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                                                       Calendar No. 122
114th Congress    }                                     {      Report
                                 SENATE
 1st Session     }                                      {      114-68

======================================================================



 
       DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2016
                                _______
                                

                 June 18, 2015.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

           Mr. Hoeven, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                                 REPORT

                         [To accompany S. 1619]

     The Committee on Appropriations reports the bill (S. 1619) 
making appropriations for the Department of Homeland Security 
for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2016, and for other 
purposes, reports favorably thereon and recommends that the 
bill do pass.



Total obligational authority, fiscal year 2016

Total of bill as reported to the Senate\1\\2\\3\\6\..... $48,689,955,000
Amount of 2015 appropriations\4\\5\.....................  47,771,419,000
Amount of 2016 budget estimate\1\\2\\6\.................  49,714,622,000
Bill as recommended to Senate compared to--
    2015 appropriations.................................    +918,536,000
    2016 budget estimate................................  -1,024,667,000

\1\Committee recommendation includes $1,359,083,000 in rescissions 
compared to $255,000,000 in proposed cancellations.
\2\Includes a permanent indefinite appropriation of $169,306,000 for the 
Coast Guard healthcare fund contribution.
\3\Includes $160,002,000 for the Coast Guard for the cost of overseas 
contingency operations.
\4\Includes rescissions totaling $894,372,000 pursuant to Public Law 
114-4. Includes permanent indefinite appropriation of $176,970,000 for 
the Coast Guard healthcare fund contribution. Includes $213,000,000 for 
the Coast Guard for the cost of overseas contingency operations.
\5\Includes $6,437,793,000 for the FEMA Disaster Relief Fund designated 
by Congress as disaster relief pursuant to Public Law 112-25.
\6\Includes $6,712,953,000 for the FEMA Disaster Relief Fund designated 
by Congress as disaster relief pursuant to Public Law 112-25.









                                CONTENTS

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
Overview and Summary of the Bill.................................     4
Title I:
    Departmental Management and Operations:
        Office of the Secretary and Executive Management.........     9
        Office of the Under Secretary for Management.............    18
        Office of the Chief Financial Officer....................    20
        Office of the Chief Information Officer..................    23
        Analysis and Operations..................................    25
        Office of Inspector General..............................    26
Title II:
    Security, Enforcement, and Investigations:
        U.S. Customs and Border Protection:
            Salaries and Expenses................................    28
            Automation Modernization.............................    43
            Border Security Fencing, Infrastructure, and 
              Technology.........................................    44
            Air and Marine Operations............................    46
            Construction and Facilities Management...............    49
        U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement:
            Salaries and Expenses................................    50
            Automation Modernization.............................    60
            Construction.........................................    61
        Transportation Security Administration:
            Aviation Security....................................    62
            Surface Transportation Security......................    69
            Intelligence and Vetting.............................    70
            Transportation Security Support......................    71
        United States Coast Guard:
            Operating Expenses...................................    73
            Environmental Compliance and Restoration.............    78
            Reserve Training.....................................    78
            Acquisition, Construction, and Improvements..........    79
            Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation..........    84
            Retired Pay..........................................    84
        United States Secret Service:
            Salaries and Expenses................................    85
            Acquisition, Construction, Improvements, and Related 
              Expenses...........................................    88
Title III:
    Protection, Preparedness, Response, and Recovery:
        National Protection and Programs Directorate:
            Management and Administration........................    90
            Infrastructure Protection and Information Security...    92
            Federal Protective Service...........................   100
            Office of Biometric Identity Management..............   101
        Office of Health Affairs.................................   103
        Federal Emergency Management Agency:
            Salaries and Expenses................................   105
            State and Local Programs.............................   109
            Firefighter Assistance Grants........................   114
            Emergency Management Performance Grants..............   115
            Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program..........   115
            United States Fire Administration....................   116
            Disaster Relief Fund.................................   117
            Flood Hazard Mapping and Risk Analysis...............   118
            National Flood Insurance Fund........................   119
            National Predisaster Mitigation Fund.................   120
            Emergency Food and Shelter...........................   121
Title IV:
    Research and Development, Training, and Services:
        United States Citizenship and Immigration Services.......   122
        Federal Law Enforcement Training Center:
            Salaries and Expenses................................   126
            Acquisitions, Construction, Improvements, and Related 
              Expenses...........................................   126
        Science and Technology:
            Management and Administration........................   127
            Research, Development, Acquisition, and Operations...   127
        Domestic Nuclear Detection Office:
            Management and Administration........................   133
            Research, Development, and Operations................   133
            Systems Acquisition..................................   135
Title V: General Provisions......................................   135
Program, Project, and Activity...................................   141
Compliance With Paragraph 7, Rule XVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the 
  Senate.........................................................   141
Compliance With Paragraph 7(c), Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules 
  of the Senate..................................................   142
Compliance With Paragraph 12, Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................   143
Budgetary Impact of Bill.........................................   146
Comparative Statement of New Budget Authority....................   147

                    OVERVIEW AND SUMMARY OF THE BILL

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Fiscal year 2016       Fiscal year 2016  Committee
                                                          request\1,\\2,\\3\     recommendation\1,\\2,\\3,\\4\
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Title I--Departmental Management and Operations.......             1,329,024                    1,073,681
Title II--Security, Enforcement, and Investigations...            33,905,143                   34,027,891
Title III--Protection, Preparedness, Response, and                12,958,798                   13,028,354
 Recovery.............................................
Title IV--Research and Development, Training, and                  1,532,680                    1,450,696
 Services.............................................
Title V--General Provisions...........................               -11,023                     -890,667
                                                       ---------------------------------------------------------
      Total, new budget (obligational authority)......            49,714,622                   48,689,955
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Committee recommendation includes $1,359,083,000 in rescissions compared to $255,000,000 in proposed
  cancellations.
\2\Includes a permanent indefinite appropriation of $169,306,000 for the Coast Guard healthcare fund
  contribution.
\3\Includes $6,712,953,000 for the FEMA Disaster Relief Fund designated by Congress as disaster relief pursuant
  to Public Law 112-25.
\4\Includes $160,002,000 for the Coast Guard for the cost of overseas contingency operations.

    The Committee recommends a total appropriation of 
$48,689,955,000 for DHS for fiscal year 2016, $1,024,667,000 
less than the budget request. Of this amount, $47,085,955,000 
is for discretionary programs, including $160,002,000 for Coast 
Guard overseas contingency operations and $6,712,953,000 for 
the FEMA Disaster Relief Fund designated by Congress as 
disaster relief pursuant to Public Law 112-25.
    The Committee recommends discretionary appropriations, 
excluding Coast Guard overseas contingency operations and the 
FEMA Disaster Relief Fund adjustment, of $40,213,000,000, 
$1,184,669,000 below the request.

                                Overview

    In the wake of the September 11th attacks, it was clear 
that our Nation was unprepared and that our Government was not 
structured to support the security of the homeland. The 9/11 
Commission Report outlined the institutional challenges, 
bureaucratic tendencies, and legal barriers that existed before 
those horrific attacks and--recognizing the ``formidable 
challenges'' that lay ahead--provided recommendations to avoid 
such a tragedy in the future. The Department of Homeland 
Security [DHS] was created before the 
9/11 Commission Report was issued, yet its genesis is grounded 
in the lessons learned and findings codified in that report. 
United with that same purpose, the Committee presents this bill 
as another step in the continued evolution of the Department 
and over a decade of important lessons learned. No structure is 
perfect, and wherever lines are drawn, seams can become gaps. 
As such, DHS and its partner agencies with a role in the 
homeland security enterprise have a responsibility to be 
vigilant and agile. Twelve years after its creation, DHS is 
still struggling to integrate policies, procedures, and 
operations, as well as to establish the most effective 
structures to meet its critical missions.
    As we wrestle with these issues, the world continues to be 
a dangerous place. Whether it is the growing reach of terrorist 
organizations focused on western targets and attacking our way 
of life; pervasive cyber-attacks; biological, chemical, or 
nuclear threats; or the proliferation of improvised explosives 
with ever-evolving methods to secrete them--all in the context 
of our welcoming, open society; the Department must be able to 
respond and adapt swiftly to interdict these threats at the 
earliest point possible. Moreover, the Department's mechanisms 
for building our Nation's preparedness apparatus are tested by 
natural disasters as well. The country asks all this of the 
Department while expecting streamlined, automated travel 
processes and efficient recovery efforts that focus limited 
resources on our greatest threats.
    The American people have invested heavily in homeland 
security. For that investment, the public deserves better 
information about the results and outcomes it can expect. 
Additional investment must be targeted at clear goals and 
measured against outcomes. The Committee expects the Department 
to provide these types of measures, and this report includes 
specific direction to that end, particularly in the areas of 
border security and immigration enforcement.
    In addition, the Department must fight complacency and the 
bureaucratic tendencies that slow its ability to respond and 
adapt to new threats as well as incorporate new capabilities. 
The Department started as 22 separate agencies and entities and 
many of those stovepipes remain today, albeit within one 
department. The Committee supports the Secretary's efforts to 
break down those silos and, where it makes sense, to push for 
integrated operations and functions.
    The bill includes funds to continue progress on the 
Department's headquarters consolidation at the St. Elizabeths 
campus. In the National Capital Region, 32,000 headquarters 
employees of the Department and its components operate from 50 
locations, most of them leased with many of those leases now 
expiring. While cost concerns have been raised in the past 
regarding the St. Elizabeths project, the Department now has a 
more affordable enhanced plan and the timing of these lease 
expirations strengthens the case. The benefits of consolidation 
are coupled with cost avoidance and cost savings. While the 
proposed fiscal year 2016 effort to bring remaining secretarial 
offices and the Management Directorate to St. Elizabeths makes 
sense, the Committee will take a fresh look each year to ensure 
that the investment continues to be worthwhile.

                        BILL FUNDING PRIORITIES

    First and foremost, the bill includes sufficient funds to 
maintain the Department's personnel and operations--reflecting 
a necessary, but not insignificant increase, for escalating 
personnel costs. Given this seemingly annual trend, the 
Committee is anxious to understand how the Department proposes 
to balance real technology needs against manpower costs. To 
this end, the Committee has asked for reports and briefings on 
the right balance of people, technology, and infrastructure to 
support its operations. Further, the Committee encourages DHS 
to seek technology solutions that will act as force-multipliers 
and automate more manual functions, for example in the area of 
TSA exit lane monitoring and border technology.
    Among the most critical missions, the Committee recommends 
increases above the fiscal year 2015 level for border security, 
the Secret Service's protective mission, cybersecurity, and 
hazard mitigation. With respect to border security, the 
Committee includes total appropriations of $11,084,026,000 for 
U.S. Customs and Border Protection [CBP] toward the right mix 
of people, technology, and infrastructure. The bill supports:
  --21,370 Border Patrol agents, 23,775 CBP officers, and 1,054 
        pilots and marine operators, to patrol and protect our 
        borders;
  --Border security technology enhancements, including tactical 
        communications equipment, mobile surveillance assets, 
        cameras, surveillance radars, laser illuminators, 
        ground sensors, increased reuse of Department of 
        Defense equipment, and low-level airborne surveillance 
        systems (aerostats);
  --Border security infrastructure investments, including the 
        replacement of 7.5 miles of tactical fencing along the 
        Arizona border, improvements to Border Patrol stations 
        and ports of entry [POEs], and operations and 
        maintenance costs for these and other facilities;
  --95,251 flight hours, procurement of two additional multi-
        role enforcement aircraft, improved sensors for 
        aircraft, unmanned aerial systems [UAS] operations, 
        including ``sense and avoid'' technology and additional 
        UAS crews;
  --Technology improvements to CBP's information technology 
        [IT] backbone to support more than 60,000 CBP 
        personnel, as well as enhancements to advanced 
        targeting systems and those facilitating commerce; and
  --CBP hiring process enhancements to ensure frontline staff 
        are properly vetted, hired timely, and placed where 
        they are needed.
    As an extension of our border security needs, the Coast 
Guard's vessel and air fleets are vital. Yet, the age of those 
fleets and their antiquated capabilities beg recapitalization 
and modernization. Year after year, the President's budget 
requests short-change Coast Guard's acquisition needs and year 
after year, the Coast Guard's Commandants indicate before 
Congress that their annual acquisition budget is insufficient. 
As the Coast Guard proceeds towards selecting a final design 
for the Offshore Patrol Cutter [OPC], the Committee sees an 
opportunity for a ninth National Security Cutter [NSC] in the 
interim. The most capable vessel ever commissioned by the Coast 
Guard, the NSC will replace aging high endurance cutters which 
were state-of-the-art nearly a half-century ago. In addition to 
cutter needs, the Committee continues its acquisition and 
sustainment investments in the Coast Guard's icebreaking fleet, 
directs further guidance from the Coast Guard on their air 
fleet mix, and increases investments in critical shore 
facilities.
    Second, the Secret Service performs a vital continuity 
function in protecting our Nation's President, Vice President, 
their families, key leaders, and visiting foreign heads of 
state and their embassies in the United States. Similar to the 
Coast Guard's silent suffering, the Secret Service hid its most 
urgent needs and maintained its vow to do more with less to the 
detriment of its operations. The Committee includes 
$258,344,000 above fiscal year 2015 enacted for the Secret 
Service to help increase staffing levels, make necessary 
protective enhancements, and support training needs. But in the 
nearer term, the Committee knows continued hardship will be 
required as Uniformed Division officers sacrifice training time 
and annual leave to cover shifts, joined by agents from 
Investigations who similarly find themselves standing critical 
posts. All of this comes ahead of the Presidential campaign 
season, Papal visit, and 70th Anniversary of the United Nations 
General Assembly which will continue to require significant 
resources from this agency and its agents, officers, and their 
families.
    Cybersecurity is one of the most complex and challenging 
threats currently facing the Nation. To that end, the Committee 
recommends $1,386,890,000, $91,855,000 above the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2015, across DHS for cybersecurity 
efforts. The Committee is pleased to see the Department is 
taking an ``early adopter'' stance when it comes to deploying 
cybersecurity measures, particularly since it is responsible 
for cybersecurity across civilian government agencies. The 
recommended level includes increases for the Office of the 
Chief Information Officer [OCIO], the Chief Human Capital 
Officer's [CHCO] efforts to build the cyber workforce, and 
cybersecurity efforts across the components. It also includes 
cyber investigations and cyber-training conducted by the Secret 
Service. Through the Secret Service, the Department is not only 
conducting extensive cyber-crime investigations, but is 
training State and local law enforcement in computer forensics 
which bolsters their Electronic Crimes Task Forces throughout 
the country.
    Through the National Protection and Programs Directorate 
[NPPD], DHS helps secure Federal networks by providing 
overarching services, capabilities, and best practices that are 
deployed across agencies' IT infrastructure. The Committee 
includes $819,755,000, $66,550,000 above the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2015, for these activities within NPPD, and 
supports programs specifically aimed at protecting civilian-
Federal and State networks while also enhancing information 
sharing with the private sector. These funds are in addition to 
funds that protect systems at other Federal agencies and 
investments made within other departments. Moreover, the 
recommended funding supports programs and offices that assist 
State and local governments in achieving the same. 
Specifically, the Committee:
  --Includes $16,369,000 for cybersecurity pay reform;
  --Supports the civilian Federal computer network to detect 
        malicious activity on government networks and provides 
        agencies with the tools and services to identify 
        network security issues through the recommended 
        $130,594,000, including $98,509,000 for Continuous 
        Diagnostics and Mitigation;
  --Allows the continued growth of the National Cybersecurity 
        Protection System--or Einstein--to expand from the 51 
        agencies participating by recommending $478,035,000;
  --Supports Enhanced Cybersecurity Services and recommends the 
        request of $16,086,000 to improve DHS-sponsored 
        protection and information sharing capability between 
        selected commercial service providers, critical 
        infrastructure companies, and State and local 
        customers;
  --Includes $97,515,000 for the U.S. Computer Emergency 
        Readiness Team [US-CERT], an operational program which 
        analyzes and reduces cyber-threats and vulnerabilities.
    In addition to terrorism and emerging threats such as 
cybersecurity, DHS is also responsible for helping the Nation 
prepare for and respond to a significant natural disaster. 
However, the rising cost of disasters has become a major 
concern in recent years. One way in which disaster costs can be 
minimized is through the support of a comprehensive mitigation 
program. Studies estimate that for every $1 spent on 
mitigation, $4 can be saved in subsequent disasters. The bill 
includes robust increases to mitigation programs within the 
Federal Emergency Management Agency [FEMA] to help curb the 
rising costs of disasters.
  --The Committee recommends $190,000,000 for the Flood Hazard 
        Mapping and Risk Analysis [RiskMAP] program, 
        $90,000,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 
        2015. RiskMAP supports the functions necessary to 
        develop and keep current flood risk information and 
        flood maps. This increase will allow FEMA to map an 
        additional 9,000 stream miles.
  --When combined with the amounts made available for mapping 
        within the National Flood Insurance Program, the 
        Committee includes a total of $311,389,000 for mapping 
        efforts.
  --The Committee recommends $75,000,000 above the amount 
        provided in fiscal year 2015 for the Pre-Disaster 
        Mitigation [PDM] grant program, for a total of 
        $100,000,000. PDM provides States, communities, 
        territories, and tribal governments for hazard 
        mitigation planning and implementing mitigation 
        projects prior to a disaster event.

                               References

    This report refers to several Public Laws by short title as 
follows: the Budget Control Act of 2011, Public Law 112-25, is 
referenced as the BCA; Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 
Commission Act of 2007, Public Law 110-53, is referenced as the 
9/11 Act; and the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and 
Emergency Assistance Act, Public Law 93-288, is referenced as 
the Stafford Act.
    Any reference in this report to the Secretary shall be 
interpreted to mean the Secretary of Homeland Security.
    Any reference to the Department or DHS shall be interpreted 
to mean the Department of Homeland Security.
    Any reference in this report to a departmental component 
shall be interpreted to mean directorates, components, offices, 
or other organizations in the Department of Homeland Security.
    Any reference to FTE shall mean full-time equivalents.
    Any reference to PPA shall mean program, project, and 
activity.
    Any reference to HSPD shall mean Homeland Security 
Presidential Directive.
    Any reference to GAO shall mean the Government 
Accountability Office.
    Any reference to OIG shall mean the Office of Inspector 
General of the Department of Homeland Security.

                    DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY


                                TITLE I


                 DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS


            Office of the Secretary and Executive Management

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $132,573,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     134,247,000
Committee recommendation................................     133,362,000

    The Office of the Secretary and Executive Management 
supports the Department by providing direction, management, and 
policy guidance to operating components. The specific 
activities funded by this account include: the Immediate Office 
of the Secretary; the Immediate Office of the Deputy Secretary; 
the Office of the Chief of Staff; the Executive Secretary; the 
Office of Policy; the Office of Public Affairs; the Office of 
Legislative Affairs; the Office of Partnership and Engagement; 
the Office of General Counsel; the Office for Civil Rights and 
Civil Liberties; the Citizenship and Immigration Services 
Ombudsman; and the Privacy Officer.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $133,362,000 for the Office of the 
Secretary and Executive Management. This is $885,000 below the 
amount requested and $789,000 above the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2015. Of this amount, the Committee recommends not 
to exceed $45,000 for official reception and representation 
expenses. The Department shall continue to submit quarterly 
obligations reports to the Committee for all DHS reception and 
representation expenses as required in prior years. The 
Department shall refrain from using funds available for 
reception and representation to purchase unnecessary 
collectibles or memorabilia.
    The Committee expects the Department to provide complete 
justification materials with the fiscal year 2017 budget 
request, including expenditure plan data for the offices within 
this account.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                                OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY AND EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Immediate Office of the Secretary.........................             7,939             8,932             8,922
Immediate Office of the Deputy Secretary..................             1,740             1,758             1,749
Office of the Chief of Staff..............................             2,782             2,716             2,696
Executive Secretary.......................................             5,589             5,640             5,601
Office of Policy..........................................            38,073            39,339            39,077
Office of Public Affairs..................................             5,591             5,510             5,472
Office of Legislative Affairs.............................             5,403             5,405             5,363
Office of Intergovernmental Affairs/Partnership and Engage-            9,848            10,025             9,966
 Pment....................................................
Office of General Counsel.................................            19,950            19,625            19,472
Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties...............            21,800            20,954            20,803
Citizenship and Immigration Services Ombudsman............             5,825             6,312             6,272
Privacy Officer...........................................             8,033             8,031             7,969
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of the Secretary and Executive                   132,573           134,247           133,362
       Management.........................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                           MEASURING OUTCOMES

    The Committee strongly supports the Secretary's efforts to 
push DHS toward data-driven decision-making, particularly when 
it comes to the best use of its resources. Such efforts are 
critical to showing what outcomes the Department is achieving 
with current investments; to setting goals for where the 
Department needs to go; and to assessing what results the 
American people can expect for additional investment. In 
addition to informing resource allocation decisions, the 
availability of data is crucial to establishing a common set of 
facts from which to begin policy debates. Direction associated 
with development and public reporting of better outcome 
measures, metrics, and operational statistics appears 
throughout this report. The Committee expects the Office of the 
Chief Financial Officer [OCFO] will continue to be supportive 
and assist with these efforts.

                    OFFICE OF IMMIGRATION STATISTICS

    The mission of the Office of Immigration Statistics [OIS] 
is to develop, analyze, and disseminate high-quality 
statistical information that is relevant, timely, cost-
effective, and customer-oriented to inform policy and assess 
the effects of immigration in the United States. Despite the 
critical need for this information, OIS has failed to deliver 
for a myriad of reasons including dwindling staff numbers and a 
lack of access to key data that is owned by Department 
components.
    The Committee strongly believes that the public discourse 
on immigration would benefit from regular, consistent, reliable 
reporting of border and immigration operations. However, the 
facts are not available or agencies fail to consistently, 
regularly report them using the same definitions over time, 
across the Department, and in a timely manner.
    The Secretary has embraced this challenge and several 
coordinated efforts are underway to improve the data collection 
and reporting. Further, OIS is taking a lead role, as it 
should. The Committee directs the Department to develop a 
consistent set of outcome-based metrics related to border 
security and immigration enforcement, other than apprehensions 
and removals, that can be regularly, publicly released. In 
prior Committee reports, this effort has been called the 
migrant lifecycle data initiative or the ability to report on 
illegal entrants from apprehension or arrest through final 
disposition. All data necessary to support a better picture of 
this lifecycle and the Department's effectiveness in enforcing 
immigration laws shall be considered and prioritized. The 
Committee expects that, at least, the following measurements or 
estimates, based on the best available data collected within 
the Department and its component agencies and based on fully 
explained methodologies, will be included:
  --annual estimates of the total number of unauthorized 
        immigrants in the United States;
  --annual estimates of the total number of unauthorized 
        entries by foreign nationals during the previous year 
        including the following specific sub-estimates: 
        estimates of the number of unauthorized entries by 
        foreign nationals at other than authorized ports of 
        entry to the United States and estimates of the number 
        of unauthorized entries by foreign nationals made 
        through the authorized ports of entry [POEs] to the 
        United States (either by fraud, false claims or via 
        concealment or evasion of inspection);
  --annual estimates of the number of new visa overstays in the 
        United States during the year;
  --annual reporting of the total number of unauthorized 
        immigrants removed from the United States including the 
        following specific information: the number of 
        individuals apprehended at the border, at border 
        checkpoints, or at POEs who are subsequently removed; 
        the number of individuals apprehended in the interior 
        of the United States and subsequently removed; and the 
        number of individuals who depart the United States 
        pursuant to: a final order of formal removal from an 
        immigration judge; an administrative removal due to an 
        aggravated felony; an expedited removal under the 
        authority of CBP or ICE; reinstatement of a previous 
        removal order; stipulated removal pursuant to 
        proceedings before an immigration court; voluntary 
        return without a formal removal order (either expedited 
        or administrative); voluntary departure permitted under 
        the order of an immigration judge; or other means of 
        departure (with description of the legal or 
        administrative authority under which the departure was 
        effected); for each of the preceding categories, where 
        possible, the data shall be delineated by nationality, 
        gender, family unit, unaccompanied alien children 
        [UAC], priority, and other attributes such as gang 
        affiliation and criminal level;
  --number of formerly unauthorized immigrants who are adjusted 
        to or granted legal status under any of the following: 
        adjustment or change of status under provisions of the 
        Immigration and Nationality Act, including details on 
        the provision of law under which the adjustment or 
        change was granted; grant of administrative discretion 
        under Temporary Protected Status, deferred action or 
        any other administrative relief, including the number 
        granted work authorization based on such discretion 
        granted; or grant of status or relief from removal 
        pursuant to an order of an immigration judge, or 
        pursuant to an agreement between the parties in 
        immigration court;
  --estimates of the number of unauthorized immigrants who have 
        departed the United States on their own accord, without 
        any intervention or encounter with immigration 
        authorities; and
  --estimates of the number of unauthorized immigrants who have 
        died during the past year in the United States.
    Where appropriate, the Department shall work with other 
agencies, particularly the Office of Refugee Resettlement [ORR] 
of the Department of Health and Human Services [HHS] and the 
Department of Justice Executive Office for Immigration Review 
[EOIR] to ensure that authoritative data sources are utilized. 
The Department shall brief the Committee on its effort to 
develop and report on these measures not later than 30 days 
after the date of enactment of this act.

                        BORDER SECURITY METRICS

    The Committee expects to see the Department develop a plan 
for coverage and measures of border security domain awareness 
and effectiveness. The Committee continues to invest in 
situational awareness capabilities, including ground-based 
fixed and mobile technology, aviation platforms, and maritime 
capabilities. The operational picture, common or not, provided 
by these assets needs to be measured and assessed against the 
need for border and pathway awareness.

               PUBLIC REPORTING OF OPERATIONAL STATISTICS

    The Committee continues its requirement that the Department 
submit quarterly Border Security Status reports, as directed in 
prior years. In an era of supposed Government transparency, 
this data should be readily available to the Committee and the 
public.
    While the Department continues to improve the quality of 
its data and reporting, the Committee directs the Department to 
include information on its Web site that provides the public 
with a regular picture of its operations and results. The 
Department is directed to provide a briefing to the Committee 
not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this act 
regarding the additional data that will now be provided on its 
Web site.

                   STRENGTHENING DHS UNITY OF EFFORT

    Since its creation, the Department has struggled to 
integrate its planning, policies, management, and operations. 
The Committee has sought to break down the silos and bring 
``unity of effort'' to Department activities over the years. 
The recent creation of Joint Task Forces as part of the 
southern border and approaches campaign is the most tangible 
attempt by a Secretary to break down component lines in order 
to enhance reporting and unity of effort. The Committee 
respects the Secretary's prerogative to undertake such efforts. 
At the same time, the Committee is concerned that rather 
drastic steps are being taken without appropriate Congressional 
outreach and full consideration of the impact. Reporting boxes 
are being altered and 208 personnel, likely from among senior 
field leaders with key responsibilities in their components, 
are being assigned to temporary duty [TDY] locations. That must 
have an impact on the ability of those field locations to meet 
their operational responsibilities. The Committee directs the 
Department to provide a better understanding of who these TDY 
staff are and how the Department will measure the effectiveness 
of this effort as well as the impact on field operations from 
which TDY personnel are taken. The Department shall brief the 
Committee not later than 30 days after the date of enactment of 
this act.

                                  EXIT

    DHS has been required by multiple statutes to implement a 
comprehensive biometric entry-exit system for the purpose of 
enhancing national security and improving the integrity of our 
immigration system, while facilitating travel. The introduction 
of the fingerprint-based biometric capability for visa issuance 
and entry revolutionized our immigration system and greatly 
enhanced our security posture. Further, progress has been made 
in collecting and matching biographic data from both entry and 
exit such that 97 percent of departing aliens can be matched to 
their arrivals. Yet, the Department has failed to implement a 
fully biometric entry-exit system.
    Pursuant to Public Law 114-4, the Department is required to 
submit its plan for implementation which has yet to be 
submitted. The bill includes language withholding $13,000,000 
from obligation for the Office of the Secretary and Executive 
Management until this plan has been submitted, in addition to 
the overstay data report discussed further below.
    The Committee recognizes that CBP has been working with 
other Department components to enhance biometric entry 
processing, improve biographic exit data collection, and test 
means to introduce biometric exit collection. CBP has entered 
into an Apex Program agreement with the Science and Technology 
directorate [S&T;] known as the Air Entry/Exit Re-Engineering 
[AEER] Project. Its purpose is to analyze, develop, test, 
evaluate, and pilot biometric solutions that improve 
facilitated and secure entry as well as confirm departure of 
non-U.S. citizens at U.S. airports. At the same time, off-the-
shelf, but highly customizable biometric entry-exit capture 
solutions are available now and have proven their value in 
feasibility, security, cost-effectiveness, and ease of use at 
numerous airports outside of the United States. Further, the 
Department is undertaking the modernization of its automated 
biometric identification system, IDENT, to enable new 
capabilities such as multi-modal biometric matching that could 
facilitate biometric exit. These efforts are not moving fast 
enough to satisfy many members of Congress who wish to see 
biometric exit implemented.

                             VISA OVERSTAYS

    Pursuant to 8 U.S.C. 1376, the Department is required to 
collect data on nonimmigrant aliens who have overstayed their 
visas and report annual estimates to Congress. Despite repeated 
inquiries from the Committees on Appropriations and the 
Judiciary, among other congressional inquiries, the Department 
has failed to produce the required report. Of the estimated 11 
million illegal immigrants in the United States, researchers 
have asserted that a growing number entered the United States 
legally but remained in the country beyond the period of their 
authorization. However, without the Department's data, the 
trend is difficult to assess.
    The bill includes language directing submission of the 
overstay report and withholding $13,000,000 from obligation for 
the Office of the Secretary and Executive Management until this 
report has been submitted, in addition to the comprehensive 
plan for biometric entry-exit discussed above. Further, the 
Committee expects that the Department will provide the report 
on an annual basis hereafter.
    Moreover, the Committee is concerned that the Department's 
enforcement efforts related to visa overstays are inadequate. 
An additional $10,000,000 is included for an ICE initiative to 
increase overstay enforcement efforts. ICE is directed to brief 
the Committee on its enforcement strategy, all funding 
associated with overstay enforcement, and the results of 
enforcement efforts not later than 60 days after the date of 
enactment of this act.

                    STOLEN AND LOST TRAVEL DOCUMENTS

    The Committee remains concerned that only a few countries 
use INTERPOL's Stolen/Lost Travel Document [SLTD] database to 
run against international airline passenger information. Per 
Senate Report 113-198, the Office of Policy, in conjunction 
with CBP and the U.S. National Central Bureau-INTERPOL 
Washington, is directed to issue an annual report on the 
efforts of the U.S. Government to enhance the routine use of 
SLTD, and other relevant INTERPOL information, by foreign 
counterparts for traveler vetting and border security 
screening.

                          VISA WAIVER PROGRAM

    The Committee recognizes the many benefits to the U.S. 
economy of the Visa Waiver Program [VWP], as well as the 
enhanced security requirements the United States has added in 
recent years. However, in response to growing concerns about 
the current threat environment, the Secretary has testified 
that the Department continues to work on additional measures 
that would strengthen the VWP. The Department is directed to 
brief the Committee not later than 30 days after the date of 
enactment of this act on these additional measures. Further, 
the Committee is concerned that VWP nations have not fully 
implemented the security measures enacted in 2007--particularly 
information sharing requirements related to criminal data. The 
briefing shall also include an update on the quality and 
quantity of automated data sharing by VWP participating 
countries.

               COOPERATION WITH CENTRAL AMERICAN NATIONS

    Over the past few years, the number of illegal aliens from 
Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras apprehended by Border 
Patrol between POEs has risen dramatically. The Committee 
believes that the United States, in conjunction with the 
Government of Mexico, should continue efforts aimed at 
enforcing the southern border of Mexico while working with 
these Central American nations to improve their civil law 
enforcement capabilities.
    As part of these efforts, the United States should 
facilitate information sharing among these nations regarding 
criminal history and prior orders of removal or immigration 
enforcement actions. The Committee notes that ICE is leading a 
critical effort through its Biometric Identification 
Transnational Migration Alert Program [BITMAP] that involves 
biometric data collection from special interest aliens, violent 
criminals, fugitives, and confirmed or suspected terrorists 
encountered within illicit pathways. While the program has been 
successful, the Committee understands that the criminal history 
information sharing agreements with El Salvador, Guatemala, and 
Honduras do not cover all possible misdemeanors and felonies. 
The Department, in conjunction with appropriate partner 
agencies, shall brief the Committee not later than 90 days 
after the date of enactment of this act on such efforts.
    In addition, the Committee believes that the multimedia 
public awareness campaign to communicate the dangers to 
children and their families of the journey to reach the United 
States and enter illegally has had an impact. The Department 
should continue these efforts. At the same time, the Committee 
is concerned that such efforts will be undermined as knowledge 
spreads that very few UAC who were apprehended at our borders 
have actually been returned to their home countries. Of the 
56,029 UAC apprehended and referred to HHS custody in fiscal 
year 2014, only 635 had been removed as of March 21, 2015. 
Furthermore, while 5,775 had been ordered removed or been 
granted voluntary departure by that time, they are likely still 
in the United States. Such removal orders were largely issued 
in absentia. The Committee's concerns about the challenges of 
obtaining such data and the need for regular, consistent 
reporting are outlined earlier in this report.

                         ACQUISITION OVERSIGHT

    The Department is again seeking to develop a joint 
requirements process and provide greater rigor to its oversight 
and execution of major acquisitions. The Committee expects to 
see the Department institute robust, effective processes that 
will not be cast aside in the next presidential transition. As 
such, it is imperative that the processes add value rather than 
bureaucracy. Funding provided in the fiscal year 2015 act is 
continued under the Immediate Office of the Secretary for the 
Joint Requirements Council. The Committee directs the 
Department to provide regular updates on its process 
improvements and their results.
    In addition, the Committee notes the important role S&T; 
plays in acquisition support. The Committee expects that 
components will utilize S&T; not just for operational test and 
evaluation, but also in developmental test and evaluation of 
technology to ensure the Department is able to procure the best 
available technology to meet mission needs.

                     COST SAVINGS AND EFFICIENCIES

    The Committee continues to encourage the Secretary to 
identify cost savings and efficiency opportunities across the 
Department. Of particular note, the Committee commends TSA for 
the real savings the organization continues to realize as a 
result of smarter, risk-based security measures. With rising 
personnel costs and growing technology needs, the Department 
must find creative ways to enhance operations while reducing 
costs.
    In addition, the Committee encourages the Department to use 
remanufactured vehicle parts in place of new parts when they 
are the most cost effective alternative and when doing so would 
not delay vehicle repair or reduce performance quality.
    The Committee is concerned about the millions of taxpayer 
dollars spent on wasteful printing practices each year and the 
lack of clear printing policies within agencies. While progress 
has been made to better utilize the cloud and digitalize 
records, little progress has been made to reform in-house 
printing practices. The Committee directs DHS to work with the 
Office of Management and Budget to reduce printing and 
reproduction by 34 percent and report to the Committee within 
60 days after the date of enactment of this act on the steps 
DHS has taken or will take to reduce printing volume and costs. 
The report should specifically identify how much money DHS has 
saved or will save as a result of these steps.

               PUBLIC ACCESS TO FEDERALLY FUNDED RESEARCH

    The Committee understands that S&T; has been working with 
the Office of Science and Technology Policy [OSTP] since May of 
2014 on its plan to provide public access to its federally 
funded research in accordance with the guidance issued by OSTP 
requiring these plans. S&T; is exploring two options including 
having the research hosted on the DHS Web site or potentially 
joining a repository hosted by Department of Defense, the 
National Institutes of Health, or the Department of Education. 
The Committee expects S&T; to expeditiously finalize and 
implement its plan and brief the Committee on its progress not 
later than 30 days after the date of enactment of this act.
    To ensure consistent application across DHS, the Department 
must also report to the Committee not later than 30 days after 
the date of enactment of this act on the status of similar 
efforts at other components such as the Domestic Nuclear 
Detection Office [DNDO] and the Coast Guard, or certify to the 
Committee that federally funded research at these components do 
not meet OSTP requirements for public access.

                          WILDLIFE TRAFFICKING

    The Committee notes the recent increase of illegal trade in 
rhinoceros horns, elephant ivory, and illegally harvested 
timber, along with the large sums of money that these products 
command on the black market. There are indisputable linkages 
between these activities and the financing of armed 
insurgencies and groups that threaten the stability and 
development of African countries and pose a threat to U.S. 
security interests. The Committee directs the Secretary to 
continue to report on wildlife trafficking activities as 
specifically outlined in Senate Report 113-198. The Department 
works in partnership with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
[USFWS] wildlife inspectors to serve as the Nation's frontline 
defense against illegal international trade in wildlife and 
wildlife products. Therefore, the Committee recommends that CBP 
and USFWS improve cooperation and coordination among the 
agencies to better address wildlife trafficking.

                            TEXTILE PRODUCTS

    Section 604 of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act 
of 2009 (Public Law 111-5) contains restrictions on the 
Department's acquisition of certain foreign textile products. 
The intent of the provision was to increase opportunities for 
American businesses, particularly textile and apparel 
manufacturers. The Committee directs GAO to review the 
Department's implementation and compliance with the provision, 
as well as the effectiveness of this policy.

                                REAL ID

    The Committee supports the Department's continued effort to 
implement the REAL ID program. Improving the security of U.S. 
identification will have a positive impact on security in many 
facets of our lives. The Committee also strongly supports the 
continued use of the law's extension provision, which gives the 
Secretary discretion to grant States additional time to meet 
the required minimum standards if the State provides adequate 
justification for noncompliance. States should have the 
opportunity to consider and debate methods of compliance 
consistent with their individual values and traditions, without 
sanction.

                            FEEDBACK SYSTEM

    The immigration missions of DHS place its frontline 
officers and agents in constant interaction with the public, 
citizens, and aliens when it comes to border operations, 
processing benefits, and taking enforcement action. While 
Department components have a variety of means to get feedback 
from individuals about their experiences, it is not always easy 
to find the right feedback mechanism. The Office of Public 
Affairs, in coordination with other appropriate offices, shall 
assess whether all appropriate DHS programs and operations have 
the ability to take and respond to feedback in a transparent 
manner. Further, the Department shall endeavor to develop a 
centralized way, on its Web site, to communicate about all of 
the means by which individuals can provide feedback, including 
in a multilingual format. The Department shall report to the 
Committee on its findings not later than 270 days after the 
date of enactment of this act with recommendations for 
addressing any shortfalls in current feedback mechanisms. The 
report shall also address how the Department will update its 
Web site and other materials (including training materials) to 
ensure individuals can easily access feedback mechanisms.

                      GUNSHOT DETECTION TECHNOLOGY

    The Committee is aware of the value of gunshot detection 
technologies and understands the Secret Service is evaluating 
various options to suit its mission. As there may be security 
applications across the homeland security enterprise, 
particularly with respect to critical infrastructure 
protection, the Committee expects the Service to share the 
results of testing, evaluation, and validation of such 
technologies with relevant DHS components.

                      PRIOR REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

    The Committee reminds CBP and ICE that a number of reports 
required in the explanatory statement accompanying the 
Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act, 2015, as 
well as House Report 113-481 and Senate Report 113-198, have 
yet to be delivered, and directs that these requirements be met 
expeditiously. The following reports are of particular 
interest: the DHS review of ICE and CBP repatriation policies 
and practices due within 150 days after the date of enactment 
of the act; the CBP report on its pilot of the use of body-worn 
cameras due within 60 days of the pilot's completion; and the 
CBP report on UAS support of State, local, and/or tribal law 
enforcement entities.

               PROGRAM OFFICE FOR THE TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRY

    On April 29, 2015, the Secretary announced DHS was 
finalizing plans to open a satellite office in Silicon Valley 
to serve as a point of contact for the technology industry. 
Despite repeated requests for details regarding the resources 
needed for this office, it took DHS 6 weeks to provide the most 
rudimentary information related to this effort. DHS is reminded 
that new starts must receive Committee approval. The Committee 
is not interested in getting in the way of progress or a good 
idea; however, transparency in funding execution is imperative 
to fulfill its oversight functions.

              Office of the Under Secretary for Management

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $187,503,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     193,187,000
Committee recommendation................................     184,465,000

    The Under Secretary for Management oversees management and 
operations of the Department, including procurement and 
acquisition, human capital, and property management. The 
specific activities funded by this account include the 
Immediate Office of the Under Secretary for Management, the 
Office of the Chief Security Officer, the Office of the Chief 
Procurement Officer, the Office of the Chief Human Capital 
Officer [OCHCO], and the Office of the Chief Readiness Support 
Officer.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $184,465,000 for the Under 
Secretary for Management. This is $8,722,000 below the amount 
requested and $3,038,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2015. Of this amount, the Committee recommends not to 
exceed $2,250 for official reception and representation 
expenses.
    The recommendation provides $26,976,000 for OCHCO, $32,000 
above the fiscal year 2015 enacted level and $6,992,000 below 
the request. Funds requested for the Cyberskills Support 
Initiative are included in the recommended levels for OCIO and 
NPPD. Further, the reduction below the request for the Human 
Resources Information Technology Program reflects available 
carryover balances for the program.
    The bill continues the requirement for submission of a 
Comprehensive Acquisition Status Report in the President's 
fiscal year 2017 budget with quarterly updates to be submitted 
45 days after the completion of each quarter. The requirements 
for the reports are described in House Report 112-331.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                                  OFFICE OF THE UNDER SECRETARY FOR MANAGEMENT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Immediate Office of the Under Secretary for Management....             2,740             3,411             3,393
Office of the Chief Security Officer......................            64,308            66,538            65,300
Office of the Chief Procurement Officer...................            60,107            58.989            58,630
 
Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer:
    Salaries and Expenses.................................            20,944            24,390            19,198
    Human Resources Information Technology Program........             6,000             9,578             7,778
 
Office of the Chief Readiness Support Officer:
    Salaries and expenses.................................            28,911            27,350            27,235
    Nebraska Avenue Complex...............................             4,493             2,931             2,931
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of the Under Secretary for Management.           187,503           193,187           184,465
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         PROCUREMENT PROCESSES

    The Committee remains concerned that DHS does not have 
sufficient insight into its procurement processes. Without such 
insight, DHS is unable to identify and address inefficiencies 
and problems. Further, procurement officials cannot provide a 
target schedule to their customers and potential vendors and 
service providers, much less one that is measurable and 
transparent covering each detailed step in the process and all 
accountable individuals.
    The Under Secretary for Management is working to establish 
timelines and metrics associated with the procurement process. 
The Committee expects the Department to continue making 
progress in this area, consistent with direction provided in 
the explanatory statement accompanying Public Law 114-4 and 
Senate Report 113-198. The Department shall brief the Committee 
not later than 120 days after the date of enactment of this act 
on its efforts to ensure an effective, efficient, and 
transparent procurement process. All metric reporting shall be 
consistent and repeatable.

                             HIRING DELAYS

    To meet its critical missions, the Department has 
consistently requested additional personnel, and Congress has 
provided for those personnel, particularly for border security 
and cybersecurity. Yet, DHS has failed to bring those funded 
positions on board for a myriad of reasons including delays in 
obtaining suitability determinations and a backlog in 
polygraphs. The hiring process remains a bureaucratic nightmare 
for many qualified applicants who have either given up or taken 
other positions by the time the offer is made, which merely 
compounds the agency's hiring challenges.
    The average number of days to hire an employee at DHS was 
163 days in 2014, going the wrong direction from 146 days in 
2013. While the Secret Service improved upon its process--going 
from an average 327 days to hire 43 positions in 2013 to 295 
days to hire 293 positions, their process still takes an 
inordinately long time. In 2013, CBP hired 2,300 positions at 
an average rate of 278 days; in 2014, that slipped to 2,533 
positions at an average rate of 308 days.
    DHS is to report to the Committee not later than 60 days 
after the date of enactment of this act on its strategy to 
decrease the number of days it takes to hire and report 
quarterly on time to hire statistics by component.
    Further, the Committee is aware that FEMA closely tracks 
the status of hiring actions, measuring how long each action 
takes during each step of the process and holding the 
appropriate officials accountable. Through this process, 
leadership can identify and address issues before they become 
significant problems. The Committee directs the Department, 
along with the other major components, to develop similar 
metrics. The Under Secretary shall brief the Committee on the 
metrics development effort not later than 90 days after the 
date of enactment of this act.

                            CYBER WORKFORCE

    Through the Cyberskills Support Initiative, CHCO has been 
leading a Department-wide effort to identify the skills and 
workforce DHS needs in cybersecurity. The requested increase is 
provided within the funds recommended for NPPD's Cybersecurity 
and Communications and OCIO.

                       HEADQUARTERS CONSOLIDATION

    A general provision is included in the bill providing 
$212,303,000 for costs associated with headquarters 
consolidation and mission support consolidation. The Under 
Secretary shall submit an expenditure plan not later than 90 
days after the date of enactment of this act detailing how 
these funds will be allocated, including a revised schedule and 
cost estimates for headquarters consolidation. Quarterly 
briefings are required on headquarters and mission support 
consolidation activities, including any deviation from the 
expenditure plan.

                 Office of the Chief Financial Officer

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $52,020,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      53,798,000
Committee recommendation................................      53,420,000

    OCFO is responsible for the fiscal management and financial 
accountability of the Department of Homeland Security. OCFO 
provides guidance and oversight of the Department's budget 
execution while ensuring that funds are allocated and expended 
in accordance with relevant laws and policies. This account 
funds the Budget Division, Office of Financial Operations, 
Office of Program Analysis and Evaluation, Office of Financial 
Management, Resource Management Transition Office, the Office 
of the Government Accountability Office/Office of Inspector 
General Audit Liaison, Cost Analysis Division, Risk Management 
and Assurance, and Workforce Development.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $53,420,000 for OCFO. This is 
$378,000 below the amount requested and $1,400,000 above the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2015.
    The recommendation includes $36,113,000 for Financial 
Systems Modernization as a general provision in title V of this 
act, $6,864,000 below the request. The reduction below the 
request is due to program delays that have occurred since the 
budget request was formulated.

                       COST OF LIVING ADJUSTMENT

    Should the President provide the requested cost of living 
adjustment [COLA] in fiscal year 2016, the Committee assumes 
the COLA for civilian employees across the Department will be 
absorbed within amounts appropriated in this act.

                    COMMON APPROPRIATIONS STRUCTURE

    The Department has been working to develop a common 
appropriations structure that would be proposed in the fiscal 
year 2017 request. The Committee believes that the goal of 
following funds from planning through execution is critical to 
departmental oversight of the components as well as 
establishing a capability to make tradeoffs in resource 
allocation and budget development decisions. At the same time, 
the Committee will not merely accept a proposal that in any way 
reduces transparency or congressional oversight and controls 
through the appropriations process nor creates a distraction 
through the time and opportunity costs associated with such a 
change. Further, the benefits of a dramatic restructuring of 
appropriations would have to outweigh the sacrifice of clear 
funding comparisons of current to prior appropriations. DHS is 
directed to tread carefully in this area and work closely with 
the Committee.

                    FINANCIAL SYSTEMS MODERNIZATION

    While the Department has made great strides in achieving 
clean opinions on all of its financial statements the past two 
years, auditors continue to find material weaknesses in the 
Department's systems. Continued modernization of financial 
systems will be critical to improved transparency and data 
quality going forward. At the same time, the Committee has 
concerns about the delays in the Department's modernization 
effort, in part due to challenges outside DHS control--namely 
governmentwide directives and contractual barriers. DHS is to 
maintain frequent communications with the Committee on 
financial management improvement plans necessary to support the 
Department's missions, including total resource requirements by 
fiscal year and a timeline for implementation with discrete 
milestones.

                    OBLIGATION AND EXPENDITURE PLANS

    The Committee continues requiring obligation and 
expenditure plan briefings for specified DHS components and 
programs. As outlined in the explanatory statement accompanying 
Public Law 114-4, the briefings shall reflect enacted 
appropriations; include the allocation of undistributed 
appropriations among and within PPAs; and specify completed 
transfer and reprogramming actions, including funds that have 
been reprogrammed below the notification threshold. Funding in 
the briefs shall be designated by PPA and cost code by quarter, 
and shall include the amount of funds planned to be carried 
over into the next fiscal year. For multi-year appropriations, 
the briefs shall detail the status of each appropriation by 
source year. In addition, the briefs shall provide data on 
FTE--enacted, actual, projected actual at the end of the year, 
as well as any associated funding under-burn. These briefings 
shall be provided not later than 45 days after the date of 
enactment of this act and on a quarterly basis thereafter to 
compare actual obligations against the initial plans.

                      ANNUAL BUDGET JUSTIFICATIONS

    The Chief Financial Officer is directed to ensure that 
fiscal year 2017 budget justifications for classified and 
unclassified budgets of all Department components are submitted 
on February 1, 2016, concurrent with the President's budget 
submission to Congress. The justifications shall include:
  --Detailed data and explanatory descriptions for each 
        appropriations request and for each PPA reflected in 
        the table accompanying this statement, including 
        offices that have been identified as PPAs. Information 
        regarding actual and planned accomplishments should be 
        in quantifiable terms and demonstrate a direct 
        relationship to funding.
  --Tables that reflect actual and estimated funding by PPA for 
        fiscal years 2016 and 2017; identify each increase, 
        decrease, transfer, and staffing change proposed in 
        fiscal year 2017; and explain such year-to-year changes 
        in terms that are clear and unambiguous, and exclude 
        nonspecific terms such as ``technical adjustment'' or 
        ``administrative savings'' unless accompanied by a 
        detailed explanation. To establish a common baseline 
        reference, the fiscal year 2016 discretionary data 
        shall tie to the fiscal year 2016 discretionary total 
        in the table accompanying this statement or have a 
        table identifying each change. Explanations of 
        adjustments to base funding, whether increases or 
        decreases, should be specific and compared to prior 
        year activity level not merely the entire PPA level, 
        and programmatic changes and initiatives should be 
        clearly identified and justified.
  --All requested increases shall also be justified with 
        measurable outcomes above the current baseline of 
        activity--if the Department does not have a current 
        measure of such baseline activity, the Department shall 
        establish one before requesting an increase.
  --For each PPA that is comprised of acquisition and 
        procurement activity, the justification should address 
        all proposed spending using a zero-based budget 
        description.
  --Information by appropriations account and PPA on all 
        reimbursable agreements and significant uses of the 
        Economy Act for each fiscal year.
  --An accurate detailed table identifying the last year that 
        authorizing legislation was enacted into law for each 
        appropriation, including the amount of the 
        authorization, when the authorization expires, and the 
        appropriation in the last year of authorization.
  --The text and citation of all Department appropriations 
        provisions enacted to date that are permanent law.
  --Explanations and justifications for all proposed 
        legislative language changes, whether they are new or 
        amend existing law, whether they are substantive or 
        technical in nature, with an annotated comparison of 
        proposed versus existing language.
  --A report on the status of overdue Committee reports, plans, 
        and briefings for each of fiscal years 2015 and 2016.
    The Committee also expects OCFO to monitor the overuse of 
funding realignments, particularly prevalent in NPPD's request. 
The practice of annually rejiggering where activities are 
funded creates a budget maze, making it difficult to maintain 
proper oversight of appropriations.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    The Department shall continue providing monthly budget 
execution reports including staffing data as in prior years, in 
compliance with the included general provision. Further, the 
Committee continues to include general provisions addressing 
unauthorized fee proposals in future budget requests and pay 
reform initiatives.
    A statutory provision is also retained requiring the 
Secretary to submit a Future Years Homeland Security Program 
budget as part of the fiscal year 2017 budget justification. 
The report shall be provided in the same manner as prior year 
requirements and shall be in unclassified form so as to be 
accessible to the general public.

                Office of the Chief Information Officer

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $288,122,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     320,596,000
Committee recommendation................................     304,479,000

    The Office of the Chief Information Officer [OCIO] is 
responsible for oversight of information technology [IT] 
development, oversight of IT acquisition, alignment of IT 
systems and infrastructure to the enterprise architecture to 
support the missions and activities of the Department.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $304,479,000, of which 
$104,790,000 is for salaries and expenses, and $199,689,000 is 
to be available through fiscal year 2017 for Department-wide 
technology investments overseen by OCIO. The recommendation is 
$16,117,000 below the amount requested and $16,357,000 above 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2015. Within the funds 
recommended, OCIO shall support CHCO in its Cyberskills Support 
Initiative.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                                     OFFICE OF THE CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Salaries and expenses.....................................            99,028           105,307           104,790
Information technology services...........................            68,298           106,270            90,670
Infrastructure and security activities....................            52,640            54,087            54,087
Homeland security data network............................            68,156            54,932            54,932
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of the Chief Information Officer......           288,122           320,596           304,479
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          EXECUTION BRIEFINGS

    In Public Law 114-4, the requirement for OCIO to submit a 
multi-year investment and management plan was eliminated. In 
lieu of that requirement, the Committee expects to see the same 
level of information provided in budget justification materials 
each year. Further, OCIO shall semiannually brief the Committee 
on the execution of its major initiatives and investment areas.

                    INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICES

    The Committee recommendation includes $90,670,000 for 
development, implementation, and maintenance of IT functional 
services, a significant increase over fiscal year 2015 to 
support enterprise implementation of single sign-on and further 
progress on the DHS Data Framework. The Department also 
requested funds for establishing a Digital Services Team at the 
OCIO level that can be used across the Department to bring 
critical IT skills and private sector experts into government 
to work on high-impact, high-profile IT and business process 
challenges. This team builds on the work already underway by 
U.S. Digital Services Team personnel on USCIS Transformation. 
Further, personnel are also beginning to work on the 
Department's immigration data challenges. The Committee expects 
that the Department will make great progress on immigration 
data reporting by December 2015, and that new Digital Services 
Team members will be used to address those challenges as the 
top priority.

                 INFRASTRUCTURE AND SECURITY ACTIVITIES

    The Committee recommendation includes $54,087,000 for 
development and acquisition of IT equipment, software, 
services, and related activities.
    The Committee is pleased with the Department's leadership 
in data center consolidation. The Department is in a 
fundamentally better position as a result of its consolidation 
efforts in understanding and reducing its IT footprint, 
achieving operational efficiencies, reducing energy 
consumption, and establishing opportunities for shared 
capabilities. Data Center 1 is a premiere facility and a 
strategic computing asset ready to serve other Federal 
customers. The Committee expects the Department to support the 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration in ensuring this 
government investment is best utilized. In addition, the 
Department shall continue to brief the Committee on a periodic 
basis regarding its execution of remaining data center 
migration funds, its future plans for Data Center 1, and its 
open market strategy for cloud services.

            SHARING AND SAFEGUARDING CLASSIFIED INFORMATION

    The recommendation includes $12,800,000 to implement 
information sharing and safeguarding measures to protect 
classified national security information. OCIO is to brief the 
Committee not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of 
this act on its progress in implementing the required measures.

                           MAJOR ACQUISITIONS

    Every major acquisition in the Department involves IT. As 
the Department seeks to put better joint requirements and 
acquisition oversight processes in place, it is critical that 
OCIO play a strong role as early in the process as possible.

                        Analysis and Operations

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $255,804,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     269,090,000
Committee recommendation................................     263,467,000

    The account supports activities to improve the analysis and 
sharing of threat information, including activities of the 
Office of Intelligence and Analysis [I&A;] and the Office of 
Operations Coordination.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $263,467,000 for Analysis and 
Operations. This is $5,623,000 below the amount requested and 
$7,663,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2015. The 
details of these recommendations are included in a classified 
annex accompanying this report.

                      ANNUAL BUDGET JUSTIFICATIONS

    The Committee emphasizes that the fiscal year 2017 budget 
justifications for the classified budget shall include the same 
level of detail required of other appropriations and PPAs. I&A; 
failed to provide adjustments to base, programmatic changes, 
and other details at the PPA level, providing only office level 
information. All proposed changes shall be clearly articulated 
at the PPA level.

                   DHS INTELLIGENCE EXPENDITURE PLAN

    The Committee requires the Department's Chief Intelligence 
Officer to brief the Committee on the I&A; expenditure plan for 
fiscal year 2016 no later than 60 days after the date of 
enactment of this act. The plan shall include the following:
  --fiscal year 2016 expenditures and staffing allotted for 
        each program as compared to fiscal years 2014 and 2015;
  --all funded versus on-board positions, including Federal 
        FTE, contractors, and reimbursable and nonreimbursable 
        detailees;
  --a plan for all programs and investments, including dates or 
        timeframes for achieving key milestones;
  --allocation of funding within each PPA for individual 
        programs and a description of the desired outcomes for 
        fiscal year 2016; and
  --items outlined in the classified annex accompanying this 
        report.

                     STATE AND LOCAL FUSION CENTERS

    The Committee directs I&A; to continue semiannual briefings 
on the State and Local Fusion Centers program.
    The Committee is interested in the capabilities and 
successes of the Kansas Intelligence Fusion Center as a 
potential model for other fusion centers. In addition, the 
National Governors Association has established a resource 
center focused on helping the States craft and implement 
effective cybersecurity policies and practices, including an 
effort to leverage fusion centers and their existing 
capabilities for cybersecurity. Therefore, the Committee 
directs the Department to assess whether to establish a State-
based Center of Excellence for the development, training, and 
ongoing support operations for multi-agency, multi-discipline 
public private partnerships to enhance threat information 
sharing and collaboration among Federal, State, and private 
sector critical infrastructure entities. The assessment shall 
consider authorities and costs for such a Center that would 
leverage capabilities among DOD, including the National Guard, 
DHS, State and local government entities, and private sector 
critical infrastructure partners for identifying, assessing, 
and mitigating classified threats to cybersecurity and critical 
infrastructure in the United States. I&A; shall include this 
assessment in its first fiscal year 2016 semiannual briefing on 
the State and Local Fusion Centers program.

                      Office of Inspector General

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $118,617,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     142,284,000
Committee recommendation................................     134,488,000

    This account finances the Office of Inspector General's 
[OIG] activities, including audits, inspections, 
investigations, and other reviews of programs and operations of 
DHS to promote economy, efficiency, and effectiveness and to 
prevent and detect fraud, waste, and abuse.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $134,488,000 for OIG, $7,796,000 
below the amount requested and $15,871,000 above the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2015. In addition, the Committee 
includes bill language transferring $24,000,000 requested by 
OIG for audits and investigations related to natural disasters 
from the Disaster Relief Fund [DRF].
    The Committee strongly supports a robust, capable OIG 
workforce that provides return on investment to the taxpayer. 
For that reason, the recommended funding level includes many of 
the requested increases for staffing, training, and 
capabilities necessary to perform the critical OIG mission. The 
Committee expects to see continued progress and results from 
these investments.
    The Inspector General shall submit a plan for expenditure 
of all funds no later than 30 days after the date of enactment 
of this act containing the same information as required in 
prior years. As specified in Senate Report 113-198, for fiscal 
year 2017 and thereafter, OIG shall submit a detailed 
expenditure plan with its annual budget justification 
documents.

                           MANAGEMENT ALERTS

    After 15 months in his post, the current Inspector General 
has made great strides in rebuilding this broken organization. 
The Committee commends OIG for its introduction of ``Management 
Alert'' products which alert DHS managers to immediate and 
serious threats of waste, fraud and abuse in agency programs. 
These are particularly useful in providing a preliminary, 
timely assessment of concerning situations as they are 
developing.

                                 AUDITS

    The Committee commends OIG for its shift in approach to 
audits such that OIG emphasizes preventing improper use of 
disaster assistance funds rather than identifying it years 
after the fact. Working with FEMA, OIG has sought to improve 
State and local understanding of and compliance with Federal 
grant and procurement requirements at the beginning of the 
process. The Committee expects OIG to continue with this 
approach.
    At the same time, the Committee notes the quality of audits 
overall must be improved. When audits are in process for a year 
or more, the Secretary, the Congress, and the public expect 
that the final product will be accurate, complete, and 
objective. Specifically, OIG should make every effort to 
validate statements by one source and, particularly on complex 
audits, address agency assertions of factual inaccuracies 
during the comment phase. The Committee encourages the 
Inspector General to examine the audit process and make 
improvements.

                          INTEGRITY OVERSIGHT

    With the size of the DHS workforce and its mission, the 
Department must always be cognizant of the risk of corruption 
and misconduct and take steps to mitigate that risk. The 
Committee appreciates the role that OIG continues to play in 
this area.
    The Committee continues to closely monitor the Department's 
compliance and implementation of the requirements of the Anti-
Border Corruption Act of 2011 (Public Law 11-338). The 
Secretary's September 2014 delegation of investigative 
authority to CBP Internal Affairs changes the division of 
responsibilities among OIG, ICE, and CBP that had previously 
been in place. However, the Committee expects OIG, CBP, and ICE 
to continue to work jointly and cooperatively to combat 
corruption.
    The Committee also wishes to note an oversight request 
described in greater detail under title II of this report for 
OIG to conduct a 1-year review on the implementation of 
recommendations from the United States Secret Service 
Protective Mission Panel.

                     CONFERENCES AND SPECIAL EVENTS

    OIG shall report to the Committee not later than 30 days 
after the end of fiscal year 2016 on DHS spending on 
conferences, ceremonies, and similar events, based on quarterly 
reporting to OIG. Consistent with prior year reports, OIG shall 
include the total costs to the Government associated with these 
events, the number of conferences held, the amount of funds 
obligated, and expenses by appropriation or other source of 
funding, including budget accounts and subaccounts used to pay 
for events.

                                TITLE II


               SECURITY, ENFORCEMENT, AND INVESTIGATIONS


                   U.S. Customs and Border Protection


                                SUMMARY

    U.S. Customs and Border Protection [CBP] is responsible for 
enforcing laws regarding admission of foreign-born persons into 
the United States, and ensuring that all goods and persons 
entering and exiting the United States do so legally.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends total resources of 
$13,060,807,000, including direct appropriations of 
$11,084,026,000 and estimated fee collections of 
$1,976,781,000.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                               U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION--FUNDING SUMMARY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Appropriations:
    Salaries and expenses.................................         8,459,657         9,124,270         8,779,325
    Small airport user fee................................             9,000             9,097             9,097
    Automation modernization..............................           808,169           867,311           854,029
    Border Security Fencing, Infrastructure, and                     382,466           373,461           373,461
     Technology [BSFIT]...................................
    Air and Marine operations.............................           750,469           747,422           754,614
    Construction and facilities management................           288,821           341,543           313,500
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Appropriations...............................        10,698,582        11,463,104        11,084,026
                                                           =====================================================
Estimated fee collections:
    Immigration inspection user fee.......................           630,218           652,699           652,699
    Immigration enforcement fines.........................               752               633               633
    ESTA..................................................            54,929            57,332            57,332
    Land border inspection fee............................            43,931            34,724            34,724
    COBRA fee.............................................           482,501           506,877           506,877
    APHIS inspection fee..................................           464,514           515,810           515,810
    Global entry user fee.................................            91,192            91,789            91,789
    Puerto Rico Trust Fund................................            98,076            99,058            99,058
    Virgin Island fee.....................................            11,789            11,867            11,867
    Customs Unclaimed Goods...............................             5,992             5,992             5,992
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Estimated fee collections....................         1,883,894         1,976,781         1,976,781
                                                           =====================================================
      Total, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, available        12,582,476        13,439,885        13,060,807
       funding............................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2015....................................  $8,459,657,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................   9,124,270,000
Committee recommendation................................   8,779,325,000

    The CBP Salaries and Expenses appropriation provides funds 
for border security, immigration, customs, agricultural 
inspections, regulating and facilitating international trade, 
collecting import duties, and enforcing U.S. trade laws. In 
addition to directly appropriated resources, fee collections 
are available for the operations of CBP from the following 
sources:
    Immigration Inspection User Fee.--CBP collects user fees to 
fund the costs of international inspections activities at 
airports and seaports, as authorized by the Immigration and 
Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1356).
    Electronic System for Travel Authorization Fee.--CBP 
collects fees to cover the cost of operating and implementing a 
system to pre-screen visitors from countries participating in 
the Visa Waiver Program prior to their arrival in the United 
States to avoid security risks, as authorized by section 
711(h)(3)(B) of the 9/11 Act (Public Law 110-53).
    Immigration Enforcement Fine.--CBP collects fines from 
owners of transportation lines and persons for unauthorized 
landing of aliens, as authorized by the Immigration and 
Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1356).
    Land Border Inspection Fee.--CBP collects fees for 
processing applications for the Dedicated Commuter Lanes 
program, the Automated Permit Ports program, the Canadian 
Border Boat Landing permits, Mexican Non-Resident Alien Border 
Crossing Cards, FAST, SENTRI and NEXUS application fees, as 
authorized by the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 
1356).
    Public-Private-Partnership [PPP] Reimbursements.--CBP is 
authorized to enter into mutually beneficial agreements with 
stakeholders at select ports of entry [POEs] whereby CBP is 
reimbursed for enhanced customs and agricultural processing, 
border security, and immigration inspection-related services.
    Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act [COBRA] 
Fee.--CBP collects fees for inspection services involving 
customs-related functions. The COBRA user fee statutory 
authority (19 U.S.C. 58c) specifies the types of covered 
expenses.
    Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Inspection 
Fee.--CBP receives as a transfer a distribution of agriculture 
inspection fees collected by the United States Department of 
Agriculture. The user fees, as authorized by the Food, 
Agriculture, Conservation, and Trade Act of 1990 (21 U.S.C. 
136), are charged to offset costs for the services related to 
the importation, entry, or exportation of animals and animal 
products.
    Global Entry User Fee.--CBP collects fees to cover the cost 
of a registered traveler program to expedite screening and 
processing of international passengers as authorized under the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2008, section 565(3)(B).
    U.S. Virgin Islands Fee Fund.--The U.S. Virgin Islands 
[USVI] are an unincorporated territory of the United States and 
although a U.S. territory, the USVI is expressly excluded from 
the definition of customs territory of the United States. The 
importation of goods into the USVI is governed by Virgin 
Islands law. CBP collects duties on behalf of the USVI and 
deposits them into the USVI Fee Fund. The account is now known 
as the U.S. Virgin Islands Fees Fund, in which duties and taxes 
collected in the USVI are deposited. The account is managed 
annually as a reimbursable account with any remaining funds 
remitted back to the USVI at the conclusion of the fiscal year.
    Puerto Rico Trust Fund.--Customs duties, taxes, and fees 
collected in Puerto Rico by CBP are deposited in the Puerto 
Rico Trust Fund. After providing for the expenses of 
administering CBP activities in Puerto Rico, the remaining 
amounts are transferred to the Treasurer of Puerto Rico 
pursuant to sections 740 and 795 of title 48, United States 
Code.
    Small Airport User Fee.--The User Fee Airports Program 
authorized under 19 U.S.C. 58b and administered under 19 U.S.C. 
58c(b)(9)(A)(i), authorizes inspection services to be provided 
to participating small airports on a fully reimbursable basis. 
The fees charged under this program are set forth in a 
memorandum of agreement between the small airport facility and 
the agency, and may be adjusted annually as costs and 
requirements change.
    Unclaimed Goods.--Any goods entered or un-entered 
merchandise (except merchandise under section 557 of the Tariff 
Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1557), but including 
merchandise entered for transportation in bond or for 
exportation) which remain in Customs custody for 6 months from 
the date of importation or a lesser period for special 
merchandise as provided by section 127.28(c), (d), and (h) of 
title 19, United States Code, and without all estimated duties 
and storage or other charges having been paid, shall be 
considered unclaimed and abandoned. This account represents the 
proceeds from the liquidation of that account.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $8,779,325,000 for CBP Salaries 
and Expenses [S&E;] for fiscal year 2016, including $3,274,000 
from the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund and, of which 
$2,410,355,358 is derived from the merchandise processing fee. 
This is $344,945,000 below the request and $319,668,000 above 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2015.
    The Committee includes bill language making available up to 
$150,000 for payment for rental space for preclearance 
operations and $1,000,000 for payments to informants. The 
Committee also includes bill language placing a $35,000 annual 
limit on overtime paid to any employee and capping official 
reception and representation expenses at $34,425. A general 
provision is continued to allow CBP to access collections 
associated with the U.S. Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement 
Implementation Act, Public Law 112-42. The spending from these 
collections is not capped, whereas the request included a cap 
of $180,000,000.
    The Committee's recommended funding level supports 21,370 
Border Patrol agents and 23,775 CBP officers, while noting that 
CBP is currently below these levels and is unlikely to reach 
these levels until late in fiscal year 2016.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                            U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION--SALARIES AND EXPENSES
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Salaries and expenses:
    Headquarters, management, and administration:
        Commissioner......................................            27,151            30,950            30,500
        Chief Counsel.....................................            45,483            49,786            49,000
        Congressional Affairs.............................             2,504             2,978             2,955
        Internal Affairs..................................           139,493           170,024           164,500
        Public Affairs....................................            13,009            14,464            14,000
        Training and Development..........................            71,585            80,466            80,000
        Technology Innovation, Acquisition................            25,277            29,658            29,000
        Intelligence......................................            62,235            78,402            78,030
        Administration....................................           382,870           420,238           373,775
        Rent..............................................           598,593           629,046           625,480
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Headquarters, management, and                  1,368,200         1,506,012         1,447,240
           administration.................................
                                                           =====================================================
    Border security inspections and trade facilitation:
        Inspections, trade, and travel facilitation at             2,810,524         3,077,568         2,978,500
         ports of entry...................................
        Harbor maintenance fee collection (Trust Fund)....             3,274             3,274             3,274
        International cargo screening.....................            68,902            69,851            69,000
        Other international programs......................            25,548            24,935            24,500
        Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism [C-               41,619            41,420            41,000
         TPAT]............................................
        Trusted Traveler Programs.........................             5,811             5,811             5,811
        Inspection and detection technology investments...           122,811           209,273           171,000
        National Targeting Center.........................            74,623            79,514            74,500
        Training..........................................            33,880            48,714            44,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Border security inspections and trade          3,186,992         3,560,360         3,411,585
           facilitation...................................
                                                           =====================================================
    Border security and control between ports of entry:
        Border security and control.......................         3,848,074         3,921,393         3,864,000
        Unaccompanied Alien Children Contingency Fund.....  ................            79,000  ................
        Training..........................................            56,391            57,505            56,500
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Border security and control between            3,904,465         4,057,898         3,920,500
           ports of entry.................................
                                                           =====================================================
      Total, Salaries and expenses........................         8,459,657         9,124,270         8,779,325
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         BORDER PATROL METRICS

    The Border Patrol must move away from solely using input 
measures--such as the amount of funding spent, the number of 
agents deployed, and the numbers of miles of fencing--and begin 
to use outcome measures to determine the overall efficacy of 
enforcement efforts and to identify the most effective mix of 
resources. While the Border Patrol has consistently relied upon 
and reported apprehensions as a primary outcome measure, this 
measure does not demonstrate whether CBP's investments in both 
people and technology are contributing to a reduction in 
illegal entries to the United States. The Committee understands 
that illegal entries cannot be fully measured directly and that 
the Border Patrol has contracted with Johns Hopkins 
University's Applied Physics Laboratory and others to more 
accurately estimate the workflow, number of illegal entrants, 
and the probability of apprehension, using available data. The 
Committee notes that CBP's outcome-driven studies are nascent 
and did not directly influence the proposed resource 
allocations included in the fiscal year 2016 budget request. 
However, the Committee expects that the fiscal year 2017 budget 
request will be data-driven and propose allocating new and 
existing resources based on risk-based analyses informed by 
outcome measures.

                        CBP HIRING AND RETENTION

    The Committee is disappointed that CBP has not been able to 
meet the funded staffing levels for Border Patrol agents and 
CBP officers. While adjudication and security reviews required 
to determine suitability for Federal law enforcement applicants 
are more stringent than other Federal agencies, CBP's current 
hiring timeline of 370 days is unacceptable. CBP has increased 
the number of testing sites for prospective applicants and 
modified the sequencing of the security-related components in 
the hiring process, and is taking the following steps to 
increase the number and rate of applicants clearing and moving 
through the polygraph examination and background investigation 
process: hiring additional polygraph examiners, requesting 
support from other DHS components and other Federal agencies 
with certified examiners, and implementing changes in the 
scheduling and completion of polygraph examinations. But more 
can be done. With representation of veterans among new hires 
increasing by more than 2 percent from 2012 to 2014, the 
Committee directs CBP to increase efforts to recruit veterans. 
Furthermore, the Department should work with the Department of 
Defense [DOD] and the Office of Personnel Management [OPM] to 
facilitate the onboarding of veterans who qualify for CBP as 
they are leaving military service.
    Compounding the hiring delays, CBP has challenges staffing 
certain locations along the northern and southern borders. The 
Committee directs CBP, working with OPM as necessary, to 
identify and utilize incentives to improve retention in those 
locations as well as incentivize personnel to choose those 
locations. The Committee directs CBP to brief the Committee 
quarterly on progress in reducing the hiring timeline. CBP is 
directed to provide notification to the Committee at the end of 
each pay period including the following: current on board 
staffing levels, changes to on board staffing levels due to 
attrition, retirements, new hires, and any other information 
necessary to detail changes to staffing for Border Patrol 
agents and CBP officers, until targeted staffing levels for 
these critical law enforcement positions are met.

                    BORDER PATROL PAY REFORM REPORT

    The Committee directs DHS to submit to the Committee, as 
well as the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs, not later than 180 days after January 1, 2016, a 
report regarding the progress of implementation of the 
provisions of Public Laws 113-277 and 114-13. Specifically, the 
report should include (1) a general overview of the 
implementation of the newly-promulgated regulations under such 
laws; (2) classification and numbers of employees within the 
three pay schedules under the law; (3) Border Patrol Agents' 
new pay ranges relative to what they were before the law was 
enacted and rules were promulgated; and (4) areas of regulation 
implementation requiring additional regulatory or statutory 
action.

                            INTERNAL AFFAIRS

    The Committee remains committed to addressing the potential 
for corruption of CBP personnel, and notes CBP's efforts to 
head-off potential problems before they occur by continuing to 
expand integrity training, conducting investigations, and 
conducting polygraphs on applicants, and meeting the 
requirements of the Anti-Border Corruption Act of 2011 (Public 
Law 111-338). The Secretary's September 2014 delegation of 
authority, directing CBP to perform investigations of its staff 
will most certainly change the prioritization of Internal 
Affairs functions. The Committee looks forward to the 
recommendations of the newly formed Integrity Advisory 
Committee. However, in future budget requests, substantial 
increases to Internal Affairs staffing levels will be 
challenging to support in the current budget environment 
without corresponding offsets elsewhere within CBP. In order to 
expedite the hiring of suitable candidates, the Committee 
recommends the requested funding increase, $1,465,000 for 
hiring additional polygraphers.
    In light of recent media reports regarding allegations of 
sexual abuse by CBP personnel, the Committee directs CBP to 
report to Congress on an annual basis regarding all cases of 
reported sexual abuse and sexual assault by its employees. The 
Committee directs the Deputy Secretary to continue to oversee 
the coordination of OIG, CBP, and ICE on program integrity 
issues.

               UNACCOMPANIED ALIEN CHILDREN AND FAMILIES

    CBP's presence on the frontline placed the Border Patrol at 
the center of the influx of UAC and families a year ago, with 
CBP professionally apprehending, caring for, processing, and 
transporting thousands of children. UAC and families began 
crossing the southwest border in the Rio Grande Valley Sector 
in unprecedented numbers in early 2014. The surge peaked in 
June, with over 10,000 UAC encountered by the Border Patrol and 
another 618 encountered by the Office of Field Operations. By 
the end of fiscal year 2014, the Border Patrol had encountered 
68,631 UAC and 68,684 members of family units; a dramatic 
increase compared to fiscal year 2013 when the Border Patrol 
encountered a total of 38,833 UAC and 15,056 members of family 
units nationwide. The Committee commends CBP for acting quickly 
to establish humane temporary accommodations for UAC and 
families and notes that the budget request includes base 
resources for UAC consistent with what was provided in fiscal 
year 2015. The Committee reminds CBP that its temporary 
facilities--while not designed for nor intended to be used as 
longer term shelter--must meet all appropriate care standards 
for special populations, especially children.
    The Committee directs CBP to work with ICE, the Office of 
Refugee Resettlement [ORR], and the U.S. Marshals Service 
[USMS] to ensure that individuals held in CBP short-term 
custody are processed and transferred to ICE, ORR, or USMS 
custody in a humane and timely manner, and that their 
nonperishable belongings are returned to them no later than the 
time of removal or release. In instances where CBP cannot 
transfer custody within 2 days, CBP is encouraged to explore 
the feasibility of adding individuals to ICE's online detainee 
locator system and brief the Committee on its findings.

                    OBLIGATION AND EXPENDITURE PLANS

    To help facilitate congressional oversight, CBP is directed 
to continue to brief the Committee on obligation and 
expenditure plans, as outlined in the explanatory statement 
accompanying Public Law 114-4 and in title I of this report.

                             PORTS OF ENTRY

    CBP's Office of Field Operations [OFO] operates 328 POEs 24 
hours a day and 7 days a week, welcoming to the United States 
over 1.3 million people daily by air, land, and sea. In 
addition to CBP's primary security mission, CBP is the second-
largest government revenue generator for the United States, 
after the Internal Revenue Service. On average, OFO collects 
$119,400,000 a day in fees, duties, and tariffs. In fiscal year 
2014, OFO processed almost $2,500,000,000 worth of trade 
through U.S. POEs.
    Visitor volume increased 6.8 percent in 2014 after 
increasing 4.7 percent in fiscal year 2013. Traveler volume is 
expected to increase 3.4 percent to 4.1 percent through 2018, 
resulting in a projected 11.5 percent increase from fiscal year 
2015 to fiscal year 2018. In 2014 alone, international 
travelers spent an estimated $222,000,000,000 in the United 
States.
    The overall proportion of CBP's salaries and benefits [S&B;] 
has been growing steadily, thus squeezing other priorities. In 
fiscal year 2009, S&B; accounted for 55.5 percent of the total 
Salaries and Expenses account, but in fiscal year 2016 it will 
be approximately 71.7 percent. Cost drivers for the growing 
payroll, in addition to staffing increases, include healthcare, 
retirement benefits, decreasing attrition rates, and changing 
grade profiles. The average General Service [GS] grade level 
for CBPOs was GS-11 in fiscal year 2010. In fiscal year 2016 
the average will be GS-12. For Border Patrol agents, it was GS-
10 in fiscal year 2010 and will be GS-12 in fiscal year 2016. 
Officer and agent payroll costs have increased markedly in 
fiscal year 2016 compared to fiscal year 2015.
    CBP's workload staffing model indicates a shortfall of 624 
CBPOs by the end of fiscal year 2016, and this assumption 
presumes all funded CBPOs are on board at that time. While the 
model needs further refinement, it is the best tool yet 
designed to assist in officer placement decisions based on 
traveler volume, wait times, expanded facilities, and increased 
cargo throughput. The model also takes into consideration the 
reduction in staffing requirements due to innovation and 
technology improvements.
    The taxpayer expects its government to do more--more 
service, more efficiency, and more protection--with fewer 
dollars. The Committee believes CBP can achieve the goal of 
expedited cargo inspections; a faster, more pleasant entry 
experience for travelers to our country; and appropriate level 
of security through a mix of well-trained people, innovative 
technology, and sufficient infrastructure. The expansion of 
public-private partnerships can play a role in all three.
    People.--CBP is increasingly streamlining its encounters 
with people at POEs, and the Committee understands that CBP 
continually reviews its workforce staffing model to account for 
the impact of enhancements on requirements for officer 
staffing. The Committee remains concerned, however, about CBP 
officer staffing levels on the northern border. As trade and 
tourism increase along the United States-Canadian border, 
additional resources should be provided as appropriate. The 
Committee directs CBP to submit an updated resource allocation 
model with the fiscal year 2017 budget detailing specific 
staffing and funding for, and implementation of, planned border 
enforcement initiatives by port of entry.
    Technology.--CBP has made steady advancements in the use of 
mobile technology which permits officers to move to where the 
arriving passengers are located to expedite the inspection 
process. It has partnered with 34 airports in placing Automated 
Passport Control kiosks to more efficiently process U.S. 
citizens, Canadian citizens, permanent residents, and travelers 
from visa waiver countries. Soon, visitors with B1/B2 visas 
will be able to use kiosks, as well. CBP has also made great 
strides in enrolling frequent travelers in the Global Entry 
program. Participation in the program has grown to over 2 
million individuals, with another nearly 1 million NEXUS 
members who also get the benefits of Global Entry. The 
increased adoption of technology will continue to change the 
way CBP performs its millions of interactions with people, 
allowing officers to better target attention on risk and 
informed targeting, rather than paperwork.
    Infrastructure.--The Committee recognizes that investments 
in infrastructure can substantially impact the flow of people 
and goods into the United States at the ports of entry, and 
encourages CBP to continue to work with stakeholders to 
determine how improvements can improve efficiency for all 
stakeholders. Additionally, the Committee encourages CBP to 
favorably consider approving Federal Inspection Service secured 
area structures that use cost effective materials in 
appropriate climates.
    The Committee is concerned that technology currently used 
to analyze vehicular traffic crossing our borders has become 
outdated and should be improved. As part of the overall effort 
to improve situational awareness, the Committee expects the 
Department to continue to improve land border integration by 
procuring and implementing the latest, most effective 
technology available to monitor and intercept vehicles crossing 
its borders, as detailed in CBP's Information Technology Multi-
Year Investment and Management Plan.

                     REIMBURSABLE SERVICES PROGRAM

    The Committee notes the initial success of CBP's Section 
559 Reimbursable Services Program and includes statutory 
language to expand the program from 5 to 10 air port-of-entry 
pilots per year to address unmet demand for the program. Prior 
to expanding the number of pilots, the Committee directs CBP to 
more clearly articulate the program's goals to the public and 
identify selection factors, consistent with their current 
statutory authorities, including those expanded authorities 
under section 559 of Public Law 113-76, to request donations of 
services or equipment from the private sector. While CBP has 
clearly illustrated the framework for private entities to 
submit offers of service and equipment donation, clarification 
must be provided on how applications for the program will be 
reviewed, while laying out clear goals that will determine the 
success of cost-sharing programs.
    Separate from section 559 authority, CBP has the ability to 
enter into agreements with foreign governments for preclearance 
activities. Stakeholders associated with some of these existing 
agreements may wish to expand operations if CBP would provide 
visibility into baseline staffing levels and the cost of 
operations.

         FIELD OPERATIONS TECHNOLOGY AND SECURITY ENHANCEMENTS

    The Committee recommends $11,100,000, the same amount as 
requested, for an integrated surveillance and intrusion 
detection system that will improve security and situational 
awareness for land POEs, and directs that CBP provide 
semiannual briefings on implementation and planned spending for 
this program. The Committee also recommends $15,000,000 for the 
Electronic Visa Information Update System [EVIUS], a program 
that will allow non-immigrant visa holders to provide updated 
biographic and travel-related information through a public Web 
site, and enable CBP to facilitate admissibility determinations 
post-visa issuance before passengers initiate travel to the 
United States. The Committee understands that due to the 
criticality of this system and need to meet projected 
timelines, base resources will be dedicated to funding a 
portion of the requested startup costs to ensure EVIUS is 
completed. The Committee also recommends $2,000,000 for 
additional canine teams.

                  INSPECTION AND DETECTION TECHNOLOGY

    The Committee provides $171,000,000 for Inspection and 
Detection Technology, including $48,100,000 for additional Non-
Intrusive Inspection [NII] equipment refresh and 
recapitalization. The Committee is aware that a significant 
portion of imaging equipment is past its estimated 10-year 
lifespan and remains concerned by the absence of a multi-year 
investment and management plan, which CBP has failed to submit 
to the Committee in a timely manner. The Committee requests CBP 
produce a 5-year investment and management plan at the time of 
the fiscal year 2017 budget request. The investment and 
management plan shall be submitted in classified, if necessary, 
and unclassified format, with the unclassified version made 
public on CBP's Web site.

                       COUNTER NETWORK ACTIVITIES

    The Committee supports CBP's efforts to address the 
persistent threats of terrorist and transnational criminal 
organizations and efforts to disrupt and degrade the complex 
networks used to fund their illicit activities. The Committee 
includes a total of $12,554,000 across all PPAs to support 
these efforts. Using CBP's unique authorities, competencies, 
and targeting enforcement resources towards entire networks has 
proven disruptive to human smuggling, trade-based money 
laundering, narcotics trafficking, and other international 
crimes. The Committee provides resources for CBP to invest in 
the technology necessary to institutionalize the counter-
network strategy, but does not support hiring a significant 
number of new contractors or the 60 new Federal staff requested 
to support a new division. CBP should institutionalize these 
targeting activities, consider rotational opportunities for 
existing staff and apply its risk-based methodologies to 
determine how vacant positions across CBP could be allocated to 
supporting the evolving counter network operations strategy 
without impacting frontline operations.

                         LAND BORDER WAIT TIMES

    In July 2013, GAO issued a report (GAO-13-603) outlining, 
among other things, flaws in CBP's commercial vehicle wait time 
collection process. The Committee is concerned that almost 2 
years after the GAO report, CBP is still working to implement 
the recommendations to meaningfully improve the wait time 
collection process and overall industry confidence in the 
current online platform. Not later than 60 days after the date 
of enactment of this act, CBP is directed to report to the 
Committees of jurisdiction on the status of deploying an 
automated wait time collection solution across land border 
operations and the adoption of trade facilitation performance 
measures that demonstrate clear impact on stakeholders or the 
agency's security and trade facilitation missions. The 
Committee also directs CBP to consider identifying current wait 
time collection practices at each land border crossing through 
its online platform to improve accountability to the traveling 
public.

                        EXPEDITING SECURE TRAVEL

    The Committee encourages CBP to add enrollment centers for 
DHS Trusted Traveler Programs, including Global Entry and NEXUS 
where demand warrants. To the extent that Global Entry can be 
expanded to passengers from other countries, CBP is encouraged 
to do so. The more enrollees in these programs, the faster 
arriving passengers can be processed upon arrival. CBP should 
consider expanding Global Entry to large and medium-sized 
international hub airports, especially those which do not have 
a permanent CBP presence.

                           HUMAN TRAFFICKING

    CBP plays a critical role in identifying potential human 
trafficking victims as they enter the United States. The 
Committee encourages DHS to continue to work with appropriate 
nonprofit organizations and victim service providers to improve 
the training of DHS personnel in the field to assist in the 
identification of human trafficking victims, especially 
children, and provide appropriate referrals to victim service 
organizations. Further, the Committee encourages the 
Commissioner to post the National Human Trafficking Resource 
Center hotline, email address, and Web site information in all 
U.S. POEs.

                         LAND BORDER FEE STUDY

    The Committee continues a general provision prohibiting CBP 
from conducting any studies for establishing and collecting any 
new land border fee. This provision does not affect any 
existing trusted traveler program such as FAST, NEXUS, SENTRI, 
and the like.

                          BORDER PATROL AGENTS

    The number of Border Patrol agents funded by the Congress 
has grown from 9,800 in 2001 to 21,370 today. Border Patrol 
apprehensions have increased from 327,577 in fiscal year 2011 
to 486,651 in fiscal year 2014. As of May 31, 2015, 
apprehensions for this fiscal year were 213,139. While the 
number of apprehensions has dropped in comparison to fiscal 
year 2014, people are still attempting to cross our border 
without authorization. Included in the amount recommended by 
the Committee for Border Security and Control is a total of 
$3,920,500,000 for hiring, paying, equipping, and training 
Border Patrol agents. Bill language is included mandating a 
floor of not less than 21,370 Border Patrol agents on-board 
throughout fiscal year 2016.

                              REPATRIATION

    The Committee urges CBP and ICE to repatriate removable 
migrants in a manner that protects deportee safety. DHS 
officials should notify their Mexican counterparts in advance 
of repatriating pregnant women or individuals with medical or 
other special needs and take all reasonable and appropriate 
steps to ensure their safe repatriation. To the extent 
practicable, and in the development and renegotiation of 
agreements with the Government of Mexico regarding arrangements 
for the deportation or removal of apprehended individuals, DHS 
is encouraged to consult with non-governmental social service 
providers and faith-based organizations regarding safety 
concerns at deportation and removal sites to ensure that 
deportations occur at times and in locations where shelter and 
other assistance is available.

                      BORDER PATROL STAFFING MODEL

    The Committee understands that CBP is continuing to refine 
a staffing allocation model for Border Patrol that would 
provide insight into the amount of time it takes for an agent 
to perform tasks and rely upon outcome measures to support more 
informed decision-making regarding deployment and use of 
resources. The Committee supports this effort and directs CBP 
to brief the Committee not later than 180 days after the date 
of enactment of this act on how the model has been used to 
inform resource allocation decisions at the headquarters and 
sector levels.

                              CARIZZO CANE

    The Committee recognizes the progress already made to 
control the growth of Carrizo cane and other invasive species 
that impede the mission of CBP along the United States-Mexico 
border. Strategic deployment of biological control agents, like 
insects which reduce plant biomass, slow the spread of new 
plant shoots, or degrade visibility conflicts, can be a useful 
tool for mitigating impact when combined with mechanized or 
manual removal and other efforts to rid the border region of 
these invasive threats to security. Within 120 days of the date 
of enactment of this act, CBP is directed to submit an updated 
comprehensive plan to the Committee on the status of approval 
for additional biological control agents to combat Carrizo cane 
and other related plant species, progress to introduce similar 
control plans in Mexico, and other strategies under 
consideration by other Federal agencies, as well as State and 
local stakeholders. The plan should identify Federal resources 
necessary to sustain and expand current temporary efforts and 
pilot deployments for the management of Carrizo cane and other 
invasive plant species impacting CBP border enforcement along 
the entire affected United States-Mexico border.

                                FIREARMS

    In March of 2015, CBP took action to implement current 
export regulations issued by the Department of State requiring 
travelers to file electronic export information for temporary 
export of personally owned firearms via the Automated Export 
System [AES] prior to departure from the United States. 
Implementation required hunters transporting firearms 
internationally to establish an Employer Identification Number 
through the Internal Revenue Service so that they could enter 
their weapons into AES prior to departing the United States. 
Such a requirement was ridiculous. As such, the Committee 
appreciates that CBP suspended this requirement while it 
modifies AES to make the system more convenient for hunters. 
The Committee encourages CBP to work with stakeholders in 
developing a common sense path forward for hunters legitimately 
traveling overseas with their firearms. The Committee directs 
CBP to remove details on hunters' weapons from its automated 
systems.

                           TRADE ENFORCEMENT

    The Committee directs CBP to further consolidate single 
transaction bonds [STBs] in order to improve duty collection, 
as recommended by GAO. These funds would improve the collection 
of revenue owed to the Federal Government by enabling CBP to 
develop an automated system for STBs. Currently, STBs are 
submitted and maintained on paper at all CBP POEs. Automation 
would allow a centralized office to oversee and administer the 
STB program and to develop the necessary expertise to verify 
the adequacy of the STBs.
    The Committee understands that current law may 
unintentionally prohibit the Department of Commerce [Commerce] 
from sharing proprietary information with CBP vital to 
determining violations or claims with respect to any provision 
of the Tariff Act of 1930. The Committee urges the Department 
to coordinate jointly with Commerce on a legislative proposal 
to amend the appropriate section of the United States Code to 
remove any legal barriers to the sharing of appropriate and 
necessary information between these prime Federal trade 
compliance and enforcement agencies.
    CBP analysis has found strong evidence to conclude that 
trade fraud and evasion is widespread in many commodity 
sectors--particularly for goods from China, which account for 
46 percent of the anti-dumping and countervailing duties 
collected. The Committee remains focused on the need for all 
Federal Government agencies involved in international trade to 
aggressively enforce existing trade laws. It has become clear 
that there are specific actions that CBP and ICE, together with 
Commerce, the Departments of Justice and State, and the United 
States Trade Representative, can take without the need for 
additional legislation.
    The Committee understands that the Centers of Excellence 
and Expertise [CEEs] support uniformity of processing and 
enforcement for covered industries and importers. CBP shall 
continue to brief the Committee annually on its efforts to 
improve the enforcement and collection process.

            ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTY ENFORCEMENT

    The Committee has ensured that, within the amounts provided 
in this account, there will be sufficient funds to administer 
the ongoing requirements of section 754 of the Tariff Act of 
1930 (19 U.S.C. 1675c), referenced in subtitle F of title VII 
of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-171; 120 
Stat. 154).
    The Committee recognizes that CBP, Homeland Security 
Investigations [HSI], and Commerce work together on a daily 
basis to facilitate CBP's Anti Dumping and Countervailing Duty 
[AD/CVD] enforcement, entry, liquidation, and collection 
processes. The Committee understands that new clarifying 
language Commerce developed, introduced, and used in the AD/CVD 
module case reference files has helped specify the roles of 
companies as exporters or manufacturers for the purposes of 
applying AD/CVD. These clarifications will significantly assist 
CBP and the trade community in correctly applying AD/CVD cash 
deposit and liquidation instructions. Commerce, with CBP, also 
continued to research the status of liquidation instructions on 
unliquidated AD/CVD entries dating back to the 1970s that are 
still in CBP's databases and files so that liquidation 
instructions could be issued where appropriate. The partnership 
between CBP and Commerce's International Trade Administration 
[ITA] is critical for AD/CVD duty enforcement. The Committee 
directs CBP to work with ITA, to increase efforts and advance 
methods to better investigate foreign imports suspected of 
evading or circumventing AD/CVD orders--including but not 
limited to lightweight thermal paper and seafood. The Committee 
further directs CBP to work with Federal partners, industry and 
other stakeholders to assess the availability of the data 
necessary to provide a full and complete picture of the current 
shrimp import regime, and to provide a plan detailing the costs 
and activities necessary to complete this analysis. The data 
should include information on compliance rates with health and 
safety standards; frequency, adequacy, and the type of 
inspections by CBP, Federal partners, and any contracted third 
parties; and where the inspections are taking place. The 
Committee shall be briefed on these efforts not later than 180 
days after the enactment of this act.
    The Committee encourages CBP to continue working, in 
consultation with Commerce, the Department of the Treasury, and 
members of the trade community, to better understand how 
requiring cash deposits of estimated AD/CVD during new shipper 
reviews (in statute) would strengthen the administration of the 
Nation's AD/CVD laws. Under current law, Commerce is required 
to allow importers to bond for cash deposits of estimated AD/
CVD during new shipper reviews.
    CBP's multidisciplinary Re-engineering Dumping Team, in 
coordination with HSI, is undertaking numerous initiatives to 
improve on three distinct areas of CBP's AD/CVD 
responsibilities: entry administration, collections, and 
deterrence of evasion. Although the United States' 
retrospective AD/CVD system may create certain challenges for 
CBP's ability to collect final duties, CBP is actively pursuing 
collection of unpaid AD/CVD claims against delinquent importers 
and sureties. To the extent these duties are unable to be 
collected, CBP shall publicly describe and post on its Web site 
the dynamics precluding timely collection.
    The Committee directs CBP to continue submitting the 
following reports required in Senate Report 112-169 
accompanying Public Law 113-6, including the same level of 
detail prescribed in such report and during the timelines 
prescribed for each report: AD/CVD Actions and Compliance 
Initiatives, AD/CVD Liquidation Instructions, AD/CVD Collection 
of Outstanding Claims (consistent with Public Law 103-182), and 
AD/CVD Collection New Shipper Single Entry Bonds. A version of 
each report shall be posted on CBP's Web site.

    PAYMENTS SUBJECT TO THE CONTINUED DUMPING AND SUBSIDY OFFSET ACT

    CBP is considering a rule change regarding distributions 
under the Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset Act, as amended 
[CDSOA]. The Committee includes a provision providing CBP the 
authority to complete in an expedited manner amendments to the 
rule prescribing the order in which payments are allocated 
between principal and interest. This authority extends only to 
the allocation of principal and interest made by sureties 
under, or in connection with, customs bonds and that are made 
on an entry for which the duties and 19 U.S.C. 1677g interest 
are subject to distribution under the CDSOA.
    While the rulemaking is underway, the provision ensures 
that payments made to CBP that would be impacted by the rule 
will not be applied to duties or interest until the completion 
of the rulemaking process, so that these payments can be 
allocated between principal and interest in accordance with the 
amended rule. This provision requires CBP to transfer certain 
payments into a specified Treasury account until the potential 
rule change becomes effective to ensure funds are available for 
distribution to affected domestic producers, where applicable, 
in accordance with the anticipated amended rule. This provision 
does not make additional forms of interest subject to 
distribution under the CDSOA. The Committee directs CBP to 
complete its consideration of the potential rule change and any 
necessary rulemaking process as soon as possible.

                               JONES ACT

    A general provision is continued prohibiting funds from 
being used to issue future waivers related to a release from 
the Strategic Petroleum Reserve until the Secretary has 
consulted with the Departments of Energy and Transportation and 
representatives of the United States flag maritime industry and 
taken adequate steps to ensure the use of United States flag 
vessels. The Secretary shall notify the Congress within two 
business days of any request for a waiver, not solely waivers 
requested to transport oil released from the Strategic 
Petroleum Reserve. The Committee shall be informed on a timely 
basis of the disposition of each waiver request.
    The Committee directs CBP to continue to track Jones Act 
violations and make information available to the public and the 
Committees, on a quarterly basis, about specific Jones Act 
violations, findings of fact, parties determined to be at 
fault, amount of penalty assessments, and status of 
collections.

                              EXIT PILOTS

    In 2013, this Committee moved the responsibility for entry-
exit policy and operations from OBIM to CBP. While the 
Committee has yet to receive the comprehensive plan for 
biometric entry-exit implementation, the Committee recognizes 
that CBP has been working with other Department components to 
improve biometric entry processing and biographic exit data 
collection.
    In the land environment, CBP is undertaking the Otay Mesa 
biometric pedestrian exit pilot as a first step for land border 
biometric exit implementation. The Committee recognizes that 
infrastructure issues are a significant challenge at land 
border ports, and encourages that a vehicular solution be 
studied and completed by CBP in a digital, simulated 
environment within 180 days of the date of enactment of this 
act, prior to implementing a land pilot requiring significant 
infrastructure design and implementation. The Committee 
recognizes that improvements to biometric entry and 
implementation of a biometric exit solution must ultimately 
integrate new technologies with the Department's backend 
biometric identity management system, IDENT, to produce fast, 
accurate assurance that non-U.S. citizens who entered the 
United States are who they say they are upon exit of the United 
States. Not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of 
this act, the Department shall report to the Committee on the 
status of the DHS Apex AEER project, as well as biometric exit 
pilots, including the facial recognition pilot at Dulles 
International Airport, the CBP mobile biometric tests, and the 
Otay Mesa land border pedestrian pilot.

             COORDINATION WITH CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL

    CBP worked with HHS Public Health Service officers to help 
prevent the spread of Ebola and continues to come into contact 
with thousands of international travelers who may potentially 
be infected with other communicable illnesses. In October 2014, 
CBP, in coordination with the Centers for Disease Control 
[CDC], the Federal lead for preventing the spread of disease, 
initiated enhanced passenger screening at five international 
airports for travelers entering the United States traveling 
from an Ebola-affected country. Potentially infected travelers 
must be identified and confirmed as quickly as possible, and 
one of the first signs of many communicable illnesses is an 
increased body temperature. Determining a traveler's body 
temperature has traditionally required close contact between 
potentially affected people and HHS Public Health Service staff 
located in certain international airports in order to perform 
medical diagnostic testing. The Committee is concerned about 
the spread of disease in this close proximity and expects S&T;, 
in conjunction with CBP, to work with HHS to test the 
operational feasibility of emerging technologies, such as those 
that provide for the automated, hands-free reading of body 
temperature, to protect CBP officers and others from exposure 
during future international epidemics.

                     FOREIGN MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE

    The Committee is aware of CBP's efforts to address the 
threat posed by trucks carrying foreign municipal solid waste 
from Canada into the United States, and directs CBP to continue 
these efforts in a risk-based, targeted manner.

                        Automation Modernization

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $808,169,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     867,311,000
Committee recommendation................................     854,029,000

    The automation modernization account includes funds for 
major information technology systems and services for CBP, 
including the Automated Commercial Environment [ACE] and the 
International Trade and Data System projects, and connectivity 
of and integration of existing systems.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $854,029,000, of which 
$463,059,000 is to be available until September 30, 2018, for 
automation modernization. This is $13,282,000 below the amount 
requested and $45,860,000 above the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2015.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                                            AUTOMATION MODERNIZATION
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Information technology....................................           362,094           399,027           390,970
Automated Targeting Systems...............................           109,230           122,669           122,640
Automated Commercial Environment/International Trade Data            140,970           153,736           151,062
 System [ITDS]............................................
Current operations protection and processing support                 195,875           191,879           189,357
 [COPPS]..................................................
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Automation modernization.....................           808,169           867,311           854,029
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                               TARGETING

    The Committee staunchly supports CBP's targeting 
capabilities and, in recommending the requested system 
enhancements, expects CBP to continue to refine the Automated 
Targeting System [ATS]. ATS has proven an invaluable tool in 
identifying and countering terrorist travel and other illicit 
activity in the global travel and trade systems. The Committee 
recommends $122,640,000, and encourages CBP to effectively 
maintain and enhance this critical capability to meet mission 
needs.

                         REPORTS AND BRIEFINGS

    The Committee expects to continue receiving the ACE and 
TECS Modernization reports on a semiannual basis. CBP is 
directed to brief the Committees on the updated master 
schedules for both programs.

                         REVENUE MODERNIZATION

    The Committee provides a $10,000,000 funding increase for 
revenue modernization business process improvement, system 
automation, and associated program management and acquisition 
activities. The Committee expects that CBP's investments in 
these technologies will eliminate the need for CBPOs to accept 
cash for any transactions at POEs by 2020.

                    AUTOMATED COMMERCIAL ENVIRONMENT

    The Committee understands that the completion of the 
transition to ACE requires significant investments for both 
Federal and industry partners. As CBP has spent years modifying 
its systems, often while industry awaited key Government 
decisions, the Committee expects that CBP will provide 
stakeholders with a clear schedule and ample time to modify 
their systems. As part of the ACE semiannual briefing, the 
Committee directs CBP to include an outreach plan to ensure 
appropriate steps are taken.

                         INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

    The Committee recommends $390,970,000 for Information 
Technology, including $28,876,000 for the adjustments to base 
funding requested within this PPA, including $14,230,000 
requested for Working Capital Fund increases, and directs CBP 
to provide additional details on both the allocation of base 
funding, as well as necessary adjustments to the base, for this 
account in the 2017 request.

        Border Security Fencing, Infrastructure, and Technology

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $382,466,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     373,461,000
Committee recommendation................................     373,461,000

    The BSFIT account funds the capital procurement and total 
operations and maintenance costs associated with fencing, 
infrastructure, sensors, surveillance, and other border 
security technology.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $373,461,000 for BSFIT, the same 
amount as requested, and $9,005,000 below the amount provided 
in fiscal year 2015. The Committee recommends the increased 
funding requested for Arizona Tactical Infrastructure with the 
expectation that double fencing will be used to the fullest 
extent practicable, reuse of DOD equipment, and new mobile 
equipment proposed for deployment along the southwest border. 
The Committee expects that these additional investments will be 
used to address gaps in situational awareness and be networked 
in a manner that will contribute to the operational picture. To 
maintain program efficiencies and momentum related to the 
Integrated Fixed Towers [IFT] program, the Committee encourages 
CBP to consider using prior year unobligated balances to 
continue to deploy IFTs planned for additional areas of 
responsibility in Arizona.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                             BORDER SECURITY FENCING, INFRASTRUCTURE, AND TECHNOLOGY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Development and deployment................................           125,594            99,530            99,530
Operations and maintenance................................           256,872           273,931           273,931
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Border security fencing, infrastructure, and            382,466           373,461           373,461
       technology.........................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REUSE

    The Committee directs CBP to expeditiously review and 
deploy available DOD equipment along the northern and southern 
borders. Much of this equipment has proven effective in 
dramatically increasing situational awareness and acting as 
force multipliers in the field. The Committee directs CBP to 
spend no less than $24,000,000 redeploying these assets in 
support of Border Patrol operations.

                           TETHERED AEROSTATS

    The Committee recommends $35,549,000, as requested, for 
operation and maintenance of the tethered aerostat radar 
systems [TARS] in CBP's inventory. The TARS program is a multi-
mission capability that supports both counternarcotics 
enforcement and air domain awareness. The program has assisted 
CBP with interdicting suspect aircraft for over 20 years. 
However, CBP must develop a long-term plan for this aging 
capability.

                              BORDER ROADS

    The Committee urges CBP to work with counties along the 
United States-Mexico border to identify unimproved county roads 
which are predominantly used by the Border Patrol and that 
provide critical access to the border region for the purpose of 
maintaining border security. The Committee directs CBP to 
provide a briefing on the extent to which these roads are used, 
their impact on daily border security operations, and the 
feasibility of incorporating the maintenance and repair of any 
identified high-priority access roads into its Tactical 
Infrastructure Maintenance and Repair program not later than 90 
days after the date of enactment of this act.

                     ULTRALIGHT AIRCRAFT DETECTION

    Ultralight Aircraft Detection (ULAD) has been determined to 
be a high-priority border security program for CBP to detect 
light-weight, low-flying aircraft smuggling narcotics into the 
United States. CBP is encouraged to use unobligated balances to 
accelerate this program as necessary to integrate ULAD with 
existing CBP resources and deploy additional units to counter 
this serious drug trafficking threat.

                       AIR AND MARINE OPERATIONS

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $750,469,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     747,422,000
Committee recommendation................................     754,614,000

    The CBP Air and Marine Operations account funds the 
salaries and expenses, capital procurement, and operations and 
maintenance costs of the CBP air and marine program and 
provides support to other Federal, State, and local agencies.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $754,614,000 for Air and Marine 
Operations, of which $451,169,000 is to remain available until 
September 30, 2018. This is an increase of $7,192,000 above the 
request and $4,145,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 
2015.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                                            AIR AND MARINE OPERATIONS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Salaries and expenses.....................................           299,800           306,253           303,445
Operations and maintenance................................           397,669           395,169           395,169
Procurement...............................................            53,000            46,000            56,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Air and Marine Operations....................           750,469           747,422           754,614
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee strongly supports CBP's continued efforts to 
recapitalize its air and marine assets, including sensors 
required to ensure that flight hours are used effectively to 
improve situational awareness. Working with the Office of Air 
and Marine [OAM], the Committee has consistently provided 
resources to meet the Department's border security requirements 
in the air, coastal, and riverine environments as delineated by 
the CBP Air and Marine Recapitalization Plan. Resources to 
address some of these requirements are recommended, but the 
Committee expects that future budget requests will directly tie 
planned airframe, communications equipment, and sensor 
recapitalization to specific gains in situational awareness.

                      EFFECTIVE USE OF AIR ASSETS

    The Committee has consistently supported robust Air and 
Marine Operations essential to border security and provided 
more than had been requested for procurement and operations of 
airframes, sensors, and cameras. These assets are critical to 
enhancing situational awareness, but are worthless if operators 
do not have adequate radio and communications capabilities to 
transmit this data for strategic planning and operational 
response. CBP is working to develop performance measures in 
order to more optimally integrate its air assets and sensors 
into an agency-wide strategy to create daily operational 
awareness. OAM's resource performance measures should, at 
minimum, include operational cost per resource hour, resource 
hours per mission type, and resource availability rate. These 
key measures are important basic performance factors that 
identify performance gaps and help leaders steer resource hours 
to meet the agency's target performance outcomes. While 
relating resource hours to interdictions is a commonly used 
measure for success, the Committee first expects OAM to 
effectively measure its resources' performance, then to compare 
this performance to baseline targets, and then to explain how 
and why resources were managed to satisfy mission needs. This 
multi-step process first begins with identifying relevant key 
measures to inform future acquisition decisions and reflects 
OAM's capacity to effectively create and then comprehensively 
measure basic resource performance factors. Once these factors 
are found valid and reliable, OAM is expected to use them to 
demonstrate outputs and outcomes, such as minimizing fuel costs 
and maximizing mission availability.

                  SENSOR REPLACEMENT AND ENHANCEMENTS

    The Committee understands that OAM's current plans for 
sensor replacement do not yet reflect the need for additional 
capabilities to expand domain awareness, much less to provide 
most of the existing platforms with multi-sensor capabilities. 
As such, the Committee recommends $5,100,000 above the request 
for sensor procurement. CBP's recent experience with Vehicle 
Dismount and Exploitation Radar [VADER] has demonstrated the 
value for broad area electronic surveillance capabilities on 
multiple aircraft types, and the need for electrical optical/
infrared ball and/or Law Enforcement Technical Collection 
capabilities on the same platform. However, VADER's weight and 
cost per unit presents challenges for adoption in the air 
fleet, so the Committee understands that OAM will be, in the 
nearer term, seeking information on capable, less costly sensor 
packages. The Committee encourages OAM to continue to test 
available DOD capabilities to determine the applicability for 
homeland security missions and aircraft types, and continue to 
engage with DOD and industry as they demonstrate new 
capabilities for both UAS and conventional aircraft types.

                       UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS

    The Committee fully supports OAM's efforts to effectively 
deploy UAS to improve situational awareness along the Nation's 
borders. The Committee understands that OAM does not plan to 
procure additional UAS, as alleged in a recent OIG report (OIG-
15-17), and that the report may overstate the cost of operating 
UAS, when compared to industry standard practices for measuring 
flight hour costs. The Committee is aware of the staffing 
challenges faced by the UAS program and recommends $7,936,000 
for the additional pilots, crew, and training needed to add 
more flight hours per year.
    The Committee is concerned that the current shortage of 
qualified UAS pilots to perform CBP missions may grow in the 
future as demands for these pilots increase at DOD as well as 
in the private sector. The Committee believes that CBP could 
augment its capacity to train UAS pilots on a contract basis 
and allow for greater use of CBP's UAS assets. The Committee 
therefore directs CBP to provide to the Committee, within 60 
days of the date of enactment of this act, a report describing 
the need for UAS pilots to perform CBP's missions, the ability 
of contractors to provide the training required to perform CBP 
missions, and any additional authorities and resources CBP may 
need to develop a robust pilot training pipeline,
    The Committee understands there is a growing need to 
integrate UAS operating within civil-controlled airspace. 
Currently, CBP's UAS operating within the drug source and 
transit zones are limited geographically under positive control 
relative to ground or aerial based air traffic control radars, 
which greatly hampers full use of the aircraft's high 
endurance/long distance capabilities. The integration of an 
electronically scanned radar system could allow the UAS to meet 
operating requirements when in support of enforcement 
activities, and exponentially expand the area that a UAS can 
cover to execute this mission. Such a system could also help 
CBP UAS to meet the Federal Aviation Administration's ``sense 
and avoid'' requirements when operating within the National Air 
Space. The Committee urges CBP, in coordination with S&T; where 
appropriate, to expedite the integration of ``sense and avoid'' 
technology to meet requirements for CBP's UAS and provide a 
briefing on these efforts not later than 60 days after the date 
of enactment of this act. The Committee recommends a $4,900,000 
enhancement to the request to support the implementation of 
this system on UAS.

                AIR AND MARITIME RADAR SURVEILLANCE GAPS

    The Committee understands that over the past 24 months, CBP 
has conducted multiple border security radar demonstrations at 
numerous sites on the Michigan shore of Lake Huron. These 
events demonstrated a potential radar capability that addresses 
the low altitude air and maritime surveillance coverage gaps at 
the U.S. border. Based on the positive outcomes, CBP continues 
to investigate how new radar technology may satisfy air and 
maritime capability gaps along the southern and northern 
borders. CBP is planning three additional demonstrations in San 
Diego, California, Brownsville, Texas, and Spokane, Washington 
over the next 12 months. Results from these demonstrations will 
assist CBP in refining the air and maritime surveillance 
operational requirements documentation in support of future 
acquisitions. If these pilots prove successful, the Committee 
encourages CBP to make the radar technology a system of record 
and integrate it into its border security technology plan.

                    MULTI-ROLE ENFORCEMENT AIRCRAFT

    The Committee recommends funding two Multi-Role Enforcement 
Aircraft [MEA], as requested. OAM is scheduled to conduct a 
competition for future procurements of MEA, as the current 
contract is set to expire in fiscal year 2015. The Committee 
expects a full and open competition for the next MEA 
procurement, as an opportunity to acquire the next generation 
of aircraft to meet OAM's requirements in the maritime and land 
border environment.

                 Construction and Facilities Management

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $288,821,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     341,543,000
Committee recommendation................................     313,500,000

    This appropriation provides funding to plan, construct, 
renovate, equip, and maintain buildings and facilities 
necessary for the administration and enforcement of the laws 
relating to immigration, customs, and alien registration.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $313,500,000, for construction and 
facilities management activities of CBP, to remain available 
until September 30, 2020. This is $28,043,000 below the amount 
requested and $24,679,000 above the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2015. The Committee recommends $40,000,000 to address the 
highest priority and critical facilities needs. The Committee 
understands that CBP has been pursuing governmentwide 
initiatives to limit the growth of the Federal real estate 
footprint and directs CBP to continue these efforts both at 
headquarters and in the field.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                                     CONSTRUCTION AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Facility construction and sustainment.....................           205,393           255,378           229,500
Program oversight and management..........................            83,428            86,165            84,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Construction and facilities management.......           288,821           341,543           313,500
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                ADDITIONAL LAND BORDER PORT REQUIREMENTS

    The Committee notes its continued interest in CBP exploring 
alternate options for funding POE construction and 
improvements, including expanded use of public-private 
partnerships [PPP], and was pleased that CBP successfully 
negotiated a PPP to fund the capital costs associated with 
establishing a new POE at the New International Trade Crossing 
in Michigan, the largest commercial corridor between Canada and 
the United States.

                        5-YEAR CONSTRUCTION PLAN

    The Committee reminds CBP that the fiscal year 2012 
Department of Homeland Security Act made permanent the 
requirement that a 5-year plan for all Federal land POEs shall 
be submitted annually with the President's budget request. The 
Committee directs the Department to continue to work with the 
General Services Administration on its nationwide strategy to 
prioritize and address infrastructure needs at land POEs and to 
comply with the requirements of the Public Buildings Act of 
1959 (40 U.S.C. 3301) and seek necessary funding.

                U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement


                                SUMMARY

    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement [ICE] is 
responsible for enforcing immigration and customs laws and 
detaining and removing deportable or inadmissible aliens.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends total resources of $6,137,494,000, 
including direct appropriations of $5,815,494,000, and 
estimated fee collections of $322,000,000.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                            U.S. IMMIGRATION AND CUSTOMS ENFORCEMENT--FUNDING SUMMARY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Appropriations:
    Salaries and expenses.................................         5,932,756         5,886,549         5,762,494
    Automation modernization..............................            26,000            73,500            53,000
    Construction..........................................  ................             5,000  ................
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Appropriations...............................         5,958,756         5,965,049         5,815,494
                                                           =====================================================
Estimated Fee Collections:
    Immigration inspection user fee.......................           135,000           135,000           135,000
    Breached bond/detention fund..........................            65,000            42,000            42,000
    Student exchange and visitor fee......................           145,000           145,000           145,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Estimated fee collections....................           345,000           322,000           322,000
                                                           =====================================================
      Total, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.....         6,303,756         6,287,049         6,137,494
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         Salaries and Expenses

Appropriations, 2015....................................  $5,932,756,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................   5,886,549,000
Committee recommendation................................   5,762,494,000

    The ICE Salaries and Expenses account provides funds for 
the enforcement of immigration and customs laws, intelligence, 
and detention and removals. In addition to directly 
appropriated resources, funding is derived from the following 
offsetting collections:
    Immigration Inspection User Fee.--ICE derives funds from 
user fees to support the costs of detention and removals in 
connection with international inspections activities at 
airports and seaports, as authorized by the Immigration and 
Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1356).
    Student Exchange Visitor Program Fee.--ICE collects fees 
from foreign students, exchange visitors, and schools and 
universities to certify and monitor participating schools, and 
to conduct compliance audits.
    Immigration Breached Bond/Detention Fund.--ICE derives 
funds from the recovery of breached cash and surety bonds in 
excess of $8,000,000 as authorized by the Immigration and 
Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1356); and from a portion of fees 
charged under section 245(i) of the Immigration and Nationality 
Act to support the cost of the detention of aliens.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $5,762,494,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses of ICE for fiscal year 2016. This is $124,055,000 
below the request and $170,262,000 below the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2015. The Committee includes bill language placing 
a $35,000 limit on overtime paid to any employee; making up to 
$10,000,000 available for special operations; making up to 
$2,000,000 available for the payment of informants; making up 
to $11,216,000 available to reimburse other Federal agencies 
for the costs associated with the care, maintenance, and 
repatriation of smuggled illegal aliens; making not less than 
$305,000 available for promotion of public awareness of the 
child pornography tipline and activities to counter child 
exploitation; making not less than $5,400,000 available to 
facilitate agreements consistent with section 287(g) of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act; making $15,770,000 available 
for activities to enforce laws against forced child labor, of 
which $6,000,000 shall remain available until expended; making 
up to $11,475 available for official reception and 
representation expenses; and making a total of $13,300,000 
available until September 30, 2017, for the Visa Security 
Program [VSP] and international operations postings.
    The Committee recognizes that ICE has several hundred 
staffing vacancies and is taking action to fill these 
vacancies. Included in the amount recommended by the Committee 
is $47,407,000 to annualize the special agent, attorney, and 
support positions funded in the fiscal year 2015 act.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                         U.S. IMMIGRATION AND CUSTOMS ENFORCEMENT--SALARIES AND EXPENSES
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Headquarters, management, and administration:
    Personnel compensation and benefits, services, and               197,002           195,950           195,020
     other costs..........................................
    Headquarters-managed IT investment....................           150,419           146,046           145,192
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Headquarters, management, and                        347,421           341,996           340,212
       administration.....................................
                                                           =====================================================
Legal proceedings.........................................           217,393           248,096           242,894
                                                           =====================================================
Investigations:
    Domestic investigations...............................         1,699,811         1,766,654         1,760,364
    International operations..............................           110,682           107,931           107,210
    Visa Security Program.................................            49,526            30,749            30,561
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Investigations............................         1,860,019         1,905,334         1,898,135
                                                           =====================================================
Intelligence..............................................            76,479            80,041            79,276
                                                           =====================================================
Enforcement and removal operations:
    Custody operations....................................         2,532,593         2,406,744         2,296,068
    Fugitive operations...................................           142,615           129,438           143,072
    Criminal Alien Program................................           327,223           320,267           317,177
    Alternatives to detention.............................           109,740           122,481           122,053
    Transportation and Removal Program....................           319,273           324,152           323,607
    UAC Contingency Fund..................................  ................             8,000  ................
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Detention and removal operations..........         3,431,444         3,311,082         3,201,977
                                                           =====================================================
        Total, Salaries and expenses......................         5,932,756         5,886,549         5,762,494
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                METRICS

    Metrics are essential to measuring the effectiveness of 
ICE's law enforcement activities, and the Committee believes it 
is vital that ICE improve its ability to report on each step of 
the immigration enforcement and criminal justice lifecycles, 
including how and why aliens are encountered by law 
enforcement, and what decisions are made regarding their 
processing, including all of the factors considered when 
decisions are made regarding disposition. This necessarily 
includes whether the alien is put into removal proceedings and 
detained or not, including prior arrests and convictions, their 
level of criminality, gang affiliation, and other appropriate 
attributes. The Committee recognizes that many factors are 
considered during the course of investigations, and that not 
all of these factors can be made public, but notes that using a 
common set of metrics will help advance the public discourse on 
activities and results while increasing accountability to 
taxpayers. The Committee directs ICE to improve its collection 
and use of data for all of its law enforcement activities, 
including making use of previously collected data from 
authoritative sources that will reduce errors and manual input. 
The Committee expects ICE to continue its efforts, working with 
CBP, USCIS and the Office of Immigration Statistics, and, with 
these partners, to brief the Committee quarterly on progress. 
Further, the Committee directs ICE to publish non-law 
enforcement sensitive enforcement statistics on its Web site.

                    INABILITY TO REPORT ON RELEASES

    The Committee is appalled by ICE's inability to provide 
basic immigration enforcement data on the 34,000 criminal 
aliens released from custody in 2013, and the 30,000 criminal 
aliens released from custody in 2014, without a labor-intensive 
manual review of each file. After tens of millions of dollars 
have been invested in ICE's Detention and Removal Operations 
Modernization project, these results are unacceptable. The 
Committee understands that ICE has entered into a study with 
S&T; to inventory all of the data assets and IT systems used by 
its law enforcement personnel, review the existing data 
architecture, and recommend changes as necessary to identify 
and fill information gaps, or modify operating procedures as 
necessary to collect, produce, and analyze person-centric, 
rather than encounter-centric data. The Committee expects a 
concrete plan that should not require a massive new IT system. 
Many of the improvements necessary could be implemented through 
the establishment of common definitions with ICE's partners, 
improved training on the use of existing forms, and the 
harmonization of existing data systems. ICE shall brief its 
plan as part of the Department's quarterly updates on progress 
in improving data reporting.

                        IMMIGRATION ENFORCEMENT

    The Committee has consistently provided ICE's Enforcement 
and Removal Operations [ERO] with the resources necessary to 
implement enacted immigration laws and expects that ICE will 
utilize these resources in a manner transparent to the 
Committee as well as the public.
    In fiscal year 2014, ICE removed a total of 315,943 aliens, 
compared with 368,644 removed in fiscal year 2013. While the 
Administration has indicated enforcement resources would be 
targeted based on aliens' risk to their communities, the number 
of convicted criminal aliens removed dropped from 216,810 in 
2013 to 177,960 in 2014. The Committee is concerned that while 
funding provided for ERO has steadily increased, the total 
number of removals, along with the total number of criminal 
aliens removed, has decreased. Maintaining an adequate number 
of detention beds is critical to ensuring the integrity of our 
entire immigration enforcement system, including border 
enforcement. The Committee recognizes that the number of aliens 
in detention spikes at certain periods during the fiscal year, 
but notes that ICE maintained an average daily population of 
27,234 aliens as of May 11, 2015, while funding was provided 
for an average daily population of 34,000 adult detention beds 
and 3,732 family unit beds. Operating in 2015 with nearly 
10,000 beds fewer than the level funded by this Committee begs 
questions regarding the policies driving ICE's enforcement of 
immigration laws. The Committee recognizes that ICE will not 
utilize all of the detention resources provided in 2015 and 
will apply some of these resources to contracts with a period 
of performance spanning into 2016. The Committee's recommended 
funding level provides resources necessary to maintain 34,000 
detention beds, and expects ICE to vigorously enforce all 
immigration laws under its purview while ensuring that 
disciplinary actions are not taken against employees performing 
functions clearly provided for under the Immigration and 
Naturalization Act.

                    OBLIGATION AND EXPENDITURE PLANS

    To help facilitate congressional oversight, ICE is directed 
to continue briefing the Committee on obligation and 
expenditure plans, as outlined in the explanatory statement 
accompanying Public Law 114-4 and in title I of this report. 
The briefing shall include investigative levels of effort ICE 
has previously provided to the Committee.

                 OFFICE OF THE PRINCIPAL LEGAL ADVISOR

    The Committee recommends $242,894,000 for the Office of the 
Principal Legal Advisor [OPLA], including $23,000,000 for 150 
new attorney positions. The Committee understands that hiring 
authorities for attorneys can result in much faster hiring than 
occurs for other positions across DHS and expects that the new 
positions will be filled immediately after the new attorneys 
funded in 2015 are in place. The Committee directs that the new 
attorneys be deployed in the field, to locations where their 
efforts can increase removals of criminal aliens from the 
United States.

                             INVESTIGATIONS

    The Committee recommends a total of $1,760,364,000 for 
Homeland Security's [HSI] domestic investigations. Within the 
total is $27,737,000 is to sustain the enhanced investigative 
capacity funded in 2015. Recognizing that HSI is currently 
recruiting and onboarding many new investigators, and that many 
will not be on board until late in calendar year 2015, the 
Committee directs that the new investigative capacity, when 
combined with base investigative resources, shall focus on 
commercial fraud, human smuggling and trafficking, 
counterproliferation, anti-gang, and counterterrorism 
investigations. ICE is directed to maintain its relationship 
with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children 
[NCMEC] in regards to its ongoing support for investigations 
and other activities to counter child-exploitation.

                          OVERSTAY ENFORCEMENT

    The Committee recommends $10,000,000 above the request to 
increase HSI's visa overstay enforcement investigations. The 
Committee expects that, once identified and apprehended, 
targeted aliens should be removed by ERO. The Committee directs 
ICE to report on its plans for spending these resources within 
60 days of the date of enactment of this act.

                           HUMAN TRAFFICKING

    The Committee strongly supports ICE's continued efforts to 
combat human trafficking, particularly the coordinated approach 
of its Anti-trafficking Coordination Teams [ACTeams]. ACTeams 
bring together Federal agents and investigators from the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, ERO, HSI, and the Department 
of Labor's Wage and Hour Division, and prosecutors from U.S. 
Attorneys' Offices to conduct human trafficking investigations 
and prosecutions. However, the Committee notes that despite the 
high level of human trafficking occurring along the Interstate 
95 corridor, there are no ACTeams located on the east coast 
north of Atlanta. The Committee directs the Department to 
provide a report not later than 120 days after the date of 
enactment of this act on the feasibility and advisability of 
creating additional ACTeams, particularly in the northeast 
region. Within funds made available within the Domestic 
Investigations PPA, the Committee recommends not less than 
$10,000,000 for investigations into severe forms of human 
trafficking and to expand investigations against suspected 
human traffickers.
    The Committee remains concerned that online classifieds Web 
sites like Backpage.com can be used to facilitate human 
trafficking, and in particular the sexual exploitation and sex 
trafficking of minors. With human trafficking becoming nearly 
as, or even more, lucrative than the trafficking of illicit 
goods, the Committee understands that the revenues from human 
trafficking are becoming a larger component of the funding 
streams for criminal gangs. The Committee directs ICE, as part 
of its obligation and expenditure and level of effort briefings 
on investigations, to begin to track and provide information on 
instances where an online classifieds site is determined to be 
the conduit for exploiting trafficked persons, especially 
minors, and the actions ICE is taking to shut down these sites. 
Relatedly, the Committee encourages ICE to partner with the 
Federal Law Enforcement Training Center [FLETC] to transition 
optional take-home material on human trafficking awareness into 
dedicated classroom instruction.

                        HERO CHILD RESCUE CORPS

    In April 2013, HSI entered into a partnership with U.S. 
Special Operations Command and the National Association to 
Protect Children [PROTECT] to launch the ``Human Exploitation 
Rescue Operative [HERO] Child Rescue Corps'' program. The 
program is designed for wounded, injured, and ill former 
Special Operations Forces servicemembers to receive training in 
computer forensics and law enforcement skills. Upon successful 
completion of the training, HERO participants receive on-the-
job training experience in combating child exploitation. The 
HERO program has graduated 28 participants, 14 of whom accepted 
positions with HSI and 12 more who are participating in 
internships within HSI offices. For fiscal year 2015, it is 
anticipated that HSI will train approximately 48 HERO 
participants in two classes. The Committee commends ICE for its 
participation in this innovative program and expects the 
Department to allocate not less than $1,000,000 in available 
funds to hire, train, and equip wounded, ill, or injured 
veterans as digital forensic analysts or investigators to 
support child exploitation investigations.

                                 GANGS

    The Committee supports the work of the National Gang Unit 
and encourages the Department and ICE to continue its 
investigations of gangs of national significance. Gangs are 
perpetuating much of the violence in our major urban areas 
while also engaging in a variety of illicit activity including 
international drug, gun, and human trafficking.
    The Committee remains concerned about increasing gang 
violence and criminal activity in many parts of our Nation and 
directs ICE to continually track gang membership amongst 
fugitives, as well as the detained and non-detained 
populations. The Committee directs ICE, not later than 180 days 
after the date of enactment of this act, to submit a report to 
the Committee regarding the detention and removal of gang 
members. This report should include: (1) a State by State 
breakdown of the number of gang members detained, removed, or 
both detained and removed; and (2) the number of gang members 
detained, removed, or both detained and removed in the 10 
largest metropolitan areas in the United States. The Committee 
will continue directing ICE to produce this report until data 
systems and procedures are capable of readily providing gang-
related information and other key attributes of aliens to 
Congress upon request.

                       WAR CRIMES INVESTIGATIONS

    The Committee is concerned by the large number of suspected 
human rights violators from foreign countries who have found 
safe haven in the United States. ICE has devoted inadequate 
resources to holding such individuals accountable. Accordingly, 
the Committee directs ICE to increase efforts to: investigate; 
remove; and prosecute individuals who have committed human 
rights abuses including persecution, genocide, severe 
violations of religious freedom, torture, extrajudicial 
killing, use or recruitment of child soldiers, crimes against 
humanity, and war crimes. For this purpose, the Committee 
directs that not less than $5,300,000 be allocated for 
expenses, including but not limited to hiring additional OPLA 
Human Rights Law Section and HSI Human Rights Violators and War 
Crimes Unit personnel, training, and transportation.

                    TRADE COMPLIANCE AND ENFORCEMENT

    The Committee directs that not less than $15,000,000 
support intellectual property rights [IPR] and commercial trade 
fraud investigations, including undercover equipment, 
translation and transcription of court-ordered wiretaps, 
commercial fraud training, and outreach at the National IPR 
Coordination Center [NIPRCC]. The Committee notes ICE's 
emphasis on goods potentially dangerous to Americans, but also 
encourages ICE to evaluate the deterrent value of its 
investigations, as well as the potential financial impact 
criminal activities have on U.S. companies when establishing 
its investigative priorities. The Committee urges the NIPRCC to 
prioritize staff and enforcement to combating and supporting 
copyright owners' efforts to curtail online copyright piracy in 
the online space.

            STUDENT AND EXCHANGE VISITOR INFORMATION SYSTEM

    The Student and Exchange Visitor Information System was 
launched in 2002 to mitigate critical vulnerabilities exploited 
by the 9/11 hijackers. The Committee directs ICE to execute a 
remediation plan for any current vulnerabilities and brief the 
Committee on the implementation of the plan every 30 days until 
problems are addressed appropriately.

               UNACCOMPANIED ALIEN CHILDREN AND FAMILIES

    As discussed earlier in this report, the number of UAC and 
families encountered along our southwest border last year 
overwhelmed our border security, immigration enforcement, and 
public welfare systems. ICE was frequently called upon to 
escort and transport UAC to an HHS/ORR location via commercial 
or chartered air transport. The Committee directs ICE to 
continue its efforts to use appropriate contracted vendors to 
transport UAC to ORR-designated shelters as ICE agents should 
be a last resort. Additionally, ICE should support ORR's 
efforts to continue to develop increased capacity in major 
apprehension sites, in major cities that serve as 
transportation hubs, and in areas where UAC are released to 
sponsors.

                     LAW ENFORCEMENT SUPPORT CENTER

    The Committee provides funding of $34,500,000 for resources 
and full-time law enforcement personnel at the Law Enforcement 
Support Center [LESC] which serves a critical function in the 
Federal Government's immigration enforcement efforts. Further, 
in order to promote efficiency, the Committee recommends that 
ICE take steps to ensure that current operations being carried 
out at the LESC remain centralized at the LESC facility and are 
not unnecessarily duplicated in other parts of the country.

                      INTERNATIONAL INVESTIGATIONS

    The Committee recommends $107,210,000 for international 
operations and $30,561,000 for VSP. Of the total amount 
provided for VSP, $13,300,000 is available for obligation 
through September 30, 2017, due the lengthy period of time it 
takes to negotiate with the Department of State on placing ICE 
personnel abroad. In fiscal year 2016, ICE is directed to 
maintain or increase the level of effort for international 
investigations to disrupt transnational criminal organizations 
involved in bringing children from Central America to the U.S. 
border.
    With the total cost for deploying and maintaining an 
overseas investigator position costing nearly twice as much as 
a domestic investigator, the Committee directs ICE to provide 
the Committee with detailed enforcement metrics demonstrating 
the appropriate balance of overseas investigative activities to 
reduce crime in the United States, in order to justify ICE's 
current and proposed international footprint 90 days after the 
date of enactment of this act.

               ENFORCEMENT AND REMOVAL OFFICER PAY REFORM

    The Department announced the development of a unified 
career path for Immigration Enforcement Agents and Deportation 
Officers and asserted that pay parity in the ERO workforce 
would result in ERO's being better equipped and positioned to 
successfully meet operational demands and fulfill its evolving 
and complex law-enforcement mission. These changes, estimated 
to cost more than $60,000,000 in 2016, were announced to ERO 
staff prior to notifying this Committee. In defending the 
proposal, DHS argued that pay reform would result in more 
effective, efficient ERO operations. The Committee expects ERO 
pay reform will be coupled with operational enhancements and 
that ERO will use the newly unified workforce more effectively 
to deliver improved enforcement outcomes within base funding 
levels.

                         SEX OFFENDER REGISTRY

    The Committee understands that ICE is taking steps to 
improve ICE's notification of enforcement authorities and 
regulatory state organizations through the Sex Offender 
Registration and Notification Act [SORNA] exchange portal when 
ICE releases an individual in their jurisdiction who has a 
registration requirement. In addition to notifying aliens of 
any registration requirements, local ICE/ERO Victim Witness 
Coordinators [VWC] will upload the alien's information--to 
include biographic, address, and conditions of release--into 
the SORNA exchange portal in order to notify local law 
enforcement authorities of an alien's release, with a National 
Sex Offender Registry alert. Further, the VWC will alert any 
registered victim associated with the alien of the pending 
release and update records accordingly. The Committee directs 
ICE to engage with victims' rights groups and law enforcement 
agencies to measure the efficacy of this new process and brief 
the Committee on its findings. Further, ICE shall brief on VWC 
workload and assess how VWC can provide assistance to United 
States citizens who are victims of other violent crimes 
committed by aliens.

                       ALTERNATIVES TO DETENTION

    The Committee recommends $122,053,000 for the Alternatives 
to Detention [ATD] program. This level supports total number of 
participants included in the request and is $12,313,000 above 
the enacted level. While the Committee remains supportive of 
the ATD program, ICE must develop a nationwide concept of 
operations detailing how field offices should use the differing 
levels of supervision in a manner most conducive to reducing 
the overall cost and effectiveness of the immigration 
enforcement lifecycle.
    The Committee directs ICE to provide greater transparency 
on its use of the program--including providing quarterly 
briefings on the results of any evaluations of the program by 
field offices. ICE should post on its Web site any contractor 
evaluations and OIG reports related to the ATD program.

                      MOBILE CRIMINAL ALIEN TEAMS

    The Committee recommends $15,000,000 above the request for 
10 new Mobile Criminal Alien Teams [MCAT] to respond to threats 
to public safety by supplementing immigration enforcement 
efforts targeted against at-large criminal aliens, to include 
sexual offenders, drug traffickers, gangs, fugitives, and other 
violent felons. These teams would be temporarily deployed where 
existing ERO resources are not commensurate with the criminal 
alien and gang workload and where detainer non-compliance or 
other operational impediments necessitate surges in officer 
presence within particular geographic areas. ICE shall brief 
the Committee on the plans for this program at its first 
obligation and expenditure plan briefing.

                      PRIORITY ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM

    The administration contends that the new Priority 
Enforcement Program [PEP] will help ICE address some of the 
community safety problems and enforcement gaps presented when 
States and localities are unwilling or unable to honor ICE 
detainers placed on criminal aliens while they are 
incarcerated. PEP will focus on those individuals who pose a 
national security or public safety risk, including felons, 
significant/repeat misdemeanants, and gang members. The 
Committee is disappointed that the administration has not done 
more to require compliance with ICE detainers on criminal 
aliens, expects to see a notable increase in jurisdictions 
honoring detainers under PEP, and directs ICE to report on its 
Web site to that end.

                          ENFORCEMENT IMPACTS

    The Committee is aware that HHS is funding a study focused 
on U.S. citizen children affected by the detention and removal 
of a parent, the impact of family separation and loss of income 
on the well-being of children, and the short, intermediate, and 
long-term economic, health, and social service needs of these 
children. The Committee directs ICE to provide all appropriate 
assistance to those conducting the study and to review any 
recommendations once the report is completed. The Committee 
directs ICE to continue to submit the semiannual report on 
deportation of parents of U.S.-born citizens.

                         BONDING POLICY REVIEW

    In order to ensure continued and appropriate oversight of 
these procedures, the Committee directs ICE to scrutinize all 
of its bonding policies, consistent with regulations governing 
the detention of aliens with orders of removal and recent 
policy decisions, including the need for individualized custody 
determinations following positive credible fear determinations, 
and brief the Committee semiannually on its reviews.

                     SHADOW WOLVES AND ICE STAFFING

    There have been significant changes in activity along the 
northern border since ICE last conducted an extensive threat 
analysis of the region in March 2008. The Committee notes the 
recent development of the Bakken oil fields is causing a sharp 
increase in drug trafficking and other criminal activity along 
the northern border and directs HSI to conduct a current threat 
analysis to determine if Shadow Wolf units should be placed on 
the northern border. HSI should consult with federally 
recognized Indian tribes in closest proximity to the United 
States-Canada border when conducting this analysis. In 
addition, ICE should study whether the addition of other 
personnel would reduce criminal activity along the northern 
border. The results of these analyses shall be briefed to the 
Committees not later than 180 days after the enactment of this 
act.

   USE OF INTERNATIONAL MOBILE SUBSCRIBER IDENTITY CATCHER TECHNOLOGY

    HSI is working with the ICE Privacy Office on a Privacy 
Threat Assessment [PTA] to address procedures when 
International Mobile Subscriber Identity [IMSI] catcher 
surveillance devices and other similar technology IMSI-catchers 
and similar devices are used during criminal investigations. 
According to ICE, HSI's IMSI-catcher devices do not collect 
call content or call/text transaction data and are limited to 
revealing the IMSI used by a particular cellular network. The 
Department shall consider whether to expand the PTA to include 
all law enforcement agencies in the Department which currently 
use, or in the future may use, such devices, as well as 
consider issuing guidance to advise Federal grantees on the use 
of these technologies. In addition, the Department should work 
with its device vendors to have the software changed to exclude 
non-target IMSI data, which may be captured during target-
specific missions, and to include an additional step to require 
an authorization and a badge number entered into the system 
prior to deployment. The Department shall brief the Committee 
not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this act 
on its consideration of expanding the PTA and the status of the 
ICE PTA.

                        AUTOMATION MODERNIZATION

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $26,000,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      73,500,000
Committee recommendation................................      53,000,000

    The Automation Modernization account provides funds for 
major information technology [IT] projects for ICE.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends a total of $53,000,000, 
$20,500,000 less than the request and $27,000,000 above the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2015. These funds are to remain 
available until September 30, 2018.

                                            AUTOMATION MODERNIZATION
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Automation modernization..................................            26,000            73,500  ................
    Consolidated ICE Financial Solution...................  ................  ................             5,000
    TECS modernization....................................  ................  ................            21,500
    IT Refresh............................................  ................  ................             4,000
    Tactical Communications...............................  ................  ................            18,500
    ICE Operational Data Store............................  ................  ................             4,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal............................................            26,000            73,500            53,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                           TECS MODERNIZATION

    The Committee understands that, after abandoning the 
previous TECS modernization procurement, ICE is executing a new 
strategy for TECS modernization with development based upon a 
consumer-off-the-shelf-type product that will be modified to 
meet ICE's law enforcement and analytic needs. The Committee 
appreciates that ICE has dedicated significant leadership 
attention to completing TECS modernization and directs that ICE 
brief the Committee semiannually until the system is fully 
operational. Further, ICE shall notify the Committee not later 
than 10 days after any substantial deviation from projected 
timelines is anticipated and if any critical milestone will not 
be met. The Committee encourages ICE to continually assess 
projected operations and maintenance costs during the 
development period and weigh the benefits of enhanced system 
functionality against any increases in recurring operating 
costs, particularly costs related to bandwidth and data 
requirements.

                        TACTICAL COMMUNICATIONS

    The Tactical Communications [TACCOM] program supports ICE 
agents and officers through the use of tactical communications 
equipment and systems on a daily basis in their primary duties 
to prevent, protect against, respond to, and recover from 
incidents, investigations, and operations. While 
recapitalization of TACCOM infrastructure is needed, ICE must 
establish a realistic plan for the program including 
identifying its highest priority locations. In so doing, ICE 
shall work with its Federal, State, and local partners to 
leverage their investments. The Committee expects ICE to brief 
on its program semiannually and, where substantial investments 
are proposed, ICE shall note how it intends to leverage other 
agencies' capabilities.

                  CONSOLIDATED ICE FINANCIAL SOLUTION

    The Committee recommends $5,000,000, as requested, for the 
Consolidated ICE Financial Solution [CIFS]. The Committee 
understands CIFS will allow ICE to take steps necessary to 
extract the data from its legacy core financial system and take 
steps towards receiving financial services from a Shared 
Service Provider which will host and operate the core financial 
system for ICE and its customers. ICE shall provide a briefing 
on the progress with CIFS, including details on the capacity of 
potential service providers to meet ICE's requirements, not 
later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this act.

                              Construction

Appropriations, 2015....................................................
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      $5,000,000
Committee recommendation................................................

    This appropriation provides funding to plan, construct, 
renovate, equip, and maintain buildings and facilities 
necessary for the administration and enforcement of the laws 
relating to immigration, detention, and alien registration.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends no funding for this account. Any 
carryover funds available within the Construction account will 
be used for emergency repairs and alterations, especially those 
focused on life and safety. The Committee notes that up to 
$40,000,000 is provided within the Salaries and Expenses 
account for necessary facilities expenses at both ICE-owned and 
leased properties.

                 Transportation Security Administration

    The Transportation Security Administration [TSA] is charged 
with ensuring security across U.S. transportation systems, 
including aviation, railways, highways, pipelines, and 
waterways, and safeguarding the freedom of movement of people 
and commerce. Separate appropriations are provided for the 
following activities within TSA: aviation security including 
Federal Air Marshals; surface transportation security; 
intelligence and vetting; and transportation security support.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends a total program level of 
$7,298,591,000 and a net of $4,719,438,000 for the activities 
of TSA for fiscal year 2016.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                                     TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Aviation Security.........................................         5,639,095         5,614,767         5,582,528
Aviation Security Capital Fund (mandatory)................           250,000           250,000           250,000
Surface Transportation Security...........................           123,749           123,828           122,728
Intelligence and Vetting (direct appropriations)..........           219,166           227,698           225,315
Intelligence and Vetting (fee-funded programs)............            79,605           199,153           199,153
Transportation Security Support...........................           917,226           931,479           918,867
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Transportation Security Administration                7,228,841         7,346,925         7,298,591
       (gross)............................................
 
Aviation Security Fees....................................        -2,065,000        -2,130,000        -2,130,000
Additional Offsetting Collections--(leg. proposal)........  ................            15,000  ................
 
Aviation Security Capital Fund (mandatory)................          -250,000          -250,000          -250,000
Fee Accounts..............................................           -79,605          -199,153          -199,153
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Transportation Security Administration (net).         4,834,236         4,782,772         4,719,438
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                           AVIATION SECURITY

Appropriations, 2015....................................  $5,639,095,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................   5,614,767,000
Committee recommendation................................   5,582,528,000

    The Aviation Security account provides for Federal aviation 
security, including screening of all passengers and baggage, 
deployment of on-site law enforcement, continuation of a 
uniform set of background requirements for airport and airline 
personnel, and deployment of explosives detection technology.
    The aviation security activities include funding for: 
Federal transportation security officers [TSOs] and private 
contract screeners; air cargo security; procurement, 
installation, and maintenance of explosives detection systems 
[EDS]; checkpoint technologies and support; airport management 
and support; Federal Air Marshals and other aviation regulation 
and enforcement activities.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $5,582,528,000 for aviation 
security activities. This is $32,239,000 below the amount 
requested. Of this amount, the Committee recommends not to 
exceed $7,650 for official reception and representation 
expenses.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                                                AVIATION SECURITY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Screening Partnership Program.............................           166,666           166,928           166,928
Screening Personnel, Compensation, and Benefits...........         2,923,890         2,872,070         2,843,305
Screener Training and Other...............................           225,442           226,551           238,883
Checkpoint Support........................................            88,469            97,265           112,177
EDS Procurement and Installation..........................            83,933            83,380            83,212
Screening Technology Maintenance..........................           294,509           280,509           280,509
Aviation Regulation and Other Enforcement.................           349,821           349,013           346,878
Airport Management and Support............................           587,657           596,233           592,881
FFDO and Flight Crew Training.............................            22,365            20,095            22,541
Air Cargo.................................................           106,343           105,978           105,214
Federal Air Marshals......................................           790,000           816,745           790,000
Aviation Security Capital Fund (mandatory)................          -250,000          -250,000          -250,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Aviation Security............................         5,639,095         5,614,767         5,582,528
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         AVIATION SECURITY FEES

    The Committee understands that TSA will be submitting a 
request to the appropriate authorizing committees for changes 
to the aviation security fee structure. The Committee 
appreciates TSA heeding Committee guidance to avoid submitting 
a budget request which assumes revenues that have not been 
enacted into law.

                     SCREENING PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends $166,928,000 for the Screening 
Partnership Program [SPP], as requested. The recommendation 
provides the necessary funds for security at airports where 
private screening contracts are in place, including four 
airports recently added to the program.
    The Committee acknowledges the important alternative SPP 
provides TSA airports in deciding to ``opt-out'' and request 
private screening support instead of Federal screeners. 
Commensurate with the Committee's interest in this program, TSA 
shall notify the Committee within 10 days of any changes in 
private screening contracts, including new awards under the 
SPP, or the movement from privatized screening into Federal 
screening.
    The Committee is also aware that TSA plans to move towards 
an Indefinite Delivery, Indefinite Quantity [IDIQ] contract 
vehicle for the SPP program and is concerned that TSA has 
chosen the largest SPP airport--San Francisco International--to 
be first under this new effort. The Committee expects TSA to 
continue to adhere to a 12-month goal for awarding new SPP 
contracts and that the implementation of a new contract vehicle 
will not disrupt this goal.

             SCREENER PERSONNEL, COMPENSATION, AND BENEFITS

    The Committee recommends $2,843,305,000 for Screener 
Personnel, Compensation, and Benefits. This is $28,765,000 
below the amount requested and $80,585,000 below the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2015. The recommendation supports the 
proposed decrease of 1,361 positions associated with risk-based 
security [RBS] efficiencies to the screener workforce and 
although the Committee appreciates these efficiencies, the 
Committee expects TSA to give serious consideration to 
recommendations from OIG on how the program can be improved. 
The Committee also includes a statutory cap on TSA screening 
personnel consistent with personnel levels provided in the 
President's budget request.

                      SCREENER TRAINING AND OTHER

    The Committee recommends $238,883,000 for Screener Training 
and Other. This is $12,332,000 above the amount requested and 
$13,441,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2015. In 
response to recent findings by OIG pertaining to checkpoint 
security, the increase supports both instructor-led and on-the-
job training critical for a professional workforce to identify 
the constantly evolving threats to commercial aviation. The 
Committee also supports efforts by TSA to explore collateral 
officer duties associated with resolution procedures.
    Of this increase, the Committee directs TSA to utilize not 
less than $2,500,000 for the establishment of a Tiger Team 
focused on aviation security which pairs senior DHS and TSA 
managers and external subject matters experts, governmental or 
otherwise, to rapidly assess potential or identified 
weaknesses. The Committee expects that, in light of recent OIG 
findings, initial focus would be on passenger screening. This 
team shall report directly to the Administrator and be charged 
with delivering corrective actions plans with a focus on near-
term improvements to standard operating procedures and 
technology, as well as reducing screener error.

                           CHECKPOINT SUPPORT

    The Committee recommends $112,177,000 for Checkpoint 
Support. This is $14,912,000 above the amount requested and 
$23,708,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2015. 
Funds are provided to field test and deploy equipment for 
passenger screening, carry-on baggage screening, checkpoint 
reconfiguration, electronic surveillance of checkpoints, and 
operational integration of systems. Currently deployed 
technologies include walk-through metal detectors, explosives 
trace detection [ETD], bottled liquid scanners, chemical 
analysis devices, advanced technology systems, and Advanced 
Imaging Technology [AIT]. The request also includes funding for 
the new Credential Authentication Technology [CAT] equipment to 
digitally validate passengers' credentials in near-real time 
utilizing information from Secure Flight. TSA is expected to 
complete testing and procurement of CAT in fiscal year 2016 to 
help close a known security vulnerability. The Committee 
expects that this additional funding will be used in part to 
further hone existing detection systems to detect emerging 
threats.

               ADVANCED INTEGRATED SCREENING TECHNOLOGIES

    Pursuant to a statutory requirement in the bill, TSA is to 
continue providing a report on advanced integrated passenger 
screening technologies for the most effective security of 
passengers and baggage not later than 90 days after the date of 
enactment of this act. The report provides a useful description 
of existing and emerging equipment capable of detecting threats 
concealed on passengers and in baggage as well as projected 
funding levels for the next 5 fiscal years for each technology 
discussed in the report.

                      ADVANCED IMAGING TECHNOLOGY

    In GAO-14-357, GAO reported that while TSA had studied the 
use of AIT equipped with Automated Target Recognition in the 
laboratory setting, it had not done similar testing in an 
operational environment. Consequently, the actual detection 
rate of threats utilizing various resolution methods may not be 
identical to those resulting from a controlled environment and 
so ultimate effectiveness may be misrepresented to Congress, 
oversight bodies such as GAO or OIG, and TSA itself. The 
Committee is aware that TSA has aggressively deployed AITs to 
combat evolving threats, including non-metallic explosives, and 
appreciates the commitment of the private sector in continued 
algorithm refinement and threat detection support. However, it 
is critical that TSA be fully cognizant of AIT efficacy when 
that technology is transitioned from the lab to the field with 
human operators. To ensure clarity on AIT detection rates and 
effectiveness, TSA is directed to brief the Committee no later 
than 60 days after the date of enactment of this act on the 
potential for detection discrepancies in the context of GAO-14-
357.

                    RISK-BASED SECURITY INITIATIVES

    The Committee continues to support TSA's screening 
evolution from one-size-fits-all security to an intelligence-
driven, risk-based approach which will focus limited resources 
on unknown travelers and baggage while speeding the movement of 
known travelers. As the process expands and TSA seeks to cast a 
wider net, it's not clear that additional populations granted 
expedited screening meet comparable levels of security. On 
March 16, 2015, OIG issued report OIG-15-45 detailing how a 
known felon and former domestic terrorist was granted expedited 
screening. Had the individual formally applied through the 
PreCheck process, they would not have been granted this level 
of screening. However, the process of providing expedited 
screening for certain groups of known travelers is being 
expanded to unknown travelers through a variety of means, and 
it is not clear that these travelers provide a commensurate 
level of security for the expedited service. The Committee 
expects TSA to continue to work with OIG to address 
vulnerabilities in RBS and the PreCheck program in particular.
    Additionally, TSA has indicated it plans to partner with 
third party providers in order to draw on private sector 
expertise to increase program awareness and ease enrollment. 
The Committee is supportive of this effort, but adamant that 
the security of the program not be compromised to reach TSA's 
enrollment goals as outlined in its fiscal year 2015 
congressional budget justification.

                           EXIT LANE SECURITY

    The Committee continues direction that TSA will monitor 
exit lanes consistent with section 603 of the Bipartisan Budget 
Act and that, with regard to remodeling and modernization 
efforts undertaken by an airport at an existing exit lane for 
which TSA was responsible for monitoring on December 1, 2013, 
TSA shall continue to be responsible for monitoring the exit 
lane after the remodeling or modernization effort is completed.
    The Committee is also interested in understanding low-cost 
technological solutions for monitoring exit lanes and how TSA 
can achieve further staffing efficiencies, but has seen little 
progress. Therefore, TSA shall brief the Committee not later 
than 180 days after the date of enactment of this act on the 
feasibility of establishing standards for exit lane monitoring 
systems that would allow airports to choose from a predefined 
set of options. TSA will include in the brief the feasibility 
and annual cost associated with maintaining an exit lane 
technology qualified products list.

                      EXPLOSIVES DETECTION SYSTEMS

    The Committee recommends $83,212,000 for Explosives 
Detection Systems procurement and installation. This is 
$168,000 below the amount requested and $721,000 below the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2015. An additional $250,000,000 
in mandatory spending will be available from Aviation Security 
Capital Fund [ASCF] fee collections. This level of funding will 
allow for the procurement of explosives detection systems, 
continued investment in the latest threat detection 
capabilities, as well as test and evaluation of new 
technologies. The Committee directs TSA to include its EDS 
recapitalization plans within the congressional budget 
justification for fiscal year 2017 including detailed 
information on expected unit replacements. Section 44923 of 
title 49, United States Code, requires that the $250,000,000 in 
annual mandatory funding deposited into the ASCF be available 
for airport security improvement projects, such as facility 
modifications. However, procurement and installation of EDS 
equipment associated with these projects is not permitted. With 
a diminishing base of airport applications seeking large 
improvement projects and the need to replace aging EDS machines 
currently deployed at airports, the recommendation continues 
bill language, as requested, to permit ASCF funding to be used 
to procure and install EDS equipment during fiscal year 2016. 
This will allow TSA to more effectively, economically, and 
expeditiously plan and implement the acquisition and 
replacement of existing EDS units.

                             HIGH-SPEED EDS

    The Committee is supportive of the new requirements 
implemented by Public Law 113-245, the Transportation Security 
Acquisitions Reform Act [TSARA], to improve transparency with 
regard to technology acquisitions programs. At the same time, 
the Committee remains concerned about the lengthy and opaque 
nature of test and evaluation--a process which can take years 
putting undue burden on industry to plan for and allocate the 
systems and technical resources for extended periods of time. 
Consistent with language included in Senate Report 113-198, the 
Committee expects TSA to issue reports on candidate systems 
concurrently with the completion of each phase of testing. The 
Committee also understands that a number of airports planning 
for future growth are interested in high-speed EDS as they 
enter the design phase for future expansion partly driven by 
potential efficiencies of the new technology. Therefore, the 
Committee includes a provision in the bill to include high-
speed baggage screening in TSA reporting on labor savings.
    TSA is required under section 1604(b)(2) of the 9/11 Act to 
give funding consideration to airports that incurred eligible 
costs for in-line baggage systems but were not recipients of 
funding agreements. However, TSA has not established a process 
or program that has resulted in the reimbursement of eligible 
costs to affected airports. Further, TSA has not validated the 
costs submitted by airports asserting eligible costs. 
Therefore, the Committee directs TSA to develop a process to 
validate whether airports incurred costs with a reasonable 
anticipation of reimbursement and thereafter establish a plan 
to reimburse those airports if such costs are validated by 
TSA's review. The Committee expects TSA to include sufficient 
funding to carry out this plan in future budget requests. TSA 
is to brief the Committee no later than 60 days after the date 
of enactment of this Act on its efforts to carry out these 
activities.

                       AIRPORT EMPLOYEE SCREENING

    On April 8, 2015, the Aviation Security Advisory Committee 
[ASAC] delivered its final report on airport employee screening 
to TSA. As a result of these recommendations on April 20, 2015, 
the Secretary directed TSA to implement several actions derived 
from the ASAC's recommendations, and the Department and private 
sector are now working to implement this direction. TSA shall 
brief the Committee not later than 60 days after the date of 
enactment of this act on their concurrence or non-concurrence 
and subsequent implementation associated with all 28 of the 
ASAC's recommendations on airport access control.

                 EDS/CHECKPOINT TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENTS

    Not later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this 
act, TSA is to brief the Committee on its fiscal year 2016 
investment plans for checkpoint security and EDS refurbishment, 
procurement, and installations on an airport-by-airport basis. 
The briefing shall include specific technologies for purchase, 
program schedules and major milestones, a schedule for 
obligation of the funds, recapitalization priorities, status of 
operational testing for each passenger screening technology 
under development, and a table detailing actual versus 
anticipated unobligated balances at the close of the fiscal 
year. The briefing shall also include details on passenger 
screening pilot programs that are in progress or being 
considered for implementation in fiscal year 2016. Information 
in this section is to include a summary of the pilot program 
describing what the program is attempting to achieve; potential 
capabilities and benefits of the program; the airports where 
the pilots will be operating; funding commitments; and plans 
for future expansion. The Committee expects the briefing to 
include detailed program schedules for passenger screening 
technologies. Schedules should include all milestones from the 
issuance of a request for proposal to deployment.

                       EXPLOSIVE TRACE DETECTION

    Not later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this 
act, TSA is directed to brief the Committee on the operational 
effectiveness of currently deployed ETD systems. The report 
shall include data on the false alarm rates of deployed systems 
and the impact of those false alarms on checkpoint through-put 
and operations. The report shall also include performance 
metrics of the currently deployed systems and their compliance 
with the latest detection, performance, and security 
requirements.

             SCREENING TECHNOLOGY MAINTENANCE AND UTILITIES

    The Committee recommends $280,509,000 for Screening 
Technology Maintenance and Utilities. This is the same amount 
as requested and $14,000,000 below the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2015. The reduction below fiscal year 2015 reflects 
the retiring of obsolete technologies and favorable pricing in 
competitively awarded service contracts.

               AVIATION REGULATION AND OTHER ENFORCEMENT

    The Committee recommends $346,878,000 for Aviation 
Regulation and Other Enforcement. This is $2,135,000 below the 
amount requested and $2,943,000 below the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2015. The recommended amount provides for law 
enforcement and regulatory activities at airports to: ensure 
compliance with required security measures, respond to security 
incidents, and provide international support for worldwide 
security requirements. The Committee also fully supports 
requested funding for the National Explosives Detection Canine 
Team Program and encourages TSA to continue efforts to partner 
with State and local law enforcement to train and certify 
additional teams. These teams provide an additional layer of 
explosives screening throughout the airport.

                     AIRPORT MANAGEMENT AND SUPPORT

    The Committee recommends $592,881,000 for Airport 
Management and Support. This is $3,352,000 below the amount 
requested and $5,224,000 above the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2015. Funds are provided for: the workforce to support TSA 
Federal Security Directors; Bomb Appraisal Officers; Explosives 
Security Specialists; the Transportation Security Operations 
Center; airport rent and furniture; a vehicle fleet; airport 
parking; and employee transit benefits. The request also 
includes reductions associated with RBS efficiencies.

     FEDERAL FLIGHT DECK OFFICER AND FLIGHT CREW TRAINING PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends $22,541,000 for the Federal Flight 
Deck Officer and Flight Crew Training programs. This is 
$2,446,000 above the amount requested and $176,000 above the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2015. Funding above the budget 
request reflects the Committee's support for the program, which 
deputizes qualified airline pilots who volunteer to be Federal 
law enforcement officers and to provide initial and recurrent 
law enforcement training. Funds are also provided for the Crew 
Member Self-Defense Training program for the purpose of 
teaching crew members basic self-defense concepts and 
techniques. The Committee continues to support implementation 
of an Inactive Reserve Force of pilots who predominantly fly 
international flights.

                               AIR CARGO

    The Committee recommends $105,214,000 for air cargo 
security. This is $764,000 below the amount requested and 
$1,129,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2015. Funds 
are provided to secure the air cargo supply chain, conveyances, 
and people. TSA is also directed to include planned fiscal year 
2017 investments in its congressional budget justification 
materials for fiscal year 2017.

                          FEDERAL AIR MARSHALS

    The Committee recommends $790,000,000 for Federal Air 
Marshals [FAMs]. This is $26,745,000 below the amount requested 
and the same amount as provided in fiscal year 2015. Funding is 
included for FAMs to protect the air transportation system 
against terrorist threats, sabotage, and other acts of 
violence. The Committee continues to await a workforce staffing 
report to help understand the appropriate personnel levels of 
the FAMS. In the interim, if TSA determines that sufficient 
funding and need exists, the Committee supports efforts to hire 
against attrition.
    The Committee directs TSA to continue to submit quarterly 
reports on mission coverage, staffing levels, and hiring rates 
as in prior years.

                    SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $123,749,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     123,828,000
Committee recommendation................................     122,728,000

    Surface transportation security provides funding for 
personnel and operational resources to assess the risk of a 
terrorist attack on aviation modes of transportation, to 
establish standards and procedures to address those risks, and 
to ensure compliance with established regulations and policies.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $122,728,000 for Surface 
Transportation Security. This is $1,100,000 below the amount 
requested and $1,021,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2015. Funds are available to assess the risk of terrorist 
attacks for all non-aviation transportation modes, issue 
regulations to improve the security of those modes, and enforce 
regulations to ensure the protection of the transportation 
system.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                                         SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Staffing and operations...................................            29,230            28,510            28,329
Surface transportation security inspectors and VIPR.......            94,519            95,318            94,399
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Surface Transportation Security..............           123,749           123,828           122,728
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

          SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY INSPECTORS AND VIPR

    The Committee recommends $94,399,000 for Surface 
Transportation Security Inspectors and VIPR. This is $919,000 
below the amount requested and $120,000 below the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2015. TSA is to brief the Committee no 
later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this act on 
its surface transportation technology pilot programs and 
initiatives. The briefing shall include a summary of all 
technology pilot programs and initiatives TSA will have 
operating or has planned for fiscal year 2016; what each 
program/initiative is attempting to achieve; potential 
capabilities and benefits of the program/initiative; locations 
of each program/initiative; and plans for future expansion.

                        INTELLIGENCE AND VETTING

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $219,166,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     227,698,000
Committee recommendation................................     225,315,000

    Intelligence and Vetting includes several programs that are 
intended to identify known or suspected terrorists threats 
working in or seeking access to the Nation's transportation 
system.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $225,315,000 for Intelligence and 
Vetting. This is $2,383,000 below the amount requested and 
$6,149,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2015. In 
addition, an estimated $199,153,000 in fee collections is 
available for these activities in fiscal year 2016, as proposed 
in the budget.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                                            INTELLIGENCE AND VETTING
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Direct Appropriations:
    Intelligence..........................................            51,545            51,977            51,635
    Secure Flight.........................................            99,569           105,637           105,276
    Other Vetting Programs................................            68,052            70,084            68,404
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, direct appropriations.....................           219,166           227,698           225,315
                                                           =====================================================
Fee Collections:
    Transportation worker identification credential.......            34,382            82,267            82,267
    Hazardous material....................................            12,000            21,083            21,083
    General aviation at DCA...............................               350               400               400
    Commercial aviation and airport.......................             6,500             6,500             6,500
    Other security threat assessments.....................                50                50                50
    Air cargo/certified cargo screening program...........             7,173             3,500             3,500
    TSA PreCheck Application Program......................            13,700            80,153            80,153
    Alien flight school...................................             5,000             5,200             5,200
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, fee collections...........................            79,605           199,153           199,153
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                             SECURE FLIGHT

    The Committee recommends $105,276,000 for Secure Flight. 
This is $361,000 below the amount requested and $5,707,000 
above the amount provided in fiscal year 2015. As recommended 
by the 9/11 Commission and mandated by the Intelligence Reform 
Act, this program transferred the responsibility of airline 
passenger watchlist matching from the air carriers to the 
Federal Government.
    The Committee recommendation includes funding in support of 
the CAT effort and decreases associated with the implementation 
of RBS initiatives.

                         OTHER VETTING PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends $68,404,000 for Other Vetting 
Programs. This is $1,680,000 below the amount requested and 
$352,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2015.
    The Committee supports TSA's efforts to modernize its 
vetting and credentialing infrastructure, known as Technology 
Infrastructure Modernization, but is deeply concerned about 
program risks and the drastic measures that appear to have been 
required to ultimately continue towards deployment of other 
populations. The Committee expects TSA to expeditiously define 
remaining program requirements for its next population--
Surface--and be kept apprised of any further challenges that 
might delay full operational capability.
    To account for under-burn during program reformation, the 
Committee has reduced the PPA by $1,680,000. TSA shall brief 
the Committee on its program not later than 30 days after the 
date of enactment of this act.

                    TRANSPORTATION SECURITY SUPPORT

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $917,226,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     931,479,000
Committee recommendation................................     918,867,000

    The Transportation Security Support account supports the 
operational needs of TSA's extensive airport/field personnel 
and infrastructure. Transportation Security Support includes: 
headquarters' personnel, pay, benefits, and support; mission 
support centers; human capital services; and information 
technology support.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $918,867,000 for Transportation 
Security Support. This is $12,612,000 below the amount 
requested and $1,641,000 above the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2015.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                                         TRANSPORTATION SECURITY SUPPORT
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Headquarters administration...............................           269,100           276,930           272,751
Information technology....................................           449,000           452,385           446,921
Human capital services....................................           199,126           202,164           199,195
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Transportation Security Support..............           917,226           931,479           918,867
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      HEADQUARTERS ADMINISTRATION

    The Committee recommends $272,751,000 for Headquarters 
Administration. This is $4,179,000 below the amount requested 
and $3,651,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2015.
    TSA shall provide quarterly briefings on covert testing 
activities, to include the latest metrics gathered from recent 
tests and resulting mitigation factors.

                       United States Coast Guard


                                SUMMARY

    The Coast Guard's primary responsibilities are the 
enforcement of all applicable Federal laws on the high seas and 
waters subject to the jurisdiction of the United States; 
promotion of safety of life and property at sea; assistance to 
navigation; protection of the marine environment; and 
maintenance of a state of readiness to function as a 
specialized service in the Navy in time of war, as authorized 
by sections 1 and 2 of title 14, United States Code.
    The Commandant of the Coast Guard reports directly to the 
Secretary of Homeland Security.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The President's fiscal year 2016 discretionary budget 
request proposes to reduce funding for the Coast Guard by 2.7 
percent as compared to fiscal year 2015 enacted levels. The 
budget submission trades paltry increases in operational 
expenses--many of which do not encompass congressional intent 
detailed in fiscal year 2015--for woefully inadequate support 
in recapitalizing the Coast Guard's aging fleet. This has 
required Congress to make difficult choices about restoration 
of certain priorities. These restorations, described below in 
detail, include support for Aids to Navigation Teams, continued 
``Bravo-0'' availability for fixed wing aircraft, the 
restoration of military special pays, and funding for rotary 
wing air facilities.
    The Committee recommends a total program level of 
$10,484,794,000 for the activities of the Coast Guard for 
fiscal year 2016. When costs for overseas contingency 
operations are excluded, the recommendation for the Coast Guard 
is $10,324,792,000.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                                          COAST GUARD--FUNDING SUMMARY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operating Expenses........................................         7,043,318         6,822,503         6,996,365
Environmental Compliance and Restoration..................            13,197            13,269            13,221
Reserve Training..........................................           114,572           110,614           110,614
Acquisition, Construction, and Improvements...............         1,225,223         1,017,269         1,573,269
Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation...............            17,892            18,135            18,019
Health Care Fund Contribution (Permanent Indefinite                  176,970           169,306           169,306
 Appropriations)..........................................
Retired Pay...............................................         1,450,626         1,604,000         1,604,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Coast Guard..................................        10,041,798         9,755,096        10,484,794
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Coast Guard will pay an estimated $169,306,000 in 
fiscal year 2016 to the Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care 
Fund for the costs of military Medicare-eligible health 
benefits earned by its uniformed servicemembers. The 
contribution is funded by permanent indefinite discretionary 
authority pursuant to the National Defense Authorization Act 
for fiscal year 2005 (Public Law 108-375).

                           OPERATING EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2015....................................  $7,043,318,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................   6,822,503,000
Committee recommendation................................   6,996,365,000

    The Operating Expenses appropriation provides funds for the 
operation and maintenance of multipurpose vessels, aircraft, 
and shore units strategically located along the coasts and 
inland waterways of the United States and in selected areas 
overseas. The program activities of this appropriation fall 
into the following categories:
    Search and Rescue.--As one of its earliest and most 
traditional missions, the Coast Guard maintains a nationwide 
system of boats, aircraft, cutters, and rescue coordination 
centers on 24-hour alert.
    Aids to Navigation.--To help mariners determine their 
location and avoid accidents, the Coast Guard maintains a 
network of manned and unmanned aids to navigation along the 
Nation's coasts and on its inland waterways. In addition, the 
Coast Guard operates radio stations in the United States that 
serve the domestic and international needs of the armed 
services, marine and air commerce.
    Marine Safety.--The Coast Guard ensures compliance with 
Federal statutes and regulations designed to improve safety in 
the merchant marine industry and operates a recreational 
boating safety program.
    Marine Environmental Protection.--The primary objectives of 
the marine environmental protection program are to minimize the 
dangers of marine pollution and to assure the safety of ports 
and waterways.
    Enforcement of Laws and Treaties.--The Coast Guard is the 
principal maritime enforcement agency with regard to Federal 
laws on the navigable waters of the United States and the high 
seas, including fisheries, drug smuggling, illegal immigration, 
and hijacking of vessels.
    Ice Operations.--In the Arctic and Antarctic, Coast Guard 
icebreakers escort supply ships, support research activities 
and Department of Defense [DOD] operations, survey uncharted 
waters, and collect scientific data. The Coast Guard also 
assists commercial vessels through ice-covered waters.
    Defense Readiness.--During peacetime, the Coast Guard 
maintains an effective state of military preparedness to 
operate as a service in the Navy in time of war or national 
emergency at the direction of the President. As such, the Coast 
Guard has primary responsibility for the security of ports, 
waterways, and navigable waters up to 200 miles offshore.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $6,996,365,000 for Coast Guard 
Operating Expenses, including $24,500,000 from the Oil Spill 
Liability Trust Fund and $500,002,000 for Coast Guard defense-
related activities, of which $160,002,000 is for Overseas 
Contingency Operations. Of this amount, the Committee 
recommends not to exceed $30,600 for official reception and 
representation expenses.
    The recommendation level is $173,862,000 above the amount 
requested and $46,953,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2015. The Committee's recommendation is $13,860,000 above 
the comparable net request and $6,045,000 above fiscal year 
2015 when excluding funds provided for overseas contingency 
operations.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                                               OPERATING EXPENSES
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Military pay and allowances...............................         3,449,782         3,466,088         3,480,279
Civilian pay and benefits.................................           781,517           799,816           792,229
Training and recruiting...................................           198,279           205,825           206,444
Operating funds and unit level maintenance................         1,008,682         1,010,317         1,013,004
Centrally managed accounts................................           335,556           329,684           329,874
Intermediate and depot level maintenance..................         1,056,502         1,009,773         1,014,533
Overseas contingency operations...........................           213,000  ................           160,002
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Operating Expenses...........................         7,043,318         6,822,503         6,996,365
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS

    The Committee provides $160,002,000 for Coast Guard 
operations in support of overseas contingency operations. While 
funding for these activities is requested in the DOD budget for 
the Navy, the Committee adopted a practice beginning in the 
fiscal year 2009 Supplemental Appropriations Act of 
appropriating these amounts directly to the Coast Guard. The 
Coast Guard shall brief the Committee not later than 30 days 
after the date of enactment of this act on any changes expected 
during fiscal year 2016 or projected transition costs expected 
in fiscal year 2017 to support overseas contingency operations.

                        OPERATIONAL ENHANCEMENTS

    Fixed Wing Bravo-Zero Requirement.--The recommendation 
includes $2,200,000 to maintain the Coast Guard's Fixed Wing 
Aircraft ``Bravo-0'' readiness requirement, which means 
aircraft will be ready for launch within 30 minutes of a search 
and rescue [SAR] case. The Coast Guard has long maintained a 
``layered'' SAR response strategy and eliminating fixed-wing 
Bravo-0 support would be a penny-wise, pound-foolish endeavor.
    Air Facilities.--The Committee includes full-year funding 
for air facility operations and directs the Coast Guard to meet 
obligations laid out in section 225 of the Howard Coble Coast 
Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2014.
    Military Pay.--Funding for military pay critical rate bonus 
is included to ensure that these positions will be retained.

                            POLAR ICEBREAKER

    It is obvious that the United States needs another polar 
icebreaker, yet the administration has offered nothing in the 
way of a plan to fund and procure this new asset. Furthermore, 
the administration has not articulated a bridging strategy to 
demonstrate how legacy assets will be used in the interim to 
accomplish Coast Guard missions. Even with one operational 
heavy polar icebreaker, it is unclear how the Coast Guard would 
perform a rescue operation in the event that the Polar Star 
were to be in jeopardy.
    Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of 
this act, the Secretary, in coordination with the Secretary of 
the Navy, shall submit to Congress a report on the current 
ability of the Coast Guard to provide the U.S. Navy with 
adequate icebreaking capabilities to operate a surface 
combatant ship in the Arctic year-round. This report shall take 
into account the current requirements on Coast Guard 
icebreakers to conduct Operation Deep Freeze as well as 
regularly scheduled maintenance. This report shall also provide 
what assets are required to ensure that the Coast Guard can 
provide the Navy year-round icebreaking capabilities in the 
Arctic while also completing all current missions through 2030.

                    GREAT LAKES ICEBREAKING CAPACITY

    The Coast Guard is required by law to maintain a heavy 
icebreaking capability on the Great Lakes to assist in keeping 
channels and harbors open to navigation in response to the 
reasonable demands of commerce to meet the winter shipping 
needs of industry. The Committee is concerned that the Coast 
Guard does not possess adequate capacity to meet its 
statutorily required icebreaking mission on the Great Lakes, 
with negative consequences to the regional and national economy 
as well as to the safety of local communities. While the 
Committee fully supports the Coast Guard's Service Life 
Extension Project for its nine-vessel 140-foot icebreaking tugs 
as part of the In-Service Vessel Sustainment Program, it notes 
that additional assets may be necessary to successfully operate 
in the heavy ice conditions often experienced by the Great 
Lakes. The Committee directs the Coast Guard to undertake an 
updated mission analysis study to determine the assets 
necessary to effectively carry out its icebreaking requirements 
on the Great Lakes, including consideration of a second heavy 
icebreaker for the Great Lakes, consistent with the 
capabilities of the Mackinaw. The updated mission analysis 
should factor in recent historically high levels of ice 
coverage and the economic costs of reduced Great Lakes shipping 
associated with maintaining only one heavy icebreaker. The 
updated mission analysis shall be submitted to the Committee 
not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this 
act.

                          BERING SEA COVERAGE

    The Committee is concerned that adequate cutter coverage in 
the Bering Sea and Arctic Region will become increasingly 
difficult to achieve as the medium endurance cutter Alex Haley 
and high endurance cutter Munro have both exceeded 40 years of 
service life under extremely demanding conditions.
    Not later than 60 days after the date on enactment of this 
act, the Secretary shall submit to Congress a report on the 
plans of the Coast Guard to ensure that at least one cutter 
capable of operating in and patrolling the Bering Sea and 
Arctic Region maintains a presence in the Bering Sea and Arctic 
Region at all times during the 10-year period beginning on the 
date of such submittal. This report shall include the 
following:
    (1) For each cutter of the Coast Guard involved in 
patrolling the Bering Sea and Arctic Region on the day before 
the date of enactment of this act that the Secretary considers 
a legacy cutter, the date on which the Secretary expects to 
decommission the cutter;
    (2) For each cutter described in (1), the date on which the 
Secretary expects to replace the cutter;
    (3) The Committee expects the replacement cutters to meet 
or exceed the current capabilities of the legacy assets, 
keeping in mind the growing presence of China and Russia; and
    (4) The Coast Guard's plan to ensure there are no gaps in 
coverage during this 10-year period.

                           AIDS TO NAVIGATION

    The Coast Guard shall continue to support Aids to 
Navigation [ATON] and maintain billets associated with Coast 
Guard Aids to Navigation Teams.
    Not later than 270 days after the date of enactment of this 
act, the Commandant shall submit to Congress a report on the 
feasibility and advisability of using electronic ATON in the 
Bering Sea and United States areas of the Arctic Ocean, 
including their use in the Port Access Route Study of the Coast 
Guard.

                  VESSEL TRAFFIC IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

    The Committee recognizes the importance of promoting 
domestic trade within the Gulf of Mexico and notes that there 
are shallow areas within the Gulf's Boundary Line, as 
delineated in 46 CFR part 7, that may restrict the safe transit 
of certain non-load line vessels. The Committee therefore 
directs the Coast Guard to examine issues related to the need 
of non-load line vessels, including unmanned barges, to cross 
the Boundary Line temporarily to enable safe transit around 
these shallow areas in the Gulf of Mexico east of 84 degrees 
west longitude. The Committee further directs the Coast Guard 
to specifically identify the vessel safety and loading 
restrictions necessary for safe passage of these non-load line 
vessels. The Coast Guard is also directed to supply a risk 
assessment or other evidence that indicates why 12 nautical 
miles is the appropriate boundary for non-load line vessels. 
The Coast Guard shall report to the Committee not later than 
180 days after the date of enactment of this act.

                       MINOR SHORE INFRASTRUCTURE

    The bill includes long-standing language to allow funds 
from the Operating Expenses appropriation to be used for the 
sustainment, repair, replacement, and maintenance of shore 
infrastructure, including projects to correct deficiencies for 
code compliance or that threaten life, health, or safety to an 
amount not exceeding 50 percent of a building's or structure's 
replacement value. Additionally, Operating Expenses funds are 
allowed to be used for contingent, emergent, or other 
unspecified minor construction projects, which includes new 
construction, procurement, development, conversion, rebuilding, 
improvement, or an extension of any facility not exceeding 
$1,000,000 in total costs at any location for planned or 
unplanned operational needs.
    Minor construction projects funded from the Operating 
Expenses appropriation can be combined with depot level 
maintenance projects for the sake of administrative and 
economic efficiency. The Coast Guard is to provide a report to 
the Committee not later than 45 days after the date of 
enactment of this act detailing such projects and any 
sustainment, repair, replacement, or maintenance projects over 
$1,000,000 for fiscal year 2016. For fiscal year 2017, such 
information shall be included in the congressional budget 
justification.
    The Committee includes requested funding to complete shore 
facility follow-on, as detailed in the Coast Guard's 
congressional budget justification.

                              SMALL BOATS

    The Committee is aware of an outstanding Coast Guard 
requirement to replace aging small response boats and notes 
that the Coast Guard is not procuring enough boats annually to 
meet its acquisition objective. Not less than $18,100,000 shall 
be utilized for small response boat purchases in fiscal year 
2016.
    The bill also includes long-standing language to allow 
funds from the Operating Expenses appropriation to be used for 
the purchase or lease of small boats for contingent and 
emergent requirements (at a unit cost of no more than $700,000) 
and repairs and end-of-service-life replacements. The annual 
cost of these activities is capped at $31,000,000. Unlike major 
procurements requested for the Acquisition, Construction, and 
Improvements appropriation, the Coast Guard's annual request 
for the Operating Expenses appropriation includes minimal 
information about the budget for small boat activities. In 
order to gain more clarity on these matters, the Coast Guard 
shall report to the Committee no later than 30 days after the 
date of enactment of this act detailing planned small boat 
purchases, leases, repairs, and service life replacements for 
fiscal year 2016. For fiscal year 2017, such information shall 
be included in the congressional budget justification.

                   FACILITY SECURITY OFFICER TRAINING

    The Committee is aware of the Coast Guard's intent to 
publish a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking [NPRM] concerning 
Facility Security Officer Training. The Coast Guard is directed 
to move expeditiously on this effort and the Committee expects 
the NPRM will be published during calendar year 2015.

                            COAST GUARD YARD

    The Coast Guard Yard located at Curtis Bay, Maryland, is 
recognized as a critical component of the Coast Guard's core 
logistics capability which directly supports fleet readiness. 
The Committee recognizes the Yard has been a vital part of the 
Coast Guard's readiness and infrastructure for more than 100 
years and believes that sufficient industrial work should be 
assigned to the Yard to maintain this capability. The Committee 
further recognizes the importance of completing the replacement 
of the Oakridge in fiscal year 2016 to keep the In-Service 
Vessel Sustainment program on schedule, to meet the Coast 
Guard's important missions, and save taxpayers' money.

                        FISHING SAFETY TRAINING

    The Committee encourages the Coast Guard to fully comply 
with section 309 of Public Law 113-281, which authorizes 
competitive grants for a Coast Guard-certified Fishing Safety 
Training Grants Program. Once fully implemented, this program 
could provide irreplaceable training that prevents injuries and 
saves countless lives to include hands-on training that is 
essential to the safety and future of commercial fishermen.

                   EXECUTIVE TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT

    The Coast Guard is directed to notify the Committee prior 
to making any changes in the type or number of the command and 
control aircraft.

                ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE AND RESTORATION

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $13,197,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      13,269,000
Committee recommendation................................      13,221,000

    The Environmental Compliance and Restoration account 
provides funds to address environmental problems at former and 
current Coast Guard units as required by applicable Federal, 
State, and local environmental laws and regulations. Planned 
expenditures for these funds include major upgrades to 
petroleum and regulated substance storage tanks, restoration of 
contaminated ground water and soils, remediation efforts at 
hazardous substance disposal sites, and initial site surveys 
and actions necessary to bring Coast Guard shore facilities and 
vessels into compliance with environmental laws and 
regulations.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $13,221,000. The Coast Guard is 
directed to include in its annual budget justification a 
listing of the activities projected to be funded by the amount 
requested under this heading and an updated backlog report for 
Environmental Compliance and Restoration projects, with an 
explanation of how the amount requested will impact this 
documented backlog.

                            RESERVE TRAINING

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $114,572,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     110,614,000
Committee recommendation................................     110,614,000

    The Reserve Training appropriation provides for the 
training of qualified individuals who are available for Active 
Duty in time of war or national emergency or to augment regular 
Coast Guard forces in the performance of peacetime missions.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $110,614,000 for Reserve Training, 
as requested which is $3,958,000 below the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2015.

              ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

Appropriations, 2015....................................  $1,225,223,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................   1,017,269,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,573,269,000

    Funding in this account supports the Acquisition, 
Construction, and Improvement of vessels, aircraft, information 
management resources, shore facilities, aids to navigation, and 
military housing required to execute the Coast Guard's missions 
and achieve its performance goals.
    Vessels.--The vessel program provides funding to 
recapitalize and improve the Coast Guard's fleet of aging boats 
and cutters.
    Aircraft.--The aircraft program is the primary 
recapitalization and sustainment effort for the Coast Guard's 
aging aircraft.
    Other Equipment.--The Coast Guard invests in numerous 
management information and decision-support systems that will 
result in increased efficiencies.
    Shore Facilities and Aids to Navigation.--The Coast Guard 
invests in the acquisition, construction, rebuilding, and 
improvement of shore facilities, aids to navigation, and 
related equipment.
    Military Housing.--The Coast Guard invests in Military 
Housing facilities to ensure military members have access to 
housing in areas where there is a lack of affordable 
accommodations.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $1,573,269,000 for Acquisition, 
Construction, and Improvements, including $24,500,000 from the 
Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund. This is $556,000,000 above the 
amount requested and $348,046,000 above the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2015.
    The increase above the President's request is a reflection 
of what the Committee views as an underfunded recapitalization 
effort which simply cannot provide new assets at the pace 
required. The sheer age of the Coast Guard's assets is 
staggering, including high endurance cutters from the 1960s, a 
dry dock at the Coast Guard Yard which had its heyday during 
World War II, and C-130H aircraft which will continue to age 
without necessary upgrades as they await transfer or 
replacement. The Coast Guard cutter Reliance celebrated its 
50th anniversary in 2014 and in 2015 was at the Coast Guard 
Yard in the dry dock Oakridge for repairs. The combined age of 
these two assets was over 120 years. This poses questions about 
not only mission efficacy but also of crew safety.
    In addition to recapitalizing aging infrastructure and 
vessels, the Committee is concerned about the Coast Guard's air 
fleet mix. While the Coast Guard inducts the C-27J it has 
prudently paused the C-144A but has not indicated to Congress 
whether it still requires additional C-130Js. How the Coast 
Guard expects to transition to an all ``J'' fleet by the mid-
2020s is unclear, and the Coast Guard's Capital Investment Plan 
[CIP] for 2016-2020 is silent. Similarly troubling is the 
neglect of the unmanned aircraft systems [UAS] procurement. The 
Coast Guard will procure its first operational UAS in 2015 at 
the direction of Congress despite having already commissioned 
four National Security Cutters with which they should be 
paired.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                                   ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Vessels:
    Survey and Design--Vessel and Boats...................               500             9,000            15,000
    In-Service Vessel Sustainment.........................            49,000            68,000            68,000
    National Security Cutter..............................           632,847            91,400           731,400
    Offshore Patrol Cutter................................            20,000            18,500            18,500
    Fast Response Cutter..................................           110,000           340,000           230,000
    Cutter Boats..........................................             4,000             3,000             3,000
    Polar Ice Breaking Vessel.............................  ................             4,000             4,000
    Polar Icebreaker Preservation.........................             8,000  ................  ................
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Vessels...................................           824,347           533,900         1,069,900
                                                           =====================================================
Aircraft:
    H-60 Airframe Replacement.............................            12,000  ................  ................
    HC-144 Conversion/Sustainment.........................            15,000             3,000             3,000
    HC-27J Conversion /Sustainment........................            20,000           102,000           102,000
    HC-130J Acquisition/Conversion/Sustainment............           103,000            55,000            55,000
    HH-65 Conversion/Sustainment..........................            30,000            40,000            40,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Aircraft..................................           180,000           200,000           200,000
                                                           =====================================================
Other Acquisition Programs:
    Program Oversight and Management......................            18,000            20,000            20,000
    C4ISR.................................................            36,300            36,600            36,600
    CG-Logistics Information Management System............             5,000             8,500             8,500
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Other Acquisition Programs................            59,300            65,100            65,100
                                                           =====================================================
Shore Facilities and Aids to Navigation:
    Major Construction, ATON, and Survey and Design.......            19,580            41,900            61,900
    Major Acquisition Systems Infrastructure..............            16,000            54,500            54,500
    Minor Shore...........................................             5,000             5,000             5,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Shore Facilities and Aids to Navigation...            40,580           101,400           121,400
                                                           =====================================================
Military Housing..........................................             6,000  ................  ................
                                                           =====================================================
Personnel and Related Support:
    Direct Personnel Costs................................           114,996           116,869           116,869
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Personnel and Related Support.............           114,996           116,869           116,869
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Acquisition, Construction, and Improvements..         1,225,223         1,017,269         1,573,269
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                        CAPITAL INVESTMENT PLAN

    The CIP is essential for the Committee to carry out its 
oversight function of the Coast Guard, especially at a time 
when recapitalization of aging assets has become so critical 
for the service. All of the information required by the 
Committee is in accordance with the Coast Guard's Major Systems 
Acquisition Manual and applicable DHS management directives. 
The fiscal year 2017-2021 plan is to be submitted with the 
fiscal year 2017 congressional budget justification. While the 
Committee appreciates the timely delivery of the 2016-2020 CIP, 
the Coast Guard needs to ensure the document it provides is 
robust and meets congressional intent particularly with respect 
to detailing the deviations from original baseline. For 
example, the Coast Guard has the goal of a C-130 fleet 
comprised entirely of the ``J'' model by the mid-2020s, but 
provides no funding to that end and no roadmap to this fleet. 
The CIP is similarly brief concerning other critical assets 
such as the polar icebreaker and plans for UAS. The Committee 
expects additional details on these areas in the CIP 
accompanying the fiscal year 2017 budget request.

                    QUARTERLY ACQUISITION BRIEFINGS

    The Coast Guard is to continue quarterly briefings on all 
major acquisitions. In addition to the information normally 
provided for each asset, these briefings shall include: the top 
five risks for each acquisition, if applicable, consistent with 
those on the risk watch list in quarterly program manager 
reports, and if the risks have future budget implications; the 
objective for operational hours the Coast Guard expects to 
achieve; the gap between that objective, current capabilities, 
and stated mission requirements; and how the acquisition of the 
specific asset closes the gap. The information presented at 
these briefings shall also include a discussion of how the 
Coast Guard calculated the operational hours, an explanation on 
risks to mission performance associated with the current 
shortfall, and the operational strategy to mitigate such risks. 
Finally, the briefings are to include a status chart on all 
shore construction projects that have not been completed. For 
each construction project, the chart is to include the funding 
status, design status, and procurement and construction status.

                           Survey and Design

    The bill includes $15,000,000 in support of survey and 
design work related to the In-Service Vessel Sustainment [ISVS] 
project. The fiscal year 2016 request supports the multi-year 
engineering survey and design efforts for Healy and 175-foot 
coastal buoy tenders, as well as a Material Condition 
Assessment [MCA] for the Polar Sea. An additional $6,000,000 is 
included above the request for survey and design work 
associated with reactivation of the Polar Sea. The Coast Guard 
is directed to brief the Committee after completion of the MCA 
and subsequent analysis of alternatives prior to obligating 
this additional funding.

                     IN-SERVICE CUTTER SUSTAINMENT

    The bill includes $68,000,000 to continue in-service 
sustainment efforts for the 140-foot icebreaking tugs, mid-life 
service sustainment of the 225-foot ocean-going buoy tender, 
the third of four phases of the Eagle service life extension, 
and engineering work on the 47-foot motor life boat. Given the 
success of the Mission Effectiveness Projects for the medium 
endurance cutters and the 110-foot patrol boats at the Coast 
Guard Yard, the Committee expects the Coast Guard to direct 
sustainment work on all aging vessels there when geographically 
feasible.

                        NATIONAL SECURITY CUTTER

    The National Security Cutter [NSC] is the largest and most 
technologically advanced cutter the Coast Guard has ever placed 
into service. Built to replace the aging 378-foot high 
endurance cutters commissioned in the late 1960s and early 
1970s, the NSC has no peer within the Coast Guard and is 
effectively a floating sector, equally capable of search and 
rescue in the Bering Sea or counternarcotics enforcement in the 
South Pacific. It is also currently the only vessel within the 
Coast Guard capable of detecting and defending its crew against 
chemical, biological and radiological attacks and its suite of 
sensors and secure communications capabilities make its domain 
awareness unmatched in the fleet.
    Since commissioning of the first NSC in 2008 the Legend-
class cutters have demonstrated their efficacy continuously. In 
2012, a newly commissioned NSC was dispatched to the Arctic 
tasked with monitoring exploratory drilling and performing 
domain awareness, operational response, and command and control 
functions. In subsequent years, the NSC had led multinational 
coalitions in the biannual Rim of the Pacific Exercise and 
continues to seize thousands of pounds of illicit drugs bound 
for the United States.
    In 2011, a cutter study commissioned by the Coast Guard 
indicated that ``the NSC has a mature design, stable 
requirements, demonstrated operational performance and 
predictable costs''. And given the Coast Guard's experience 
with its current fleet of high endurance cutters with an 
average age of 46 years old, it's likely that the Coast Guard 
will have the NSCs it procures now for decades to come. The 
Coast Guard has also stated that central to its plan to replace 
its legacy high endurance cutters is a new crew rotation 
concept [CRC] which would ultimately increase days away from 
home port for the new NSCs. Unfortunately, the Coast Guard has 
yet to fully test the CRC and will not understand its 
feasibility until 2019 meaning that the Coast Guard's goal of 
meeting or exceeding operational performance of the legacy high 
endurance cutters within the NSCs Program of Record may fall 
well short of mission needs.
    For these reasons, the Committee recommends $640,000,000 
for award and production costs associated with a ninth National 
Security Cutter, notwithstanding future costs for post-delivery 
activities.

                          FULL FUNDING POLICY

    The Committee again directs an exception to the 
administration's current acquisition policy that requires the 
Coast Guard to attain total acquisition cost for a vessel, 
including long lead time materials [LLTM], production costs, 
and post-production costs, before a production contract can be 
awarded. This has the potential to create shipbuilding 
inefficiencies, force delayed obligation of production funds, 
and require post-production funds far in advance of when they 
will be used. The Department should be in a position to acquire 
vessels in the most efficient manner within the guidelines of 
strict governance measures. The Committee expects the 
administration to adopt a similar policy for the acquisition of 
the Offshore Patrol Cutter [OPC].

                          FAST RESPONSE CUTTER

    The Committee recommends $230,000,000 for the Coast Guard's 
Fast Response Cutter [FRC]. This funding will allow the Coast 
Guard to acquire four FRC hulls (33-36) and supports base award 
of the phase II re-compete FRC production contract. This 
contract will allow options for four, five, or six cutters.

                         OFFSHORE PATROL CUTTER

    The recommendation includes $18,500,000 for the OPC, as 
requested. Funding is provided to support Preliminary and 
Contract Design [P&CD;] deliverables to complete the P&CD; phase 
and related support for the acquisition. The Committee also 
includes language whereby the Department may propose a 
reprogramming or transfer of $70,500,000 to award Detailed 
Design, should the Coast Guard be prepared to award in fiscal 
year 2016.

                      POLAR ICEBREAKER ACQUISITION

    The recommendation includes $4,000,000, as requested, to 
continue initial acquisition activities for a new Coast Guard 
polar icebreaker.

                       UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS

    The Committee is concerned that the Coast Guard will 
commission its fifth NSC in the summer of 2015, but have only 
one UAS pair to support deployments. Since the early days of 
Coast Guard recapitalization under the Deepwater Program, UAS 
were integral to the overall ``system of systems.'' Over a 
decade later, the Coast Guard still appears unsure of how to 
incorporate UAS technology despite examples of such integration 
within DHS and across the Federal Government.
     The Committee expects the Coast Guard to continue its 
long-standing plan to conduct vertical take-off and landing UAS 
flight demonstrations. The Coast Guard has reported to the 
Committee that this system would enhance the surveillance 
capabilities of the NSC and estimates a significant increase in 
the number of prosecutions achieved by the cutter. The 
Committee continues to be very supportive of the use of 
vertical take-off UAS aboard Coast Guard cutters and strongly 
encourages the Coast Guard to ensure that the acquisition 
schedule is not delayed for this enhanced surveillance 
capability. The Committee is encouraged by the successful 
results of the Coast Guard's cutter-based testing and 
evaluation completed in December, 2014. The Coast Guard is 
directed to provide a report outlining its plans to acquire and 
utilize this capability with the fiscal year 2017 budget 
request.

                      INDUCTION OF C-27J AIRCRAFT

    The Committee concurs with GAO recommendations in GAO-15-
325 that induction of the C-27J, while feasible, faces 
significant hurdles. The Committee is eager to understand how 
the Coast Guard plans to purchase sufficient spare parts and 
support technical needs associated with missionizing and 
operating the C-27J over its life. The Committee expects to be 
kept apprised of developments in the program during quarterly 
acquisition briefings.

                SHORE FACILITIES AND AIDS TO NAVIGATION

    The Committee recommends $121,400,000 for shore facilities 
and aids to navigation, which is $20,000,000 above the request. 
This increase provides $26,000,000 for concurrent activities at 
the Coast Guard Yard associated with demolition of the floating 
dry-dock Oakridge and subsequent construction of additional 
ship capacity at the Yard. Funding these phases concurrently 
further restores a loss in capacity 1 year earlier than a 
phased implementation and shortens construction duration and 
uncertainty.

                             AC&I; PERSONNEL

    The Committee provides $116,869,000 for personnel and 
related support, as requested.

                          UNFUNDED PRIORITIES

    The Committee directs the Commandant to provide to 
Congress, at the time of the President's budget submission, a 
list of approved but unfunded Coast Guard priorities and the 
funds needed for each.

              RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $17,892,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      18,135,000
Committee recommendation................................      18,019,000

    The Coast Guard's Research and Development program develops 
techniques, methods, hardware, and systems that directly 
contribute to increasing the productivity and effectiveness of 
the Coast Guard's operating missions. This account provides 
funds to operate and maintain the Coast Guard Research and 
Development Center.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $18,019,000 for the Coast Guard's 
Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation activities. This is 
$116,000 below the amount requested and $127,000 above the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2015.

                              RETIRED PAY

Appropriations, 2015....................................  $1,450,626,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................   1,604,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,604,000,000

    This account provides for the retired pay of military 
personnel of the Coast Guard and Coast Guard Reserve, members 
of the former Lighthouse Service, and for annuities payable to 
beneficiaries of retired military personnel under the retired 
serviceman's family protection plan (10 U.S.C. 1431-1446) and 
survivor benefit plan (10 U.S.C. 1447-1455); payments for 
career status bonuses under the National Defense Authorization 
Act; and payments for medical care of retired personnel and 
their dependents under the Dependents Medical Care Act (10 
U.S.C., ch. 55).

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $1,604,000,000 for Retired Pay. 
This is the same amount as requested and $153,374,000 above the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2015.

                      United States Secret Service


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2015....................................  $1,615,860,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................   1,867,453,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,837,165,000

    The United States Secret Service's [USSS] Salaries and 
Expenses appropriation provides funds for the security of the 
President, the Vice President, and other dignitaries and 
designated individuals; for enforcement of laws relating to 
obligations and securities of the United States and laws 
relating to financial crimes, that include, but are not limited 
to, access device fraud, financial institution fraud, identity 
theft, and computer fraud; computer-based attacks on financial, 
banking, and telecommunications infrastructure; and for 
protection of the White House and other buildings within the 
Washington, DC, metropolitan area. The agency also provides 
support for investigations related to missing and exploited 
children.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $1,837,165,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses. This is $30,288,000 below the amount requested and 
$221,305,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2015.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                               UNITED STATES SECRET SERVICE--SALARIES AND EXPENSES
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Protection:
    Protection of persons and facilities..................           892,685         1,009,246           972,425
    Protective intelligence activities....................            67,536            72,806            71,726
    National Special Security Event Fund..................             4,500             4,500             4,500
    Presidential candidate nominee protection.............            25,500           203,687           203,687
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Protection................................           990,221         1,290,239         1,252,338
                                                           =====================================================
Investigations:
    Domestic field operations.............................           338,295           291,139           294,523
    International field office administration, operations,            34,195            34,168            33,933
     and training.........................................
    Support for missing and exploited children............             8,366                 0             8,366
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Investigations............................           380,856           325,307           336,822
                                                           =====================================================
Headquarters, management, and administration..............           188,380           194,680           191,699
Rowley Training Center....................................            55,378            56,170            55,268
Information Integration and Technology Transformation.....             1,025             1,057             1,038
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Salaries and expenses........................         1,615,860         1,867,453         1,837,165
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       SECRET SERVICE ACTIVITIES

    The Committee recommends $1,252,338,000 for protection of 
persons and facilities, protective intelligence, and 
investigations; $203,687,000 as requested to continue 
preparation for the 2016 presidential campaign, including the 
campaign protective vehicles and communications technology; and 
$43,791,000 consistent with the request to establish the 
protective detail for the next former President. The Committee 
also fully funds requested enhancements within the Protective 
Intelligence Division.
    The Committee has numerous concerns with the structure and 
presentation of the fiscal year 2016 budget. This includes 
complex information technology upgrades such as radio 
procurement outside appropriate programs which exist to track 
such acquisitions, and major acquisitions such as the Next 
Generation Presidential Limousine outside the Acquisitions, 
Construction, Improvement, and Related Expenses account. The 
Committee has directed the movement of funds where applicable 
and expects the fiscal year 2017 budget submission to reflect 
these changes.

        IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PROTECTIVE MISSION PANEL FINDINGS

    Included in its fiscal year 2016 budget request was 
$86,700,000 in ``enhancements'' associated with findings of the 
United States Secret Service Protective Mission Panel [Panel]. 
This funding is in addition to $25,000,000 provided in fiscal 
year 2015, and what the Committee expects will be a 
reprogramming from the Department also in support of these 
enhancements. Given the timing of the Panel's findings however, 
the Committee has already witnessed significant deviation in 
spending priorities brought-on by a combination of current 
events and last minute cost formulations. For that reason, the 
Committee views it as prudent to allocate funds for absolutely 
critical items, including not less than $4,400,000 for the 
Uniformed Division Retention Bonus and not less than $8,200,000 
in support of the Crown fence replacement which shall be 
available for 2 years. Given the large increase in funding as 
well as the complexity and critical nature of these 
enhancements, the Secret Service is directed to submit 
quarterly obligation and expenditure plans for funds associated 
with implementation of the Panel's recommendations.
    As noted in the Committee's hearing on the fiscal year 2016 
budget request for the Secret Service, many of the challenges 
the Panel highlighted are not new and consequently the 
Committee agrees that the Secret Service must commit itself to 
``transformative, continuing change''. To ensure the Panel's 
work is given thoughtful consideration, the Committee directs 
the OIG to conduct a review to begin not earlier than December 
15, 2015, on the status of recommendations made by the Panel. 
The report should include, but not be limited to: concurrence 
with Panel recommendations and subsequent action or 
implementation; non-concurrence with Panel recommendation and 
the associated rationale; and any associated organizational 
changes executed after the Panel released its findings.

                          TRAVEL OF PROTECTEES

    The Secret Service annually includes in its budget 
submission the total number of travel stops for selected 
protectees in the previous fiscal year. To this table, the 
Secret Service is directed to submit all travel costs 
associated with the ``formers'', including former Presidents, 
Vice Presidents, First and Second Ladies. The table will also 
include the total travel stops and costs associated with 
domestic government officials who have been designated by the 
President as requiring protection from the Secret Service.

                   WHITE HOUSE COMPLEX CAMERA SYSTEM

    The Secret Service is directed to brief the Committee not 
later than 30 days after the date of enactment of this act 
concerning the Standard Operating Procedures and any associated 
policies related to the capture and retention of Closed Circuit 
Television Camera systems or other video/audio systems 
operating at the White House Complex and Naval Observatory/Vice 
President's Residence. The briefing shall include, but not be 
limited to: the timeline of video storage, policies or 
procedures associated with retaining specific video segments 
for training or after-action reporting purposes, and any 
privacy, civil liberties or archiving and retention concerns 
with video storage.

                  STATE AND LOCAL CYBERCRIME TRAINING

    In fiscal year 2015, the Committee provided resources in 
continued support of the National Computer Forensics Institute 
[NCFI] which trains State and local law enforcement and legal 
and judicial professionals in computer forensics and cyber 
investigations. This training is critical to bolster State and 
local cyber resources while similarly acting to support the 
Secret Service's Electronic Crimes Task Forces. Since opening 
in 2008, more than 3,800 State and local officials, including 
more than 2,600 police investigators, 982 prosecutors, and 288 
judges from all 50 States and three U.S. territories have been 
trained through NCFI. The Committee recommends $10,000,000 to 
continue this activity which will ensure training requests 
continue to be met.

                          cyber investigations

    The Committee is encouraged by consistent progress made by 
the Secret Service in the realm of cyber investigations. From 
fiscal year 2010 through the first half of fiscal year 2015, 
the Secret Service has affected over 6,155 arrests associated 
with approximately $1.6 billion in fraud losses. Since fiscal 
year 2014, the agency's proactive approach to cyber law 
enforcement is credited with responding to or making 
notifications to over 550 potential victim companies preventing 
billions of dollars in losses. The Secret Service continues to 
train all newly hired special agents in basic computer 
investigations.
    Under the Critical Systems Protection [CSP] program, the 
Secret Service detects and mitigates the potential impact of 
malicious cyber activity on physical security. Since fiscal 
year 2014, the CSP program has conducted 391 advances in direct 
support of protective operations, which includes: 253 for the 
President, 121 for the Vice President, 3 for National Special 
Security Events [NSSE], and 14 for visiting foreign heads of 
state and government.

           NATIONAL CENTER FOR MISSING AND EXPLOITED CHILDREN

    The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children 
[NCMEC] was created in 1984 to serve as the Nation's resource 
on missing and sexually exploited children. The Secret Service 
has provided grant funding to NCMEC since 1997 and currently 
funds 14 percent of their staff including analysts in the 
Exploited Children Division, the entire Age Progression Unit, 
and numerous other outreach and prevention programs. The Secret 
Service also directly supports NCMEC with forensic, technical, 
and investigative support. In fiscal year 2014, the Secret 
Service opened 162 cases resulting in 188 arrests, conducted 
288 polygraph examinations, and completed 333 forensics and 
computer examinations.
    For fiscal year 2016, the Committee recommends $6,000,000 
for grants in support of missing and exploited children and 
expects the USSS to sustain forensic support at the fiscal year 
2015 level of $2,366,000.

                    NATIONAL SPECIAL SECURITY EVENTS

    The Committee recommends $4,500,000, as requested, for 
support to currently planned and unanticipated NSSEs for fiscal 
year 2016. The Committee directs the USSS to provide semiannual 
briefings on the use of these funds, with the first briefing to 
occur not later than March 31, 2016. Also included in the bill 
is a general provision that states that none of the funds in 
this act may be used to reimburse any Federal department or 
agency for its participation in an NSSE.

                      STRATEGIC HUMAN CAPITAL PLAN

    The Committee continues the requirement that not later than 
60 days after the date of enactment of this act, the Secret 
Service is directed to provide a strategic human capital plan 
for fiscal years 2016 through 2020 that aligns mission 
requirements with resource projections and delineates between 
protective and investigative missions. The plan shall address 
how projected resources can provide the appropriate combination 
of special agents and Uniformed Division officers to avoid 
routine leave restrictions, enable a regular schedule of 
mission-critical training, and provide appropriate levels of 
support staffing.

                        REPROGRAMMING THRESHOLDS

    Statutory language is included in the bill setting a higher 
threshold for the reprogramming of funds in section 503 of this 
act to accommodate unanticipated shifts in funding requirements 
for protection and investigation activities.

     ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION, IMPROVEMENTS, AND RELATED EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $49,935,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      71,669,000
Committee recommendation................................      86,974,000

    This appropriation provides funding for security upgrades 
of existing facilities; for information integration and 
technology transformation [IITT]; to continue development of 
the current master plan; to maintain and renovate existing 
facilities, including the James J. Rowley Training Center 
[Center]; and to ensure efficient and full utilization of the 
Center.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $86,974,000 for infrastructure 
improvements, IITT, and other activities. This is $37,039,000 
above the amount provided in fiscal year 2015. Of this amount, 
$26,432,000 is for facilities and $60,542,000 is for IITT.
    The Committee directs that not less than $16,805,000 be 
made available for radio upgrades and that the radio upgrade 
project be included under IITT for the fiscal year 2017 budget 
submission. No longer simple push-to-talk devices, radio 
procurement should be managed as the complex information 
technology program it represents. Their presence within IITT is 
more appropriate and will allow Congress to maintain better 
visibility into this crucial upgrade.
    The Committee is also concerned about the progress and 
delivery of some IITT projects, most notably the Combined 
Operations Logistics Database 2 [COLD2]. It's unclear that the 
USSS will receive the system it originally contracted to 
procure and that the total capability, while useful, falls far 
short of the original intent and by extension should receive 
funding commensurate with that reduction in capability. For 
that reason, the Committee reduces the request associated with 
COLD2 by $1,500,000.
    The Secret Service is directed to brief the Committee no 
later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this act, 
which includes a multiyear investment and management plan, for 
its IITT program for fiscal years 2016 through 2019.

                    James J. Rowley Training Center

    The Committee recommends $26,432,000 for improvements and 
construction at the Center. The increase in fiscal year 2016 
corresponds to findings of the Panel to support the Secret 
Service's canine program as well as tactical training needs. 
Unfortunately, cost estimates provided in the President's 
budget request for these projects were inaccurate. For example, 
renovation of existing kennel facilities for a proposed 
$8,000,000 is not a viable option, and new construction to 
accommodate increased canine usage is required. Similarly, the 
scope and ultimate cost of the White House Mock-Up remains 
uncertain, and the Committee cannot in good conscience provide 
the requested funding until a feasibility study has been 
conducted and design plans with detailed costs have been 
submitted to Congress.
    For these reasons, of the $20,950,000 requested for Panel 
findings the recommendation includes: $4,950,000, as requested, 
for renovation of ranges and tactical training areas; 
$13,100,000 for construction of a new canine facility; and 
$750,000 for a feasibility study and design plan for the White 
House Mock-Up. The Committee directs that the balance of this 
request, $2,150,000, be utilized for deferred maintenance at 
the Center in addition to maintenance funding already requested 
for fiscal year 2016.
    The Secret Service is directed to submit a revised master 
plan for the Center with the fiscal year 2017 budget proposal.

                               TITLE III


            PROTECTION, PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND RECOVERY


              National Protection and Programs Directorate

    The National Protection and Programs Directorate [NPPD] 
aims to foster better integration of national approaches 
between strategic homeland security programs, facilitate 
infrastructure protection, ensure broad emergency 
communications capabilities, and ensure the protection of 
Federal buildings and facilities.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                                  NATIONAL PROTECTION AND PROGRAMS DIRECTORATE
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Management and Administration.............................            61,651            64,191            57,971
Infrastructure Protection and Information Security:
    Infrastructure Protection.............................           271,032           294,912           279,694
    Cybersecurity.........................................           753,200           818,343           819,755
    Communications........................................           164,447           198,434           197,551
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Infrastructure Protection and Information          1,188,679         1,311,689         1,297,000
       Security...........................................
                                                           =====================================================
Federal Protective Service................................         1,342,606         1,443,449         1,443,449
Office of Biometric Identity Management...................           252,056           283,533           283,265
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Protection and Programs Directorate          2,844,992         3,102,862         3,081,685
       (gross)............................................
                                                           =====================================================
Offsetting fee collections................................        -1,342,606        -1,443,449        -1,443,449
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Protection and Programs Directorate          1,502,386         1,659,413         1,638,236
       (net)..............................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                     MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $61,651,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      64,191,000
Committee recommendation................................      57,971,000

    This account funds salaries and expenses for the Office of 
the Under Secretary, which oversees all activities of NPPD. 
This account also funds business operations and information 
technology support services.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $57,971,000 for Management and 
Administration, $6,220,000 below the amount requested and 
$3,680,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2015. 
Within the funds recommended for Cybersecurity and 
Communications, $4,000,000 is for NPPD support of the DHS CHCO 
Cyberskills Support Initiative. To further support the need for 
a robust cybersecurity workforce, the Committee includes the 
full request of $16,369,000 in cybersecurity pay reform.

                           BUDGET SUBMISSION

    Despite repeated suggestions and direction from this 
Committee in the past, NPPD continues to make a sport of 
rearranging resources. The time has come for the Directorate to 
complete the task of determining mission objectives across 
functional areas, properly planning for and allocating 
resources consistent with those objectives, and subsequently 
acting upon the plan ensuring oversight and metrics. Without a 
comprehensive plan, NPPD will continue lurching from one issue 
to the next. Once again, a provision is included requiring NPPD 
to submit its fiscal year 2017 budget request by office and by 
PPA. Each office shall provide: (1) budget detail by object 
classification; (2) the number of full-time equivalents on 
board; (3) the number of full-time equivalent vacancies; and 
(4) the appropriations account(s) used to support the office 
and the programs the office uses. This information shall be 
provided for the previously enacted year and the requested year 
on the day the budget justification is received. NPPD and 
Office of Management and Budget staff are encouraged to work 
with the Committee on the format of the presentation. To help 
facilitate congressional oversight, NPPD is directed to 
continue to brief the Committee quarterly on its obligation and 
expenditure plans, as outlined in the explanatory statement 
accompanying Public Law 114-4 and in title I of this report.

                          PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT

    Part of the challenge in determining the path forward for 
NPPD is the seeming inability of the Directorate to adequately 
staff to appropriate and funded FTE levels. The Committee 
recognizes the inherent challenges in the Federal hiring 
process and recent efforts by NPPD to improve internal 
procedures. Considering unfilled positions from previous 
appropriations, even under the best of hiring conditions, the 
requested net increase of 49 FTE will result in at least 164 
positions going unfilled by the end of fiscal year 2016; 
therefore, 46 of the requested FTEs and $6,624,000 are not 
granted. NPPD is directed to target any available positions to 
those actions which will ensure furthering the core mission. As 
progress is made in future fiscal years and NPPD continues 
demonstrating improvements in the hiring process, further 
consideration can be given to requests for increases. NPPD is 
directed to provide semiannual updates throughout the fiscal 
year on the impact of improvements to the hiring process.

                        COMPONENT COLLABORATION

    The role of NPPD within the Department is vital to the 
overall mission, and priorities must be focused, coordinated, 
and consistent. The Committee maintains an interest in 
maximizing the efforts of FEMA and NPPD through close 
coordination and sharing information. The Committee expects 
FEMA and NPPD to jointly brief on continued collaboration no 
later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this act, 
including how information about critical infrastructure is 
coordinated. Furthermore, NPPD should note language in title I 
regarding gunshot detection technologies. As there may be 
security applications in critical infrastructure protection, 
the Committee expects NPPD to share results of any testing, 
evaluation, and validation of such technologies with relevant 
DHS components.

           INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION AND INFORMATION SECURITY

Appropriations, 2015....................................  $1,188,679,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................   1,311,689,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,297,000,000

    Infrastructure Protection and Information Security [IPIS] 
programs assist the entities and people responsible for 
securing the Nation's critical infrastructure assets. In 
addition, IPIS supports collaborative efforts with State, 
local, public, private, and international entities to secure 
cyberspace and U.S. cyber assets, and reduce the vulnerability 
of the Nation's telecommunications and information technology 
infrastructures.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends total appropriations of 
$1,297,000,000 for Infrastructure Protection and Information 
Security programs, $14,689,000 below the amount requested and 
$108,321,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2015.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                               INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION AND INFORMATION SECURITY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Infrastructure Protection and Information Security:
    Infrastructure Protection:
        Infrastructure Analysis and Planning..............            64,494            75,969            69,951
        Sector Management and Governance..................            64,961            71,311            67,739
        Regional Field Operations.........................            56,550            52,755            52,022
        Infrastructure Security Compliance................            85,027            94,877            89,982
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Infrastructure Protection.............           271,032           294,912           279,694
                                                           =====================================================
Cybersecurity and Communications:
    Cybersecurity:
        Cybersecurity Coordination........................             4,311             4,318             4,275
        US-Computer Incident Response Team [US-CERT]                  98,573            98,642            97,515
         Operations.......................................
        Federal Network Security..........................           171,000           131,202           130,594
        Network Security Deployment.......................           377,000           479,760           478,035
        Global Cybersecurity Management...................            25,873            20,321            27,276
        Critical Infrastructure Cyber Protection and                  70,919            77,584            75,621
         Awareness........................................
        Business Operations...............................             5,524             6,516             6,439
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Cybersecurity.........................           753,200           818,343           819,755
                                                           =====================================================
    Communications:
        Office of Emergency Communications................            37,335            33,025            32,920
        Priority Telecommunications Services..............            53,324            63,649            63,516
        Next Generation Networks..........................            53,293            80,102            79,575
        Programs to Study and Enhance Telecommunications..            10,092            10,418            10,386
        Critical Infrastructure Protection Programs.......            10,403            11,240            11,154
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Communications........................           164,447           198,434           197,551
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Cybersecurity and Communications..........           917,647         1,016,777         1,017,306
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Infrastructure Protection and Information             1,188,679         1,311,689         1,297,000
       Security...........................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION

    The Committee recommends $279,694,000 for Infrastructure 
Protection [IP], $15,218,000 below the amount requested and 
$8,662,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2015.

         NATIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE SIMULATION AND ANALYSIS CENTER

    Of the total amount recommended for Infrastructure 
Protection, not less than $17,150,000, the same amount as 
provided in fiscal year 2015, is for the National 
Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center [NISAC]. The 
NISAC is key to understanding the impact and cascading effects 
of infrastructure failures and disruptions. The Committee 
recognizes the important mission of the NISAC, but also 
encourages NPPD to ensure the Center remains mission-focused 
with a vision toward the future and ability to highlight return 
on investment.

                       VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENTS

    Of the total amount recommended, $15,500,000 is for 
vulnerability assessments, the same amount as provided in 
fiscal year 2015. The Committee notes that in conducting 
assessments on risks to critical infrastructure and key 
resources, interdependencies on associated infrastructure, 
including cyber, are often revealed. The Committee encourages 
NPPD to ensure this information is shared regionally and with 
interested stakeholders within the Department to maximize the 
benefits of the assessments and facilitate planning for 
restoration of services post-disaster.

          REGIONAL RESILIENCY AND INTERDEPENDENCY ASSESSMENTS

    Through the Infrastructure Analysis and Planning PPA, NPPD 
manages a suite of assessment programs including analytic 
assessments, vulnerability assessments, and the Regional 
Resiliency Assessment Program [RRAP]. Together, the three 
programs offer an assessment of critical infrastructure and 
examine vulnerabilities, threats, and potential consequences 
from an all-hazards perspective to identify dependencies, 
interdependencies, cascading effects, resilience 
characteristics, and gaps.
    To date, these programs have achieved encouraging results, 
yet the Committee believes improvements can be gained through a 
better-defined strategic focus and vision. Such analysis can 
aid in project selection, a risk-based application of funding, 
and demonstration of measurable risk reduction through 
quantifiable performance metrics. Therefore, the Committee 
includes an additional $1,500,000 and directs IP to develop and 
submit a 3-year strategic plan that will guide this suite of 
programs with a specific, priority focus on completing 
comprehensive assessments of critical lifeline infrastructure 
dependencies and interdependencies; how to assist FEMA in 
planning assumptions and support grant allocations including 
development of the Threat Hazard Identification and Risk 
Assessments [THIRA]; and enhance the ability of State and local 
officials to understand and address the physical consequences 
of a cyber-event. The plan shall outline a process by which IP 
will conduct a comprehensive assessment in at least 10 of the 
Urban Area Security Initiative regions. This strategic plan 
shall include a detailed set of performance metrics against 
which program effectiveness can be measured and reported to 
Congress on an annual basis. As recommended funds remain 
available, IP is encouraged to begin the assessment process. An 
initial briefing outlining the strategy for this project shall 
be provided within 60 days of the date of enactment of this 
act.

                 COORDINATING INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION

    The Committee recognizes the Department's mission to 
support the protection of critical infrastructure and 
encourages the Department to share best practices to prevent 
incidents like the 2014 alleged arson at the Chicago Air Route 
Traffic Control Center. NPPD, in coordination with other 
appropriate DHS components, is directed to brief the Committee 
within 90 days of the date of enactment of this act on how the 
Department works with the Department of Transportation and 
other relevant agencies to reduce the vulnerability of critical 
infrastructure. The briefing should include how the Department 
consults with other agencies in vetting individuals with access 
to critical infrastructure such as Federal contractors, reviews 
security risks, and coordinates contingency plans. The briefing 
should also include suggested recommendations for relevant 
Committees of jurisdiction if Congress can better facilitate 
interagency information sharing in law.
    The Department needs awareness of incidents involving 
critical infrastructure to support the prevention of or 
response to disasters; however, the Committee is concerned that 
among the current network of centers within the Department, it 
is unclear which centers are specifically charged with a 
critical infrastructure mission and if there is any duplication 
of effort. To gain clarity into the roles and responsibilities 
of each center charged with critical infrastructure protection, 
the Committee directs the following organizations to provide a 
joint briefing within 30 days of the date of enactment of this 
act: the National Watch Center, National Response Coordination 
Center, National Operations Center, National Infrastructure 
Coordination Center, National Cybersecurity and Communications 
Integration Center, and Transportation Security Operations 
Center. This briefing must include the unique roles and 
responsibilities of each center, the costs associated with 
operating the center (including number of personnel), areas of 
duplication, and efforts being taken to streamline and ensure a 
coordinated approach to critical infrastructure protection.

                           BOMBING PREVENTION

    The Office of Boming Prevention [OBP] shall be funded at 
$11,595,000, which is the same amount as requested and 
$2,595,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2015. The 
increase above the fiscal year 2015 level will provide for 
assessment and analyses of: bomb squads; explosives detection 
and SWAT team capabilities throughout the Nation; point-of-sale 
and suspicious activity awareness; and bombing risk mitigation 
training. The amount recommended will also sustain needed 
training, information sharing, and awareness for State, local, 
and private sector entities regarding how terrorists use 
explosives, in addition to needed analysis of counter-
explosives requirements, capabilities, and gaps. The Committee 
is aware of OBP's efforts to work with the National Guard on 
training and encourages the Office to analyze efficiencies that 
could be gained through coordination with the National Guard 
mission.

                           LARGE VENUE SAFETY

    The Committee directs NPPD to fully fund training of safety 
and security professionals charged with public protection at 
large venues with large crowds. The Committee encourages the 
Department to continue strengthening existing partnerships with 
institutions and centers that have well-developed training 
programs for security personnel to meet safety and security 
requirements at large venues, including those that host 
professional, collegiate, and amateur sporting events. Such 
entities should possess unique resources, research, and 
programs that can be combined to enhance dissemination of 
effective security techniques to sports safety venue 
professionals.

                           CHEMICAL SECURITY

    The Committee recommends $89,982,000 for Infrastructure 
Security Compliance, $4,895,000 below the request and 
$4,955,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2015. 
Within the amount recommended, the Committee directs 
$13,115,000 for the Ammonium Nitrate Security Program, which 
will institute new requirements on the sale and transfer of 
ammonium nitrate to prevent the misappropriation or use of 
ammonium nitrate in an act of terrorism. The Committee notes 
that delays in promulgating regulations for ammonium nitrate 
reduce the need for the funding requested in fiscal year 2016. 
NPPD is encouraged to continue engaging with stakeholders to 
finalize a rule as expeditiously as possible to improve 
security and prevent terrorists' use of ammonium nitrate.
    The Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standard [CFATS] 
secures the Nation's high-risk chemical facilities through 
regulation, inspection, and enforcement. The program has 
struggled to meet timely implementation goals in the past; 
however, authorizing legislation was enacted last year 
codifying the program and providing needed guidance. Moving 
forward, the Committee expects NPPD to implement the program 
based on the new law and specific measures of performance. 
Further, NPPD is directed to brief the Committee within 90 days 
of the date of enactment of this act to explain how these 
metrics will be institutionalized including a list of why 
facilities leave the CFATS program; an outline quantifying 
whether CFATS is truly increasing security compared to existing 
security measures in place; and, a timeline for which NPPD will 
complete the backlog of security plan approvals and site 
visits.
    The Under Secretary of NPPD is directed to provide a report 
on the implementation of CFATS to the relevant Committees of 
jurisdiction on a semiannual basis that includes the number of: 
facilities covered, inspectors, completed inspections, 
inspections completed by region, pending inspections, days 
inspections are overdue, enforcements resulting from 
inspections, and enforcements overdue for resolution. This data 
should be delineated by tier. The first report shall be 
submitted not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of 
this act.

                             CYBERSECURITY

    The Committee recommends $819,755,000 for Cybersecurity 
programs, $1,412,000 above the budget request and $66,555,000 
above the fiscal year 2015 level. Through NPPD, DHS helps 
secure the government cyber-domain by providing overarching 
services and capabilities and best practices that agencies are 
to deploy to protect their information technology 
infrastructure.

                    NOTIFICATION OF CYBER-INCIDENTS

    The basis and process by which the Committee is notified of 
cyber-incidents appears ad hoc and uncoordinated. NPPD is 
directed to develop a systematic process, in coordination with 
other potentially impacted Departments and agencies, by which 
the Committee is notified of major cyber-incidents, including 
any event involving another Federal agency. This process should 
include a tiered approach starting with initial notification, 
then interim updates, and culminating in a briefing, to be 
classified if appropriate. The development of such a process 
will ensure the Committee that the Department is developing a 
course of action and working with those impacted to resolve the 
issue and prevent further incidents. NPPD should seek advice 
from Federal agencies who regularly notify Congress on events 
for best practices.

                 CYBERSECURITY INFORMATION COORDINATION

    The National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration 
Center [NCCIC] serves as a centralized location to coordinate 
and integrate operational elements involved in cybersecurity 
and communications protection and resilience. Significant 
progress has been made in recent years to codify and focus the 
priorities of the NCCIC, yet the Center has struggled in 
incorporating all the needed private sector partners and 
developing mission-specific strategic priorities. For example, 
after more than 5 years in operation, the NCCIC has full-time 
representation from only four of the 18 private sector critical 
infrastructure Information Sharing and Analysis Centers [ISAC]. 
The NCCIC provides impressive statistics regarding reports, 
alerts, and warnings communicated to Federal and non-Federal 
partners; however, a methodology for analyzing these 
statistics, communicating trends, and developing comprehensive 
protective measures necessary to prevent or reduce the impact 
of evolving cybersecurity trends is lacking.
    Within 180 days of the date of enactment of this act, NPPD 
is directed to brief the Committee on efforts to include 
metrics throughout NCCIC programs and processes to include: 
properly scaling operations, particularly in regard to 
engagement with stakeholders; implementing policies and 
procedures to provide technical assistance in conjunction with 
U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Teams to Federal civilian 
agencies to prevent and respond to data breaches, including 
those involving unauthorized access to personally identifiable 
information; and improving the threat indicator process to 
better align information with action.

                        FEDERAL NETWORK SECURITY

    Of the total amount for cybersecurity, the Committee 
recommends $130,594,000 for Federal Network Security, of which 
$98,509,000, the full amount requested, is to provide 
continuous diagnostics and mitigation [CDM] for the civilian 
Federal computer network to detect malicious activity on 
government networks. Through the CDM program, NPPD provides 
Federal civilian agencies with tools and services to identify 
network security issues. Awards throughout fiscal years 2015 
and 2016 will ultimately cover over 60 additional Federal 
agencies. CDM also provides each agency with detailed 
information into specific, prioritized risks through the use of 
dashboards which are expected to be fully operational for all 
agencies by fiscal year 2017.
    As directed through previous appropriations, each 
participating agency must continue to plan and budget for 
security needs consistent with current law and policies as well 
as emerging threats and needs. NPPD shall provide its expertise 
and capabilities to supplement, but not supplant, the budget 
and responsibilities of other agencies.

                      NETWORK SECURITY DEPLOYMENT

    The National Cybersecurity Protection System [NCPS], known 
as Einstein, was deployed in 2004, and has been upgraded in 
stages to address the evolving threat through technological 
advances. The Committee is pleased to see the continued 
enhancements to the Einstein program and notes that 51 agencies 
have signed memorandums of agreement to participate in Einstein 
services, representing approximately 96 percent of all Federal 
civilian personnel. GAO is currently conducting a comprehensive 
review of the Einstein program's effectiveness including 
whether the system meets stated objectives, DHS has designed 
requirements for future stages of the system, and Federal 
agencies have adopted the system. The Committee expects NPPD 
will act upon reasonable recommendations without delay.

                    ENHANCED CYBERSECURITY SERVICES

    The Enhanced Cybersecurity Services [ECS] program is 
another DHS-sponsored protection and information sharing 
capability between selected Commercial Service Providers and 
validated critical infrastructure companies as well as State 
and local customers. While the relationship between ECS and the 
private sector has been utilized since this program began as a 
pilot in 2010, the addition of State and local partners is 
relatively new. Since these governments oversee the safety of, 
and in some cases directly operate elements of the electrical 
grid, water utilities, public transportation, communications 
systems, and other key assets, it is critical they have access 
to the latest tools. The Committee expects NPPD to ensure ECS 
stakeholders are engaged in the development of requirements and 
process improvements. Overall, the ECS program must be scalable 
and integrated with other programs within the Directorate. Not 
later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this act, 
NPPD is to report to the Committee on its strategy to integrate 
State and local stakeholders in the ECS process, develop a 
strategy to make the ECS program scalable, and the strategic 
priorities moving forward.

                       STATE AND LOCAL ENGAGEMENT

    The Committee awaits the biannual National Cybersecurity 
Review which contains key information about State and local 
government resiliency against, and readiness for, cyber-
incidents. The Committee directs NPPD to utilize this review to 
develop a strategic plan on how best to integrate with State 
and local leaders on the issue of cybersecurity. The Committee 
further directs a briefing upon the release of this Review to 
include stakeholders that participated in the effort. Outreach 
and integration with stakeholders is not a one-size-fits-all 
proposition. As State and local governments continue to 
struggle with and expand cybersecurity capabilities, NPPD can 
support these efforts by increasing access to, and promoting 
greater awareness of Federal cybersecurity tools, training, 
exercises, and technical assistance. Close collaboration is 
also required during the response to a cyber-threat or incident 
to critical infrastructure. Although the majority of the 
Nation's critical infrastructure is owned and operated by the 
private sector, the immediate physical consequences of a major 
attack would largely fall to State and local governments to 
manage. To this end, the strategic plan should include how 
Federal, State, and local partners work together as well as an 
assessment of the role the National Guard has in cybersecurity 
initiatives.
    Finally, just as the National Response Framework provides a 
strategic outline for how the Nation responds to major natural 
hazards or terrorist attacks, an update to the National Cyber 
Incident Response Plan should guide the response to a cyber-
incident and define the roles and responsibilities of various 
government stakeholders. NPPD must ensure State and local 
governments are engaged from the beginning of the process. 
Within 90 days of the date of enactment of this act, NPPD is 
directed to brief the Committee on the timeline for updating 
the National Cyber Incident Response Plan, and the plan to 
engage with State and local government and private sector 
stakeholders in the development of the framework.

                    GLOBAL CYBERSECURITY MANAGEMENT

    The Committee recommends $27,276,000 for Global 
Cybersecurity Management, of which no less than $15,810,000 is 
for cybersecurity education. Due to the importance of the 
Software Assurance Program, the Committee rejects the proposal 
to eliminate funds for the program and includes $1,679,000, the 
same amount as provided in fiscal year 2015. For the second 
consecutive year, the administration's proposal to reduce 
funding for cybersecurity education is denied. The 
cybersecurity education programs are critical to establishing a 
robust workforce for the future. Should NPPD wish to 
discontinue or relocate these programs within the Department, 
such changes should be addressed in a comprehensive manner 
through the budget process and the Committee should be briefed 
accordingly so the proposal can be adequately assessed. As 
future priorities for cybersecurity education are evaluated, 
the Committee directs NPPD to consider education providers that 
specialize in the delivery of nationally recognized onsite and 
Internet-based education programs. Programs focusing on issues 
such as creation of new and updated curricula, development of 
simulation and animation delivery of degree program training 
and education, workforce development, and creation of 
mentorship and technician-level research opportunities will 
broaden the appeal of cybersecurity education programs 
nationwide.

                             COMMUNICATIONS

    The Committee recommends $197,551,000 for communications 
programs, $883,000 below the amount requested and $33,104,000 
above the amount provided in fiscal year 2015.

                        EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS

    Of the total amount recommended, $32,920,000 is for the 
Office of Emergency Communications [OEC], $105,000 below the 
amount requested, and $4,415,000 below the fiscal year 2015 
level.
    The Committee remains committed to ensuring Federal funding 
for interoperability is used to enhance communications among 
Federal, State, and local first responders, consistent with 
each community's needs. The Committee directs OEC to continue 
working with FEMA to ensure that applicable Department fiscal 
year 2016 guidance for first responder grant programs includes 
appropriate guidance based on factors including effectiveness, 
risk, and affordability for newer capabilities as they become 
available.
    The Committee also is concerned regarding the need to 
develop innovative programs to improve emergency medical 
response through the use of improved public safety 
communications systems, educational programs, and research. 
Therefore, the Committee directs OEC to consider how best to 
leverage existing technologies to help establish or sustain 
statewide medical communications systems and utilize existing 
infrastructures to improve the delivery of rural medical care.
    The Committee notes the publication of the second National 
Emergency Communications Plan in November 2014. The Plan 
highlights that the goals of reaching interoperability in 
specific geographical areas, as set forth in the first Plan 
(published in 2008), have been completed. Further, the update 
explains the communications operating environment has changed 
with new technologies, modernization, and demands from public 
safety and citizens. Several recommendations and objectives are 
included in the Plan which is broad-reaching and more complex 
than the initial plan but it lacks specific timeframes and 
metrics to evaluate progress. OEC shall provide a report to the 
Committee no later than 120 days after the date of enactment of 
this act outlining the measures that will be used to evaluate 
fulfillment of the goals. Additionally, the report shall 
include a description of how DHS and OEC work with Federal 
agencies to ensure current and future programs such as FEMA 
preparedness grants, FirstNet, and other programs work together 
to meet the needs of national emergency communications.

                        NEXT GENERATION NETWORKS

    Of the total amount recommended, $79,575,000 is for the 
Next Generation Networks Program, $527,000 below the request, 
and $26,282,000 above fiscal year 2015. This funding provides 
the next significant increment to ensure priority calls can be 
placed on the most current technology during disasters and 
emergencies.

                       FEDERAL PROTECTIVE SERVICE

Appropriations, 2015....................................  $1,342,606,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................   1,443,449,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,443,449,000

    The Federal Protective Service [FPS] is responsible for the 
security and protection of Federal property under the control 
of the General Services Administration [GSA]; and for the 
enforcement of laws for the protection of persons and property, 
the prevention of breaches of peace, and enforcement of any 
rules and regulations made and promulgated by the GSA 
Administrator and/or the Secretary. The FPS authority can also 
be extended by agreement to any area with a significant Federal 
interest. The FPS account provides funds for the salaries, 
benefits, travel, training, and other expenses of the program, 
offset by collections paid by GSA tenants and credited to the 
account.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $1,443,449,000, as requested, for 
salaries and expenses of the Federal Protective Service for 
fiscal year 2016. This amount is fully offset by collections of 
security fees. The amount requested for the 2016 pay adjustment 
is not assumed in the funds allocated. FPS should utilize funds 
allocated to meet its highest priority, unfunded needs.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                                           FEDERAL PROTECTIVE SERVICE
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Basic security............................................           275,763           275,763           275,763
Building-specific Security................................           600,615           665,121           665,121
Reimbursable Security Fees (Contract Guard Services)......           466,228           502,565           502,565
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Protective Service...................         1,342,606         1,443,449         1,443,449
                                                           =====================================================
Offsetting Fee Collections................................        -1,342,606        -1,443,449        -1,443,449
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee, as in previous years, includes a provision 
requiring a strategic human capital plan. It is noted that the 
first strategic plan was submitted on March 12, 2014, and GAO 
is currently reviewing it as required in the joint explanatory 
statement accompanying the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 
2014. Should the review be completed and find no outstanding 
issues before enactment of the fiscal year 2016 act, it is 
possible the requirement will not need to be continued. Through 
this effort, the Committee expects FPS to utilize this human 
capital plan to help manage risk-based resource allocation 
efforts, thereby tying the actual needs of Federal facilities 
to measurable outcomes. The Committee expects this to be done 
in conjunction with efforts for more transparency on issues 
such as personnel surges and fee increases.

                OFFICE OF BIOMETRIC IDENTITY MANAGEMENT

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $252,056,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     283,533,000
Committee recommendation................................     283,265,000

                                MISSION

    The mission of the Office of Biometric Identity Management 
[OBIM] is to collect, maintain, and share biometric data with 
authorized DHS, Federal, State, tribal, local law enforcement 
agencies, and strategic foreign partners. As the agency 
responsible for maintaining the Automated Biometric 
Identification System [IDENT] and a biometric center of 
expertise, OBIM provides an invaluable capability to ensure 
national security, public safety and the integrity of the 
Nation's immigration system. OBIM is charged with fostering 
full interoperability and real-time data sharing among the 
Homeland Security, Justice, and Defense Departments' biometric 
identity management systems. OBIM also must ensure that 
biometrics can be used as the means to link associated 
biographic information such that individuals can be uniquely 
identified, serving its customers' security, facilitation, and 
customer service needs.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee recommends $283,265,000 for OBIM. This is 
$268,000 below the request and $31,209,000 above the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2015. Of the total amount available, 
the Committee expects OBIM to allocate not less than 
$65,800,000 for Increment 1 of the successor system to IDENT. 
This includes funding for the planning, acquisition, and 
maintenance for Increment 1 of the new system and assumes an 
additional $11,802,515 from recoveries is also available. This 
first increment is funded with the understanding that current 
estimates for follow-on increments are accurate. These include 
$52,800,000 for Increment 2, $40,000,000 for Increment 3, and 
$46,700,000 for Increment 4. OBIM is directed to find cost-
savings across all phases as system construction begins and 
ensure measurable performance metrics are built-in to ensure 
proper assessment of the new system.
    The IDENT system has proven to be an adaptable tool in 
helping to secure our Nation's borders. Over the years, the 
system has been scaled to keep pace with rapidly growing 
identification demands. The matching system has grown from a 2-
finger system to a 10-print multi-stage matching solution. 
Today, the system houses over 180 million 10-print records. The 
Committee expects the modernized system to upgrade and enhance 
the IDENT system to include, among other features, an 
additional biometric matching modalities. As Increment 1 of the 
new system is developed, OBIM is directed to provide regular 
briefings to the Committee on the status of new system, future 
cost savings to out-year costs, as well as a full accounting of 
any additional funds being utilized.

                          SEMIANNUAL BRIEFINGS

    OBIM is directed to continue briefing the Committee on a 
semiannual basis on its workload and service levels, staffing, 
modernization efforts, and other operations.

                        FOCUSED CUSTOMER SERVICE

    OBIM is expected to continue its strong coordination with 
DHS and interagency partners to ensure appropriate focus on 
customer needs and service through regular, informal means of 
communication as well as through the official mechanism of the 
OBIM Executive Stakeholder Board.
    OBIM shall continue efforts to enroll into IDENT TSA's 
special vetted populations as well as departmental employees 
and contractors, which has been a priority for a number of 
years. These populations and other potential future populations 
would enable better security and improve customer service. 
Consequently, OBIM is directed to include the status of these 
projects in its semiannual briefings.

                           IDENTITY SERVICES

    DHS is encouraged to work cooperatively with the 
Departments of Justice, Defense, and State to standardize and 
share biometric information. The Committee directs OBIM to 
continue semiannual briefings on progress toward integrating 
the various systems, including Unique Identity, to describe 
existing capability gaps and a methodology by which to close 
them. Further, the Committee encourages OBIM to continue its 
data sharing and connectivity improvement efforts with the 
Intelligence Community.

                        OFFICE OF HEALTH AFFAIRS

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $129,358,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     124,069,000
Committee recommendation................................     122,924,000

    The Office of Health Affairs [OHA], headed by the Chief 
Medical Officer who also serves as the Assistant Secretary for 
Health Affairs, leads the Department on medical issues related 
to natural and man-made disasters; serves as the principal 
advisor to the Secretary on medical and public health issues; 
coordinates biodefense activities within the Department; and 
serves as the Department's primary contact with other 
Departments and State, local, and tribal governments on medical 
and public health issues.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends total appropriations of 
$122,924,000, $1,145,000 below the request and $6,434,000 below 
the fiscal year 2015 level, for Office of Health Affairs 
programs. As requested, no funds are included for official 
reception and representation expenses since they have not been 
utilized in previous years and are not needed.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                                            OFFICE OF HEALTH AFFAIRS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
BioWatch..................................................            86,891            83,278            83,278
National Biosurveillance Integration Center...............            10,500             8,000             8,000
Chemical Defense Program..................................               824               824               824
Planning and Coordination.................................             4,995             4,957             4,957
Salaries and Expenses.....................................            26,148            27,010            25,865
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of Health Affairs.....................           129,358           124,069           122,924
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                BIOWATCH

    The Committee recommends $83,278,000 for the BioWatch 
Program, the amount requested, and $3,613,000 below the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2015. This funding sustains current 
operations including the refresh and recapitalization of 
equipment.
    The Committee remains supportive of next generation bio-
detection technology and the use of effective emerging 
technologies. The current gaps in timeliness and agent 
detection should be addressed. The Committee understands OHA 
and S&T; are working together and with professionals in the 
field, but is concerned the effort lacks an aggressive 
strategic plan in considering new technologies and in 
developing a comprehensive approach to future investments. OHA 
and S&T; are directed to provide a briefing to the Committee no 
later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this act on 
the way forward to determine the future of this detection 
capability, including a description of available and emerging 
technologies and a process and timeframe for decision-making.

              NATIONAL BIOSURVEILLANCE INTEGRATION CENTER

    The Committee recommends $8,000,000 for the National 
Biosurveillance Integration Center [NBIC], the same amount as 
requested and $2,500,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2015.
    The Committee remains concerned that the NBIC is not fully 
implementing aspects of the 2012 strategic plan which purports 
to provide for additional measurement and validation of 
projects to ensure the accomplishment of specific goals. 
Ongoing projects must demonstrate metrics of performance. OHA 
must seriously evaluate the methods in which resources are 
allocated and projects are evaluated and ensure projects 
conform to the priorities of the strategic plan. Therefore, the 
Committee directs OHA to provide a briefing within 90 days of 
the date of enactment of this act to outline comprehensive 
efforts in place and being developed to adequately demonstrate 
the return on investment of all NBIC pilot projects.
    In addition to current NBIC initiatives, OHA should 
consider the potential health threats including the health-
related policies and planning efforts in support of overseas 
missions of DHS components. Currently, there is no validated or 
verified information on health risks available. As OHA works to 
develop future pilot projects, consideration should be given to 
those initiatives which provide operational support to 
personnel overseas in health protection and readiness, 
including international health data acquisition, display, and 
analysis to meet the needs of multiple Federal agencies.

                        CHEMICAL DEFENSE PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends $824,000 for the Chemical Defense 
Program, the same amount as requested and as provided in fiscal 
year 2015.
    OHA has selected four cities across the United States for 
demonstration projects aimed at developing a comprehensive 
chemical defense framework and best practices to share how the 
Public Health community engages in large-scale events.
    OHA shall brief the Committee on its report following the 
completion of the demonstration projects in fiscal year 2016. 
The Committee also notes the interagency participation in this 
effort, including CBP, HHS, and CDC, and encourages continued 
cooperation with partners in the field.

                  Federal Emergency Management Agency

    The primary mission of the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency [FEMA] is to reduce the loss of life and property and 
protect the Nation from all hazards, including natural 
disasters, acts of terrorism, and other manmade disasters, by 
leading and supporting the Nation in a risk-based, 
comprehensive emergency management system of preparedness, 
protection, response, recovery, and mitigation.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                                       FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Salaries and Expenses.....................................           934,396           949,296           928,806
State and Local Programs..................................         1,500,000      2,231,424\1\         1,500,000
Firefighter Assistance Grants.............................           680,000             (\2\)           680,000
Emergency Management Performance Grants...................           350,000             (\2\)           350,000
Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program...............            -1,815              -305              -305
United States Fire Administration.........................            44,000            41,582            44,000
Disaster Relief Fund:
    Base..................................................           595,672           661,740           661,740
    Disaster Relief Category..............................         6,437,793         6,712,953         6,712,953
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Disaster Relief Fund......................         7,033,465         7,374,693         7,374,693
                                                           =====================================================
Flood Hazard Mapping and Risk Analysis....................           100,000           278,625           190,000
National Flood Insurance Fund.............................        179,294\3\        181,198\3\        181,198\3\
National Predisaster Mitigation Fund......................            25,000           200,001           100,000
Emergency food and shelter................................           120,000           100,000           100,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Emergency Management Agency..........        10,785,046        11,175,316        11,267,194
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes $670,000,000 proposed for Firefighter Assistance Grants and $350,000,000 proposed for Emergency
  Management Performance Grants, which continue to be funded in separate appropriations.
\2\Funding proposed under State and Local Programs.
\3\Fully offset by fee collection.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $934,396,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     949,296,000
Committee recommendation................................     928,806,000

    Funding for FEMA Salaries and Expenses provides for the 
development and maintenance of an integrated, nationwide 
capability to prepare for, mitigate against, respond to, and 
recover from the consequences of major disasters and 
emergencies, regardless of cause, in partnership with Federal 
agencies, State, local, and tribal governments, volunteer 
organizations, and the private sector. The Salaries and 
Expenses account supports FEMA's programs by coordinating 
between headquarters and regional offices the policy, 
managerial, resource, and administrative actions.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends a total appropriation of 
$928,806,000 for FEMA Salaries and Expenses, which is 
$20,490,000 below the request and $5,590,000 below fiscal year 
2015. The reduction partially reflects a significant under-burn 
of personnel costs in fiscal year 2015 and anticipated in 
fiscal year 2016. Should FEMA wish to realign the available 
resources within Salaries and Expenses, a revised expenditure 
plan shall be submitted to the Committee not later than 90 days 
after the date of enactment of this act.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                                              SALARIES AND EXPENSES
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Administrative and Regional Offices.......................           244,183           243,323           236,428
    Office of National Capital Region Coordination........           (3,400)                 -           (3,422)
Preparedness and Protection...............................           180,797           190,928           178,679
Response..................................................           175,986           168,466           172,363
    Urban Search and Rescue Response Systems..............          (35,180)          (27,513)          (35,180)
Recovery..................................................            55,789            51,472            50,768
Mitigation................................................            28,876            25,753            27,641
Mission Support...........................................           145,316           168,437           162,010
Centrally Managed Accounts................................           103,449           100,917           100,917
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Salaries and Expenses........................           934,396           949,296           928,806
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                           PROGRAM ACTIVITIES

    After many years of shifts in programs contained in FEMA 
Salaries and Expenses programs, the account has normalized 
through recent budgets. This demonstrates FEMA leadership's 
commitment to address actual need and planning considerations 
for future year costs. The Committee expects FEMA to continue 
this diligence by ensuring submissions accurately reflect the 
true costs of managing the agency to include costs coming from 
the Disaster Relief Fund.
    Of the total amount made available, $27,500,000 is included 
for Mount Weather capital improvements and operations, as 
requested.
    Of the total amounts recommended, not less than: $2,000,000 
is for the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC) under 
the Preparedness and Protection PPA; $2,470,515 is for the 
National Hurricane Program under the Response PPA; $8,500,000 
is for the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program and 
$9,100,000 is for the National Dam Safety Program under the 
Mitigation PPA. Funding levels for each of these programs are 
maintained at fiscal year 2015 levels after adjusting for one-
time expenditures. For the second year in a row, the budget 
request recommends a reduction in EMAC funding. The Committee 
continues to struggle with the justification for these proposed 
reductions given the inherent cost savings associated with a 
robust national mutual aid system since EMAC allows State and 
local jurisdictions to be more self-reliant. The proposed cut 
would reduce training, upgrades to the Mutual Aid Support 
System, and readiness activities and is therefore rejected.

                     MEASURING GRANT EFFECTIVENESS

    FEMA has made progress in attempting to measure the 
performance of the grant programs through the use of the Threat 
Hazard Identification and Risk Assessments [THIRA], State 
Preparedness Reports, and the National Preparedness Report. But 
preparedness reports alone cannot adquately measure our gains 
and gaps in capabilities. Implementation of the THIRA process 
across preparedness efforts is central to assessing return on 
investment. At the same time, the THIRA is only the first step 
in the preparedness process for FEMA and grantees which should 
also include rigorous strategic planning, coordinated funding 
decisions, and gap assessments. The THIRA must aid in informed, 
measurable investments to build capabilities that address the 
risk from all hazards. Once in place, the THIRA allows the 
Nation's preparedness planners to turn swiftly to a new 
adversary, emerging hazard, or evolving threat. To gain better 
awareness of the current state of the THIRA and preparedness 
process, FEMA is directed to develop an analysis of THIRA and 
the overall preparedness process and provide it to the 
Committee no later than the end of fiscal year 2016. The 
analysis should include an assessment of how grantees and sub-
grantees utilize the THIRA for planning purposes; barriers to 
fully integrating the THIRA into preparedness efforts; and 
changes that could be made to the preparedness grant programs 
to fully incorporate the THIRA. FEMA shall brief the Committee 
within 60 days of the date of enactment of this act on the 
execution plan for this effort and within 30 days of the end of 
fiscal year 2016, to present the final analysis.

                   INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY RESILIENCE

    In previous appropriations, the Committee has provided FEMA 
with increases above the total requested to ensure the agency's 
Automation Modernization process could continue. The funding 
and direction gave FEMA a start to modernize its systems for 
better performance and future costs savings. The Committee is 
pleased with the emerging efforts from FEMA, including a robust 
IT resiliency and cyber request this year. The Committee 
includes the requested amounts of $5,917,000 for continuation 
of the newly developed IT Resiliency Review in the Mission 
Support PPA and $3,200,000 in upgrades to the financial 
management system in the Administrative and Regional Offices 
PPA. The Committee is encouraged by recent efforts of FEMA's 
Chief Information Officer to adequately inventory and 
coordinate the various legacy IT systems within the agency. The 
IT Resiliency Review has reduced the number of IT systems and 
applications from 567 to less than 200. This has improved the 
agency's Federal Information Security Management Act [FISMA] 
score, facilitated proper validation of existing systems, and 
allowed the agency to gain better situational awareness of 
activities throughout headquarters and the Regions. FEMA shall 
continue to provide regular updates to the Committee throughout 
implementation of this effort.

                     GRANTS MODERNIZATION STRATEGY

    The Committee recommends $10,000,000, as requested, in the 
Protection and National Preparedness PPA to begin 
implementation of the Grants Management Modernization Strategy 
which will consolidate more than 14 disparate grants management 
systems and create a more streamlined and effective interface 
for grantees and financial management personnel. The Committee 
commends FEMA for conducting due diligence in the analysis of 
this proposal, outlining clear cost savings, and assessing 
alternatives. The Committee directs FEMA to provide regular 
updates on the development and roll-out of this initiative.

             OFFICE OF NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION COORDINATION

    The Committee recommends $3,422,000 for the Office of 
National Capital Region Coordination [ONCRC], the same amount 
as provided in fiscal year 2015. The Committee recognizes the 
unique responsibilities of the Office in coordinating emergency 
preparedness and response activity in a high-population area, 
where the workforce is made up of many independently operating 
Federal agencies and the District of Columbia, and where 
National leaders and foreign dignitaries are ever present. A 
permanent provision included in the Department of Homeland 
Security Appropriations Act, 2013, requires inclusion of the 
Governors of the State of West Virginia and the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania in the National Capital Region decision-making 
process for mass evacuations. FEMA is directed to include 
officials from the counties and municipalities that contain the 
evacuation routes and their tributaries in the planning 
process.

                URBAN SEARCH AND RESCUE RESPONSE SYSTEM

    The Committee recommends $35,180,000 for the Urban Search 
and Rescue [USAR] Response System, $7,667,000 above the request 
and the same amount as provided in fiscal year 2015. Funding 
will sustain the existing system and additional chemical, 
biological, nuclear, radiological, and explosives capabilities 
gained in fiscal year 2012. The budget request lacked any level 
of detail as to the justification for the proposed cut to the 
USAR program. Should the funding level for USAR require 
adjustment, FEMA is directed to include such justification with 
the budget including how any proposed adjustments to the 
program would impact nationwide capability.

                          BUDGET PRESENTATION

    The Committee directs FEMA to submit its fiscal year 2017 
budget request, including justification materials, by office. 
Each office and FEMA region shall include (1) budget detail by 
object classification; (2) the number of FTE on-board; (3) the 
number of FTE vacancies; and (4) the appropriations account(s) 
used to support the office and the programs managed by the 
office. The level of detail provides improved transparency and 
refined tracking of actual spending.

                         ENSURING RAIL SECURITY

    The Committee recognizes that the increase in crude oil 
transported by rail poses new challenges to State and local 
officials and first responders. The objective in ensuring safe 
crude oil transport must be to prevent accidents and mitigate 
their impacts when they do occur. This means Federal agencies 
working together to ensure not only guidelines for tanker car 
construction, but also sufficient inspectors and track 
inspections and enhanced training for first responders. The 
movement of crude oil must be collaborative across industry 
leaders, those charged with protecting critical infrastructure, 
and emergency management professionals. Therefore, the 
Department is directed to provide a briefing to the Committee 
within 60 days of the date of enactment of this act to outline 
how NPPD and FEMA programs are addressing the issue of crude 
oil movement, those actions being taken to address gaps in 
capabilities at the State and local levels, and any unfulfilled 
needs in coordinating with other departments and agencies. When 
awarding grants and providing training, the Committee expects 
FEMA to consider the unique needs of first responders in 
meeting the issues related to crude oil shipping by rail.

                  FOCUSING ON COMPREHENSIVE MITIGATION

    The Committee fully supports robust mitigation programs 
within FEMA, but is adamant that the focus of the mitigation 
should be against the hazard itself and not on causation of 
hazards. Mitigation programs within FEMA are diverse and 
implementation often varies widely by region and type of 
hazard. The common thread in these mitigation programs, 
however, is the return on investment in encouraging and 
implementing strong risk reduction measures. Therefore, when 
addressing priorities through any mitigation programs within 
FEMA, the agency is directed to focus programmatic priorities 
and guidance to grantees on the risk reduction aspects of 
hazards versus causation.

                     SANDY RECOVERY IMPROVEMENT ACT

    In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, Congress provided FEMA with 
multiple tools to improve the speed and cost-effectiveness of 
public assistance and debris removal programs, including the 
ability to get full funding for Public Assistance projects up-
front based on agreed-upon cost estimates. These reforms are 
designed to save State, local, and Federal governments 
significant amounts of time and money in the long-run. FEMA is 
directed to continue working with grantees on how to gain 
acceptance of these opportunities and integrate the new 
authorities into broader reforms of the Public Assistance 
program. As previously instructed by the Committee, FEMA is 
also directed to continue documenting the savings in time and 
costs, and expedited recovery opportunities afforded 
communities due to these programmatic changes.

                        STATE AND LOCAL PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2015....................................  $1,500,000,000
Budget estimate, 2016\1\................................   2,231,424,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,500,000,000

\1\Includes $670,000,000 proposed for Firefighter Assistance Grants and 
$350,000,000 proposed for Emergency Management Performance Grants, which 
continue to be funded in separate appropriations.

    Funding for State and Local Programs provides grants for 
training, equipment, planning, and exercises to improve 
readiness for potential disasters.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $1,500,000,000 for State and Local 
Programs, $298,576,000 above the amount requested in comparable 
programs and the same amount as provided in fiscal year 2015. 
The following table summarizes the Committee's recommendations 
as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget request levels:

                                            STATE AND LOCAL PROGRAMS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Grants:
    National Preparedness Grant Program...................  ................         1,043,200  ................
    State Homeland Security Grant Program.................           467,000  ................           467,000
        Operation Stonegarden.............................          (55,000)  ................          (55,000)
    Urban Area Security Initiative........................           600,000  ................           600,000
        Nonprofit Security Grants.........................          (13,000)  ................          (25,000)
    Public Transportation Security/Railroad Security......           100,000  ................           100,000
        Amtrak............................................          (10,000)  ................          (10,000)
        Over-Road Bus Security............................           (3,000)  ................  ................
    Port Security Grants..................................           100,000  ................           100,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Grants................................         1,267,000         1,043,200         1,267,000
                                                           =====================================================
Emergency Management Performance Grants...................             (\1\)           350,000             (\1\)
Firefighter Assistance Grants.............................             (\1\)           670,000             (\1\)
Education, Training, and Exercises:
    Emergency Management Institute........................            20,569            19,523            20,569
    Center for Domestic Preparedness......................            64,991            62,860            64,991
    National Domestic Preparedness Consortium.............            98,000            42,000            98,000
    National Exercise Program.............................            19,919            25,841            19,919
    Continuing Training/Center for Homeland Defense                   29,521            18,000            29,521
     andPSecurity.........................................
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Education, Training, and Exercises........           233,000           168,224           233,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, State and Local Programs.....................         1,500,000         2,231,424         1,500,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Funds appropriated under a separate account.

                              GRANT REFORM

    The Committee notes that the budget request includes a 
proposal for grant reform, similar to the fiscal year 2013, 
2014, and 2015 requests. Until such time as the appropriate 
authorizing committees have assessed the proposal, the 
Committee believes the budget process is not the appropriate 
avenue for implementation. The Committee therefore recommends 
funds in accordance with current law and provides funding in 
the same manner as fiscal year 2015. Should authorizing 
legislation be completed before enactment of fiscal year 2016 
appropriations, adjustments could be considered. As evaluation 
of the proposal continues, FEMA is directed to evaluate the 
effects of the grant reform on small and rural communities as 
well as how the proposed system could better address the need 
to measure the return on investment of these grants and submit 
a report to the Committee within 180 days of the date of 
enactment of this act. This report could be done in conjunction 
with the requirement regarding THIRA implementation.

                           GRANTS MANAGEMENT

    The Committee includes specific timeframes for grant dollar 
distribution. For each of the grant programs, funding 
opportunity announcements shall be issued in 60 days, 
applicants shall apply within 80 days after announcements are 
made, and FEMA shall act on the application within 65 days 
after applications are due.
    The Committee is concerned that State and local 
cybersecurity issues are not receiving the needed resources and 
attention, and the Department should encourage State and local 
governments to include their Chief Information Officers in 
planning efforts. Further, serious consideration shall be given 
to eligible applications to protect networks against cyber-
attacks and the Department shall work to raise awareness among 
State and local governments of the need to strengthen their own 
cyber-defenses and of the resources available for such purpose. 
The Committee also is concerned regarding the need to develop 
innovative programs to improve emergency medical response 
through the use of improved public safety communications 
systems, educational programs, and research. FEMA is encouraged 
to work with grantees to consider how best to leverage existing 
technologies to help establish and sustain statewide medical 
communications systems and utilize existing infrastructures to 
improve the delivery of rural medical care. FEMA should ensure 
the need to address emerging issues, including unique hazards 
such as volcanic activity, are considered through eligible 
programs.
    FEMA is directed to work with grantees, particularly Urban 
Area Security Initiative [UASI] recipients, on planning and 
sustainment of resources needed for preparedness to ensure that 
if Federal funding fluctuates, gains in preparedness can be 
sustained.

                 STATE HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends $467,000,000 for the State 
Homeland Security Grant Program [SHSGP], of which $55,000,000 
shall be for Operation Stonegarden. Activities previously 
funded under Metropolitan Medical Response System, Citizens 
Corps, Regional Catastrophic Preparedness, Emergency Operations 
Centers, Driver's Licenses Security Program, Buffer Zone 
Protection Program, and the Interoperable Emergency 
Communication Grant Programs in fiscal year 2011 are eligible 
for funding under SHSGP.
    Operation Stonegarden grants shall continue to be 
competitively awarded and shall not be restricted to any 
particular border. As in previous years, FEMA is directed to 
ensure all border States shall be eligible to apply in fiscal 
year 2016.

                     URBAN AREA SECURITY INITIATIVE

    The Committee recommends $600,000,000 for UASI, of which 
$25,000,000 shall be for nonprofit entities determined to be at 
high risk by the Secretary. Eligibility for nonprofit entities 
shall not be limited to UASI communities. Activities previously 
funded under Metropolitan Medical Response System, Citizens 
Corps, Regional Catastrophic Preparedness, Buffer Zone 
Protection Program, Emergency Operations Centers, and the 
Interoperable Emergency Communication Grant Programs in fiscal 
year 2011 are eligible for funding under UASI.
    The Committee notes that the 9/11 Act requires FEMA to 
conduct a risk assessment for the 100 most populous 
metropolitan areas annually. All such areas are eligible for 
UASI funding based on threat, vulnerability, and consequence.

              LAW ENFORCEMENT TERRORISM PREVENTION PROGRAM

    In accordance with section 2006 of the Homeland Security 
Act of 2002, the Law Enforcement Terrorism Prevention Program 
[LETPP] is funded through a required set aside of 25 percent of 
the funds appropriated through the SHSGP and UASI programs. The 
Committee directs FEMA to provide clear guidance to States and 
urban areas to ensure that the intent of LETPP is fully 
realized.

     PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ASSISTANCE, RAILROAD SECURITY 
         ASSISTANCE, AND OVER-THE-ROAD BUS SECURITY ASSISTANCE

    The Committee recommends $100,000,000 for Public 
Transportation Security Assistance, Railroad Security 
Assistance, and Over-the-Road Bus Security Assistance. Of the 
recommended amount, no less than $10,000,000 is for Amtrak 
security needs.

                          PORT SECURITY GRANTS

    The Committee recommends $100,000,000 for the Port Security 
Grant Program.

                   EDUCATION, TRAINING, AND EXERCISES

    The Committee recommends $233,000,000 for Education, 
Training, and Exercises, $64,776,000 above the request and the 
same amount as fiscal year 2015.
    Of this amount, the Committee recommends $64,991,000 for 
the Center for Domestic Preparedness [CDP] and notes a 
permanent provision in the Department of Homeland Security 
Appropriations Act, 2013, regarding training conducted at CDP. 
CDP provides specialized all-hazards preparedness training to 
State, local, and tribal emergency responders on skills tied to 
national priorities, particularly those related to terrorist 
attacks using weapons of mass destruction [WMD] and mass 
casualty events. It is the Nation's only live-agent training 
facility for civilian responders, and it offers a unique 
environment allowing them to train using toxic nerve agents and 
live biological agents in safety. The Committee recognizes the 
work done thus far at CDP in updating active shooter policies 
and encourages collaboration with other training facilities to 
ensure such advancements in curriculum are implemented 
throughout the full Federal, State, and local training 
spectrum. A provision is included permitting the Administrator 
to use the funds provided under paragraph (5) under this 
heading to acquire real property for the purpose of 
establishing or appropriately extending the security buffer 
zones for FEMA-owned training facilities. Funding used for such 
purpose shall only come from funds specifically appropriated to 
the facility for which the property is acquired.
    The Committee seeks to ensure CDP maintains all appropriate 
assets to fulfill both its primary mission of training State 
and local responders, as well as its cooperative efforts to 
provide training to Federal agencies under the Economy Act. To 
that end, FEMA is directed to conduct an analysis of CDP 
funding mechanisms for capital improvements, facilities 
maintenance, and general wear and tear. FEMA shall brief the 
Committee on the findings of this study within 180 days of the 
date of enactment of this act.
    Within the total, the Committee includes $98,000,000 for 
the National Domestic Preparedness Consortium [NDPC], instead 
of the requested $42,000,000. The Consortium, authorized by the 
9/11 Act, has conducted training in all 50 States and each U.S. 
territory. Over 2,258,000 first responders have been trained to 
date. Funding shall be distributed in accordance with the 9/11 
Act as in previous years. The Committee notes that high-profile 
attention and media coverage of spectator sports and special 
events present a significant risk as potential targets for 
international and domestic terrorists. Intelligence and law 
enforcement agencies conduct investigations and devise 
strategies to thwart acts of terrorism. The Committee is 
concerned with the level of training provided to State and 
local responders to address such events and recommends FEMA and 
NDPC partner with organizations specializing in training 
dealing with spectator sports events and special events. The 
Committee notes the importance of FEMA-certified training in 
natural hazards for first responders.
    The Committee includes $29,521,000 for Continuing Training 
Grants. Within the total, the Committee includes $18,000,000 
for the Center for Homeland Defense and Security [CHDS]. 
Congress has been funding CHDS since 2001. As such, the 
Committee is pleased to see the Department take ownership of 
this unique asset in homeland security and emergency management 
by including a specific request in the budget submission. CHDS 
programs include a fully accredited Master's Degree program; 
executive education seminars for Governors, locally elected 
officials, and their senior department leaders; an Executive 
Leaders Program; a Fusion Center Leaders Program; a peer-
reviewed online academic journal; a university and agency 
partnership effort; and an online homeland security library. 
These endeavors advance the strategic and critical thinking 
abilities of emergency management and homeland security 
personnel in their daily responsibilities, policy 
deliberations, and relationships with senior leadership within 
their jurisdictions. Moving forward, FEMA is directed to 
consider the personnel requirements of this DHS asset 
particularly where unused FTE allocations from fiscal year 2015 
could be applied. The remaining $11,521,000 for Continuing 
Training shall be for training grants as in previous years 
based on known and emerging needs.
    The Committee includes $20,569,000 for the Emergency 
Management Institute [EMI], $1,046,000 above the request and 
the same amount as provided in fiscal year 2015. The Committee 
notes EMI's requirement to deliver training for a wide number 
of homeland security response scenarios. The Committee 
understands that technical assistance partners have been used 
where particular expertise is needed to meet this requirement. 
The Committee therefore encourages EMI to continue these 
partnerships, particularly with academic institutions that have 
proven track records of providing FEMA, EMI, and other 
comparable entities with technical expertise.
    The Committee includes $19,919,000 for the National 
Exercise Program [NEP]. The Committee is concerned about 
bureaucratic obstacles to conducting a robust exercise program 
throughout the agency and Department. For purposes of approval 
and reporting requirements, the Department requires all 
exercises be considered ``conferences.'' This adds a 
significant burden to programmatic staff when attempting to 
plan and conduct exercises. The National Exercise Division 
supports the conduct and evaluation of approximately 75 
exercises per year while the Radiological Emergency 
Preparedness [REP] Program conducts an additional 34 exercises. 
The REP exercises are required by regulation, are scheduled up 
to 5 years in advance, and are costly to States, locals, and 
industry as well as for the sponsors. The Committee directs 
FEMA to work with the Department to develop a mutually agreed 
upon arrangement which ensures the planning and conduct of 
exercises is effective and efficient.
    Many of these education, training, and exercise programs 
have been funded since before the creation of the Department. 
As the threats facing our Nation have evolved, so too have the 
capabilities of first responders and homeland security and 
emergency management personnel. Despite the vast improvements 
to our national system, the time has come for these programs to 
undergo a rigorous review so the true return on this investment 
may be determined. Therefore, FEMA is directed to develop 
measurable performance metrics by which all the education, 
training, and exercise programs can be evaluated individually 
and holistically for quality, and cost-effectiveness, and must 
extend beyond cost-per-student or exercise data and include 
impact and actionable outcomes. The Committee expects FEMA to 
provide a briefing on the findings of this effort no later than 
180 days after the date of enactment of this act.

                     Firefighter assistance grants

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $680,000,000
Budget estimate, 2016\1\................................................
Committee recommendation................................     680,000,000

\1\Budget request proposes $670,000,000 under State and Local Programs.

    Firefighter assistance grants, as authorized by section 33 
of the Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974 (15 
U.S.C. 2229), assist local firefighting departments for the 
purpose of protecting the health and safety of the public and 
firefighting personnel, including volunteers and emergency 
medical service personnel, against fire and fire-related 
hazards.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $680,000,000 for firefighter 
assistance grants, including $340,000,000 for firefighter 
assistance grants, and $340,000,000 for firefighter staffing 
grants, to remain available until September 30, 2017. This is 
$10,000,000 above the amount requested and the same amount as 
provided in fiscal year 2015.
    The Committee directs the Department to continue the 
present practice of funding applications according to local 
priorities and those established by the United States Fire 
Administration [USFA], and to continue direct funding to fire 
departments and the peer review process. The Committee expects 
that the rural fire department funding level will be consistent 
with the previous 5-year history, and encourages FEMA to 
prioritize resources for staffing grants to rural departments 
that meet both local and regional needs. FEMA shall brief the 
Committee no later than 30 days after the date of enactment of 
this act if there is an anticipated fluctuation. As in the 
past, bill language is included granting the Secretary the 
authority to waive certain statutory requirements. FEMA is 
directed to work with stakeholders and present a recommendation 
to the Committee no later than the submission of the fiscal 
year 2017 budget on the feasibility of removing this waiver in 
future appropriations.

                EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PERFORMANCE GRANTS

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $350,000,000
Budget estimate, 2016\1\................................................
Committee recommendation................................     350,000,000

\1\Budget request proposes $350,000,000 under State and Local Programs.

    Funding requested in this account provides support to the 
Nation's all-hazards emergency management system and helps to 
build State and local emergency management capability.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $350,000,000 for Emergency 
Management Performance Grants [EMPG], which is the same amount 
as provided in fiscal year 2015. The Committee directs FEMA to 
retain EMPG as a separate grant program and not to combine its 
funding with any other grant allocation or application process.
    The Committee notes the purpose of EMPG is to sustain an 
all-hazards emergency capability at the State and local level. 
It should be noted, FEMA capabilities are only used when a 
State is overwhelmed in its ability to support a disaster and 
the President declares Federal assistance is needed. According 
to the National Emergency Management Association and the U.S. 
Council of the International Association of Emergency Managers, 
in fiscal year 2014, in addition to the 45 Presidential 
declarations, 27,006 events required State assets, but did not 
reach the level of a gubernatorial declaration, and 17,890 
local and tribal events were supported using EMPG funds without 
State or Federal support. This level of activity and the 
requirement for all levels of government to work together for 
unexpected disasters demonstrates the importance of sustaining 
a nationwide capability. The Federal contribution through EMPG, 
which is a little over $1 per citizen, is matched by over 50 
percent from State and local governments. This system enables 
an efficient response and assists in reducing costs to the 
Disaster Relief Fund [DRF]. FEMA is directed to take into 
account the unique purpose of EMPG, as defined in the Stafford 
Act, when developing grant guidance.

              RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PROGRAM

Appropriations, 2015....................................     -$1,815,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................        -305,000
Committee recommendation................................        -305,000

    The Radiological Emergency Preparedness [REP] Program 
assists State and local governments in the development of off-
site radiological emergency preparedness plans within the 
emergency planning zones of commercial nuclear power facilities 
licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission [NRC]. The fund 
is financed from fees assessed and collected from the NRC 
licensees to recover the amounts anticipated to be obligated in 
the next fiscal year for expenses related to REP program 
activities.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee provides for the receipt and expenditure of 
fees collected, as authorized by Public Law 105-276. The budget 
estimates fee collections to exceed expenditures by $305,000 in 
fiscal year 2016.
    Through implementation of the REP Program, FEMA has 
developed not only specialists in the field, but also a 
capacity for a wide-range of radiation responses. Direction for 
FEMA to streamline exercise planning requirements for REP is 
included in the Education, Training, and Exercises section of 
this report.

                   UNITED STATES FIRE ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $44,000,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      41,582,000
Committee recommendation................................      44,000,000

    The mission of the USFA is to reduce losses, both economic 
and human, due to fire and other emergencies through training, 
research, coordination, and support. USFA also prepares the 
Nation's first responder and healthcare leaders through 
ongoing, and when necessary, expedited training regarding how 
to evaluate and minimize community risk, improve protection to 
critical infrastructure, and be better prepared to react to 
all-hazard and terrorism emergencies.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $44,000,000 for USFA, which is 
$2,418,000 above the amount requested and the same amount as 
provided in fiscal year 2015. FEMA is encouraged to utilize the 
amount included above the request to allow for the continued 
development of the National Fire Incident Reporting System 
[NFIRS].
    The Committee is concerned that the current version of 
NFIRS operates on a 15-year-old platform and the current state 
of, and future plans for, NFIRS lack aggressive and innovative 
solutions. The Committee recommends FEMA address the shortfalls 
and long-term planning needs of NFIRS in future budget 
submissions.
    USFA, in cooperation with FEMA, is directed to continue its 
traditional funding for the congressionally mandated National 
Fallen Firefighters Memorial and related activities, which 
support the needs of survivors after the loss of a firefighter 
in the line of duty. Full USFA funding, combined with a grant 
from the Department of Justice and private sector support, is 
critical to sustain these services.

                          DISASTER RELIEF FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2015\1\.................................  $7,033,465,000
Budget estimate, 2016\2\................................   7,374,693,000
Committee recommendation\2\.............................   7,374,693,000

\1\Includes disaster relief category funding of $6,437,792,622.
\2\Includes disaster relief category funding of $6,712,953,000.

    Through the Disaster Relief Fund [DRF], the Department 
provides a significant portion of the total Federal response to 
victims in presidentially declared major disasters and 
emergencies. Major disasters are declared when a State requests 
Federal assistance and proves that a given disaster is beyond 
the local and State capacity to respond. Under the DRF, FEMA 
will continue to operate the primary assistance programs, 
including Federal assistance to individuals and households; and 
public assistance, which includes the repair and reconstruction 
of State, local, and nonprofit infrastructure. The post-
disaster hazard mitigation set-aside to States, as part of the 
DRF, works as a companion piece to the National Predisaster 
Mitigation Fund.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends funding the request of 
$7,374,693,000 for DRF, of which $6,712,953,000 is provided 
under the disaster relief adjustment pursuant to Public Law 
112-25. In future budget submissions, FEMA is directed to 
include the Disaster Readiness Support in all DRF documentation 
including adequate justifications for all programmatic 
expenditures. Only through appropriate oversight of these funds 
can the Committee fully understand the true costs of 
administering FEMA programs. The Committee directs FEMA to 
continue working on efforts to better understand annual costs 
to ensure readiness for disasters shared between FEMA Salaries 
and Expenses and FEMA DRF, and improvements to the alignment of 
such costs.
    The Committee includes bill language requiring an 
expenditure plan and semiannual reports for disaster readiness 
and support costs; and a monthly report on disaster relief 
expenditures. The Committee recommends bill language 
transferring $24,000,000 to OIG for audits and investigations.
    In December 2014, GAO released a report (GAO-15-65) 
entitled ``Opportunities Exist to Strengthen Oversight of 
Administrative Costs for Major Disasters.'' This report found 
excessive administrative costs were taken by the agency from 
fiscal years 2004 to 2013. During that time, FEMA obligated 
$12.7 billion from the DRF for its administrative costs which 
totals 13 percent of the total amount appropriated over 650 
disasters. For comparison, States and locals utilized only $1.4 
billion, or an average of 3 percent, over the same period. 
While the Committee recognizes the inherently higher costs of 
conducting disaster response at the Federal level, this 
disparity seems excessive and should be addressed. Therefore, 
within 120 days of the date of enactment of this act, FEMA is 
directed to brief the Committee on steps being taken to reduce 
administrative costs within FEMA, ensure costs are right-sized 
at the grantee and sub-grantee levels, and address GAO's 
recommendations.
    Further, given the rise in the frequency and severity of 
all hazards, the Committee fundamentally believes that States, 
as well as tribal and local governments, must plan ahead for 
unexpected costs. Not only will these governments need to have 
funds to respond to the increasing number of disasters and 
incidents that do not meet the criteria for Federal assistance, 
but they also must meet cost share requirements for 
Presidentially declared disasters. Through the fiscal year 2015 
explanatory statement, FEMA was directed to make 
recommendations regarding financial steps State, local, and 
tribal governments can take to better prepare for disasters 
including methodologies for calculating reserves and best 
practices. FEMA shall brief the Committee on the results of 
this effort not later than 180 days of the date of enactment of 
this act.
    In Senate Report 113-198, this Committee noted that FEMA 
and OIG have engaged in a process to identify preventative 
measures to eliminate waste, fraud, and abuse. Further, the 
Committee set an expectation that FEMA and OIG present specific 
solutions and measurable results within fiscal year 2015. The 
Committee looks forward to such presentation, which shall take 
place within 90 days of the date of enactment of this act.
    The Committee notes safe room construction is an eligible 
expense under HMGP and under PDM and early warning systems are 
eligible expenses under HMGP. FEMA is expected to give serious 
consideration to eligible applications.

                 FLOOD HAZARD MAPPING AND RISK ANALYSIS

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $100,000,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     278,625,000
Committee recommendation................................     190,000,000

    This appropriation supports the functions necessary to 
develop, and keep current, flood risk information and flood 
maps. The flood maps are used to determine appropriate risk-
based premium rates for the National Flood Insurance Program, 
to complete flood hazard determinations required of the 
Nation's lending institutions, and to develop appropriate 
disaster response plans for Federal, State, and local emergency 
management personnel.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $190,000,000 for Flood Hazard 
Mapping and Risk Analysis, $88,625,000 below the amount 
requested and $90,000,000 above the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2015. In total, the bill provides $311,271,000 for flood 
mapping when combined with $121,271,000 in fee funded mapping 
activity. This increase reflects the strong commitment of this 
Committee to robust flood mapping. The Committee directs FEMA 
to ensure any mapping updates are done in coordination with 
ongoing State and local flood mitigation efforts.
    The Committee is concerned regarding how Federal mapping 
and mitigation programs integrate with efforts conducted at the 
State and local levels of government. FEMA must ensure FEMA's 
flood mapping works in concert with communities' flood 
protection projects so that efforts are accurately reflected in 
insurance rates. Large mitigation projects are often done in 
phases, so flood maps and insurance rates should be coordinated 
with each phase of the project and adjusted accordingly based 
on new projections. FEMA is directed to brief the Committee not 
later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this act on 
steps being taken by the agency to ensure these Federal, State, 
and local government efforts are integrated.
    The development of current and accurate flood maps using 
the best available engineering and hydrologic data remains a 
high priority for the Committee, and it is encouraged that 
FEMA's Technical Mapping Assistance Committee [TMAC] began 
meeting in September 2014. With respect to TMAC's work, in its 
fiscal year 2015 committee report, the Committee directed FEMA 
to provide, no later than 120 days after the commencement of 
the TMAC, a report ``outlining the scope of its activities, 
timeframe for implementation of such activities and any costs 
associated.'' Recommendations from TMAC are due on October 1, 
2015. The Committee looks forward to the timely submission of 
that report, and publication of TMAC's recommendations, so they 
can appropriately inform the President's budget request and the 
Committee's deliberations, for fiscal year 2017.

                     NATIONAL FLOOD INSURANCE FUND

Appropriations, 2015\1\.................................    $179,294,000
Budget estimate, 2016\1\................................     181,198,000
Committee recommendation\1\.............................     181,198,000

\1\Fully offset by fee collection.

    The National Flood Insurance Fund [NFIF] is a fee-generated 
fund which provides funding for the National Flood Insurance 
Program [NFIP]. This program enables property owners to 
purchase flood insurance otherwise unavailable in the 
commercial market. The National Flood Insurance Act of 1968 
authorizes the Federal Government to provide flood insurance on 
a national basis. This insurance is available to communities 
which enact and enforce appropriate floodplain management 
measures and covers virtually all types of buildings and their 
contents.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $181,198,000, as proposed in the 
budget, for NFIF activities related to floodplain management, 
flood mapping and mitigation, and flood insurance operations.
    The Committee is appalled by allegations that fraudulent 
behavior has shortchanged NFIP policyholders on claims filed as 
a result of damage from Hurricane Sandy. The ongoing efforts by 
FEMA to address the issue are recognized, and the agency is 
directed to continue working to determine the facts, hold 
accountable those found responsible for any fraud, and ensure 
that policyholders are treated fairly. FEMA is further directed 
to keep all committees of jurisdiction apprised as negotiations 
progress and reforms are considered.
    The Committee notes the importance of the Community Rating 
System [CRS] and believes FEMA should continue ensuring 
adequate resources for a robust and nationwide program. Since 
1990, CRS has encouraged voluntary community floodplain 
management activities in excess of NFIP minimum standards. As a 
community implements additional mitigation activities, local 
residents become eligible for NFIP policy discounts. The 
Committee directs FEMA to utilize partnerships with public/
private, higher education, not-for-profit, and other 
institutions with expertise in the CRS program to provide 
technical assistance and help promulgate the program across the 
country.
    The Committee notes that the Community Assistance Program 
provides resources to States to assist and monitor NFIP 
participating communities that is essential to effective 
implementation of the NFIP. This program provides funding to 
States who then provide technical assistance to communities in 
the NFIP and evaluate community performance in implementing 
NFIP floodplain management activities. Unlike competitive grant 
programs for projects, its purpose is to build capacity by 
providing knowledge and expertise and ensure compliance with a 
Federal program.
    The Committee is pleased that the Cooperating Technical 
Partners effort within the mapping budget contributes to 
supporting the mapping activities and fosters local confidence 
in map products. Community buy-in on flood maps often leads to 
local public and private risk reduction actions. This 
cooperative fiscal approach benefits all levels of government.

                 FEDERAL FLOOD RISK MANAGEMENT STANDARD

    On January 30, 2015, the President issued Executive Order 
13690 establishing a new Federal Flood Risk Management Standard 
and amending Executive Order 11988 (Floodplain Management). The 
Committee has heard numerous concerns about the new standard 
from many potentially affected stakeholders. These concerns 
include the process by which the standard was developed, the 
lack of clarity as to which specific programs and activities 
will be affected, and the uncertainty related to how each 
agency will implement the new standard. Further, the Committee 
remains frustrated with the quality of the responses from the 
executive branch on this issue. Therefore, the Committee 
includes bill language directing that none of the funds made 
available by this or any other act shall be used by any Federal 
agency to prepare, issue, administer, or implement the FFRMS 
until such time as the administration can demonstrate to the 
Committee that all concerns have been addressed.

                  NATIONAL PREDISASTER MITIGATION FUND

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $25,000,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     200,001,000
Committee recommendation................................     100,000,000

    The National Predisaster Mitigation [PDM] Fund provides 
grants to States, communities, territories, and tribal 
governments for hazard mitigation planning and implementing 
mitigation projects prior to a disaster event. PDM grants are 
awarded on a competitive basis. This program operates 
independent from, but in concert with, the Hazard Mitigation 
Grant Program [HMGP], funded through the Disaster Relief Fund, 
which provides grants to a State in which a disaster has been 
declared.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $100,000,000 for PDM, $100,001,000 
below the amount requested and $75,000,000 above the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2015. This increase demonstrates the 
continued strong support of the Committee for mitigation 
efforts. FEMA is directed to remain vigilant, however, of how 
these funds are balanced between planning and true mitigation 
projects. The intention of the Committee is for the majority of 
the increase in funding to be utilized for actual mitigation 
projects since the past several years have allowed for a 
greater focus on planning. The Committee continues to support 
predisaster mitigation, and recognizes the importance of 
coordinating predisaster mitigation projects with projects 
being completed through the post-disaster HMGP. Furthermore, as 
already noted, the Committee directs these funds to remain 
focused on actual hazards and not speculation on causation.

                       EMERGENCY FOOD AND SHELTER

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $120,000,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     100,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     100,000,000

    This appropriation funds grants to nonprofit and faith-
based organizations at the local level to supplement their 
programs for emergency food and shelter to provide for the 
immediate needs of the homeless.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $100,000,000 for Emergency Food 
and Shelter Program [EFSP], which is the same amount as 
requested and $20,000,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2015. The Committee recognizes the EFSP is one program, in 
conjunction with other Federal programs, which serve those in 
immediate need of food and shelter assistance.
    A provision is included directing the transfer of EFSP to 
the Department of Housing and Urban Development [HUD]. The 
transfer is intended to facilitate coordination among similar 
programs currently managed by HUD and further the effectiveness 
of the program. The EFSP has proven itself an effective public-
private partnership, supplementing critical public and 
nonprofit services to meet the immediate and short-term needs 
of individuals and families facing economic crisis. The 
Committee emphasizes that this program is not duplicative of 
other HUD programs, and therefore shall retain its original 
purpose and not be combined with other HUD programs. Further, 
the Committee expects that FEMA and HUD will enter into an 
Interagency Agreement within 30 days of the date of enactment 
of this act detailing how the program will be transitioned, 
including ensuring proper funds management of prior year 
obligations, close out of previous grants, and handling of 
recoveries. The agreement should also outline staffing terms 
between the agencies to ensure timely and efficient transfer of 
roles and workloads. FEMA and HUD shall conduct regular 
outreach efforts with appropriate stakeholders to ensure a 
transparent, orderly transition.

                                TITLE IV


            RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, TRAINING, AND SERVICES


           United States Citizenship and Immigration Services

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $124,435,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     129,671,000
Committee recommendation................................     119,671,000

    United States Citizenship and Immigration Services [USCIS] 
funds expenses necessary for the administration of laws and the 
provision of services related to people seeking to enter, 
reside, work, and naturalize in the United States. In addition 
to directly appropriated resources, fee collections are 
available for the operations of USCIS.
    Immigration Examinations Fees.--USCIS collects fees from 
persons applying for immigration benefits to support the 
adjudication of applications, as authorized by the Immigration 
and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1356).
    H-1B and L Fraud Prevention and Detection Fees.--USCIS 
collects fees from petitioners seeking a beneficiary's initial 
grant of H-1B or L nonimmigrant classification or those 
petitioners seeking to change a beneficiary's employer within 
those classifications (Public Law 108-447).
    H-1B Nonimmigrant Petitioner Fees.--USCIS collects fees 
from petitioners using the H-1B program (Public Law 108-447).

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends direct appropriations of 
$119,671,000 and notes estimated fee collections of 
$3,490,546,000 for total resources of $3,610,217,000. The 
amount requested for the 2016 pay adjustment is not assumed 
within the funds allocated. USCIS should utilize funds 
allocated to meet its highest priority, unfunded needs.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations for appropriations as compared to the fiscal 
year 2015 and budget request levels:

                       UNITED STATES CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION SERVICES--PROGRAM SUMMARY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Appropriations:
    E-Verify..............................................           124,435           119,671           119,671
    Immigrant integration programs........................  ................            10,000  ................
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Appropriations...............................           124,435           129,671           119,671
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                E-VERIFY

    The Committee recommends $119,671,000 for the E-Verify 
program. This is the same as the amount requested and 
$4,764,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2015. The 
Committee is supportive of the Department's efforts to improve 
E-Verify's ability to automatically verify those who are work 
authorized, detect identity fraud, and detect system misuse and 
discrimination. E-Verify is both a tool for employers committed 
to maintaining a legal workforce and a deterrent to illegal 
immigration. The Committee notes progress continues to be made 
on reducing the mismatch rate.
    The growth in E-Verify use by employers has significantly 
increased from fewer than 25,000 employers in fiscal year 2007 
to more than 526,600 as of April 2015, with an average of more 
than 1,600 new employers enrolling per week. E-Verify processed 
28,000,000 cases in fiscal year 2014, a more than seven-fold 
increase from the 4,000,000 cases processed in fiscal year 
2007. So far in fiscal year 2015, E-Verify processed more than 
15,000,000 cases. The Committee directs USCIS to include on its 
Web site statistics showing E-Verify use across the Nation. At 
a minimum, the Web site should include basic analytics and 
descriptive statistics functions, such as graphics and tables 
showing the number and percentage of employers in each State 
using E-Verify, the adoption rates by industry, and the number 
of cases processed each year.
    USCIS shall update the Committee on its efforts to create a 
mobile application and other available smart-phone technologies 
for employers using E-Verify so as to encourage small employers 
to use the system. In addition, the Committee directs USCIS to 
study and report to the Committee within 45 days of the date of 
enactment of this act on the estimated costs and timeline for 
making E-Verify mandatory for employers.

                                  H-2B

     On March 5, 2015, USCIS suspended adjudication of Form I-
129 H-2B petitions for temporary non-agricultural workers while 
the government considered the response to the court order 
entered March 4, 2015, in Perez v. Perez. The Committee notes 
that the 12-day suspension of processing was disruptive to 
applicants and expects that USCIS will not halt processing 
without presenting adequate legal justification to the 
Committees of jurisdiction going forward. Separately, USCIS 
announced that it had met the fiscal year 2015 cap for H-2B 
visa applications as of March 26, 2015, and then, more than 2 
months later and following a comparison of data with the 
Department of State, determined that additional visas could be 
released within the cap.
    The Committee directs USCIS to study the actual usage of H-
2B visas in relation to the number of applications granted and 
provide recommendations on how to systematically ensure the 
number of visas granted is more closely aligned with the number 
of visas used by employers in the United States. The results of 
the study shall be provided to the Committee in a report within 
90 days of the date of enactment of this act that describes: 
(1) any investigations or lawsuits related to the methodology 
used to determine the numerical limitation on H-2B visas; (2) 
any revisions to the cap calculation methodology during the 
past 10 fiscal years; (3) any work products used to develop or 
inform the cap calculation methodology during the past 10 
fiscal years; (4) the current cap calculation methodology; (5) 
the number of ``target beneficiaries'' for the first 6 months 
and for the last 6 months of fiscal year 2015; and (6) actual 
usage rates, compared to the cap during the past 10 fiscal 
years, including the methodologies used to calculate actual 
usage rates.

        FRAUD DETECTION AND NATIONAL SECURITY COMPLIANCE REVIEWS

    The Committee is concerned about visa fraud and encourages 
USCIS to establish a risk-based, data-driven goal for 
completing unannounced compliance audits of employers and 
directs USCIS to provide a report to the Committee within 45 
days of the date of enactment of this act describing the 
methodology for setting the goal and the actions planned to 
achieve the goal. The Committee further directs USCIS to 
provide quarterly briefings describing progress and any 
deviations from the planned actions described in the 
aforementioned report. Within 90 days of the enactment of this 
act, the Committee directs USCIS to report on how many H-1B and 
L compliance review site visits have been conducted over the 
past 4 years, as a percentage of total of active petitioners 
and visa beneficiaries, including the localities in which the 
visits have been performed, the outcomes of the site visits, 
including when petitioners or beneficiaries have requested that 
the review be terminated, and when cases were referred to ICE.

                             ADVANCE PAROLE

    The Committee seeks more detail on the use of advance 
parole and directs USCIS to report on how many advance parole 
documents are being approved for entry into the United States. 
The report should, for the past 4 years, detail: (1) how many 
applications for advance parole were made, how many granted, 
and how many denied; (2) the number of advance parole documents 
granted to deferred action recipients and applicants for 
adjustment of status; (3) the specific basis for the grant of 
advance parole under USCIS's criteria set forth in the 
instructions to the Form I-131 (i.e., educational, employment, 
or humanitarian); (4) the number of applications in each year 
for which the filing fee was waived; (5) the supporting 
documentation, by type, that was used to make advance parole 
determinations; and (6) the number of aliens, broken down by 
deferred action recipients and non-deferred action recipients, 
granted advance parole who left the country, were paroled back 
into the country using the advance parole document, and have 
filed an application for adjustment of status to lawful 
permanent residence. If USCIS does not already maintain this 
data, USCIS is directed to begin collecting data so that such 
data is available for reporting.

                              O-VISA FRAUD

    The Committee is concerned that the process for approval of 
O-1B and O-2 visa petitions for artists working in motion 
pictures at USCIS lacks a robust mechanism to verify the 
authenticity and/or accuracy of petitions and may, therefore, 
be unintentionally open to instances of fraud and abuse on the 
part of petitioners. Specifically, the Committee has been 
informed that required written advisory opinions from peer 
groups or from organizations with expertise in the 
beneficiary's area of ability are not being weighed 
appropriately during the adjudication process. Therefore, USCIS 
is directed to report back to the Committee within 90 days of 
the date of enactment of this act, detailing how it will 
address these potential shortcomings to ensure the integrity of 
O-1B and O-2 visa issuances.

                           VISA CAP INCREASES

    The budget request included proposed increases in the caps 
for U and S visas that the Congressional Budget Office has 
determined would increase spending. The Committee requests that 
USCIS consult with the committees of jurisdiction regarding the 
policies behind these requests and consider CBO's scoring of 
these policies when submitting the 2017 request.

                           GAO ASYLUM REPORTS

    In fiscal year 2015, the Committee directed GAO to update 
two reports related to the asylum process: ``Agencies Have 
Taken Actions to Help Ensure Quality in the Asylum Adjudication 
Process but Challenges Remain'' (GAO-08-935) and ``The U.S. 
Asylum System: Significant Variation Existed in Asylum Outcomes 
across Immigration Courts and Judges'' (GAO-08-940). In order 
to provide continuing data streams for additional analysis by 
this Committee and others, the Committee directs USCIS to 
report annual statistics on affirmative asylum applications and 
asylum officers' decisions on the applications. The Committee 
also directs USCIS and the Executive Office for Immigration 
Review [EOIR] to analyze and report every 5 years on trends and 
factors associated with asylum decisions made by asylum offices 
and officers, and immigration courts and judges, respectively. 
These analyses should utilize consistent methodologies over 
time and include statistical analysis that examines trends and 
associated factors in asylum outcomes, including the extent and 
nature of outcome variability across asylum offices and 
officers, and immigration courts and judges. The Committee 
further directs GAO to review the validity and reliability of 
the methodologies used in the statistical analyses performed by 
USCIS and EOIR every 5 years.

                            USCIS FEE STUDY

    Every 2 years, USCIS conducts a fee study to assess whether 
its fee schedule should be updated by regulation. USCIS shall 
brief the Committee on the results of its fee study, regardless 
of whether it decides to amend its regulations. The Committee 
expects the fee study to be completed within fiscal year 2015; 
therefore, the briefing shall take place not later than 
November 1, 2015.

                            SERVICE CENTERS

     The Committee seeks additional information on cost of 
USCIS service center operations and plans to meet projected 
demand and directs USCIS to submit a report to the Committee by 
July 31, 2015. For each service center, this report shall 
include: data on any backlogs of each type of application and 
plans to address these backlogs; space currently available for 
additional hires, including contractors; details on the use of 
telework and hoteling arrangements available to staff; the 
estimated costs to increase processing capacity; a detailed 
breakout of the number and cost of any planned staff 
relocations; plans to backfill any positions left vacant due to 
relocation; and a detailed breakout of the training programs in 
place to ensure retention of experienced staff.

                Federal Law Enforcement Training Center


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $230,497,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     239,141,000
Committee recommendation................................     219,443,000

    The Federal Law Enforcement Training Center [FLETC] 
Salaries and Expenses appropriation provides funds for basic 
and some advanced training to Federal law enforcement personnel 
from more than 90 agencies. This account also allows for 
research of new training methodologies; provides for training 
delivered to certain State, local, and foreign law enforcement 
personnel on a space-available basis; and supports 
accreditation of Federal law enforcement training programs.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $219,443,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses, $19,698,000 below the amount requested and 
$11,054,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2015. 
Within the funds provided is $1,303,000 for the Federal Law 
Enforcement Training Accreditation Board and a one-time 
increase of $8,191,387 to train 700 new CBP officers 
anticipated in 2016. The Committee expects the Director to 
maintain training at or near capacity before entering into new 
leases with private contractors. Further, FLETC is directed to 
provide a facility utilization briefing to the Committee not 
later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this act 
detailing, at minimum, each training center's maximum 
instructional capacity by program classification measured 
against its annual student occupancy. To further help 
facilitate congressional oversight, FLETC is directed to 
continue to brief the Committee on obligation and expenditure 
plans, as outlined in the explanatory statement accompanying 
Public Law 114-4 and in title I of this report.
    The Committee recognizes the work done thus far by FLETC to 
continue and expand training of Federal law enforcement 
officials regarding active shooter scenarios, but also 
recognizes the inherent nexus to that training conducted for 
State and local first responders. As active shooter response 
tactics and training strategies evolve, FLETC is encouraged to 
coordinate and partner where appropriate with other training 
facilities within the Department, such as the Center for 
Domestic Preparedness in Anniston, Alabama, to ensure the most 
recent doctrines are included in existing training.

     ACQUISITIONS, CONSTRUCTION, IMPROVEMENTS, AND RELATED EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $27,841,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      27,553,000
Committee recommendation................................      26,453,000

    This account provides for the acquisition and related costs 
for expansion and maintenance of facilities of the Federal Law 
Enforcement Training Center. This includes construction and 
maintenance of facilities and environmental compliance. The 
environmental compliance funds ensure compliance with 
Environmental Protection Agency and State environmental laws 
and regulations.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $26,453,000 for Acquisition, 
Construction, Improvements, and Related Expenses, $1,100,000 
below requested, and $1,388,000 below the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2015.

                         Science and Technology


                                SUMMARY

    The mission of Science and Technology [S&T;] is to conduct, 
stimulate, and enable homeland security research, development, 
and testing, and to facilitate the timely transition of 
capabilities to Federal, State, local, and tribal end-users.

                     MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $129,993,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     132,115,000
Committee recommendation................................     130,431,000

    The Management and Administration account funds salaries 
and expenses related to the Office of the Under Secretary for 
S&T; and headquarters.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $130,431,000 for Management and 
Administration of programs and activities carried out by S&T.; 
This is $1,684,000 below the amount requested and $438,000 
above the amount provided in fiscal year 2015. Of this amount, 
the Committee recommends not to exceed $7,650 for official 
reception and representation expenses.

           RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, ACQUISITION, AND OPERATIONS

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $973,915,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     646,873,000
Committee recommendation................................     634,435,000

    S&T; supports the mission of DHS through basic and applied 
research, fabrication of prototypes, and research and 
development to mitigate the effects of weapons of mass 
destruction, as well as acquiring and field testing equipment.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $634,435,000 for Research, 
Development, Acquisition, and Operations of S&T.; This is 
$12,438,000 below the amount requested and $339,480,000 below 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2015.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                   SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, ACQUISITION, AND OPERATIONS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Research, Development, and Innovation.....................           457,499           434,850           414,650
Laboratory Facilities (operations and construction).......           434.989           133,921           133,683
Acquisition and Operations Support........................            41,703            47,102            47,102
University Programs.......................................            39,724            31,000            39,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Research, Development, Acquisition and                  973,915           646,873           634,435
       Operations.........................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                  RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FLEXIBILITY

    The Committee continues flexibility provided in fiscal year 
2015 by maintaining one overall PPA for research and 
development [R&D;]. This structure avoids unnecessary 
restriction of accounts which often contain overlapping 
programs and thrust areas. This is particularly important as 
R&D; funding must be as nimble as possible and allow for 
research on emerging threats and areas of interest. However, to 
ensure sufficient oversight S&T; is directed to brief the 
Committee 30 days after the date of enactment of this act on 
the allocation of funds by projects and thrust area. Quarterly 
status briefings are to be provided on the plan, including any 
changes from the original allocation.
    In conjunction with the President's fiscal year 2017 budget 
request, S&T; is to report on results of its R&D; for the prior 
fiscal year to include all technologies, technology 
improvements, or capabilities delivered to frontline users.

                                APEX R&D;

    The Committee directs that not less than prior year funding 
should be applied to S&T;'s Apex R&D; programs which are high 
priority, high value technologies and knowledge products for 
customers in the homeland security enterprise.
    At their core Apex projects are defined by concrete 
deliverables, precise timelines and milestones, and a 
demonstrated focus between S&T; and a partner component to 
dedicate additional funding and personnel to some of their 
greatest challenges. The chosen focus areas are encompassed in 
a memorandum of understanding, signed by both the Under 
Secretary of S&T; and the partner component leadership. 
Currently S&T; has agreements with CBP as well as the Secret 
Service, with plans to expand to other components.
    In seeking to provide additional focus on certain Apex 
projects, S&T; acknowledges these challenges will not be easy. 
The problems S&T; is working to solve include screening 
travelers at speed, supplying tools for investigators to make 
better decisions in employing limited resources, as well as 
providing real-time awareness to first responders. In 
particular, the Committee expects that S&T; will continue its 
focus on:
  --Apex Border Situational Awareness.--A program that delivers 
        increased situational awareness of the border to CBP 
        and other border security stakeholders. This project 
        will employ an enterprise information sharing system 
        that allows data from a multitude of unrelated sensors 
        and sources to be easily shared within and across 
        organizations. In advancing this project, the Committee 
        expects S&T; to work with research universities that 
        have proven expertise, experience, and capabilities in 
        design and development of a variety of wireless sensor 
        technologies;
  --Apex Next Generation First Responder [NGFR].--A program 
        that seeks to seamlessly integrate wearable computing 
        devices, voice and data connectivity and other 
        information delivery tools into ruggedized gear that 
        can be adapted for all response disciplines. The 
        Committee expects S&T; to work with research 
        universities with R&D; capabilities, experience in 
        design, development, prototype manufacturing, testing 
        or wearable wireless sensors, telecommunication gear 
        that would advance this program; and
  --Apex Flood Awareness.--A program developed in partnership 
        with FEMA which seeks to increase community resilience 
        and reduce the costly damage caused by floods in 
        communities across the United States through the 
        creation of a ``decision-support system-of-systems''. 
        The Committee expects S&T; to work with research 
        universities with expertise and capabilities in 
        emergency management, water resource management and 
        transportation logistics that collectively develop 
        improved decision support systems for better management 
        of flood-related activities by communities.
    S&T; is directed to brief the Committee no later than 30 
days after the date of enactment of this act on the funding 
allocation by project; and progress made to field improved 
technologies in an Apex environment.

                           COMPONENT LIAISONS

    The Committee supports fostering more robust relationships 
between S&T; and other DHS components via the Partnering for 
Innovation and Operational Needs thru Embedding for Effective 
Relationships [PIONEER] program. This program embeds S&T; 
personnel directly with various DHS components while similarly 
stationing component personnel at S&T.; Within 60 days after the 
date of enactment of this act, S&T; shall provide a briefing on 
the status of the program including the participating 
components as well as any pending memorandum of agreement.

                    INNOVATIVE FUNDING PARTNERSHIPS

    The Committee notes that S&T; is continuing to develop 
innovative and unique relationships to help secure technologies 
critical to the homeland security enterprise. The Committee is 
supportive of these activities, such as the exercise of prize 
authority, as well as efforts to leverage the private sector. 
The Committee expects S&T; to continue to run prize competitions 
for critical homeland security needs and encourages S&T; to 
ensure that plans are in place to transition the prize winners 
to other contract vehicles if further development is warranted.
    The Committee expects the results of S&T;'s utilization of 
prize authority to be submitted as part of the fiscal year 2017 
budget justification.

                        DOMAIN AWARENESS SYSTEMS

    The Committee is concerned about the feasibility of the 
Integrated Maritime Domain Enterprise-Coastal Surveillance 
System. Described as an information sharing capability to 
support improved situational awareness, interim deployments and 
pilots have yet to achieve their stated goal of adequate sensor 
and data fusion. Further, initial operational capability is 
slated for late fiscal year 2016--nearly a decade after the 
first Maritime Domain Awareness System was piloted and 
requirements were identified. For these reasons, S&T; is 
directed to brief the Committee not later than 60 days after 
the date of enactment of this act concerning the results of its 
first technical demonstration.

                             CYBERSECURITY

    The Committee continues to recognize the cyber threats to 
the Nation's electric grid and the other control systems vital 
to our security and economy. In order to address this 
challenge, the Committee expects that S&T; will continue to 
invest in control systems test beds and associated cyber 
education.
    The Committee believes that sophisticated cyber-attacks, 
such as those launched against major retailers, energy cyber-
physical systems, and other critical infrastructures both in 
the United States and around the world have devastating 
consequences. Critical infrastructures depend on the digital 
transmission of data for ongoing operation, and disrupting the 
confidentiality, integrity, or availability of market 
transactions or other information can have catastrophic and 
cascading economic effects. Such a disruption of, or intrusion 
into, U.S. critical infrastructure could result in a renewed 
global economic downturn. The Committee encourages S&T; to 
expand the simulation based cyber-war gaming tool for the 
financial sector into additional critical infrastructure 
sectors.
    The Committee recognizes the increased frequency of cyber-
attacks on and the present vulnerabilities of State and local 
networks and infrastructure. Subsequently, the Committee 
encourages S&T;'s continued development of cybersecurity tools 
and platforms that facilitate information sharing, threat 
monitoring, and response initiation at the State and local 
level.
    The Committee urges DHS, when making determinations about 
how to more effectively allocate resources for academic centers 
of excellence, to consider competitively establishing one or 
more academic centers that focus on cybersecurity research and 
education.
    The Committee is also aware that collaboration with cyber 
accelerators has the potential to help transition innovative 
cybersecurity technologies into commercial use. S&T; may 
consider the use of cyber accelerators as is practicable.

                         SUPPLY CHAIN SECURITY

    The Committee recognizes the importance of enhancing cargo 
supply chain security through emerging technologies, and is 
concerned that the product options for the security of storage 
and transit cargo containers rely heavily on legacy mechanical 
devices. The Committee, therefore, encourages S&T; to examine 
next generation cargo container technology and evaluate 
upgraded security solutions, including wireless tracking and 
security systems for intermodal containers or trailers.
    Congress has long supported enhancing cargo supply chain 
security through emerging technologies. Such efforts are 
critical to securing the global maritime supply chain, as 
Congress recognized when it directed the Secretary in the SAFE 
Port Act of 2006 to promulgate a rulemaking on minimum 
standards for shipping containers. The Committee notes that the 
Department of Defense [DOD] has requested funding for a secure 
cargo container project, which has the potential to improve 
homeland and cargo security. The Committee encourages S&T; to 
work with DOD in this area, including through the use of its 
Defense Production Act authorities, and to continue examination 
of next-generation cargo container technology.

                         LABORATORY FACILITIES

    The Committee recommendation includes $133,683,000 for 
Laboratory Facilities, $238,000 below the amount requested and 
$301,306,000 below fiscal year 2015. Approximately $300,000,000 
of this reduction is associated with previous one-time 
construction costs for the National Bio-Agro Defense Facility 
[NBAF]. NBAF will support the complimentary missions of DHS and 
the United States Department of Agriculture [USDA] and the 
Committee recognizes the critical role strategic non-
governmental partnerships will play in assessing potential 
threats and better leveraging the research capabilities of NBAF 
once it is operational. The Committee also recognizes the 
importance of having the high performance computing environment 
and infrastructure to address critical technology issues in 
computational research areas, and an experienced workforce 
capable of conducting BSL-3 and BSL-4 animal research. The 
Committee therefore encourages the Department to continue 
partnerships, particularly with non-governmental entities, that 
have proven expertise in agricultural research and strong 
familiarity with both system dynamics modeling and NBAF's 
immediate and future workforce requirements. S&T; shall submit 
to the Committee a detailed update of NBAF construction 
progress and a schedule not later than 30 days after the date 
of enactment of this act.
    As full funding for the construction of NBAF has been 
provided, the Committee directs the Department, in conjunction 
with GSA, the Department of the Interior, and the Environmental 
Protection Agency, to report on an analysis of alternatives for 
final disposition of Plum Island. The report shall consider: 
conservation of the island's resources including those of 
historic, cultural, and environmental significance; analysis of 
any remediation responsibilities; the need for any legislative 
changes; cost; and revenues from any of the alternatives. The 
report shall be submitted not later than 180 days after the 
date of enactment of this act.

           FEDERALLY FUNDED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTERS

    The Committee notes that S&T; is again seeking to compete 
one of its Federally Funded Research and Development Centers 
[FFRDC]. If S&T; proceeds with this competition, it would be the 
third such iteration since the creation of the Department.
    The benefit of having an FFRDC is the establishment of a 
lasting relationship whereby agencies can seek impartial, 
independent analysis for their most challenging problems. 
Instead, the habit of constant change creates not only 
uncertainty for the FFRDC but naturally raises questions for 
components seeking their assistance.
    The Committee is interested in seeing S&T; invest the 
appropriate time and resources at a program manager level to 
ensure that components wishing to access FFRDCs can do so more 
easily. Not later than 30 days after the date of enactment of 
this act, S&T; is directed to brief the Committee on actions it 
is taking to better manage the FFRDCs and make them more 
accessible to components seeking their support.

                               SAFETY ACT

    The Committee supports efforts to more thoroughly define 
certain aspects of the SAFETY Act, including those that relate 
to qualifying cyber-attacks and cyber-incidents and extending 
SAFETY Act protections to cybersecurity technologies. This 
support should not be construed to expand the scope of the 
SAFETY Act protections, but rather clarify the authority of the 
Secretary in designating events which trigger SAFETY Act 
protections. The Department shall report to the Committee 
regarding whether legislative changes are required to achieve 
such a change.

                          UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommendation includes $39,000,000 for 
University Programs, $8,000,000 above the amount requested and 
$724,000 below fiscal year 2015. University Programs supports 
critical homeland security-related research and education at 
U.S. colleges and universities to address high-priority DHS-
related issues and to enhance homeland security capabilities 
over the long term. The increase above the request is for the 
University Centers of Excellence program and will allow S&T; to 
maintain at least 10 Centers of Excellence.

                   Domestic Nuclear Detection Office


                                SUMMARY

    DNDO is responsible for development of technologies to 
detect and report attempts to import, possess, store, develop, 
or transport nuclear and radiological material.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $320,263,000 for activities of 
DNDO for fiscal year 2016. This is $37,064,000 below the amount 
requested and $12,421,000 above the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2015.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                                        DOMESTIC NUCLEAR DETECTION OFFICE
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Management and Administration.............................            37,339            38,316            37,518
Research, Development, and Operations.....................           197,900           196,000           196,000
Systems Acquisition.......................................            72,603           123,011            86,745
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Domestic Nuclear Detection Office............           307,842           357,327           320,263
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                     MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $37,339,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      38,316,000
Committee recommendation................................      37,518,000

    The Management and Administration account funds salaries, 
benefits, and expenses for DNDO.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $37,518,000 for Management and 
Administration of programs and activities carried out by DNDO. 
This is $798,000 below the amount requested and $179,000 above 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2015. Of this amount, the 
Committee recommends not to exceed $2,250 for official 
reception and representation expenses.

                     STRATEGIC PLAN OF INVESTMENTS

    In lieu of providing a report updating the Department's 
strategic plan of investments, the Director shall continue to 
brief the Committee annually on DNDO's efforts to implement the 
Department's responsibilities under the domestic component of 
the Global Nuclear Detection Architecture. The briefing shall 
identify:
  --the various elements of the domestic architecture and the 
        roles and responsibilities of each departmental entity;
  --investments being made in fiscal year 2016 and planned for 
        2017 to secure pathways (sea, land, and air) into the 
        United States;
  --investments necessary to close known vulnerabilities and 
        gaps, including associated costs and timeframes, and 
        estimates of feasibility and cost effectiveness; and
  --how R&D; funding is furthering the implementation of the 
        domestic architecture.
    The briefing shall also include a discussion on DNDO's 
ability to surge capabilities in concert with Federal, State, 
and local level assets to respond to suspected radiological 
threats.

                 RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND OPERATIONS

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $197,900,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     196,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     196,000,000

    The Research, Development and Operations account funds the 
development of nuclear detection systems and the integration 
and advancement of national nuclear forensics capabilities.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $196,000,000 for Research, 
Development and Operations. This is the same amount as 
requested and $1,900,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2015.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                                      RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND OPERATIONS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Systems Engineering and Architecture......................            17,000            17,000            17,000
Systems Development.......................................            21,400            22,000            22,000
Transformational Research and Development.................            69,500            68,000            68,000
Assessments...............................................            38,000            38,000            38,000
Operations Support........................................            31,000            31,000            31,000
National Technical Nuclear Forensics Center...............            21,000            20,000            20,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Research, Development, and Operations........           197,900           196,000           196,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          SEMIANNUAL BRIEFINGS

    DNDO shall continue semiannual program briefings and 
provide periodic updates on any new threats, research, studies 
and assessments related to the Global Nuclear Detection 
Architecture. Semiannual program briefings shall also cover 
emergent technology solutions being explored by DNDO. One of 
these semiannual briefings may be combined with the more 
comprehensive annual brief on the strategic plan of 
investments.

                          TEST AND EVALUATION

    Within the funding provided, the Committee supports the 
continued testing of commercial systems that have the potential 
to simultaneously and passively detect shielded and unshielded 
nuclear materials. With the consequences of allowing nuclear 
material to enter our country undetected being so great, any 
technology that demonstrates potential to detect hazardous, 
illicit or nuclear material, before it crosses our border, 
should be given significant attention. Therefore, the Committee 
encourages the operational testing of a full scale passive 
inspection system in a domestic port of entry.

                SEMICONDUCTOR AND SCINTILLATOR MATERIALS

    The Committee recognizes the importance of radiation 
detection technology in emergency response to enhance mission 
performance and save lives. The Committee understands that the 
development and deployment of highly efficient radiation 
detectors is necessary to adequately support proper 
identification and interdiction of radiological and nuclear 
threats. Therefore, the Committee requests funding be allocated 
for research and development of a new generation semiconductor 
or scintillator materials.

             INCIDENTS OF NATIONAL OR REGIONAL SIGNIFICANCE

    The Committee directs DNDO to fund research to facilitate 
the location and collection of radiological material from 
incidents of national significance. This research should 
involve collaboration among academic institutions and existing 
Federal research and development organizations.

                          SYSTEMS ACQUISITION

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $72,603,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     123,011,000
Committee recommendation................................      86,745,000

    The Systems Acquisition account funds the acquisition of 
equipment for frontline users across the Department.

                       COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee recommends $86,745,000 for Systems 
Acquisition. This is $36,266,000 below the amount requested and 
$14,142,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2015.
    The following table summarizes the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the fiscal year 2015 and budget 
request levels:

                                               SYSTEMS ACQUISITION
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2015  Fiscal year 2016      Committee
                                                                 enacted       budget request    recommendations
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Radiation Portal Monitor Program..........................             5,000  ................  ................
Securing the Cities.......................................            19,000            22,000            22,000
Human Portable Radiation Detection Systems................            48,603  ................  ................
Radiological and Nuclear Detection Equipment Acquisition..  ................           101,011            64,745
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, Systems Acquisition..........................            72,603           123,011            86,745
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

        RADIOLOGICAL AND NUCLEAR DETECTION EQUIPMENT ACQUISITION

    The Committee recommendation includes $64,745,000 for 
recapitalization of detection equipment, including not less 
than $16,142,000 for human portable radiation detection 
systems. The Committee understands that recapitalization will 
eventually provide Department-wide cost savings by replacing 
aging equipment, which has higher operations and maintenance 
costs, with modernized replacement basic handheld radiation 
isotope identifier device systems with greater capability and 
lower annual costs.

                          SECURING THE CITIES

    The Committee recommendation includes $22,000,000 for 
Securing the Cities, the same amount as requested.

                                TITLE V


                           GENERAL PROVISIONS


                    (INCLUDING RESCISSIONS OF FUNDS)

    Section 501. The bill includes a provision that no part of 
any appropriation shall remain available for obligation beyond 
the current fiscal year unless expressly provided.
    Section 502. The bill includes a provision that unexpended 
balances of prior appropriations may be merged with new 
appropriations accounts and used for the same purpose, subject 
to reprogramming guidelines.
    Section 503. The bill includes a provision that provides 
authority to reprogram appropriations within an account and to 
transfer up to 5 percent between appropriations accounts with 
15-day advance notification of the Committees on 
Appropriations. A detailed funding table identifying each 
congressional control level for reprogramming purposes is 
included at the end of this statement. These reprogramming 
guidelines shall be complied with by all departmental 
components funded by this act.
    The Committee expects the Department to submit 
reprogramming requests on a timely basis, and to provide 
complete explanations of the reallocations proposed, including 
detailed justifications of the increases and offsets, and any 
specific impact the proposed changes will have on the budget 
request for the following fiscal year and future-year 
appropriations requirements. Each request submitted to the 
Committees should include a detailed table showing the proposed 
revisions at the account, program, project, and activity level 
to the funding and staffing (full-time equivalent) levels for 
the current fiscal year and to the levels required for the 
following fiscal year.
    The Committee expects the Department to manage its programs 
and activities within the levels appropriated. The Committee 
reminds the Department that reprogramming or transfer requests 
should be submitted only in the case of an unforeseeable 
emergency or situation that could not have been predicted when 
formulating the budget request for the current fiscal year. 
When the Department submits a reprogramming or transfer request 
to the Committees on Appropriations and does not receive 
identical responses from the House and Senate, it is the 
responsibility of the Department to reconcile the House and 
Senate differences before proceeding, and if reconciliation is 
not possible, to consider the reprogramming or transfer request 
unapproved.
    The Department shall not propose a reprogramming or 
transfer of funds after June 30 unless there are extraordinary 
circumstances, which place human lives or property in imminent 
danger. To the extent any reprogramming proposals are required; 
the Department is strongly encouraged to submit them well in 
advance of the June 30 deadline.
    The Committee did not include a provision requested in the 
budget related to the use of unobligated funds for disaster 
response since the authority already rests with the President.
    Section 504. The bill includes a provision relating to the 
Department's Working Capital Fund [WCF] that: extends the 
authority of the Department's WCF in fiscal year 2016; 
prohibits funds appropriated or otherwise made available to the 
Department from being used to make payments to the WCF, except 
for the activities and amounts allowed in the President's 
fiscal year 2016 budget; makes WCF funds available until 
expended; ensures departmental components are only charged for 
direct usage of each WCF service; makes funds provided to the 
WCF available only for purposes consistent with the 
contributing component; and requires the WCF to be paid in 
advance or reimbursed at rates which will return the full cost 
of each service. The WCF table included in the Department's 
congressional justification accompanying the President's fiscal 
year 2016 budget shall serve as the control level for quarterly 
execution reports submitted to the Committee not later than 30 
days after the end of each quarter. These reports shall 
identify any activity added or removed from the fund.
    Section 505. The bill includes a provision that not to 
exceed 50 percent of unobligated balances recorded not later 
than June 30 from appropriations made for salaries and expenses 
in fiscal year 2016 shall remain available through fiscal year 
2017, subject to reprogramming.
    Section 506. The bill includes a provision providing that 
funds for intelligence activities are specifically authorized 
during fiscal year 2016 until the enactment of an act 
authorizing intelligence activities for fiscal year 2016.
    Section 507. The bill includes a provision requiring 
notification to the Committees 3 business days before any grant 
allocation, grant award, contract award (including Federal 
Acquisition Regulation-covered contracts), other transaction 
agreement, a task or delivery order on a DHS multiple award 
contract, letter of intent, or public announcement of the 
intention to make such an award totaling in excess of 
$1,000,000. If the Secretary determines that compliance would 
pose substantial risk to health, human life, or safety, an 
award may be made without prior notification but the Committees 
shall be notified within 5 full business days after such award 
or letter is issued. Additionally, FEMA is required to brief 
the Committees 5 full business days prior to announcing 
publicly the intention to make an award under State and Local 
programs. The 3-day notification also pertains to task or 
delivery order awards greater than $10,000,000 from multi-year 
DHS funds as well as for any sole-source grant awards.
    Section 508. The bill includes a provision that no agency 
shall purchase, construct, or lease additional facilities for 
Federal law enforcement training without the advance approval 
of the Committees on Appropriations.
    Section 509. The bill includes a provision that none of the 
funds may be used for any construction, repair, alteration, or 
acquisition project for which a prospectus, if required under 
chapter 33 of title 40, United States Code, has not been 
approved. The bill excludes funds that may be required for 
development of a proposed prospectus.
    Section 510. The bill includes a provision that 
consolidates and continues by reference prior-year statutory 
bill language into one provision. These provisions concern 
contracting officers' training and Federal building energy 
performance. The provision hereafter strikes a permanent 
requirement for a report related to Sensitive Security 
Information.
    Section 511. The bill includes a provision that none of the 
funds may be used in contravention of the Buy American Act.
    Section 512. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds to be used to amend the oath of allegiance required by 
section 337 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 
1448).
    Section 513. The bill includes a provision requiring the 
Chief Financial Officer to submit monthly budget execution and 
staffing reports within 30 days after the close of each month.
    Section 514. The bill includes a provision that directs 
that any funds appropriated or transferred to TSA Aviation 
Security, Administration, and Transportation Security Support 
in fiscal years 2004 and 2005, which are recovered or 
deobligated shall be available only for procurement or 
installation of explosives detection systems, air cargo, 
baggage, and checkpoint screening systems, subject to 
notification. Semiannual reporting on these funds is required.
    Section 515. The bill includes a provision regarding 
competitive sourcing for USCIS.
    Section 516. The bill includes a provision requiring any 
funds appropriated to Coast Guard for 110-123 foot patrol boat 
conversions that are recovered, collected, or otherwise 
received as a result of negotiation, mediation, or litigation, 
shall be available until expended for the Fast Response Cutter 
program.
    Section 517. The bill includes a provision classifying the 
functions of instructor staff at FLETC as inherently 
governmental for purposes of the Federal Activities Inventory 
Reform Act of 1998.
    Section 518. The bill includes a provision requiring the 
Secretary to submit a report to OIG listing all grants or 
contracts awarded by any means other than full and open 
competition. OIG is required to review the report to assess 
departmental compliance with applicable laws and regulations 
and report the results to the Committees on Appropriations no 
later than February 15, 2017.
    Section 519. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funding to grant an immigration benefit to any individual 
unless the results of background checks required by statute to 
be completed prior to the grant of a benefit have been received 
by DHS.
    Section 520. The bill includes a provision extending other 
transactional authority for DHS through fiscal year 2016.
    Section 521. The bill includes a provision requiring the 
Secretary to link all contracts that provide award fees to 
successful acquisition outcomes.
    Section 522. The bill includes a provision regarding 
waivers of the Jones Act.
    Section 523. The bill includes a provision contained in 
Public Laws 109-295, 110-161, 110-329, 111-83, 112-10, 112-74, 
113-6, 113-76, and 114-4 related to prescription drugs.
    Section 524. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds from being used to reduce the Coast Guard's Operations 
Systems Center mission or its government-employed or contract 
staff.
    Section 525. The bill includes a provision requiring the 
Secretary, in conjunction with the Secretary of the Treasury, 
to notify the Committees on proposed transfers of surplus 
balances from the Department of the Treasury Forfeiture Fund to 
any agency within DHS.
    Section 526. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds from being used to plan, test, pilot, or develop a 
national identification card.
    Section 527. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds to be used to conduct or implement the results of a 
competition under Office of Management and Budget Circular A-76 
with respect to the Coast Guard National Vessel Documentation 
Center.
    Section 528. The bill includes a provision requiring the 
posting of damage assessment information used to determine 
whether to declare a major disaster on the FEMA Web site.
    Section 529. The bill includes a provision directing that 
any official required by this act to report or certify to the 
Committees on Appropriations may not delegate such authority 
unless expressly authorized to do so in this act.
    Section 530. The bill includes a provision extending 
current law concerning individuals detained at the Naval 
Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
    Section 531. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds in this act to be used for first-class travel.
    Section 532. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds to be used to employ workers in contravention of section 
274A(h)(3) of the Immigration and Nationality Act.
    Section 533 The bill includes a provision prohibiting the 
Secretary from reducing operations within the Coast Guard's 
Civil Engineering Program except as specifically authorized by 
a statute enacted after the date of enactment of this act.
    Section 534. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds appropriated or otherwise made available by this act to 
pay for award or incentive fees for contractors with below 
satisfactory performance or performance that fails to meet the 
basic requirements of the contract.
    Section 535. The bill includes language that requires the 
Secretary to ensure screening of passengers and crews for 
transportation and national security purposes are consistent 
with applicable laws, regulations, and guidance on privacy and 
civil liberties.
    Section 536. The bill includes a provision allocating up to 
$10,000,000 in Immigration Examination Fees for the purpose of 
providing immigrant integration grants in fiscal year 2016.
    Section 537. The bill provides a total of $212,303,000 for 
consolidation of a new DHS headquarters at St. Elizabeths and 
consolidation of mission support.
    Section 538. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds appropriated or otherwise made available by this act for 
DHS to enter into a Federal contract unless the contract meets 
requirements of the Federal Property and Administrative 
Services Act of 1949 or chapter 137 of title 10 U.S.C., and the 
Federal Acquisition Regulation, unless the contract is 
otherwise authorized by statute without regard to this section.
    Section 539. The bill provides $36,113,000 for financial 
system modernization and includes a provision allowing the 
Secretary to transfer funds made available by this act between 
appropriations for the same purpose after notifying the 
Committees 15 days in advance.
    Section 540. The bill includes a provision providing some 
flexibility to the Department for financing a response to an 
immigration emergency.
    Section 541. The bill includes language directing CBP and 
ICE to submit multi-year investment and management plans for 
certain accounts and programs at the time the President's 
budget proposal is submitted.
    Section 542. The bill includes language stating that the 
Secretary shall ensure enforcement of all immigration laws.
    Section 543. The bill includes a provision regarding 
restrictions on electronic access to pornography, except for 
law enforcement purposes.
    Section 544. The bill includes a provision regarding the 
transfer of an operable firearm by a Federal law enforcement 
officer to an agent of a drug cartel.
    Section 545. The bill includes a provision prohibiting any 
funds from this or any other act to be used for creation of the 
Grant Program or any successor grant program unless explicitly 
authorized by Congress.
    Section 546. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds for the position of Public Advocate or a successor 
position in ICE.
    Section 547. The bill modifies a general provision in 
Public Law 113-76 permitting CBP to enter into up to 10 
reimbursable agreements with airports.
    Section 548. The bill includes language regarding the 
number of employees permitted to attend international 
conferences.
    Section 549. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds from this or any other act from being used to require 
airport operators to provide airport-financed staffing to 
monitor exit points from the sterile area of any airport at 
which TSA provided such monitoring as of December 1, 2013.
    Section 550. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
funds made available by this act to reimburse any Federal 
department or agency for its participation in a NSSE.
    Section 551. The bill includes a provision relating to air 
preclearance operations.
    Section 552. The bill provides the Secretary with 
discretion to waive certain requirements of the Federal Fire 
Prevention and Control Act of 1974, including a provision which 
allows grants to be used to retain firefighters.
    Section 553. The bill includes a provision that prohibits 
the collection of new land border fees or the study of the 
imposition of such a border fee.
    Section 554. The bill includes a provision addressing 
requirements of the Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset Act.
    Section 555. The bill rescinds unobligated balances of 
prior year appropriations in the Disaster Relief Fund for non-
major disaster programs due to the significant balances carried 
over from prior years and amounts recovered from previous 
disasters during project closeouts. The rescission of funds 
will have no impact on FEMA's ability to aid in recovery from 
past disasters or respond to future disasters.
    Section 556. The bill includes a provision clarifying that 
fees collected pursuant to the Colombia Free Trade Agreement 
are available until expended.
    Section 557. The bill includes a provision related to user 
fee proposals that have not been enacted into law prior to 
submission of the budget.
    Section 558. The bill includes a provision prohibiting 
implementation of the Federal Flood Risk Management Standard.
    Section 559. The bill includes a provision whereby the 
Secretary may propose a reprogramming or transfer for the 
Offshore Patrol Cutter Project.
    Section 560. The bill includes a provision on structural 
pay reform that affects more than 100 full-time positions or 
costs more than $5,000,000 in a single year.
    Section 561. The bill includes a provision directing the 
Department to post on a public Web site reports required by the 
Committees on Appropriations unless public posting compromises 
homeland or national security or contains proprietary 
information.
    Section 562. The bill rescinds funds from the Disaster 
Assistance Direct Loan Program. The rescission has no impact on 
remaining projects, emergency funds, or ongoing loan 
determinations.
    Section 563. The bill includes a provision that transfers 
funds from the Disaster Assistance Direct Loan Program to the 
Disaster Relief Fund. The transfer has no impact on remaining 
projects or ongoing loan determinations.
    Section 564. The bill includes a provision related to the 
Arms Trade Treaty.
    Section 565. The bill rescinds unobligated balances from 
prior year appropriations from accounts across the Department.
    Section 566. The bill rescinds $175,000,000 from the 
unobligated balances in the Department of the Treasury 
Forfeiture Fund.
    Section 567. The bill includes a provision related to Visa 
Waiver Program designation.

                     PROGRAM, PROJECT, AND ACTIVITY

    In fiscal year 2016, for purposes of the Balanced Budget 
and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-177), 
as amended, the following information provides the definition 
of the term ``program, project, and activity'' for the 
components of the Department of Homeland Security under the 
jurisdiction of the Homeland Security Subcommittee of the 
Committee on Appropriations. The term ``program, project, and 
activity'' shall include the most specific level of budget 
items identified in the Department of Homeland Security 
Appropriations Act, 2016, the House and Senate Committee 
reports, and the conference report and the accompanying joint 
explanatory statement of the managers of the committee of 
conference.
    If a percentage reduction is necessary, in implementing 
that reduction, components of the Department of Homeland 
Security shall apply any percentage reduction required for 
fiscal year 2016 to all items specified in the justifications 
submitted to the Committees on Appropriations of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives in support of the fiscal year 2016 
budget estimates, as amended, for such components, as modified 
by congressional action.

  COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 7 of rule XVI requires that Committee reports 
accompanying general appropriations bills identify each 
recommended amendment which proposes an item of appropriation 
which is not made to carry out the provisions of an existing 
law, a treaty stipulation, or an act or resolution previously 
passed by the Senate during that session.
    The Committee recommends funding for the following programs 
or activities which currently lack authorization for fiscal 
year 2016:
    Analysis and Operations.
    U.S. Customs and Border Protection: Salaries and Expenses; 
Automation Modernization; and Air and Marine Operations.
    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement: Salaries and 
Expenses.
    Transportation Security Administration: Aviation Security; 
Surface Transportation Security; Transportation Threat 
Assessment and Credentialing; and Federal Air Marshals.
    Coast Guard: Operating Expenses; Environmental Compliance 
and Restoration; Reserve Training; Acquisition, Construction, 
and Improvements; Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation; 
and Retired Pay.
    National Protection and Programs Directorate: 
Infrastructure Protection and Information Security.
    Federal Emergency Management Agency: Salaries and Expenses; 
State and Local Programs; Emergency Management Performance 
Grants; National Predisaster Mitigation Fund, and Emergency 
Food and Shelter.

COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(c), RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, on June 18, 2015, 
the Committee ordered favorably reported an original bill 
making appropriations for the Department of Homeland Security 
for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2016, and for other 
purposes, provided, that the bill be subject to amendment and 
that the bill be consistent with its budget allocation, by a 
recorded vote of 26-4, a quorum being present. The vote was as 
follows:
        Yeas                          Nays
Chairman Cochran                    Mrs. Murray
Mr. McConnell                       Mr. Reed
Mr. Shelby                          Mr. Tester
Mr. Alexander                       Mr. Murphy
Ms. Collins
Ms. Murkowski
Mr. Graham
Mr. Kirk
Mr. Blunt
Mr. Moran
Mr. Hoeven
Mr. Boozman
Mrs. Capito
Mr. Cassidy
Mr. Lankford
Mr. Daines
Ms. Mikulski
Mr. Leahy
Mrs. Feinstein
Mr. Durbin
Mr. Udall
Mrs. Shaheen
Mr. Merkley
Mr. Coons
Mr. Schatz
Ms. Baldwin

 COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 12 of rule XXVI requires that Committee reports 
on a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any statute 
or part of any statute include ``(a) the text of the statute or 
part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and (b) a 
comparative print of that part of the bill or joint resolution 
making the amendment and of the statute or part thereof 
proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through type and 
italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate typographical 
devices the omissions and insertions which would be made by the 
bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form recommended by 
the committee.''
    In compliance with this rule, changes in existing law 
proposed to be made by the bill are shown as follows: existing 
law to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets; new matter is 
printed in italic; and existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman.

                       TITLE 6--DOMESTIC SECURITY


               CHAPTER 1--HOMELAND SECURITY ORGANIZATION


  Subchapter VIII--Coordination With Non-Federal Entities; Inspector 
 General; United States Secret Service; Coast Guard; General Provisions


Sec. 391. Research and development projects

(a) Authority

    [Until September 30, 2015,] Until September 30, 2016, and 
subject to subsection (d), the Secretary may carry out a pilot 
program under which the Secretary may exercise the following 
authorities:

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

(c) Additional requirements

    (1) In general

            The authority of the Secretary under this section 
        shall terminate [September 30, 2015,] September 30, 
        2016, unless before that date the Secretary--
                                ------                                


                TITLE 42--THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND WELFARE


                 Chapter 46--Justice System Improvement


   Subchapter VII--FBI Training of State and Local Criminal Justice 
                               Personnel


Sec. 3771. Training and manpower development

(a) Functions, powers, and duties of Director of Federal Bureau 
            of Investigation


            

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
  Employment of Annuitants by Federal Law Enforcement Training Center


    Pub. L. 107-206, title I, Sec. 1202, Aug. 2, 2002, 116 
Stat. 887, as amended by Pub. L. 109-295, title IV, Oct. 4, 
2006, 120 Stat. 1374; Pub. L. 110-161, div. E, title IV, Dec. 
26, 2007, 121 Stat. 2068; Pub. L. 110-329, div. D, title IV, 
Sept. 30, 2008, 122 Stat. 3677; Pub. L. 111-83, title IV, Oct. 
28, 2009, 123 Stat. 2166; Pub. L. 112-74, div. D, title IV, 
Dec. 23, 2011, 125 Stat. 966, provided that:

    (a) The Federal Law Enforcement Training Center may, for a 
period ending not later than [December 31, 2017] December 31, 
2018, appoint and maintain a cadre of up to 350 Federal 
annuitants: (1) without regard to any provision of title 5, 
United States Code, which might otherwise require the 
application of competitive hiring procedures; and (2) who shall 
not be subject to any reduction in pay (for annuity allocable 
to the period of actual employment) under the provisions of 
section 8344 or 8468 of such title 5 or similar provision of 
any other retirement system for employees. A reemployed Federal 
annuitant as to whom a waiver of reduction under paragraph (2) 
applies shall not, for any period during which such waiver is 
in effect, be considered an employee for purposes of subchapter 
III of chapter 83 or chapter 84 of title 5, United States Code, 
or such other retirement system (referred to in paragraph (2)) 
as may apply.
                                ------                                


        CONSOLIDATED APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2014, PUBLIC LAW 113-76


  DIVISION F--DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2014


                                TITLE V


                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Sec. 559. (a) * * *




           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
    (e) * * *




           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
            (3) Limitations.--

                    (A) * * *


                

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
                    (D) The authority found in this subsection 
                shall be limited with respect to U.S. Customs 
                and Border Protection-serviced air ports of 
                entry to [five pilots per year] 10 pilots per 
                year.

                        BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL


  PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS
                                                     AMENDED
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               Budget authority                 Outlays
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee    Amount  in     Committee    Amount  in
                                                           allocation       bill       allocation       bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with the subcommittee
 allocation for 2016: Subcommittee on Homeland Security:
    Mandatory...........................................        1,604         1,604         1,583      \1\1,583
    Discretionary.......................................       40,213        46,926        44,811     \1\45,123
        Security........................................        1,711         1,711            NA            NA
        Nonsecurity.....................................       38,502        45,215            NA            NA
    Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on                 160           160           128           128
     Terrorism..........................................
Projections of outlays associated with the
 recommendation:
    2016................................................  ............  ............  ............    \2\27,637
    2017................................................  ............  ............  ............        9,717
    2018................................................  ............  ............  ............        6,000
    2019................................................  ............  ............  ............        2,941
    2020 and future years...............................  ............  ............  ............        2,326
Financial assistance to State and local governments for            NA         5,971            NA           356
 2016...................................................
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
\2\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
 
NA: Not applicable.
 
NOTE.--Consistent with the funding recommended in the bill for disaster funding and as an emergency requirement
  and in accordance with subparagraphs (D) and (A)(i) of section 251(b)(2) of the BBEDCA of 1985, the Committee
  anticipates that the Budget Committee will provide a revised 302(a) allocation for the Committee on
  Appropriations reflecting an upward adjustment of $6,713,000,000 in budget authority plus associated outlays.


  COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET (OBLIGATIONAL) AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2015 AND BUDGET ESTIMATES AND AMOUNTS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL FOR FISCAL
                                                                        YEAR 2016
                                                                [In thousands of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                         Senate Committee recommendation
                                                                                                                             compared with (+ or -)
                                Item                                       2015       Budget estimate     Committee    ---------------------------------
                                                                      appropriation                     recommendation        2015
                                                                                                                         appropriation   Budget estimate
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
 
          TITLE I--DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
 
                      Departmental Operations
 
Office of the Secretary and Executive Management:
    Immediate Office of the Secretary..............................           7,939            8,932            8,922             +983              -10
    Immediate Office of the Deputy Secretary.......................           1,740            1,758            1,749               +9               -9
    Office of the Chief of Staff...................................           2,782            2,716            2,696              -86              -20
    Executive Secretary............................................           5,589            5,640            5,601              +12              -39
    Office of Policy...............................................          38,073           39,339           39,077           +1,004             -262
    Office of Public Affairs.......................................           5,591            5,510            5,472             -119              -38
    Office of Legislative Affairs..................................           5,403            5,405            5,363              -40              -42
    Office of Intergovernmental Affairs/Partnership and Engagement.           9,848           10,025            9,966             +118              -59
    Office of General Counsel......................................          19,950           19,625           19,472             -478             -153
    Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties....................          21,800           20,954           20,803             -997             -151
    Citizenship and Immigration Services Ombudsman.................           5,825            6,312            6,272             +447              -40
    Privacy Officer................................................           8,033            8,031            7,969              -64              -62
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         132,573          134,247          133,362             +789             -885
 
Office of the Under Secretary for Management:
    Immediate Office of the Under Secretary for Management.........           2,740            3,411            3,393             +653              -18
    Office of the Chief Security Officer...........................          64,308           66,538           65,300             +992           -1,238
    Office of the Chief Procurement Officer........................          60,107           58,989           58,630           -1,477             -359
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         127,155          128,938          127,323             +168           -1,615
 
    Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer:
        Salaries and expenses......................................          20,944           24,390           19,198           -1,746           -5,192
        Human resources information technology.....................           6,000            9,578            7,778           +1,778           -1,800
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................          26,944           33,968           26,976              +32           -6,992
 
    Office of the Chief Readiness Support Officer:
        Salaries and expenses......................................          28,911           27,350           27,235           -1,676             -115
        Nebraska Avenue Complex [NAC]..............................           4,493            2,931            2,931           -1,562   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................          33,404           30,281           30,166           -3,238             -115
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Office of the Under Secretary for Management...         187,503          193,187          184,465           -3,038           -8,722
 
DHS Headquarters Consolidation:
    Mission support................................................  ...............          11,545   ...............  ...............         -11,545
    St. Elizabeths.................................................  ...............         204,277   ...............  ...............        -204,277
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, DHS Headquarters Consolidation.....................  ...............         215,822   ...............  ...............        -215,822
 
Office of the Chief Financial Officer..............................          52,020           53,798           53,420           +1,400             -378
 
Office of the Chief Information Officer:
    Salaries and expenses..........................................          99,028          105,307          104,790           +5,762             -517
    Information technology services................................          68,298          106,270           90,670          +22,372          -15,600
    Infrastructure and security activities.........................          52,640           54,087           54,087           +1,447   ...............
    Homeland Secure Data Network...................................          68,156           54,932           54,932          -13,224   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         288,122          320,596          304,479          +16,357          -16,117
 
Analysis and Operations............................................         255,804          269,090          263,467           +7,663           -5,623
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Departmental Operations...............................         916,022        1,186,740          939,193          +23,171         -247,547
                                                                    ====================================================================================
 
Office of Inspector General:
    Operating expenses.............................................         118,617          142,284          134,488          +15,871           -7,796
        (By transfer from Disaster Relief).........................         (24,000)         (24,000)         (24,000)  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Total, Office of Inspector General.......................         142,617          166,284          158,488          +15,871           -7,796
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title I, Departmental Management and Operations.......       1,034,639        1,329,024        1,073,681          +39,042         -255,343
          (By transfer)............................................         (24,000)         (24,000)         (24,000)  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
        TITLE II--SECURITY, ENFORCEMENT, AND INVESTIGATIONS
 
                 U.S. Customs and Border Protection
 
Salaries and Expenses:
    Headquarters, Management, and Administration:
        Commissioner...............................................          27,151           30,950           30,500           +3,349             -450
        Chief Counsel..............................................          45,483           49,786           49,000           +3,517             -786
        Congressional Affairs......................................           2,504            2,978            2,955             +451              -23
        Internal Affairs...........................................         139,493          170,024          164,500          +25,007           -5,524
        Public Affairs.............................................          13,009           14,464           14,000             +991             -464
        Training and development...................................          71,585           80,466           80,000           +8,415             -466
        Tech, innovation, acquisition..............................          25,277           29,658           29,000           +3,723             -658
        Intelligence...............................................          62,235           78,402           78,030          +15,795             -372
        Administration.............................................         382,870          420,238          373,775           -9,095          -46,463
        Rent.......................................................         598,593          629,046          625,480          +26,887           -3,566
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................       1,368,200        1,506,012        1,447,240          +79,040          -58,772
 
    Border Security Inspections and Trade Facilitation:
        Inspections, trade, and travel facilitation at ports of           2,810,524        3,077,568        2,978,500         +167,976          -99,068
         entry.....................................................
        Harbor maintenance fee collection (trust fund).............           3,274            3,274            3,274   ...............  ...............
        International cargo screening..............................          68,902           69,851           69,000              +98             -851
        Other international programs...............................          25,548           24,935           24,500           -1,048             -435
        Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism [C-TPAT].......          41,619           41,420           41,000             -619             -420
        Trusted Traveler programs..................................           5,811            5,811            5,811   ...............  ...............
        Inspection and detection technology investments............         122,811          209,273          171,000          +48,189          -38,273
        National Targeting Center..................................          74,623           79,514           74,500             -123           -5,014
        Training...................................................          33,880           48,714           44,000          +10,120           -4,714
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................       3,186,992        3,560,360        3,411,585         +224,593         -148,775
 
    Border Security and Control Between Ports of Entry:
        Border security and control................................       3,848,074        3,921,393        3,864,000          +15,926          -57,393
        UAC Contingency Fund.......................................  ...............          79,000   ...............  ...............         -79,000
        Training...................................................          56,391           57,505           56,500             +109           -1,005
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................       3,904,465        4,057,898        3,920,500          +16,035         -137,398
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Salaries and Expenses..........................       8,459,657        9,124,270        8,779,325         +319,668         -344,945
            Appropriations.........................................      (8,456,383)      (9,120,996)      (8,776,051)       (+319,668)       (-344,945)
            Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund..........................          (3,274)          (3,274)          (3,274)  ...............  ...............
 
Small Airport User Fee (permanent indefinite discretionary                    9,000            9,097            9,097              +97   ...............
 appropriation)....................................................
 
Automation Modernization:
    Information technology.........................................         362,094          399,027          390,970          +28,876           -8,057
    Automated targeting systems....................................         109,230          122,669          122,640          +13,410              -29
    Automated Commercial Environment/International Trade Data               140,970          153,736          151,062          +10,092           -2,674
     System [ITDS].................................................
    Current Operations Protection and Processing Support [COPPS]...         195,875          191,879          189,357           -6,518           -2,522
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         808,169          867,311          854,029          +45,860          -13,282
 
Border Security Fencing, Infrastructure, and Technology [BSFIT]:
      Development and deployment...................................         125,594           99,530           99,530          -26,064   ...............
      Operations and maintenance...................................         256,872          273,931          273,931          +17,059   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         382,466          373,461          373,461           -9,005   ...............
 
Air and Marine Operations:
    Salaries and expenses..........................................         299,800          306,253          303,445           +3,645           -2,808
    Operations and maintenance.....................................         397,669          395,169          395,169           -2,500   ...............
    Procurement....................................................          53,000           46,000           56,000           +3,000          +10,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         750,469          747,422          754,614           +4,145           +7,192
 
Construction and Facilities Management:
    Facilities construction and sustainment........................         205,393          255,378          229,500          +24,107          -25,878
    Program oversight and management...............................          83,428           86,165           84,000             +572           -2,165
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         288,821          341,543          313,500          +24,679          -28,043
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, U.S. Customs and Border Protection Direct                   10,698,582       11,463,104       11,084,026         +385,444         -379,078
       Appropriations..............................................
                                                                    ====================================================================================
 
Fee Accounts:
    Immigration inspection user fee................................        (630,218)        (652,699)        (652,699)        (+22,481)  ...............
    Immigration enforcement fines..................................            (752)            (633)            (633)           (-119)  ...............
    Electronic system for travel authorization fee.................         (54,929)         (57,332)         (57,332)         (+2,403)  ...............
    Land border inspection fee.....................................         (43,931)         (34,724)         (34,724)         (-9,207)  ...............
    COBRA passenger inspectionfFee.................................        (482,501)        (506,877)        (506,877)        (+24,376)  ...............
    APHIS inspection fee...........................................        (464,514)        (515,810)        (515,810)        (+51,296)  ...............
    Global entry user fee..........................................         (91,192)         (91,789)         (91,789)           (+597)  ...............
    Puerto Rico collections........................................         (98,076)         (99,058)         (99,058)           (+982)  ...............
    Virgin Island fee..............................................         (11,789)         (11,867)         (11,867)            (+78)  ...............
    Customs unclaimed goods........................................          (5,992)          (5,992)          (5,992)  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Fee Accounts.......................................      (1,883,894)      (1,976,781)      (1,976,781)        (+92,887)  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, U.S. Customs and Border Protection....................      12,582,476       13,439,885       13,060,807         +478,331         -379,078
          Appropriations...........................................     (10,698,582)     (11,463,104)     (11,084,026)       (+385,444)       (-379,078)
          Fee accounts.............................................      (1,883,894)      (1,976,781)      (1,976,781)        (+92,887)  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
              U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement
 
Salaries and Expenses:
    Headquarters Management and Administration:
        Personnel compensation and benefits, services and other             197,002          195,950          195,020           -1,982             -930
         costs.....................................................
        Headquarters managed IT investment.........................         150,419          146,046          145,192           -5,227             -854
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................         347,421          341,996          340,212           -7,209           -1,784
 
    Legal proceedings..............................................         217,393          248,096          242,894          +25,501           -5,202
    Investigations:
        Domestic investigations....................................       1,699,811        1,766,654        1,760,364          +60,553           -6,290
        International investigations:
            International operations...............................         110,682          107,931          107,210           -3,472             -721
            Visa Security Program..................................          49,526           30,749           30,561          -18,965             -188
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal.............................................         160,208          138,680          137,771          -22,437             -909
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, Investigations.............................       1,860,019        1,905,334        1,898,135          +38,116           -7,199
 
    Intelligence...................................................          76,479           80,041           79,276           +2,797             -765
    Enforcement and Removal Operations:
        Custody operations.........................................       2,532,593        2,406,744        2,296,068         -236,525         -110,676
        Fugitive operations........................................         142,615          129,438          143,072             +457          +13,634
        Criminal Alien Program.....................................         327,223          320,267          317,177          -10,046           -3,090
        Alternatives to detention..................................         109,740          122,481          122,053          +12,313             -428
        Transportation and Removal Program.........................         319,273          324,152          323,607           +4,334             -545
        UAC Contingency Fund.......................................  ...............           8,000   ...............  ...............          -8,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................       3,431,444        3,311,082        3,201,977         -229,467         -109,105
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Salaries and Expenses..........................       5,932,756        5,886,549        5,762,494         -170,262         -124,055
 
Automation Modernization:
    Automation modernization.......................................          26,000           73,500   ...............         -26,000          -73,500
    Consolidated ICE financial solution............................  ...............  ...............           5,000           +5,000           +5,000
    TECS modernization.............................................  ...............  ...............          21,500          +21,500          +21,500
    IT refresh.....................................................  ...............  ...............           4,000           +4,000           +4,000
    Tactical communucations........................................  ...............  ...............          18,500          +18,500          +18,500
    ICE operational data store.....................................  ...............  ...............           4,000           +4,000           +4,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................          26,000           73,500           53,000          +27,000          -20,500
 
Construction.......................................................  ...............           5,000   ...............  ...............          -5,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Direct              5,958,756        5,965,049        5,815,494         -143,262         -149,555
       Appropriations..............................................
                                                                    ====================================================================================
 
Fee Accounts:
    Immigration inspection user fee................................        (135,000)        (135,000)        (135,000)  ...............  ...............
    Breached Bond/Detention Fund...................................         (65,000)         (42,000)         (42,000)        (-23,000)  ...............
    Student exchange and visitor fee...............................        (145,000)        (145,000)        (145,000)  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         345,000          322,000          322,000          -23,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement..............       6,303,756        6,287,049        6,137,494         -166,262         -149,555
          Appropriations...........................................      (5,958,756)      (5,965,049)      (5,815,494)       (-143,262)       (-149,555)
          Fee accounts.............................................        (345,000)        (322,000)        (322,000)        (-23,000)  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
               Transportation Security Administration
 
Aviation Security:
    Screening Partnership Program..................................         166,666          166,928          166,928             +262   ...............
    Screener personnel, compensation, and benefits.................       2,923,890        2,872,070        2,843,305          -80,585          -28,765
    Screener training and other....................................         225,442          226,551          238,883          +13,441          +12,332
    Checkpoint support.............................................          88,469           97,265          112,177          +23,708          +14,912
    EDS procurement/installation...................................          83,933           83,380           83,212             -721             -168
    Screening technology maintenance...............................         294,509          280,509          280,509          -14,000   ...............
    Aviation regulation and other enforcement......................         349,821          349,013          346,878           -2,943           -2,135
    Airport management and support.................................         587,657          596,233          592,881           +5,224           -3,352
    Federal Flight Deck Officer and flight crew training...........          22,365           20,095           22,541             +176           +2,446
    Air cargo......................................................         106,343          105,978          105,214           -1,129             -764
    Federal Air Marshals...........................................         790,000          816,745          790,000   ...............         -26,745
    Aviation Security Capital Fund (mandatory).....................        (250,000)        (250,000)        (250,000)  ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Aviation Security (gross)..........................       5,639,095        5,614,767        5,582,528          -56,567          -32,239
 
Aviation security fees (offsetting collections)....................      -2,065,000       -2,130,000       -2,130,000          -65,000   ...............
Additional offsetting collections (leg. proposal)..................  ...............          15,000   ...............  ...............         -15,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Aviation Security (net, discretionary).............       3,574,095        3,499,767        3,452,528         -121,567          -47,239
 
Surface Transportation Security:
    Staffing and operations........................................          29,230           28,510           28,329             -901             -181
    Surface inspectors and VIPR....................................          94,519           95,318           94,399             -120             -919
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         123,749          123,828          122,728           -1,021           -1,100
 
Intelligence and Vetting:
    Intelligence...................................................          51,545           51,977           51,635              +90             -342
    Secure flight..................................................          99,569          105,637          105,276           +5,707             -361
    Other vetting programs.........................................          68,052           70,084           68,404             +352           -1,680
    TWIC fee.......................................................         (34,832)         (82,267)         (82,267)        (+47,435)  ...............
    Hazardous material fee.........................................         (12,000)         (21,083)         (21,083)         (+9,083)  ...............
    General aviation at DCA fee....................................            (350)            (400)            (400)            (+50)  ...............
    Commercial aviation and airport fee............................          (6,500)          (6,500)          (6,500)  ...............  ...............
    Other security threat assessments fee..........................             (50)             (50)             (50)  ...............  ...............
    Air Cargo/Certified Cargo Screening Program fee................          (7,173)          (3,500)          (3,500)         (-3,673)  ...............
    TSA Precheck Application Program fee...........................         (13,700)         (80,153)         (80,153)        (+66,453)  ...............
    Alien flight school fee........................................          (5,000)          (5,200)          (5,200)           (+200)  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         298,771          426,851          424,468         +125,697           -2,383
          Direct Appropriations....................................        (219,166)        (227,698)        (225,315)         (+6,149)         (-2,383)
          Fee funded programs......................................         (79,605)        (199,153)        (199,153)       (+119,548)  ...............
 
Transportation Security Support:
    Headquarters administration....................................         269,100          276,930          272,751           +3,651           -4,179
    Information technology.........................................         449,000          452,385          446,921           -2,079           -5,464
    Human capital services.........................................         199,126          202,164          199,195              +69           -2,969
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         917,226          931,479          918,867           +1,641          -12,612
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Transportation Security Administration................       7,228,841        7,346,925        7,298,591          +69,750          -48,334
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Offsetting collections.............................................     (-2,065,000)     (-2,115,000)     (-2,130,000)        (-65,000)        (-15,000)
Aviation Security Capital Fund (mandatory).........................        (250,000)        (250,000)        (250,000)  ...............  ...............
Fee funded programs................................................         (79,605)        (199,153)        (199,153)       (+119,548)  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Transportation Security Administration (net)..........       4,834,236        4,782,772        4,719,438         -114,798          -63,334
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                            Coast Guard
 
Operating Expenses:
    Military pay and allowances....................................       3,449,782        3,466,088        3,480,279          +30,497          +14,191
    Civilian pay and benefits......................................         781,517          799,816          792,229          +10,712           -7,587
    Training and recruiting........................................         198,279          205,825          206,444           +8,165             +619
    Operating funds and unit level maintenance.....................       1,008,682        1,010,317        1,013,004           +4,322           +2,687
    Centrally managed accounts.....................................         335,556          329,684          329,874           -5,682             +190
    Intermediate and depot level maintenance.......................       1,056,502        1,009,773        1,014,533          -41,969           +4,760
    Overseas contingency operations/ global war on terrorism.......         213,000   ...............         160,002          -52,998         +160,002
    Tricare (leg. proposal)........................................  ...............           1,000   ...............  ...............          -1,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................       7,043,318        6,822,503        6,996,365          -46,953         +173,862
          (Defense)................................................        (553,000)        (340,000)        (500,002)        (-52,998)       (+160,002)
          (Nondefense).............................................      (6,490,318)      (6,482,503)      (6,496,363)         (+6,045)        (+13,860)
 
Environmental compliance and restoration...........................          13,197           13,269           13,221              +24              -48
Reserve training...................................................         114,572          110,614          110,614           -3,958   ...............
 
Acquisition, construction, and improvements:
    Vessels:
        Survey and design-vessel and boats.........................             500            9,000           15,000          +14,500           +6,000
        In-Service vessel sustainment..............................          49,000           68,000           68,000          +19,000   ...............
        National security cutter...................................         632,847           91,400          731,400          +98,553         +640,000
        Offshore patrol cutter.....................................          20,000           18,500           18,500           -1,500   ...............
        Fast response cutter.......................................         110,000          340,000          230,000         +120,000         -110,000
        Cutter boats...............................................           4,000            3,000            3,000           -1,000   ...............
        Polar ice breaking vessel..................................  ...............           4,000            4,000           +4,000   ...............
        Polar icebreaker preservation..............................           8,000   ...............  ...............          -8,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................         824,347          533,900        1,069,900         +245,553         +536,000
 
    Aircraft:
        H-60 airframe replacement..................................          12,000   ...............  ...............         -12,000   ...............
        HC-144 conversion/sustainment..............................          15,000            3,000            3,000          -12,000   ...............
        HC-27J conversion/sustainment..............................          20,000          102,000          102,000          +82,000   ...............
        HC-130J acquisition/conversion/sustainment.................         103,000           55,000           55,000          -48,000   ...............
        HH-65 conversion/sustainment...............................          30,000           40,000           40,000          +10,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................         180,000          200,000          200,000          +20,000   ...............
 
    Other Acquisition Programs:
        Program oversight and management...........................          18,000           20,000           20,000           +2,000   ...............
        C4ISR......................................................          36,300           36,600           36,600             +300   ...............
        CG-Logistics information management system.................           5,000            8,500            8,500           +3,500   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................          59,300           65,100           65,100           +5,800   ...............
 
    Shore Facilities and Aids to Navigation:
        Major construction; Housing; ATON; and survey and design...          19,580           41,900           61,900          +42,320          +20,000
        Major acquisition systems infrastructure...................          16,000           54,500           54,500          +38,500   ...............
        Minor shore................................................           5,000            5,000            5,000   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................          40,580          101,400          121,400          +80,820          +20,000
 
    Military housing...............................................           6,000   ...............  ...............          -6,000   ...............
    Personnel and related support:
        Direct personnel costs.....................................         114,996          116,869          116,869           +1,873   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................         114,996          116,869          116,869           +1,873   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Acquisition, Construction, and Improvements....       1,225,223        1,017,269        1,573,269         +348,046         +556,000
 
Research, development, test, and evaluation........................          17,892           18,135           18,019             +127             -116
Health Care Fund contribution (permanent indefinite discretionary           176,970          169,306          169,306           -7,664   ...............
 appropriation)....................................................
Retired pay (mandatory)............................................       1,450,626        1,604,000        1,604,000         +153,374   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Coast Guard...........................................      10,041,798        9,755,096       10,484,794         +442,996         +729,698
          Appropriations...........................................      (9,828,798)      (9,755,096)     (10,324,792)       (+495,994)       (+569,696)
          Overseas contingency operations/global war on terrorism..        (213,000)  ...............        (160,002)        (-52,998)       (+160,002)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                    United States Secret Service
 
Salaries and Expenses:
    Protection:
        Protection of persons and facilities.......................         892,685        1,009,246          972,425          +79,740          -36,821
        Protective intelligence activities.........................          67,536           72,806           71,726           +4,190           -1,080
        National Special Security Event Fund.......................           4,500            4,500            4,500   ...............  ...............
        Presidential candidate nominee protection..................          25,500          203,687          203,687         +178,187   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................         990,221        1,290,239        1,252,338         +262,117          -37,901
 
    Investigations:
        Domestic field operations..................................         338,295          291,139          294,523          -43,772           +3,384
        International field office administration, Operations and            34,195           34,168           33,933             -262             -235
         training..................................................
        Support for missing and exploited children.................           8,366   ...............           8,366   ...............          +8,366
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................         380,856          325,307          336,822          -44,034          +11,515
 
    Headquarters, management and administration....................         188,380          194,680          191,699           +3,319           -2,981
    Rowley Training Center.........................................          55,378           56,170           55,268             -110             -902
    Information integration and technology Transformation..........           1,025            1,057            1,038              +13              -19
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Salaries and Expenses..............................       1,615,860        1,867,453        1,837,165         +221,305          -30,288
 
Acquisition, Construction, Improvements, and Related Expenses:
    Facilities.....................................................           5,380           26,432           26,432          +21,052   ...............
    Information integration and technology transformation..........          44,555           45,237           60,542          +15,987          +15,305
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................          49,935           71,669           86,974          +37,039          +15,305
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, United States Secret Service..........................       1,665,795        1,939,122        1,924,139         +258,344          -14,983
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title II, Security, Enforcement, and Investigations...      33,199,167       33,905,143       34,027,891         +828,724         +122,748
          Appropriations...........................................     (32,986,167)     (33,905,143)     (33,867,889)       (+881,722)        (-37,254)
          Overseas contingency operations/global war on terrorism..        (213,000)  ...............        (160,002)        (-52,998)       (+160,002)
          (Fee accounts)...........................................      (2,308,499)      (2,497,934)      (2,497,934)       (+189,435)  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
    TITLE III--PROTECTION, PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND RECOVERY
 
            National Protection and Programs Directorate
 
Management and administration......................................          61,651           64,191           57,971           -3,680           -6,220
 
Infrastructure Protection and Information Security:
    Infrastructure Protection:
        Infrastructure analysis and planning.......................          64,494           75,969           69,951           +5,457           -6,018
        Sector management and governance...........................          64,961           71,311           67,739           +2,778           -3,572
        Regional field operations..................................          56,550           52,755           52,022           -4,528             -733
        Infrastructure security compliance.........................          85,027           94,877           89,982           +4,955           -4,895
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Infrastructure Protection......................         271,032          294,912          279,694           +8,662          -15,218
 
    Cybersecurity and Communications:
        Cybersecurity:
            Cybersecurity coordination.............................           4,311            4,318            4,275              -36              -43
            US Computer Emergency Readiness Team [US-CERT]                   98,573           98,642           97,515           -1,058           -1,127
             operations............................................
            Federal network security...............................         171,000          131,202          130,594          -40,406             -608
            Network security deployment............................         377,000          479,760          478,035         +101,035           -1,725
            Global cybersecurity management........................          25,873           20,321           27,276           +1,403           +6,955
            Critical infrastructure cyber protection and awareness.          70,919           77,584           75,621           +4,702           -1,963
            Business operations....................................           5,524            6,516            6,439             +915              -77
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, Cybersecurity..............................         753,200          818,343          819,755          +66,555           +1,412
 
        Communications:
            Office of Emergency Communications.....................          37,335           33,025           32,920           -4,415             -105
            Priority telecommunications services...................          53,324           63,649           63,516          +10,192             -133
            Next generation networks...............................          53,293           80,102           79,575          +26,282             -527
            Programs to study and enhance telecommunications.......          10,092           10,418           10,386             +294              -32
            Critical infrastructure protection programs............          10,403           11,240           11,154             +751              -86
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, Communications.............................         164,447          198,434          197,551          +33,104             -883
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, Cybersecurity and Communications...........         917,647        1,016,777        1,017,306          +99,659             +529
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, Infrastructure Protection and Information         1,188,679        1,311,689        1,297,000         +108,321          -14,689
               Security............................................
 
Federal Protective Service:
    Basic security.................................................         275,763          275,763          275,763   ...............  ...............
    Building-specific security.....................................         600,615          665,121          665,121          +64,506   ...............
    Reimbursable security fees (Contract Guard Services)...........         466,228          502,565          502,565          +36,337   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Federal Protective Service.........................       1,342,606        1,443,449        1,443,449         +100,843   ...............
 
    Offsetting collections.........................................      -1,342,606       -1,443,449       -1,443,449         -100,843   ...............
Office of Biometric Identity Management............................         252,056          283,533          283,265          +31,209             -268
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Protection and Programs Directorate (gross)..       2,844,992        3,102,862        3,081,685         +236,693          -21,177
          (Defense)................................................      (1,188,679)      (1,311,689)      (1,297,000)       (+108,321)        (-14,689)
          (Nondefense).............................................        (313,707)        (347,724)        (341,236)        (+27,529)         (-6,488)
          Offsetting collections...................................     (-1,342,606)     (-1,443,449)     (-1,443,449)       (-100,843)  ...............
          Total, National Protection and Programs Directorate (net)       1,502,386        1,659,413        1,638,236         +135,850          -21,177
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                      Office of Health Affairs
 
BioWatch...........................................................          86,891           83,278           83,278           -3,613   ...............
National Biosurveillance Integration Center........................          10,500            8,000            8,000           -2,500   ...............
Chemical Defense Program...........................................             824              824              824   ...............  ...............
Planning and coordination..........................................           4,995            4,957            4,957              -38   ...............
Salaries and expenses..............................................          26,148           27,010           25,865             -283           -1,145
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of Health Affairs..............................         129,358          124,069          122,924           -6,434           -1,145
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                Federal Emergency Management Agency
 
Salaries and Expenses:
    Administrative and regional offices............................         244,183          243,323          236,428           -7,755           -6,895
        Office of National Capital Region Coordination.............          (3,400)  ...............          (3,422)            (+22)         (+3,422)
    Preparedness and protection....................................         180,797          190,928          178,679           -2,118          -12,249
    Response.......................................................         175,986          168,466          172,363           -3,623           +3,897
        Urban search and rescue response system....................         (35,180)         (27,513)         (35,180)  ...............         (+7,667)
    Recovery.......................................................          55,789           51,472           50,768           -5,021             -704
    Mitigation.....................................................          28,876           25,753           27,641           -1,235           +1,888
    Mission support................................................         145,316          168,437          162,010          +16,694           -6,427
    Centrally managed accounts.....................................         103,449          100,917          100,917           -2,532   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Salaries and Expenses..............................         934,396          949,296          928,806           -5,590          -20,490
          (Defense)................................................         (72,000)         (74,000)         (74,000)         (+2,000)  ...............
          (Nondefense).............................................        (862,396)        (875,296)        (854,806)         (-7,590)        (-20,490)
 
Grants and Training:
    State and Local Programs:
        Discretionary Grants:
            National Preparedness Grant Program....................  ...............       1,043,200   ...............  ...............      -1,043,200
            State Homeland Security Grant Program..................         467,000   ...............         467,000   ...............        +467,000
            Operation Stonegarden..................................         (55,000)  ...............         (55,000)  ...............        (+55,000)
            Urban Area Security Initiative.........................         600,000   ...............         600,000   ...............        +600,000
            Nonprofit Security Grants..............................         (13,000)  ...............         (25,000)        (+12,000)        (+25,000)
            Public transportation security assistance and railroad          100,000   ...............         100,000   ...............        +100,000
             security assistance...................................
              Amtrak security......................................         (10,000)  ...............         (10,000)  ...............        (+10,000)
              Over-Road Bus security...............................          (3,000)  ...............  ...............         (-3,000)  ...............
            Port Security Grants...................................         100,000   ...............         100,000   ...............        +100,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, Discretionary Grants.......................       1,267,000        1,043,200        1,267,000   ...............        +223,800
 
        Education, Training, and Exercises:
            Emergency Management Institute.........................          20,569           19,523           20,569   ...............          +1,046
            Center for Domestic Preparedness.......................          64,991           62,860           64,991   ...............          +2,131
            National Domestic Preparedness Consortium..............          98,000           42,000           98,000   ...............         +56,000
            National Exercise Program..............................          19,919           25,841           19,919   ...............          -5,922
            Continuing Training Grants/Center for Homeland Defense           29,521           18,000           29,521   ...............         +11,521
             & Security............................................
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Subtotal, Education, Training and Exercises..........         233,000          168,224          233,000   ...............         +64,776
 
        Emergency management performance grants....................  ...............         350,000   ...............  ...............        -350,000
        Fire grants................................................  ...............         670,000   ...............  ...............        -670,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, State and Local Programs.......................       1,500,000        2,231,424        1,500,000   ...............        -731,424
 
    Firefighter Assistance Grants:
        Fire grants................................................         340,000   ...............         340,000   ...............        +340,000
        Staffing for adequate fire and emergency response [SAFER]           340,000   ...............         340,000   ...............        +340,000
         act grants................................................
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................         680,000   ...............         680,000   ...............        +680,000
 
    Emergency management performance grants........................         350,000   ...............         350,000   ...............        +350,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Grants and Training................................       2,530,000        2,231,424        2,530,000   ...............        +298,576
 
Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program........................          -1,815             -305             -305           +1,510   ...............
United States Fire Administration..................................          44,000           41,582           44,000   ...............          +2,418
 
Disaster Relief Fund:
    Base disaster relief...........................................         595,672          661,740          661,740          +66,068   ...............
    Disaster relief category.......................................       6,437,793        6,712,953        6,712,953         +275,160   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Disaster Relief Fund...............................       7,033,465        7,374,693        7,374,693         +341,228   ...............
 
Flood Hazard Mapping and Risk Analysis Program.....................         100,000          278,625          190,000          +90,000          -88,625
 
National Flood Insurance Fund:
    Salaries and expenses..........................................          23,759           25,299           25,299           +1,540   ...............
    Flood plain management and mapping.............................         155,535          155,899          155,899             +364   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         179,294          181,198          181,198           +1,904   ...............
 
    Offsetting fee collections.....................................        -179,294         -181,198         -181,198           -1,904   ...............
National Predisaster Mitigation Fund...............................          25,000          200,001          100,000          +75,000         -100,001
Emergency food and shelter.........................................         120,000          100,000          100,000          -20,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Emergency Management Agency...................      10,785,046       11,175,316       11,267,194         +482,148          +91,878
          (Appropriations).........................................      (4,347,253)      (4,462,363)      (4,554,241)       (+206,988)        (+91,878)
          (Disaster relief category)...............................      (6,437,793)      (6,712,953)      (6,712,953)       (+275,160)  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title III, Protection, Preparedness, Response and           12,416,790       12,958,798       13,028,354         +611,564          +69,556
       Recovery....................................................
          Appropriations...........................................      (5,978,997)      (6,245,845)      (6,315,401)       (+336,404)        (+69,556)
          Disaster relief category.................................      (6,437,793)      (6,712,953)      (6,712,953)       (+275,160)  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      TITLE IV--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TRAINING, AND SERVICES
 
         United States Citizenship and Immigration Services
 
Appropriations:
    E-Verify Program...............................................         124,435          119,671          119,671           -4,764   ...............
    Immigrant integration programs.................................  ...............          10,000   ...............  ...............         -10,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         124,435          129,671          119,671           -4,764          -10,000
 
Fee Accounts:
    Adjudication Services:
        District operations........................................      (1,565,903)      (1,916,344)      (1,644,932)        (+79,029)       (-271,412)
            (Immigrant Integration Grants).........................         (10,000)  ...............  ...............        (-10,000)  ...............
        Service center operations..................................        (542,449)        (694,306)        (700,060)       (+157,611)         (+5,754)
        Asylum, refugee and international operations...............        (239,065)        (268,042)        (259,350)        (+20,285)         (-8,692)
        Records operations.........................................         (93,209)        (124,177)        (124,177)        (+30,968)  ...............
        Business transformation....................................        (184,923)        (226,380)        (226,380)        (+41,457)  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................      (2,625,549)      (3,229,249)      (2,954,899)       (+329,350)       (-274,350)
 
    Information and Customer Services:
        Operating expenses.........................................         (98,868)        (142,565)        (124,041)        (+25,173)        (-18,524)
    Administration:
        Operating expenses.........................................        (342,308)        (415,132)        (384,585)        (+42,277)        (-30,547)
    Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlements [SAVE]..........         (30,259)         (27,021)         (27,021)         (-3,238)  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Fee Accounts.......................................      (3,096,984)      (3,813,967)      (3,490,546)       (+393,562)       (-323,421)
 
H1-B Visa Fee Account:
    Adjudication Services:
        Service center operations..................................  ...............         (15,000)  ...............  ...............        (-15,000)
 
H1-B and L Fraud Prevention Fee Account:
    Adjudication services:
        District operations........................................  ...............         (29,523)  ...............  ...............        (-29,523)
        Asylum and refugee operating expenses......................  ...............            (308)  ...............  ...............           (-308)
        Service center operations..................................  ...............         (15,169)  ...............  ...............        (-15,169)
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal.................................................  ...............         (45,000)  ...............  ...............        (-45,000)
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Total, Fee Accounts......................................      (3,096,984)      (3,873,967)      (3,490,546)       (+393,562)       (-383,421)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, United States Citizenship and Immigration Services....      (3,221,419)      (4,003,638)      (3,610,217)       (+388,798)       (-393,421)
          Appropriations...........................................        (124,435)        (129,671)        (119,671)         (-4,764)        (-10,000)
          Fee accounts.............................................      (3,096,984)      (3,873,967)      (3,490,546)       (+393,562)       (-383,421)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
(Immigration Examination Fee Account)..............................      (3,042,484)      (3,813,967)      (3,430,546)       (+388,062)       (-383,421)
(H1-B Visa Fee Account)............................................         (13,500)         (15,000)         (15,000)         (+1,500)  ...............
(H1-B and L Fraud Prevention Fee Account)..........................         (41,000)         (45,000)         (45,000)         (+4,000)  ...............
 
              Federal Law Enforcement Training Center
 
Salaries and Expenses:
    Law enforcement training.......................................         202,122          209,507          190,065          -12,057          -19,442
    Management and administration..................................          27,080           28,323           28,075             +995             -248
    Accreditation..................................................           1,295            1,311            1,303               +8               -8
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         230,497          239,141          219,443          -11,054          -19,698
 
Acquisitions, Construction, Improvements, and Related Expenses.....          27,841           27,553           26,453           -1,388           -1,100
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Law Enforcement Training Center...............         258,338          266,694          245,896          -12,442          -20,798
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                       Science and Technology
 
Management and administration......................................         129,993          132,115          130,431             +438           -1,684
 
Research, Development, Acquisition, and Operations:
    Research, development, and innovation..........................         457,499          434,850          414,650          -42,849          -20,200
    Laboratory facilities..........................................         434,989          133,921          133,683         -301,306             -238
    Acquisition and operations support.............................          41,703           47,102           47,102           +5,399   ...............
    University programs............................................          39,724           31,000           39,000             -724           +8,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         973,915          646,873          634,435         -339,480          -12,438
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Science and Technology................................       1,103,908          778,988          764,866         -339,042          -14,122
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                 Domestic Nuclear Detection Office
 
Management and administration......................................          37,339           38,316           37,518             +179             -798
 
Research, Development, and Operations:
    Systems engineering and architecture...........................          17,000           17,000           17,000   ...............  ...............
    Systems development............................................          21,400           22,000           22,000             +600   ...............
    Transformational research and development......................          69,500           68,000           68,000           -1,500   ...............
    Assessments....................................................          38,000           38,000           38,000   ...............  ...............
    Operations support.............................................          31,000           31,000           31,000   ...............  ...............
    National Technical Nuclear Forensics Center....................          21,000           20,000           20,000           -1,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................         197,900          196,000          196,000           -1,900   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
 
Systems Acquisition:
    Radiation Portal Monitor Program...............................           5,000   ...............  ...............          -5,000   ...............
    Securing the Cities............................................          19,000           22,000           22,000           +3,000   ...............
    Human portable radiation detection systems.....................          48,603   ...............  ...............         -48,603   ...............
    Radiological and Nuclear Detection Equipment [RDE] acquisition.  ...............         101,011           64,745          +64,745          -36,266
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................          72,603          123,011           86,745          +14,142          -36,266
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Domestic Nuclear Detection Office.....................         307,842          357,327          320,263          +12,421          -37,064
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title IV, Research and Development, Training, and            1,794,523        1,532,680        1,450,696         -343,827          -81,984
       Services....................................................
      (Fee Accounts)...............................................      (3,096,984)      (3,873,967)      (3,490,546)       (+393,562)       (-383,421)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                    TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS
 
DHS Consolidated Headquarters Project..............................          48,600   ...............         212,303         +163,703         +212,303
Financial systems modernization....................................          34,072           42,977           36,113           +2,041           -6,864
Colombia Free Trade Act collections................................         138,000          180,000          220,000          +82,000          +40,000
CBP BSFIT (rescission).............................................          -5,000   ...............         -21,856          -16,856          -21,856
CBP OAM (rescission)(Public Law 113-76)............................          -8,000   ...............  ...............          +8,000   ...............
CBP Construction and Facilities Management (rescission)............         -10,000   ...............          -4,500           +5,500           -4,500
CBP OAM (rescission)...............................................  ...............  ...............         -12,000          -12,000          -12,000
TSA Aviation Security (70 x 0550) (rescission).....................         -15,300   ...............  ...............         +15,300   ...............
TSA Aviation Security (rescission) (Public Law 113-76).............        -187,000   ...............  ...............        +187,000   ...............
Coast Guard AC&I; (rescission)(Public Law 112-10)...................          -2,550   ...............  ...............          +2,550   ...............
Coast Guard AC&I; (rescission)(Public Law 112-74)...................         -12,095   ...............          -5,800           +6,295           -5,800
Coast Guard AC&I; (rescission)(Public Law 113-6)....................         -16,349   ...............  ...............         +16,349   ...............
Coast Guard AC&I; (rescission)(Public Law 113-76)...................         -30,643   ...............         -16,445          +14,198          -16,445
FEMA predisaster mitigation (70 x 0716)(rescission)................         -24,000   ...............         -13,758          +10,242          -13,758
Science and technology, research, development, acquisition, and             -16,627   ...............  ...............         +16,627   ...............
 operations (70 x 0800)(rescission)................................
Science and technology, research, development, acquisition, and      ...............  ...............            -393             -393             -393
 operations (Public Law 113-6)(rescission).........................
Science and technology, research, development, acquisition, and      ...............  ...............          -8,500           -8,500           -8,500
 operations (Public Law 113-76)(rescission)........................
Science and technology, research, development, acquisition, and      ...............  ...............          -1,107           -1,107           -1,107
 operations (Public Law 114-4)(rescission).........................
Treasury Asset Forfeiture Fund (rescission)........................        -175,000   ...............        -175,000   ...............        -175,000
Rescission of legacy funds (rescission)............................          -1,476   ...............  ...............          +1,476   ...............
Rescission of unobligated balances (nondefense)....................         -14,653   ...............  ...............         +14,653   ...............
Rescission of unobligated balances (defense).......................            -679   ...............  ...............            +679   ...............
FEMA Disaster Relief Fund (rescission).............................        -375,000         -250,000       -1,025,062         -650,062         -775,062
FEMA Disaster Assistance Direct Loan Program (rescission)..........  ...............          -5,000          -27,338          -27,338          -22,338
U-Visa immigration proposal........................................  ...............          21,000   ...............  ...............         -21,000
CBP automation modernization (rescission)..........................  ...............  ...............          -7,000           -7,000           -7,000
TSA Aviation security (Public Law 114-4) (rescission)..............  ...............  ...............         -28,000          -28,000          -28,000
TSA Surface transportation security (Public Law 114-4) (rescission)  ...............  ...............          -5,000           -5,000           -5,000
Analysis and operations (rescission)...............................  ...............  ...............          -7,324           -7,324           -7,324
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title V, General Provisions...........................        -673,700          -11,023         -890,667         -216,967         -879,644
          Appropriations...........................................        (220,672)        (243,977)        (468,416)       (+247,744)       (+224,439)
          Rescissions..............................................       (-894,372)       (-255,000)     (-1,359,083)       (-464,711)     (-1,104,083)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Grand Total..................................................      47,771,419       49,714,622       48,689,955         +918,536       -1,024,667
          Appropriations...........................................     (42,014,998)     (43,256,669)     (43,176,083)     (+1,161,085)        (-80,586)
          Rescissions..............................................       (-894,372)       (-255,000)     (-1,359,083)       (-464,711)     (-1,104,083)
          Overseas contingency operations/global war on terrorism..        (213,000)  ...............        (160,002)        (-52,998)       (+160,002)
          Disaster relief category.................................      (6,437,793)      (6,712,953)      (6,712,953)       (+275,160)  ...............
          (Fee funded programs)....................................      (5,405,483)      (6,371,901)      (5,988,480)       (+582,997)       (-383,421)
          (By transfer)............................................         (24,000)         (24,000)         (24,000)  ...............  ...............
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                                [all]