Report text available as:

  • TXT
  • PDF   (PDF provides a complete and accurate display of this text.) Tip ?

                                                       Calendar No. 132
 114th Congress      {                           }             Report
  1st Session        {            SENATE         }               114-73
_______________________________________________________________________

 .                              

                    IPAWS MODERNIZATION ACT OF 2015

                               __________

                              R E P O R T

                                 of the

                   COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY AND

                          GOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS

                          UNITED STATES SENATE

                              to accompany

                                S. 1180

             TO AMEND THE HOMELAND SECURITY ACT OF 2002 TO
           DIRECT THE ADMINISTRATOR OF THE FEDERAL EMERGENCY
          MANAGEMENT AGENCY TO MODERNIZE THE INTEGRATED PUBLIC
 ALERT AND WARNING SYSTEM OF THE UNITED STATES, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES




                 June 25, 2015.--Ordered to be printed
        COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY AND GOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS

                    RON JOHNSON, Wisconsin Chairman
JOHN McCAIN, Arizona                 THOMAS R. CARPER, Delaware
ROB PORTMAN, Ohio                    CLAIRE McCASKILL, Missouri
RAND PAUL, Kentucky                  JON TESTER, Montana
JAMES LANKFORD, Oklahoma             TAMMY BALDWIN, Wisconsin
MICHAEL B. ENZI, Wyoming             HEIDI HEITKAMP, North Dakota
KELLY AYOTTE, New Hampshire          CORY A. BOOKER, New Jersey
JONI ERNST, Iowa                     GARY C. PETERS, Michigan
BEN SASSE, Nebraska

                    Keith B. Ashdown, Staff Director
                  Christopher R. Hixon, Chief Counsel
             David S. Luckey, Director of Homeland Security
       William H.W. McKenna, Chief Counsel for Homeland Security
     Brooke N. Ericson, Deputy Chief Counsel for Homeland Security
              Gabrielle A. Batkin, Minority Staff Director
           John P. Kilvington, Minority Deputy Staff Director
               Mary Beth Schultz, Minority Chief Counsel
         Robert H. Bradley, Minority Professional Staff Member
                     Laura W. Kilbride, Chief Clerk
                            C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
  I. Purpose and Summary..............................................1
 II. Background and Need for the Legislation..........................1
III. Legislative History..............................................3
 IV. Section-by-Section Analysis......................................3
  V. Evaluation of Regulatory Impact..................................4
 VI. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate........................5
VII. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported............6
                                                       Calendar No. 132
114th Congress
                                 SENATE
                                                                 Report
 1st Session                                                     114-73

======================================================================



 
                    IPAWS MODERNIZATION ACT OF 2015

                                _______
                                

                 June 25, 2015.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

 Mr. Johnson, from the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
                    Affairs, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                         [To accompany S. 1180]

    The Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs, to which was referred the bill (S. 1180) to amend the 
Homeland Security Act of 2002 to direct the Administrator of 
the Federal Emergency Management Agency to modernize the 
integrated public alert and warning system of the United 
States, and for other purposes, having considered the same, 
reports favorably thereon with amendments and recommends that 
the bill, as amended, do pass.

                         I. Purpose and Summary

    The purpose of S. 1180, the Integrated Public Alert and 
Warning System Modernization Act of 2015, is to modernize the 
Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS) of the 
United States, establish and integrate into the National 
Incident Management System a training program to educate 
federal, state, tribal, and local government officials using 
the Emergency Alert System, and to establish an integrated 
public alert and warning system subcommittee. This bill will 
enhance the ability of state and local governments to integrate 
IPAWS into their own systems, increasing adoption of the system 
and advancing the goal of a nationwide integrated and 
interoperable system. The bill also establishes a Subcommittee 
to the National Advisory Council composed of IPAWS stakeholders 
to expand collaboration and recommend improvements to the 
system. Finally, the bill would also authorize the program, 
ensuring full Congressional oversight of the system.

              II. Background and the Need for Legislation

    In 2004, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) 
began developing IPAWS to create a comprehensive public-alert 
system.\1\ On June 26, 2006, President George W. Bush signed 
Executive Order 13407 directing the Department of Homeland 
Security (DHS) to create ``an effective, reliable, integrated, 
flexible, and comprehensive'' public alert and warning system 
for the United States.\2\ The Executive Order named FEMA to 
lead the effort and adopt a set of standards and protocols to 
support this system.\3\ In April 2007, FEMA established the 
IPAWS Program Management Office to carry out the Executive 
Order.\4\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\Fed. Emergency Mgmt. Agency, Integrated Public Alert and Warning 
System (IPAWS): Overview and Commercial Mobile Alert System CMAS 
Introduction 4 (2009), available at https://www.fema.gov/ppt/emergency/
ipaws/ipaws_cmas.ppt.
    \2\Exec. Order No. 13,407, 3 C.F.R. 236 (2007); see also Fed. 
Emergency Mgmt. Agency, supra note 1 at 4.
    \3\Exec. Order No. 13,407, 3 C.F.R. 236 (2007).
    \4\Fed. Emergency Mgmt. Agency, supra note 1 at 4.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    IPAWS supports sending local, state, tribal, and 
territorial government alerts to local areas during regional 
emergencies, as well as sending national-level alerts from the 
President, in the event of a catastrophic national 
emergency.\5\ Emergency alerts and information from emergency 
officials are sent to the public through radio and television 
via the Emergency Alert System (EAS), cellular phones via 
Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA), the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) All Hazards Weather Radio via 
the IPAWS-NOAA gateway, and Internet applications and websites 
via the IPAWS Public Feed.\6\ IPAWS is used to alert the public 
of, among other things, tornados, evacuations, earthquakes, 
child abductions (through America's Missing: Broadcast 
Emergency Response alerts, also known as AMBER alerts), 
shelter-in-place, disaster resources, and Presidential 
alerts.\7\ In 2013, for example, the Massachusetts Emergency 
Management Agency sent alerts through IPAWS after the Boston 
Marathon bombings.\8\ To date, no President has ever sent an 
alert through the system, though the system was tested at the 
national level for such an occasion on November 9, 2011.\9\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \5\Fed. Emergency Mgmt. Agency, The Integrated Public Alert and 
Warning System (IPAWS): IPAWS 101 at 6 (2015), available at https://
www.fema.gov/media-library/assets/documents/105498.
    \6\Id.
    \7\Id. at 10.
    \8\Id. at 32.
    \9\Gov't Accountability Office, GAO-13-375, Emergency Alerting: 
Capabilities Have Improved, But Additional Guidance and Testing Are 
Needed 20 (2013).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    DHS's intent in establishing IPAWS was to integrate 
federal, state, territorial, tribal, and local government alert 
and warning systems, enabling various messaging options and 
communications pathways in the event of an emergency.\10\ 
However, in 2009, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) 
found that IPAWS was struggling with planning and 
coordination.\11\ For example, from 2007 to 2009, IPAWS 
operated without an implementation plan, and was hindered by 
two transitions in its mission over that time period.\12\ As a 
result, states made investments in their alert systems without 
assurances that they would be compatible with federal 
investments.\13\ At the time, GAO also reported that ``the 
scope and range of stakeholder involvement in each new effort 
is limited . . .'' and that FEMA faced challenges in developing 
multilingual alert and alerts that reached people with 
disabilities.\14\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \10\Fed. Emergency Mgmt. Agency, Strategic Plan for the Integrated 
Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS) Program 5-6 (2010).
    \11\Gov't Accountability Office, GAO-09-834, Emergency 
Preparedness: Improved Planning and Coordination Necessary for 
Modernization and Integration of Public Alert and Warning System passim 
(2009).
    \12\Id. at 16-17.
    \13\Id. at 24-25.
    \14\Id. at 24-26.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    In 2013, GAO reported that state and local officials needed 
more guidance from FEMA on how to integrate and test IPAWS 
capabilities with their existing alerting systems.\15\ The 
absence of sufficient guidance made some states reluctant to 
fully implement IPAWS.\16\ Since IPAWS was designed to be a 
nationwide system, low state participation ``decreases the 
capability for an integrated, interoperable, and nationwide 
alerting system.''\17\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \15\Gov't Accountability Office, Emergency Alerting, supra note 9, 
at passim.
    \16\Id. at 15-16.
    \17\Id.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    FEMA has since addressed some of the issues and 
recommendations raised in these reports.\18\ Moreover, 49 out 
of 50 states are now actively pursuing integration with 
IPAWS.\19\ This legislation will further this progress and help 
address many of the other problems stakeholders, Congress, and 
GAO previously identified, including helping to ensure 
sufficient training for emergency alerting officials, 
increasing collaboration at all levels of government, and 
ensuring Congress's important role of oversight.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \18\Gov't Accountability Office, Emergency Preparedness, supra note 
11.
    \19\Data Provided to Committee Staff by the Fed. Emergency Mgmt. 
Agency (May 20, 2015); see also Fed. Emergency Mgmt. Agency, IPAWS 
Public Alerting Authorities (May 1, 2015), https://www.fema.gov/
integrated-public-alert-warning-system-authorities.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                        III. Legislative History

    Legislation to authorize IPAWS has been introduced in both 
the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate since the 
110th Congress.\20\ In the 114th Congress, Chairman Johnson and 
Senator McCaskill introduced S. 1180 on May 4, 2015, which was 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs. The Committee considered S. 1180 at a business meeting 
on May 6, 2015.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \20\S. 2664, 113th Congress (2014); S. 2319, 112th Congress (2012); 
H.R. 2591, 111th Congress (2009); H.R. 6038, 110th Congress (2008).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Senator Sasse offered one amendment, clarifying that no 
state or local jurisdiction is required to use IPAWS. The 
Committee adopted the amendment and ordered the bill, as 
amended, reported favorably, both by voice vote. Senators 
present for both votes were: Johnson, McCain, Portman, 
Lankford, Ernst, Sasse, Carper, McCaskill, Baldwin, Heitkamp, 
and Peters.

        IV. Section-by-Section Analysis of the Act, as Reported


Section 1. Short title

    This section provides the bill's short title, the 
``Integrated Public Alert and Warning System Modernization Act 
of 2015.''

Section 2. Integrated Public Alert and Warning System Modernization

    Subsection (a) amends Title V of the Homeland Security Act 
of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 311 et seq.) by adding Sec. 526. Integrated 
Public Alert and Warning System Modernization. The subsection 
authorizes the Administrator of FEMA (``the Administrator'') to 
modernize and implement IPAWS to ensure that under all 
conditions, the President, Federal agencies, and state, tribal, 
and local governments can alert and warn the civilian 
population in areas endangered by natural disasters, acts of 
terrorism, and other man-made disasters or threats to public 
safety.
    The subsection includes implementation requirements, such 
as establishing or adopting common alerting and warning 
protocols; providing for technological and geographic 
adaptability; ensuring resiliency; including a capability for 
providing warnings and alerts in other formats to facilitate 
alerting the disabled and non-English speakers; incorporating 
IPAWS into existing systems and training and exercise programs; 
mandatory testing; educating the public about the functions of 
the system; and consulting and coordinating with stakeholders 
and regulators, taking into account current regulations and the 
WEA system. The subsection also establishes system requirements 
for IPAWS, to maximize reach of emergency alerts and the 
system's continued effectiveness as technologies evolve, while 
ensuring individuals' privacy. The subsection limits the use of 
IPAWS to notification of emergencies and disasters and testing.
    In addition, subsection (a) provides for annual 
implementation and performance reports to Congress for a period 
of three years after enactment.
    Subsection (b) establishes an IPAWS Subcommittee to the 
National Advisory Council led by FEMA's Deputy Administrator 
for Protection and National Preparedness and composed of 
representatives from Federal agencies and other stakeholders--
including state and local governments, federally recognized 
Indian tribes, and the private sector--to develop 
recommendations for implementation of IPAWS. The subsection 
requires the Subcommittee to consult with other organizations 
on technologies that may be beneficial to IPAWS and to submit 
its recommendations to Congress and the Executive Branch via 
the National Advisory Council. The subsection also terminates 
the Subcommittee after three years.
    Subsection (c) authorizes to be appropriated to carry out 
this Act and the amendments made by this Act such sums as may 
be necessary for each of fiscal years 2016, 2017, and 2018.
    Subsection (d) provides various limits on statutory 
construction, including that this bill does not: affect the 
authority of the Department of Commerce or the Federal 
Communications Commission, or provide the Secretary of Homeland 
Security authority to require any action by the Department of 
Commerce, the Federal Communications Commission or any non-
governmental entity; apply to, or provide the Administrator 
with authority over, participating commercial mobile service 
providers, as defined in the subsection, including with respect 
to testing the public alert and warning system; alter in any 
way the WEA system established under the Warning, Alert, and 
Response Network Act or any related orders issued by the 
Federal Communications Commission after Oct. 13, 2006; or 
provide FEMA with authority to require a state or local 
jurisdiction to use IPAWS.

                   V. Evaluation of Regulatory Impact

    Pursuant to the requirements of paragraph 11(b) of rule 
XXVI of the Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee has 
considered the regulatory impact of this act and determined 
that the act will have no regulatory impact within the meaning 
of the rules. The Committee agrees with the Congressional 
Budget Office's statement that the act contains no 
intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as defined in the 
Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) and would impose no costs 
on state, local, or tribal governments.

             VI. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate

                                                      May 21, 2015.
Hon. Ron Johnson,
Chairman, Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, U.S. 
        Senate, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for S. 1180, the Integrated 
Public Alert and Warning System Modernization Act of 2015.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Martin von 
Gnechten.
            Sincerely,
                                                        Keith Hall.
    Enclosure.

S. 1180--Integrated Public Alert and Warning System Modernization Act 
        of 2015

    Summary: S. 1180 would authorize activities to operate and 
modernize the Integrated Public Alert and Warning System 
(IPAWS) within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) over 
the 2016-2018 period. The bill also would establish a committee 
to develop and submit recommendations for improving the system. 
CBO estimates that implementing S. 1180 would cost $37 million 
over the next five years, assuming appropriation of the 
necessary amounts over the 2016-2018 period.
    Enacting this legislation would not affect direct spending 
or revenues; therefore, pay-as-you-go procedures do not apply.
    S. 1180 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) 
and would not affect the budgets of state, local, or tribal 
governments.
    Estimated cost to the Federal Government: The estimated 
budgetary effect of S. 1180 is shown in the following table. 
The cost of this legislation falls within budget function 450 
(community and regional development).

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 By fiscal year, in millions of dollars--
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
                                                            2016     2017     2018     2019     2020   2016-2020
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  CHANGES IN SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION
 
Estimated Authorization Level...........................       13       13       13        0        0        39
Estimated Outlays.......................................        4        8       11        8        5        37
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note:Details may not sum to totals because of rounding.

    Basis of estimate: For this estimate, CBO assumes that the 
legislation will be enacted near the end of fiscal year 2015 
and that the necessary amounts will be appropriated for each 
year during the three-year authorization period.
    CBO estimates that implementing the legislation would cost 
about $13 million annually over the 2016-2018 authorization 
period for DHS to modernize and to continue to employ IPAWS. In 
recent years, $12 million has been allocated annually for 
IPAWS, and recent annual budget requests have sought $15 
million or more to operate IPAWS. CBO estimates that continuing 
the current operation of IPAWS and implementing the additional 
requirements under the bill would cost $13 million a year over 
the next three years.
    IPAWS uses multiple technologies (for example, satellite 
radios, computers, and cellular phones) in addition to 
traditional radio and television communications to provide 
information about an impending or ongoing emergency situation. 
The bill specifies several performance criteria that IPAWS 
would be required to meet. DHS is currently pursuing several of 
those criteria under Executive Order 13407. In addition to 
codifying elements of the executive order, the bill specifies 
additional criteria for IPAWS, including training state and 
local governments and other stakeholders to use the system, 
conducting nationwide testing of the system every three years, 
and ensuring that IPAWS can withstand terrorist attacks.
    The bill also would establish an advisory committee to 
develop recommendations to continue improving IPAWS and to 
submit a report to the Congress within one year of enactment. 
Under the bill, the committee would terminate three years after 
enactment.
    Based on the rate of current spending by DHS for IPAWS 
work, CBO estimates that implementing the three-year 
authorization for IPAWS in S. 1180 would cost $37 million over 
the 2016-2020 period, assuming appropriation of the necessary 
amounts.
    Pay-As-You-Go considerations: None.
    Intergovernmental and private-sector impact: S. 1180 
contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as 
defined in UMRA and would not affect the budgets of state, 
local, or tribal governments.
    Previous CBO estimate: On April 27, 2015, CBO transmitted a 
cost estimate for H.R. 1472, the Integrated Public Alert and 
Warning System Modernization Act of 2015, as ordered reported 
by the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure on 
April 15, 2015. The two bills are similar. However, H.R. 1472 
would specify the authorization of nearly $13 million annually 
over the 2016-2018 period. S. 1180 would authorize the 
appropriation of such sums as may be necessary to carry out the 
legislation over the 2016-2018 period. Those differences do not 
affect the estimated costs of the bill.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal costs: Martin von Gnechten; 
Impact on state, local, and tribal governments: Melissa 
Merrell; Impact on the private sector: Logan Smith.
    Estimate approved by: H. Samuel Papenfuss, Deputy Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

       VII. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

    In compliance with paragraph 12 of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, changes in existing law made by 
S. 1180 as reported are shown as follows (existing law proposed 
to be omitted is enclosed in brackets, new matter is printed in 
italic, and existing law in which no change is proposed is 
shown in roman):

HOMELAND SECURITY ACT OF 2002

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


TITLE V--NATIONAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 526. INTEGRATED PUBLIC ALERT AND WARNING SYSTEM MODERNIZATION.

    (a) In General.--To provide timely and effective warnings 
regarding natural disasters, acts of terrorism, and other man-
made disasters or threats to public safety, the Administrator 
shall--
          (1) modernize the integrated public alert and warning 
        system of the United States (in this section referred 
        to as the ``public alert and warning system'') to help 
        ensure that under all conditions the President and, 
        except to the extent the public alert and warning 
        system is in use by the President, Federal agencies and 
        State, tribal, and local governments can alert and warn 
        the civilian population in areas endangered by natural 
        disasters, acts of terrorism, and other man-made 
        disasters or threats to public safety; and
          (2) implement the public alert and warning system to 
        disseminate timely and effective warnings regarding 
        natural disasters, acts of terrorism, and other man-
        made disasters or threats to public safety.
    (b) Implementation Requirements.--In carrying out 
subsection (a), the Administrator shall--
          (1) establish or adopt, as appropriate, common 
        alerting and warning protocols, standards, terminology, 
        and operating procedures for the public alert and 
        warning system;
          (2) include in the public alert and warning system 
        the capability to adapt the distribution and content of 
        communications on the basis of geographic location, 
        risks, and multiple communication systems and 
        technologies, as appropriate and to the extent 
        technically feasible;
          (3) include in the public alert and warning system 
        the capability to alert, warn, and provide equivalent 
        information to individuals with disabilities, 
        individuals with access and functional needs, and 
        individuals with limited-English proficiency, to the 
        extent technically feasible;
          (4) ensure that training, tests, and exercises are 
        conducted for the public alert and warning system, 
        including by--
                  (A) incorporating the public alert and 
                warning system into other training and exercise 
                programs of the Department, as appropriate;
                  (B) establishing and integrating into the 
                National Incident Management System a 
                comprehensive and periodic training program to 
                instruct and educate Federal, State, tribal, 
                and local government officials in the use of 
                the Common Alerting Protocol enabled Emergency 
                Alert System; and
                  (C) conducting, not less than once every 3 
                years, periodic nationwide tests of the public 
                alert and warning system;
          (5) to the extent practicable, ensure that the public 
        alert and warning system is resilient and secure and 
        can withstand acts of terrorism and other external 
        attacks;
          (6) conduct public education efforts so that State, 
        tribal, and local governments, private entities, and 
        the people of the United States reasonably understand 
        the functions of the public alert and warning system 
        and how to access, use, and respond to information from 
        the public alert and warning system through a general 
        market awareness campaign;
          (7) consult, coordinate, and cooperate with the 
        appropriate private sector entities and Federal, State, 
        tribal, and local governmental authorities, including 
        the Regional Administrators and emergency response 
        providers;
          (8) consult and coordinate with the Federal 
        Communications Commission, taking into account rules 
        and regulations promulgated by the Federal 
        Communications Commission; and
          (9) coordinate with and consider the recommendations 
        of the Integrated Public Alert and Warning System 
        Subcommittee established under section 2(b) of the 
        Integrated Public Alert and Warning System 
        Modernization Act of 2015.
    (c) System Requirements.--The public alert and warning 
system shall--
          (1) to the extent determined appropriate by the 
        Administrator, incorporate multiple communications 
        technologies;
          (2) be designed to adapt to, and incorporate, future 
        technologies for communicating directly with the 
        public;
          (3) to the extent technically feasible, be designed--
                  (A) to provide alerts to the largest portion 
                of the affected population feasible, including 
                nonresident visitors and tourists, individuals 
                with disabilities, individuals with access and 
                functional needs, and individuals with limited-
                English proficiency; and
                  (B) to improve the ability of remote areas to 
                receive alerts;
          (4) promote local and regional public and private 
        partnerships to enhance community preparedness and 
        response;
          (5) provide redundant alert mechanisms where 
        practicable so as to reach the greatest number of 
        people; and
          (6) to the extent feasible, include a mechanism to 
        ensure the protection of individual privacy.
    (d) Use of System.--Except to the extent necessary for 
testing the public alert and warning system, the public alert 
and warning system shall not be used to transmit a message that 
does not relate to a natural disaster, act of terrorism, or 
other man-made disaster or threat to public safety.
    (e) Performance Reports.--
          (1) In general.--Not later than 1 year after the date 
        of enactment of the Integrated Public Alert and Warning 
        System Modernization Act of 2015, and annually 
        thereafter through 2018, the Administrator shall make 
        available on the public website of the Agency a 
        performance report, which shall--
                  (A) establish performance goals for the 
                implementation of the public alert and warning 
                system by the Agency;
                  (B) describe the performance of the public 
                alert and warning system, including--
                          (i) the type of technology used for 
                        alerts and warnings issued under the 
                        system;
                          (ii) the measures taken to alert, 
                        warn, and provide equivalent 
                        information to individuals with 
                        disabilities, individuals with access 
                        and function needs, and individuals 
                        with limited-English proficiency; and
                          (iii) the training, tests, and 
                        exercises performed and the outcomes 
                        obtained by the Agency;
                  (C) identify significant challenges to the 
                effective operation of the public alert and 
                warning system and any plans to address these 
                challenges;
                  (D) identify other necessary improvements to 
                the system; and
                  (E) provide an analysis comparing the 
                performance of the public alert and warning 
                system with the performance goals established 
                under subparagraph (A).
          (2) Congress.--The Administrator shall submit to the 
        Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs 
        and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
        Transportation of the Senate and the Committee on 
        Transportation and Infrastructure and the Committee on 
        Homeland Security of the House of Representatives each 
        report required under paragraph (1).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *