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                                                       Calendar No. 126
114th Congress   }                                       {      Report
                                 SENATE
 1st Session     }                                       }      114-70

======================================================================



 
     DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, ENVIRONMENT, AND RELATED AGENCIES 
                       APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2016
                                _______
                                

                 June 23, 2015.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

         Ms. Murkowski, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                                 REPORT

                         [To accompany S. 1645]

    The Committee on Appropriations reports the bill (S. 1645) 
making appropriations for the Department of the Interior, 
environment, and related agencies for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 2016, and for other purposes, reports favorably 
thereon and recommends that the bill do pass.



Total obligational authority, fiscal year 2016

Total of bill as reported to the Senate................. $31,131,289,000
Amount of 2015 appropriations...........................  30,105,720,000
Amount of 2016 budget estimate..........................  33,324,129,000
Bill as recommended to Senate compared to--
    2015 appropriations.................................  +1,025,569,000
    2016 budget estimate................................  -2,192,840,000

                    ========================================================
                      __________________________________________________






                                CONTENTS

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
Summary of Bill..................................................     4
    Major Changes Recommended in the Bill........................     4
    Reprogramming Guidelines.....................................     9
Title I:
    Department of the Interior:
        Land and Water Resources: Bureau of Land Management......    10
    Fish and Wildlife and Parks:
        U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service...........................    16
        National Park Service....................................    24
    Energy and Minerals:
        U.S. Geological Survey...................................    30
        Bureau of Ocean Energy Management........................    33
        Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement...........    34
        Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement.....    35
    Indian Affairs: Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian 
      Education..................................................    36
    Departmental Offices:
        Office of the Secretary..................................    41
        Insular Affairs..........................................    41
        Office of the Solicitor..................................    42
        Office of Inspector General..............................    43
        Office of Special Trustee for American Indians...........    43
    Department-wide Programs:
        Wildland Fire Management.................................    43
        Central Hazardous Materials Fund.........................    44
        Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration.......    44
        Working Capital Fund.....................................    44
    General Provisions: Department of the Interior...............    44
Title II:
    Environmental Protection Agency:
        Science and Technology...................................    49
        Environmental Programs and Management....................    51
        Office of Inspector General..............................    57
        Buildings and Facilities.................................    57
        Hazardous Substance Superfund............................    57
        Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund..............    58
        Inland Oil Spill Program.................................    58
        State and Tribal Assistance Grants.......................    58
        Administrative Provisions................................    59
Title III:
    Related Agencies:
        Department of Agriculture: Forest Service................    60
        Administrative Provisions................................    69
        Department of Health and Human Services:
            Indian Health Service................................    69
            Contract Support Costs...............................    71
            National Institutes of Health........................    71
            Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.....    72
        Other Related Agencies:
            Executive Office of the President....................    72
            Council on Environmental Quality and Office of 
              Environmental Quality..............................    72
            Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board.......    72
            Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation..........    73
            Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native 
              Culture and Arts Development.......................    73
            Smithsonian Institution..............................    74
            National Gallery of Art..............................    76
            John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.......    76
            Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.....    77
            National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities:
                National Endowment for the Arts..................    77
                National Endowment for the Humanities............    78
            Commission of Fine Arts..............................    78
            National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs...........    79
            Advisory Council on Historic Preservation............    79
            National Capital Planning Commission.................    80
            United States Holocaust Memorial Museum..............    80
            Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission.............    81
Title IV: General Provisions.....................................    82
Title V: Wildfire Disaster Funding...............................    84
Compliance with Paragraph 7, Rule XVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the 
  Senate.........................................................    85
Compliance with Paragraph 7(c), Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules 
  of the Senate..................................................    87
Compliance with Paragraph 12, Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................    87
Budgetary Impact of Bill.........................................    99
Comparative Statement of Budget Authority........................   100

                            SUMMARY OF BILL

    For this bill, estimates totaling $31,131,289,000 in new 
obligational authority are provided for the programs and 
activities of the agencies and bureaus of the Department of the 
Interior, except the Bureau of Reclamation, and the following 
related agencies:
    Environmental Protection Agency
    Department of Agriculture: Forest Service
    Department of Health and Human Services:
        Indian Health Service
        National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
        Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
  Council on Environmental Quality and Office of Environmental 
        Quality
    Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board
    Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation
  Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and 
        Arts Development
    Smithsonian Institution
    National Gallery of Art
    John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts
    Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
    National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities:
        National Endowment for the Arts
        National Endowment for the Humanities
    Commission of Fine Arts
    National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs
    Advisory Council on Historic Preservation
    National Capital Planning Commission
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission 

                 Major Changes Recommended in the Bill

    This bill includes revisions to the budget estimate for the 
2016 fiscal year.
    A comparative summary of funding in the bill is shown by 
agency or principal program in the following table:

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                   Chairman's
                                                                                Chairman's       recommendation
                                                          Budget estimate     recommendation     compared with
                                                                                                budget estimate
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
          TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
 
Bureau of Land Management..............................          1,230,896          1,187,801            -43,095
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.........................          1,575,510          1,441,201           -134,309
National Park Service..................................          3,047,707          2,729,027           -318,680
United States Geological Survey........................          1,194,782          1,058,503           -136,279
Bureau of Ocean Energy Management......................             74,235             74,235  .................
Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement.........             82,464             88,464             +6,000
Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement...            160,462            150,135            -10,327
Bureau of Indian Affairs...............................          2,924,968          2,693,026           -231,942
Departmental Offices...................................            696,007            620,580            -75,427
Department-wide Programs...............................          1,099,204          1,183,623            +84,419
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Title I--Department of the Interior.......         12,086,236         11,226,595           -859,640
                                                        ========================================================
       TITLE II--ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
 
Science and Technology.................................            769,088            703,958            -65,130
Environmental Programs and Management..................          2,841,718          2,561,498           -280,220
Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest System Fund........              7,368              3,786             -3,582
Office of Inspector General............................             50,999             41,489             -8,610
Buildings and Facilities...............................             51,507             42,317             -9,190
Hazardous Substance Superfund..........................          1,153,834          1,106,809            -47,025
Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund............             95,326             91,485             -3,841
Inland Oil Spill Program...............................             23,378             18,078             -5,300
State and Tribal Assistance Grants.....................          3,599,400          3,027,937           -571,463
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Title II--Environmental Protection Agency.          8,591,718          7,597,357           -994,361
                                                        ========================================================
              TITLE III--RELATED AGENCIES
 
Department of Agriculture: Forest Service..............          5,780,410          5,977,877           +197,467
Department of Health and Human Services:
    Indian Health Service..............................          5,102,985          4,779,311           -323,674
    National Institutes of Health: National Institute               77,349             77,349  .................
     of Environmental Health Sciences..................
    Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry...             74,691             74,691  .................
Council on Environmental Quality and Office of                       3,015              3,000                -15
 Environmental Quality.................................
Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board.........             12,271             10,700             -1,571
Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation............              8,400              7,341             -1,059
Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture              11,619             11,619  .................
 and Arts Development..................................
Smithsonian Institution................................            935,825            819,541           -116,284
National Gallery of Art................................            152,660            138,500            -14,160
John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.........             36,400             32,800             -3,600
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.......             10,420             10,500                +80
National Endowment for the Arts........................            147,949            146,021             -1,928
National Endowment for the Humanities..................            147,942            146,021             -1,921
Commission of Fine Arts................................              2,653              2,653  .................
National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs.............              2,000              2,000  .................
Advisory Council on Historic Preservation..............              6,080              6,080  .................
National Capital Planning Commission...................              8,348              7,948               -400
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum................             54,959             52,385             -2,574
Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission...............             70,200              1,000            -69,200
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Title III--Related Agencies...............         12,646,176         12,307,337           -338,839
                                                        ========================================================
      Grand Total......................................         33,324,129         31,131,289         -2,192,840
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND

    The following table displays appropriations from the Land 
and Water Conservation Fund.

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                            Fiscal year
                         Agency/program                          --------------------------------   Chairman's
                                                                   2015 enacted    2016 estimate  recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Federal Land Acquisition:
    Bureau of Land Management...................................          19,746          38,000          18,922
    Fish and Wildlife Service...................................          47,535          58,500          48,887
    National Park Service.......................................          50,843          64,339          51,275
    Forest Service..............................................          47,500          63,000          38,440
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Federal Land Acquisition........................         165,624         223,839         157,524
                                                                 ===============================================
National Park Service, State Assistance.........................          48,117          53,161          55,000
Forest Legacy Program...........................................          53,000          61,000          59,800
Cooperative Endangered Species Fund.............................          27,400          50,000          21,817
Office of Valuation Services....................................          12,000          12,000          12,000
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      Total, Land and Water Conservation Fund...................         306,141         400,000         306,141
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    WILDLAND FIRE BUDGETING REFORMS

    This bill provides a total of $4,664,664,000 for wildland 
fire programs for the Forest Service and Department of the 
Interior, including a total amount of $2,564,251,000 for 
wildland fire suppression activities, of which $1,054,578,000 
is designated as emergency. The recommendation also includes an 
important reform proposal that amends the Budget Control Act of 
2011 (Public Law 112-25) to allow certain wildland fire 
suppression activities to be funded through a disaster cap 
adjustment consistent with other natural disasters, as detailed 
below. This recommendation is a modification of the proposal 
included in the fiscal year 2016 budget request, and the 
subject of bipartisan legislation introduced in both the House 
and the Senate. Legislative language to enact this proposal is 
included in title V, but under congressional budgeting rules, 
this bill cannot both create a new cap adjustment to the 
statutory discretionary spending limits and appropriate funding 
under that cap. Therefore, the funds requested through the 
disaster cap adjustment have been designated as a one-time 
emergency spending requirement for the purposes of this bill. 
Historically, budgeting for wildland firefighting is determined 
by the 10-year average of suppression costs. The proposal 
continues this practice and only provides access to the cap 
adjustment when regular fire suppression amounts are exhausted.
    The aim of this proposal is to finally put an end to the 
fire borrowing and repayment cycle. These changes are 
critically important because of the frequency with which the 
agencies exhaust firefighting funds and are required to 
transfer funds from other programs to continue their 
suppression operations. And since fiscal year 2002, the Forest 
Service and Department of the Interior collectively have 
``borrowed'' more than $3,200,000,000 from discretionary, 
mandatory, and permanent accounts to pay for fire suppression 
costs. These fire transfers have been highly disruptive to 
natural resource programs, and borrowed funds have not always 
been repaid by Congress. As importantly, the effects of fire 
borrowing are not only felt within the land management 
agencies. While the historical method for reimbursing transfers 
was through emergency supplementals, $1,000,000,000 has been 
provided over the last 3 years to repay firefighting transfers 
from within the subcommittee's regular discretionary 
allocation. The result has been that with the ever-increasing 
cost of fire being directly shouldered by this bill, the other 
agencies funded by the subcommittee are being asked to forego 
important priorities to make room for fire. This bill 
authorizes bold action that will put an end to this 
unpredictable mechanism to pay for fire suppression needs and 
will greatly enhance the efficiency of the Forest Service and 
the Department of the Interior, where managers in traditional 
non-fire programs must frequently curtail contracts early in 
the field season because of the likelihood of fire borrowing. 
The legislative text also includes auditing and reporting 
requirements to track expenditures of funds from the disaster 
cap.
    This is not a ``blank check'' for additional spending. To 
complement the new structure proposed in title V for fire 
suppression, this bill invests in funding for prevention 
activities and post-fire rehabilitation, in order to tackle the 
fire problem from both ends, which can dramatically decrease 
the suppression costs when fires do occur. The Forest Service 
and Department of the Interior are provided with a 4-percent 
increase for hazardous fuels reduction activities, to protect 
communities by treating high-priority areas in the wildland-
urban interface and the backcountry. By employing all of these 
tools, this bill provides a multifaceted approach to combat the 
increasing cost of fighting wildfire. Without the additional 
resources made available for Federal wildland fire management 
within this bill to attack the problem before, during, and 
after a wildfire event, it is evident that the Federal land 
management agencies will not get ahead of the disastrous curve 
on catastrophic fire, and suppression costs and the economic 
costs to communities nationwide will continue to rise.

                        MULTI-AGENCY DIRECTIVES

    Wildlife Data Coordination.--The Department of the Interior 
and U.S. Forest Service are expected to prioritize continued 
coordination with other Federal agencies and State wildlife 
agencies to utilize State fish and wildlife data and analyses 
as an applicable source to inform land use, land planning, and 
related natural resource decisions. Federal agencies should not 
unnecessarily duplicate raw data, but when appropriate, 
evaluate existing analysis of data prepared by the States and 
reciprocally, share data with State wildlife managers, to 
ensure that the most complete data set is available for 
decision support systems.
    Dead and Downed Trees.--The Committee is concerned by the 
substantial increase in the number of dead and downed trees as 
a result of drought and invasive pests on public lands in the 
West managed by the Forest Service, National Park Service, and 
Bureau of Land Management. Given the increased potential for 
devastating wildfires, the Committee directs the Forest 
Service, National Park Service, and Bureau of Land Management 
to work with State and local governments in drought-stricken 
regions to facilitate the prompt removal of these trees and to 
prioritize funding for projects that reduce fire threats to 
communities, drinking water supplies, utilities, and groves of 
ancient trees.
    Land Grants, Acequias and Community Ditches.--The Committee 
urges the Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary of 
Agriculture to recognize and respect the traditional use of 
State recognized land grants, acequias and community ditches in 
the American Southwest, during the land use planning process. 
Land grants, acequias and community ditches have a unique 
history in this region, in that they pre-date the Federal land 
management agencies and are central to the local communities' 
culture and heritage.
    Multi-Agency Transparency.--The Committee expresses support 
for increasing transparency within all agencies of the 
Department of the Interior, the U.S. Forest Service and the 
Environmental Protection Agency. The agencies are encouraged to 
disclose costs associated with analyses required by the 
National Environmental Policy Act.
    Social Cost of Carbon.--The Administrator should not 
promulgate any regulations in fiscal year 2016 using the May 
2013 estimates for the social cost of carbon until a new 
working group is convened. The working group should include the 
relevant agencies and affected stakeholders, re-examine the 
social cost of carbon using the best available science, and 
revise the estimate using an accurate discount rate and 
domestic estimate in accordance with Executive Order 12866 and 
OMB Circular A-4. To increase transparency, the working group 
should solicit public comments prior to finalizing any updates.
    Sportsman/Recreational Access.--The Committee provides new 
funding to the National Park Service and the Fish and Wildlife 
Service for recreational access while maintaining funding to 
the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service for 
these purposes. The Committee believes increasing access to our 
public lands is important and it is expected the agencies will 
prioritize projects that significantly enhance access to 
existing public lands that have inadequate access for hunting, 
fishing, and other recreational activities. The Committee 
expects the agencies to report within 30 days of enactment of 
this act on how this funding will be spent. Further, in future 
congressional budget justifications, the agencies will include 
a description and explanation on the use of funds for this 
purpose.
    Land and Water Conservation Fund.--The Committee is 
concerned about the prioritization of projects. The Committee 
urges agencies to prioritize Federal land acquisition projects 
with available funding in fiscal year 2016 and in future budget 
requests where the acquisition of Federal land parcels create 
management efficiencies or are accompanied by related land and 
easement acquisitions made by State, local, or non-Federal 
entities. The Committee also encourages the agencies to 
consider geographic distribution, historic sites, wilderness 
inholdings, and the national trail system when prioritizing 
projects.
    Paper Reduction Efforts.--The Committee is concerned about 
the millions of taxpayer dollars spent on wasteful printing 
practices each year and the lack of clear printing policies 
within each of the agencies. While progress has been made to 
better utilize the cloud and digitize records, little progress 
has been made to reform in-house printing practices. The 
Committee urges each agency funded by this bill to work with 
the Office of Management and Budget to reduce printing and 
reproduction by 34 percent and directs each agency report to 
the Committee within 60 days of enactment of this act on what 
steps have been taken to reduce printing volume and costs. The 
report should specifically identify how much money each agency 
will be saving.

                        Reprogramming Guidelines

    The Chairman retains the reprogramming guidelines contained 
in the Statement of Managers accompanying the Conference Report 
for the Fiscal Year 2012 Interior, Environment, and Related 
Agencies Appropriations Act (Public Law 112-74).

                                TITLE I

                       DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

                        LAND AND WATER RESOURCES

                       Bureau of Land Management

    The Bureau of Land Management [Bureau] manages over 245 
million acres of public lands, primarily in 11 Western States 
and Alaska. The Bureau also has responsibility for 700 million 
acres of federally owned sub-surface mineral estate. The Bureau 
is mandated to administer these lands for multiple uses, 
including recreation, wildlife habitat, mineral and energy 
production, timber harvesting, and rangeland grazing, while 
managing natural, cultural, and historical resources.

                   MANAGEMENT OF LANDS AND RESOURCES

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $970,016,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................   1,067,466,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................   1,045,562,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $1,045,562,000 
for the Management of Lands and Resources account. This amount 
is $75,546,000 above the enacted level. Program changes to the 
enacted level are detailed in the following budget activity 
narratives. Funding levels for each sub-activity can be found 
in the table that accompanies this statement. The request 
included transfer of funds from various budget line items into 
the National Landscape Conservation System, which the Committee 
rejects. The Committee encourages the Bureau to submit an 
accurate representation of funds required to support the 
National Landscape Conservation System in the fiscal year 2017 
budget request.
    The United States, as an Arctic Nation, has broad interest 
in the region that includes meeting security needs, protecting 
the environment, responsibly managing resources, supporting 
indigenous communities, promoting scientific research and 
strengthening international cooperation. In April, the United 
States assumed the chairmanship of the Arctic Council, which 
offers the Nation the opportunity to make significant progress 
on policy objectives in the President's 2009 National Security 
Directive and the 2013 National Strategy for the Arctic Region.
    The Department of the Interior is the lead agency for five 
efforts under the 2013 National Strategy to: (1) ensure the 
safe and responsible development of non-renewable energy 
resources; (2) advance Integrated Arctic Management; (3) 
understand the effects of climate change on terrestrial 
ecosystems; (4) investigate the role of wildland fires in the 
Arctic; and (5) identify and assess invasive species impacts 
and risks. The Bureau, as the largest Federal landholder in the 
Arctic region of Alaska, is directed to work cooperatively with 
local stakeholders to enhance economic opportunities for the 
people who live and work in the region. The Committee 
understands the importance of the need for research conducted 
by the Department, but also believes that improving the lives 
of the local people through responsible resource management and 
other economic development is equally as important.
    Land Resources.--The bill provides $248,412,000 for land 
resources, an increase of $2,638,000 above the enacted level. 
The Committee rejects the budget request proposal to implement 
a new grazing administration fee. Within the funds provided for 
Rangeland Management, the Committee directs the Bureau to 
prioritize activities related to Secretarial Order 3336 on 
Rangeland Fire Prevention, Management and Restoration and 
managing the spread of invasive plants. As the Bureau 
implements the order, it is encouraged to find ways to 
strategically incorporate public and private firefighting 
assets into fighting wildland fire.
    Within the amount provided for wild horse and burro 
management, the Bureau should continue to implement reforms 
based on the findings and recommendations outlined in the 
National Academy of Sciences June 2013 report. The Committee 
remains concerned about the well-being of animals on the range 
due to drought conditions and population trends, as well as 
about the resulting impacts to rangeland and riparian areas. 
The Bureau is directed to achieve appropriate management levels 
in Herd Management Areas, with priority given to those areas 
that overlap priority sage-grouse habitat.
    The Committee recognizes the need to combat invasive plant 
species through the protection, restoration and enhancement of 
native plants, including those that are endangered or 
threatened, and has identified the Native Plant Materials 
Development Program as one through which these efforts could be 
expanded. The Committee encourages the Secretary to continue 
support for native plant conservation efforts throughout the 
Department and urges the Secretary to actively integrate and 
coordinate the plant conservation effort across Offices, to 
develop a plan that is an integrated, comprehensive approach to 
native plant issues and restoration. The Bureau is urged to 
make available its yearly estimated seed needs by variety, to 
be more transparent with the science supporting its policy, and 
to insure there has been ample opportunity for public comment 
and collaboration regarding the National Seed Strategy, as well 
as coordination with related initiatives, including the 
President's Pollinator Strategy. Furthermore, the Department is 
encouraged to rely more heavily on existing research being 
conducted at the U.S. Department of Agriculture Plant Material 
Centers to avoid additional expense and duplication of effort.
    The Committee directs the Bureau, to the greatest extent 
possible, to make vacant grazing allotments available to a 
holder of a grazing permit or lease when lands covered by the 
holder of the permit or lease are unusable because of drought 
or wildfire.
    Wildlife and Fisheries.--The bill provides $101,911,000 for 
wildlife and fisheries, which is $37,043,000 above the enacted 
level. Of the funds provided, no less than $37,043,000 is for 
on-the-ground activities to improve sage-grouse habitat, 
including removal of conifers, creating fire breaks, seeding, 
reducing fuels, removing invasive species and post-fire 
restoration activities.
    Threatened and Endangered Species.--The bill provides 
$21,567,000 for threatened and endangered species conservation, 
an increase of $109,000 above the enacted level.
    Recreation Management.--The bill provides $65,461,000 for 
recreation management, a decrease of $1,500,000 below the 
enacted level. The Committee is concerned that despite the 
funding prohibition on Secretarial Order 3310, the Bureau has 
taken the recommendations of the order and implemented them in 
contravention to the intent of Congress. The Committee reminds 
the Bureau to be cognizant that well-managed and reclaimed 
lands may be rehabilitated to achieve wilderness 
characteristics and do not necessarily merit protection under 
the Wilderness Act. Of the funds provided, $14,264,000 is for 
wilderness management and $51,197,000 is for recreation 
management activities to reflect the direction of the Committee 
to prioritize recreation management over the creation of lands 
to be managed as wilderness.
    Energy and Minerals Management.--The bill provides 
$163,543,000 for oil, gas, coal, and other minerals management, 
an increase of $19,992,000 above the enacted level. The 
detailed allocation of funding by program is included in the 
table that accompanies this statement. The increased funding 
reflects changes made to the oil and gas program by the Carl 
Levin and Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-291) and 
the need to increase program capacity. The Committee rejects 
the creation of a new inspection and enforcement fee, but 
provides the full $48,000,000 the Bureau cited as necessary to 
address deficiencies identified in Government Accountability 
Office reports to improve production accountability to better 
ensure proper revenue collection.
    The Committee is concerned about the current downward 
leasing trends on public lands as well as the cumulative impact 
of actions undertaken by the Bureau and the Department that 
could result in furthering the competitive disadvantage of 
conventional resource development on public lands when compared 
to non-Federal lands. The Committee directs the Bureau to 
refrain from taking regulatory actions, including raising 
royalty rates, likely to result in discouraging responsible 
development of resources on public lands. Additionally, the 
Bureau shall return to the practice of publishing oil and gas 
statistics quarterly.
    In addition to the appropriation, the Bureau will receive 
$40,375,000 in collections from fees for applications for 
permits [APD] to drill. The Committee is aware APD fee 
collections will transition from discretionary funding to 
mandatory funding. In prior years, APD fees were appropriated 
and available for expenditure in advance of collections; 
however, beginning in 2016, the Bureau can access the fees only 
as they are collected. The reliance on realized collections may 
result in a shortfall in funding early in the fiscal year, 
particularly in the first year of the transition. The Committee 
believes this transition can be appropriately accommodated 
given the flexibility to use base appropriated funding in the 
Oil and Gas Management program for APD permitting program 
operations. The Committee does not support the proposal to 
establish a new budget line for these activities and instead 
provides sufficient funding within Oil and Gas Management to 
maintain the current level of APD program support. The 
Committee believes continuation of the current budget 
structure, sufficient appropriated funding for processing 
activities, and the ability to reprogram funds as needed, will 
enable the Bureau to cover operating costs in early fiscal year 
2016.
    When the Bureau chooses to defer leasing on lands that have 
been nominated and are otherwise available for oil and gas 
activity under resource management plans, the Bureau shall 
submit, within 60 days of said deferral, a report to the 
Committee containing an explanation for the deferral.
    The Committee directs the Bureau of Land Management to work 
cooperatively with the Alaska State Oil and Gas Conservation 
Commission and the royalty owners to resolve the outstanding 
issue of measurement of production in the National Petroleum 
Reserve-Alaska in a manner that provides a fair return for 
taxpayers and does not discourage the commencement of 
production.
    The Committee finds that the Bureau continues to be 
significantly behind on processing APDs, particularly on Indian 
Reservation lands. Any coordinating office created by the 
Bureau in partnership with other oil and gas related permitting 
agencies shall closely coordinate with the Fort Berthold tribal 
authorities.
    The Committee rejects the proposal to repeal Section 224(b) 
of the Energy Policy Act of 2005.
    The Committee recognizes the Federal Government has an 
ongoing interest in collecting royalties from production of 
Federal oil and gas resources. The Committee directs the Bureau 
to work with States to explore options to streamline the 
permitting process in instances where Federal subsurface 
minerals account for less than half of the spacing unit or in 
instances when the Federal Government does not own or lease the 
surface rights within the drilling spacing unit in a manner 
that ensures the Federal Government receives all relevant 
royalties from its mineral interests.
    Placer Mining Reclamation Activities.--The Bureau is 
instructed to develop a definition of ``re-vegetation'' that 
fully accounts for the various ecological constraints on re-
vegetation regionally within Alaska and results in economically 
viable requirements for the purposes of evaluating reclamation 
plans for placer mining activities. In the interim, the Bureau 
is instructed to assign required personnel to swiftly review 
and make reclamation plan determinations, with priority given 
to those areas where evidence of re-growth exists.
    Realty and Ownership Management.--The bill provides 
$67,658,000 for public land realty and ownership management 
activities, equal to the enacted level. Upon completion of the 
inventory of contaminated Alaska Native lands in need of 
remediation, the Committee directs the Bureau to coordinate 
with all responsible Federal agencies to expedite the cleanup 
process, including the Department of Defense and the Forest 
Service, so that the lands meet appropriate environmental 
standards at the earliest possible date.
    The Bureau is encouraged to make funds available to offset 
State expenses in situations where a conveyance error by the 
Bureau necessitates re-conveyance to settle conveyances under 
the Alaska Native Allotment Act of 1906, the Alaska Statehood 
Act of 1958, and the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 
1971.
    Resource Protection and Maintenance.--The bill provides 
$108,008,000 for resource protection and maintenance, an 
increase of $11,959,000 above the enacted level. Of the funds 
provided for Law Enforcement activities, $6,000,000 is for 
marijuana eradication programs.
    Of the funds provided for Resource Management Planning, no 
less than $8,000,000 is to complete planning and evaluation 
activities required to implement on-the-ground projects funded 
through increases to the wildlife management program.
    The Bureau is expected to defer any final decision-making 
regarding land use plans as part of the Oklahoma, Kansas, and 
Texas Resource Management Plan Revision until appropriate 
surveys have been conducted to determine ownership along the 
Red River or a legislative solution is enacted. The Bureau is 
encouraged to consider recurring recreational events carefully 
as land use plans are revised or updated.
    Transportation and Facilities Maintenance.--The bill 
provides $65,937,000 for transportation and facilities 
maintenance, an increase of $305,000 above the enacted level.
    Workforce and Organizational Support.--The bill provides 
$163,833,000 for workforce organization and support, equal to 
the enacted level.
    Challenge Cost Share.--The bill provides $2,413,000 for 
challenge cost share partnership projects, equal to the enacted 
level.
    National Landscape Conservation System.--The bill provides 
$36,819,000 for major units of the National Landscape 
Conservation System, an increase of $5,000,000 above the 
enacted level. Within the funds provided, $5,000,000 is 
provided to initiate foundational efforts at newly designated 
national monuments. While monument designations are made at the 
Presidential level, the Committee reminds the Bureau and the 
Department of its belief that monument designations should only 
be made in circumstances where there is robust support on the 
local, State and Federal level.
    Mining Law Administration.--The bill provides $39,696,000 
for mining law administration. This amount is equal to the 
budget request and the enacted level and is fully offset by 
collections from mining claims fees.
    Greater Sage-Grouse.--The Committee acknowledges that the 
Department has directed the Fish and Wildlife Service to 
announce whether the greater sage-grouse should be listed under 
the Endangered Species Act during fiscal year 2015. The 
Committee notes that the Department takes this action in direct 
contravention of the intent of Congress. Language included in 
the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act of 
2015 was designed to prevent such an announcement from being 
made in fiscal year 2015. The delay in decision-making was 
intended to give the 11 States with greater sage-grouse 
populations adequate time to demonstrate that State-developed 
sage-grouse management plans can provide adequate sage-grouse 
conservation when coupled with the improved management of 
public lands. This model has been proven effective by the 
manner in which the Wyoming Greater Sage-Grouse Conservation 
Plan is incorporated in the recently released land use plan 
amendments for the conservation of greater sage-grouse proposed 
by the Bureau and the Forest Service. However, Wyoming is the 
only State that has been completely afforded this opportunity. 
States have invested an unprecedented level of time and 
taxpayer resources to prepare conservation and management plans 
for the conservation of the greater sage-grouse and its 
habitat. These investments, made at the invitation of the 
Department, should be given time to work. The Bureau should 
dedicate funding for collaboration with States on the 
implementation of State plans designed to promote sustainable 
sage-grouse populations.
    The Committee is also concerned about the yet unknown 
consequences of the above-mentioned plan amendments on 
recreation, renewable and conventional energy development, 
transmission, grazing and a variety of other multiple-use 
activities on public lands. For example, plan amendments 
recommend mineral withdrawals totaling approximately 11 million 
acres. The level of acreage proposed for withdrawal is far 
greater than the acres of potentially impacted essential sage-
grouse habitat. This calls into question the necessity of the 
withdrawals because most development would be required to 
include mitigation activities.
    Sage-grouse conservation activities should be driven by the 
quality of outcomes and the default should not always be 
restricting land use. The Committee appreciates the desire of 
the Bureau and Forest Service to preserve the ability to modify 
allowable uses on federally managed lands, but is concerned 
that the plan amendments only allow modification toward more 
restrictive uses, regardless of whether the bird is listed. If 
the expectation is that agency actions will provide for species 
recovery, the Committee rejects the notion that flexibility in 
allowable changes to land status should only be granted in 
cases of more restrictions on land uses. If species 
conservation and recovery were determined by degree of 
regulation, the Endangered Species Act recovery rate would be 
higher. The Committee believes State plans and on-the-ground 
sagebrush steppe habitat management investments made by this 
bill should be given an opportunity to work outside both the 
Endangered Species Act and overly restrictive actions taken by 
the Bureau and the Forest Service.

                            LAND ACQUISITION

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $19,746,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      38,000,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      18,922,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $18,922,000 for land 
acquisition, a decrease of $824,000 below the enacted level, 
and the Committee provides $3,000,000 for recreational access. 
The amount provided within this bill is available for the 
following distribution of funds and projects requested by the 
administration:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                             Budget            Bill
State               Project                 estimate     (Discretionary)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
   COUpper Rio Grande: Blanca              $6,346,000       $6,346,000
      Wetlands ACEC/SRMA
   NMUpper Rio Grande: Rio Grande del       2,900,000        2,900,000
      Norte NM
   WYNorth Platte River SRMA                1,310,000        1,310,000
   ORSandy River ACEC/Oregon National         750,000          750,000
      Historic Trail
   AZIronwood Forest                        1,000,000        1,000,000
     Other Projects                        18,078,000  ...............
     Sportsman/Recreational Access          4,000,000        3,000,000
     Acquisition Management                 2,000,000        2,000,000
     Inholdings, Emergencies, and           1,616,000        1,616,000
      Hardships
    --------------------------------------------------------------------
           Total, Land Acquisition         38,000,000       18,922,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                   OREGON AND CALIFORNIA GRANT LANDS

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $113,777,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     107,734,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     105,621,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $105,621,000 for 
Oregon and California Grant Lands, a decrease of $8,156,000 
below the enacted level.

                           range improvements

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $10,000,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      10,000,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      10,000,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $10,000,000 for range 
improvements, an amount equal to the enacted level.

               service charges, deposits, and forfeitures

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $32,465,000
Offsetting collections..................................     -32,465,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      31,050,000
Offsetting collections..................................     -31,050,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      31,050,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $31,050,000 for 
service charges, deposits, and forfeitures. The appropriation 
is fully offset by the collection of fees to pay for reasonable 
administrative and other costs.

                       miscellaneous trust funds

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $24,000,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      24,000,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      24,000,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $24,000,000 for 
miscellaneous trust funds, equal to the enacted level.

                      FISH AND WILDLIFE AND PARKS


                     U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the principal Federal 
agency responsible for conserving, protecting and enhancing 
fish, wildlife and plants and their habitats. The Service 
manages more than 150 million acres in the National Wildlife 
Refuge System, which encompasses 563 national wildlife refuges, 
thousands of small wetlands and other special management areas 
and Marine National Monuments. It also operates 72 national 
fish hatcheries, 65 fish and wildlife management offices, and 
80 ecological services field stations. The Agency enforces 
Federal wildlife laws, administers the Endangered Species Act, 
manages migratory bird populations, restores nationally 
significant fisheries, conserves and restores wildlife habitat 
such as wetlands, and helps foreign governments with their 
conservation efforts. It also oversees the Federal Assistance 
program, which distributes hundreds of millions of dollars in 
excise taxes on fishing and hunting equipment to State fish and 
wildlife agencies.

                          RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

Appropriations, 2015....................................  $1,207,658,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................   1,326,832,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................   1,203,545,000

    The bill provides $1,203,545,000 for resource management. 
This amount is a decrease of $4,113,000 below the fiscal year 
2015 enacted level.
    Ecological Services.--$284,712,000 is provided for 
Ecological Services activities. The Service's proposal to 
consolidate the budget structure for Ecological Services into 
three subactivities: Listing; Planning and Consultation; and 
Conservation and Restoration, is not accepted. Within the 
ecological services program, funding is provided as follows:
    Endangered Species.--$172,131,000 is provided for 
endangered species, $880,000 below the fiscal year 2015 level. 
Within the Endangered Species budget, the Committee encourages 
the Service to allocate equal resources to listing and 
delisting efforts. In next year's budget request, the Service 
is directed to include detailed information about the amount of 
resources dedicated to (1) listing and (2) delisting efforts so 
the Committee can understand how the Service is allocating its 
resources internally.
    Candidate Conservation.--$14,150,000 is provided for 
candidate conservation, $2,120,000 above the fiscal year 2015 
level. Within candidate conservation, an additional $2,000,000 
is provided for conservation of the sagebrush steppe ecosystem. 
The Service is directed to use those funds to work with States 
and private landowners to implement science-based, flexible 
conservation efforts for to protect the sage-grouse.
    Listing and Critical Habitat.--$17,515,000 is provided for 
ESA listings and critical habitat activities, $3,000,000 below 
the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. Consistent with the 
request, legislative caps for petition processing, for listing 
activities related to foreign species, and for critical habitat 
designations have been maintained in an effort to limit the 
impact of petitions and lawsuits on the remainder of the 
Service's budget. The Committee has provided $1,501,000 for 
petition activities, $1,504,000 for listing of foreign species, 
and $1,605,000 for critical habitat designations.
    The Committee remains concerned that the deadlines imposed 
by the Service's 2011 multispecies litigation settlements and 
other settlement agreements on specific species limit the 
Service's ability to allow impacted State and local governments 
to work on conservation efforts to protect species. Given the 
limited budget resources and the importance of allowing on-the-
ground conservation efforts to succeed, in instances where 
impacted State and local governments are working on 
conservation measures to protect species, the Service is 
directed to seek deadline extensions as necessary.
    The Committee is concerned that there is not adequate 
transparency for impacted stakeholders when the Service chooses 
to enter into a settlement agreement on an endangered species 
listing petition. This is particularly troubling in the context 
of multiple species--as happened in the 2011 multispecies 
litigation settlement agreements. Before entering into any 
settlement agreement involving more than one species, the 
Service is directed to provide notice to the Governor of each 
State where the species are located at least 30 days prior to 
finalizing the settlement agreement.
    The Committee is also concerned about the extent to which 
data that is used in listing determinations and critical 
habitat designations is made available to the public. 
Specifically, the Committee is concerned that there are 
instances where that data is not made available to the public, 
including to State and local governments who are directly 
impacted by these listing decisions. As such, the Committee 
directs the Service to provide plans to improve transparency of 
the data for all species determinations. This includes making a 
determination about the feasibility of publishing data for all 
species on the Internet.
    Consultation and HCPs.--The bill provides $62,550,000 for 
consultation and HCPs. This is equal to the fiscal year 2015 
enacted level.
    Recovery.--$77,916,000 is provided for planning and 
consultation activities. This is equal to the fiscal year 2015 
level. Within the funds provided, $2,500,000 is for the State 
of the Birds program. The Service is directed to use $1,000,000 
of the amount provided to reinstate the wolf-livestock loss 
demonstration program as authorized by Public Law 111-11. 
States with de-listed wolf populations shall continue to be 
eligible for funding, provided that those States continue to 
meet the eligibility criteria contained in Public Law 111-11.
    Additionally, the Service is directed to prioritize the 
recovery of the California condor and provide the necessary 
funding to enable the longstanding public-private partnership 
to continue to support the wild population through captive 
propagation, releases, and management, as the Service and the 
States work to address the continued environmental threats to 
the species, including lead.
    Habitat Conservation.--As described above, the Committee 
rejects the proposal to move Habitat Conservation in the 
budget, and $103,024,000 is provided for habitat conservation 
activities. This is $189,000 above the fiscal year 2015 enacted 
level. Within this amount, $52,103,000 is provided for the 
Partners for Fish and Wildlife and $13,293,000 is provided for 
coastal programs. Within Conservation Planning and Assistance, 
the Committee has provided $4,860,000 is provided for renewable 
energy activities.
    Environmental Contaminants.--$9,557,000 is provided for 
Environmental Contaminants. This is equal to the fiscal year 
2015 enacted level.
    National Wildlife Refuge System.--$475,218,000 is provided 
for the National Wildlife Refuge System, an increase of 
$1,016,000 over the fiscal year 2015 level. Within this amount, 
$1,000,000 is provided for inventory and monitoring of sage-
grouse habitat. Additionally, $2,500,000 is provided for the 
Urban Wildlife Conservation Program. Funding for the 
subsistence program has been provided at the request level, and 
$9,726,000 has been provided for invasive species.
    The Committee directs that no funds are provided for the 
Service to conduct a caribou hunt on Kagalaska island in the 
State of Alaska. Additionally, the Committee directs that no 
funds are provided to the Service for efforts to remove cattle 
on Chirikof and Wosnesenski Islands in the State of Alaska.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of the bottomland 
hardwood research conducted by the U.S. Forest Service on the 
Sharkey Restoration Research and Demonstration Site (commonly 
referred to as the Brown Tract), which is under ownership of 
the Service. In order to preserve the research activities on 
the Brown Tract, which have been conducted by the U.S. Forest 
Service through the Southern Research Station, Center for 
Bottomland Hardwoods Research, since 1994, the Committee 
encourages the Service and U.S. Forest Service to enter into a 
memorandum of understanding to continue this research and to 
ensure the Brown Tract is not considered an appropriate area 
for future land swaps or exchanges carried out by Service.
    Conservation and Enforcement.--$129,648,000 has been 
provided for Conservation and Enforcement, which is $1,937,000 
above the enacted level in fiscal year 2015. Consistent with 
the Administration's request, Science Support has been shifted 
out of Conservation and Enforcement into its own activity.
    Within Conservation and Enforcement, the Committee 
recommends $46,355,000 for the migratory bird management 
program, $68,690,000 for law enforcement, and $14,603,000 for 
international affairs.
    The illegal trade in rhinoceros horns and elephant ivory 
from Africa is of concern. To help address this concern, the 
Committee has provided $5,500,000 for efforts to combat 
wildlife trafficking, a $2,000,000 increase above the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2015. The Committee directs the Service 
to use this funding for the highest priority work related to 
intentional, illegal trafficking. These activities include 
increasing the Service's information analysis capability, 
better collaborating with other Federal, local, State, and 
foreign governments, and improving forensic processes.
    Further, the Committee is concerned that there remains 
considerable uncertainty for individuals, nonprofit 
organizations, and businesses that are in possession of 
products containing a small amount of ivory because the Service 
is still operating under Director's Order 210 as opposed to a 
rulemaking that gives stakeholders notice and the opportunity 
to comment. The Committee understands the Service has been 
working on such a rulemaking since the release of Director's 
Order 210 on February 25, 2014, and urges the Service to 
complete this rulemaking in an expeditious manner. Further, 
within that rulemaking, the Committee urges the Service to 
consider providing de minimis exemptions for trade and 
transport of some items, as well as potential exceptions for 
antiques and allowances for U.S. by sports hunters.
    Fish and Aquatic Conservation.--$156,071,000 is provided 
for Fish and Aquatic Conservation, an increase of $8,623,000 
above the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. Adequate funding is 
provided to ensure that no fish hatcheries will close in fiscal 
year 2016.
    Within the Fish and Aquatic Conservation program, funding 
is provided for national fish hatchery system operations, 
maintenance and equipment, and aquatic habitat and species 
conservation as follows:
    National Fish Hatchery System Operations.--$53,418,000 is 
provided for National Fish Hatchery System Operations, an 
increase of $558,000 above the fiscal year 2015 level.
    It is recognized that the Service has entered into 
reimbursable agreements with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 
the Tennessee Valley Authority, the Department of Interior's 
Central Utah Project, and the Bonneville Power Administration 
in order to ensure the continued operation of mitigation 
hatcheries. So that operations at these hatcheries are not 
disrupted, future budget requests must ensure that Federal 
partners have committed to making sufficient funding available 
to reimburse the Service before the Service proposes to 
eliminate funding for mitigation hatcheries.
    Maintenance and Equipment.--$19,402,000 is provided for 
maintenance and equipment expenses related to the National Fish 
Hatchery System, an increase of $2,000,000 above the fiscal 
year 2015 enacted level. A portion of the funding provided for 
National Fish Hatchery Maintenance and Equipment should be 
allocated to hatcheries where partner agencies fund mitigation 
work.
    Aquatic Habitat and Species Conservation.--$80,733,000 is 
provided for aquatic habitat and species conservation, an 
increase of $4,065,000 over the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. 
Within aquatic habitat and species conservation, funding is 
provided as follows:
    Habitat Assessment and Restoration.--$29,141,000 is 
provided for habitat assessment and restoration activities, an 
increase of $820,000 above the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. 
Within this amount, $3,000,000 has been provided for work 
related to implementation of the Klamath Basin Restoration 
Agreement and related settlement agreements. Recognizing the 
critical role that tribes can play in cooperative resource 
management and ecosystem restoration efforts, the Service is 
encouraged to seek opportunities to partner and collaborate 
with the tribes on habitat restoration work, including 
opportunities to partner in ways that create jobs and economic 
activity for tribal members. The Committee also provides 
$13,748,000 for the National Fish Passage Program, $1,000,000 
above the amount provided in fiscal year 2015.
    Population Assessment and Cooperative Management.--
$30,828,000 is provided for population assessment and 
cooperative management activities, an increase of $7,000 over 
the fiscal year 2015 enacted level and equal to the President's 
request. Funding is provided for fisheries subsistence.
    Aquatic Invasive Species.--$15,249,000 is provided for 
aquatic invasive species activities, an increase of $3,193,000 
above the fiscal year 2015 level. Within this amount, 
$7,900,000 is provided for Asian Carp activities and $2,045,000 
is provided for invasive species prevention.
    The Committee is aware that work is ongoing in several 
regions to address the threats posed by aquatic invasive 
species and directs the agency to continue to make available 
competitive grant funding for projects to eliminate these 
destructive, non-native species, which include Asian carp, 
quagga-zebra mussels, and variable-leaf watermilfoil. The 
Committee encourages the Service to support research, 
monitoring, and mitigation efforts, as well as efforts to 
disseminate such work, in all regions.
    The Committee appreciates the Service's work to prevent the 
spread of aquatic invasive species. However, the Committee is 
concerned with the Service's proposed Categorical Exclusion 
Rule and its potential to interrupt the transfer of water 
supply across State borders. Fast-track listing of invasive 
species under the Lacey Act, with regard to quagga mussels, or 
any other species potentially associated with water supply, 
could severely impact cross-border water supply transfers in 
the Southwestern United States including the permitting and 
management of water supply infrastructure overseen by the Army 
Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation. In developing 
its final rule on Categorical Exclusion, the Committee urges 
the Fish and Wildlife Service to include an exclusion for water 
supply transfers, especially when a listed species is already 
present on both sides of a State border.
    Cooperative Landscape Conservation.--Cooperative landscape 
conservation is funded at $7,344,000. This is $6,644,000 below 
the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. Within that amount, 
$700,000 is provided for Gulf Coast restoration. The decrease 
in funding is due to higher priorities elsewhere in the 
Service's budget.
    Science Support.--Consistent with the President's request, 
science support becomes a new activity in fiscal year 2016 and 
$12,192,000 is provided. This represents a decrease of 
$4,793,000 from fiscal year 2015. Adaptive science is funded at 
$5,724,000, of which $931,000 is for Gulf Coast restoration 
activities. Service science is funded at $6,468,000. Within 
service science, $2,500,000 is provided for white nose syndrome 
research.
    General Operations.--$140,360,000 is provided for general 
operations, a decrease of $1,561,000 below the fiscal year 2015 
enacted level.

                              CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $15,687,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      20,812,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      23,687,000

    A total appropriation of $23,687,000 has been provided for 
the Construction account. This amount is $8,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2015 enacted level. The amount provided within the 
bill is available for the following distribution of funds and 
projects requested by the administration:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                              Budget        Chairman's
State               Project                  estimate     recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
   OR Clark R. Bavin National Fish and         450,000         450,000
       Wildlife Forensics Lab
   IL Crab Orchard NWR                         600,000         600,000
   IL Crab Orchard NWR                         362,000         362,000
   CA San Pablo Bay NWR                      1,125,000       1,125,000
   NM Valle de Oro NWR                       3,458,000       3,458,000
   OR Warm Springs NFH                         736,000         736,000
   GA Warm Springs NFH                       1,800,000       1,800,000
   OR Julia Butler Hansen NWR                  842,000         842,000
  N/A Branch of Dam Safety                     215,000         215,000
   KY Wolf Creek NFH                         1,168,000       1,168,000
   SD Gavins Point NFH                         600,000         600,000
   OK Tishomingo NFH                            60,000          60,000
   AZ Williams Creek NFH                        60,000          60,000
   AZ Williams Creek NFH                        78,000          78,000
      Other Previously Authorized                  N/A       3,000,000
       Refuge projects
     -------------------------------------------------------------------
            Total                           11,554,000      14,554,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                            land acquisition

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $47,535,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      58,500,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      48,887,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $48,887,000 for land 
acquisition, an increase of $1,352,000 above the enacted level. 
The Committee provides $1,000,000 for a new recreational access 
line for these purposes. The Committee continues to support the 
work of the Highlands Conservation Act grants to protect and 
preserve the priority projects in PA, NJ, NY, and CT and 
expects the Service to include the program in the fiscal year 
2017 budget if there are eligible projects. The amount provided 
within this bill is available for the following distribution of 
funds and projects requested by the administration:

                       fish and wildlife service


------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                             Budget            Bill
State               Project                 estimate     (Discretionary)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
   HI Island Forests at Risk: Hakalau      $8,589,000       $8,589,000
       Forest NWR
ND/SD Dakota Grassland CA                   6,500,000        6,500,000
CO/NM Upper Rio Grande: Sangre de           1,000,000        1,000,000
       Cristo CA
ND/SD Dakota Tallgrass Prairie WMA          3,000,000        3,000,000
   ID High Divide: Camas NWR                  280,000          280,000
   MT High Divide: Red Rocks Lake NWR       1,000,000        1,000,000
   FL Everglades Headwaters CA              2,091,000        2,091,000
   VA Rivers of the Chesapeake:             1,600,000        1,600,000
       Rappahannock NWR
   MD Rivers of the Chesapeake:             1,511,000        1,511,000
       Blackwater NWR
   FL Everglades Headwaters CA              2,500,000        2,500,000
   ID National Trails System: Gray's        2,500,000        2,500,000
       Lake NWR
      Other Projects                        5,340,000  ...............
      Acquisition Management               12,773,000       10,000,000
      Land Protection Planning                465,000          465,000
      Inholdings/Emergencies/               5,351,000        5,351,000
       Hardships
      Exchanges                             1,500,000        1,500,000
      Sportsman/Recreational Access         2,500,000        1,000,000
      Highlands Conservation           ..............  ...............
     -------------------------------------------------------------------
            Total, Land Acquisition        58,500,000       48,887,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

            cooperative endangered species conservation fund

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $50,095,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      50,000,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      42,417,000

    The Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund 
program has been provided $42,417,000. This amount is a 
decrease of $7,678,000 below the fiscal year 2015 enacted 
level. Funds are to be distributed as follows: $10,508,000 for 
endangered species conservation grants to States and 
territories; $7,390,000 for habitat conservation planning 
grants; $7,640,000 for species recovery land acquisition 
grants; $14,177,000 for habitat conservation land acquisition 
grants; and $2,702,000 for program administration.

                     national wildlife refuge fund

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $13,228,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................................
Chairman's recommendation...............................      13,228,000

    The National Wildlife Refuge Fund has been provided 
$13,228,000. This amount is equal to the fiscal year 2015 
enacted level.

               north american wetlands conservation fund

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $34,145,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      34,145,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      35,145,000

    The North American Wetlands Conservation Fund program has 
been provided $35,145,000. This amount is $1,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2015 enacted level.
    Settlement Agreement Funds.--The Committee is aware of the 
method by which the funds are being distributed from the North 
American Wetlands Conservation Fund as a result the BP Guilty 
Plea Agreement (Count 13) and is concerned that substantial 
funding has been allocated for projects outside of the gulf 
coast region. Although the Committee appreciates the need to 
fund important migratory bird habitat throughout flyways, funds 
as a result of the BP Guilty Plea Agreement (Count 13) are 
available as a result of the tragic oil spill that happened in 
the Gulf of Mexico. As such, when considering how to allocate 
this funding, the Service should work with its partners on the 
North American Wetlands Conservation Council and give 
preference to projects that occur in States that border the 
Gulf of Mexico. No later than 90 days after distribution of 
these funds, the Service shall provide to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate a 
work plan including the following information: (1) a detailed 
description of the rating system used to evaluate projects; (2) 
delineation of how these funds were allocated, including the 
name and location of each project; (3) a summary of the work to 
be accomplished by each project; and (4) a list of all projects 
that were considered but did not receive funding, including an 
explanation of the specific reasons each project was considered 
as being less competitive for an allocation of funds.

              neotropical migratory bird conservation fund

Appropriations, 2015....................................      $3,660,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................       4,160,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       3,660,000

    The recommendation for the neotropical migratory bird 
conservation fund is $3,660,000, equal to both the fiscal year 
2015 enacted level.

                multinational species conservation fund

Appropriations, 2015....................................      $9,061,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      11,061,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      10,061,000

    The multinational species conservation fund programs have 
been provided $10,061,000, $1,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2015 enacted level. Funds are distributed as follows: 
$2,082,000 for African elephant conservation; $2,940,000 for 
rhinoceros and tiger conservation; $1,557,000 for Asian 
elephant conservation; $1,975,000 for great ape conservation; 
and $1,507,000 for marine turtle conservation. The budget 
increase reflects the Committee's commitment to the protection 
of iconic species with on-the-ground conservation efforts. In 
future budget requests, the Service should identify 
opportunities for on-the-ground conservation efforts that may 
limit the need for additional regulatory activities.

                    STATE AND TRIBAL WILDLIFE GRANTS

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $58,695,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      70,000,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      60,571,000

    The State and tribal wildlife grants program has been 
provided $60,571,000. This amount is $1,876,000 above the 
fiscal year 2015 enacted level. The recommended level provides 
$51,000,000 for State and tribal apportioned grants; $4,084,000 
for competitive grants for tribes; and $5,487,000 for 
competitive grants for States.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    The bill continues several administrative provisions from 
previous years.

                         National Park Service

    Since the creation of Yellowstone National Park in 1872, 
the National Park System has grown to encompass 401 sites 
spanning more than 84 million acres in all 50 States, the 
District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, 
Saipan, and the Virgin Islands. The National Park Service, 
created in 1916, is charged with preserving these sites 
``unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations.'' The 
Service and its more than 20,000 employees also contribute to 
the protection of other historical, cultural and recreational 
resources through a variety of grant and technical assistance 
programs.

                 operation of the national park system

Appropriations, 2015....................................  $2,275,773,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................   2,515,131,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................   2,323,273,000

    The Committee recommends $2,323,273,000 for the operation 
of the national park system, an increase of $47,500,000 above 
the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. The National Park Service 
will celebrate its centennial in fiscal year 2016 and in 
acknowledgement of this milestone the Administration requested 
significant additional funding for the agency. The Committee 
strongly supports the work of the Service and its unique 
mission to manage and conserve some of our Nation's most 
significant Federal lands, and to interpret and preserve 
America's history and culture. However, given budgetary 
constraints, not all aspects of the request could be 
accommodated. The recommendation does support funding for new 
and expanded park activities and has consolidated these 
activities within the Park Support line item. Other program 
changes are detailed below and in the table that accompanies 
the Committee report.
    Resource Stewardship.--The Committee recommends 
$318,707,000 for resource stewardship, an increase of 
$1,500,000 above the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. The 
increase provided shall be used to complete ongoing landscape 
restoration projects at newly established park units. Within 
the amounts provided, the Committee expects the Service to 
continue its marijuana eradication programs at no less than the 
fiscal year 2015 enacted level.
    Visitor Services.--The Committee recommends $242,986,000 
for visitor services, which is equal to the enacted level. 
Within the funds provided, the Service shall maintain funding 
for the National Capital Area Performing Arts program at the 
enacted level.
    Facility Operations and Maintenance.--The Committee 
recommends $727,312,000 for facility operations and 
maintenance, an increase of $30,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2015 enacted level. These additional funds are part of the 
proposed Centennial Initiative to address the maintenance 
backlog and shall be allocated equally between the cyclic 
maintenance and repair and rehabilitation programs.
    Park Support.--The Committee recommends $505,462,000 for 
park support, an increase of $16,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2015 enacted level. The increase above the enacted level 
supports the Service's Centennial Initiative and shall be used 
to fund new park units and monuments, including support for the 
Pullman and Honouliuli national monuments, and to fund other 
critical operating needs. The final allocation of these funds 
shall be provided to the Committee as part of the Service's 
annual operating plan, which is due 60 days from enactment of 
this act. Consistent with the request, the recommendation 
supports the transfer of funding for the Valles Caldera 
National Preserve to the Service to reflect its new status as a 
national park unit. Within the amounts provided, the Committee 
expects that the Service will maintain funding for the Preserve 
at no less than its fiscal year 2015 operating level. The 
amount provided includes the requested amount to support the 
new Blackstone River Valley National Historical Park. The 
Service is directed to enter into and fund cooperative 
agreements with the local coordinating entity for the 
Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor, as 
authorized by Public Law 113-291, to assist in the management 
of the park.
    External Administrative Costs.--The Committee recommends 
$180,004,000 for external administrative costs, which is equal 
to the fiscal year 2015 enacted level.
    Ste. Genivieve Special Resource Study.--The Committee urges 
the National Park Service to work towards timely completion of 
the Ste. Genevieve Special Resource Study. The study has been 
ongoing since 2010 and the community is eager to see its 
completion.
    Ozark National Scenic Riverways.--The Service is directed 
to work collaboratively with affected parties to ensure that 
implementation of the General Management Plan for the Ozark 
National Scenic Riverways addresses the legitimate concerns of 
affected stakeholders including, but not limited to local 
communities and businesses.
    Sewall-Belmont House.--The Committee is pleased that a 
recent reconnaissance study prepared by the Service affirms 
that the Sewall-Belmont House and Museum is suitable for 
inclusion in the national park system because of its historic 
status and place in the history of the women's suffrage and 
equal rights movements. The Committee is also pleased that the 
study calls for the Service to assume additional management 
responsibilities, including more support to address deferred 
maintenance needs and to ensure that the site remains open to 
the public. Given that conversion to a national park system 
unit can be a lengthy process, however, the Committee expects 
the Service to use funding included within the Park Support 
line item to expand the Service's ongoing support of the site 
until a long-term management solution is reached.
    Virgin Islands National Park.--The Service notes a proposed 
marina development in Coral Bay, St. John, U.S.V.I., has the 
potential to create resource impacts on the species and 
habitats conserved by the park. Therefore, the Committee urges 
the Service to continue its efforts to coordinate with the U.S. 
Army Corps of Engineers to analyze environmental impacts of the 
proposed development and to provide input during the permitting 
process for the project.
    National Scenic Trails.--The Committee is concerned that 
the Park Service has recognized certain national scenic trails 
as units of the national park system, while not recognizing the 
North Country, the Ice Age and New England scenic trails. The 
Service is directed to reconsider whether conferring unit 
status to these three national scenic trails would provide 
improved access to funding or program opportunities. The 
Service shall provide the Committee with a report regarding its 
findings and proposed management actions within 90 days of 
enactment of this act.
    National Mall and Memorial Parks Concessions.--The 
Committee notes that the Service has yet to submit its long-
term plan for renewal of the concessions contract on the 
National Mall, as previously directed in the fiscal year 2015 
Omnibus Appropriations Act. The Committee reiterates its 
direction that the Service provide the report to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations, not later than 30 days 
after enactment of this act.
    Bill Language.--The Committee has included bill language 
concerning the Roosevelt-Campobello International Park to 
address concerns relating to the budget submission for the 
Park. Language is also included which will allow donations made 
to the Park Service to earn interest on bonds issued by the 
United States. This provision will encourage more private 
donations to the agency and reduce the cost of important 
projects nationwide.

                  NATIONAL RECREATION AND PRESERVATION

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $63,117,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      54,199,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      63,132,000

    The Committee recommends $63,132,000 for national 
recreation and preservation programs, an increase of $15,000 
above the fiscal year 2015 enacted level.
    Natural Programs.--As requested, a total of $2,014,000 is 
included for the Chesapeake Gateways and Trails program.
    Heritage Partnership Programs.--The Committee recommends 
$20,321,000 for heritage partnership programs, which is equal 
to the enacted level. This level of funding provides 
$19,339,000 for grants to national heritage areas and $982,000 
to administer the program.
    The Committee recognizes Snow College's Mormon Pioneer 
Heritage Institute [MPHI] in Ephraim, Utah as the center for 
the Mormon Pioneer National Heritage Area [MPNHA], and its 
efforts to create a locally sustained program. The National 
Park Service shall encourage MPHI's efforts to ensure the long-
term viability of the MPNHA by working cooperatively to bolster 
State, local and private investment in Heritage Areas.
    In order to provide stable funding sources for all areas, 
the bill provides funding for longstanding areas at fiscal year 
2015 funding levels; provides a total of $300,000 to national 
heritage areas with recently approved management plans, known 
as tier 2 areas; and provides $150,000 to each tier 1 area that 
has been authorized and is still in the process of having its 
management plan approved.

                       HISTORIC PRESERVATION FUND

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $56,410,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      89,910,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      61,410,000

    The Committee recommends $61,410,000 for the historic 
preservation fund, an increase of $5,000,000 above the fiscal 
year 2015 enacted level.
    The Committee recommendation provides $46,925,000 for 
grants-in-aid to States and territories and $8,985,000 for 
grants-in-aid to tribes, which is equal to the enacted level 
for both programs.
    The Committee has provided $5,000,000 in support of the 
Civil Rights in America portion of the Centennial Initiative. 
These funds shall be for competitive grants to document, 
interpret, and preserve the stories and sites associated with 
the Civil Rights Movement, with priority given to projects 
focused on the near-decade of the Movement from August 1955 to 
July 1963. Prior to execution of these funds, the National Park 
Service shall submit a spend plan to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate. 
Bill language has been included to implement this grant 
program.

                              construction

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $138,339,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     250,967,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     192,937,000

    The bill includes $192,937,000 for construction 
requirements for the national park system, an increase of 
$54,598,000 above the fiscal year 2015 enacted level.
    The following table details the line item construction 
activity for specific projects requested by the administration.

                   NATIONAL PARK SERVICE CONSTRUCTION
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Chairman's
State               Project               Budget request  recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
   FL Dry Tortugas NP, Fort Jefferson        6,618,000       6,618,000
       stabilization
   NY Gateway NRA, electrical upgrades       5,594,000       5,594,000
   OH Perry's Victory & International        8,561,000       8,561,000
       Peace Memorial, exterior
       repairs
   NY Vanderbilt Mansion NHS, repair         5,275,000       5,275,000
       foundation and support walls
   WY Yellowstone NP, Mammoth Hotel          8,668,000       8,668,000
       stabilization
   PR San Juan NHS, Santa Elena/San          1,947,000       1,947,000
       Agustin preservation
   DC C & O Canal NHP, rehabilitate          4,235,000       4,235,000
       lift lock #3
   MT Glacier NP, Glacier Hotel health       7,156,000       7,156,000
       and safety repairs
   CA Golden Gate NRA, repairs to            9,954,000       9,954,000
       Alcatraz exterior walls
   CA Yosemite NP, sewer system              4,886,000       4,886,000
       rehabilitation
   AK Katmai NP, floating bridge             2,235,000       2,235,000
       replacement completion
   WY Grand Teton NP, replace water/        13,948,000      13,948,000
       waste systems
   DC National Mall, water systems          11,183,000      11,183,000
       rehabilitiation
   CA Yosemite NP, water system              1,720,000       1,720,000
       replacement
   MS Vicksburg NMP, stabilization to        1,502,000       1,502,000
       protect National Cemetery
   CO Mesa Verde NP, waste water             2,456,000       2,456,000
       facilities reconstruction
   NM Bandelier NP, replace section of       5,138,000       5,138,000
       electrical system
   NC Cape Hatteras NS, Wright               6,824,000       6,824,000
       Brothers visitor center
       rehabilitation
   AR Buffalo National River, replace        1,697,000       1,697,000
       waste water treatment plant
   CO Curecanti NRA, visitor safety/         1,958,000       1,958,000
       accessibility needs
   AL Horseshoe Bend NMP, musuem             1,105,000       1,105,000
       rehabilitation
   AK Denali NP, rehabilitate Toklat         3,616,000       3,616,000
       utility infrastructure
      Other requested projects              37,068,000  ..............
     -------------------------------------------------------------------
            Total                          153,344,000     116,276,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    land and water conservation fund


                              (RESCISSION)

Appropriations, 2015....................................    -$28,000,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     -30,000,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     -28,000,000

    The bill includes a rescission of $28,000,000 in annual 
contract authority provided by 16 U.S.C. 460l-10a. This 
authority has not been used in recent years and there are no 
plans to use it in fiscal year 2016.

                 land acquisition and state assistance

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $98,960,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     117,500,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     106,275,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $106,275,000 for land 
acquisition and State assistance, an increase of $7,315,000 
over the fiscal year 2015 enacted level of which $51,275,000 is 
for land acquisition and $55,000,000 is for State assistance. 
The Committee provides $1,000,000 for a new recreational access 
activity for the Park Service. The Committee is aware of 
efforts by non-Federal agencies in helping the Federal 
Government leverage funds in order to maximize funding for the 
management and acquisition of lands for the Ice Age, North 
Country, and New England Scenic Trails. The funding provided by 
the Committee for recreation access may be available to acquire 
land to close gaps in the National Scenic Trails. Additionally, 
the Committee has already expressed concerns about the 
prioritization of projects and the funding requested for this 
fiscal year, which included only one National Scenic Trail 
project with no recommendations for the upper Midwest. The 
Committee urges the Service to consider geographic distribution 
and to ensure investments for the trail system are reflected in 
project prioritization. The amount provided within this bill is 
available for the following distribution of funds and projects 
requested by the administration:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                             Budget            Bill
 State              Project                 estimate     (Discretionary)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
    HI Island Forests at Risk: Hawaii       6,000,000        6,000,000
        Volcanoes NP
    TN Obed Wild and Scenic River           1,204,000        1,204,000
    NY Saratoga National Historical           740,000          740,000
        Park
    AL Little River Canyon National           625,000          625,000
        Preserve
 CO/NM Upper Rio Grande: Great Sand         6,852,000        6,852,000
        Dunes NP
    WA Ebey's Landing National              1,450,000        1,450,000
        Historical Reserve
    AK Lake Clark National Park and           943,000          943,000
        Preserve
    FL Timucuan Ecological and                110,000          110,000
        Historic Preserve
    MT High Divide: Big Hole National         300,000          300,000
        Battlefield
    GA Chattahoochee River National         2,123,000        2,123,000
        Recreation Area
    FL Fort Caroline National                 324,000          324,000
        Monument
    WI Saint Croix National Scenic            223,000          223,000
        Riverway
    DE Rivers of the Chesapeake:            2,237,000        2,237,000
        Captain John Smith Chesapeake
        NHT
    NM Pecos National Historical Park         386,000          386,000
    AZ Saguro National Park                 1,348,000        1,348,000
    MA National Trails System: New            875,000          875,000
        England NST
       Other Projects                       9,078,000  ...............
       Acquisition Management               9,679,000        7,679,000
       Emergencies, Hardships,              3,928,000        3,928,000
        Relocations and Deficiencies
       Inholdings, Exchanges,               4,928,000        4,928,000
        Donations
       American Battlefield                 8,986,000        8,000,000
        Protection Grant Program
       Sportsman/Recreational Access        2,000,000        1,000,000
      ------------------------------------------------------------------
       Total, Land Acquisition             64,339,000       51,275,000
      ==================================================================
       State Assistance Grants,            45,000,000       48,883,000
        Discretionary
       State Assistance Grants,             5,000,000        3,000,000
        Competitive
       Administrative Expenses              3,161,000        3,117,000
      ------------------------------------------------------------------
             Total, State Assistance       53,161,000       55,000,000
      ==================================================================
             Total, Land Acquisition      117,500,000      106,275,000
              and State Assistance
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          CENTENNIAL CHALLENGE

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $10,000,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      50,000,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      10,000,000

    The recommendation includes $10,000,000, equal to the 
fiscal year 2015 level for the Centennial Challenge program. 
This funding will be used to continue a program begun under 
Public Law 110-161 that provides dedicated Federal funding to 
leverage partnerships for signature projects and programs for 
the national park system, including critical infrastructure 
investments. These funds shall be used to complement increases 
provided in the Operations of the National Park Service 
appropriation to enhance the visitor experience and better 
protect cultural and natural resources at national park system 
units in anticipation of the Service's 2016 centennial 
celebration. While a 1-to-1 matching requirement is required by 
law for projects to qualify for these funds, the Service is 
urged to give preference to projects that demonstrate 
additional leveraging capacity from its partners.

                          ENERGY AND MINERALS


                         U.S. Geological Survey

    Established in 1879, the U.S. Geological Survey [USGS] 
serves as the Earth and natural science research bureau for the 
Department of the Interior and is the only integrated natural 
resources research bureau in the Federal Government. USGS 
conducts research, monitoring, and assessments to contribute to 
understanding America's lands, water, and biological resources. 
Its research and data products support the Department's 
resource and land management needs and also provide the water, 
biological, energy, and mineral resources information needed by 
other Federal, State, tribal, and local government agencies to 
guide planning, management, and regulatory programs. More than 
9,000 scientists, technicians, and support staff of the USGS 
are located in nearly 400 offices in every State and in several 
foreign countries throughout the world. The USGS leverages its 
resources and expertise in partnership with more than 2,000 
agencies of Federal, State, local, and tribal governments; the 
academic community; nongovernmental organizations; and the 
private sector.

                 SURVEYS, INVESTIGATIONS, AND RESEARCH

Appropriations, 2015....................................  $1,045,000,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................   1,194,782,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................   1,058,503,000

    The bill provides $1,058,503,000 for Surveys, 
Investigations, and Research, an increase of $13,503,000 over 
the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. Unless otherwise stated in 
this report, where increases and decreases among projects 
within a subactivity in the aggregate do not change the overall 
amount available for that subactivity, the redirections can be 
assumed.
    Ecosystems.--The bill provides $158,041,000 for Ecosystems 
programs, which is an increase of $1,000,000 from the enacted 
level. Within the invasive species program, $500,000 has been 
included to address new and emerging species of national 
concern. Within the wildlife program an additional $500,000 is 
provided to continue White Nose Syndrome studies. The Committee 
expects the additional $2,000,000 included in fiscal year 2015 
will continue to be used to address Asian carp issues in the 
Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River.
    The Committee is aware of the work USGS is performing in 
critical landscapes such as the Arctic, Puget Sound, California 
Bay Delta, Great Lakes, Columbia River, and the Chesapeake Bay 
here as well as in other areas throughout USGS, and expects 
this work to continue. The Committee also appreciates the 
research that USGS is conducting regarding the Columbia River's 
flow regimes and understands the value of such research in 
light of the Columbia River Treaty. The Committee urges such 
flow regime research to be conducted in partnership with 
academic partners that have an advanced-technology observation 
and prediction system in this Estuary.
    The Committee acknowledges the high quality of research 
that USGS performs for all the relevant Department of Interior 
agencies, but is concerned that some scientific activities are 
duplicative and outside of the core mission of USGS. While it 
appears USGS is adapting to new demands by expanding research 
capacity, there are concerns that some program areas such as 
Ecosystems and Climate Landuse Change are advancing at a rapid 
pace while not enough resources are being devoted to important 
areas such as Energy and Mineral Resources. The Committee wants 
to ensure that the USGS is taking a balanced approach towards 
its program areas and directs the USGS to report back within 
180 days of enactment of this act on what new studies and 
projects over $500,000 have been initiated within the last 1-3 
fiscal years under the various program areas. The Committee 
also directs USGS to consult with other agencies and report 
back to the Committee within 180 days of enactment of this act 
with a detailed report about how USGS scientific research, 
analysis, and support is unique and not duplicative of research 
being done by agencies within the Department of Interior.
    Climate and Land Use Change.--The bill provides 
$135,975,000 for the Climate and Land Use Change program, an 
amount equal to the enacted level. Program adjustments have 
been made to the subactivities to provide an increase of 
$4,300,000 for the Landsat system to stay on track with the 
NASA operation and plan. Within the Land Remote Sensing 
Subactivity, a programmatic decrease has been made instead of 
the recommended decrease to the National Civil Applications 
Program. The Committee does not provide funding for an 
additional free flying thermal infrared instrument.
    Energy, Minerals and Environmental Health.--The bill 
provides $95,511,000 for Energy, Minerals, and Environmental 
Health programs, an increase of $3,240,000 above the enacted 
level including an increase of $2,400,000 for the Critical 
Minerals Program. The Committee does not accept the proposed 
$2,000,000 decrease for sunsetting activities and directs the 
Survey to continue the geologic mapping initiatives. The 
Committee remains very concerned that there are regions of the 
country that have high quality mineral and energy resources 
that remain unmapped at a useable scale. Geologic mapping and 
understanding is the basis for resource discovery and without 
it the mineral potential is largely unknown, therefore, the 
Committee not only rejects the proposal to end these 
activities, but provides an additional $1,000,000 for the 
Mineral Resources Program to continue this important work. The 
Committee does accept the proposed reduction of $200,000 for 
publications.
    Natural Hazards.--The bill includes $138,286,000 for 
Natural Hazards programs, an increase of $3,100,000 above the 
enacted level. Within the Earthquake Hazards program, the 
Committee does not accept the requested cut of $1,502,000 to 
the early earthquake warning event characterization activity 
and includes an additional $1,000,000 for this work. 
Earthquakes have enormous potential to cause catastrophic 
casualties, damage, economic loss, and disruption. Many 
urbanized areas across the country, including in the Pacific 
Northwest, Alaska, and California, are at particular risk of 
significant damage should an earthquake hit. The Committee is 
concerned about the lack of real time instrumentation available 
especially for the Cascadia Subduction zone. The Committee 
understands the National Science Foundation [NSF] has supported 
temporary seismometer deployments across the United States for 
the EarthScope USArray project and for the Cascadia initiative 
run by the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology 
[IRIS]. The Committee is aware the seismometers may then be 
available for regional networks, States, and other entities to 
adopt after the project concludes. The Committee directs the 
USGS to conduct a cost benefit proposal and spending plan for 
the adoption of seismic stations to be included as part of the 
USGS Advanced National Seismic System [ANSS] for research and 
possible inclusion in the earthquake early warning system. The 
information and data collected may be helpful to understanding 
earthquakes and the ocean environment which could help the 
earthquake early warning system.
    The Committee is encouraged by the work to restore 
monitoring networks on high-threat volcanos and the Committee 
expects the $2,000,000 provided last year for the Volcano 
Hazards Program [VHP] and the additional $1,000,000 in fiscal 
year 2016 will be used to continue deferred network maintenance 
of volcano hazard monitoring stations. Several monitors remain 
inoperable and maintenance is needed to continue rapid 
detection for public safety dissemination, including 
information critical to civil and military air routes. Funding 
should continue to be prioritized for the highest risk 
volcanoes as described in USGS's most recent nationwide volcano 
assessment.
    USGS's Landslide Hazards program has been an important 
partner in the delivery of emergency assessments of debris flow 
hazards following several major fires in Colorado and 
California. This important public safety program is encouraged 
to continue and strengthen its partnerships with other Federal 
agencies, such as the U.S. Forest Service, as well as State and 
local emergency managers, in order to increase the 
dissemination of information and enhance coordination among 
them.
    The Committee is concerned that the lahar warning system on 
Mount Rainier, Washington, monitors only two of the six river 
valleys off the mountain and that the technology has reached 
its end of life. The Committee applauds the joint efforts to 
protect life and property that began in 1998 by USGS's Cascades 
Volcanic Observatory and the Pierce County Management 
Department and encourages these efforts to continue until all 
six impacted river valleys achieve the same level of coverage.
    Within USGS's Global Seismographic Network [GSN], 
$1,600,000 has been included for the GSN primary sensory 
deployment.
    In agreement with the request, a $700,000 reduction has 
been taken for the precision monitoring activity.
    Water Resources.--The bill includes $212,608,000 for Water 
Resources, an increase of $1,341,000 above the enacted level. 
The Committee accepts the USGS proposal to realign the Water 
Resources Mission Area budget structure, which collapses seven 
existing programs into four. Program increases include 
$41,182,000 for the new Water Availability and Use Science 
Program, including $2,000,000 for groundwater resource studies 
to assess transboundary aquifers as authorized by Public Law 
109-488 and regions within the Mississippi River Alluvial Plain 
which are experiencing variability in groundwater systems and 
$301,000 for drought forecasting; $72,135,000 for the new 
Groundwater and Streamflow Information Program, including an 
additional $1,000,000 for the groundwater network, $928,000 for 
the streamflow information and streamgages, and $500,000 for 
work with tribes on water rights; and $92,791,000 for the new 
National Water Quality Program. Funding for Water Resources 
Research Act activities remain at the enacted level of 
$6,500,000. The bill includes the recommended reductions and 
internal transfers taken for the new budget restructure with 
the expectation that within this structure the activities 
associated with the Cooperative Water Program [CWP] will 
receive $58,210,000.
    Core Science Systems.--The bill includes $112,050,000 for 
Core Science Systems, an increase of $4,822,000 from the 
enacted level. Program levels include: $3,000,000 for 3D 
elevation activities; $500,000 for 3D elevation: coastal lidar 
and $1,322,000 to fund the Alaska mapping program. The National 
Geologic Cooperative Mapping program is funded at $24,397,000 
and the Science, Synthesis, Analysis, and Research Program is 
funded at $24,299,000, equal to the enacted level.
    The Committee disagrees with the U.S. Board of Geographic 
Names' continued reliance on Policy I regarding applications 
for geographic name changes. This policy was originally adopted 
in 1981 by the U.S. Board of Geographic Names to prevent 
confusion by possible conflicting actions of Congress and the 
Board, but instead has been used as a tool to indefinitely 
delay and prevent consideration by the Board of applications 
for geographic name changes. Leaving these applications in 
limbo indefinitely is unfair to the applicants who deserve a 
decision on their applications. If the Congress disagrees with 
the decision of the Board it retains the authority to take 
action on the name change through legislation.
    Science Support.--The bill includes $105,611,000 for 
Science Support programs, an amount equal to the enacted level.
    Facilities.--The bill includes $100,421,000 for facilities, 
deferred maintenance and capital improvement, which is an 
amount equal to the enacted level. The Committee understands 
that critical infrastructure repairs are necessary to resume 
activities related to avian influenza research at the National 
Wildlife Health Center. USGS is urged to undertake these 
repairs immediately and may submit a reprogramming request if 
necessary. USGS is also encouraged to accelerate plans to 
modernize the Center, which was last renovated in 1985, and to 
budget for such activities in fiscal year 2017.
    The table that accompanies this statement displays the full 
allocation of funds among USGS's various activities.

                   Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

    The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management is responsible for 
resource evaluation, environmental review, leasing activities, 
and lease management for the Nation's offshore energy and 
minerals resources.

                        OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $169,770,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     170,857,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     170,857,000

    The bill provides $170,857,000 for the Ocean Energy 
Management account, commensurate with the budget request and 
$1,087,000 above the enacted level. This amount will be 
partially offset with the collection of offsetting rental 
receipts and cost recovery fees totaling $96,622,000. The 
Committee concurs with the agency's budget restructuring which 
removes the general support services activity and allocates 
theses funds to the remaining budget lines.
    Renewable Energy.--The bill provides $24,278,000 for 
renewable energy activities, an increase of $1,174,000 above 
the enacted level. The Bureau should continue to work with the 
Department of Energy to identify and permit a national offshore 
wind test site and to exchange information with the Department 
and the coastal States about the development of new technology 
related to the structural material, environmental, and design 
safety criteria, as well as design and performance standards, 
of transitional depth and floating wind turbines. The Bureau is 
also expected to continue working with coastal States and other 
stakeholders to study new wind energy areas, including in 
shallow, transitional, and deep (over 200 feet) waters.
    Conventional Energy.--The bill provides $59,869,000 for 
conventional energy activities, an increase of $10,236,000 
above the enacted level. The Bureau is reminded to continue to 
provide quarterly reports on the status of exploration and 
development plans to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations as required under the approval of the 
reorganization of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, 
Regulation and Enforcement.
    Environmental Assessment.--The bill provides $68,045,000 
for environmental assessment activities, an increase of 
$2,333,000 above the enacted level.
    Executive Direction.--The bill provides $18,665,000 for 
executive direction of the Bureau, including the Office of the 
Director, an increase of $2,346,000 above the enacted level.

             Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement

    The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement is 
responsible for regulating and enforcing safety, environmental, 
and conservation compliance during the development of the 
Nation's ocean energy and mineral resources on the Outer 
Continental Shelf, and oil spill research.

             OFFSHORE SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $189,726,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     189,772,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     189,772,000

    The bill provides $189,772,000 for the Offshore Safety and 
Environmental Enforcement account, commensurate with the budget 
request and $46,000 above the enacted level. This amount will 
be partially offset with the collection of offsetting rental 
receipts, cost recovery fees, and inspection fees, totaling 
$116,207,000.
    The Committee concurs with the agency's budget 
restructuring which removes the general support services 
activity and allocates these funds to the appropriate remaining 
budget lines.
    Operations, Safety and Regulation.--The bill provides 
$151,768,000 for operations, safety, and regulation activities, 
an increase of $18,171,000 above the enacted level, primarily 
due to the budget restructuring.
    Administrative Operations.--The bill provides $18,268,000 
for administrative operations, an increase of $2,592,000 above 
the enacted level.
    Executive Direction.--The bill provides $19,736,000 for 
executive direction of the Bureau, including the Office of the 
Director, an increase of $1,509,000 above the enacted level.
    Other.--On April 17, 2015, the Bureau of Safety and 
Environmental Enforcement [BSEE] published a notice of proposed 
rulemaking regarding the requirements for offshore Blowout 
Preventer Systems and Well Control. The Committee understands 
that this new proposal is in response to the Deepwater Horizon 
tragedy and addresses recommendations following that incident. 
However, the Committee is concerned that given the complexity 
and technical nature of this proposal a number of factors 
should be further examined by BSEE and provided to this 
Committee as well as the Committees of policy jurisdiction 
before the rulemaking proceeds further. The Committee believes 
any rulemaking, especially one as technical and complex as this 
one, benefits from robust analysis and encourages BSEE to 
conduct this examination to ensure the proposal addresses the 
intent of the regulation in a cost-effective manner.

                           oil spill research

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $14,899,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      14,899,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      14,899,000

    The bill provides $14,899,000 for oil spill research, as 
requested and equal to the enacted level.

          Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement

    The Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 
[OSMRE] was established in 1977 to oversee and carry out the 
requirements of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act 
[SMCRA] in concert with States and Indian tribes. OSMRE's 
primary objectives are to ensure coal mining activities are 
conducted in a manner that protects citizens and the 
environment during mining, ensure the land is properly 
reclaimed, and mitigate effects of past mining by reclaiming 
abandoned coal mines. OSMRE addresses its mission with a mix of 
grants to States and tribes to carry out their own regulatory 
and reclamation programs, and the administration of OSMRE's 
regulatory and reclamation programs.
    The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act Amendments 
of 2006 (Public Law 109-432) revised the mine reclamation fee 
distribution mechanism beginning in fiscal year 2008. State and 
tribal reclamation grants are now provided under mandatory 
appropriations instead of through this bill.

                       REGULATION AND TECHNOLOGY

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $122,713,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     128,388,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     122,747,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $122,747,000 for 
Regulation and Technology, $34,000 above the fiscal year 2015 
enacted level.
    Since fiscal year 2011, the Administration has proposed to 
reduce grants to State programs. This proposal has been 
rejected by the full Congress each year and is once again 
rejected this year. The bill funds regulatory grants at 
$68,590,000, which is equal to the fiscal year 2015 enacted 
level. Similarly, the Committee rejects the Administration's 
proposal to increase funding by $3,486,000 for State Program 
Evaluation. The Committee also rejects the request for $200,000 
for additional solicitor support.
    Stream Buffer Zone Rule.--The Committee is concerned about 
the work at OSMRE on the Stream Buffer Zone rule and notes that 
more than half of the States who agreed to work as 
participating agencies have withdrawn from the process. The 
Committee is concerned that OSMRE is not working with important 
State partners in an effective manner and believes that OSMRE 
should reengage State partners in a meaningful manner before 
further action is taken on the Stream Buffer Zone rule. To 
achieve the best outcome possible, OSM should provide the 
States with all documents, technical reports, data, 
information, analyses, comments received, and working drafts 
relative to the environmental reviews, draft and final 
environmental impact statements, and meet with any State with 
primacy during such process at the request of the State.

                    ABANDONED MINE RECLAMATION FUND

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $27,399,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      32,074,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      27,388,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $27,388,000 for 
the Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fund, $11,000 below the fiscal 
year 2015 enacted level. The table that accompanies this 
statement reflects the distribution of funds for activities 
within this account.
    The Committee rejects the Administration's request for an 
additional $150,000 for solicitors support and the request for 
$1,400,000 to reevaluate the Abandoned Mine Lands program.

                             INDIAN AFFAIRS


        Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian Education

    The Bureau of Indian Affairs [BIA] was founded in 1824 to 
uphold a Government-to-government relationship between the 
Federal Government and tribal entities. The Federal Government 
retains trust responsibility for individual Indians and tribes 
as a result of formal treaties and agreements with Native 
Americans.
    The Bureau provides services directly or through contracts, 
grants, or compacts to a population of 1.9 million American 
Indians and Alaska Natives who are members of 566 federally 
recognized Indian tribes in the lower 48 States and Alaska. 
Programs administered by the BIA and tribes include an 
education system for almost 48,000 elementary and secondary 
students; 28 tribal colleges, universities and post secondary 
schools; social services; natural resource management on 56 
million acres of trust land; economic development; law 
enforcement; administration of tribal courts; implementation of 
land and water claim settlements; replacement and repair of 
schools; repair and maintenance of roads and bridges; and 
repair of structural deficiencies on high hazard dams.

                      operation of indian programs


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2015....................................  $2,429,236,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................   2,660,591,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................   2,232,419,000

    The bill provides a total of $2,232,419,000 for the 
Operations of Indian Programs account, a decrease of 
$196,817,000 below the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. This 
amount does not include funding for contract support costs and 
for the Indian Self-Determination Fund, as these have been 
moved to a separate account. Fixed costs have been included 
throughout the core programs based upon actual expenditures for 
the enacted fiscal year and internal transfers have been 
accepted.
    Tribal Government.--The bill provides $301,517,000 for 
tribal government programs. The recommendation includes 
$464,000 for new tribes and notes the challenge of reconciling 
the timing of the tribal recognition process with the annual 
budget formulation process. If additional tribes are recognized 
during fiscal year 2016 beyond those contemplated in the budget 
request, the Bureau is urged to support their capacity building 
efforts to the extent feasible.
    Human Services.--The bill includes $146,004,000 for human 
services programs, an increase of $3,370,000 above the enacted 
level. Program increases include funding to continue the Tiwahe 
initiative.
    Trust--Natural Resources Management.--The recommendation 
includes $189,846,000 for trust and natural resources programs, 
an increase of $4,994,000 above the enacted level. Within that 
amount, program increases include funding to support a level of 
$37,638,000 for rights protection implementation programs and 
an additional $2,000,000 for forest thinning activities.
    Trust--Real Estate Services.--The bill provides 
$127,486,000 an increase of $484,000 above the enacted level 
for trust-real estate services programs. The Committee 
recognizes natural gas flaring has been an ongoing issue in 
places of energy development, including on tribal lands. The 
Committee also recognizes the challenge of attracting 
investment and building infrastructure and understands that 
rights-of-way approvals are an important component to reduce 
natural gas flaring. The Committee is aware there are 
significant delays in getting rights-of-way approvals and 
encourages the Department to move forward with reservation-wide 
fair market appraisals that provide fair market values to all 
parties affected for future rights-of-way applications on 
energy-affected tribal lands with natural gas flaring.
    Education.--The bill includes $824,934,000 for educational 
programs, an increase of $14,403,000 above the enacted level. 
Within these funds, the Committee has included an increase 
above the enacted level for the Johnson O'Malley assistance 
grants to support a program level of $17,376,000. The Committee 
also provides $64,395,000 for administrative cost grants, an 
increase of $2,000,000 over the enacted level. For Post-
Secondary programs, the Committee includes an additional 
$5,000,000 to forward fund tribal technical colleges. This one-
time increase provides a transition to forward funding, 
consistent with funding practices for most other tribal 
colleges, by covering both the 2015-2016 and 2016-2017 school 
years. This funding addresses the long-standing concerns of 
tribal college leaders by providing greater financial security 
to plan for the academic year through forward funding. The 
Committee believes there should be parity on the way all tribal 
colleges that receive assistance throught the bill are funded 
and encourages the administration to look for ways for all the 
tribal colleges to be put on the same funding schedule.
    The administration is commended for its continued focus on 
tribal education programs, including efforts to improve 
collaboration between the Departments of the Interior and 
Education and to implement Executive Order 13592 to improve 
educational outcomes for American Indian and Alaska Native 
students. It is noted that the administration is proposing 
significant reforms to the Bureau of Indian Education [BIE] to 
improve the quality of education offered and address the 
persistent performance gap of students educated at BIE-funded 
schools. These proposed changes will require a restructuring of 
the Bureau that is not currently reflected in the fiscal year 
2016 budget request and will necessitate continued consultation 
with tribes, as well as the Committees on Appropriations and 
the authorizing committees of jurisdiction.
    The Committee is concerned the Office of the Assistant 
Secretary-Indian Affairs, which includes the Bureau of Indian 
Education [BIE], has not addressed the findings or implemented 
the recommendations in recent Government Accountability Office 
[GAO] reports and testimonies (GAO-13-774, GAO-14-121, GAO-15-
389T, and GAO-15-539T). These reports outline systemic problems 
with management of BIE schools, such as lack of oversight over 
school spending and facilities, including construction, 
operation, maintenance, and basic repair and upgrades needed to 
improve the condition of schools that serve Indian Country. The 
Committee stands ready to work with the administration on the 
appropriate steps forward and directs the Office of the 
Assistant Secretary-Indian Affairs to report back within 60 
days after enactment of this act on how this Office is 
implementing the GAO recommendations. As part of this report, 
the Committee expects a detailed description of the 
administrative functions of each entity that has or will have a 
decisionmaking role in supporting and overseeing school 
facilities, including construction, maintenance, operation, and 
relevant activities for BIE schools.
    The administration's emphasis on education must be 
complemented by efforts to improve interagency coordination for 
the multiplicity of programs that affect the wellbeing of 
Native children. In addition to education, these include 
healthcare, social service, child welfare and juvenile justice 
programs. The Committee would like to note the recent Senate 
passage of S24, the Alyce Spotted Bear and Walter Soboleff 
Commission on Native Children. The Committee encourages the 
Bureau to work with other relevant Federal, State, local, and 
tribal organizations to begin the process of identifying ways 
to make programs more effective in serving Native Children.
    Within the funding provided for the Early Child and Family 
Development Program, the Bureau shall not reduce funding for 
currently operating Family and Child Education programs. The 
Bureau, working with the Indian Health Service as appropriate, 
is also urged to consider integrating school-based preventative 
health services such as dental care into elementary schools in 
order to improve health outcomes of tribal students.
    Public Safety and Justice.--The bill includes $377,405,000 
for public safety and justice programs, an increase of 
$24,555,000 above the enacted level. The program increases 
support a level of $197,504,000 for criminal investigations and 
police services, $16,245,000 for tribal justice support, 
$11,305,000 for tribal law enforcement and special initiatives, 
and $28,173,000 for Tribal Courts.
    Consistent with the recommendations of the Indian Law and 
Order Commission report ``A Roadmap For Making Native America 
Safer'' as required by the Tribal Law and Order Act of 2010 and 
to address the added tribal responsibilities outlined in the 
Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013. Within the 
increases provided for tribal justice support, the Committee 
includes $10,000,000 for the Office of Tribal Justice Support 
to work with Indian tribes and tribal organizations to assess 
needs, consider options, and design, develop, and pilot tribal 
court systems for tribal communities including those 
communities subject to full or partial State jurisdiction under 
Public Law 83-280.
    Community and Economic Development.--The bill provides 
$36,119,000 for community and economic development programs, an 
increase of $123,000 above the enacted level.
    Executive Direction and Administrative Services.--The bill 
includes $229,108,000 for executive direction and 
administrative services, an increase of $1,416,000 above the 
enacted level.

                         CONTRACT SUPPORT COSTS

Appropriations, 2015....................................................
Budget estimate, 2016...................................................
Chairman's recommendation...............................    $277,000,000

    Contract Support Costs.--The Committee has included new 
language establishing an indefinite appropriation for contract 
support costs estimated to be $277,000,000, which is an 
increase of $26,000,000 above the fiscal year 2015 level. The 
budget request proposed to fund these costs within the 
``Operation of Indian Programs'' account through Contract 
Support and the Indian Self Determination Fund budget lines. 
Under the Committee's new budget structure, the full amount 
tribes are entitled to will be paid and other programs will not 
be reduced in cases where the agency may have underestimated 
these payments when submitting its budget. Additional funds may 
be provided by the agency if its budget estimate proves to be 
lower than necessary to meet the legal obligation to pay the 
full amount due to tribes, but this account is solely for the 
purposes of paying contract support costs and no transfers from 
this account are permitted for other purposes. Similar to the 
President's request for calculating contract support costs, 
this provision also applies to new and expanded Indian Self-
Determination and Education Assistance Act agreements funded 
through the Indian Self-Determination Fund activity.

                              construction


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $128,876,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     188,973,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     135,204,000

    The bill includes a total appropriation of $135,204,000 for 
the Construction account. This amount is an increase of 
$6,328,000 above the enacted level and fixed costs based upon 
actual expenditures have been included and internal transfers 
have been accepted. Within this funding, $23,115,000 is 
included for replacement school construction and $2,000,000 has 
been included for replacement facility construction. The 
Committee understands the significant infrastructure needs and 
strongly urges the administration to work with tribal leaders 
in a transparent manner on developing the new school 
construction list. Further, the Committee stands ready to work 
with the administration and tribes to develop a strategy that 
provides safe, functional, and accessible facilities for 
schools. The Committee also includes an increase for the 
Construction Program Management activity to support a program 
level of $7,907,000.
    Details of the recommendation are contained in the table 
that accompanies this statement.

INDIAN LAND AND WATER CLAIMS SETTLEMENTS AND MISCELLANEOUS PAYMENTS TO 
                                INDIANS

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $35,655,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      67,656,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      40,655,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $40,655,000 for 
the Indian Land and Water Claim Settlements account. This 
amount is an increase of $5,000,000 above the enacted level. 
The Committee appreciates the importance of settling the 
numerous land and water settlements and directs the Department 
to submit a spending plan to the Committee within 90 days of 
enactment of this act for how it plans to allocate the funds 
provided by this bill for the specific settlements.

                 indian guaranteed loan program account

Appropriations, 2015....................................      $7,731,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................       7,748,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       7,748,000

    The bill includes a total appropriation of $7,748,000 for 
the Indian Guaranteed Loan account. This amount is an increase 
of $17,000 above the enacted level. The total loan principal 
provided is $113,804,510.

                          Departmental Offices


                        Office of the Secretary


                        DEPARTMENTAL OPERATIONS

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $265,263,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     327,939,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     265,263,000

    The bill includes a total appropriation of $265,263,000 for 
the Office of the Secretary account. This amount is equal to 
the enacted level.
    Leadership and Administration.--The recommendation includes 
an appropriation of $122,885,000 for the leadership and 
administration activity, equal to the enacted level.
    Management Services.--The bill provides an appropriation of 
$20,747,000 for the management services activity, equal to the 
enacted level.
    Natural Resources Revenue.--The bill includes an 
appropriation of $121,631,000 for the natural resources revenue 
activity, equal to the enacted level.
    The Committee is aware that the Office of Natural Resources 
Revenue is in the process of revising the existing valuation 
method for Federal Oil and Gas and Federal and Indian coal. 
This is proposed in 80 Fed. Reg. 608, dated January 6, 2015, 
and would amend the existing regulations in 30 C.F.R. part 
1206. To help inform this process, the Committee requests that 
the Government Accountability Office report to the Congress on 
the effectiveness of the existing regulations, including 
whether there is evidence of substantial, intentional 
underpayment of coal royalties under the current system.

                            Insular Affairs

    The Office of Insular Affairs [OIA] was established on 
August 4, 1995, through Secretarial Order No. 3191, which also 
abolished the former Office of Territorial and International 
Affairs. OIA has administrative responsibility for coordinating 
Federal policy in the territories of American Samoa, Guam, the 
U.S. Virgin Islands, and the Commonwealth of the Northern 
Mariana Islands [CNMI], and oversight of Federal programs and 
funds in the freely associated states of the Federated States 
of Micronesia [FSM], the Republic of the Marshall Islands 
[RMI], and the Republic of Palau.
    Following the expiration of the first Compact of Free 
Association in 2003, a new Compact of Free Association was 
negotiated between the United States and the states of FSM and 
RMI. Under the Compact, the status of free association 
recognizes each Freely Associated State as a sovereign state 
with the capacity to conduct foreign affairs consistent with 
the terms of the Compact. The Compact places full 
responsibility for defense with the United States. The Compact 
also provides grant funds and Federal program assistance, 
principally through the Department of the Interior.

                       assistance to territories

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $85,976,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      99,660,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      85,976,000

    The bill includes $85,976,000 for assistance to 
territories, an amount equal to the fiscal year 2015 enacted 
level.
    Within these amounts, the bill includes a total of 
$3,000,000 to continue discretionary grants to mitigate the 
impact of Compact-related migration on affected jurisdictions, 
as authorized by section 104(e) of Public Law 108-188. This 
amount is equal to the fiscal year 2015 level. As in previous 
years, the Department shall allocate these grants in 
conjunction with other currently authorized mandatory grants in 
order to help offset educational costs incurred by these 
jurisdictions. The recommendation also includes a total of 
$3,500,000 for brown tree snake removal activities.
    American Samoa Operations Grants/American Samoa 
Construction.--The bill provides $22,752,000 for grants to 
American Samoa, equal to the enacted level.
    CNMI/Covenant Grants.--The recommendation includes 
$27,720,000 for covenant grants, equal to the enacted level.

                      compact of free association

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $16,465,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................       3,318,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      16,465,000

    The bill includes $16,465,000 for Compact of Free 
Association programs, equal to the fiscal year 2015 enacted 
level. Within the funds provided, the Committee has provided 
$500,000 for Enewetak support, in agreement with the request.
    Language has been included in the title I general 
provisions section to extend the eligibility for the Republic 
of Palau to receive Federal aid until a new Compact of Free 
Association is enacted by Congress.

                        Office of the Solicitor


                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $65,800,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      69,888,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      63,800,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $63,800,000 for 
the Office of the Solicitor, $2,000,000 below the enacted 
level.

                      Office of Inspector General


                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $50,047,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      52,224,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      50,047,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $50,047,000 for 
the Office of Inspector General, equal to the enacted level.

             Office of Special Trustee for American Indians

    The Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians 
holds responsibility for approximately 56 million acres of 
land, with more than 10 million acres belonging to individual 
Indians and 46 millions acres held in trust for Indian tribes.

                         FEDERAL TRUST PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $139,029,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     142,978,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     139,029,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $139,029,000 for the 
``Federal Trust Programs'' account, equal to the fiscal year 
2015 level. The recommendation includes a total appropriation 
of $22,120,000 for historical accounting activities.

                        Department-wide Programs


                        wildland fire management


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    The Department's Wildland Fire Management account funds 
fire prevention, readiness, suppression, and rehabilitation 
activities performed by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Bureau of 
Land Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the 
National Park Service.

Appropriations, 2015\1\.................................    $896,779,000
Budget estimate, 2016\2\................................   1,005,495,000
Chairman's recommendation\3\............................   1,108,745,000

\1\Includes $92,000,000 appropriated under the FLAME Wildfire 
Suppression Reserve Account.
\2\Includes $200,000,000 for suppression designated as disaster pursuant 
to pending congressional action.
\3\Includes $200,000,000 for suppression designated as emergency.

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $1,108,745,000 
for wildland fire management, an increase of $211,966,000 above 
the enacted level. This includes $200,000,000 provided with an 
emergency designation, for additional suppression resources. 
Funding levels for each subactivity can be found in the table 
at the end of this statement and in the following budget 
activity narrative.
    Fire Operations.--The bill provides $707,358,000 for 
wildfire preparedness and suppression, an increase of 
$96,731,000 above the enacted level. This amount includes 
$323,685,000 for preparedness and $383,673,000 for fire 
suppression operations. As noted, the bill provides 
$200,000,000, with an emergency designation, for additional 
suppression resources that the Department can access in lieu of 
the President's budget proposal to provide this amount within 
the disaster cap. These emergency funds are only available if 
discretionary funds for suppression are exhausted.
    Other Operations.--The bill provides $201,387,000 for other 
wildland fire management operations, an increase of $7,235,000 
above the enacted level. This includes $170,000,000 for 
hazardous fuels reduction, $18,970,000 for burned area 
rehabilitation, $6,427,000 for fire facilities, and $5,990,000 
for joint fire science. Within the amount provided for 
hazardous fuels reduction, $10,000,000 is available for 
resilient landscape activities.

                    CENTRAL HAZARDOUS MATERIALS FUND

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $10,010,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      10,011,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      10,011,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $10,011,000 for the 
Central Hazardous Materials Fund, commensurate with the budget 
request and $1,000 above the enacted level.

           NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENT AND RESTORATION

                NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENT FUND

Appropriations, 2015....................................      $7,767,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................       9,236,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       7,767,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $7,767,000 for 
the Natural Resource Damage Assessment Fund, an amount equal to 
the enacted level. The detailed allocation of funding by 
activity is included in the table at the end of this 
explanatory report.

                          WORKING CAPITAL FUND

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $57,100,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      74,462,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      57,100,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $57,100,000 for 
the Working Capital Fund. This amount is equal to the fiscal 
year 2015 enacted level.

                           General Provisions


                       DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    Title I of the bill includes ``General Provisions, 
Department of the Interior'', which are various legislative 
provisions affecting the Department. Several of these 
provisions have been carried in previous years and others are 
newly proposed this year. The provisions are:
    Sec. 101. Provides secretarial authority for the intra-
bureau transfer of program funds for expenditures in cases of 
emergency when all other emergency funds are exhausted.
    Sec. 102. Provides for the department-wide expenditure or 
transfer of funds by the Secretary in the event of actual or 
potential emergencies including forest fires, range fires, 
earthquakes, floods, volcanic eruptions, storms, oil spills, 
grasshopper and Mormon cricket outbreaks, and surface mine 
reclamation emergencies.
    Sec. 103. Provides for use of appropriated funds by the 
Secretary for contracts, rental cars and aircraft, certain 
library memberships, and certain telephone expenses.
    Sec. 104. Provides for the transfer of unobligated balances 
from the Bureau of Indian Affairs or the Office of Special 
Trustee for American Indians for expenditure or transfer for 
Indian trust management activities.
    Sec. 105. Permits the redistribution of tribal priority 
allocation and tribal base funds to alleviate funding 
inequities.
    Sec. 106. Authorizes the acquisition of lands for the 
purpose of operating and maintaining facilities that support 
visitors to Ellis, Governors, and Liberty Islands.
    Sec. 107. Authorizes Outer Continental Shelf inspection 
fees to be collected by the Secretary of the Interior.
    Sec. 108. Authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to 
continue the reorganization of the Bureau of Ocean Energy 
Management, Regulation and Enforcement.
    Sec. 109. Provides the Secretary of the Interior with 
authority to enter into multi-year cooperative agreements with 
nonprofit organizations for long-term care of wild horses and 
burros.
    Sec. 110. Requires reissuance of final rules regarding the 
gray wolf.
    Sec. 111. Addresses the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's 
responsibilities for mass marking of salmonid stocks.
    Sec. 112. Extends a provision limiting funding for any 
proposal to approve specified rights-of-way or similar 
authorizations on the Mojave National Preserve or lands managed 
by the Needles Field Office of the Bureau of Land Management.
    Sec. 113. Extends authorization for certain payments to the 
Republic of Palau for fiscal year 2016.
    Sec. 114. Requires statewide variances to be granted with 
respect to the Bureau of Land Management's final rule on 
hydraulic fracturing.
    Sec. 115. Continues prohibition on Secretarial Order No. 
3310.
    Sec. 116. Expands the National Park Service's ability to 
implement the Volunteers in Parks program in anticipation of 
increased volunteer activity related to the Service's 
centennial in 2016.
    Sec. 117. Allows the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of 
Indian Education to more efficiently and effectively perform 
reimbursable work.
    Sec. 118. Addresses National Heritage Areas.
    Sec. 119. Retains provision addressing issuance of rules 
for sage-grouse.
    Sec. 120. Extends certain offshore pay authority to hire 
and maintain qualified personnel.
    Sec. 121. Extends certain onshore pay authority to hire and 
maintain qualified personnel.
    Sec. 122. Addresses funding for National Park Service 
affiliated areas.
    Sec. 123. Allows certain funds to continue to be used for 
waterfowl conservation.
    Sec. 124. Provides authority for the Department of the 
Interior to enter into cooperative agreements with nonprofit 
organizations designated under the Older Americans Act.
    Sec. 125. Technical correction related to section 3096 of 
title XXX--Natural Resources Related General Provisions of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 2015.
    Sec. 126. Provides for the direct submission of the budget 
for the Roosevelt Campobello International Park.
    Sec. 127. Authorizes land exchange between the State of 
Alaska and the Department of the Interior for the purpose of 
construction of a one-lane, life-saving road from King Cove to 
Cold Bay, Alaska.
    Sec. 128. Prohibits funds to implement or enforce the 
threatened species listing of the lesser prairie chicken.

                                TITLE II

                    ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

                          Program Description

    The Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] was created 
through Executive Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1970, designed 
to consolidate certain Federal Government environmental 
activities into a single agency. The plan was submitted by the 
President to the Congress on July 8, 1970, and the EPA was 
established as an independent agency in the executive branch on 
December 2, 1970, by consolidating 15 components from 5 
departments and independent agencies.
    A description of EPA's pollution control programs by media 
follows:
    Air.--The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 authorize a 
national program of air pollution research, regulation, 
prevention, and enforcement activities.
    Water Quality.--The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as 
amended, provides the framework for protection of the Nation's 
surface waters. The law recognizes that it is the primary 
responsibility of the States to prevent, reduce, and eliminate 
water pollution. The States determine the desired uses for 
their waters, set standards, identify current uses and, where 
uses are being impaired or threatened, develop plans for the 
protection or restoration of the designated use. They implement 
the plans through control programs such as permitting and 
enforcement, construction of municipal waste water treatment 
works, and nonpoint source control practices. The act also 
regulates discharge of dredge or fill material into waters of 
the United States, including wetlands.
    Drinking Water.--The Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974, as 
amended in 1996, charges EPA with the responsibility of 
implementing a program to assure that the Nation's public 
drinking water supplies are free of contamination that may pose 
a human health risk, and to protect and prevent the 
endangerment of ground water resources which serve as drinking 
water supplies.
    Hazardous Waste.--The Resource Conservation and Recovery 
Act of 1976 [RCRA] mandated EPA to develop a regulatory program 
to protect human health and the environment from improper 
hazardous waste disposal practices. The RCRA Program manages 
hazardous wastes from generation through disposal.
    EPA's responsibilities and authorities to manage hazardous 
waste were greatly expanded under the Hazardous and Solid Waste 
Amendments of 1984. Not only did the regulated universe of 
wastes and facilities dealing with hazardous waste increase 
significantly, but past mismanagement practices, in particular 
prior releases at inactive hazardous and solid waste management 
units, were to be identified and corrective action taken. The 
1984 amendments also authorized a regulatory and implementation 
program directed to owners and operators of underground storage 
tanks.
    The Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest Establishment Act 
of 2012 amended subtitle C of the Solid Waste Disposal Act to 
establish an electronic means of tracking wastes subject to 
RCRA regulation. Appropriations to the Hazardous Waste 
Electronic Manifest Fund support development, operation, 
maintenance, and upgrading of the hazardous waste electronic 
manifest system.
    Pesticides.--The objective of the pesticide program is to 
protect the public health and the environment from unreasonable 
risks while permitting the use of necessary pest control 
approaches. This objective is pursued by EPA under the Food 
Quality Protection Act, the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and 
Rodenticide Act, the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, and 
the Pesticide Registration Improvement Extension Act of 2012 
through three principal means: (1) review of existing and new 
pesticide products; (2) enforcement of pesticide use rules; and 
(3) research and development to reinforce the ability to 
evaluate the risks and benefits of pesticides.
    Radiation.--The radiation program's major emphasis is to 
minimize the exposure of persons to ionizing radiation, whether 
from naturally occurring sources, from medical or industrial 
applications, nuclear power sources, or weapons development.
    Toxic Substances.--The Toxic Substances Control Act 
establishes a program to stimulate the development of adequate 
data on the effects of chemical substances on health and the 
environment, and institute control action for those chemicals 
which present an unreasonable risk of injury to health or the 
environment. The act's coverage affects more than 60,000 
chemicals currently in commerce, and all new chemicals.
    Multimedia.--Multimedia activities are designed to support 
programs where the problems, tools, and results are cross media 
and must be integrated to effect results. This integrated 
program encompasses the EPA's research, enforcement, and 
abatement activities.
    Superfund.--The Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 established a national 
program to protect public health and the environment from the 
threats posed by inactive hazardous waste sites and 
uncontrolled spills of hazardous substances. The original 
statute was amended by the Superfund Amendments and 
Reauthorization Act of 1986. Under these authorities, EPA 
manages a hazardous waste site clean-up program including 
emergency response and long-term remediation.
    Brownfields.--The Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 as amended by the Small 
Business Liability Relief and Brownfields Revitalization Act of 
2002 establishes a national program to assess, cleanup, and 
provide support to States, tribes, local communities, and other 
stakeholders to work together to develop Brownfields.
    Leaking Underground Storage Tanks.--The Leaking Underground 
Storage Tank [LUST] Program addresses petroleum releases from 
federally regulated underground storage tanks. It was created 
in 1986 when Congress amended subtitle I of the Solid Waste 
Disposal Act. EPA implements the LUST response program 
primarily through cooperative agreements with the States. In 
2005, the Energy Policy Act expanded eligible uses of the Trust 
Fund to include certain leak prevention activities.
    Inland Oil Spill.--The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, 
as amended by section 4202 of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, 
established a national program to help prepare for, and respond 
to, any oil spill affecting the inland waters of the United 
States.

                         Science and Technology


Appropriations, 2015....................................    $734,648,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     769,088,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     703,958,000

    The bill provides $703,958,000 for science and technology 
activities with an additional $16,217,000 to be paid from 
Hazardous Substance Superfund to fund ongoing research 
activities authorized by the Comprehensive Environmental, 
Compensation and Liability Act of 1980, as amended. This amount 
is $30,690,000 below the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. A 
detailed allocation of funding by program is included in the 
table that accompanies this report. Additional changes to the 
request are detailed below
    Clean Air and Climate.--$105,982,000 is provided for clean 
air and climate activities. This amount is $10,559,000 below 
the fiscal year 2015 enacted level.
    Indoor Air and Radiation.--$6,255,000 is provided for 
indoor air and radiation activities. This amount is an increase 
of $258,000 above the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. The 
proposed elimination of radon activities has been rejected.
    Homeland Security.--$36,285,000 is provided for homeland 
security activities. This amount is a decrease of $825,000 
below the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. The Committee 
supports the continuation of the Water Security Initiative to 
ensure that there is an effective system in place for timely 
detection and appropriate response of water contamination.
    Pesticides Licensing.--$6,054,000 is provided for pesticide 
program activities. This amount is an increase of $27,000 above 
the fiscal year 2015 enacted level.
    Research: National Priorities.--The bill provides 
$4,100,000, which shall be used for extramural research grants, 
independent of the Science to Achieve Results [STAR] grant 
program, to fund high-priority water quality and availability 
research by not-for-profit organizations who often partner with 
the Agency. Because these grants are independent of the STAR 
program, the Agency should strive to award grants in as large 
an amount as is possible to achieve the most scientifically 
significant research. Funds shall be awarded competitively with 
priority given to partners proposing research of national scope 
and who provide a 25-percent match. The Agency is directed to 
allocate funds to grantees within 180 days of enactment of this 
act.
    Research: Air, Climate, and Energy.--$90,400,000 is 
provided for the air, climate, and energy research program. 
This amount is a decrease of $1,506,000 below the fiscal year 
2015 enacted level. The funding requested to engage in 
additional research related to hydraulic fracturing with the 
Department of Energy and the Department of the Interior is not 
provided.
    Research: Safe and Sustainable Water Resources.--
$104,912,000 is provided for safe and sustainable water 
resources research. This amount is $2,522,000 below the fiscal 
year 2015 enacted level. In fiscal year 2016, the Agency is 
directed to complete the hydraulic fracturing study that 
examines whether there is a relationship between hydraulic 
fracturing activities and drinking water. While the Committee 
appreciates the Agency's work to address this important topic, 
more than $25,000,000 has been provided for this study since it 
was first requested in 2010. As such, the Committee believes 
the study should be completed by the end of fiscal year 2016. 
No additional funding for hydraulic fracturing research is 
provided.
    Research: Sustainable Communities.--$135,110,000 has been 
provided for research activities for sustainable communities. 
This amount is $14,865,000 below the fiscal year 2015 enacted 
level. Reductions in this area are consistent with reductions 
proposed in the President's fiscal year 2016 budget 
justification.
    Research: Chemical Safety and Sustainability.--$125,948,000 
is provided for the chemical safety and sustainability program. 
This amount is a reduction of $982,000 below the fiscal year 
2015 enacted level.
    Additional Guidance.--The Committee has provided the 
following additional guidance with respect to funding provided 
under this account.
    Integrated Risk Information System.--The Committee 
appreciates the work of the Agency to implement the 2011 
National Academy of Science's Chapter 7 recommendations for the 
Integrated Risk Information System [IRIS], but is concerned 
that the recommendations have not been fully implemented. 
Specifically, the concerns relate to: transparent frameworks 
for problem formulation; processes for study selection, 
particularly data quality and relevance; use of a robust weight 
of the evidence process for applying scientific findings; and, 
apparent continued reliance on default linear modeling 
approaches to hazard determinations. In an effort to ensure 
that the IRIS program uses the best available science, the 
Committee encourages the Agency to implement the Chapter 7 
recommendations as soon as possible.
    Nanomaterial Research.--The FDA has developed increased 
capabilities to study environment, health, and the safety of 
nanomaterials [nanoEHS] within FDA's Jefferson Laboratory 
Campus, including the National Center for Toxicological 
Research, and its consolidated headquarters at White Oak, 
Maryland. EPA and the FDA are encouraged to continue 
collaborative research efforts and, where possible, seek to 
expand and maximize the impact of their respective research 
program related to nanotechnology and safe and sustainable 
molecular design.
    Public Access to Research.--In February 2013, the Office of 
Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the 
President issued guidelines on increasing public access to the 
results of federally funded scientific research. Given the 
importance of research funded by EPA, the Agency is encouraged 
to comply expeditiously.
    Validation of Scientifically Significant Studies.--The 
National Academy of Sciences has acknowledged that 
reproducibility of research results is fundamental to the 
scientific process. The Committee understands that EPA is 
likely to include the findings of the Zhang et al (Cancer 
Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; Jan; 19(1):80-88) study for 
scientifically significant decisions in fiscal year 2016. The 
study, however, has drawn criticisms about its methods and 
interpretations. Given the public health importance of the 
findings of this study, validation of the findings is 
important. The Agency is directed to ensure that the Science 
Advisory Board Chemical Assessment Advisory Committee [SAB 
CAAC] specifically addresses the strengths and limitations of 
the Zhang et al. study during their peer review and takes this 
evaluation into account in their review of the total body of 
evidence for the carcinogenicity of formaldehyde.

                 Environmental Programs and Management

Appropriations, 2015....................................  $2,613,679,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................   2,841,718,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................   2,561,498,000

    The bill provides $2,561,498,000 for environmental programs 
and management activities. This amount is a decrease of 
$52,181,000 below the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. A 
detailed allocation of funding by program is included in the 
table that accompanies this report. Additional changes to the 
request are detailed below.
    Brownfields.--$27,562,000 has been provided for the 
Brownfields program. This amount is an increase of $1,969,000 
above the fiscal year 2015 enacted level.
    Clean Air and Climate.--$248,590,000 has been provided for 
clean air and climate programs. This amount is a decrease of 
$24,518,000 below the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. The 
Committee has not included the Administration's requests for 
funding increases and for additional employees related to the 
Clean Power Plan. Within the funds provided, the Agency is 
directed to develop a publicly available data base that 
provides information about when State Implementation Plans are 
submitted under the Clean Air Act and the date by which the 
Agency has responded to each State Implementation Plan.
    Enforcement.--The bill provides $233,178,000 for 
enforcement, $7,459,000 below the fiscal year 2015 enacted 
level.
    Environmental Protection: National Priorities.--The bill 
provides $15,000,000 for a competitive grant program to provide 
technical assistance for improved water quality or safe 
drinking water to rural and urban communities or individual 
private well owners. The Agency is directed to provide 
$13,000,000 for grants to qualified not-for-profit 
organizations, on a national or multi-State regional basis, for 
the sole purpose of providing on-site training technical 
assistance for water systems in rural or urban communities. The 
Agency is also directed to provide $2,000,000 for grants to 
qualified not-for-profit organizations for technical assistance 
for individual private well owners, with priority given to 
organizations that provide technical and educational assistance 
to individual private well owners. The Agency shall require 
each grantee to provide a minimum 10 percent match, including 
in-kind contributions. The Agency is directed to allocate funds 
to grantees within 180 days of enactment.
    Geographic Programs.--The bill provides $432,493,000 for 
Geographic Programs, an increase of $4,756,000 above the fiscal 
year 2015 enacted level. Funding levels for the specific 
geographic programs are as follows:
  --$300,000,000 for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.
  --$73,000,000 for the Chesapeake Bay program.
  --$4,819,000 for the San Francisco Bay program.
  --$29,998,000 for the Puget Sound program.
  --$1,340,000 for the South Florida program.
  --$3,940,000 for the Long Island Sound program.
  --$8,110,000 for the Gulf of Mexico program.
  --$4,399,000 for the Lake Champlain program.
  --$5,000,000 for the Southern New England Estuaries program.
  --$948,000 for the Lake Pontchartrain program.
    Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.--A long-term goal of 
GLRI articulated in the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative 
Action Plan calls for land use, recreation and economic 
activities that are managed to ensure that nearshore aquatic, 
wetland and upland habitats will sustain the health and 
function of natural communities. The Committee is aware that 
Metropolitan Planning Organizations in the region are working 
on site-specific land-use and economic development projects 
with local communities bordering the Great Lakes that can help 
advance this effort. The Agency is encouraged to work with 
these groups to advance this long term goal as they allocate 
funding under the GLRI.
    Chesapeake Bay.--The Committee recommends $73,000,000 for 
the Chesapeake Bay program. From within the amount provided, 
$6,000,000 is for nutrient and sediment removal grants and 
$6,000,000 is for small watershed grants to control polluted 
runoff from urban, suburban and agricultural lands.
    Indoor Air and Radiation.--$28,255,000 has been provided 
for indoor air and radiation activities, an increase of 
$618,000 above the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. The 
Administration's request for additional funding for the ongoing 
rulemaking related to uranium mill tailings is not provided. 
The proposed elimination of the radon program has been rejected 
and $3,105,000 has been provided.
    Information Exchange.--$121,004,000 has been provided for 
information exchange programs. This amount is a decrease of 
$5,534,000 below the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. Within 
that amount, the environmental education program is funded at 
$4,351,000. Additional funding is as follows: $4,000,000 for 
the Administrator's immediate office; $7,300,000 for the Office 
of Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs; and $4,000,000 
for the Office of Public Affairs. The Committee is disappointed 
that funds were used during a rulemaking to facilitate a social 
media campaign in support of a proposed rule. This occurred at 
the same time Congress was considering legislation related to 
the proposed rule. A prohibition on such activity exists in 
this bill and must be followed.
    Legal/Science/Regulatory/Economic Review.--The 
recommendation provides $104,291,000, a reduction of $7,123,000 
below the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. Funding for the Civil 
Rights/Title VI compliance program is $11,467,000, an increase 
of $397,000 above the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. The 
Committee has not included the Administration's requests for 
funding increases and for additional employees in this account.
    Operations and Administration.--$478,090,000 is provided 
for operation and administration.
    Pesticides Licensing.--$105,304,000 is provided for 
pesticides licensing activities, an increase of $2,941,000 
above the fiscal year 2015 enacted level.
    Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.--The recommendation 
provides $108,827,000, an increase of $3,950,000 above the 
fiscal year 2015 enacted level. An additional $2,842,000 is 
included within this program area to provide support for Tribal 
waste management activities as requested by the Administration.
    Toxics Risk Review and Prevention.--$88,764,000 is provided 
for toxics risk review and prevention activities, a decrease of 
$3,757,000 below the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. Within 
funding provided to the Agency, EPA is required to maintain 
funding for the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics at 
not less than the fiscal year 2015 level.
    Water: Ecosystems.--$47,788,000 has been provided for water 
ecosystem programs, equal to the fiscal year 2015 enacted 
level. Within the amount provided, $27,310,000 has been 
provided for National Estuary Program grants as authorized by 
section 320 of the Clean Water Act. This amount is an increase 
of $587,000 above the fiscal year 2015 enacted level and is 
sufficient to provide each of the 28 national estuaries in the 
program with a grant of $600,000.
    Water: Human Health Protection.--$97,454,000 has been 
provided for water-related human health protection activities 
equal to the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. The proposed 
elimination of the beach program has been rejected and funding 
restored to the fiscal year 2015 level.
    Water Quality Protection.--$195,291,000 has been provided 
for water quality protection. This is $15,126,000 below the 
fiscal year 2015 enacted level. Within that amount, $5,000,000 
is provided for implementation of the Water Infrastructure 
Finance and Innovation Act as requested by the Administration.
    Additional Guidance.--The Committee has provided the 
following additional guidance with respect to funding provided 
under this account.
    Combined Sewer Overflows.--The Committee supports the EPA 
's mission to improve water quality and protect the Great 
Lakes, the drinking water source for millions of Americans. 
This Committee notes that many communities around the entire 
Great Lakes Basin have made great strides to update wastewater 
infrastructures since the Agency's last report to Congress on 
Combined Sewer Overflows [CSO] in the lake Michigan Basin, as 
directed by Congress in HR. Rep. No. 108-674 at 101(September 
9, 2004). Despite the progress made, the Committee remains 
concerned that billions of gallons of untreated water and 
contaminants from a variety of sources, including combined 
sewage overflows from wastewater treatment facilities, are 
dumped into the Great Lakes every year.
    Within the funds provided, the Committee directs the EPA to 
report to Congress on the status of combined sewer overflows 
into the Great Lakes Basin and identify steps the Agency is 
taking to minimize such overflows. Specifically, the report 
should include the cause of sewer overflows, where these 
overflows are occurring, the total annual volume, as well as, 
the average historic volume at the locations where these 
overflows occur. The Agency should also outline what steps are 
being taken to work with States and local stakeholders to 
quickly notify the public about anticipated and unanticipated 
discharge events, including the volume and state of the 
treatment of the discharge, the date and time of the discharge, 
expected duration, the location of the discharge to the maximum 
level of specificity practicable and the cause of the 
discharge. Additionally, the Agency is directed to provide a 
report indicating, for each CSO community in the Great Lakes 
Basin, the implementation status of each CSO long term control 
plan. Further, the Committee directs the EPA to outline how the 
Agency is collaborating with other Federal agencies using 
existing data to advance water quality protections that are 
both timely and measurable.
    Within 60 days of passage of this act, the EPA should 
provide the Committee on Appropriations in the House and the 
Senate with a plan for completing this study.
    Community Affordability.--Within the funds provided, the 
Committee directs the EPA to contract with the National Academy 
of Public Administration--an independent, nonpartisan, 
nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress--to 
conduct an independent study to create a definition and 
framework for ``community affordability.'' The Academy shall 
consult with the EPA, States and localities, and such 
organizations, including, but not limited to the National 
Association of Counties, the National League of Cities, and the 
U.S. Conference of Mayors; review existing studies of the costs 
and benefits associated with major regulations under such laws 
as the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Safe Drinking 
Water Act, the Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act, and the Resource Conservation 
and Recovery Act; and determine how different localities can 
effectively fund municipal projects. The Academy shall submit a 
report with its findings, conclusions, and recommendations no 
later than 1 year after the date of contract with EPA.
    Drinking Water Supply Support.--The chemical spill along 
the Elk River in January 2014 was a sobering reminder of the 
many ways in which we must work to safeguard our drinking 
water. It is the Committee's understanding that interstate 
water pollution control agencies within the Ohio River Basin 
have begun the necessary steps toward improving monitoring 
programs for the protection of drinking water. EPA is 
encouraged to partner with these agencies to promote and 
enhance these efforts that will help protect drinking water 
supplies.
    Lead Test Kit.--In 2008, EPA adopted the Lead Renovation, 
Repair and Painting rule which included criteria by which the 
Agency could certify a test kit that contractors could use 
onsite to comply with the rule. The Committee is concerned that 
7 years later, no kit has been developed that meets these 
standards. The Agency was directed in the fiscal year 2015 
Consolidated Appropriations Act to prioritize efforts with 
stakeholders to identify solutions that would allow for a test 
kit to meet the criteria within the 2008 rule to reduce costs 
for consumers, remodelers and families to comply with the rule. 
The Agency has interpreted this requirement to be satisfied by 
holding a public meeting during fiscal year 2015. The Committee 
is concerned that this action is not adequate and is concerned 
that progress is not being made to identify a solution to this 
issue. If no solution is reached by the end of the fiscal year, 
EPA should reopen the rule and determine whether it is possible 
to include an opt-out provision until a test kit is certified 
that can comply with the rule.
    Methane.--The Committee is concerned about the Agency's 
efforts to regulate methane emissions beyond the New Source 
Performance Standard [NSPS] OOOO rule, which were finally 
implemented in January 2015. The Committee notes that EPA has 
reported that methane emissions from hydraulically fractured 
natural gas wells have declined by 79 percent since 2005. Given 
that the NSPS OOOO has been implemented for such a limited 
amount of time and that emissions are declining without further 
EPA regulation, the Committee is concerned that additional 
regulation of methane emissions is premature. Before finalizing 
additional regulation, the Committee urges the Agency to ensure 
the NSPS OOOO rule is fully implemented and contains at least 1 
year of data to better inform future decisions.
    Ozone Layer Protection.--The use of HCFC-22, a gas 
principally used in refrigeration and air-conditioning systems, 
is currently being phased-down by the Agency under the Montreal 
Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone layer. While the 
Agency prohibits the sale of new air-conditioning units that 
are pre-charged with HCFC-22, it permits the sale of un-charged 
condensing equipment. To pursue the goal of an orderly phase 
down of HCFC-22, the Committee urges the Agency to continue 
evaluating the sale and performance of un-charged HCFC-22 
condensing units in order to gauge the environmental and 
economic impact of the continued sale of this equipment.
    Pesticide Registration Improvement Act.--The Committee 
appreciates the work of the EPA and its partners to implement a 
sensible registration service fee system for applications for 
pesticide registration. The Committee urges the Agency to 
ensure that its review of applications complies with the 
predictable evaluation process and specific decision review 
periods contemplated in the legislation to the maximum extent 
possible.
    Response to Congressional Requests.--The Committee is 
concerned that the Agency has not provided Congressional 
Committees with underlying scientific data to confirm certain 
statements made by the administration. Providing underlying 
data to support assertions made is an important component of a 
transparent debate. As such, the Agency should respond to such 
requests in a timely and thorough manner.
    Significant New Alternatives Policy (``SNAP'') Program.--
The Committee is aware that the Agency has proposed to change 
the listing status of certain substitutes used in domestic and 
commercial refrigeration and foam-blowing sectors pursuant to 
the SNAP program. The Committee has concerns about the costs, 
technology requirements, and compressed compliance periods 
associated with that proposal. It has also been suggested that 
the timeframe conflicts with the Department of Energy's energy 
conservation standards. The Committee notes that EPA's proposal 
is not being driven by any statutory deadline, and, therefore, 
encourages the EPA to ensure its proposal takes into 
consideration the Department of Energy's energy conservation 
standards as well as concerns related to costs and technology 
compliance.
    St. Johns Bayou and New Madrid Floodway Project.--The 
Committee is aware that the St. Johns Bayou and New Madrid 
Floodway Project, authorized by Congress in 1954 and again in 
1986, has yet to be completed. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 
[USACE] has completed numerous Environmental Impact Statements 
[EIS] on this project and is in the process of completing yet 
another EIS involving a blue-ribbon panel of third-party 
experts to address concerns voiced by EPA, the Fish and 
Wildlife Service [FWS], and others. The most recent EIS 
involved an interagency working group comprised of EPA and FWS 
personnel meeting over the past 6 years. In spite of the fact 
that the USACE is proposing significant environmental 
enhancements to the project, the Committee is aware the EPA and 
FWS have recently shared correspondence with the USACE opposing 
to the project. On many past occasions, Congress has urged the 
completion of this project, which provides vital flood 
protection to the citizens of New Madrid and Mississippi 
Counties in Southeast Missouri. Therefore, the Committee again 
expresses its support for the completion of the St. Johns Bayou 
and New Madrid Floodway Project and strongly discourages EPA 
from using any authority under the Clean Water Act, including 
authorities in section 404(c), to prohibit the project from 
moving forward.
    Uranium Mill Tailings.--The Committee is concerned that the 
Agency has proposed new groundwater standards for facilities 
that produce uranium by in situ recovery [ISR] without 
consulting State regulators or the industry that will be 
regulated by the rule. The proposed standards include 
significant new requirements, such as the requirement for 30 
years of groundwater monitoring, without providing any evidence 
that such a requirement is necessary to protect public health 
or that existing Federal and State regulatory programs are not 
sufficiently restoring groundwater. The Agency is directed to 
provide information to the Committee regarding its outreach 
efforts to State regulators in States where ISR currently 
exists or is proposed. Additionally, before finalizing the 
rule, the Agency should engage State regulators and impacted 
parties to ensure that the standards proposed are necessary to 
protect public health.

             HAZARDOUS WASTE ELECTRIC MANIFEST SYSTEM FUND

Appropriations, 2015....................................      $3,674,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................       7,368,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       3,786,000

    The bill provides $3,786,000 for the Hazardous Waste 
Electric Manifest System Fund. This amount is an increase of 
$112,000 above the fiscal year 2015 enacted level.

                      Office of Inspector General

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $41,489,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      50,099,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      41,489,000

    The bill provides $41,489,000 for the Office of Inspector 
General. This amount is equal to the fiscal year 2015 enacted 
level. A detailed allocation of funding by program is included 
in the table that accompanies this report.

                        Buildings and Facilities

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $42,317,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      51,507,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      42,317,000

    The bill provides $42,317,000 for buildings and facilities 
programs. This amount is an equal to the fiscal year 2015 
enacted level. A detailed allocation of funding by program is 
included in the table that accompanies this report.

                     Hazardous Substance Superfund


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2015....................................  $1,088,769,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................   1,153,834,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................   1,106,809,000

    The bill provides $1,106,809,000 for Superfund programs. 
This amount is an increase of $18,040,000 above the enacted 
level. A detailed allocation of funding by program is included 
in the table that accompanies this report. Additional changes 
to the request are detailed below.
    Homeland Security.--$33,751,000 is provided for homeland 
security activities, a reduction of $2,611,000 below the fiscal 
year 2015 enacted level. This recommendation is consistent with 
reductions proposed by the Administration.
    Research: Sustainable Communities.--$12,220,000 is provided 
for the sustainable and healthy communities program, a 
reduction of $1,812,000 below the fiscal year 2015 enacted 
level. This recommendation is consistent with reductions 
proposed by the Administration.
    Superfund Cleanup.--$732,607,000 is provided for Superfund 
cleanup activities, an increase of $21,540,000 above the fiscal 
year 2015 enacted level. Within that amount, a $1,714,000 
increase is provided for emergency response and removal 
activities and a $19,615,000 increase is provided for remedial 
activities. The Agency is directed to factor community 
acceptance into its Superfund remedial cleanup remedy selection 
process and, when supported by a community, consider remedial 
cleanup remedies that provide green space as part of a remedial 
action that is protective of human health and the environment.
    Additional Guidance.--The Committee has provided the 
following additional guidance with respect to funding provided 
under this account:
    Lead at Superfund Sites.--Using the funds provided, the 
Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency shall 
contract with the National Academy of Sciences to conduct a 
study of the sources of lead in the environment at each 
designated Superfund site that is proximal to a historic 
surface lead mining district. The study shall focus on whether 
naturally occurring lead, lead-based paint, and the consumer 
use of products containing lead are significant sources of lead 
at such sites. The Administrator shall transmit to Congress a 
report containing the results of the study not later than 1 
year after the date of enactment of this act.
    Sediment Guidance.--There remains a significant number of 
large cleanups involving contaminated sediment in rivers and 
ports across the country. Within 90 days of the enactment of 
this act, the Agency shall provide the Committee an analysis of 
the degree to which sediment guidance and adaptive management 
policies are being applied in a consistent basis at sediment 
sites currently undergoing investigation and/or remediation.

              Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $91,941,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      95,326,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      91,485,000

    The bill provides $91,485,000 for leaking underground 
storage tank trust fund activities. This amount is $456,000 
below the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. A detailed allocation 
of funding by program is included in the table that accompanies 
this statement.

                        Inland Oil Spill Program

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $18,209,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      23,378,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      18,078,000

    The bill provides $18,078,000 for inland oil spill 
programs. This amount is a decrease of $131,000 below the 
fiscal year 2015 enacted level. A detailed allocation of 
funding by program is included in the table that accompanies 
this statement.

                   State and Tribal Assistance Grants

Appropriations, 2015....................................  $3,545,161,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................   3,599,400,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................   3,027,937,000

    The bill provides $3,027,937,000 for State and tribal 
assistance grants. This amount is $517,224,000 below the fiscal 
year 2015 enacted level. A detailed allocation of funding by 
program is included in the table that accompanies this 
statement. Additional changes to the request are detailed 
below.
    Infrastructure Assistance.--$1,852,896 has been provided 
for infrastructure assistance. The amount provided includes 
$1,047,000,000 for the Clean Water State Revolving Fund [CWSRF] 
program and $775,896,000 for the Drinking Water State Revolving 
Fund [DWSRF] program. The Committee strongly supports the State 
Revolving Funds [SRFs] and regrets less funding is available 
for these funds than was available in fiscal year 2015. While 
that is the case, the Committee notes that more funding has 
been provided in the SRFs than was proposed by the 
Administration in fiscal year 2015 when its budget proposal 
abided by the spending limits required in law.
    More than $23,000,000,000 has been appropriated to the 
State Revolving Funds since fiscal year 2009. While this amount 
is substantial, the need is even greater. The EPA estimates 
more than $334,000,000,000 is needed for public water systems 
that are eligible to receive funding from the DWSRF program and 
more than $298,000,000,000 is needed for water systems that are 
eligible for the CWSRF program. Given the tremendous need, the 
Committee believes that the Agency should continue to look for 
innovative financing opportunities.
    Targeted Airshed Grant.--$15,000,000 has been provided for 
Targeted Airshed Grants. These grants have traditionally been 
distributed on a competitive basis to non-attainment areas that 
EPA determines are ranked as the top five most polluted areas 
relative to annual ozone or particulate matter 2.5 standards in 
the past. For fiscal year 2016, the Committee has provided 
funding in addition to base funds so that additional grants can 
be made on a competitive basis to particulate matter 2.5 non-
attainment areas where wood stoves are a major cause of the 
non-attainment. Funds distributed in this manner should be used 
for a wood stove change out program or programs supporting the 
conversion of residential boilers to achieve attainment.
    Categorical Grants.--For categorical grants to States and 
other environmental partners for the implementation of 
delegated programs, the bill provides $1,060,041,000. The 
Committee continues to reject the elimination of the Radon 
program and the Beaches Protection program and funding is 
provided at fiscal year 2015 enacted levels for both programs.
    Categorical Grant: Nonpoint Source (Sec. 319).--The 
Committee has provided $164,195,000 in Nonpoint Source grants. 
The Committee urges the Agency to examine the allocation 
formula to ensure that resources are being spent in areas with 
the most pressing need.
    Categorical Grant: State and Local Air Quality Management 
Grant Program.--For fiscal year 2016 and beyond, the Committee 
believes that, in accordance with EPA's recommendations, the 
formula determining the allocation of Air Quality Grant's 
should be modified to take into account recent population and 
demographic shifts.

                       administrative provisions


             (INCLUDING TRANSFER AND RESCISSIONS OF FUNDS)

    The bill continues several administrative provisions from 
previous years.

                               TITLE III

                            RELATED AGENCIES

                       DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

                             Forest Service

    The U.S. Forest Service, a bureau of the Department of 
Agriculture, manages 193 million acres in 44 States and 
territories. In addition, the Service maintains a system of 
research stations and experimental forests and ranges 
throughout the country. The Agency also provides technical and 
financial assistance to private landowners, States, and 
communities to help sustain the Nation's urban and rural 
forests.

                     forest and rangeland research

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $296,000,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     291,982,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     291,904,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $291,904,000 for 
forest and rangeland research. This amount is $78,000 below the 
budget request and $4,096,000 below to the enacted level.
    Forest Inventory and Analysis.--The bill provides 
$80,000,000 for forest inventory and analysis, $13,000,000 
above the enacted level.
    Research and Development Programs.--The bill provides 
$211,904,000 for base research activities. The Committee 
recognizes the role of the forests products sector in the U.S. 
economy and supports work at the Forest Products Laboratory to 
research the use of wood building materials in the domestic 
construction industry; and wood-based material usage such as 
fiber-based productions, cellulose nanomaterials, chemical feed 
stocks, and bioenergy. Because demand is expected to increase 
substantially for wood as a sustainable raw material and for 
associated technical expertise in the design of timber, wood 
and wood products in architecture and engineering, and other 
sustainable, renewable, and recyclable material and products, 
the Committee directs the Forest Products Laboratory to support 
work conducted at Land Grant Universities intended to 
accelerate the growth of the domestic finished wood products 
industry.
    The Forest Products Laboratory, which conducts innovative 
wood and fiber utilization research that contributes to 
conservation and forest resource productivity, is provided 
$27,000,000 to advance ongoing work and collaborative 
partnerships that will optimize the research for the 
commercialization of high value, high volume biomass uses while 
helping eliminate hazardous fuels in our Nation's forests.
    White Nose Syndrome.--The Forest Service's leading role in 
the fight against white nose syndrome in bats is to be 
commended, but as a greater focus is placed on the need for 
conservation measures on our Nation's private and public 
forestlands, the Forest Service must continue to play an 
important role in the implementation of its National Science 
Strategy on White Nose Syndrome. The Forest Service is expected 
to prioritize white nose syndrome in bats.

                       STATE AND PRIVATE FORESTRY

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $232,653,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     236,611,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     226,655,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $226,655,000 for 
State and private forestry programs, a decrease of $5,998,000 
below the enacted level. Program changes to the enacted level 
are detailed in the following budget activity narratives and 
funding levels for each subactivity can also be found in the 
table at the end of this report.
    Landscape Scale Restoration.--The bill provides an 
appropriation of $12,000,000 for the landscape scale 
restoration line item, an amount $2,000,000 below the enacted 
level. The Committee recommends that the funding spent on the 
State and Private Forestry Redesign efforts, under the 
Landscape Scale Restoration Program [LSR] budget line item, be 
awarded to States to address priorities in Forest Action Plans. 
The goal would be to create a competitive process to fund the 
best cross-boundary, landscape-scale projects that are 
innovative, meet priority needs, and are outcome driven.
    Forest Health Management.--The bill provides $98,594,000 
for forest health management activities, an amount $5,983,000 
below the enacted level. This includes $58,750,000 for 
activities on Federal lands and $39,844,000 on cooperative 
lands. Within the funds provided for forest health management 
activities, $3,700,000 is to combat the threat of invasive 
plants and species.
    Cooperative Forestry.--The bill provides $108,061,000 for 
cooperative forestry activities, an increase of $1,985,000 
above the enacted level. This includes $22,575,000 for forest 
stewardship, $2,000,000 for community forest and open space 
conservation, and $23,686,000 for urban and community forestry.
    Forest Legacy.--The bill provides $59,800,000 for the 
forest legacy program commensurate with the budget request and 
an increase of $6,800,000 above the enacted level. The amount 
provided within this bill is available for the following 
distribution of funds and projects requested by the 
administration:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                             Budget            Bill
State               Project                 estimate     (Discretionary)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
   MTTrumbull Creek Watershed              $6,500,000       $6,500,000
   GALentile Longleaf Pine Tract            3,500,000        3,500,000
   IDHall Mountain-Kootenai Valley          3,300,000        3,300,000
   FLSilver Springs Watershed               3,700,000        3,700,000
   NYRensselaer Plateau Working             5,455,000        5,455,000
      Forest
   MEBig Six Forest                         3,800,000        3,800,000
   WAMt. St. Helens Forest Phase 2          3,800,000        3,800,000
   UTZion-Orderville Gulch                  2,630,000        2,630,000
   TNSherwood Forest                        3,345,000        3,345,000
   OREast Moraine Wallowa Lake              3,000,000        3,000,000
   NCEast Fork of French Broad              2,800,000        2,800,000
      Headwaters Phase III
   CTWhip-Poor-Will Woods                   1,430,000        1,430,000
   ARPine-Flatwoods Recovery                1,150,000        1,150,000
      Initiative
   HIHelemano Wilderness Area               3,000,000        3,000,000
   PAThe Northeast Connection               2,985,000        2,985,000
   TXLongleaf Ridge                         2,000,000        2,000,000
   SCChestnut Ridge Extension               1,005,000        1,005,000
     Other projects                         1,200,000  ...............
     Administration                         6,400,000        6,400,000
    --------------------------------------------------------------------
           Total, Forest Legacy            61,000,000       59,800,000
            Program
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    International Forestry.--The bill provides $8,000,000 for 
international forestry activities, an amount equal to the 
enacted level.

                         national forest system

Appropriations, 2015....................................  $1,494,330,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................   1,648,314,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................   1,516,764,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $1,516,764,000 for 
national forest system operations, an increase of $22,434,000 
above the enacted level and $131,550,000 below the budget 
request. Program changes to the enacted level are detailed in 
the following budget activity narratives and funding levels for 
each subactivity can also be found in the table at the end of 
this statement.
    Integrated Resource Restoration [IRR].--The Committee notes 
that for the fifth consecutive fiscal year the budget request 
has included a major restructuring in which several programs 
are combined to form the Integrated Resource Restoration [IRR] 
budget line. The Committee rejects this consolidation. The 
Forest Service has yet to provide to the Committee tangible 
accomplishments, true management efficiencies and 
accountability achieved by the proposal through the IRR pilot 
projects. The Committee warns the Forest Service that in 
absence of adequate demonstrable benefits provided to the 
Committee prior to the fiscal year 2017 budget submission, IRR 
could be permanently rejected.
    Land Management Planning, Inventory and Monitoring.--The 
bill provides $36,998,000 for Land Management Planning and 
$147,998,000 for Inventory and Monitoring, a decrease of 
$756,000 and $3,021,000 below the enacted level, respectively. 
The Committee rejects the proposal to consolidate these two 
line items.
    Grazing Management.--The bill provides $56,856,000 for 
grazing management programs, $1,500,000 above the enacted 
level. The Committee rejects the proposed new grazing fees.
    The Committees directs the Forest Service, to the greatest 
extent possible, to make vacant grazing allotments available to 
a holder of a grazing permit or lease when lands covered by the 
holder of the permit or lease are unusable because of drought 
or wildfire. The Committee recognizes the importance of grazing 
on Forest Service lands not only because of its economic 
impacts and ability to be used as management tool, but also for 
its role in the heritage of the Western States.
    Forest Products.--The bill provides $359,805,000 for forest 
products, $20,675,000 above the enacted level. The Committee 
directs the Forest Service to report program outputs from the 
Forest Products line item by counting only commercial products, 
including sawlogs, pulpwood, commercial biomass, and commercial 
firewood. Personal use firewood should be reported separately 
and should not be used to calculate program costs or 
efficiencies.
    The Committee notes that over the last 10 years the timber 
supply in Region 10 has been constrained to less than 10 
percent of the allowable sale quantity in the current land 
management plan. As a result, numerous mills have closed. In an 
effort to restore confidence in the timber supply and foster 
and allow investment in new facilities, the Forest Service 
pledged to prepare and offer four 10-year timber sales each 
with a volume of 150-200 million board feet. The agency 
recently converted the first two timber sales to smaller 
stewardship projects. These projects will neither restore 
confidence, nor will they allow investment in new facilities. 
The Committee directs the Forest Service to prepare and offer, 
within 2 years, the four 10-year timber sales as promised.
    Recreation, Heritage and Wilderness.--The bill provides 
$261,719,000 for recreation, heritage, and wilderness, an 
amount equal to the enacted level. In recent years the Alaska 
Region has seen its recreation, trails and facilities funding 
shrink at a disproportionately higher rate when compared to 
other regions. The Committee urges the Forest Service to 
prioritize funding for recreation, trails and facilities in the 
Tongass National Forest and to bring investments in Region 10 
more in-line with funding nationwide. This can be accomplished 
by returning to using regional priorities to allocate funds 
rather than models that use inputs that favor certain regions 
over others.
    The Committee is concerned about the impacts of Executive 
Order 13658 on outfitters operating in national forests. The 
Committee understands that the Forest Service attempted to work 
with the Department of Labor to craft an exemption for 
outfitters operating in national forests and is disappointed 
that those efforts were rejected by the Department of Labor. 
The Committee urges the Forest Service to seek an alternative 
remedy.
    Vegetation and Watershed Management.--The bill provides 
$190,116,000 for vegetation and watershed management 
activities, which is $5,400,000 above the enacted level. The 
Committee expresses concern with the pace and scale of the 
Forest Service's use of the authorities granted by section 8204 
of the Agricultural Act of 2014 to perform critically needed 
treatments of insect and disease infested trees on National 
Forests. The Committee provides no less than $5,400,000 to 
fully and promptly implement this authority.
    Wildlife and Fish Habitat Management.--The bill provides 
$140,466,000 for wildlife and fish habitat management, an 
amount equal to the enacted level.
    Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Fund [CFLR].--
The bill provides $40,000,000 for collaborative forest 
landscape restoration projects. The Committee notes that the 
CFLR was intended to leverage non-Federal resources to carry 
out collaborative projects across a mixed ownership landscape. 
The Committee has become aware of the lack of apparent 
transparency relating to funds required to carry out the CFLR 
program to-date. During fiscal year 2014, the Forest Service 
spent more than $79,000,000 in non-CFLR dollars with in CFLR 
project boundaries. If this spending trend were to continue, 
for every additional $10,000,000 in additional CFLR funding, 
the Forest Service would spend nearly $20,000,000 in additional 
non-CFLR funds within CFLR project areas. While the Committee 
supports collaboration, it is concerned about the impact this 
resource consumption has on lands outside project boundaries, 
particularly coupled with questions about the tangible benefits 
of the program. As such, the Committee rejects the proposal to 
increase funds for the program at this time. The Committee also 
directs the Forest Service to accurately portray the true cost 
of the CFLR program in future budget submissions and to make 
future requests reflective of such amounts as would be 
necessary to carry out all activities within project 
boundaries.
    Minerals and Geology Management.--The bill provides 
$78,423,000 for minerals and geology management, $2,000,000 
above the enacted level.
    Law Enforcement.--The bill provides $126,653,000 for law 
enforcement activities, an amount equal to the enacted level. 
Of the funds provided, up to $13,000,000 is for marijuana 
eradication activities.
    Tongass National Forest.--The Committee is concerned about 
the Forest Service's implementation strategy in Region 10 with 
respect to the timber program and its ability to preserve a 
viable timber industry. The Committee notes that in order to 
preserve a viable timber industry, the Forest Service must 
provide a reliable supply of economically viable timber from 
the national forest system that includes both old growth and 
young growth. To that end, the Committee expects the Forest 
Service to meet the requirements of section 705(a) of the 
Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (16 U.S.C. 539 
d(a)). In addition, the Committee directs the Forest Service to 
make available funds previously set-aside for activities 
related to the proposed Transition Framework for assistance in 
Region 10 to conduct a comprehensive inventory of young growth 
to include the stand-level field work on young growth, 
recommended by the Tongass Advisory Committee, to ground-proof 
and refine inventory and growth data and improve inventory 
accuracy. Unless and until the comprehensive inventory is 
completed, the Forest Service shall not issue a Record of 
Decision for any Forest Plan Amendments to the 2008 Tongass 
Land Management Plan that includes transition to young growth 
management.
    Mark Twain National Forest.--The Committee is aware of 
commitments made by the Forest Service to study the economic 
impact and success associated with prescribed burning in the 
Missouri Pine-Oak Woodlands Collaborative Forest Landscape 
Restoration project area and on the Mark Twain National Forest, 
in general. The Forest Service is directed to refrain from 
using prescribed burns in the study area until such study is 
complete. Additionally, the Forest Service is directed to offer 
timber sales that will allow salvageable dying oak to be 
harvested prior to it losing its economic value.
    Stewardship Contracting.--The Forest Service is directed to 
expeditiously prepare and publish draft rulemaking to establish 
a small business set-aside program for timber contracts 
undertaken using stewardship contracting authority that is 
consistent with previous commitments made by the Service and 
the Department of Agriculture on this matter.
    Groundwater Directive.--The Forest Service is encouraged to 
withdraw the Groundwater Directive in light of agency 
acknowledgement of the challenges associated with implementing 
the directive.
    Interdisciplinary Teams.--The Committee is concerned that 
there needs to be dramatic improvement in Federal forest 
management, to improve forest health, reduce hazardous fuels, 
increase timber production, and restore forest jobs. The 
Committee urges the Forest Service to make investments to 
improve efficiency and expedite the backlog of planning work, 
and encourages the agencies to prioritize such hiring, 
including additional interdisciplinary teams, with appropriated 
funds, with a focus on areas where collaboratively developed 
management plans can contribute to forest restoration and also 
maintain infrastructure that could be critical to the Service's 
ability to manage and restore lands in the future.
    Bighorn Sheep Conservation.--The Committee directs the 
Forest Service to take prompt action to seek and enact 
multiple-use solutions to ensure our Nation does not continue 
to lose substantial portions of either our domestic sheep 
industry or our bighorn sheep conservation legacy. The 
Committee encourages the Forest Service to continue 
quantitative, science-based analyses of the risk of 
transmission of disease from domestic to bighorn sheep at the 
appropriate jurisdictional scale. In addition, the Committee 
encourages the Forest Service to work with partners to convene 
a roundtable discussion of diverse stakeholders including 
Federal land management agencies, domestic sheep industry 
representatives, grazing permittees, State wildlife management 
agencies, tribes, wild sheep conservation organizations, and 
other parties interested in collaboration on strategies and 
solutions to address risk of disease transmission. The 
Committee directs the Forest Service to brief the Committee on 
progress regarding the results from the roundtable prior to the 
submission of the fiscal year 2017 budget request.
    Greater Sage-Grouse.--The Committee's direction on greater 
sage-grouse can be found in the report language for the Bureau 
of Land Management.

                  CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT AND MAINTENANCE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $360,374,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     341,924,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     358,164,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $358,164,000 for 
capital improvement and maintenance programs, a decrease of 
$2,210,000 below the enacted level. As in previous years, this 
amount is offset with a $16,000,000 scoring credit related to 
the Roads and Trails Fund.
    Facilities.--The bill provides $71,390,000, including 
$55,369,000 for maintenance and $16,021,000 for construction, a 
total decrease of $210,000 below the enacted level.
    Roads.--The bill provides $181,094,000, including 
$154,454,000 for maintenance and $26,640,000 for construction, 
a total increase of $13,000,000 above the enacted level.
    Trails.--The bill provides $77,530,000, including 
$70,830,000 for maintenance and $6,700,000 for construction, an 
amount equal to the enacted level. The Committee directs the 
Forest Service to use $250,000 of the funds provided for trail 
maintenance for use by Ranger Districts for the purpose of 
entering into contracts with willing private outfitting, 
recreational services or nonprofit organizations in trail 
maintenance activities.
    Deferred Maintenance.--The bill provides $3,150,000 for 
deferred maintenance, an amount equal to the enacted level.
    Legacy Road and Trail Remediation.--The bill provides 
$25,000,000 for the legacy road initiative, a decrease of 
$15,000,000 below the enacted level. The Forest Service is 
expected to allocate this funding in a manner proportionate to 
the distribution of roads in need of attention across the 
system and to direct funds to regions most in need of road 
remediation.

                            land acquisition

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $47,500,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      63,000,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      38,440,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $38,440,000 for land 
acquisition. This amount is a decrease of $9,060,000 below the 
enacted level.
    The Committee has provided $3,000,000 for recreational 
access and the Forest Service is directed to prioritize 
recreational access projects that significantly enhance access 
to existing public lands that have inadequate access for 
hunting, fishing, and other recreational activities. Further, 
the Committee expects the Service to report within 30 days of 
enactment of how this funding will be spent and include a 
description and explanation on the use of funds in future 
congressional budget justifications.
    The amount provided within this bill is available for the 
following distribution of funds and projects requested by the 
administration:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                             Budget            Bill
State               Project                 estimate     (Discretionary)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
   COUpper Rio Grande: Rio Grande NF       $5,000,000       $5,000,000
   CAHurdygurdy: Six Rivers NF                700,000          700,000
   UTWasatch Watersheds-Bonneville          2,320,000        2,320,000
      Shoreline Trail: Uinta-Wasatch-
      Cache NF
   NCNorth Carolina's Threatened            1,250,000        1,250,000
      Treasures: Pisgah NF
   NCNorth Carolina's Threatened              450,000          450,000
      Treasures: Uwharrie NF
   MTHigh Divide: Beaverhead-               1,525,000        1,525,000
      Deerlodge NF
   IDHigh Divide: Caribou-Targhee NF        1,625,000        1,625,000
   MTHigh Divide: Gallatin NF               2,000,000        2,000,000
   IDHigh Divide: Frank Church River          425,000          425,000
      of No Return Wilderness
   IDHigh Divide: Sawtooth NF               2,500,000        2,500,000
   CASierra Nevada Checkerboard:            1,400,000        1,400,000
      Tahoe NF
   COToll Properties: Roosevelt NF            800,000          800,000
   TNTennessee Mountains: Cherokee NF       1,635,000        1,635,000
   MOCurrent River: Mark Twain NF           2,070,000        2,070,000
   VARivers of the Chesapeake: George       1,990,000        1,990,000
      Washington and Jefferson NF
     Other Projects                        21,560,000  ...............
     Acquisition Management                 8,500,000        7,500,000
     Cash Equalization                        250,000          250,000
     Critical Inholdings/Wilderness         2,000,000        2,000,000
     Sportsman/Recreational Access          5,000,000        3,000,000
    --------------------------------------------------------------------
           Total, Land Acquisition         63,000,000       38,440,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------


        acquisition of lands for national forests, special acts

Appropriations, 2015....................................        $950,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................       1,950,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................         950,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $950,000, which is 
equal to the enacted level. These funds are derived from 
receipts at certain forests.

            acquisition of lands to complete land exchanges

Appropriations, 2015....................................        $216,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................         216,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................         216,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $216,000, which is 
equal to the enacted level. This amount is derived from funds 
deposited by State, county, and municipal governments or public 
school authorities pursuant to the act of December 4, 1967, as 
amended (16 U.S.C. 484a).

                         range betterment fund

Appropriations, 2015....................................      $2,320,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................       2,320,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       2,320,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $2,320,000, which is 
equal to the request. This amount is for range rehabilitation, 
protection, and improvement, and is derived from fees received 
for livestock grazing on national forests pursuant to section 
401(b)(1) of Public Law 94-579, as amended.

    gifts, donations and bequests for forest and rangeland research

Appropriations, 2015....................................         $45,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................          45,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................          45,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $45,000, which is 
equal to the budget request. This amount is derived from the 
fund established under 16 U.S.C. 1643(b).

        MANAGEMENT OF NATIONAL FOREST LANDS FOR SUBSISTENCE USES

Appropriations, 2015....................................      $2,500,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................       2,441,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       2,500,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $2,500,000, equal to 
the enacted level. This account provides for carrying out the 
Forest Service's responsibilities for subsistence under the 
Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act.

                        wildland fire management


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2015\1\.................................  $2,636,358,000
Budget estimate, 2016\2\................................   3,208,607,000
Chairman's recommendation\3\............................   3,555,919,000

\1\Includes $303,060,000 appropriated under the FLAME Wildfire 
Suppression Reserve Account.
\2\Includes $854,578,000 for suppression designated as disaster pursuant 
to pending congressional action.
\3\Includes $854,578,000 for suppression designated as emergency.

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $3,555,919,000 
for wildland fire management, an increase of $919,561,000 above 
the enacted level. This includes $854,578,000 provided with an 
emergency designation, for additional suppression resources. 
Funding levels for each subactivity can also be found in the 
table at the end of this statement. Of the funds provided, 
$2,000,000 is for the Southwest Ecological Restoration 
Institutes to continue to enhance the Forest Service's capacity 
to execute science-based forest restoration treatments to 
reduce the risk of wildfires and improve the health of dry 
forest ecosystems.
    Fire Operations.--The bill provides $2,208,620,000 for 
wildfire preparedness and suppression operations, $354,780,000 
above the enacted level. This amount includes $1,082,620,000 
for preparedness and $1,126,000,000 for suppression. As noted 
earlier, the bill provides $854,578,000 with an emergency 
designation for additional suppression resources that are only 
available if regular discretionary funds for suppression are 
exhausted.
    Other Operations.--The bill provides $492,721,000 for other 
wildland fire management operations, an increase of $13,263,000 
above the enacted level. The bill provides $375,000,000 for 
hazardous fuels reduction, of which up to $15,000,000 may be 
used for biomass utilization grants, which the Forest Service 
is expected to use for the development of bioenergy and bio-
based products, such as nanotechnology, that will expand 
commercial markets for low value wood to facilitate increased 
removal of biomass beyond traditional fuels treatment. 
Investing in the research and development of advanced woody 
biomass uses will help reduce excessive hazardous fuels on our 
Nation's forestlands while creating new economic markets and 
opportunity for taxpayers. The bill also provides $19,795,000 
for fire plan research and development, $6,914,000 for joint 
fire science, $78,012,000 for State fire assistance, and 
$13,000,000 for volunteer fire assistance.
    Fire Suppression Aviation.--The Committee acknowledges the 
importance of ensuring all available resources are on hand to 
fight the wildfires that ravage the Nation's forests, and 
understands how critical private industry is in these efforts. 
The Committee also recognizes the investment of the Forest 
Service in developing the Next Generation Large Air Tanker 
Modernization Strategy and the need to ensure a sufficient 
number of available aircraft and the proper mix of Federal and 
private equipment to adequately respond to the needs of the 
agencies fighting wildfires. Due to Congressional action, the 
Forest Service can expect to take possession of seven, 
Government-owned C-130H aircraft beginning this year, as well 
as to pursue the acquisition of new aircraft with funding 
provided in fiscal year 2015. The Forest Service is directed to 
evaluate and provide to the Committee evidence of cost-savings 
expected to result from the acquisition of Federal aircraft. 
This evaluation should include not only costs charged to the 
Forest Service, but costs charged to other agencies so the 
Committee has an accurate accounting of the actual cost of 
Federal ownership compared with utilization of private 
contractors.
    Wildland Urban Interface.--The Committee understands the 
significant threat of severe wildland fires to communities and 
natural resources within the Wildland Urban Interface. The 
Committee believes that limited Federal budgets require 
innovative approaches that directly improve the capacity and 
capability of firefighters and communities to respond and fight 
wildland fires. The Committee supports the plan to utilize 
regional partnerships to implement 50 percent cost-shared 
approaches to install fire suppression response and suppression 
infrastructure, as well as coordinating programs that emphasize 
collaborative management of such programs. Priority shall be 
given to ongoing programs that have demonstrated the ability to 
implement such approaches.
    Greater Sage-Grouse.--The Committee's direction on Greater 
sage-grouse can be found in the report language for the Bureau 
of Land Management.
    Wildland Fire Science Partnership.--The Committee 
appreciates the work of the Wildland Fire Science Partnership 
and expects funds within joint fire science to be used to study 
current wildland firefighting operations and the safety and 
health impacts of such operations on wildland firefighters.

                       Administrative Provisions


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    The bill continues several administrative provisions from 
previous years.
    In order to improve transparency and communication between 
the Forest Service and the Committee, the Forest Service is 
directed to improve methods by which spending statistics can be 
reported by region, State and forest.

                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES


                         Indian Health Service

    The Indian Health Service [IHS] is the agency within the 
Department of Health and Human Services that has responsibility 
for providing Federal health services to approximately 2.2 
million American Indians and Alaska Natives. The provision of 
health services to tribes grew out of the special relationship 
between the Federal Government and Indian tribes that was 
established in 1787, based on article I, section 8 of the 
Constitution, and given form and substance by numerous 
treaties, laws, Supreme Court decisions, and Executive orders 
that followed. Most notable among these is the Snyder Act of 
1921, which provides the basic authority for most Indian health 
services provided by the Federal Government to Native Americans 
and Alaska Natives.
    IHS services are provided directly and through tribally 
contracted and operated programs in over 600 health care 
facilities located throughout the United States, primarily in 
rural and isolated areas. Health care is also purchased from 
more than 9,000 private providers annually. The Federal system 
consists of 28 hospitals, 61 health centers, and 34 health 
stations. Through Public Law 93-638, the Indian Self-
Determination and Education Act, tribes and tribal 
organizations compact and contract health programs to manage 17 
hospitals, 249 health centers and 70 health stations. In 
addition, grants to 34 nonprofit urban Indian health 
organizations provide a variety of health and referral 
services.

                         indian health services

Appropriations, 2015....................................  $4,182,147,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................   4,463,260,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................   3,539,523,000

    The Committee recommends $3,539,523,000 for clinical 
services programs of the Indian Health Service. This is a 
decrease of $642,624,000 below the enacted level. The decrease 
reflects the Committee's creation of a new, separate account 
for contract support costs. In prior years, funds were 
reprogrammed from other important services programs in order to 
fully fund these obligations. Under the Committee's new budget 
structure which also establishes an indefinite appropriation 
for contract support costs, the full amount tribes are entitled 
to will be paid and other programs will not be reduced in cases 
where the agency may have underestimated these payments when 
submitting its budget. Taking the restructuring into account, 
the Committee's recommendation for the services appropriation 
is $20,346,000 above the level for fiscal year 2015.
    Increases above the enacted level in the services account 
include $16,222,000 for staffing of newly opened health 
facilities, $2,000,000 for the alcohol and substance abuse 
program to focus on tribal youth, and $2,000,000 for operating 
shortfalls at previously authorized community health clinics. 
Funds for the staffing of new facilities are provided solely to 
support facilities on the Health Care Facilities Construction 
Priority System and Joint Venture construction projects that 
have opened in fiscal year 2015 or will open in fiscal year 
2016. None of these funds may be allocated to a facility until 
such facility has achieved beneficial occupancy status.
    Purchased and Referred Care.--The Committee is aware that 
certain Indian people in Oregon have not been counted for 
purposes of purchased and referred care under current Service 
policies and that the Service is currently considering options 
to address the situation, including the potential expansion of 
service delivery areas. The Committee believes that it is 
important that this issue be resolved without impacting 
existing purchased and referred care allocations to California 
and Oregon. Within 60 days of enactment of this act, the 
Service is directed to provide a report to the Committee 
detailing its proposed management actions to address the 
situation.

                         Contract Support Costs

Appropriations, 2015....................................................
Budget estimate, 2016...................................................
Chairman's recommendation...............................    $717,970,000

    The Committee has included new language establishing an 
indefinite appropriation for contract support costs estimated 
to be $717,970,000, which is an increase of $55,000,000 above 
the fiscal year 2015 level. The budget request proposed to fund 
this program within the ``Indian Health Services'' account. 
Under this heading the Committee has provided the full amount 
of the request for contract support costs. By virtue of the 
indefinite appropriation, additional funds may be provided by 
the agency if its budget estimate proves to be lower than 
necessary to meet the legal obligation to pay the full amount 
due to tribes. This account is solely for the purposes of 
paying contract support costs and no transfers from this 
account are permitted for other purposes.

                        indian health facilities

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $460,234,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     639,725,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     521,818,000

    The Committee recommends $521,818,000 for health facilities 
operations of the Indian Health Service. This amount is 
$61,584,000 above the enacted level. Increases above the 
enacted level include $1,584,000 for the staffing of new 
facilities; $20,000,000 for facilities maintenance and 
improvement; $20,000,000 for sanitation facilities 
construction; and $20,000,000 for healthcare facilities 
construction in order to make progress on the next facility on 
the Service's Health Care Facilities Construction Priority 
System. The stipulations included in the ``Indian Health 
Services'' account regarding the allocation of funds for the 
staffing of new facilities pertain to the funds in this account 
as well.

                     National Institutes of Health


          NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES

    The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, an 
agency within the National Institutes of Health, was authorized 
in section 311(a) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended, to conduct 
multidisciplinary research and training activities associated 
with the Nation's Hazardous Substance Superfund program, and in 
section 126(g) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization 
Act of 1968, to conduct training and education of workers who 
are or may be engaged in activities related to hazardous waste 
removal or containment or emergency response.

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $77,349,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      77,349,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      77,349,000

    The bill provides $77,349,000 for the operations of the 
``National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences'' 
account. This amount is equal to the budget request and the 
enacted level.

            Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry 
[ATSDR], an agency of the Public Health Service, was created in 
section 104(i) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980. The ATSDR's primary 
mission is to conduct surveys and screening programs to 
determine relationships between exposure to toxic substances 
and illness. Other activities include the maintenance and 
annual update of a list of hazardous substances most commonly 
found at Superfund sites, the preparation of toxicological 
profiles on each such hazardous substance, consultations on 
health issues relating to exposure to hazardous or toxic 
substances, and the development and implementation of certain 
research activities related to ATSDR's mission.

            TOXIC SUBSTANCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $74,691,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      74,691,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      74,691,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $74,691,000 for 
the operations of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease 
Registry account. This amount is equal to the budget request 
and the enacted level.

                         OTHER RELATED AGENCIES


                   Executive Office of the President


  COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

    The Council on Environmental Quality [CEQ] and the Office 
of Environmental Quality [OEQ] were established by the National 
Environmental Policy Act of 1969 [NEPA] and the Environmental 
Quality Improvement Act of 1970, respectively. The Council 
serves as a source of environmental expertise and policy 
analysis for the White House, Executive Office of the 
President, and other Federal agencies. CEQ promulgates 
regulations binding on all Federal agencies to implement the 
procedural provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act 
and resolves interagency environmental disputes informally and 
through issuance of findings and recommendations.

Appropriations, 2015....................................      $3,000,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................       3,015,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       3,000,000

    The bill provides $3,000,000 for the operations of the 
Council on Environmental Quality and Office of Environmental 
Quality account. This amount is equal to the enacted level.

             Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board

    The Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board was 
authorized by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 to 
investigate accidental releases of certain chemicals substances 
that result in, or may cause, serious injury, death, 
substantial property damage, or serious adverse effects on 
human health. It became operational in fiscal year 1998.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $11,000,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      12,271,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      10,700,000

    The bill provides $10,700,000 for salaries and expenses of 
the Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board. This amount 
is $300,000 below the enacted level.
    The Committee remains focused on activities at the U.S. 
Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board. The Inspector 
General of the Environmental Protection Agency investigated the 
Board and found troubling issues related to records management, 
contracting, and personnel management. The Committee is 
encouraged by efforts at the Board to remedy these issues, but 
remains concerned that more must be done to restore credibility 
to an agency with the important responsibility of investigating 
industrial chemical accidents. The Committee urges the 
administration to take all appropriate steps to address 
remaining credibility and personnel issues in an expeditious 
manner.

              Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation

    The Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation was 
established by Public Law 93-531. The Office is charged with 
planning and conducting relocation activities associated with 
the settlement of land disputes between the Navajo Nation and 
Hopi Tribe.

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2015....................................      $7,341,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................       8,400,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       7,341,000

    The bill provides $7,341,000 for the Office of Navajo and 
Hopi Indian Relocation, equal to the fiscal year 2015 enacted 
level.

    Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and Arts 
                              Development

    The Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture 
and Arts Development [IAIA] was originally founded in 1962 as a 
Bureau of Indian Affairs [BIA] high school. The Institute was 
moved out of the BIA in 1988 to become a federally chartered 4-
year college governed by a board of trustees appointed by the 
President of the United States and confirmed by the Senate. Its 
mission is to serve as the national center of research, 
training, language, and scholarship for Native Americans and 
Alaska Natives through the dedicated study, creative 
application, preservation, and care of Native cultures and 
arts. In addition to its academic programs, the IAIA houses the 
National Collection of Contemporary Indian Art and carries the 
designation as the National Repository for Native Languages. 
The IAIA's operations are funded by direct Federal support and 
a diversified private sector approach to foundations, 
corporations, tribes, and individual donors.

                        payment to the institute

Appropriations, 2015....................................      $9,469,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      11,619,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      11,619,000

    The bill provides $11,619,000 for the Institute of American 
Indian and Alaska Native Culture and Development, which is an 
increase of $2,150,000 over the enacted level. The additional 
funding will allow the Administration to forward fund the 
Institute.

                        Smithsonian Institution

    Congress established the Smithsonian Institution in 1846 to 
administer a large bequest left to the United States by James 
Smithson, an English scientist, for the purpose of establishing 
in Washington, DC, an institution ``. . . for the increase and 
diffusion of knowledge among men.'' The act establishing the 
Smithsonian provided for the administration of the trust, 
independent of the Government itself, by a Board of Regents and 
a Secretary, who were given broad discretion in the use of 
these funds. The board was to be composed of both private 
citizens and members of all three branches of the Federal 
Government in order to ensure ``the wise and faithful use'' of 
the Institution's funds. The trust funds were permanently 
loaned to the U.S. Treasury to be maintained in a separate 
account, with the interest from that money used for the 
operation of the Institution. Construction of the Smithsonian 
Castle was completed in 1855 and collections that the 
Government had accepted on behalf of the Institution were moved 
into the building. Today, the Smithsonian Institution is the 
world's largest museum and research complex, housing 
approximately 144 million objects and specimens, and receiving 
an estimated 25 million visitors annually.
    Its facilities include 19 museums and galleries, the 
National Zoo, and nine research facilities--most located in or 
near Washington, DC, with others in Massachusetts, New York, 
Florida, Arizona, Hawaii, and the Republic of Panama. The 
Smithsonian's growth continues as construction proceeds on the 
National Museum of African American History and Culture, 
authorized by Congress in 2003 and scheduled to open to the 
public in 2016.

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $675,343,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     735,825,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     689,566,000

    The bill provides $689,566,000 for salaries and expenses of 
the Smithsonian Institution. This amount is an increase of 
$14,223,000 above the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. The 
Committee understands the role the Institution has played as a 
source of learning and inspiration, and appreciates the 
challenges the Institution must overcome to keep the museums 
open and available to the public. The Committee also understand 
the importance of collaboration and partnerships and strongly 
encourages areas, such as the National Zoological Park, to work 
with external sources to provide support in pathological 
research, services, and training to augment the existing needs 
of the National Zoo.
    The Committee provides a total of $273,714,000 for 
Facilities Services, of which $71,985,000 is for Facilities 
Maintenance and $201,729,000 is for Facilities Operations, 
Security and Support. Within the funds provided in the Salaries 
and Expenses account, it is the Committee's expectation that 
any additional staff, activities, or necessary expenses 
required may be utilized for the opening of the National Museum 
of African American History and Culture in 2016.
    The creation of a Museum of the American Latino within the 
Smithsonian Institution at some future date continues to be a 
strongly supported priority. Until such time, the Smithsonian 
Latino Center, which was formed in 1997 with the goal of 
promoting the inclusion of Latino contributions in the 
Institution's exhibitions, collections and public outreach 
programs, should continue this important work. In accordance 
with the recommendations provided to Congress and the President 
of the United States in the May 2011 report by the National 
Museum of the American Latino Commission (created by Public Law 
110-229), the Committee urges collaboration between the 
Smithsonian and appropriate Federal and local organizations to 
increase Latino programming, exhibitions, collections, and 
outreach at the Institution. The Committee expects that within 
the funds provided for program support and outreach, the 
Institution will be able to increase support for this effort. 
The Committee is also aware the Asian Pacific American Center 
is examining ways in which it could expand its outreach, both 
within the Institution and beyond the National Mall. Within the 
funds provided for program outreach and support, the Committee 
encourages the Institution to find ways to share the 
contributions Asian American have contributed to the American 
experience.

                           facilities capital

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $144,198,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     200,000,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     129,975,000

    The bill includes $129,965,000 for the Smithsonian 
Institution's Facilities Capital program, $14,223,000 below the 
current year enacted level. Within these funds, $89,165,000 is 
provided for revitalizations efforts and $40,810,000 for 
planning and design efforts. The Committee understands the 
Institution will initiate the planning and design phase for 
renovations to the National Air and Space Museum within this 
funding. The Committee recognizes the Institution's efforts to 
comply with Federal initiatives on energy efficiency and 
sustainable buildings, and notes that federally supported 
museums are an ideal forum for applying advanced building 
technologies for the preservation of art and energy efficiency. 
Therefore, the Committee encourages federally supported museums 
to integrate innovative energy saving building technologies and 
design features, such as dynamic glass and other building 
efficiency technologies, in its new construction, renovation, 
and maintenance plans.

                        National Gallery of Art

    The National Gallery of Art was created in 1937 by a joint 
resolution of Congress accepting Andrew W. Mellon's gift to the 
Nation of his art collection. The generosity of the Mellon 
family also provided the funds to construct the Gallery's two 
landmark buildings, the West Building, designed by Alexander 
Pope and completed in 1941, and the East Building, designed by 
I.M. Pei and completed in 1978. In 1999, an outdoor sculpture 
garden was created with funding from the Cafritz Foundation. 
Today, these two buildings and the Sculpture Garden form a 
museum complex that houses one of the world's premier art 
collections. Since the Gallery's founding, Federal funds have 
been appropriated to ensure the operation, maintenance, 
protection, and care of its collection. Private contributions 
are used by the Gallery for art acquisition and conservation, 
scholarly and scientific research, exhibitions, and educational 
outreach programs.

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $119,500,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     126,660,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     122,500,000

    The bill provides $122,500,000 for salaries and expenses of 
the National Gallery of Art. This amount is $3,000,000 above 
the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. The distribution of funds 
among the Gallery's various activities is displayed in the 
table that accompanies this report.

            repair, restoration, and renovation of buildings

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $19,000,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      26,000,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      16,000,000

    The bill provides $16,000,000 for major repairs, 
restoration and renovation of the Gallery's buildings. This 
amount is $3,000,000 below the fiscal year 2015 enacted level.

             John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

    Originally established in 1958 as the National Cultural 
Center, an independently administered bureau of the Smithsonian 
Institution, the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts 
was designated as a living memorial to President Kennedy in 
1964. The Kennedy Center building was constructed with a 
combination of private contributions, Federal matching funds 
and long-term revenue bonds held by the U.S. Department of the 
Treasury. Since 1972, Congress has provided funds for the 
operations and repair of the presidential monument, initially 
through the National Park Service and since 1995 to the Kennedy 
Center Board of Trustees. Approximately 87 percent of the 
Center's total annual operating budget is derived from 
nonappropriated funds such as ticket sales, auxiliary income, 
investment income and private contributions that support 
performing arts programming and administrative activities.

                       operations and maintenance

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $22,000,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      21,660,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      21,660,000

    The bill provides $21,660,000 for the operations and 
maintenance of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing 
Arts, the same amount as the administration's fiscal year 2016 
request.

                     CAPITAL REPAIR AND RESTORATION

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $10,800,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      14,740,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      11,140,000

    The bill provides $11,140,000 for the Kennedy Center's 
capital repair and restoration program, $340,000 above fiscal 
year 2015 enacted.

            Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

    The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars is the 
living national memorial to President Wilson established by 
Congress in 1968 and headquartered in Washington, DC. Its 
mission is to commemorate the ideals and concerns of the former 
president by providing a link between the world of ideas and 
the world of policy; and by fostering research, study, 
discussion, and collaboration among a full spectrum of 
individuals concerned with policy and scholarship in national 
and world affairs. The Woodrow Wilson Center is a nonpartisan 
institution that is supported by a combination of public and 
private funds.

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $10,500,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      10,420,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      10,500,000

    The bill provides $10,500,000 for salaries and expenses of 
the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the same 
amount as the fiscal year 2015 enacted level.

           National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities


                    National Endowment for the Arts

    Established in 1965 as an independent agency of the Federal 
Government, the National Endowment for the Arts [NEA] is the 
official arts organization of the United States Government. As 
the largest annual funder of the arts in the United States, the 
NEA has helped to create regional theater, opera, ballet, 
symphony orchestras, museums and other arts organizations that 
Americans now enjoy. Since its founding, the National Endowment 
for the Arts has awarded more than 120,000 grants that have 
brought the arts to Americans in communities both large and 
small. The NEA, through its competitive, peer-reviewed grants 
process, uses the majority of its annual operating funds to 
award grants to nonprofit organizations for arts education, 
arts outreach, artistic excellence and partnership agreements. 
In addition to those activities, State and jurisdictional arts 
agencies are awarded 40 percent of the Endowment's funds.

                       grants and administration

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $146,021,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     147,949,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     146,021,000

    The bill provides $146,021,000 for grants and 
administration of the National Endowment for the Arts, equal to 
the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. The NEA is to be commended 
for the work it has done through its Healing Arts Partnerships 
with Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and Fort 
Belvoir Community Hospital to incorporate arts therapy into the 
treatment plans of active-duty military patients and their 
families. The agency is encouraged to explore options on how to 
expand this partnership. The Committee also directs State arts 
agencies to explore how they can contribute to expanding arts 
programs for service members and their families at the local 
level. The distribution of funds among the agency's various 
activities is displayed in the table that accompanies this 
statement.

                 National Endowment for the Humanities

    The National Endowment for the Humanities [NEH] was 
established by the 1965 National Foundation on the Arts and 
Humanities Act as an independent Federal agency of the United 
States Government dedicated to supporting research, education, 
preservation, and public programs in the humanities. Today, it 
is the largest funder of humanities programs in the Nation. 
NEH's longstanding tradition of a peer-reviewed competitive 
grant process is designed to ensure that the most meritorious 
projects are funded. Typically, NEH grants are used to support 
cultural institutions, such as museums, archives, libraries, 
colleges, universities, public television and radio, and 
individual scholars. The NEH, through its State-Federal 
partnership, also provides grants to State humanities councils 
in all 50 States and the 6 territories.

                       grants and administration

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $146,021,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     147,942,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     146,021,000

    The bill provides $146,021,000 for grants and 
administration of the National Endowment for the Humanities, 
equal to the fiscal year 2015 enacted level. The Committee 
encourages the NEH to continue and expand the special 
programming for the initiative Standing Together: The 
Humanities and the Experience of War through funding provided 
for special initiatives. The distribution of funds among the 
agency's various activities is displayed in the table that 
accompanies this statement.

                        Commission of Fine Arts

    The Commission of Fine Arts was established in 1910 to fill 
the need for a permanent agency whose members would be 
qualified to make available to the Government expert opinion on 
questions of art and architecture. The Commission's mission, as 
design proposals are brought before it, is to safeguard and 
improve the appearance and symbolic significance of the city as 
a capital. The Commission provides knowledgeable advice on 
matters pertaining to architecture, landscape architecture, 
sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts to all branches 
and departments of the Federal and District of Columbia 
governments when such matters affect the National Capital. The 
Commission also must approve of the site and design of all 
commemorative works and memorials erected in the District. The 
Commission advises on the design of circulating and 
commemorative coinage and must approve the siting and design 
for national memorials, both in the United States and on 
foreign soil, in accordance with the American Battle Monuments 
Act and the Commemorative Works Act.

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2015....................................      $2,524,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................       2,653,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       2,653,000

    The bill provides $2,653,000 for salaries and expenses of 
the Commission of Fine Arts, the same amount as the 
administration's fiscal year 2016 request and an increase of 
$129,000 over the fiscal year 2015 enacted level.

               National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs

    The National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs program was 
established by Public Law 99-190 to provide grants for general 
operating support to District of Columbia nonprofit arts and 
other cultural organizations. In fiscal year 1988, 
administrative responsibility for the program was transferred 
from the National Endowment for the Humanities to the 
Commission of Fine Arts. Currently, this program helps support 
more than 20 nationally renowned organizations in the Nation's 
Capital by providing funding for operating expenses, jobs, 
exhibits, and performances that might not have been possible 
otherwise.

Appropriations, 2015....................................      $2,000,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................       2,000,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       2,000,000

    The bill provides $2,000,000, the same amount as the fiscal 
year 2015 appropriation, to continue support for the National 
Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs program administered by the 
Commission of Fine Arts.

               Advisory Council on Historic Preservation

    The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 established 
the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation as an independent 
Federal agency. The Council's mission is to promote the 
preservation, enhancement, and productive use of our Nation's 
historic resources, and advise the President and Congress on 
national historic preservation policy. It also provides a forum 
for discussion of Federal activities, programs, and policies 
that affect historic properties. One of the principal 
responsibilities of the Council is to implement Section 106 of 
the National Historic Preservation Act, which requires that the 
Council be given an opportunity to comment on the impacts of 
projects or actions undertaken by other Federal agencies on 
sites or structures eligible for inclusion in the National 
Register of Historic Places.

Appropriations, 2015....................................      $6,204,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................       6,080,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       6,080,000

    The bill provides $6,080,000 for the Advisory Council on 
Historic Preservation, a reduction of $124,000 below the 
enacted level.

                  National Capital Planning Commission

    The National Capital Planning Commission [NCPC] was 
established in 1924 as a park planning agency. Two years later, 
the agency's role was expanded to included more comprehensive 
planning. The National Capital Planning Act of 1952 designated 
the NCPC as the central planning agency for the Federal 
Government in the National Capital Region. Today, major 
functions and responsibilities of the NCPC include 
comprehensive and coordinated planning for the Nation's 
Capital; an annual assessment of all proposed Federal capital 
improvements in the national capital region; the review of 
proposed Federal development projects; and representation of 
the Federal interest in local and regional planning 
initiatives.

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2015....................................      $7,948,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................       8,348,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       7,948,000

    The bill provides $7,948,000 for salaries and expenses of 
the National Capital Planning Commission, equal to the fiscal 
year 2015 enacted level.

                United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

    The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum was created by 
Congress in 1980 through Public Law 96-388 with the mandate to 
operate and maintain a permanent living memorial museum to the 
victims of the Holocaust; provide appropriate ways for the 
Nation to commemorate the victims of the Holocaust through the 
annual national civic observances known as the Days of 
Remembrance; and carry out the recommendations of the 
President's Commission on the Holocaust. The building that 
houses the museum was constructed with private funds and opened 
to the public in 1993. Since that time, the museum has 
attracted four to five times the number of expected visitors 
and has been highly successful in its fundraising efforts. With 
private contributions comprising nearly 50 percent of its 
annual operating budget, the Holocaust Memorial Museum serves 
as a model for the public-private partnership.

                       holocaust memorial museum

Appropriations, 2015....................................     $52,385,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      54,959,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      52,385,000

    The bill provides $52,385,000 for operations of the United 
States Holocaust Memorial Museum, the same amount as the fiscal 
year 2015 enacted level.

                Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2015....................................      $1,000,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................       2,000,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       1,000,000

    The bill provides $1,000,000 for salaries and expenses of 
the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission, $1,000,000 below 
the administration's fiscal year 2016 request and the same 
amount as the fiscal year 2015 enacted level for salaries and 
expenses.

                              CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2015....................................................
Budget estimate, 2016...................................     $68,200,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................................

    No funds have been provided in the ``Capital Construction'' 
account for the memorial. The Committee is concerned that 
significant unresolved issues remain among the many 
stakeholders involved with the Eisenhower Memorial. 
Construction should not commence until there is broad support 
among the public, the Eisenhower family, and Congress 
concerning the design and construction. However, language has 
been included in the bill under title IV, General Provisions, 
that extends the memorial's site authority to September 30, 
2016. The current authority expires in September 2015.

                                TITLE IV

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

                     (Including Transfers of Funds)

    Title IV of the bill includes the following general 
provisions:
    Sec. 401. Provides that appropriations available in the 
bill shall not be used to produce literature or otherwise 
promote public support of a legislative proposal on which 
legislative action is not complete or for publicity or 
propaganda purposes in support of administration policies 
except to the executive branch or Congress.
    Sec. 402. Continues a provision providing for annual 
appropriations unless expressly provided otherwise in this act.
    Sec. 403. Continues a provision providing restrictions on 
departmental assessments unless approved by the Committees on 
Appropriations.
    Sec. 404. Retains the mining patent moratorium carried in 
previous years.
    Sec. 405. Continues a provision regarding the payment of 
contract support costs.
    Sec. 406. Provides that only certain amounts provided in 
the 2016 Consolidated Appropriations Act may be used to fund 
contract support costs.
    Sec. 407. Continues a provision providing that the 
Secretary of Agriculture shall not be considered in violation 
of certain provisions of the Forest and Rangeland Renewable 
Resources Planning Act solely because more than 15 years have 
passed without revision of a forest plan, provided that the 
Secretary is working in good faith to complete the plan 
revision within available funds.
    Sec. 408. Prohibits oil, natural gas, and mining-related 
activities within current national monument boundaries, except 
where such activities are allowed under the presidential 
proclamation establishing the monument.
    Sec. 409. Restricts funding appropriated for acquisition of 
land or interests in land from being used for declarations of 
taking or complaints in condemnation.
    Sec. 410. Addresses timber sales involving Alaska western 
red and yellow cedar.
    Sec. 411. Restricts awards of no-bid contracts.
    Sec. 412. Requires the public disclosure of certain 
reports.
    Sec. 413. Continues a provision which delineates the grant 
guidelines for the National Endowment for the Arts.
    Sec. 414. Continues a provision which delineates the 
program priorities for the National Endowment for the Arts.
    Sec. 415. Retains certain reporting requirements regarding 
the status of appropriations balances.
    Sec. 416. Continues a provision on reporting on the use of 
climate change funds.
    Sec. 417. Prohibits Federal Implementation Plans under the 
Clean Air Act in certain cases.
    Sec. 418. Continues prohibition of any rules that would 
require the regulation of emissions from livestock.
    Sec. 419. Continues prohibition on EPA using funds to 
implement a mandatory greenhouse gas reporting system for 
manure management systems.
    Sec. 420. Extends existing authority to collect recreation 
fees for one year.
    Sec. 421. Prohibits modifying definition of waters under 
the jurisdiction of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.
    Sec. 422. Extends the authority for the Dwight D. 
Eisenhower Memorial Commission by 1 year.
    Sec. 423. Continues standards for the use of American iron 
and steel for certain infrastructure projects.
    Sec. 424. Prohibits funding to update national ambient air 
quality standards until certain compliance thresholds have been 
achieved.
    Sec. 425. Continues prohibition on regulation of fishing 
tackle and ammunition under the Toxic Substances Control Act.
    Sec. 426. Continues certain contracting authorities.
    Sec. 427. Extends the Chesapeake Bay Initiative until 2017.
    Sec. 428. Prohibition on sewage dumping into the Great 
Lakes.
    Sec. 429. Stewardship Contracting technical correction.
    Sec. 430. Continues provision regarding grazing permits on 
Forest Service lands.
    Sec. 431. Prohibits expansion of certain regulations under 
the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and 
Liability Act.
    Sec. 432. Prohibits funding for greenhouse gas guidance 
under the National Environmental Policy Act.
    Sec. 433. Technical corrections to Good Neighbor Authority.

                                TITLE V

                       WILDFIRE DISASTER FUNDING

    Title V of the bill includes language to create a new cap 
adjustment to the statutory discretionary spending limits for 
wildland fire suppression activities, to combat the most 
severe, complex, and threatening fires, and to serve as a 
contingency reserve. This mechanism is critically needed to 
provide certainty for the Federal agencies tasked with 
preventing and responding to the increasing incidence of 
catastrophic wildfires throughout the country. In addition, the 
language requires specific reporting and cost containment by 
the agencies utilizing this new cap adjustment. Further 
explanation can be found in the front matter of this statement. 
The language in title V is a modification of the proposal 
included in the fiscal year 2016 budget request, which is also 
the subject matter of bipartisan legislation introduced in both 
the House and the Senate.

  COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Rule XVI, paragraph 7 requires that every report on a 
general appropriation bill filed by the Committee must identify 
each recommended amendment which proposes an item of 
appropriation which is not made to carry out the provisions of 
an existing law, a treaty stipulation, or an act or resolution 
previously passed by the Senate during that session.
    Those items are as follows:
  --Sums provided to the Bureau of Land Management for 
        management of lands and resources, land acquisition, 
        construction and maintenance, and loans to States.
  --Sums provided to the Bureau of Land Management to 
        inventory, manage, and improve rangelands for domestic 
        livestock grazing pursuant to Public Law 95-514, the 
        Public Rangeland Improvement Act of 1978.
  --$172,131,000 for the endangered species program, U.S. Fish 
        and Wildlife Service.
  --Sums provided to the Fish and Wildlife service for coastal 
        wetlands planning, protection, and restoration.
  --Sums provided for the Yukon River Restoration and 
        Enhancement Fund, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 
        pursuant to the Fisheries Act of 1995.
  --Sums provided to the Fish and Wildlife Service for the 
        conservation and protection of marine mammals pursuant 
        to Public Law 103-238, the Marine Mammal Protection Act 
        Amendments of 1994.
  --Sums provided for Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration 
        grants.
  --Sums provided to the Fish and Wildlife Service pursuant to 
        the Klamath River Basin Fishery Resources Restoration 
        Act; Fisheries Restoration Irrigation Mitigation Act; 
        and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation 
        Establishment Act.
  --Sums provided to the U.S. Geological Survey for the 
        National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program.
  --Sums provided to the Bureau of Indian Affairs pursuant to 
        The Tribal Colleges or Universities Assistance Act of 
        1978; The Indian Tribal Justice Act; Indian Child 
        Protection and Family Violence Act; and The No Child 
        Left Behind Act.
  --$1,106,809,000 for the Hazardous Substance Superfund.
  --$20,000,000 for State and tribal assistance grants: Alaska 
        Native Villages.
  --$1,047,000,000 for State and tribal assistance grants: 
        Clean Water SRF.
  --$775,896,000 for State and tribal assistance grants: 
        Drinking Water SRF.
  --Sums provided pursuant to the Clean Air Act, Radon 
        Abatement Act, Clean Water Act, BEACH Act, Safe 
        Drinking Water Act, Solid Waste Disposal Act [RCRA], 
        Toxic Substances Control Act, Pollution Prevention Act, 
        and the Indian Environmental General Assistance Program 
        Act.
  --$3,000,000 for matching funds for projects of the National 
        Forest Foundation, U.S. Forest Service.
  --$146,021,000 for the National Endowment for the Arts.
  --$146,021,000 for the National Endowment for the Humanities.

COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(c), RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, on June 18, 2015, 
the Committee ordered favorably reported an original bill 
making appropriations for the Department of the Interior, 
environment, and related agencies for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 2016, and for other purposes, provided, that the 
bill be subject to amendment and that the bill be consistent 
with its budget allocation, by a recorded vote of 16-14, a 
quorum being present. The vote was as follows:
        Yeas                          Nays
Chairman Cochran                    Ms. Mikulski
Mr. McConnell                       Mr. Leahy
Mr. Shelby                          Mrs. Murray
Mr. Alexander                       Mrs. Feinstein
Ms. Collins                         Mr. Durbin
Ms. Murkowski                       Mr. Reed
Mr. Graham                          Mr. Tester
Mr. Kirk                            Mr. Udall
Mr. Blunt                           Mrs. Shaheen
Mr. Moran                           Mr. Merkley
Mr. Hoeven                          Mr. Coons
Mr. Boozman                         Mr. Schatz
Mrs. Capito                         Ms. Baldwin
Mr. Cassidy                         Mr. Murphy
Mr. Lankford
Mr. Daines

 COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 12 of rule XXVI requires that Committee reports 
on a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any statute 
or part of any statute include ``(a) the text of the statute or 
part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and (b) a 
comparative print of that part of the bill or joint resolution 
making the amendment and of the statute or part thereof 
proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through type and 
italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate typographical 
devices the omissions and insertions which would be made by the 
bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form recommended by 
the committee.''
    In compliance with this rule, the following changes in 
existing law proposed to be made by the bill are shown as 
follows: existing law to be omitted is enclosed in black 
brackets; new matter is printed in italic; and existing law in 
which no change is proposed is shown in roman.

                         TITLE 16--CONSERVATION


                    Chapter 5B--Wildlife Restoration


Sec. 669b. Authorization of appropriations

(a) In general

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

(b) Investment of unexpended amounts

    (2) The interest on obligations held in the fund--

            (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (C) shall become available for apportionment under 
        this chapter at the beginning of fiscal year [2016] 
        2017.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


            Chapter 87--Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement


Sec. 6809. Sunset provision

    The authority of the Secretary to carry out this chapter 
shall terminate on [September 30, 2016] September 30, 2017.
                                ------                                


               TITLE 33--NAVIGATION AND NAVIGABLE WATERS


           Chapter 26--Water Pollution Prevention and Control


                  Subchapter IV--Permits and Licenses


Sec. 1342. National pollutant discharge elimination system

(a) Permits for discharge of pollutants

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

(r) Discharges incidental to the normal operation of 
recreational vessels

    No permit shall be required under this chapter by the 
Administrator (or a State, in the case of a permit program 
approved under subsection (b)) for the discharge of any 
graywater, bilge water, cooling water, weather deck runoff, oil 
water separator effluent, or effluent from properly functioning 
marine engines, or any other discharge that is incidental to 
the normal operation of a vessel, if the discharge is from a 
recreational vessel.
    (s) Prohibition on Sewage Dumping Into the Great Lakes.--

            (1) Definitions.--In this subsection:

                    (A) Bypass.--The term ``bypass'' means an 
                intentional diversion of waste streams to 
                bypass any portion of a treatment facility 
                which results in a discharge into the Great 
                Lakes.

                    (B) Discharge.--

                            (i)  In General.--The term 
                        ``discharge'' means a direct or 
                        indirect discharge of untreated sewage 
                        or partially treated sewage from a 
                        treatment works into the Great Lakes or 
                        a tributary of the Great Lakes.

                            (ii)  Inclusions.--The term 
                        ``discharge'' includes a bypass and a 
                        combined sewer overflow.

                    (C) Great lakes.--The term ``Great Lakes'' 
                has the meaning given the term in section 
                118(a)(3).

                    (D) Partially treated sewage.--The term 
                ``partially treated sewage'' means any sewage, 
                sewage and storm water, or sewage and 
                wastewater, from domestic or industrial sources 
                that--

                            (i) is not treated to national 
                        secondary treatment standards for 
                        wastewater; or

                            (ii) is treated to a level less 
                        than the level required by the 
                        applicable national pollutant discharge 
                        elimination system permit.

                    (E) Treatment facility.--The term 
                ``treatment facility'' includes all wastewater 
                treatment units used by a publicly owned 
                treatment works to meet secondary treatment 
                standards or higher, as required to attain 
                water quality standards, under any operating 
                conditions.

                    (F) Treatment works.--The term ``treatment 
                works'' has the meaning given the term in 
                section 212.

            (2) Prohibition.--A publicly owned treatment works 
        is prohibited from performing a bypass unless--

                    (A)(i) the bypass is unavoidable to prevent 
                loss of life, personal injury, or severe 
                property damage;

                    (ii) there is not a feasible alternative to 
                the bypass, such as the use of auxiliary 
                treatment facilities, retention of untreated 
                wastes, or maintenance during normal periods of 
                equipment downtime; and

                    (iii) the treatment works provides notice 
                of the bypass in accordance with this 
                subsection; or

                    (B) the bypass does not cause effluent 
                limitations to be exceeded, and the bypass is 
                for essential maintenance to ensure efficient 
                operation of the treatment facility.

            (3) Limitation.--The requirement of paragraph 
        (2)(A)(ii) is not satisfied if--

                    (A) adequate back-up equipment should have 
                been installed in the exercise of reasonable 
                engineering judgment to prevent the bypass; and

                    (B) the bypass occurred during normal 
                periods of equipment downtime or preventive 
                maintenance.

            (4) Immediate notice requirements.--

                    (A) In general.--The Administrator shall 
                work with States having publicly owned 
                treatment works subject to the requirements of 
                this subsection to create immediate notice 
                requirements in the event of discharge that 
                provide for the method, contents, and 
                requirements for public availability of the 
                notice.

                    (B) Minimum requirements.--

                            (i) In general.--At a minimum, the 
                        contents of the notice shall include--

                                (I) the exact dates and times 
                        of the discharge;

                                (II) the volume of the 
                        discharge; and

                                (III) a description of any 
                        public access areas impacted.

                            (ii) Consistency.--Minimum 
                        requirements shall be consistent for 
                        all States.

                    (C) Additional requirements.--The 
                Administrator and States described in 
                subparagraph (A) shall include--

                            (i) follow-up notice requirements 
                        that provide a more full description of 
                        each event, the cause, and plans to 
                        prevent reoccurrence; and

                            (ii) annual publication 
                        requirements that list each treatment 
                        works from which the Administrator or 
                        the State receive a follow-up notice.

                    (D) Timing.--The notice and publication 
                requirements described in this paragraph shall 
                be implemented not later than 2 years after the 
                date of enactment of this subsection.

            (5) Sewage blending.--Bypasses prohibited by this 
        section include bypasses resulting in discharges from a 
        publicly owned treatment works that consist of effluent 
        routed around treatment units and thereafter blended 
        together with effluent from treatment units prior to 
        discharge.

            (6) Implementation.--As soon as practicable, the 
        Administrator shall establish procedures to ensure that 
        permits issued under this section (or under a State 
        permit program approved under this section) to a 
        publicly owned treatment works include requirements to 
        implement this subsection.

            (7) Increase in maximum civil penalty for 
        violations occurring after january 1, 2035.--
        Notwithstanding section 309, in the case of a violation 
        of this subsection occurring on or after January 1, 
        2035, or any violation of a permit limitation or 
        condition implementing this subsection occurring after 
        that date, the maximum civil penalty that shall be 
        assessed for the violation shall be $100,000 per day 
        for each day the violation occurs.

            (8) Applicability.--This subsection shall apply to 
        a bypass occurring after the last day of the 1-year 
        period beginning on the date of enactment of this 
        subsection.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                    Subchapter V--General Provisions


Sec. 1377. Indian tribes

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 519. ESTABLISHMENT OF GREAT LAKES CLEANUP FUND.

    (a) Definitions.--In this section:

            (1) Fund.--The term ``Fund'' means the Great Lakes 
        Cleanup Fund established by subsection (b).

            (2) Great lakes; great lakes states.--The terms 
        ``Great Lakes'' and ``Great Lakes States'' have the 
        meanings given the terms in section 118(a)(3).

    (b) Establishment of Fund.--There is established in the 
Treasury of the United States a trust fund to be known as the 
``Great Lakes Cleanup Fund'' (referred to in this section as 
the ``Fund'').

    (c) Transfers to Fund.--Effective January 1, 2035, there 
are authorized to be appropriated to the Fund amounts 
equivalent to the penalties collected for violations of section 
402(s).

    (d) Administration of Fund.--The Administrator shall 
administer the Fund.

    (e) Use of Funds.--The Administrator shall--

            (1) make the amounts in the Fund available to the 
        Great Lakes States for use in carrying out programs and 
        activities for improving wastewater discharges into the 
        Great Lakes, including habitat protection and wetland 
        restoration; and

            (2) allocate those amounts among the Great Lakes 
        States based on the proportion that--

                    (A) the amount attributable to a Great 
                Lakes State for penalties collected for 
                violations of section 402(s); bears to

                    (B) the total amount of those penalties 
                attributable to all Great Lakes States.

    (f) Priority.--In selecting programs and activities to be 
funded using amounts made available under this section, a Great 
Lakes State shall give priority consideration to programs and 
activities that address violations of section 402(s) resulting 
in the collection of penalties.

                              SHORT TITLE

    Sec. [519] 520. This Act may be cited as the ``Federal 
Water Pollution Control Act'' (commonly referred to as the 
Clean Water Act).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


      Subchapter VI--State Water Pollution Control Revolving Funds


Sec. 1387. Authorization of appropriations

    [There is] (a) There is authorized to be appropriated to 
carry out the purposes of this subchapter the following sums:

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (5) $600,000,000 for fiscal year 1994.

    (b) Treatment of Great Lakes Cleanup Fund.--For purposes of 
this title, amounts made available from the Great Lakes Cleanup 
Fund under section 519 shall be treated as funds authorized to 
be appropriated to carry out this title and as funds made 
available under this title, except that the funds shall be made 
available to the Great Lakes States in accordance with section 
519.
                                ------                                


          TITLE 54--NATIONAL PARK SERVICE AND RELATED PROGRAMS


                    Subtitle I--National Park System


          DIVISION A--ESTABLISHMENT AND GENERAL ADMINISTRATION


                Chapter 1023--Programs and Organizations


Sec. 102301. Volunteers in park program

    (a) Enforcement.--* * *




           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
    (d) Authorization of Appropriations.--There is authorized 
to be appropriated to carry out this section not more than 
[$5,000,000] $10,000,000 for each fiscal year.
                                ------                                


                 HISTORIC SITES AND NATIONAL MONUMENT, 
                           PUBLIC LAW 93-486


                                TITLE II

    Sec. 204. There are hereby authorized to be appropriated 
such sums as may be necessary to carry out the purpose of this 
Act[, but not to exceed $500,000].
                                ------                                


                     UNITED STATES INSULAR AREAS, 
                           PUBLIC LAW 95-348


                         AMERICAN MEMORIAL PARK

    Sec. 5. (a) * * *




           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
    (g) For the development, maintenance, and operation of the 
park (but not for any acquisition of land or interests in 
lands), there is hereby authorized to be appropriated [not to 
exceed $3,000,000] such sums as may be necessary for the 
purposes of this Section effective October 1, 1978. Amounts 
appropriated pursuant to this subsection shall remain available 
until expended.
                                ------                                


 BALANCED BUDGET AND EMERGENCY DEFICIT CONTROL ACT OF 1985, PUBLIC LAW 
                                 99-177


  PART C--EMERGENCY POWERS TO ELIMINATE DEFICITS IN EXCESS OF MAXIMUM 
                             DEFICIT AMOUNT


SEC. 251. ENFORCING DISCRETIONARY SPENDING LIMITS.

    (a) Enforcement.--

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (b) Adjustments to Discretionary Spending Limits.--

            (1) Concepts and definitions.--* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (2) Sequestration reports.--* * *

                    (A) Emergency appropriations; overseas 
                contingency operations/global war on 
                terrorism.--* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                    (D) Disaster Funding.--

                            (i) If, for fiscal years 2012 
                        through 2021, appropriations for 
                        discretionary accounts are enacted that 
                        Congress designates as being for 
                        disaster relief in statute, the 
                        adjustment for a fiscal year shall be 
                        the total of such appropriations for 
                        the fiscal year in discretionary 
                        accounts designated as being for 
                        disaster relief, but not to exceed the 
                        total of--

                                    (I) the average funding 
                                provided for disaster relief 
                                over the previous 10 years, 
                                excluding the highest and 
                                lowest years; [and] plus

                                    (II) the amount, for years 
                                when the enacted new 
                                discretionary budget authority 
                                designated as being for 
                                disaster relief for the 
                                preceding fiscal year was less 
                                than the average as calculated 
                                in subclause (I) for that 
                                fiscal year, that is the 
                                difference between the enacted 
                                amount and the allowable 
                                adjustment as calculated in 
                                such subclause for that fiscal 
                                year[.] ; less

                                    (III) the additional new 
                                budget authority provided in an 
                                appropriation Act for wildfire 
                                suppression operations pursuant 
                                to subparagraph (E) for the 
                                preceding fiscal year.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                            (iv) Appropriations considered 
                        disaster relief under this subparagraph 
                        in a fiscal year shall not be eligible 
                        for adjustments under subparagraph (A) 
                        for the fiscal year.

                            (v) Beginning in fiscal year 2018, 
                        and for each fiscal year thereafter, 
                        the calculation of the ``average 
                        funding provided for disaster relief 
                        over the previous 10 years'' shall 
                        include, for each year within that 
                        average, the additional new budget 
                        authority provided in an appropriation 
                        Act for wildfire suppression operations 
                        pursuant to subparagraph (E) for the 
                        preceding fiscal year.

                    (E) Wildfire suppression.--

                            (i) Definitions.--In this 
                        subparagraph:

                                    (I) Additional new budget 
                                authority.--The term 
                                ``additional new budget 
                                authority'' means the amount 
                                provided for a fiscal year in 
                                an appropriation Act that is--

                                            (aa) in excess of 
                                        100 percent of the 
                                        average costs for 
                                        wildfire suppression 
                                        operations over the 
                                        previous 10 years; and

                                            (bb) specified to 
                                        pay for the costs of 
                                        wildfire suppression 
                                        operations.

                                    (II) Wildfire suppression 
                                operations.--The term 
                                ``wildfire suppression 
                                operations'' means the 
                                emergency and unpredictable 
                                aspects of wildland 
                                firefighting, including--

                                            (aa) support, 
                                        response, and emergency 
                                        stabilization 
                                        activities;

                                            (bb) other 
                                        emergency management 
                                        activities; and

                                            (cc) the funds 
                                        necessary to repay any 
                                        transfers needed for 
                                        the costs of wildfire 
                                        suppression operations.

                            (ii) Additional new budget 
                        authority.--If a bill or joint 
                        resolution making appropriations for a 
                        fiscal year is enacted that specifies 
                        an amount for wildfire suppression 
                        operations in the Wildland Fire 
                        Management accounts at the Department 
                        of Agriculture or the Department of the 
                        Interior, then the adjustments for that 
                        fiscal year shall be the amount of 
                        additional new budget authority 
                        provided in that Act for wildfire 
                        suppression operations for that fiscal 
                        year, but shall not exceed--

                                    (I) for fiscal year 2016, 
                                $1,460,000,000 in additional 
                                new budget authority;

                                    (II) for fiscal year 2017, 
                                $1,557,000,000 in additional 
                                new budget authority;

                                    (III) for fiscal year 2018, 
                                $1,778,000,000 in additional 
                                new budget authority;

                                    (IV) for fiscal year 2019, 
                                $2,030,000,000 in additional 
                                new budget authority;

                                    (V) for fiscal year 2020, 
                                $2,319,000,000 in additional 
                                new budget authority; and

                                    (VI) for fiscal year 2021, 
                                $2,650,000,000 in additional 
                                new budget authority.

                            (iii) Average cost calculation.--
                        The average costs for wildfire 
                        suppression operations over the 
                        previous 10 years shall be calculated 
                        annually and reported in the budget of 
                        the President submitted under section 
                        1105(a) of title 31, United States 
                        Code, for each fiscal year.
                                ------                                


 OMNIBUS PARKS AND PUBLIC LANDS MANAGEMENT ACT OF 1996, PUBLIC LAW 104-
                                  333


                              DIVISION II


              TITLE II--TENNESSEE CIVIL WAR HERITAGE AREA


SEC. 208. SUNSET.

    The Secretary may not make any grant or provide any 
assistance under this title after September 30, [2015] 2021.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


            TITLE III--AUGUSTA CANAL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA


SEC. 310. SUNSET.

    The Secretary may not make any grant or provide any 
assistance under this title after September 30, [2015] 2021.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


          TITLE VI--SOUTH CAROLINA NATIONAL HERITAGE CORRIDOR


SEC. 607. SUNSET.

    The Secretary may not make any grant or provide any 
assistance under this title after September 30, [2015] 2021.
                                ------                                


                CHESAPEAKE BAY INITIATIVE ACT OF 1998, 
                           PUBLIC LAW 105-312


                   TITLE V--CHESAPEAKE BAY INITIATIVE


SEC. 502. CHESAPEAKE BAY GATEWAYS AND WATERTRAILS.

    (a) Chesapeake Bay Gateways and Watertrails Network.--

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (c) Authorization of Appropriations.--There is authorized 
to be appropriated to carry out this section $3,000,000 for 
each of fiscal years 1999 through [2015] 2017.
                                ------                                


   DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2000, PUBLIC LAW 106-79


                               TITLE VIII


                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Sec. 8162. Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial. (a) Findings.--
Congress finds that--

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (m) Authority to Establish Memorial.--

                    (1) In general.--* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                    (3) Expiration.--Any reference in section 
                8903(e) of title 40, U.S.C. to the expiration 
                at the end of, or extension beyond, a 7-year 
                period shall be considered to be a reference to 
                an expiration on, or extension beyond, 
                [September 30, 2015] September 30, 2016.
                                ------                                


               HEALTHY FORESTS RESTORATION ACT OF 2003, 
                           PUBLIC LAW 108-148


                        TITLE VI--MISCELLANEOUS


SEC. 604. STEWARDSHIP END RESULT CONTRACTING PROJECTS.

    (a) Definitions.--* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (d) Agreements or Contracts.--

            (1) Procurement procedures.--* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (5) Relation to other laws.--Notwithstanding 
        subsections (d) and (g) of secton 14 of the National 
        Forest Management Act of 1976 (16 U.S.C. 472a), the 
        Chief may enter into an agreement or contract under 
        subsection (b). Notwithstanding the Materials Act of 
        1947 (30 U.S.C. 602(a)), the Director may enter into an 
        agreement or contract under subsection (b).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (7) Fire liability provisions.--Not later than 90 
        days after the date of enactment of this section, the 
        Chief [and the Director] shall issue for use in all 
        contracts and agreements under this section fire 
        liability provisions that are in substantially the same 
        form as the fire liability provisions contained in--
                                ------                                


                CONSOLIDATED APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2012, 
                           PUBLIC LAW 112-74


   DIVISION E--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, ENVIRONMENT, AND RELATED 
                   AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2012


                                TITLE I


                       DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR


                        CONTRACTING AUTHORITIES

    Sec. 412. In awarding a Federal contract with funds made 
available by this Act, notwithstanding Federal Government 
procurement and contracting laws, the Secretary of Agriculture 
and the Secretary of the Interior (the ``Secretaries'') may, in 
evaluating bids and proposals, through [fiscal year 2015,] 
fiscal year 2017, give consideration to local contractors who 
are from, and who provide employment and training for, 
dislocated and displaced workers in an economically 
disadvantaged rural community, including those historically 
timber-dependent areas that have been affected by reduced 
timber harvesting on Federal lands and other forest-dependent 
rural communities isolated from significant alternative 
employment opportunities: * * *
                                ------                                


                CONSOLIDATED APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2014, 
                           PUBLIC LAW 113-76


   DIVISION G--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, ENVIRONMENT, AND RELATED 
                   AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2014


                                TITLE I


                       DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR


                    OFFSHORE PAY AUTHORITY EXTENSION

    Sec. 117. For fiscal years 2014 [and 2015] through 2016, 
funds made available in this title for the Bureau of Ocean 
Energy Management and the Bureau of Safety and Environmental 
Enforcement may be used by the Secretary of the Interior to 
establish higher minimum rates of basic pay described in 
section 121(c) of division E of Public Law 112-74 (125 Stat. 
1012).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                         ONSHORE PAY AUTHORITY

    Sec. 123. For fiscal years 2014 [and 2015] through 2016, 
funds funds made available in this title for the Bureau of Land 
Management and the Bureau of Indian Affairs may be used by the 
Secretary of the Interior to establish higher minimum rates of 
basic pay for employees of the Department of the Interior 
carrying out the inspection and regulation of onshore oil and 
gas operations on public lands in the Petroleum Engineer (GS-
0881) and Petroleum Engineering Technician (G-0802) job series 
at grades 5 through 14 at rates no greater than 25 percent 
above the minimum rates of basic pay normally scheduled, and 
such higher rates shall be consistent with subsections (e) 
through (h) of section 5305 of title 5, United States Code.
                                ------                                


                       AGRICULTURAL ACT OF 2014, 
                           PUBLIC LAW 113-79


                          TITLE VIII--FORESTRY


       Subtitle C--Reauthorization of Other Forestry-Related Laws


SEC. 8206. GOOD NEIGHBOR AUTHORITY.

    (a) Definitions.--* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (b) Good Neighbor Agreements.--

            (1) Good Neighbor Agreements.--

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (2) Timber sales.--

                    (A) In general.--* * *

                    (B) Approval of silviculture prescriptions 
                and marking guides.--The Secretary shall 
                provide or approve all silviculture 
                prescriptions and marking guides to be applied 
                on Federal land in all timber sale projects 
                conductedunder this section.
                    (C) Forest development roads.--

                            (i) In general.--Notwithstanding 
                        subsection (a)(3)(B), existing roads 
                        shall be repaired or reconstructed to a 
                        satisfactory condition to perform 
                        authorized restoration services 
                        including removal of timber.
                                ------                                


               CARL LEVIN AND HOWARD P. ``BUCK'' MCKEON 
 NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIAZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2015, PUBLIC LAW 
                                113-291


            DIVISION B--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION AUTHORIZATIONS


        TITLE XXX--NATURAL RESOURCES RELATED GENERAL PROVISIONS


                       Subtitle J--Other Matters


SEC. 3096. PAYMENTS IN LIEU OF TAXES.

    For payments in lieu of taxes under chapter 69 of title 31, 
United States Code, which shall be available without further 
appropriation to the Secretary of the Interior--
            (1) $33,000,000 for fiscal year 2015; and
            (2) $37,000,000 for fiscal year 2015 to be 
        available for obligation and payment beginning on 
        October 1, 2015.

                        BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL


  PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS
                                                     AMENDED
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               Budget authority                 Outlays
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee    Amount  in     Committee    Amount  in
                                                           allocation       bill       allocation       bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with the subcommittee
 allocation for 2016: Subcommittee on Department of the
 Interior, environment, and related agencies:
    Mandatory...........................................           62            62            62         \1\62
    Discretionary.......................................       30,010        31,065        31,565     \1\32,601
        Security........................................  ............  ............           NA            NA
        Nonsecurity.....................................       30,010        31,065            NA            NA
    Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on         ............  ............  ............  ............
     Terrorism..........................................
Projections of outlays associated with the
 recommendation:
    2016................................................  ............  ............  ............    \2\21,027
    2017................................................  ............  ............  ............        5,965
    2018................................................  ............  ............  ............        2,396
    2019................................................  ............  ............  ............        1,014
    2020 and future years...............................  ............  ............  ............          543
Financial assistance to State and local governments forP           NA         5,406            NA         2,108
 2016...................................................
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
\2\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
 
NA: Not applicable.
 
NOTE.--Consistent with the funding recommended in the bill as an emergency requirement and in accordance with
  section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the BBEDCA of 1985, the Committee anticipates that the Budget Committee will
  provide a revised 302(a) allocation for the Committee on Appropriations reflecting an upward adjustment of
  $1,055,000,000 in budget authority plus associated outlays.


  COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET (OBLIGATIONAL) AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2015 AND BUDGET ESTIMATES AND AMOUNTS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL FOR FISCAL
                                                                        YEAR 2016
                                                                [In thousands of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                      Chairman's recommendation compared
                                                                                                                                 with (+ or -)
                             Item                                     2015         Budget estimate     Chairman's    -----------------------------------
                                                                  appropriation                      recommendation         2015
                                                                                                                        appropriation    Budget estimate
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
 
                   BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT
 
               Management of Lands and Resources
 
Land Resources:
    Soil, water and air management............................           43,239            46,755            42,735              -504            -4,020
    Rangeland management......................................           79,000            76,444            79,000   ................           +2,556
    Grazing administration management.........................  ................           16,500   ................  ................          -16,500
    Grazing administration management offsetting collections..  ................          -16,500   ................  ................          +16,500
    Forestry management.......................................            9,838             9,980             9,980              +142   ................
    Riparian management.......................................           21,321            22,784            21,321   ................           -1,463
    Cultural resources management.............................           15,131            17,206            15,131   ................           -2,075
    Wild horse and burro management...........................           77,245            80,555            80,245            +3,000              -310
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          245,774           253,724           248,412            +2,638            -5,312
 
Wildlife and Fisheries:
    Wildlife management.......................................           52,338            89,381            89,381           +37,043   ................
    Fisheries management......................................           12,530            12,685            12,530   ................             -155
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           64,868           102,066           101,911           +37,043              -155
 
Threatened and endangered species.............................           21,458            21,567            21,567              +109   ................
 
Recreation Management:
    Wilderness management.....................................           18,264            18,559            14,264            -4,000            -4,295
    Recreation resources management...........................           48,697            56,851            51,197            +2,500            -5,654
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           66,961            75,410            65,461            -1,500            -9,949
 
Energy and Minerals:
    Oil and gas management....................................           53,183            59,671            59,671            +6,488   ................
    Oil and gas permit processing.............................           32,500             7,125             7,125           -25,375   ................
    Oil and gas inspection and enforcement....................           41,126            48,000            48,000            +6,874   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Oil and gas...................................          126,809           114,796           114,796           -12,013   ................
 
    Oil and gas permit processing fees........................          -32,500   ................  ................          +32,500   ................
    Oil and gas inspection and enforcement fees...............  ................          -48,000   ................  ................          +48,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Offsetting collections........................          -32,500           -48,000   ................          +32,500           +48,000
 
    Coal management...........................................            9,595            10,868            10,868            +1,273   ................
    Other mineral resources...................................           10,586            11,879            11,879            +1,293   ................
    Renewable energy..........................................           29,061            29,356            26,000            -3,061            -3,356
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Energy and Minerals...........................          143,551           118,899           163,543           +19,992           +44,644
 
Realty and Ownership Management:
    Alaska conveyance.........................................           22,000            22,220            22,000   ................             -220
    Cadastral, lands, and realty management...................           45,658            51,252            45,658   ................           -5,594
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           67,658            73,472            67,658   ................           -5,814
 
Resource Protection and Maintenance:
    Resource management planning..............................           38,125            59,341            48,125           +10,000           -11,216
    Abandoned mine lands......................................           16,987            19,946            19,946            +2,959   ................
    Resource protection and law enforcement...................           25,325            25,495            24,325            -1,000            -1,170
    Hazardous materials management............................           15,612            15,786            15,612   ................             -174
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           96,049           120,568           108,008           +11,959           -12,560
 
Transportation and Facilities Maintenance:
    Annual maintenance........................................           38,637            38,942            38,942              +305   ................
    Deferred maintenance......................................           26,995            31,387            26,995   ................           -4,392
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           65,632            70,329            65,937              +305            -4,392
 
Workforce and Organizational Support:
    Administrative support....................................           47,127            50,942            47,127   ................           -3,815
    Bureauwide fixed costs....................................           91,010            93,645            91,010   ................           -2,635
    Information technology management.........................           25,696            25,958            25,696   ................             -262
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          163,833           170,545           163,833   ................           -6,712
 
Challenge cost share..........................................            2,413            12,416             2,413   ................          -10,003
National landscape conservation system, base program..........           31,819            48,470            36,819            +5,000           -11,651
Communication site management.................................            2,000             2,000             2,000   ................  ................
Offsetting collections........................................           -2,000            -2,000            -2,000   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Management of lands and resources.............          970,016         1,067,466         1,045,562           +75,546           -21,904
 
Mining Law Administration:
    Administration............................................           39,696            39,696            39,696   ................  ................
    Offsetting collections....................................          -57,000           -56,000           -56,000            +1,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Mining Law Administration.....................          -17,304           -16,304           -16,304            +1,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Management of Lands and Resources................          952,712         1,051,162         1,029,258           +76,546           -21,904
                                                               =========================================================================================
                       Land Acquisition
 
Land acquisition..............................................           14,226            30,384            12,306            -1,920           -18,078
Emergencies, hardships, and inholdings........................            1,616             1,616             1,616   ................  ................
Acquisition management........................................            1,904             2,000             2,000               +96   ................
Recreational access...........................................            2,000             4,000             3,000            +1,000            -1,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Land acquisition.................................           19,746            38,000            18,922              -824           -19,078
                                                               =========================================================================================
               Oregon and California Grant Lands
 
Western Oregon resources management...........................          101,423            95,255            93,255            -8,168            -2,000
Western Oregon information and resource data systems..........            1,772             1,786             1,772   ................              -14
Western Oregon transportation & facilities maintenance........            9,517             9,602             9,517   ................              -85
Western Oregon construction and acquisition...................              312               324               324               +12   ................
Western Oregon national monument..............................              753               767               753   ................              -14
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Oregon and California Grant Lands................          113,777           107,734           105,621            -8,156            -2,113
                                                               =========================================================================================
                      Range Improvements
 
Current appropriations........................................           10,000            10,000            10,000   ................  ................
 
          Service Charges, Deposits, and Forfeitures
 
Service charges, deposits, and forfeitures....................           32,465            31,050            31,050            -1,415   ................
Offsetting fees...............................................          -32,465           -31,050           -31,050            +1,415   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Service charges, deposits and forfeitures........  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
    Miscellaneous Trust Funds and Permanent Operating Funds
 
Current appropriations........................................           24,000            24,000            24,000   ................  ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT........................        1,120,235         1,230,896         1,187,801           +67,566           -43,095
                                                               =========================================================================================
            UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE
 
                      Resource Management
 
Ecological Services (Fiscal Year 2015 Structure):
    Endangered species:
        Candidate conservation................................           12,030   ................           14,150            +2,120           +14,150
        Listing and critical habitat..........................           20,515   ................           17,515            -3,000           +17,515
        Consultation and HCPs.................................           62,550   ................           62,550   ................          +62,550
        Recovery..............................................           77,916   ................           77,916   ................          +77,916
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal............................................          173,011   ................          172,131              -880          +172,131
 
    Habitat conservation:
        Partners for fish and wildlife........................           51,776   ................           52,103              +327           +52,103
        Conservation planning assistance......................           33,014   ................           32,767              -247           +32,767
        Coastal programs......................................           13,184   ................           13,293              +109           +13,293
        National wetlands inventory...........................            4,861   ................            4,861   ................           +4,861
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal............................................          102,835   ................          103,024              +189          +103,024
 
    Environmental contaminants................................            9,557   ................            9,557   ................           +9,557
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Ecological services.......................          285,403   ................          284,712              -691          +284,712
 
Ecological Services (Proposed Fiscal Year 2016 Structure):
    Listing...................................................  ................           23,002   ................  ................          -23,002
    Planning and consultation.................................  ................          108,943   ................  ................         -108,943
    Conservation and restoration..............................  ................          126,298   ................  ................         -126,298
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................  ................          258,243   ................  ................         -258,243
 
Habitat conservation (Proposed Fiscal Year 2016 Structure):
    Partners for fish and wildlife............................  ................           52,393   ................  ................          -52,393
    Coastal programs..........................................  ................           13,375   ................  ................          -13,375
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................  ................           65,768   ................  ................          -65,768
 
National Wildlife Refuge System:
    Wildlife and habitat management...........................          230,343           249,832           231,343            +1,000           -18,489
    Visitor services..........................................           70,319            76,792            73,743            +3,424            -3,049
    Refuge law enforcement....................................           38,054            38,959            36,054            -2,000            -2,905
    Conservation planning.....................................            2,988             2,665             2,580              -408               -85
    Refuge maintenance........................................          132,498           139,910           131,498            -1,000            -8,412
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          474,202           508,158           475,218            +1,016           -32,940
 
Conservation and Enforcement:
    Migratory bird management.................................           46,468            53,602            46,355              -113            -7,247
    Law enforcement...........................................           66,737            75,423            68,690            +1,953            -6,733
    International affairs.....................................           14,506            14,696            14,603               +97               -93
    Science support...........................................           16,985   ................  ................          -16,985   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          144,696           143,721           129,648           -15,048           -14,073
 
Fish and Aquatic Conservation:
    National fish hatchery system operations..................           52,860            53,418            53,418              +558   ................
    Maintenance and equipment.................................           17,920            19,920            19,920            +2,000   ................
    Aquatic habitat and species conservation..................           76,668            74,152            80,733            +4,065            +6,581
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          147,448           147,490           154,071            +6,623            +6,581
 
Cooperative landscape conservation............................           13,988            17,869             7,344            -6,644           -10,525
 
Science Support:
    Adaptive science..........................................  ................           15,159             5,724            +5,724            -9,435
    Service science...........................................  ................           16,516             6,468            +6,468           -10,048
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................  ................           31,675            12,192           +12,192           -19,483
 
General Operations:
    Central office operations.................................           39,985            42,257            40,312              +327            -1,945
    Regional office operations................................           37,722            41,798            37,344              -378            -4,454
    Servicewide bill paying...................................           35,227            35,898            34,130            -1,097            -1,768
    National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.....................            7,022             7,022             7,022   ................  ................
    National Conservation Training Center.....................           21,965            25,830            21,552              -413            -4,278
    Health benefits for seasonal employees....................  ................            1,103   ................  ................           -1,103
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          141,921           153,908           140,360            -1,561           -13,548
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Resource Management..............................        1,207,658         1,326,832         1,203,545            -4,113          -123,287
                                                               =========================================================================================
                         Construction
 
Construction and rehabilitation:
    Line item construction projects...........................            6,554            11,554            14,554            +8,000            +3,000
    Bridge and dam safety programs............................            1,972             1,972             1,972   ................  ................
    Nationwide engineering service............................            7,161             7,286             7,161   ................             -125
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Construction.....................................           15,687            20,812            23,687            +8,000            +2,875
                                                               =========================================================================================
                       Land Acquisition
 
Acquisitions..................................................           25,071            35,911            30,571            +5,500            -5,340
Emergencies, hardships, and inholdings........................            5,351             5,351             5,351   ................  ................
Exchanges.....................................................            1,500             1,500             1,500   ................  ................
Acquisition management........................................           12,613            12,773            10,000            -2,613            -2,773
Highlands Conservation Act Grants.............................            3,000   ................  ................           -3,000   ................
Recreational access...........................................  ................            2,500             1,000            +1,000            -1,500
Land protection planning......................................  ................              465               465              +465   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Land Acquisition.................................           47,535            58,500            48,887            +1,352            -9,613
                                                               =========================================================================================
       Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund
 
Grants and administration:
    Conservation grants.......................................           10,508            10,508            10,508   ................  ................
    HCP assistance grants.....................................            9,485             7,390             7,390            -2,095   ................
    Administration............................................            2,702             3,002             2,702   ................             -300
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           22,695            20,900            20,600            -2,095              -300
 
Land acquisition:
    Species recovery land acquisition.........................            9,462            11,162             7,640            -1,822            -3,522
    HCP land acquisition grants to states.....................           17,938            17,938            14,177            -3,761            -3,761
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           27,400            29,100            21,817            -5,583            -7,283
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Cooperatiave Endangered Species Conservation Fund           50,095            50,000            42,417            -7,678            -7,583
                                                               =========================================================================================
                 National Wildlife Refuge Fund
 
Payments in lieu of taxes.....................................           13,228   ................           13,228   ................          +13,228
 
           North American Wetlands Conservation Fund
 
North American Wetlands Conservation Fund.....................           34,145            34,145            35,145            +1,000            +1,000
 
            Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation
 
Migratory bird grants.........................................            3,660             4,160             3,660   ................             -500
 
            Multinational Species Conservation Fund
 
African elephant conservation fund............................            1,582             2,582             2,082              +500              -500
Rhinoceros and tiger conservation fund........................            2,440             3,440             2,940              +500              -500
Asian elephant conservation fund..............................            1,557             1,557             1,557   ................  ................
Great ape conservation fund...................................            1,975             1,975             1,975   ................  ................
Marine turtle conservation fund...............................            1,507             1,507             1,507   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Multinational Species Conservation Fund..........            9,061            11,061            10,061            +1,000            -1,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
               State and Tribal Wildlife Grants
 
State wildlife grants (formula)...............................           49,124            51,000            51,000            +1,876   ................
State wildlife grants (competitive)...........................            5,487            13,000             5,487   ................           -7,513
Tribal wildlife grants........................................            4,084             6,000             4,084   ................           -1,916
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, State and tribal wildlife grants.................           58,695            70,000            60,571            +1,876            -9,429
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE...................        1,439,764         1,575,510         1,441,201            +1,437          -134,309
                                                               =========================================================================================
                     NATIONAL PARK SERVICE
 
             Operation of the National Park System
 
Park Management:
    Resource stewardship......................................          317,207           351,242           318,707            +1,500           -32,535
    Visitor services..........................................          242,986           276,935           242,986   ................          -33,949
    Park protection...........................................          348,802           359,034           348,802   ................          -10,232
    Facility operations and maintenance.......................          697,312           848,944           727,312           +30,000          -121,632
    Park support..............................................          489,462           498,373           505,462           +16,000            +7,089
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................        2,095,769         2,334,528         2,143,269           +47,500          -191,259
 
External administrative costs.................................          180,004           180,603           180,004   ................             -599
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Operation of the National Park System............        2,275,773         2,515,131         2,323,273           +47,500          -191,858
                                                               =========================================================================================
             National Recreation and Preservation
 
Recreation programs...........................................              589               858               589   ................             -269
Natural programs..............................................           13,560            13,743            13,575               +15              -168
Cultural programs.............................................           24,562            25,502            24,562   ................             -940
International park affairs....................................            1,648             1,667             1,648   ................              -19
Environmental and compliance review...........................              433               440               433   ................               -7
Grant administration..........................................            2,004             2,037             2,004   ................              -33
Heritage Partnership Programs.................................           20,321             9,952            20,321   ................          +10,369
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Recreation and Preservation.............           63,117            54,199            63,132               +15            +8,933
                                                               =========================================================================================
                  Historic Preservation Fund
 
State historic preservation offices...........................           46,925            46,925            46,925   ................  ................
Tribal grants.................................................            8,985             9,985             8,985   ................           -1,000
Competitive grants............................................              500            30,500             5,500            +5,000           -25,000
New grants to Historically Black Colleges and Universities....  ................            2,500   ................  ................           -2,500
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Historic Preservation Fund.......................           56,410            89,910            61,410            +5,000           -28,500
                                                               =========================================================================================
                         Construction
 
General Program:
    Line item construction and maintenance....................           61,678           153,344           116,276           +54,598           -37,068
    Emergency and unscheduled.................................            3,855             3,855             3,855   ................  ................
    Housing...................................................            2,200             2,200             2,200   ................  ................
    Dam safety................................................            1,248             1,248             1,248   ................  ................
    Equipment replacement.....................................           13,500            13,500            13,500   ................  ................
    Planning, construction....................................            7,266            16,520             7,266   ................           -9,254
    Construction program management...........................           36,771            48,330            36,771   ................          -11,559
    General management plans..................................           11,821            11,970            11,821   ................             -149
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Construction.....................................          138,339           250,967           192,937           +54,598           -58,030
                                                               =========================================================================================
Land and Water Conservation Fund (rescission of contract                -28,000           -30,000           -28,000   ................           +2,000
 authority)...................................................
 
             Land Acquisition and State Assistance
 
Assistance to States:
    State conservation grants (formula).......................           42,000            45,000            48,883            +6,883            +3,883
    State conservation grants (competitive)...................            3,000             5,000             3,000   ................           -2,000
    Administrative expenses...................................            3,117             3,161             3,117   ................              -44
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           48,117            53,161            55,000            +6,883            +1,839
 
National Park Service:
    Acquisitions..............................................           23,475            34,818            25,740            +2,265            -9,078
    Recreational access.......................................  ................            2,000             1,000            +1,000            -1,000
    American Battlefield Protection Program...................            8,986             8,986             8,000              -986              -986
    Emergencies, hardships, relocations, and deficiencies.....            3,928             3,928             3,928   ................  ................
    Acquisition management....................................            9,526             9,679             7,679            -1,847            -2,000
    Inholdings, donations, and exchanges......................            4,928             4,928             4,928   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           50,843            64,339            51,275              +432           -13,064
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Land Acquisition and State Assistance............           98,960           117,500           106,275            +7,315           -11,225
                                                               =========================================================================================
Centennial Challenge..........................................           10,000            50,000            10,000   ................          -40,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, NATIONAL PARK SERVICE............................        2,614,599         3,047,707         2,729,027          +114,428          -318,680
                                                               =========================================================================================
                UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
 
             Surveys, Investigations, and Research
 
Ecosystems:
    Status and trends.........................................           20,473            22,178            20,473   ................           -1,705
    Fisheries: Aquatic and endangered resources...............           20,886            25,422            20,886   ................           -4,536
    Wildlife: Terrestrial and endangered resources............           45,257            46,671            45,757              +500              -914
    Terrestrial, freshwater and marine environments...........           36,224            42,755            36,224   ................           -6,531
    Invasive species..........................................           16,830            19,281            17,330              +500            -1,951
    Cooperative research units................................           17,371            19,992            17,371   ................           -2,621
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Ecosystems.......................................          157,041           176,299           158,041            +1,000           -18,258
                                                               =========================================================================================
Climate and Land Use Change:
    Climate variability:
        Climate science centers...............................           26,735            37,403            25,735            -1,000           -11,668
        Climate research and development......................           21,495            26,656            20,495            -1,000            -6,161
        Carbon sequestration..................................            9,359            18,513             8,859              -500            -9,654
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal............................................           57,589            82,572            55,089            -2,500           -27,483
 
    Land Use Change:
        Land remote sensing...................................           67,894            97,531            71,194            +3,300           -26,337
        Land change science...................................           10,492            11,725             9,692              -800            -2,033
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal............................................           78,386           109,256            80,886            +2,500           -28,370
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Total, Climate and Land Use Change..................          135,975           191,828           135,975   ................          -55,853
                                                               =========================================================================================
Energy, Minerals, and Environmental Health:
    Minerals resources........................................           45,931            47,717            49,371            +3,440            +1,654
    Energy resources..........................................           24,895            28,068            24,695              -200            -3,373
    Contaminant biology.......................................           10,197            12,070            10,197   ................           -1,873
    Toxic substances hydrology................................           11,248            15,447            11,248   ................           -4,199
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Energy, Minerals, and Environmental Health.......           92,271           103,302            95,511            +3,240            -7,791
                                                               =========================================================================================
Natural Hazards:
    Earthquake hazards........................................           59,503            57,952            59,803              +300            +1,851
    Volcano hazards...........................................           25,121            25,709            26,321            +1,200              +612
    Landslide hazards.........................................            3,485             4,039             3,485   ................             -554
    Global seismographic network..............................            4,853             9,799             6,453            +1,600            -3,346
    Geomagnetism..............................................            1,888             3,624             1,888   ................           -1,736
    Coastal and marine geology................................           40,336            45,230            40,336   ................           -4,894
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Natural Hazards..................................          135,186           146,353           138,286            +3,100            -8,067
                                                               =========================================================================================
Water Resources:
    Groundwater resources.....................................           11,348   ................  ................          -11,348   ................
    National water quality assessment.........................           59,459   ................  ................          -59,459   ................
    National streamflow information program...................           34,901   ................  ................          -34,901   ................
    Hydrologic research and development.......................           11,215   ................  ................          -11,215   ................
    Hydrologic networks and analysis..........................           30,134   ................  ................          -30,134   ................
    Cooperative Water Program.................................           57,710   ................  ................          -57,710   ................
    Water Availability and Use Science Program................  ................           46,758            41,182           +41,182            -5,576
    Groundwater and Streamflow Information Program............  ................           73,533            72,135           +72,135            -1,398
    National Water Quality Program............................  ................           96,087            92,791           +92,791            -3,296
    Water Resources Research Act Program......................            6,500             6,500             6,500   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Water Resources..................................          211,267           222,878           212,608            +1,341           -10,270
                                                               =========================================================================================
Core Science Systems:
    Science, synthesis, analysis, and research................           24,299            25,897            24,299   ................           -1,598
    National cooperative geological mapping...................           24,397            25,339            24,397   ................             -942
    National Geospatial Program...............................           58,532            75,731            63,354            +4,822           -12,377
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Core Science Systems.............................          107,228           126,967           112,050            +4,822           -14,917
                                                               =========================================================================================
Science Support:
    Administration and management.............................           84,192            90,599            84,192   ................           -6,407
    Information services......................................           21,419            22,229            21,419   ................             -810
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Science Support..................................          105,611           112,828           105,611   ................           -7,217
                                                               =========================================================================================
Facilities:
    Rental payments and operations & maintenance..............           93,141           107,047            93,141   ................          -13,906
    Deferred maintenance and capital improvement..............            7,280             7,280             7,280   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Facilities.......................................          100,421           114,327           100,421   ................          -13,906
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY..................        1,045,000         1,194,782         1,058,503           +13,503          -136,279
                                                               =========================================================================================
               BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT
 
                    Ocean Energy Management
 
Renewable energy..............................................           23,104            24,278            24,278            +1,174   ................
Conventional energy...........................................           49,633            59,869            59,869           +10,236   ................
Environmental assessment......................................           65,712            68,045            68,045            +2,333   ................
General support services......................................           15,002   ................  ................          -15,002   ................
Executive direction...........................................           16,319            18,665            18,665            +2,346   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          169,770           170,857           170,857            +1,087   ................
 
Offsetting rental receipts....................................          -94,868           -92,961           -92,961            +1,907   ................
Cost recovery fees............................................           -2,480            -3,661            -3,661            -1,181   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, offsetting collections........................          -97,348           -96,622           -96,622              +726   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT................           72,422            74,235            74,235            +1,813   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
        BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT
 
         Offshore Safety and Environmental Enforcement
 
Environmental enforcement.....................................            8,314   ................  ................           -8,314   ................
Operations, safety and regulation.............................          133,597           151,768           151,768           +18,171   ................
Administrative operations.....................................           15,676            18,268            18,268            +2,592   ................
General support services......................................           13,912   ................  ................          -13,912   ................
Executive direction...........................................           18,227            19,736            19,736            +1,509   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          189,726           189,772           189,772               +46   ................
 
Offsetting rental receipts....................................          -50,412           -49,399           -49,399            +1,013   ................
Inspection fees...............................................          -65,000           -65,000           -59,000            +6,000            +6,000
Cost recovery fees............................................           -8,167            -7,808            -7,808              +359   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Offsetting collections........................         -123,579          -122,207          -116,207            +7,372            +6,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Offshore Safety and Environmental Enforcement....           66,147            67,565            73,565            +7,418            +6,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
                      Oil Spill Research
 
Oil spill research............................................           14,899            14,899            14,899   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT...           81,046            82,464            88,464            +7,418            +6,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
     OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT
 
                   Regulation and Technology
 
Environmental protection......................................           91,832            91,880            92,032              +200              +152
    Permit fees...............................................               40             1,900                40   ................           -1,860
    Offsetting collections....................................              -40            -1,900               -40   ................           +1,860
Technology development and transfer...........................           14,455            20,086            14,546               +91            -5,540
Financial management..........................................              505               711               508                +3              -203
Executive direction...........................................           15,921            15,711            15,661              -260               -50
 
Civil penalties (indefinite)..................................              100               100               100   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          122,813           128,488           122,847               +34            -5,641
 
Civil penalties (offsetting collections)......................             -100              -100              -100   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Regulation and Technology........................          122,713           128,388           122,747               +34            -5,641
                                                               =========================================================================================
                Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fund
 
Environmental restoration.....................................            9,480            11,431             9,533               +53            -1,898
Technology development and transfer...........................            3,544             6,283             3,563               +19            -2,720
Financial management..........................................            6,396             6,477             6,436               +40               -41
Executive direction...........................................            7,979             7,883             7,856              -123               -27
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fund..................           27,399            32,074            27,388               -11            -4,686
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND                   150,112           160,462           150,135               +23           -10,327
       ENFORCEMENT............................................
                                                               =========================================================================================
    BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS AND BUREAU OF INDIAN EDUCATION
 
                 Operation of Indian Programs
 
                     Tribal Budget System
 
Tribal Government:
    Aid to tribal government..................................           24,614            24,833            24,833              +219   ................
    Consolidated tribal government program....................           76,348            77,088            77,088              +740   ................
    Self governance compacts..................................          158,767           162,321           162,321            +3,554   ................
    Contract support..........................................          246,000           272,000   ................         -246,000          -272,000
    Indian self determination fund............................            5,000             5,000   ................           -5,000            -5,000
    New tribes................................................              463               464               464                +1   ................
    Small and needy tribes....................................            1,845             3,095             1,845   ................           -1,250
    Road maintenance..........................................           26,461            26,693            26,693              +232   ................
    Tribal government program oversight.......................            8,181            12,273             8,273               +92            -4,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          547,679           583,767           301,517          -246,162          -282,250
 
Human Services:
    Social services...........................................           40,871            47,179            44,179            +3,308            -3,000
    Welfare assistance........................................           74,809            74,791            74,791               -18   ................
    Indian child welfare act..................................           15,433            15,641            15,641              +208   ................
    Housing improvement program...............................            8,009             8,021             8,021               +12   ................
    Human services tribal design..............................              407               246               246              -161   ................
    Human services program oversight..........................            3,105             3,126             3,126               +21   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          142,634           149,004           146,004            +3,370            -3,000
 
Trust--Natural Resources Management:
    Natural resources, general................................            5,089             8,168             5,168               +79            -3,000
    Irrigation operations and maintenance.....................           11,359            12,898            11,398               +39            -1,500
    Rights protection implementation..........................           35,420            40,138            37,638            +2,218            -2,500
    Tribal management/development program.....................            9,244            14,263             9,263               +19            -5,000
    Endangered species........................................            2,675             3,684             2,684                +9            -1,000
    Cooperative landscape conservation........................            9,948            30,355             9,955                +7           -20,400
    Integrated resource information program...................            2,996             3,996             2,996   ................           -1,000
    Agriculture and range.....................................           30,494            30,751            30,751              +257   ................
    Forestry..................................................           47,735            51,914            49,914            +2,179            -2,000
    Water resources...........................................           10,297            14,917            10,367               +70            -4,550
    Fish, wildlife and parks..................................           13,577            15,646            13,646               +69            -2,000
    Resource management program oversight.....................            6,018             6,066             6,066               +48   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          184,852           232,796           189,846            +4,994           -42,950
 
Trust--Real Estate Services...................................          127,002           143,686           127,486              +484           -16,200
 
Education:
    Elementary and secondary programs (forward funded)........          536,897           565,517           542,577            +5,680           -22,940
      (Tribal grant support costs)............................          (62,395)          (75,335)          (64,395)          (+2,000)         (-10,940)
    Post secondary programs (forward funded)..................           69,793            69,793            74,793            +5,000            +5,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, forward funded education......................          606,690           635,310           617,370           +10,680           -17,940
 
    Elementary and secondary programs.........................          119,195           142,361           122,361            +3,166           -20,000
    Post secondary programs...................................           64,182            69,412            64,602              +420            -4,810
    Education management......................................           20,464            57,381            20,601              +137           -36,780
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Education.....................................          810,531           904,464           824,934           +14,403           -79,530
 
Public Safety and Justice:
    Law enforcement...........................................          328,296           334,976           347,958           +19,662           +12,982
    Tribal courts.............................................           23,280            28,173            28,173            +4,893   ................
    Fire protection...........................................            1,274             1,274             1,274   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          352,850           364,423           377,405           +24,555           +12,982
 
Community and economic development............................           35,996            40,619            36,119              +123            -4,500
Executive direction and administrative services...............          227,692           241,832           229,108            +1,416           -12,724
(Housing improvement, road maint, etc. in bill lang)..........          (48,553)          (46,663)          (43,810)          (-4,743)          (-2,853)
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Operation of Indian Programs.....................        2,429,236         2,660,591         2,232,419          -196,817          -428,172
                                                               =========================================================================================
                    Contract Support Costs
 
Contract support cost.........................................  ................  ................          272,000          +272,000          +272,000
Indian Self-determination fund................................  ................  ................            5,000            +5,000            +5,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Contract Support Cost............................  ................  ................          277,000          +277,000          +277,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
                         Construction
 
Education.....................................................           74,501           133,245            79,476            +4,975           -53,769
Public safety and justice.....................................           11,306            11,306            11,306   ................  ................
Resources management..........................................           34,427            34,488            34,488               +61   ................
General administration........................................            8,642             9,934             9,934            +1,292   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Construction.....................................          128,876           188,973           135,204            +6,328           -53,769
                                                               =========================================================================================
   Indian Land and Water Claim Settlements and Miscellaneous
                      Payments to Indians
 
Water Claim Settlements and Miscellaneous Payments to Indians.           35,655            67,656            40,655            +5,000           -27,001
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Indian Land and Water Claim Settlements and                 35,655            67,656            40,655            +5,000           -27,001
       Miscellaneous Payments to Indians......................
                                                               =========================================================================================
            Indian Guaranteed Loan Program Account
 
Indian guaranteed loan program account........................            7,731             7,748             7,748               +17   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS AND INDIAN EDUCATION....        2,601,498         2,924,968         2,693,026           +91,528          -231,942
                                                               =========================================================================================
                     DEPARTMENTAL OFFICES
 
                    Office of the Secretary
 
Leadership and administration.................................          122,885           128,256           122,885   ................           -5,371
Management services...........................................           20,747            20,966            20,747   ................             -219
New Coastal Resilience Fund...................................  ................           50,000   ................  ................          -50,000
Office of Natural Resources Revenue...........................          121,631           128,717           121,631   ................           -7,086
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of the Secretary..........................          265,263           327,939           265,263   ................          -62,676
                                                               =========================================================================================
                        Insular Affairs
 
                   Assistance to Territories
 
Territorial Assistance:
    Office of Insular Affairs.................................            9,448            10,184             9,448   ................             -736
    Technical assistance......................................           14,504            24,239            14,504   ................           -9,735
    Maintenance assistance fund...............................            1,081             5,000             1,081   ................           -3,919
    Brown tree snake..........................................            3,500             3,000             3,500   ................             +500
    Coral reef initiative.....................................            1,000             1,000             1,000   ................  ................
    Empowering insular communities............................            2,971             4,421             2,971   ................           -1,450
    Compact impact............................................            3,000             1,344             3,000   ................           +1,656
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Territorial Assistance........................           35,504            49,188            35,504   ................          -13,684
 
American Samoa operations grants..............................           22,752            22,752            22,752   ................  ................
Northern Marianas covenant grants.............................           27,720            27,720            27,720   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Assistance to Territories........................           85,976            99,660            85,976   ................          -13,684
                                                               =========================================================================================
 
                  Compact of Free Association
 
Compact of Free Association--Federal services.................            2,818             2,818             2,818   ................  ................
Enewetak support..............................................              500               500               500   ................  ................
Compact payments, Palau.......................................           13,147   ................           13,147   ................          +13,147
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Compact of Free Association......................           16,465             3,318            16,465   ................          +13,147
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Insular Affairs..................................          102,441           102,978           102,441   ................             -537
                                                               =========================================================================================
                    Office of the Solicitor
 
Legal services................................................           59,091            63,167            57,091            -2,000            -6,076
General administration........................................            4,971             4,982             4,971   ................              -11
Ethics........................................................            1,738             1,739             1,738   ................               -1
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of the Solicitor..........................           65,800            69,888            63,800            -2,000            -6,088
                                                               =========================================================================================
                  Office of Inspector General
 
Audit and investigations......................................           37,538            39,503            37,538   ................           -1,965
Administrative services and information management............           12,509            12,721            12,509   ................             -212
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of Inspector General......................           50,047            52,224            50,047   ................           -2,177
                                                               =========================================================================================
        Office of Special Trustee for American Indians
 
                    Federal Trust Programs
 
Program operations, support, and improvements.................          136,998           140,938           136,998   ................           -3,940
    (Office of Historical Accounting).........................          (23,061)          (22,120)          (22,120)            (-941)  ................
Executive direction...........................................            2,031             2,040             2,031   ................               -9
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of Special Trustee for American Indians...          139,029           142,978           139,029   ................           -3,949
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, DEPARTMENTAL OFFICES.............................          622,580           696,007           620,580            -2,000           -75,427
                                                               =========================================================================================
                   DEPARTMENT-WIDE PROGRAMS
 
                   Wildland Fire Management
 
Fire Operations:
    Preparedness..............................................          318,970           323,685           323,685            +4,715   ................
    Fire suppression operations...............................          291,657           268,571           383,673           +92,016          +115,102
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Fire operations...............................          610,627           592,256           707,358           +96,731          +115,102
 
Other Operations:
    Fuels management..........................................          164,000           148,279           170,000            +6,000           +21,721
    Resilient landscapes......................................  ................           30,000   ................  ................          -30,000
    Burned area rehabilitation................................           18,035            18,970            18,970              +935   ................
    Fire facilities...........................................            6,127            10,000             6,427              +300            -3,573
    Joint fire science........................................            5,990             5,990             5,990   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Other operations..............................          194,152           213,239           201,387            +7,235           -11,852
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Wildland fire management......................          804,779           805,495           908,745          +103,966          +103,250
 
Wildland fire management (emergency)..........................  ................  ................          200,000          +200,000          +200,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Wildland fire management.........................          804,779           805,495         1,108,745          +303,966          +303,250
                                                               =========================================================================================
          FLAME Wildfire Suppression Reserve Account
 
FLAME wildfire suppression reserve account....................           92,000   ................  ................          -92,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, All wildland fire accounts.......................          896,779           805,495         1,108,745          +211,966          +303,250
                                                               =========================================================================================
Wildland fire disaster relief.................................  ................          200,000   ................  ................         -200,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Wildland Fire Management.........................          896,779         1,005,495         1,108,745          +211,966          +103,250
                                                               =========================================================================================
               Central Hazardous Materials Fund
 
Central hazardous materials fund..............................           10,010            10,011            10,011                +1   ................
 
            Natural Resource Damage Assessment Fund
 
Damage assessments............................................            2,500             2,063             2,500   ................             +437
Program management............................................            2,192             2,466             2,192   ................             -274
Restoration support...........................................            2,075             3,607             2,075   ................           -1,532
Oil Spill Preparedness........................................            1,000             1,100             1,000   ................             -100
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Natural Resource Damage Assessment Fund..........            7,767             9,236             7,767   ................           -1,469
                                                               =========================================================================================
Working Capital Fund..........................................           57,100            74,462            57,100   ................          -17,362
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, DEPARTMENT-WIDE PROGRAMS.........................          971,656         1,099,204         1,183,623          +211,967           +84,419
          Appropriations......................................         (971,656)         (899,204)         (983,623)         (+11,967)         (+84,419)
          Emergency appropriations............................  ................  ................         (200,000)        (+200,000)        (+200,000)
          Disaster relief cap adjustment......................  ................         (200,000)  ................  ................        (-200,000)
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, TITLE I, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR..............       10,718,912        12,086,235        11,226,595          +507,683          -859,640
          Appropriations......................................      (10,746,912)      (12,116,235)      (11,054,595)        (+307,683)      (-1,061,640)
          Rescissions of contract authority...................         (-28,000)         (-30,000)         (-28,000)  ................          (+2,000)
          Emergency appropriations............................  ................  ................         (200,000)        (+200,000)        (+200,000)
      (Disaster relief cap adjustment)........................  ................         (200,000)  ................  ................        (-200,000)
                                                               =========================================================================================
           TITLE II--ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
 
                    Science and Technology
 
Clean air and climate.........................................          116,541           124,844           105,982           -10,559           -18,862
    (Climate protection program)..............................           (8,018)           (8,124)           (7,973)             (-45)            (-151)
 
Enforcement...................................................           13,669            14,398            13,669   ................             -729
Homeland security.............................................           37,122            38,150            36,285              -837            -1,865
Indoor air and radiation......................................            5,997             6,615             6,255              +258              -360
IT/data management/security...................................            3,089             3,196             3,196              +107   ................
Operations and administration.................................           68,339            79,170            68,339   ................          -10,831
Pesticide licensing...........................................            6,027             7,691             6,054               +27            -1,637
Research: Air, climate and energy.............................           91,906           100,342            90,400            -1,506            -9,942
Research: Chemical safety and sustainability..................          126,930           140,722           125,948              -982           -14,774
    (Research: Computational toxicology)......................          (21,409)          (33,775)          (21,409)  ................         (-12,366)
    (Research: Endocrine disruptor)...........................          (16,253)          (15,417)          (15,417)            (-836)  ................
 
Research: National priorities.................................            4,100   ................            4,100   ................           +4,100
Research: Safe and sustainable water resources................          107,434           111,022           104,912            -2,522            -6,110
Research: Sustainable and healthy communities.................          149,975           139,172           135,110           -14,865            -4,062
Water: Human health protection................................            3,519             3,766             3,708              +189               -58
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Science and Technology...........................          734,648           769,088           703,958           -30,690           -65,130
          (By transfer from Superfund)........................          (18,850)          (16,217)          (16,217)          (-2,633)  ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
             Environmental Programs and Management
 
Brownfields...................................................           25,593            29,599            27,562            +1,969            -2,037
 
Clean air and climate.........................................          273,108           336,907           248,590           -24,518           -88,317
    (Climate protection program)..............................          (95,436)         (109,625)          (85,892)          (-9,544)         (-23,733)
 
Compliance....................................................          101,665           122,424           101,665   ................          -20,759
 
Enforcement...................................................          240,637           269,256           233,178            -7,459           -36,078
    (Environmental justice)...................................           (6,737)          (13,971)           (6,636)            (-101)          (-7,335)
 
Environmental protection: National priorities.................           12,700   ................           15,000            +2,300           +15,000
 
Geographic programs:
    Great Lakes Restoration Initiative........................          300,000           250,000           300,000   ................          +50,000
    Chesapeake Bay............................................           73,000            70,000            73,000   ................           +3,000
    San Franciso Bay..........................................            4,819             3,988             4,819   ................             +831
    Puget Sound...............................................           28,000            29,998            29,998            +1,998   ................
    Long Island Sound.........................................            3,940             2,893             3,940   ................           +1,047
    Gulf of Mexico............................................            4,482             3,908             8,110            +3,628            +4,202
    South Florida.............................................            1,704             1,340             1,340              -364   ................
    Lake Champlain............................................            4,399             1,399             4,399   ................           +3,000
    Lake Pontchartrain........................................              948               948               948   ................  ................
    Southern New England estuaries............................            5,000             5,000             5,000   ................  ................
    Other geographic activities...............................            1,445               939               939              -506   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          427,737           370,413           432,493            +4,756           +62,080
 
Homeland security.............................................           10,195            10,274             9,738              -457              -536
Indoor air and radiation......................................           27,637            30,277            28,255              +618            -2,022
Information exchange/Outreach.................................          126,538           155,678           121,004            -5,534           -34,674
    (Children and other sensitive populations: Agency                    (6,548)           (8,035)           (7,088)            (+540)            (-947)
     coordination)............................................
    (Environmental education).................................           (8,702)          (10,969)           (4,351)          (-4,351)          (-6,618)
 
International programs........................................           15,400            16,561            16,373              +973              -188
IT/data management/security...................................           90,536           103,061            90,536   ................          -12,525
Legal/science/regulatory/economic review......................          111,414           138,786           104,291            -7,123           -34,495
Operations and administration.................................          482,751           505,402           478,090            -4,661           -27,312
Pesticide licensing...........................................          102,363           111,765           105,304            +2,941            -6,461
Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).................          104,877           111,242           108,827            +3,950            -2,415
Toxics risk review and prevention.............................           92,521            87,705            88,764            -3,757            +1,059
    (Endocrine disruptors)....................................           (7,553)           (4,259)           (4,259)          (-3,294)  ................
 
Underground storage tanks (LUST/UST)..........................           11,295            11,657            11,295   ................             -362
 
Water: Ecosystems:
    National estuary program/Coastal waterways................           26,723            27,310            27,310              +587   ................
    Wetlands..................................................           21,065            23,334            20,478              -587            -2,856
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           47,788            50,644            47,788   ................           -2,856
 
Water: Human health protection................................           98,507           125,768            97,454            -1,053           -28,314
Water quality protection......................................          210,417           254,299           195,291           -15,126           -59,008
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Environmental Programs and Management............        2,613,679         2,841,718         2,561,498           -52,181          -280,220
                                                               =========================================================================================
        Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest System Fund
 
E-Manifest System Fund........................................            3,674             7,368             3,786              +112            -3,582
 
                  Office of Inspector General
 
Audits, evaluations, and investigations.......................           41,489            50,099            41,489   ................           -8,610
    (By transfer from Superfund)..............................           (9,939)           (8,459)           (8,459)          (-1,480)  ................
 
                   Buildings and Facilities
 
Homeland security: Protection of EPA personnel and                        6,676             7,875             6,676   ................           -1,199
 infrastructure...............................................
Operations and administration.................................           35,641            43,632            35,641   ................           -7,991
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Buildings and Facilities.........................           42,317            51,507            42,317   ................           -9,190
                                                               =========================================================================================
                 Hazardous Substance Superfund
 
Audits, evaluations, and investigations.......................            9,939             8,459             8,459            -1,480   ................
Compliance....................................................              995             1,067             1,009               +14               -58
Enforcement...................................................          166,375           173,263           166,176              -199            -7,087
Homeland security.............................................           36,362            33,767            33,751            -2,611               -16
Indoor air and radiation......................................            1,985             2,180             2,065               +80              -115
Information exchange/outreach.................................            1,328             1,366             1,238               -90              -128
IT/data management/security...................................           14,485            15,642            15,198              +713              -444
Legal/science/regulatory/economic review......................            1,253             1,241             1,241               -12   ................
Operations and administration.................................          128,105           137,340           130,014            +1,909            -7,326
Research: Chemical safety and sustainability..................            2,843             2,831             2,831               -12   ................
Research: Sustainable communities.............................           14,032            12,220            12,220            -1,812   ................
 
Superfund cleanup:
    Superfund: Emergency response and removal.................          181,306           190,732           182,480            +1,174            -8,252
    Superfund: Emergency preparedness.........................            7,636             7,843             7,843              +207   ................
    Superfund: Federal facilities.............................           21,125            26,265            21,669              +544            -4,596
    Superfund: Remedial.......................................          501,000           539,618           520,615           +19,615           -19,003
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          711,067           764,458           732,607           +21,540           -31,851
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Hazardous Substance Superfund....................        1,088,769         1,153,834         1,106,809           +18,040           -47,025
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund [LUST]
 
Enforcement...................................................              620               627               627                +7   ................
Operations and administration.................................            1,352             1,681             1,351                -1              -330
Research: Sustainable communities.............................              320               348               327                +7               -21
Underground storage tanks (LUST/UST)..........................           89,649            92,670            89,180              -469            -3,490
    (LUST/UST)................................................           (9,240)           (9,409)           (9,409)            (+169)  ................
    (LUST cooperative agreements).............................          (55,040)          (54,402)          (54,402)            (-638)  ................
    (Energy Policy Act grants)................................          (25,369)          (28,859)          (25,369)  ................          (-3,490)
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund......           91,941            95,326            91,485              -456            -3,841
                                                               =========================================================================================
                   Inland Oil Spill Program
                 (Formerly Oil Spill Response)
 
Compliance....................................................              139               155               148                +9                -7
Enforcement...................................................            2,413             2,424             2,424               +11   ................
Oil...........................................................           14,409            18,524            14,409   ................           -4,115
Operations and administration.................................              584             1,762               584   ................           -1,178
Research: Sustainable communities.............................              664               513               513              -151   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Inland Oil Spill Program.........................           18,209            23,378            18,078              -131            -5,300
                                                               =========================================================================================
           State and Tribal Assistance Grants [STAG]
 
Alaska Native villages........................................           10,000            10,000            20,000           +10,000           +10,000
Brownfields projects..........................................           80,000           110,000            80,000   ................          -30,000
Clean water state revolving fund [SRF]........................        1,448,887         1,116,000         1,047,000          -401,887           -69,000
Diesel emissions grants.......................................           30,000            10,000            20,000           -10,000           +10,000
Drinking water state revolving fund [SRF].....................          906,896         1,186,000           775,896          -131,000          -410,104
Mexico border.................................................            5,000             5,000            10,000            +5,000            +5,000
Targeted airshed grants.......................................           10,000   ................           15,000            +5,000           +15,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Infrastructure assistance grants..............        2,490,783         2,437,000         1,967,896          -522,887          -469,104
 
Categorical grants:
    Beaches protection........................................            9,549   ................            9,549   ................           +9,549
    Brownfields...............................................           47,745            49,500            47,745   ................           -1,755
    Environmental information.................................            9,646            25,346             9,646   ................          -15,700
    Hazardous waste financial assistance......................           99,693            99,693            99,693   ................  ................
    Lead......................................................           14,049            14,049            14,049   ................  ................
    Nonpoint source (Sec. 319)................................          159,252           164,915           164,915            +5,663   ................
    Pesticides enforcement....................................           18,050            18,050            18,050   ................  ................
    Pesticides program implementation.........................           12,701            13,201            12,701   ................             -500
    Pollution control (Sec. 106)..............................          230,806           249,164           230,806   ................          -18,358
    (Water quality monitoring)................................          (17,848)          (18,500)          (17,848)  ................            (-652)
    Pollution prevention......................................            4,765             4,765             4,765   ................  ................
    Public water system supervision...........................          101,963           109,700           101,963   ................           -7,737
    Radon.....................................................            8,051   ................            8,051   ................           +8,051
    State and local air quality management....................          228,219           268,229           228,219   ................          -40,010
    Toxics substances compliance..............................            4,919             4,919             4,919   ................  ................
    Tribal air quality management.............................           12,829            12,829            12,829   ................  ................
    Tribal general assistance program.........................           65,476            96,375            65,476   ................          -30,899
    Underground injection control (UIC).......................           10,506            10,506            10,506   ................  ................
    Underground storage tanks.................................            1,498             1,498             1,498   ................  ................
    Wetlands program development..............................           14,661            19,661            14,661   ................           -5,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Categorical grants............................        1,054,378         1,162,400         1,060,041            +5,663          -102,359
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, State and Tribal Assistance Grants...............        3,545,161         3,599,400         3,027,937          -517,224          -571,463
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Subtotal, ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...............        8,179,887         8,591,718         7,597,357          -582,530          -994,361
 
                   Administrative Provisions
 
Rescission....................................................          -40,000   ................  ................          +40,000   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, TITLE II, ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY........        8,139,887         8,591,718         7,597,357          -542,530          -994,361
          Appropriations......................................       (8,179,887)       (8,591,718)       (7,597,357)        (-582,530)        (-994,361)
          Rescissions.........................................         (-40,000)  ................  ................         (+40,000)  ................
      (By transfer)...........................................          (28,789)          (24,676)          (24,676)          (-4,113)  ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
                  TITLE III--RELATED AGENCIES
 
                   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
 
                        FOREST SERVICE
 
                 Forest and Rangeland Research
 
Forest inventory and analysis.................................           70,000            83,000            80,000           +10,000            -3,000
Research and development programs.............................          226,000           208,982           211,904           -14,096            +2,922
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Forest and rangeland research....................          296,000           291,982           291,904            -4,096               -78
                                                               =========================================================================================
                  State and Private Forestry
 
Landscape scale restoration...................................           14,000            23,513            12,000            -2,000           -11,513
 
Forest Health Management:
    Federal lands forest health management....................           58,922            58,998            58,750              -172              -248
    Cooperative lands forest health management................           45,655            40,678            39,844            -5,811              -834
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          104,577            99,676            98,594            -5,983            -1,082
 
Cooperative Forestry:
    Forest stewardship........................................           23,036            23,049            22,575              -461              -474
    Forest legacy.............................................           53,000            61,000            59,800            +6,800            -1,200
    Community forest and open space conservation..............            2,000             1,683             2,000   ................             +317
    Urban and community forestry..............................           28,040            23,686            23,686            -4,354   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Cooperative Forestry..........................          106,076           109,418           108,061            +1,985            -1,357
 
International forestry........................................            8,000             4,004             8,000   ................           +3,996
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, State and Private Forestry.......................          232,653           236,611           226,655            -5,998            -9,956
                                                               =========================================================================================
                    National Forest System
 
Integrated resource restoration...............................  ................          822,110   ................  ................         -822,110
Land management planning......................................           37,754   ................           36,998              -756           +36,998
Inventory and monitoring......................................          151,019   ................          147,998            -3,021          +147,998
Land management planning, assessment and monitoring...........  ................          184,236   ................  ................         -184,236
Recreation, heritage and wilderness...........................          261,719           263,942           261,719   ................           -2,223
Grazing management............................................           55,356            49,706            56,856            +1,500            +7,150
Forest products...............................................          339,130   ................          359,805           +20,675          +359,805
Vegetation and watershed management...........................          184,716   ................          190,116            +5,400          +190,116
Wildlife and fish habitat management..........................          140,466   ................          140,466   ................         +140,466
Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Fund...............           40,000            60,000            40,000   ................          -20,000
Minerals and geology management...............................           76,423            70,689            78,423            +2,000            +7,734
Landownership management......................................           77,730            71,601            77,730   ................           +6,129
Law enforcement operations....................................          126,653           126,030           126,653   ................             +623
Valles Caldera National Preserve..............................            3,364   ................  ................           -3,364   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Forest System...........................        1,494,330         1,648,314         1,516,764           +22,434          -131,550
                                                               =========================================================================================
              Capital Improvement and Maintenance
 
Facilities:
    Maintenance...............................................           55,369            55,674            55,369   ................             -305
    Construction..............................................           16,231            16,021            16,021              -210   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           71,600            71,695            71,390              -210              -305
 
Roads:
    Maintenance...............................................          143,454           129,580           154,454           +11,000           +24,874
    Construction..............................................           24,640            24,682            26,640            +2,000            +1,958
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          168,094           154,262           181,094           +13,000           +26,832
 
Trails:
    Maintenance...............................................           69,777            74,264            70,830            +1,053            -3,434
    Construction..............................................            7,753             8,252             6,700            -1,053            -1,552
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           77,530            82,516            77,530   ................           -4,986
 
Deferred maintenance..........................................            3,150            33,451             3,150   ................          -30,301
Legacy road and trail remediation.............................           40,000   ................           25,000           -15,000           +25,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Capital improvement and maintenance...........          360,374           341,924           358,164            -2,210           +16,240
 
Deferral of road and trail fund payment.......................          -17,000           -17,000           -16,000            +1,000            +1,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Capital improvement and maintenance..............          343,374           324,924           342,164            -1,210           +17,240
                                                               =========================================================================================
                       Land Acquisition
 
Acquisitions..................................................           36,000            47,250            25,690           -10,310           -21,560
Acquisition management........................................            7,500             8,500             7,500   ................           -1,000
Cash equalization.............................................              500               250               250              -250   ................
Recreational access...........................................            2,000             5,000             3,000            +1,000            -2,000
Critical inholdings/wilderness................................            1,500             2,000             2,000              +500   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Land Acquisition.................................           47,500            63,000            38,440            -9,060           -24,560
                                                               =========================================================================================
Acquisition of land for national forests, special acts........              950             1,950               950   ................           -1,000
Acquisition of lands to complete land exchanges...............              216               216               216   ................  ................
Range betterment fund.........................................            2,320             2,320             2,320   ................  ................
Gifts, donations and bequests for forest and rangeland                       45                45                45   ................  ................
 research.....................................................
Management of national forest lands for subsistence uses......            2,500             2,441             2,500   ................              +59
 
                   Wildland Fire Management
 
Fire operations:
    Wildland fire preparedness................................        1,145,840         1,082,620         1,082,620           -63,220   ................
    Wildland fire suppression operations......................          708,000           794,534         1,126,000          +418,000          +331,466
        Wildland fire management (emergency)..................  ................  ................          854,578          +854,578          +854,578
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Fire operations...........................        1,853,840         1,877,154         3,063,198        +1,209,358        +1,186,044
 
Other operations:
    Hazardous fuels...........................................          361,749           359,126           375,000           +13,251           +15,874
        (Hazardous Fuels Base Program)........................         (346,749)         (344,126)         (360,000)         (+13,251)         (+15,874)
        (Biomass Grants)......................................          (15,000)          (15,000)          (15,000)  ................  ................
    Fire plan research and development........................           19,795            19,820            19,795   ................              -25
    Joint fire sciences program...............................            6,914             6,917             6,914   ................               -3
    State fire assistance.....................................           78,000            78,012            78,012               +12   ................
    Volunteer fire assistance.................................           13,000            13,000            13,000   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Other operations..............................          479,458           476,875           492,721           +13,263           +15,846
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Wildland Fire Management......................        2,333,298         2,354,029         3,555,919        +1,222,621        +1,201,890
 
          FLAME Wildfire Suppression Reserve Account
 
FLAME wildfire suppression reserve account....................          303,060   ................  ................         -303,060   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, All wildland fire accounts.......................        2,636,358         2,354,029         3,555,919          +919,561        +1,201,890
                                                               =========================================================================================
Wildland fire disaster relief.................................  ................          854,578   ................  ................         -854,578
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Wildland Fire Management.........................        2,636,358         3,208,607         3,555,919          +919,561          +347,312
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, Forest Service without Wildland Fire Management..        2,419,888         2,571,803         2,421,958            +2,070          -149,845
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, FOREST SERVICE...................................        5,056,246         5,780,410         5,977,877          +921,631          +197,467
          Appropriations......................................       (5,056,246)       (4,925,832)       (5,123,299)         (+67,053)        (+197,467)
          Emergency appropriations............................  ................  ................         (854,578)        (+854,578)        (+854,578)
          Disaster Relief cap adjustment......................  ................         (854,578)  ................  ................        (-854,578)
                                                               =========================================================================================
            DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
 
                     INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE
 
                    Indian Health Services
 
Clinical Services:
    Hospital and health clinics...............................        1,836,789         1,936,323         1,846,076            +9,287           -90,247
    Dental health.............................................          173,982           181,459           175,690            +1,708            -5,769
    Mental health.............................................           81,145            84,485            81,578              +433            -2,907
    Alcohol and substance abuse...............................          190,981           227,062           195,971            +4,990           -31,091
    Purchased/referred care...................................          914,139           984,475           915,347            +1,208           -69,128
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................        3,197,036         3,413,804         3,214,662           +17,626          -199,142
 
Preventive Health:
    Public health nursing.....................................           75,640            79,576            76,140              +500            -3,436
    Health education..........................................           18,026            19,136            18,122               +96            -1,014
    Community health representatives..........................           58,469            62,363            58,469   ................           -3,894
    Immunization (Alaska).....................................            1,826             1,950             1,950              +124   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          153,961           163,025           154,681              +720            -8,344
 
Other services:
    Urban Indian health.......................................           43,604            43,604            43,604   ................  ................
    Indian health professions.................................           48,342            48,342            48,342   ................  ................
    Tribal management grant program...........................            2,442             2,442             2,442   ................  ................
    Direct operations.........................................           68,065            68,338            70,065            +2,000            +1,727
    Self-governance...........................................            5,727             5,735             5,727   ................               -8
    Contract support costs....................................          662,970           717,970   ................         -662,970          -717,970
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          831,150           886,431           170,180          -660,970          -716,251
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Indian Health Services...........................        4,182,147         4,463,260         3,539,523          -642,624          -923,737
                                                               =========================================================================================
                    Contract Support Costs
 
Contract support costs........................................  ................  ................          717,970          +717,970          +717,970
 
                   Indian Health Facilities
 
Maintenance and improvement...................................           53,614            89,097            73,614           +20,000           -15,483
Sanitation facilities construction............................           79,423           115,138            99,423           +20,000           -15,715
Health care facilities construction...........................           85,048           185,048           105,048           +20,000           -80,000
Facilities and environmental health support...................          219,612           226,870           221,196            +1,584            -5,674
Equipment.....................................................           22,537            23,572            22,537   ................           -1,035
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Indian Health Facilities.........................          460,234           639,725           521,818           +61,584          -117,907
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE............................        4,642,381         5,102,985         4,779,311          +136,930          -323,674
                                                               =========================================================================================
                 NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
 
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences...........           77,349            77,349            77,349   ................  ................
 
       AGENCY FOR TOXIC SUBSTANCES AND DISEASE REGISTRY
 
Toxic substances and environmental public health..............           74,691            74,691            74,691   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..........        4,794,421         5,255,025         4,931,351          +136,930          -323,674
                                                               =========================================================================================
                    OTHER RELATED AGENCIES
 
               EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
 
Council on Environmental Quality and Office of Environmental              3,000             3,015             3,000   ................              -15
 Quality......................................................
 
        CHEMICAL SAFETY AND HAZARD INVESTIGATION BOARD
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................           11,000            12,271            10,700              -300            -1,571
 
          OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................            7,341             8,400             7,341   ................           -1,059
 
  INSTITUTE OF AMERICAN INDIAN AND ALASKA NATIVE CULTURE AND
                       ARTS DEVELOPMENT
 
Payment to the Institute......................................            9,469            11,619            11,619            +2,150   ................
 
                    SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION
 
                     Salaries and Expenses
 
Museum and Research Institutes:
    National Air and Space Museum.............................           18,603            19,469            19,109              +506              -360
    Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.....................           23,957            24,343            24,343              +386   ................
    Major scientific instrumentation..........................            4,118             6,118             4,118   ................           -2,000
    Universe Center...........................................              184               184               184   ................  ................
    National Museum of Natural History........................           47,992            48,935            48,935              +943   ................
    National Zoological Park..................................           25,420            26,603            25,903              +483              -700
    Smithsonian Environmental Research Center.................            3,909             3,992             3,992               +83   ................
    Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute...................           14,025            14,271            14,271              +246   ................
    Biodiversity Center.......................................            1,520             2,285             1,525                +5              -760
    Arthur M. Sackler Gallery/Freer Gallery of Art............            6,049             6,169             6,169              +120   ................
    Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.................            2,503             2,603             2,603              +100   ................
    Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum.....................            4,755             4,842             4,842               +87   ................
    Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.....................            4,301             4,605             4,455              +154              -150
    National Museum of African Art............................            4,227             4,632             4,302               +75              -330
    World Cultures Center.....................................              284               284               284   ................  ................
    Anacostia Community Museum................................            2,093             2,415             2,135               +42              -280
    Archives of American Art..................................            1,859             1,898             1,898               +39   ................
    National Museum of African American History and Culture...           40,648            41,501            41,501              +853   ................
    National Museum of American History.......................           22,840            24,333            23,333              +493            -1,000
    National Museum of the American Indian....................           31,444            32,077            32,027              +583               -50
    National Portrait Gallery.................................            5,997             6,448             6,118              +121              -330
    Smithsonian American Art Museum...........................            9,474            10,005             9,675              +201              -330
    American Experience Center................................              593               595               595                +2   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Museums and Research Institutes...............          276,795           288,607           282,317            +5,522            -6,290
 
Mission enabling:
Program support and outreach:
    Outreach..................................................            9,150            14,317             9,317              +167            -5,000
    Communications............................................            2,567             3,945             2,620               +53            -1,325
    Institution-wide programs.................................           10,505            14,784            10,505   ................           -4,279
    Office of Exhibits Central................................            2,974             3,037             3,037               +63   ................
    Museum Support Center.....................................            1,848             1,884             1,884               +36   ................
    Museum Conservation Institute.............................            3,244             3,308             3,308               +64   ................
    Smithsonian Institution Archives..........................            2,167             2,223             2,223               +56   ................
    Smithsonian Institution Libraries.........................           10,399            10,748            10,748              +349   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Program support and outreach..................           42,854            54,246            43,642              +788           -10,604
 
Office of Chief Information Officer...........................           48,929            53,395            51,595            +2,666            -1,800
Administration................................................           34,067            34,977            34,822              +755              -155
Inspector General.............................................            3,416             3,476             3,476               +60   ................
 
Facilities services:
    Facilities maintenance....................................           71,403            86,695            71,985              +582           -14,710
    Facilities operations, security and support...............          197,879           214,429           201,729            +3,850           -12,700
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Facilities services...........................          269,282           301,124           273,714            +4,432           -27,410
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Mission enabling..............................          398,548           447,218           407,249            +8,701           -39,969
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Salaries and expenses............................          675,343           735,825           689,566           +14,223           -46,259
                                                               =========================================================================================
                      Facilities Capital
 
Revitalization................................................           97,588           144,590            89,165            -8,423           -55,425
Facilities planning and design................................           22,600            55,410            40,810           +18,210           -14,600
Construction..................................................           24,010   ................  ................          -24,010   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Facilities Capital...............................          144,198           200,000           129,975           -14,223           -70,025
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION..........................          819,541           935,825           819,541   ................         -116,284
                                                               =========================================================================================
                    NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART
 
                     Salaries and Expenses
 
Care and utilization of art collections.......................           39,418            42,226            40,918            +1,500            -1,308
Operation and maintenance of buildings and grounds............           33,858            34,532            33,858   ................             -674
Protection of buildings, grounds and contents.................           22,418            22,943            23,918            +1,500              +975
General administration........................................           23,806            26,959            23,806   ................           -3,153
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Salaries and Expenses............................          119,500           126,660           122,500            +3,000            -4,160
                                                               =========================================================================================
        Repair, Restoration and Renovation of Buildings
 
Base program..................................................           19,000            26,000            16,000            -3,000           -10,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART..........................          138,500           152,660           138,500   ................          -14,160
                                                               =========================================================================================
        JOHN F. KENNEDY CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS
 
Operations and maintenance....................................           22,000            21,660            21,660              -340   ................
Capital repair and restoration................................           10,800            14,740            11,140              +340            -3,600
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, JOHN F. KENNEDY CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS...           32,800            36,400            32,800   ................           -3,600
                                                               =========================================================================================
       WOODROW WILSON INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR SCHOLARS
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................           10,500            10,420            10,500   ................              +80
 
      NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES
 
                National Endowment for the Arts
 
                   Grants and Administration
 
Grants:
    Direct grants.............................................           62,380            63,420            62,380   ................           -1,040
    Challenge America grants..................................            7,600             7,600             7,600   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           69,980            71,020            69,980   ................           -1,040
 
    State partnerships:
        State and regional....................................           36,716            37,262            36,716   ................             -546
        Underserved set-aside.................................            9,937            10,084             9,937   ................             -147
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal............................................           46,653            47,346            46,653   ................             -693
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Grants....................................          116,633           118,366           116,633   ................           -1,733
 
Program support...............................................            1,990             1,780             1,990   ................             +210
Administration................................................           27,398            27,803            27,398   ................             -405
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Arts.............................................          146,021           147,949           146,021   ................           -1,928
                                                               =========================================================================================
             National Endowment for the Humanities
 
                   Grants and Administration
 
Grants:
    Bridging cultures.........................................            3,500   ................            3,500   ................           +3,500
    Special Initiative: The Common Bond.......................  ................            5,500   ................  ................           -5,500
    Federal/State partnership.................................           42,528            43,040            42,528   ................             -512
    Preservation and access...................................           15,460            15,200            15,460   ................             +260
    Public programs...........................................           13,684            13,454            13,684   ................             +230
    Research programs.........................................           14,784            14,536            14,784   ................             +248
    Education programs........................................           13,265            13,040            13,265   ................             +225
    Program development.......................................              500               500               500   ................  ................
    Digital humanities initiatives............................            4,400             4,480             4,400   ................              -80
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Grants........................................          108,121           109,750           108,121   ................           -1,629
 
Matching Grants:
    Treasury funds............................................            2,400             2,400             2,400   ................  ................
    Challenge grants..........................................            8,500             8,500             8,500   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Matching grants...............................           10,900            10,900            10,900   ................  ................
 
Administration................................................           27,000            27,292            27,000   ................             -292
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Humanities.......................................          146,021           147,942           146,021   ................           -1,921
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE                    292,042           295,891           292,042   ................           -3,849
       HUMANITIES.............................................
                                                               =========================================================================================
                    COMMISSION OF FINE ARTS
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................            2,524             2,653             2,653              +129   ................
 
          NATIONAL CAPITAL ARTS AND CULTURAL AFFAIRS
 
Grants........................................................            2,000             2,000             2,000   ................  ................
 
           ADVISORY COUNCIL ON HISTORIC PRESERVATION
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................            6,204             6,080             6,080              -124   ................
 
             NATIONAL CAPITAL PLANNING COMMISSION
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................            7,948             8,348             7,948   ................             -400
 
            UNITED STATES HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL MUSEUM
 
Holocaust Memorial Museum.....................................           52,385            54,959            52,385   ................           -2,574
 
           DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER MEMORIAL COMMISSION
 
Construction..................................................  ................           68,200   ................  ................          -68,200
Salaries and expenses.........................................            1,000             2,000             1,000   ................           -1,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER MEMORIAL COMMISSION.........            1,000            70,200             1,000   ................          -69,200
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, TITLE III, RELATED AGENCIES......................       11,246,921        12,646,176        12,307,337        +1,060,416          -338,839
          Emergency appropriations............................  ................  ................         (854,578)        (+854,578)        (+854,578)
          (Disaster Relief cap adjustment)....................  ................         (854,578)  ................  ................        (-854,578)
                                                               =========================================================================================
GRAND TOTAL...................................................       30,105,720        33,324,129        31,131,289        +1,025,569        -2,192,840
    Appropriations............................................      (30,173,720)      (32,299,551)      (30,104,711)         (-69,009)      (-2,194,840)
    Rescissions...............................................         (-40,000)  ................  ................         (+40,000)  ................
    Rescissions of contract authority.........................         (-28,000)         (-30,000)         (-28,000)  ................          (+2,000)
    Emergency appropriations..................................  ................  ................       (1,054,578)      (+1,054,578)      (+1,054,578)
    Disaster Relief cap adjustment............................  ................       (1,054,578)  ................  ................      (-1,054,578)
(By transfer).................................................          (28,789)          (24,676)          (24,676)          (-4,113)  ................
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