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114th Congress     }                                  {         Report
                                 SENATE
 2d Session        }                                  {        114-397

======================================================================



 
                     KEVIN AND AVONTE'S LAW OF 2016

                                _______
                                

                December 9, 2016.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

          Mr. Grassley, from the Committee on the Judiciary, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                         [To accompany S. 2614]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on the Judiciary, to which was referred the 
bill (S. 2614) to amend the Violent Crime Control and Law 
Enforcement Act of 1994, to reauthorize the Missing Alzheimer's 
Disease Patient Alert Program, and to promote initiatives that 
will reduce the risk of injury and death relating to the 
wandering characteristics of some children with autism, having 
considered the same, reports favorably thereon, without 
amendment, and recommends that the bill do pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
  I. Background and Purpose of Kevin and Avonte's Law.................1
 II. History of the Bill and Committee Consideration..................3
III. Section-by-Section Summary of the Bill...........................4
 IV. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate........................5
  V. Regulatory Impact Evaluation.....................................6
 VI. Conclusion.......................................................6
VII. Changes to Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported............6

          I. Background and Purpose of Kevin and Avonte's Law

    Autism, dementia, and other developmental conditions affect 
numerous families in the United States. Many such families have 
experienced a loved one wandering away from a supervised 
setting due to these conditions. The Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention (CDC) identified one in sixty-eight 
children as having autism spectrum disorder, and CDC survey 
data was used in a widely-cited 2016 study that concluded about 
a third of these children wander away from a supervised setting 
in any given year.\1\ The Alzheimer's Association estimates as 
many as one in three seniors will die with some form of 
dementia.\2\ Kevin and Avonte's Law of 2016 would enhance 
support for the many American families who have loved ones that 
go missing due to autism, Alzheimer's disease, or related 
conditions. The bill extends a program designed to assist in 
locating Alzheimer's disease and dementia patients; it also 
adds new support for people with autism or other developmental 
disabilities.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Prevalence and 
Characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorder Among Children Aged 8 
Years--Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network, 11 
Sites, United States, 2012 (April 1, 2016), http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/
volumes/65/ss/ss6503al.htm; Bridget Kiely et al., Prevalence and 
Correlates of Elopement in a Nationally Representative Sample of 
Children with Developmental Disabilities in the United States. PLoS ONE 
11(2): e0148337 (Feb. 4, 2016), http://journals.plos.org/plosone/
article?id=10.1371/ journal.pone.0148337; see also Autism Speaks, Study 
Finds A Third of Schoolkids With Autism Wander from Safety Each Year 
(Feb. 4, 2016), http://www.autismspeaks.org/science/science-news/study-
finds-third-schoolkids-autism-wander-safety-each-year.
    \2\Press Release, Alzheimer's Association, New Alzheimer's 
Association Report Reveals 1 in 3 Seniors Dies With Alzheimer's or 
Another Dementia (March 19, 2013), https://www.alz.org/national/
documents/facts_and_figures_2013_press_release.pdf.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Families with developmentally disabled children and aging 
parents often experience challenges that others do not face on 
a daily basis. It is common for many children with autism or 
seniors with Alzheimer's disease to wander away from their 
caregiver's supervision, sometimes with tragic results. To help 
meet the needs of Alzheimer's patients who go missing, Congress 
years ago authorized $900,000 annually to establish the Missing 
Alzheimer's Disease Patient Alert program,\3\ a ``locally 
based, proactive program to protect and locate missing patients 
with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias.''
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \3\42 U.S.C. 14181.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Kevin and Avonte's Law updates and expands this expired 
program, authorizing $2 million per year to cover not only 
those with dementia but also those with developmental 
disabilities. The legislation calls for the Attorney General to 
award grants to assist eligible applicants in developing and 
operating locative tracking technology programs. The locative 
tracking technology would be used solely to assist in the 
recovery of children with developmental disabilities in the 
event of separation from parents or caregivers. The bill also 
would change the name of the program to the ``Missing Americans 
Alert Program.''
    Under this legislation, participation in such a locative 
tracking technology program would remain entirely voluntary. 
The Committee intends that a guardian or parent, in 
consultation with that child's health care provider, would make 
any decisions about whether or not to accept a tracking device 
for their child, and any such device should be the least 
restrictive option available to help locate the child in the 
event of a crisis. (Nothing in this Act would require use of 
tracking technology if a parent or guardian does not believe 
that use of such a device is not necessary or in the child's 
interest.) The Committee further intends that tracking devices 
assigned to children under this program should be limited to 
non-invasive, non-permanent devices that do not create an 
external or internal marker or involve the implantation of a 
device or other trackable items.
    The bill includes additional provisions designed to 
safeguard the privacy of children who are assigned tracking 
devices, including a requirement that the Attorney General must 
develop privacy standards and best practices within 120 days 
after enactment of this legislation. In developing such 
standards and best practices, the Attorney General is strongly 
encouraged to ensure that: (1) any collection, use, and 
retention of data under this program is solely for the purpose 
of preventing injury or death to the child assigned a tracking 
device; (2) any tracking data generated by tracking devices 
issued under this program may not be used by a Federal entity 
to create a database; and (3) continued participation in this 
program shall remain entirely voluntary for the participants.
    The legislation also authorizes the Attorney General to 
award competitive grants to State and local law enforcement or 
public safety agencies and nonprofit organizations to ``assist 
in planning, designing, establishing, or operating locally 
based, proactive programs to prevent wandering and locate 
missing individuals with forms of dementia.'' Such grants might 
be used, for example, to develop training and emergency 
protocols for school officials and first responders; to 
increase personal safety and survival skills of vulnerable 
children with developmental disabilities and adults with 
dementia; or to operate notification systems for alerts and 
advisories to aid in the recovery of an endangered missing 
child with developmental disabilities or an adult with 
dementia.
    The bill is named in honor of two young boys from Iowa and 
New York, each diagnosed with autism. Each boy wandered away 
from a supervised setting and drowned. One of the two, nine-
year-old Kevin Curtis Wills, died in 2008 after jumping into 
the Raccoon River near his home town of Jefferson, Iowa. The 
other, fourteen-year-old Avonte Oquendo of Queens, New York, 
drowned in New York's East River in 2014. The purpose of the 
legislation is to equip families and communities with 
additional tools and resources to help avoid similar tragedies.

          II. History of the Bill and Committee Consideration


                      A. INTRODUCTION OF THE BILL

    On March 1, 2016, Senator Charles Schumer introduced Kevin 
and Avonte's Law of 2016. Senators Chuck Grassley and Thom 
Tillis were original cosponsors, and Senators Richard Burr, 
Chris Coons, Richard Durbin, Amy Klobuchar, and Bill Nelson 
later joined as cosponsors of the legislation. The bill was 
referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

                       B. COMMITTEE CONSIDERATION

    On April 14, 2016, the Committee voted to report Kevin and 
Avonte's Law of 2016, without amendment, favorably to the 
Senate. The Committee proceeded by roll call vote as follows:
    Tally: 15 Yeas, 5 Nays
    Yeas (15): Hatch (R-UT), Graham (R-SC), Cornyn (R-TX), 
Vitter (R-LA), Tillis (R-NC), Leahy (D-VT), Feinstein (D-CA), 
Schumer (D-NY), Durbin (D-IL), Whitehouse (D-RI), Klobuchar (D-
MN), Franken (D-MN), Coons (D-DE), Blumenthal (D-CT), Grassley 
(R-IA).
    Nays (5): Sessions (R-AL), Cruz (R-TX), Flake (R-AZ), 
Perdue (R-GA), Lee (R-UT).

              III. Section-by-Section Summary of the Bill


Section 1. Short title

    This section provides that the legislation may be cited as 
the ``Kevin and Avonte's Law of 2016.''

      TITLE I--MISSING ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE PATIENT ALERT PROGRAM 
                            REAUTHORIZATION

Sec. 101. Short title

    This section provides that this title may be cited as the 
``Missing Americans Alert Program Act of 2016.''

Sec. 102. Reauthorization of the Missing Alzheimer's Disease Patient 
        Alert Program

    This section adds a grant program support for individuals 
with autism and other developmental disabilities to the 
existing Missing Alzheimer's Disease Patient Alert Program. It 
provides that grants to reduce injury and death of such 
individuals shall be awarded to State and local law 
enforcement, public safety agencies, or nonprofit agencies. 
Such grants may be used to develop, establish, and operate 
tracking technology programs for individuals with dementia or 
developmental disabilities. These programs may include 
informational resources and other necessary training tools for 
families and guardians of individuals who wander away from a 
supervised setting due to their condition. The Attorney General 
shall solicit applications for grants by posting a request on 
the Department of Justice's website. The program also calls for 
priority in grant making to be accorded to agencies that 
partner with nonprofits having a direct link to individuals or 
families of individuals with dementia or developmental 
disabilities.
    This section authorizes $2 million to be appropriated to 
the program annually in each of fiscal years 2017 through 2021. 
In that time period, the Inspector General of the Department of 
Justice will conduct audits of the program. This section also 
specifies certain requirements for nonprofit organizations 
seeking a grant award; imposes specified limits on conference 
expenditures; and requires the Attorney General to take steps 
to avoid duplicative grants.

                    TITLE II--EDUCATION AND OUTREACH

Sec. 201. Activities by the National Center for Missing and Exploited 
        Children

    This section clarifies that the National Center for Missing 
and Exploited Children may use a portion of its annual grant 
from the Department of Justice to provide technical assistance 
and training to agencies and individuals in the prevention, 
investigation, prosecution and treatment of cases involving 
missing children who have developmental disabilities such as 
autism.

                     TITLE III--PRIVACY PROTECTIONS

Sec. 301. Definitions

    This section defines terms and phrases used in the Act, 
including ``child,'' ``Indian tribe,'' ``law enforcement 
agency,'' ``State,'' and ``unit of local government.''

Sec. 302. Standards and best practices for use of tracking devices

    This section outlines the process the Attorney General must 
follow to determine best practices and standards for the 
locative tracking technology program authorized under this 
legislation. (Such a process must include establishing a 
complaint and investigation process; establishing privacy 
protection procedures; adopting measures to protect the civil 
rights and liberties of individuals who are assigned tracking 
devices; establishing criteria to ensure use of the tracking 
device is the least restrictive alternative to prevent the risk 
of a child's injury or death; developing training for law 
enforcement personnel to recognize signs of child abuse; and 
determining who may have direct access to the tracking system, 
among other requirements.) This section also mandates that each 
entity that receives grant funds must comply with any such 
standards and best practices established by the Attorney 
General.

             IV. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate

    The Committee sets forth, with respect to the bill, S. 
2614, the following estimate and comparison prepared by the 
Director of the Congressional Budget Office under section 402 
of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974:

                                                       May 3, 2016.
Hon. Chuck Grassley,
Chairman, Committee on the Judiciary
U.S. Senate, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for S. 2614, the Kevin and 
Avonte's Law of 2016.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Mark 
Grabowicz.
            Sincerely,
                                               Keith Hall, Director
    Enclosure.

S.2614--Kevin and Avonte's Law of 2016

    Summary: S. 2614 would authorize the appropriation of $2 
million annually over the 2017-2021 period for the Department 
of Justice (DOJ) to make grants to State and local governments 
and non-profit organizations for programs to locate missing 
persons with dementia or developmental disabilities. Assuming 
appropriation of the authorized amounts and the historical rate 
of spending for similar activities, CBO estimates that 
implementing S. 2614 would cost $7 million over the 2017-2021 
period.
    Pay-as-you-go procedures do not apply to this legislation 
because enacting it would not affect direct spending or 
revenues. CBO estimates that enacting S. 2614 would not 
increase net direct spending or on-budget deficits in any of 
the four consecutive 10-year periods beginning in 2027.
    S. 2614 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA).
    Estimated cost to the Federal Government: The estimated 
budgetary effects of S. 2614 are shown in the following table. 
The costs of this legislation fall within budget function 750 
(administration of justice).

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 By fiscal year, in millions of dollars--
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
                                                            2017     2018     2019     2020     2021   2017-2021
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                 Increase In Spending Subject To Appropriations:
 
Authorization Level.....................................        2        2        2        2        2         10
Estimated Outlays.......................................        *        1        2        2        2          7
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note: * = less than $500,000.

    Pay-As-You-Go-considerations: None.
    Increase in long term direct spending and deficits: CBO 
estimates that enacting S. 2614 would not increase net direct 
spending or on-budget deficits in any of the four consecutive 
10-year periods beginning in 2027.
    Intergovernmental and private sector impact: S. 2614 
contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as 
defined in UMRA. State and local governments would benefit from 
grants authorized in the bill. Any costs to those governments 
would result from complying with conditions of assistance.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal Costs: Mark Grabowicz; Impact 
on State, Local, and Tribal Governments: Rachel Austin; Impact 
on the Private Sector: Paige Piper/Bach.
    Estimate approved by: H. Samuel Papenfuss, Deputy Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

                    V. Regulatory Impact Evaluation

    In compliance with rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of the 
Senate, the Committee finds that no significant regulatory 
impact will result from the enactment of S. 2614.

                             VI. Conclusion

    Kevin and Avonte's Law of 2016, S.2614, addresses the need 
for tracking technology for individuals with dementia and 
developmental disabilities such as autism. It would add 
additional funding of $2 million a year to the Missing 
Alzheimer's Diseases Patient Alert Program, now called the 
Missing Americans Alert Program, to plan, design, establish, or 
operate tracking technology programs for individuals and 
families of individuals who wander away from a supervised 
setting due to their condition. This reauthorization measure 
also seeks to bolster oversight and accountability for the 
grant program.

       VII. Changes to Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

    In compliance with paragraph 12 of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, changes in existing law made by 
S.2614, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italic, and existing law in which no 
change is proposed is shown in roman):

UNITED STATES CODE

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                                TITLE 42

         CHAPTER 136--VIOLENT CRIME CONTROL AND LAW ENFORCEMENT


Subchapter XI--Protections for the Elderly

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



               SUBCHAPTER XI--PROTECTIONS FOR THE ELDERLY


[SEC. 240001. MISSING ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE PATIENT ALERT PROGRAM]

SEC. 240001. MISSING AMERICANS ALERT PROGRAM.

Sec. 14181. MISSING [ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE PATIENT] AMERICANS ALERT 
                    PROGRAM

    [(a) Grant
    [The Attorney General shall, subject to the availability of 
appropriations, award a grant to an eligible organization to 
assist the organization in paying for the costs of planning, 
designing, establishing, and operating a Missing Alzheimer's 
Disease Patient Alert Program, which shall be a locally based, 
proactive program to protect and locate missing patients with 
Alzheimer's disease and related dementias.]
    (a) Grant Program to Reduce Injury and Death of Missing 
Americans With Dementia and Developmental Disabilities.--
Subject to the availability of appropriations to carry out this 
section, the Attorney General, through the Bureau of Justice 
Assistance and in consultation with the Secretary of Health and 
Human Services--
          (1) shall award grants to State and local law 
        enforcement or public safety agencies to assist such 
        agencies in designing, establishing, and operating 
        locative tracking technology programs for individuals 
        with forms of dementia, such as Alzheimer's Disease, or 
        children with developmental disabilities, such as 
        autism, who have wandered from safe environments; and
          (2) shall award competitive grants to State and local 
        law enforcement or public safety agencies and nonprofit 
        organizations to assist such entities in planning, 
        designing, establishing, or operating locally based, 
        proactive programs to prevent wandering and locate 
        missing individuals with forms of dementia, such as 
        Alzheimer's Disease, or developmental disabilities, 
        such as autism, who, due to their condition, wander 
        from safe environments, including programs that--
                  (A) provide prevention and response 
                information, including online training 
                resources, and referrals to families or 
                guardians of such individuals who, due to their 
                condition, wander from a safe environment;
                  (B) provide education and training, including 
                online training resources, to first responders, 
                school personnel, clinicians, and the public in 
                order to--
                          (i) increase personal safety and 
                        survival skills for such individuals 
                        who, due to their dementia or 
                        developmental disabilities, wander from 
                        safe environments;
                          (ii) facilitate the rescue and 
                        recovery of individuals who, due to 
                        their dementia or developmental 
                        disabilities, wander from safe 
                        environments; and
                          (iii) recognize and respond to 
                        endangered missing individuals with 
                        dementia or developmental disabilities 
                        who, due to their condition, wander 
                        from safe environments;
                  (C) provide prevention and response training 
                and emergency protocols for school 
                administrators, staff, and families or 
                guardians of individuals with dementia, such as 
                Alzheimer's Disease, or developmental 
                disabilities, such as autism, to help reduce 
                the risk of wandering by such individuals; and
                  (D) develop, operate, or enhance a 
                notification or communications systems for 
                alerts, advisories, or dissemination of other 
                information for the recovery of missing 
                individuals with forms of dementia, such as 
                Alzheimer's Disease, or with developmental 
                disabilities, such as autism.
    (b) Application.--To be eligible to receive a competitive 
grant under subsection (a) of this section, an agency or 
organization shall submit an application to the Attorney 
General at such time, in such manner, and containing such 
information as the Attorney General may require, including, at 
a minimum, an assurance that the agency or organization will 
obtain and use assistance from private nonprofit organizations 
to support the program. The Attorney General shall periodically 
solicit applications for grants under this section by 
publishing a request for applications in the Federal Register 
and by posting such a request on the website of the Department 
of Justice.
    [(c) Eligible organization
    [The Attorney General shall award the grant described in 
subsection (a) of this section to a national voluntary 
organization that has a direct link to patients, and families 
of patients, with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias.
    [(d) Authorization of appropriations
    [There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out this 
section
          [(1) $900,000 for fiscal year 1996;
          [(2) $900,000 for fiscal year 1997; and
          [(3) $900,000 for fiscal year 1998.]
    (c) Preference.--In awarding grants under subsection 
(a)(1), the Attorney General shall give preference to law 
enforcement or public safety agencies that partner with 
nonprofit organizations that have a direct link to individuals, 
and families of individuals, with forms of dementia, such as 
Alzheimer's Disease, or developmental disabilities, such as 
autism.
    (d) Authorization of Appropriations--There are authorized 
to be appropriated to carry out this section $2,000,000 for 
each of fiscal years 2017 through 2021.
    (e) Grant Accountability.--All grants awarded by the 
Attorney General under this section shall be subject to the 
following accountability provisions:
          (1) Audit requirement.--
                  (A) Definition.--In this paragraph, the term 
                `unresolved audit finding' means a finding in 
                the final audit report of the Inspector General 
                of the Department of Justice that the audited 
                grantee has utilized grant funds for an 
                unauthorized expenditure or otherwise 
                unallowable cost that is not closed or resolved 
                within 12 months from the date when the final 
                audit report is issued.
                  (B) Audits.--Beginning in the first fiscal 
                year beginning after the date of enactment of 
                this subsection, and in each fiscal year 
                thereafter, the Inspector General of the 
                Department of Justice shall conduct audits of 
                recipients of grants under this section to 
                prevent waste, fraud, and abuse of funds by 
                grantees. The Inspector General shall determine 
                the appropriate number of grantees to be 
                audited each year.
                  (C) Mandatory exclusion.--A recipient of 
                grant funds under this section that is found to 
                have an unresolved audit finding shall not be 
                eligible to receive grant funds under this 
                section during the first 2 fiscal years 
                beginning after the end of the 12-month period 
                described in subparagraph (A).
                  (D) Priority.--In awarding grants under this 
                section, the Attorney General shall give 
                priority to eligible applicants that did not 
                have an unresolved audit finding during the 3 
                fiscal years before submitting an application 
                for a grant under this section.
                  (E) Reimbursement.--If an entity is awarded 
                grant funds under this section during the 2-
                fiscal-year period during which the entity is 
                barred from receiving grants under subparagraph 
                (C), the Attorney General shall--
                          (i) deposit an amount equal to the 
                        amount of the grant funds that were 
                        improperly awarded to the grantee into 
                        the General Fund of the Treasury; and
                          (ii) seek to recoup the costs of the 
                        repayment to the fund from the grant 
                        recipient that was erroneously awarded 
                        grant funds.
          (2) Nonprofit organization requirements.--
                  (A) Definition of nonprofit organization.--
                For purposes of this paragraph and the grant 
                programs under this part, the term `nonprofit 
                organization' means an organization that is 
                described in section 501(c)(3) of the Internal 
                Revenue Code of 1986 and is exempt from 
                taxation under section 501(a) of such Code.
                  (B) Prohibition.--The Attorney General may 
                not award a grant under this part to a 
                nonprofit organization that holds money in 
                offshore accounts for the purpose of avoiding 
                paying the tax described in section 511(a) of 
                the Internal Revenue Code of 1986.
                  (C) Disclosure.--Each nonprofit organization 
                that is awarded a grant under this section and 
                uses the procedures prescribed in regulations 
                to create a rebuttable presumption of 
                reasonableness for the compensation of its 
                officers, directors, trustees, and key 
                employees, shall disclose to the Attorney 
                General, in the application for the grant, the 
                process for determining such compensation, 
                including the independent persons involved in 
                reviewing and approving such compensation, the 
                comparability data used, and contemporaneous 
                substantiation of the deliberation and 
                decision. Upon request, the Attorney General 
                shall make the information disclosed under this 
                subparagraph available for public inspection.
          (3) Conference expenditures.--
                  (A) Limitation.--No amounts made available to 
                the Department of Justice under this section 
                may be used by the Attorney General, or by any 
                individual or entity awarded discretionary 
                funds through a cooperative agreement under 
                this section, to host or support any 
                expenditure for conferences that uses more than 
                $20,000 in funds made available by the 
                Department of Justice, unless the head of the 
                relevant agency or department, provides prior 
                written authorization that the funds may be 
                expended to host the conference.
                  (B) Written approval.--Written approval under 
                subparagraph (A) shall include a written 
                estimate of all costs associated with the 
                conference, including the cost of all food, 
                beverages, audio-visual equipment, honoraria 
                for speakers, and entertainment.
                  (C) Report.--The Deputy Attorney General 
                shall submit an annual report to the Committee 
                on the Judiciary of the Senate and the 
                Committee on the Judiciary of the House of 
                Representatives on all conference expenditures 
                approved under this paragraph.
          (4) Annual certification.--Beginning in the first 
        fiscal year beginning after the date of enactment of 
        this subsection, the Attorney General shall submit, to 
        the Committee on the Judiciary and the Committee on 
        Appropriations of the Senate and the Committee on the 
        Judiciary and the Committee on Appropriations of the 
        House of Representatives, an annual certification--
                  (A) indicating whether--
                          (i) all audits issued by the Office 
                        of the Inspector General under 
                        paragraph (1) have been completed and 
                        reviewed by the appropriate Assistant 
                        Attorney General or Director;
                          (ii) all mandatory exclusions 
                        required under paragraph (1)(C) have 
                        been issued; and
                          (iii) all reimbursements required 
                        under paragraph (1)(E) have been made; 
                        and
                  (B) that includes a list of any grant 
                recipients excluded under paragraph (1) from 
                the previous year.
    (f) Preventing Duplicative Grants.--
          (1) In general.--Before the Attorney General awards a 
        grant to an applicant under this section, the Attorney 
        General shall compare potential grant awards with other 
        grants awarded by the Attorney General to determine if 
        grant awards are or have been awarded for a similar 
        purpose.
          (2) Report.--If the Attorney General awards grants to 
        the same applicant for a similar purpose the Attorney 
        General shall submit to the Committee on the Judiciary 
        of the Senate and the Committee on the Judiciary of the 
        House of Representatives a report that includes--
                  (A) a list of all such grants awarded, 
                including the total dollar amount of any such 
                grants awarded; and
                  (B) the reason the Attorney General awarded 
                multiple grants to the same applicant for a 
                similar purpose.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                                TITLE 42

        CHAPTER 72--JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION


Subchapter IV--Missing Children

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



Sec. 5773. Duties and Functions of the Administrator

    (b) Annual Grant to National Center for Missing and 
Exploited Children.--
          (1) In general.--The Administrator shall annually 
        make a grant to the Center, which shall be used to--

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                  (H) Provide technical assistance and training 
                to law enforcement agencies, State and local 
                governments, elements of the criminal justice 
                system, public and private nonprofit agencies, 
                and individuals in the prevention, 
                investigation, prosecution, and treatment of 
                cases involving missing and exploited children, 
                including cases involving children with 
                developmental disabilities such as autism.

                                  [all]