SHELTER (SQD 2)..................          82,300          82,300  ..............
        F-35A AIRCRAFT WEATHER SHELTERS (SQD 1).................          79,500          79,500  ..............
        F-35A EARTH COVERED MAGAZINES...........................          11,300          11,300  ..............
        F-35A HANGAR/PROPULSION MX/DISPATCH.....................          44,900          44,900  ..............
        F-35A HANGAR/SQUAD OPS/AMU SQ #2........................          42,700          42,700  ..............
        F-35A MISSILE MAINTENANCE FACILITY......................          12,800          12,800  ..............
    JOINT BASE ELMENDORF-RICHARDSON:
        ADD/ALTER AWACS ALERT HANGAR............................          29,000          29,000  ..............
DEFENSE-WIDE:
    CLEAR AFS:
        LONG RANGE DISCRIM RADAR SYS COMPLEX PH1................         155,000         155,000  ..............
    FORT GREELY:
        MISSILE DEFENSE COMPLEX SWITCHGEAR FACILITY.............           9,560           9,560  ..............
    JOINT BASE ELMENDORF-RICHARDSON:
        CONSTRUCT TRUCK OFFLOAD FACILITY........................           4,900           4,900  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, ALASKA.............................................         561,060         561,060  ..............
 
                             ARIZONA
 
NAVY:
    YUMA:
        VMX-22 MAINTENANCE HANGAR...............................          48,355          48,355  ..............
AIR FORCE:
    LUKE AFB:
        F-35A SQUAD OPS/AIRCRAFT MAINT UNIT #5..................          20,000          20,000  ..............
DEFENSE-WIDE:
    FORT HUACHUCA:
        JITC BUILDING 52110 RENOVATION..........................           4,493           4,493  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, ARIZONA............................................          72,848          72,848  ..............
 
                           CALIFORNIA
 
ARMY:
    CONCORD:
        ACCESS CONTROL POINT....................................          12,600          12,600  ..............
NAVY:
    CORONADO:
        COASTAL CAMPUS ENTRY CONTROL POINT......................          13,044          13,044  ..............
        COASTAL CAMPUS UTILITIES INFRASTRUCTURE.................          81,104          81,104  ..............
        GRACE HOPPER DATA CENTER POWER UPGRADES.................          10,353          10,353  ..............
    LEMOORE:
        F-35C ENGINE REPAIR FACILITY............................          26,723          26,723  ..............
    SAN DIEGO:
        ENERGY SECURITY HOSPITAL MICROGRID......................           6,183           6,183  ..............
    SEAL BEACH:
        MISSILE MAGAZINES.......................................          21,007          21,007  ..............
AIR FORCE:
    EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE:
        FLIGHTLINE FIRE STATION.................................          24,000          24,000  ..............
DEFENSE-WIDE:
    CORONADO:
        SOF HUMAN PERFORMANCE TRAINING CENTER...................          15,578          15,578  ..............
        SOF SEAL TEAM OPS FACILITY..............................          47,290          47,290  ..............
        SOF SEAL TEAM OPS FACILITY..............................          47,290          47,290  ..............
        SOF SPECIAL RECON TEAM ONE OPERATIONS FAC...............          20,949          20,949  ..............
        SOF TRAINING DETACHMENT ONE OPS FACILITY................          44,305          44,305  ..............
        TRAVIS AFB REPLACE HYDRANT FUEL SYSTEM..................          26,500          26,500  ..............
ARMY RESERVE:
    FORT HUNTER LIGGETT:
        EMERGENCY SERVICES CENTER...............................          21,500          21,500  ..............
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, AIR FORCE RESERVE........................  ..............  ..............  ..............
        TRANSIENT TRAINING BARRACKS.............................          19,000          19,000  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, CALIFORNIA.........................................         437,426         437,426  ..............
 
                            COLORADO
 
ARMY:
    FORT CARSON:
        AUTOMATED INFANTRY PLATOON BATTLE COURSE................           8,100           8,100  ..............
        UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE HANGAR..........................           5,000           5,000  ..............
AIR FORCE:
    BUCKLEY AIR FORCE BASE:
        SMALL ARMS RANGE COMPLEX................................          13,500          13,500  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, COLORADO...........................................          26,600          26,600  ..............
 
                           CONNECTICUT
 
AIR NATIONAL GUARD:
    BRADLEY IAP:
        CONSTRUCT SMALL AIR TERMINAL............................           6,300           6,300  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, CONNECTICUT........................................           6,300           6,300  ..............
 
                            DELAWARE
 
AIR FORCE:
    DOVER AFB:
        AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE HANGAR.............................          39,000          39,000  ..............
DEFENSE-WIDE:
    DOVER AFB:
        WELCH ES/DOVER MS REPLACEMENT...........................          44,115          44,115  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, DELAWARE...........................................          83,115          83,115  ..............
 
                             FLORIDA
 
NAVY:
    EGLIN AFB:
        WMD FIELD TRAINING FACILITIES...........................          20,489          20,489  ..............
AIR FORCE:
    EGLIN AFB:
        ADVANCED MUNITIONS TECHNOLOGY COMPLEX...................          75,000          75,000  ..............
        FLIGHTLINE FIRE STATION.................................          13,600          13,600  ..............
    PATRICK AFB
        FIRE/CRASH RESCUE STATION...............................          13,500          13,500  ..............
DEFENSE-WIDE:
    PATRICK AFB:
        REPLACE FUEL TANKS......................................          10,100          10,100  ..............
AIR NATIONAL GUARD:
    JACKSONVILLE IAP:
        REPLACE FIRE CRASH/RESCUE STATION.......................           9,000           9,000  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, FLORIDA............................................         141,689         141,689  ..............
 
                             GEORGIA
 
ARMY:
    FORT GORDON:
        CYBER PROTECTION TEAM OPS FACILITY......................          90,000          90,000  ..............
    FORT STEWART
        AUTOMATED QUALIFICATION/TRAINING RANGE..................          14,800          14,800  ..............
AIR FORCE:
    MOODY AFB:
        PERSONNEL RECOVERY 4-BAY HANGAR/HELO MX UNIT............          30,900          30,900  ..............
DEFENSE-WIDE:
    FORT BENNING:
        SOF TACTICAL UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE HANGAR.............           4,820           4,820  ..............
    FORT GORDON
        MEDICAL CLINIC REPLACEMENT..............................          25,000          25,000  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, GEORGIA............................................         165,520         165,520  ..............
 
                             HAWAII
 
ARMY:
    FORT SHAFTER:
        COMMAND AND CONTROL FACILITY, INCR 2....................          40,000          40,000  ..............
NAVY:
    BARKING SANDS:
        UPGRADE POWER PLANT & ELECTRICAL DISTRIB SYS............          43,384          43,384  ..............
    KANEOHE BAY
        REGIMENTAL CONSOLIDATED COMM/ELEC FACILITY..............          72,565          72,565  ..............
ARMY NATIONAL GUARD:
    HILO:
        COMBINED SUPPORT MAINTENANCE SHOP.......................          31,000          31,000  ..............
AIR NATIONAL GUARD:
    JOINT BASE PEARL HARBOR-HICKAM:
        F-22 COMPOSITE REPAIR FACILITY..........................          11,000          11,000  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, HAWAII.............................................         197,949         197,949  ..............
 
                              IOWA
 
ARMY NATIONAL GUARD:
    DAVENPORT:
        NATIONAL GUARD READINESS CENTER.........................          23,000          23,000  ..............
AIR NATIONAL GUARD:
    SIOUX GATEWAY AIRPORT:
        CONSTRUCT CONSOLIDATED SUPPORT FUNCTIONS................          12,600          12,600  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, IOWA...............................................          35,600          35,600  ..............
 
                             KANSAS
 
AIR FORCE:
    MCCONNELL AFB:
        AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL TOWER...............................          11,200          11,200  ..............
        KC-46A ADAL TAXIWAY DELTA...............................           5,600           5,600  ..............
        KC-46A ALTER FLIGHT SIMULATOR BLDGS.....................           3,000           3,000  ..............
ARMY NATIONAL GUARD:
    FORT LEAVENWORTH:
        NATIONAL GUARD READINESS CENTER.........................          29,000          29,000  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, KANSAS.............................................          48,800          48,800  ..............
 
                            LOUISIANA
 
AIR FORCE:
    BARKSDALE AFB:
        CONSOLIDATED COMMUNICATION FACILITY.....................          21,000          21,000  ..............
NAVY RESERVE:
    NEW ORLEANS:
        JOINT RESERVE INTELLIGENCE CENTER.......................          11,207          11,207  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, LOUISIANA..........................................          32,207          32,207  ..............
 
                              MAINE
 
NAVY:
    KITTERY:
        UNACCOMPANIED HOUSING...................................          17,773          17,773  ..............
        UTILITY IMPROVEMENTS FOR NUCLEAR PLATFORMS..............          30,119          30,119  ..............
DEFENSE-WIDE:
    KITTERY:
        MEDICAL/DENTAL CLINIC REPLACEMENT.......................          27,100          27,100  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, MAINE..............................................          74,992          74,992  ..............
 
                            MARYLAND
 
NAVY:
    PATUXENT RIVER:
        CBARS RDT&E; HANGAR......................................          40,576          40,576  ..............
AIR FORCE:
    JOINT BASE ANDREWS:
        21 POINTS ENCLOSED FIRING RANGE.........................          13,000          13,000  ..............
        PAR RELOCATE JADOC SATELLITE SITE.......................           3,500           3,500  ..............
DEFENSE-WIDE:
    BETHESDA NAVAL HOSPITAL:
        MEDCEN ADDITION/ALTERATION INCR 1.......................          50,000          50,000  ..............
    FORT MEADE
        ACCESS CONTROL FACILITY.................................          21,000          21,000  ..............
        NSAW CAMPUS FEEDERS PHASE 3.............................          17,000          17,000  ..............
        NSAW RECAPITALIZE BUILDING #2 INCR 2....................         195,000         195,000  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, MARYLAND...........................................         340,076         340,076  ..............
 
                          MASSACHUSETTS
 
AIR FORCE:
    HANSCOM AFB:
        SYSTEM MANAGEMENT ENGINEERING FACILITY..................          20,000          20,000  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, MASSACHUSETTS......................................          20,000          20,000  ..............
 
                            MINNESOTA
 
AIR NATIONAL GUARD:
    DULUTH IAP:
        LOAD CREW TRAINING/WEAPON SHOPS.........................           7,600           7,600  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, MINNESOTA..........................................           7,600           7,600  ..............
 
                            MISSOURI
 
DEFENSE-WIDE:
    ST LOUIS:
        LAND ACQUISITION-NEXT NGA WEST (N2W) CAMPUS.............             801             801  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, MISSOURI...........................................             801             801  ..............
 
                             MONTANA
 
AIR FORCE:
    MALMSTROM AFB:
        MISSILE MAINTENANCE FACILITY............................          14,600          14,600  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, MONTANA............................................          14,600          14,600  ..............
 
                             NEVADA
 
NAVY:
    FALLON:
        AIR WING SIMULATOR FACILITY.............................          13,523          13,523  ..............
AIR FORCE:
    NELLIS AFB:
        F-35A POL FILL STAND ADDITION...........................          10,600          10,600  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, NEVADA.............................................          24,123          24,123  ..............
 
                          NEW HAMPSHIRE
 
ARMY NATIONAL GUARD:
    HOOKSETT:
        NATIONAL GUARD VEHICLE MAINTENANCE SHOP.................          11,000          11,000  ..............
    ROCHESTER
        NATIONAL GUARD VEHICLE MAINTENANCE SHOP.................           8,900           8,900  ..............
AIR NATIONAL GUARD:
    PEASE INTERNATIONAL TRADE PORT:
        KC-46A INSTALL FUSELAGE TRAINER BLDG 251................           1,500           1,500  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, NEW HAMPSHIRE......................................          21,400          21,400  ..............
 
                           NEW MEXICO
 
AIR FORCE:
    CANNON AFB:
        NORTH FITNESS CENTER....................................          21,000          21,000  ..............
    HOLLOMAN AFB
        HAZARDOUS CARGO PAD AND TAXIWAY.........................          10,600          10,600  ..............
    KIRTLAND AFB
        COMBAT RESCUE HELICOPTER (CRH) SIMULATOR................           7,300           7,300  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, NEW MEXICO.........................................          38,900          38,900  ..............
 
                            NEW YORK
 
NAVY RESERVE:
    BROOKLYN:
        ELECTRIC FEEDER DUCTBANK................................           1,964           1,964  ..............
    SYRACUSE
        MARINE CORPS RESERVE CENTER.............................          13,229          13,229  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, NEW YORK...........................................          15,193          15,193  ..............
 
                         NORTH CAROLINA
 
NAVY:
    CAMP LEJEUNE:
        RANGE FACILITIES SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS....................          18,482          18,482  ..............
        CHERRY POINT MARINE CORPS AIR STATION CENTRAL HEATING             12,515          12,515  ..............
         PLANT CONVERSION.......................................
DEFENSE-WIDE:
    CAMP LEJEUNE:
        DENTAL CLINIC REPLACEMENT...............................          31,000          31,000  ..............
        FORT BRAGG SOF COMBAT MEDIC TRAINING FACILITY...........          10,905          10,905  ..............
        SOF PARACHUTE RIGGING FACILITY..........................          21,420          21,420  ..............
        SOF SPECIAL TACTICS FACILITY (PH3)......................          30,670          30,670  ..............
        SOF TACTICAL EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE FACILITY.............          23,598          23,598  ..............
AIR NATIONAL GUARD:
    CHARLOTTE/DOUGLAS IAP:
        C-17 CORROSION CONTROL/FUEL CELL HANGAR.................          29,600          29,600  ..............
        C-17 TYPE III HYDRANT REFUELING SYSTEM..................          21,000          21,000  ..............
AIR FORCE RESERVE:
    SEYMOUR JOHNSON AFB:
        KC-46A ADAL BLDG FOR AGE/FUSELAGE TRAINING..............           5,700           5,700  ..............
        KC-46A ADAL SQUADRON OPERATIONS FACILITIES..............           2,250           2,250  ..............
        KC-46A TWO BAY CORROSION/FUEL CELL HANGAR...............          90,000          90,000  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, NORTH CAROLINA.....................................         297,140         297,140  ..............
 
                              OHIO
 
AIR FORCE:
    WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB:
        RELOCATED ENTRY CONTROL FACILITY 26A....................          12,600          12,600  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, OHIO...............................................          12,600          12,600  ..............
 
                            OKLAHOMA
 
AIR FORCE:
    ALTUS AFB:
        KC-46A FTU/FTC SIMULATOR FACILITY PH 2..................          11,600          11,600  ..............
    TINKER AFB:
        KC-46A DEPOT SYSTEM INTEGRATION LABORATORY..............          17,000          17,000  ..............
ARMY NATIONAL GUARD:
    ARDMORE
        NATIONAL GUARD READINESS CENTER.........................          22,000          22,000  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, OKLAHOMA...........................................          50,600          50,600  ..............
 
                          PENNSYLVANIA
 
ARMY NATIONAL GUARD:
    YORK:
        NATIONAL GUARD READINESS CENTER.........................           9,300           9,300  ..............
AIR FORCE RESERVE:
    PITTSBURGH IAP:
        C-17 ADAL FUEL HYDRANT SYSTEM...........................          22,800          22,800  ..............
        C-17 CONST/OVERLAYTAXIWAY AND APRON.....................           8,200           8,200  ..............
        C-17 CONSTRUCT TWO BAY CORROSION/FUEL HANGAR............          54,000          54,000  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, PENNSYLVANIA.......................................          94,300          94,300  ..............
 
                          RHODE ISLAND
 
ARMY NATIONAL GUARD:
    EAST GREENWICH:
        NATIONAL GUARD/RESERVE CENTER BUILDING (JFHQ)...........          20,000          20,000  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, RHODE ISLAND.......................................          20,000          20,000  ..............
 
                         SOUTH CAROLINA
 
NAVY:
    BEAUFORT:
        AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE HANGAR.............................          83,490          83,490  ..............
    PARRIS ISLAND:
        RECRUIT RECONDITIONING CENTER & BARRACKS................          29,882          29,882  ..............
DEFENSE-WIDE:
    JOINT BASE CHARLESTON:
        CONSTRUCT HYDRANT FUEL SYSTEM...........................          17,000          17,000  ..............
AIR NATIONAL GUARD:
    MCENTIRE ANGS:
        REPLACE OPERATIONS AND TRAINING FACILITY................           8,400           8,400  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, SOUTH CAROLINA.....................................         138,772         138,772  ..............
 
                              TEXAS
 
ARMY:
    FORT HOOD:
        AUTOMATED INFANTRY PLATOON BATTLE COURSE................           7,600           7,600  ..............
AIR FORCE:
    JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO:
        BMT RECRUIT DORMITORY 6.................................          67,300          67,300  ..............
DEFENSE-WIDE:
    RED RIVER ARMY DEPOT:
        CONSTRUCT WAREHOUSE & OPEN STORAGE......................          44,700          44,700  ..............
    SHEPPARD AFB:
        MEDICAL/DENTAL CLINIC REPLACEMENT.......................          91,910          91,910  ..............
AIR NATIONAL GUARD:
    ELLINGTON FIELD:
        CONSOLIDATE CREW READINESS FACILITY.....................           4,500           4,500  ..............
NAVY RESERVE:
    GALVESTON:
        RESERVE CENTER ANNEX....................................           8,414           8,414  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, TEXAS..............................................         224,424         224,424  ..............
 
                              UTAH
 
ARMY:
    CAMP WILLIAMS:
        LIVE FIRE EXERCISE SHOOTHOUSE...........................           7,400           7,400  ..............
AIR FORCE:
    HILL AFB:
        649 MUNS MUNITIONS STORAGE MAGAZINES....................           6,600           6,600  ..............
        649 MUNS PRECISION GUIDED MISSILE MX FACILITY...........           8,700           8,700  ..............
        649 MUNS STAMP/MAINT & INSPECTION FACILITY..............          12,000          12,000  ..............
        COMPOSITE AIRCRAFT ANTENNA CALIBRATION FAC..............           7,100           7,100  ..............
        F-35A MUNITIONS MAINTENANCE COMPLEX.....................          10,100          10,100  ..............
ARMY NATIONAL GUARD:
    CAMP WILLIAMS:
        NATIONAL GUARD READINESS CENTER.........................          37,000          37,000  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, UTAH...............................................          88,900          88,900  ..............
 
                             VERMONT
 
AIR NATIONAL GUARD:
    BURLINGTON IAP:
        F-35 BEDDOWN 4-BAY FLIGHT SIMULATOR.....................           4,500           4,500  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, VERMONT............................................           4,500           4,500  ..............
 
                            VIRGINIA
 
ARMY:
    FORT BELVOIR:
        SECURE ADMIN/OPERATIONS FACILITY, INCR 2................          64,000          64,000  ..............
AIR FORCE:
    JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS:
        AIR FORCE TARGETING CENTER..............................          45,000          45,000  ..............
        FUEL SYSTEM MAINTENANCE DOCK............................          14,200          14,200  ..............
DEFENSE-WIDE:
    PENTAGON:
        PENTAGON METRO ENTRANCE FACILITY........................          12,111  ..............         -12,111
        UPGRADE IT FACILITIES INFRASTRUCTURE-RRMC...............           8,105           8,105  ..............
ARMY RESERVE:
    DUBLIN:
        ORGANIZATIONAL MAINTENANCE SHOP/AMSA....................           6,000           6,000  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, VIRGINIA...........................................         149,416         137,305         -12,111
 
                           WASHINGTON
 
NAVY:
    BANGOR:
        SERVICE PIER ELECTRICAL UPGRADES........................          18,939          18,939  ..............
        SUBMARINE REFIT MAINT SUPPORT FACILITY..................          21,476          21,476  ..............
    BREMERTON:
        NUCLEAR REPAIR FACILITY.................................           6,704           6,704  ..............
    WHIDBEY ISLAND:
        EA-18G MAINTENANCE HANGAR...............................          45,501          45,501  ..............
        TRITON MISSION CONTROL FACILITY.........................          30,475          30,475  ..............
AIR FORCE:
    FAIRCHILD AFB:
        PIPELINE DORM, USAF SERE SCHOOL (150 RM)................          27,000          27,000  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, WASHINGTON.........................................         150,095         150,095  ..............
 
                            WISCONSIN
 
ARMY RESERVE:
    FORT MCCOY:
        AT/MOB DINING FACILITY..................................          11,400          11,400  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, WISCONSIN..........................................          11,400          11,400  ..............
 
                             WYOMING
 
AIR FORCE:
    F. E. WARREN AFB:
        MISSILE TRANSFER FACILITY BLDG 4331.....................           5,550           5,550  ..............
ARMY NATIONAL GUARD:
    LARAMIE:
        NATIONAL GUARD READINESS CENTER.........................          21,000          21,000  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, WYOMING............................................          26,550          26,550  ..............
 
                            AUSTRALIA
 
AIR FORCE:
    DARWIN:
        APR--AIRCRAFT MX SUPPORT FACILITY.......................           1,800           1,800  ..............
        APR--EXPAND PARKING APRON...............................          28,600          28,600  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, AUSTRALIA..........................................          30,400          30,400  ..............
 
                            BULGARIA
 
AIR FORCE:
    GRAF IGNATIEVO:
        SQUADRON OPERATIONS/OPERATION ALERT FACILITY............  ..............           3,800          +3,800
        FIGHTER RAMP EXTENSION..................................  ..............           7,000          +7,000
        UPGRADE MUNITIONS STORAGE...............................  ..............           2,600          +2,600
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, BULGARIA...........................................  ..............          13,400         +13,400
 
                              CUBA
 
ARMY:
    GUANTANAMO BAY:
        MASS MIGRATION COMPLEX..................................          33,000          33,000  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, CUBA...............................................          33,000          33,000  ..............
 
                          DIEGO GARCIA
 
DEFENSE-WIDE:
    DIEGO GARCIA:
        IMPROVE WHARF REFUELING CAPABILITY......................          30,000          30,000  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, DIEGO GARCIA.......................................          30,000          30,000  ..............
 
                            DJIBOUTI
 
NAVY:
    CAMP LEMONNIER:
        MEDICAL/DENTAL FACILITY.................................  ..............          37,409         +37,409
AIR FORCE:
    CHABELLEY AIRFIELD:
        ACCESS ROAD.............................................  ..............           3,600          +3,600
        PARKING APRON AND TAXIWAY...............................  ..............           6,900          +6,900
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, DJIBOUTI...........................................  ..............          47,909         +47,909
 
                             ESTONIA
 
AIR FORCE:
    AMARI AB:
        BULK FUEL STORAGE.......................................  ..............           6,500          +6,500
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, ESTONIA............................................  ..............           6,500          +6,500
 
                             GERMANY
 
ARMY:
    EAST CAMP GRAFENWOEHR:
        TRAINING SUPPORT CENTER.................................          22,000          22,000  ..............
    GARMISCH:
        DINING FACILITY.........................................           9,600           9,600  ..............
    WIESBADEN ARMY AIRFIELD:
        CONTROLLED HUMIDITY WAREHOUSE...........................          16,500          16,500  ..............
        HAZARDOUS MATERIAL STORAGE BUILDING.....................           2,700           2,700  ..............
AIR FORCE:
    RAMSTEIN AB:
        37 AS SQUADRON OPERATIONS/AIRCRAFT MAINT UNIT...........          13,437          13,437  ..............
    SPANGDAHLEM AB:
        EIC--SITE DEVELOPMENT AND INFRASTRUCTURE................          43,465          43,465  ..............
        HIGH CAPACITY TRIM PAD AND HUSH HOUSE...................  ..............           1,000          +1,000
        F/A-22 LOW OBSERVABLE/COMPOSITE REPAIR FACILITY.........  ..............          12,000         +12,000
        F/A-22 UPGRADE INFRASTRUCTURE/COMMUNICATIONS/UTILITIES..  ..............           1,600          +1,600
        UPGRADE HARDENED AIRCRAFT SHELTERS FOR F/A-22...........  ..............           2,700          +2,700
        UPGRADE MUNITION STORAGE DOORS..........................  ..............           1,400          +1,400
DEFENSE-WIDE:
    KAISERLAUTERN AB:
        SEMBACH ELEMENTARY/MIDDLE SCHOOL REPLACEMENT............          45,221          45,221  ..............
    RHINE ORDNANCE BARRACKS:
        MEDICAL CENTER REPLACEMENT INCR 6.......................          58,063          58,063  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, GERMANY............................................         210,986         229,686         +18,700
 
                              GUAM
 
NAVY:
    JOINT REGION MARIANAS:
        HARDENING OF GUAM POL INFRASTRUCTURE....................          26,975          26,975  ..............
        POWER UPGRADE--HARMON...................................          62,210          62,210  ..............
AIR FORCE:
    JOINT REGION MARIANAS:
        APR--MUNITIONS STORAGE IGLOOS, PH 2.....................          35,300          35,300  ..............
        APR--SATCOM C4I FACILITY................................          14,200          14,200  ..............
        BLOCK 40 MAINTENANCE HANGAR.............................          31,158          31,158  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, GUAM...............................................         169,843         169,843  ..............
 
                             ICELAND
 
NAVY:
    KEFLAVIK:
        P-8A AIRCRAFT RINSE FACILITY............................  ..............           5,000          +5,000
        P-8A HANGAR UPGRADE.....................................  ..............          14,600         +14,600
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, ICELAND............................................  ..............          19,600         +19,600
 
                              JAPAN
 
NAVY:
    KADENA AB:
        AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE COMPLEX............................          26,489          26,489  ..............
    SASEBO:
        SHORE POWER (JULIET PIER)...............................          16,420          16,420  ..............
AIR FORCE:
    KADENA AB:
        APR--REPLACE MUNITIONS STRUCTURES.......................          19,815          19,815  ..............
    YOKOTA AB:
        C-130J CORROSION CONTROL HANGAR.........................          23,777          23,777  ..............
        CONSTRUCT COMBAT ARMS TRAINING & MAINT FAC..............           8,243           8,243  ..............
DEFENSE-WIDE:
    IWAKUNI:
        CONSTRUCT TRUCK OFFLOAD & LOADING FACILITIES............           6,664           6,664  ..............
    KADENA AB:
        KADENA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL REPLACEMENT....................          84,918          84,918  ..............
        MEDICAL MATERIEL WAREHOUSE..............................          20,881          20,881  ..............
        SOF MAINTENANCE HANGAR..................................          42,823          42,823  ..............
        SOF SIMULATOR FACILITY (MC-130).........................          12,602          12,602  ..............
    YOKOTA AB:
        AIRFIELD APRON..........................................          41,294          41,294  ..............
        HANGAR/AMU..............................................          39,466          39,466  ..............
        OPERATIONS AND WAREHOUSE FACILITIES.....................          26,710          26,710  ..............
        SIMULATOR FACILITY......................................           6,261           6,261  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, JAPAN..............................................         376,363         376,363  ..............
 
                            KWAJALEIN
 
DEFENSE-WIDE:
    KWAJALEIN ATOLL:
        REPLACE FUEL STORAGE TANKS..............................          85,500          85,500  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, KWAJALEIN..........................................          85,500          85,500  ..............
 
                            LITHUANIA
 
AIR FORCE:
    SIAULIAI:
        MUNITIONS STORAGE.......................................  ..............           3,000          +3,000
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, LITHUANIA..........................................  ..............           3,000          +3,000
 
                         MARIANA ISLANDS
 
AIR FORCE:
    UNSPECIFIED LOCATION:
        APR--LAND ACQUISITION...................................           9,000           9,000  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, MARIANA ISLANDS....................................           9,000           9,000  ..............
 
                             POLAND
 
AIR FORCE:
    LASK AIR BASE:
        SQUADRON OPERATIONS FACILITY............................  ..............           4,100          +4,100
    POWIDZ:
        SQUADRON OPERATIONS FACILITY............................  ..............           4,100          +4,100
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, POLAND.............................................  ..............           8,200          +8,200
 
                             ROMANIA
 
AIR FORCE:
    CAMP TURZII:
        MUNITIONS STORAGE AREA..................................  ..............           3,000          +3,000
        SQUADRON OPERATIONS FACILITY............................  ..............           3,400          +3,400
        TWO-BAY HANGAR..........................................  ..............           6,100          +6,100
        EXTEND PARKING APRONS...................................  ..............           6,000          +6,000
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, ROMANIA............................................  ..............          18,500         +18,500
 
                              SPAIN
 
NAVY:
    ROTA:
        COMMUNICATION STATION...................................          23,607          23,607  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, SPAIN..............................................          23,607          23,607  ..............
 
                             TURKEY
 
AIR FORCE:
    INCIRLIK AB:
        AIRFIELD FIRE/CRASH RESCUE STATION......................          13,449          13,449  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, TURKEY.............................................          13,449          13,449  ..............
 
                      UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
 
AIR FORCE:
    AL DHAFRA:
        LARGE AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE HANGAR.......................          35,400          35,400  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES...............................          35,400          35,400  ..............
 
                         UNITED KINGDOM
 
AIR FORCE:
    CROUGHTON RAF:
        JIAC CONSOLIDATION--PH 3................................          53,082          53,082  ..............
        MAIN GATE COMPLEX.......................................          16,500          16,500  ..............
DEFENSE-WIDE:
    CROUGHTON RAF:
        CROUGHTON ELEM/MIDDLE/HIGH SCHOOL REPLACEMENT...........          71,424          71,424  ..............
    ROYAL AIR FORCE LAKENHEATH:
        CONSTRUCT HYDRANT FUEL SYSTEM...........................          13,500          13,500  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, UNITED KINGDOM.....................................         154,506         154,506  ..............
 
                           WAKE ISLAND
 
DEFENSE-WIDE:
    WAKE ISLAND:
        TEST SUPPORT FACILITY...................................          11,670          11,670  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, WAKE ISLAND........................................          11,670          11,670  ..............
 
                   VARIOUS WORLDWIDE LOCATIONS
 
NAVY:
    TRITON FORWARD OPERATING BASE HANGAR........................          41,380          41,380  ..............
        NATO SECURITY INVESTMENT PROGRAM........................         177,932         177,932  ..............
 
                      WORLDWIDE UNSPECIFIED
 
ARMY:
    HOST NATION SUPPORT.........................................          18,000          18,000  ..............
    MINOR CONSTRUCTION..........................................          25,000          35,000         +10,000
    PLANNING AND DESIGN.........................................          80,159          99,059         +18,900
NAVY:
    PLANNING AND DESIGN.........................................          88,230          91,030          +2,800
    MINOR CONSTRUCTION..........................................          29,790          29,790  ..............
AIR FORCE:
    PLANNING AND DESIGN.........................................          84,862          94,802          +9,940
    PLANNING AND DESIGN--ANDREWS AFB............................          18,720          18,720  ..............
    PLANNING AND DESIGN--HANSCOM AFB............................          40,000          40,000  ..............
    MINOR CONSTRUCTION..........................................          30,000          40,000         +10,000
DEFENSE-WIDE:
    CONTINGENCY CONSTRUCTION....................................          10,000  ..............         -10,000
    ENERGY CONSERVATION INVESTMENT PROGRAM......................         150,000         150,000  ..............
    PLANNING AND DESIGN:
        DEFENSE WIDE............................................          23,450          23,450  ..............
        DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DEPENDENT EDUCATION...............          23,585          23,585  ..............
        DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY................................          27,660          27,660  ..............
        MDA.....................................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
        NATIONAL GEOSPATIAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY.................          71,647          71,647  ..............
        NATIONAL SECURITY AGENCY................................          24,000          24,000  ..............
        SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND..............................          27,653          27,653  ..............
        WASHINGTON HEADQUARTERS SERVICE.........................           3,427           3,427  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL, PLANNING AND DESIGN.............................         201,422         201,422  ..............
 
UNSPECIFIED MINOR CONSTRUCTION:
    DEFENSE-WIDE................................................           3,000           3,000  ..............
    DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DEPENDENT EDUCTION....................           3,000           3,000  ..............
    DEFENSE HEALTH AGENCY.......................................           8,500           8,500  ..............
    JOINT CHIEFS OF STAFF.......................................           8,631          13,631          +5,000
    MISSILE DEFENSE AGENCY......................................           2,414           2,414  ..............
    NATIONAL SECURITY AGENCY....................................           3,913           3,913  ..............
    SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND..................................           5,994           5,994  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL, UNSPECIFIED MINOR CONSTRUCTION..................          35,452          40,452          +5,000
 
ARMY NATIONAL GUARD:
    PLANNING AND DESIGN.........................................           8,729           8,729  ..............
    MINOR CONSTRUCTION..........................................          12,001          12,001  ..............
AIR NATIONAL GUARD:
    PLANNING AND DESIGN.........................................          10,462          10,462  ..............
    MINOR CONSTRUCTION..........................................          17,495          17,495  ..............
ARMY RESERVE:
    PLANNING AND DESIGN.........................................           7,500           7,500  ..............
    MINOR CONSTRUCTION..........................................           2,830           2,830  ..............
NAVY RESERVE:
    PLANNING AND DESIGN.........................................           3,783           3,783  ..............
    MINOR CONSTRUCTION..........................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
AIR FORCE RESERVE:
    PLANNING AND DESIGN.........................................           4,500           4,500  ..............
    MINOR CONSTRUCTION..........................................           1,500           1,500  ..............
 
                      FAMILY HOUSING, ARMY
 
KOREA:
    CAMP WALKER (DAEGU):
        FAMILY HOUSING NEW CONSTRUCTION (90 UNITS)..............          54,554          54,554  ..............
    CAMP HUMPHRIES:
        FAMILY HOUSING NEW CONSTRUCTION (216 UNITS).............         143,563         143,563  ..............
PLANNING AND DESIGN.............................................           2,618           2,618  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL, CONSTRUCTION....................................         200,735         200,735  ..............
 
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE:
    UTILITIES ACCOUNT...........................................          55,428          55,428  ..............
    SERVICES ACCOUNT............................................           7,993           7,993  ..............
    MANAGEMENT ACCOUNT..........................................          40,344          40,344  ..............
    MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNT.......................................             400             400  ..............
    FURNISHINGS ACCOUNT.........................................          10,178          10,178  ..............
    LEASING.....................................................         131,761         131,761  ..............
    MAINTENANCE OF REAL PROPERTY................................          60,745          60,745  ..............
    PRIVATIZATION SUPPORT COSTS.................................          19,146          19,146  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL, OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE.......................         325,995         325,995  ..............
 
              FAMILY HOUSING, NAVY AND MARINE CORPS
 
GUAM:
    NSA ANDERSON:
        REPLACEMENT HOUSING PHASE I.............................          78,815          78,815  ..............
JAPAN:
    IWAKUNI:
        CONSTRUCTION IMPROVEMENTS (36 UNITS)....................          11,047          11,047  ..............
PLANNING AND DESIGN.............................................           4,149           4,149  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL, CONSTRUCTION....................................          94,011          94,011  ..............
 
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE:
    UTILITIES ACCOUNT...........................................          56,685          56,685  ..............
    SERVICES ACCOUNT............................................          12,855          12,855  ..............
    MANAGEMENT ACCOUNT..........................................          51,291          51,291  ..............
    MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNT.......................................             364             364  ..............
    FURNISHINGS ACCOUNT.........................................          17,457          17,457  ..............
    LEASING.....................................................          54,689          54,689  ..............
    MAINTENANCE OF REAL PROPERTY................................          81,254          81,254  ..............
    PRIVATIZATION SUPPORT COSTS.................................          26,320          26,320  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL, OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE.......................         300,915         300,915  ..............
 
                    FAMILY HOUSING, AIR FORCE
 
JAPAN:
    KADENA (CAMP FOSTER):
        CONSTRUCTION IMPROVEMENTS (NORTH TOWERS)................          52,307          52,307  ..............
    KADENA:
        CONSTRUCTION IMPROVEMENTS (KADENA HEIGHTS)..............           4,179           4,179  ..............
SPAIN:
    MORON AB:
        CONSTRUCTION IMPROVEMENTS (UNITS 650 AND 658)...........             498             498  ..............
PLANNING AND DESIGN.............................................           4,368           4,368  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL, CONSTRUCTION....................................          61,352          61,352  ..............
 
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE:
    UTILITIES ACCOUNT...........................................          37,241          37,241  ..............
    MANAGEMENT ACCOUNT..........................................          42,919          42,919  ..............
    SERVICES ACCOUNT............................................          13,026          13,026  ..............
    FURNISHINGS ACCOUNT.........................................          31,690          31,690  ..............
    MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNT.......................................           1,745           1,745  ..............
    LEASING.....................................................          20,530          20,530  ..............
    MAINTENANCE.................................................          85,469          85,469  ..............
    PRIVATIZATION SUPPORT COSTS.................................          41,809          41,809  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL, OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE.......................         274,429         274,429  ..............
 
                  FAMILY HOUSING, DEFENSE-WIDE
 
OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE:
    NATIONAL SECURITY AGENCY:
        UTILITIES...............................................             367             367  ..............
        FURNISHING..............................................             399             399  ..............
        LEASING.................................................          11,044          11,044  ..............
        MAINTENANCE OF REAL PROPERTY............................             800             800  ..............
    DEFENSE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY:
        UTILITIES...............................................           4,100           4,100  ..............
        FURNISHINGS.............................................             500             500  ..............
        LEASING.................................................          40,984          40,984  ..............
    DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY:
        UTILITIES...............................................             174             174  ..............
        FURNISHINGS.............................................              20              20  ..............
        SERVICES................................................              32              32  ..............
        MANAGEMENT..............................................             388             388  ..............
        MAINTENANCE OF REAL PROPERTY............................             349             349  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL, OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE.......................          59,157          59,157  ..............
 
DOD FAMILY HOUSING IMPROVEMENT FUND.............................           3,258           3,258  ..............
DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE BASE CLOSURE ACCOUNT......................         205,237         205,237  ..............
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, ARMY.....................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, NAVY AND MARINE CORPS....................  ..............  ..............  ..............
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, AIR FORCE................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, ARMY NATIONAL GUARD......................  ..............  ..............  ..............
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, AIR NATIONAL GUARD.......................  ..............  ..............  ..............
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, ARMY RESERVE.............................  ..............  ..............  ..............
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, AIR FORCE RESERVE........................  ..............  ..............  ..............
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, ARMY (SEC. 125)..........................  ..............          40,500         +40,500
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, NAVY AND MARINE CORPS (SEC. 125).........  ..............         143,000        +143,000
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, AIR FORCE (SECTION 125.).................  ..............         195,465        +195,465
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, DEFENSE-WIDE (SEC. 125)..................  ..............          64,364         +64,364
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, ARMY NATIONAL GUARD (SEC. 125)...........  ..............          16,500         +16,500
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, AIR NATIONAL GUARD (SEC. 125)............  ..............          11,000         +11,000
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, ARMY RESERVE (SEC.125)...................  ..............          30,000         +30,000
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, AIR FORCE RESERVE (SEC. 125).............  ..............  ..............  ..............
FAMILY HOUSING CONSTRUCTION, ARMY (SEC. 125)....................  ..............          14,400         +14,400
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL..................................................  ..............         515,229        +515,229
 
        RESCISSIONS FROM PRIOR YEAR UNOBLIGATED BALANCES
 
ARMY............................................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
NAVY AND MARINE CORPS...........................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
AIR FORCE.......................................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
DEFENSE-WIDE....................................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
AIR NATIONAL GUARD..............................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
42 USC 3374 (SEC. 135)..........................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, ARMY (SEC. 126) (RESCISSION).............  ..............         -30,000         -30,000
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, NAVY AND MARINE CORPS (SEC. 126)           ..............  ..............  ..............
 (RESCISSION)...................................................
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, AIR FORCE (SEC. 126) (RESCISSION)........  ..............         -22,340         -22,340
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, DEFENSE-WIDE (SEC. 126) (RESCISSION).....  ..............        -132,283        -132,283
NATO SIP (SEC. 126) (RESCISSION)................................  ..............         -15,000         -15,000
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      SUBTOTAL..................................................  ..............        -199,623        -199,623
 
                              RECAP
 
ARMY............................................................         503,459         532,359         +28,900
        RESCISSION..............................................  ..............         -30,000         -30,000
NAVY AND MARINE CORPS...........................................       1,027,763       1,087,572         +59,809
        RESCISSION..............................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
AIR FORCE.......................................................       1,481,058       1,579,798         +98,740
        RESCISSION..............................................  ..............         -22,340         -22,340
DEFENSE-WIDE....................................................       2,056,091       2,038,980         -17,111
        RESCISSION..............................................  ..............        -132,283        -132,283
ARMY NATIONAL GUARD.............................................         232,930         232,930  ..............
        RESCISSION..............................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
AIR NATIONAL GUARD..............................................         143,957         143,957  ..............
        RESCISSION..............................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
ARMY RESERVE....................................................          68,230          68,230  ..............
        RESCISSION..............................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
NAVY RESERVE....................................................          38,597          38,597  ..............
        RESCISSION..............................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
AIR FORCE RESERVE...............................................         188,950         188,950  ..............
        RESCISSION..............................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
NATO SECURITY INVESTMENT PROGRAM................................         177,932         177,932  ..............
        RESCISSION..............................................  ..............         -15,000         -15,000
DOD FAMILY HOUSING IMPROVEMENT FUND.............................           3,258           3,258  ..............
        RESCISSION..............................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
HOMEOWNERS ASSISTANCE PROGRAM...................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
        RESCISSION..............................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
FAMILY HOUSING, ARMY............................................         526,730         526,730  ..............
    CONSTRUCTION................................................       (200,735)       (200,735)  ..............
    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE...................................       (325,995)       (325,995)  ..............
        RESCISSION..............................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
FAMILY HOUSING, NAVY AND MARINE CORPS...........................         394,926         394,926  ..............
    CONSTRUCTION................................................        (94,011)        (94,011)  ..............
    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE...................................       (300,915)       (300,915)  ..............
        RESCISSION..............................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
FAMILY HOUSING, AIR FORCE.......................................         335,781         335,781  ..............
    CONSTRUCTION................................................        (61,352)        (61,352)  ..............
    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE...................................       (274,429)       (274,429)  ..............
        RESCISSION..............................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
FAMILY HOUSING, DEFENSE-WIDE....................................          59,157          59,157  ..............
    CONSTRUCTION................................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
    OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE...................................        (59,157)        (59,157)  ..............
        RESCISSION..............................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE BASE CLOSURE ACCOUNT......................         205,237         205,237  ..............
        RESCISSION..............................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
42 USC 3374 (Sec. 135)..........................................  ..............  ..............  ..............
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION...........................................  ..............         515,229        +515,229
                                                                 ===============================================
      GRAND TOTAL...............................................       7,444,056       7,930,000        +485,944
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                         OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                     Committee
                                                                                                  recommendation
                                                                      Budget         Committee      compared to
                                                                     estimate     recommendation      budget
                                                                                                     estimate
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS
 
                      WORLDWIDE UNSPECIFIED
 
NAVY:
    PLANNING AND DESIGN.........................................           1,000  ..............          -1,000
AIR FORCE:
    PLANNING AND DESIGN.........................................             940  ..............            -940
 
                            DJIBOUTI
 
NAVY:
    CAMP LEMONIER:
        MEDICAL/DENTAL FACILITY.................................          37,409  ..............         -37,409
 
AIR FORCE:
    CHABELLEY AIRFIELD:
        ACCESS ROAD.............................................           3,600  ..............          -3,600
        PARKING APRON AND TAXIWAY...............................           6,900  ..............          -6,900
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS....................          49,849  ..............         -49,849
          NAVY..................................................          38,409  ..............         -38,409
          AIR FORCE.............................................          11,440  ..............         -11,440
                                                                 ===============================================
                 EUROPEAN REASSURANCE INITIATIVE
 
                            BULGARIA
 
AIR FORCE:
    GRAF IGNATIEVO:
        SQUADRON OPERATIONS/OPERATION ALERT FACILITY............           3,800  ..............          -3,800
        FIGHTER RAMP EXTENSION..................................           7,000  ..............          -7,000
        UPGRADE MUNITIONS STORAGE...............................           2,600  ..............          -2,600
 
                             ESTONIA
AIR FORCE:
    AMARI AB:
        BULK FUEL STORAGE.......................................           6,500  ..............          -6,500
 
                             GERMANY
 
AIR FORCE:
    SPANGDAHLEM AB:
        HIGH CAPACITY TRIM PAD AND HUSH HOUSE...................           1,000  ..............          -1,000
        F/A-22 LOW OBSERVABLE/COMPOSITE REPAIR FACILITY.........          12,000  ..............         -12,000
        F/A-22 UPGRADE INFRASTRUCTURE/COMMUNICATIONS/UTILITIES..           1,600  ..............          -1,600
    UPGRADE HARDENED AIRCRAFT SHELTERS FOR F/A-22...............           2,700  ..............          -2,700
    UPGRADE MUNITION STORAGE DOORS..............................           1,400  ..............          -1,400
 
                             ICELAND
 
NAVY:
    KEFLAVIK:
        P-8A AIRCRAFT RINSE FACILITY............................           5,000  ..............          -5,000
        P-8A HANGAR UPGRADE.....................................          14,600  ..............         -14,600
 
                            LITHUANIA
 
AIR FORCE:
    SIAULIAI:
        MUNITIONS STORAGE.......................................           3,000  ..............          -3,000
 
                             POLAND
 
AIR FORCE:
    LASK AIR BASE:
        SQUADRON OPERATIONS FACILITY............................           4,100  ..............          -4,100
    POWIDZ:
        SQUADRON OPERATIONS FACILITY............................           4,100  ..............          -4,100
 
                             ROMANIA
 
AIR FORCE:
    CAMP TURZII:
        MUNITIONS STORAGE AREA..................................           3,000  ..............          -3,000
        SQUADRON OPERATIONS FACILITY............................           3,400  ..............          -3,400
        TWO-BAY HANGAR..........................................           6,100  ..............          -6,100
        EXTEND PARKING APRONS...................................           6,000  ..............          -6,000
 
                      WORLDWIDE UNSPECIFIED
 
ARMY:
    PLANNING AND DESIGN.........................................          18,900  ..............         -18,900
NAVY:
    PLANNING AND DESIGN.........................................           1,800  ..............          -1,800
DEFENSE-WIDE:
    UNSPECIFIED MINOR CONSTRUCTION:
        THE JOINT STAFF.........................................           5,000  ..............          -5,000
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, EUROPEAN REASSURANCE INITIATIVE....................         113,600  ..............        -113,600
          ARMY..................................................          18,900  ..............         -18,900
          NAVY..................................................          21,400  ..............         -21,400
          AIR FORCE.............................................          68,300  ..............         -68,300
          DEFENSE-WIDE..........................................           5,000  ..............          -5,000
                                                                 ===============================================
                    COUNTER-TERRORISM SUPPORT
 
                      WORLDWIDE UNSPECIFIED
 
AIR FORCE:
    PLANNING AND DESIGN.........................................           9,000  ..............          -9,000
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, COUNTER-TERRORISM SUPPORT..........................           9,000  ..............          -9,000
          AIR FORCE.............................................           9,000  ..............          -9,000
                                                                 ===============================================
      TOTAL, FY2017 OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS.............         172,449  ..............        -172,449
          ARMY..................................................          18,900  ..............         -18,900
          NAVY..................................................          59,809  ..............         -59,809
          AIR FORCE.............................................          88,740  ..............         -88,740
          DEFENSE-WIDE..........................................           5,000  ..............          -5,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NOTE.--Funding for these projects was requested in Title IV. The bill provides the requested level of funding
  for these projects in Title I.


  COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET (OBLIGATIONAL) AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2016 AND BUDGET ESTIMATES AND AMOUNTS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL FOR FISCAL
                                                                        YEAR 2017
                                                                [In thousands of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                         Senate Committee recommendation
                                                                                                                             compared with (+ or -)
                                Item                                       2016       Budget estimate     Committee    ---------------------------------
                                                                      appropriation                     recommendation        2016
                                                                                                                         appropriation   Budget estimate
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
 
Military construction, Army........................................         663,245          503,459          532,359         -130,886          +28,900
Military construction, Navy and Marine Corps.......................       1,669,239        1,027,763        1,087,572         -581,667          +59,809
Military construction, Air Force...................................       1,389,185        1,481,058        1,579,798         +190,613          +98,740
Military construction, Defense-Wide................................       2,242,867        2,056,091        2,038,980         -203,887          -17,111
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Active components.....................................       5,964,536        5,068,371        5,238,709         -725,827         +170,338
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Military construction, Army National Guard.........................         197,237          232,930          232,930          +35,693   ...............
Military construction, Air National Guard..........................         138,738          143,957          143,957           +5,219   ...............
Military construction, Army Reserve................................         113,595           68,230           68,230          -45,365   ...............
Military construction, Navy Reserve................................          36,078           38,597           38,597           +2,519   ...............
Military construction, Air Force Reserve...........................          65,021          188,950          188,950         +123,929   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Reserve components....................................         550,669          672,664          672,664         +121,995   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
North Atlantic Treaty Organization Security Investment Program              135,000          177,932          177,932          +42,932   ...............
 (NSIP)............................................................
Department of Defense Base Closure Account.........................         266,334          205,237          205,237          -61,097   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Military construction.................................       6,916,539        6,124,204        6,294,542         -621,997         +170,338
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Family housing operation and maintenance, Army.....................         375,611          325,995          325,995          -49,616   ...............
Family housing operation and maintenance, Navy and Marine Corps....         353,036          300,915          300,915          -52,121   ...............
Family housing operation and maintenance, Air Force................         331,232          274,429          274,429          -56,803   ...............
Family housing operation and maintenance, Defense-Wide.............          58,668           59,157           59,157             +489   ...............
Department of Defense Family Housing Improvement Fund..............  ...............           3,258            3,258           +3,258   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Family Housing operation and maintenance..............       1,118,547          963,754          963,754         -154,793   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Family housing construction, Army..................................         108,695          200,735          200,735          +92,040   ...............
Family housing construction, Navy and Marine Corps.................          16,541           94,011           94,011          +77,470   ...............
Family housing construction, Air Force.............................         160,498           61,352           61,352          -99,146   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Family Housing construction...........................         285,734          356,098          356,098          +70,364   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, Family Housing........................................       1,404,281        1,319,852        1,319,852          -84,429   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                     ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS
 
Military construction, Army (Sec. 125).............................         -86,420   ...............  ...............         +86,420   ...............
Defense Access Roads (Sec. 132)....................................          30,000   ...............  ...............         -30,000   ...............
Military construction, Defense-Wide (Sec. 127).....................        -134,000   ...............  ...............        +134,000   ...............
Military construction, Army (Sec. 128).............................          34,500   ...............  ...............         -34,500   ...............
Military construction, Navy and Marine Corps (Sec. 129)............          34,500   ...............  ...............         -34,500   ...............
Military construction, Army National Guard (Sec. 130)..............          51,300   ...............  ...............         -51,300   ...............
Military construction, Army Reserve (Sec. 131).....................          34,200   ...............  ...............         -34,200   ...............
Military construction, Air Force (rescission)......................         -46,400   ...............  ...............         +46,400   ...............
Military construction, Defense-Wide (rescission)...................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
42 USC 3374........................................................        -105,000   ...............  ...............        +105,000   ...............
Military construction, Air Force (Sec. 132)........................          21,000   ...............  ...............         -21,000   ...............
Military construction, Air National Guard (Sec. 133)...............           6,100   ...............  ...............          -6,100   ...............
Military construction, Air Force Reserve (Sec. 135)................          10,400   ...............  ...............         -10,400   ...............
Military construction, Army (Sec. 125).............................  ...............  ...............          40,500          +40,500          +40,500
Military construction, Navy and Marine Corps (Sec. 125)............  ...............  ...............         143,000         +143,000         +143,000
Military construction, Air Force (Sec. 125)........................  ...............  ...............         195,465         +195,465         +195,465
Military construction, Defense-Wide (Sec. 125).....................  ...............  ...............          64,364          +64,364          +64,364
Military construction, Army National Guard (Sec. 125)..............  ...............  ...............          16,500          +16,500          +16,500
Military construction, Air National Guard (Sec. 125)...............  ...............  ...............          11,000          +11,000          +11,000
Military construction, Army Reserve (Sec. 125).....................  ...............  ...............          30,000          +30,000          +30,000
Family Housing construction , Army (Sec. 125)......................  ...............  ...............          14,400          +14,400          +14,400
Military construction, Army (Sec. 126) (rescission)................  ...............  ...............         -30,000          -30,000          -30,000
Military construction, Air Force (Sec. 126) (rescission)...........  ...............  ...............         -22,340          -22,340          -22,340
Military construction, Defense-Wide (Sec. 126) (rescission)........  ...............  ...............        -132,283         -132,283         -132,283
NATO SIP (Sec. 126) (rescission)...................................  ...............  ...............         -15,000          -15,000          -15,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Administrative Provisions.............................        -149,820   ...............         315,606         +465,426         +315,606
        Appropriations.............................................        (222,000)  ...............        (515,229)       (+293,229)       (+515,229)
        Rescissions................................................       (-371,820)  ...............       (-199,623)       (+172,197)       (-199,623)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title I, Department of Defense........................       8,171,000        7,444,056        7,930,000         -241,000         +485,944
        Appropriations.............................................      (8,542,820)      (7,444,056)      (8,129,623)       (-413,197)       (+685,567)
        Rescissions................................................       (-371,820)  ...............       (-199,623)       (+172,197)       (-199,623)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
              TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS
 
                  Veterans Benefits Administration
 
Compensation and pensions:
    Advance from prior year........................................  ...............     (86,083,128)     (86,083,128)    (+86,083,128)  ...............
    Current year request...........................................      76,865,545   ...............  ...............     -76,865,545   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, current year.......................................      76,865,545       86,083,128       86,083,128       +9,217,583   ...............
 
    Advance appropriation, fiscal year 2018........................      86,083,128       90,119,449       90,119,449       +4,036,321   ...............
 
Readjustment benefits:
    Advance from prior year........................................  ...............     (16,340,828)     (16,340,828)    (+16,340,828)  ...............
    Current year request...........................................      14,313,357   ...............  ...............     -14,313,357   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................      14,313,357       16,340,828       16,340,828       +2,027,471   ...............
 
    Advance appropriation, fiscal year 2018........................      16,340,828       13,708,648       13,708,648       -2,632,180   ...............
 
Veterans insurance and indemnities:
    Advance from prior year........................................  ...............         (91,920)         (91,920)        (+91,920)  ...............
    Current year request...........................................          77,160           16,605           16,605          -60,555   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................          77,160          108,525          108,525          +31,365   ...............
 
    Advance appropriation, fiscal year 2018........................          91,920          107,899          107,899          +15,979   ...............
 
Veterans housing benefit program fund:
    (Limitation on direct loans)...................................            (500)            (500)            (500)  ...............  ...............
    Administrative expenses........................................         164,558          198,856          198,856          +34,298   ...............
Vocational rehabilitation loans program account....................              31               36               36               +5   ...............
    (Limitation on direct loans)...................................          (2,952)          (2,517)          (2,517)           (-435)  ...............
    Administrative expenses........................................             367              389              389              +22   ...............
Native American veteran housing loan program account...............           1,134            1,163            1,163              +29   ...............
General operating expenses, VBA....................................       2,707,734        2,826,160        2,856,160         +148,426          +30,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Veterans Benefits Administration......................     196,645,762      106,979,205      107,009,205      -89,636,557          +30,000
          Appropriations...........................................     (94,129,886)      (3,043,209)      (3,073,209)    (-91,056,677)        (+30,000)
          Advance appropriations, fiscal year 2018.................    (102,515,876)    (103,935,996)    (103,935,996)     (+1,420,120)  ...............
          Advances from prior year appropriations..................  ...............    (102,515,876)    (102,515,876)   (+102,515,876)  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                   Veterans Health Administration
 
Medical services:
    Advance from prior year........................................     (47,603,202)     (51,673,000)     (51,673,000)     (+4,069,798)  ...............
    Current year request...........................................       2,369,158        1,078,993        1,078,993       -1,290,165   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................      49,972,360       52,751,993       52,751,993       +2,779,633   ...............
 
    Advance appropriation, fiscal year 2018........................      51,673,000       44,886,554       44,886,554       -6,786,446   ...............
 
Medical community care:
    Advance from prior year........................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
    Current year request...........................................  ...............  ...............       7,246,181       +7,246,181       +7,246,181
    Transfer from medical care accounts............................  ...............      (7,246,181)  ...............  ...............     (-7,246,181)
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................  ...............       7,246,181        7,246,181       +7,246,181   ...............
 
    Advance appropriation, fiscal year 2018........................  ...............       9,409,118        9,409,118       +9,409,118   ...............
 
Medical support and compliance:
    Advance from prior year........................................      (6,144,000)      (6,524,000)      (6,524,000)       (+380,000)  ...............
    Current year request...........................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................       6,144,000        6,524,000        6,524,000         +380,000   ...............
 
    Advance appropriation, fiscal year 2018........................       6,524,000        6,654,480        6,654,480         +130,480   ...............
 
Medical facilities:
    Advance from prior year........................................      (4,915,000)      (5,074,000)      (5,074,000)       (+159,000)  ...............
    Current year request...........................................         105,132          649,000          495,100         +389,968         -153,900
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................       5,020,132        5,723,000        5,569,100         +548,968         -153,900
 
    Advance appropriation, fiscal year 2018........................       5,074,000        5,434,880        5,434,880         +360,880   ...............
Medical and prosthetic research....................................         630,735          663,366          675,366          +44,631          +12,000
 
Medical care cost recovery collections:
    Offsetting collections.........................................      -2,445,000       -2,637,000       -2,637,000         -192,000   ...............
    Appropriations (indefinite)....................................       2,445,000        2,637,000        2,637,000         +192,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
 
DOD-VA Joint Medical Funds (by transfer)...........................        (286,000)        (274,731)        (274,731)        (-11,269)  ...............
DOD-VA Health Care Sharing Incentive Fund (by transfer)............         (15,000)         (15,000)         (15,000)  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Veterans Health Administration........................      66,376,025       68,776,391       75,880,672       +9,504,647       +7,104,281
          Appropriations...........................................      (3,105,025)      (2,391,359)      (9,495,640)     (+6,390,615)     (+7,104,281)
          (By transfer)............................................        (301,000)      (7,535,912)        (289,731)        (-11,269)     (-7,246,181)
          Advance appropriations, fiscal year 2018.................     (63,271,000)     (66,385,032)     (66,385,032)     (+3,114,032)  ...............
      Advances from prior year appropriations......................     (58,662,202)     (63,271,000)     (63,271,000)     (+4,608,798)  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                  National Cemetery Administration
 
National Cemetery Administration...................................         271,220          286,193          286,193          +14,973   ...............
 
                    Departmental Administration
 
General administration.............................................         336,659          417,959          417,959          +81,300   ...............
Board of Veterans Appeals..........................................         109,884          156,096          156,096          +46,212   ...............
Information technology systems.....................................       4,133,363        4,278,259        4,278,259         +144,896   ...............
Office of Inspector General........................................         136,766          160,106          160,106          +23,340   ...............
Construction, major projects.......................................       1,243,800          528,110          528,110         -715,690   ...............
Construction, minor projects.......................................         406,200          372,069          372,069          -34,131   ...............
Grants for construction of State extended care facilities..........         120,000           80,000           90,000          -30,000          +10,000
Grants for the construction of veterans cemeteries.................          46,000           45,000           45,000           -1,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Departmental Administration...........................       6,532,672        6,037,599        6,047,599         -485,073          +10,000
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                     Administrative Provisions
 
                         Section 226 (FY16)
 
Medical services...................................................       1,400,000   ...............  ...............      -1,400,000   ...............
    (Rescission)...................................................      -1,400,000   ...............  ...............      +1,400,000   ...............
Medical support and compliance.....................................         100,000   ...............  ...............        -100,000   ...............
    (Rescission)...................................................        -100,000   ...............  ...............        +100,000   ...............
Medical facilities.................................................         250,000   ...............  ...............        -250,000   ...............
    (Rescission)...................................................        -250,000   ...............  ...............        +250,000   ...............
Transfer authority to Medical Services.............................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
JIF (Sec. 233) (rescission)........................................         -30,000   ...............         -52,000          -22,000          -52,000
Medical Services (Sec. 218) (rescission)...........................  ...............  ...............      -7,246,181       -7,246,181       -7,246,181
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total. Administrative Provisions.............................         -30,000   ...............      -7,298,181       -7,268,181       -7,298,181
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title II..............................................     269,795,679      182,079,388      181,925,488      -87,870,191         -153,900
          Appropriations...........................................    (105,788,803)     (11,758,360)     (18,902,641)    (-86,886,162)     (+7,144,281)
          Rescissions..............................................     (-1,780,000)  ...............     (-7,298,181)     (-5,518,181)     (-7,298,181)
          (By transfer)............................................        (301,000)      (7,535,912)        (289,731)        (-11,269)     (-7,246,181)
 
                    TITLE III--RELATED AGENCIES
 
                American Battle Monuments Commission
 
Salaries and expenses..............................................         105,100           75,100           75,100          -30,000   ...............
Foreign currency fluctuations account..............................           2,000   ...............  ...............          -2,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, American Battle Monuments Commission..................         107,100           75,100           75,100          -32,000   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
             U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims
 
Salaries and expenses..............................................          32,141           30,945           30,945           -1,196   ...............
 
                    Department of Defense--Civil
 
                     Cemeterial Expenses, Army
 
Salaries and expenses..............................................          79,516           70,800           70,800           -8,716   ...............
 
              Armed Forces Retirement Home--Trust Fund
 
Operation and maintenance..........................................          43,300           63,300           41,300           -2,000          -22,000
Capital program....................................................           1,000            1,000            1,000   ...............  ...............
Payment from General Fund..........................................          20,000   ...............          22,000           +2,000          +22,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Armed Forces Retirement Home..........................          64,300           64,300           64,300   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title III.............................................         283,057          241,145          241,145          -41,912   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
             TITLE IV--OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS
 
                  Overseas Contingency Operations
 
Navy...............................................................  ...............          38,409   ...............  ...............         -38,409
Air Force..........................................................  ...............          11,440   ...............  ...............         -11,440
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................  ...............          49,849   ...............  ...............         -49,849
 
                  European Reassurance Initiative
 
Army...............................................................  ...............          18,900   ...............  ...............         -18,900
Navy...............................................................  ...............          21,400   ...............  ...............         -21,400
Air Force..........................................................  ...............          68,300   ...............  ...............         -68,300
Defense-Wide.......................................................  ...............           5,000   ...............  ...............          -5,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................  ...............         113,600   ...............  ...............        -113,600
 
                     Counter Terrorism Support
 
Air Force..........................................................  ...............           9,000   ...............  ...............          -9,000
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title IV..............................................  ...............         172,449   ...............  ...............        -172,449
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Grand total..................................................     278,249,736      189,937,038      190,096,633      -88,153,103         +159,595
          Appropriations...........................................    (114,614,680)     (19,443,561)     (27,273,409)    (-87,341,271)     (+7,829,848)
          Rescissions..............................................     (-2,151,820)  ...............     (-7,497,804)     (-5,345,984)     (-7,497,804)
          Advance appropriations, fiscal year 2018.................    (165,786,876)    (170,321,028)    (170,321,028)     (+4,534,152)  ...............
          Overseas contingency operations..........................  ...............        (172,449)  ...............  ...............       (-172,449)
      Advances from prior year appropriations......................     (58,662,202)    (165,786,876)    (165,786,876)   (+107,124,674)  ...............
      (By transfer)................................................        (301,000)      (7,535,912)        (289,731)        (-11,269)     (-7,246,181)
      (Limitation on direct loans).................................          (3,452)          (3,017)          (3,017)           (-435)  ...............
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                                                     [all]