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                                                Union Calendar No. 856
115th Congress    }                                     {       Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session       }                                     {     115-1108

======================================================================



 
 REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE ON ACTIVITIES DURING THE 115TH 
                                CONGRESS

                                _______
                                

 December 27, 2018.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on 
            the State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Conaway, from the Committee on Agriculture, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

    In accordance with rule XI, clause 1(d), of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the Committee on Agriculture 
reports herewith on its activities during the 115th Congress.

  I. Summary of Organization, Jurisdiction, and Oversight Plan of the 
                        Committee on Agriculture


                            a. organization

    The House of Representatives established the total 
authorized membership of the Committee on Agriculture for the 
115th Congress at 46, with a party division of 26 Republicans 
and 20 Democrats. Among the Committee Members were 12 
Representatives who were serving their first terms (Comer, 
Marshall, Bacon, Faso, Dunn, Arrington, Evans, Lawson, 
O'Halleran, Panetta, Soto, and Blunt Rochester).
    The Committee organized on February 1, 2017, into six 
subcommittees. The six subcommittees were constituted as 
follows:

                        SUBCOMMITTEE ASSIGNMENTS

    (Ratio includes ex officio Members.)
    (K. Michael Conaway, Chairman, and Collin C. Peterson, 
Ranking Minority Member, are ex officio members of all 
Subcommittees.)

        Subcommittee on Commodity Exchanges, Energy, and Credit
                         (Ratio 9-7 (Total 16))

  AUSTIN SCOTT, Georgia, Chairman
DAVID SCOTT, Georgia, Ranking Minority MemberLATTE, Virginia
SEAN PATRICK MALONEY, New York       MIKE ROGERS, Alabama
ANN M. KUSTER, New Hampshire         DOUG LaMALFA, California
STACEY E. PLASKETT, Virgin Islands   RODNEY DAVIS, Illinois
TOM O'HALLERAN, Arizona              JAMES COMER, Kentucky
DARREN SOTO, Florida                 ROGER W. MARSHALL, Kansas
                                     JOHN J. FASO, New York

    Jurisdiction: Policies, statutes, and markets relating to 
commodity exchanges; agricultural credit; rural development; 
energy; rural electrification.

                                 ------                                

               Subcommittee on Conservation and Forestry
                         (Ratio 9-7 (Total 16))

FRANK D. LUCAS, Oklahoma, Chairman
MARCIA L. FUDGE, Ohio, Ranking Minority MemberMPSON, Pennsylvania
TIMOTHY J. WALZ, Minnesota           JEFF DENHAM, California
ANN M. KUSTER, New Hampshire         DOUG LaMALFA, California
RICHARD M. NOLAN, Minnesota          RICK W. ALLEN, Georgia
TOM O'HALLERAN, Arizona              MIKE BOST, Illinois
FILEMON VELA, Texas                  RALPH LEE ABRAHAM, Louisiana
                                     TRENT KELLY, Mississippi

    Jurisdiction: Policies and statutes relating to resource 
conservation, forestry, and all forests under the jurisdiction 
of the Committee on Agriculture.

                                 ------                                

                       Subcommittee on Nutrition
                        (Ratio 13-10 (Total 23))

  GLENN THOMPSON, Pennsylvania, 
             Chairman
JAMES P. McGOVERN, Massachusetts,  Ranking Minority Member
ALMA S. ADAMS, North Carolina        ERIC A. ``RICK'' CRAWFORD, 
DWIGHT EVANS, Pennsylvania           Arkansas
MARCIA L. FUDGE, Ohio                SCOTT DesJARLAIS, Tennessee
MICHELLE LUJAN GRISHAM, New Mexico   VICKY HARTZLER, Missouri
AL LAWSON, Jr., Florida              RODNEY DAVIS, Illinois
JIMMY PANETTA, California            TED S. YOHO, Florida
DARREN SOTO, Florida                 DAVID ROUZER, North Carolina
SEAN PATRICK MALONEY, New York       JAMES COMER, Kentucky
                                     ROGER W. MARSHALL, Kansas
                                     JOHN J. FASO, New York
                                     JODEY C. ARRINGTON, Texas

    Jurisdiction: Policies and statutes relating to nutrition, 
including the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and 
domestic commodity distribution and consumer initiatives.

                                 ------                                

      Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk Management
                        (Ratio 13-10 (Total 23))

    ERIC A. ``RICK'' CRAWFORD, 
        Arkansas, Chairman
RICHARD M. NOLAN, Minnesota, Ranking Minority Member Oklahoma
TIMOTHY J. WALZ, Minnesota           MIKE ROGERS, Alabama
CHERI BUSTOS, Illinois               BOB GIBBS, Ohio
LISA BLUNT ROCHESTER, Delaware       AUSTIN SCOTT, Georgia
DAVID SCOTT, Georgia                 SCOTT DesJARLAIS, Tennessee
SEAN PATRICK MALONEY, New York       RICK W. ALLEN, Georgia
STACEY E. PLASKETT, Virgin Islands   MIKE BOST, Illinois
AL LAWSON, Jr., Florida              RALPH LEE ABRAHAM, Louisiana
TOM O'HALLERAN, Arizona              DON BACON, Nebraska
                                     NEAL P. DUNN, Florida
                                     JODEY C. ARRINGTON, Texas

    Jurisdiction: Policies, statutes, and markets relating to 
commodities including barley, cotton, cottonseed, corn, grain 
sorghum, honey, mohair, oats, other oilseeds, peanuts, pulse 
crops, rice, soybeans, sugar, wheat, and wool; the Commodity 
Credit Corporation; risk management policies and statues, 
including Federal Crop Insurance; producer data and privacy 
issues.

                                 ------                                

       Subcommittee on Biotechnology, Horticulture, and Research
                         (Ratio 9-7 (Total 16))

 RODNEY DAVIS, Illinois, Chairman
MICHELLE LUJAN GRISHAM, New Mexico, Ranking Minority Member
AL LAWSON, Jr., Florida              JEFF DENHAM, California
JIMMY PANETTA, California            TED S. YOHO, Florida
JIM COSTA, California                DAVID ROUZER, North Carolina
JAMES P. McGOVERN, Massachusetts     DON BACON, Nebraska
LISA BLUNT ROCHESTER, Delaware       NEAL P. DUNN, Florida
                                     JODEY C. ARRINGTON, Texas

    Jurisdiction: Policies, statutes, and markets relating to 
horticulture, including fruits, vegetables, nuts, and 
ornamentals; bees; and organic agriculture; policies and 
statutes relating to marketing and promotion orders; pest and 
disease management; bioterrorism; adulteration and quarantine 
matters; research, education, and extension; and biotechnology.

                                 ------                                

           Subcommittee on Livestock and Foreign Agriculture
                         (Ratio 9-7 (Total 16))

  DAVID ROUZER, North Carolina, 
             Chairman
JIM COSTA, California, Ranking Minority MemberATTE, Virginia
FILEMON VELA, Texas                  STEVE KING, Iowa
CHERI BUSTOS, Illinois               SCOTT DesJARLAIS, Tennessee
STACEY E. PLASKETT, Virgin Islands   VICKY HARTZLER, Missouri
DWIGHT EVANS, Pennsylvania           TED S. YOHO, Florida
----                                 TRENT KELLY, Mississippi
                                     ROGER W. MARSHALL, Kansas

    Jurisdiction: Policies, statutes, and markets relating to 
all livestock, poultry, dairy, and seafood, including all 
products thereof; the inspection, marketing, and promotion of 
such commodities and products; aquaculture; animal welfare; 
grazing; foreign agricultural assistance and trade promotion.
                       b. committee jurisdiction

    Under Rules adopted by the House of Representatives for the 
115th Congress, the Committee on Agriculture's (hereinafter 
also referred to as Committee) jurisdiction (See Rule X, clause 
1 of the Rules of the House of Representatives) extended to--

  (1) Adulteration of seeds, insect pests, and protection of 
            birds and animals in forest reserves.

  (2) Agriculture generally.

  (3) Agricultural and industrial chemistry.

  (4) Agricultural colleges and experiment stations.

  (5) Agricultural economics and research.

  (6) Agricultural education extension services.

  (7) Agricultural production and marketing and stabilization 
            of prices of agricultural products, and commodities 
            (not including distribution outside of the United 
            States).

  (8) Animal industry and diseases of animals.

  (9) Commodity exchanges.

  (10) Crop insurance and soil conservation.

  (11) Dairy industry.

  (12) Entomology and plant quarantine.

  (13) Extension of farm credit and farm security.

  (14) Inspection of livestock, poultry, meat products, and 
            seafood and seafood products.

  (15) Forestry in general, and forest reserves other than 
            those created from the public domain.

  (16) Human nutrition and home economics.

  (17) Plant industry, soils, and agricultural engineering.

  (18) Rural electrification.

  (19) Rural development.

  (20) Water conservation related to activities of the 
            Department of Agriculture.

    The revised edition of the Rules and Manual of the House of 
Representatives for the 107th Congress (House Document No. 106-
320) provides the following concerning the Committee on 
Agriculture:\1\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\References are to the volume and section of Hinds' (volumes I-V, 
e.g., IV, 500) and Cannon's (volumes VI-VIII, e.g., VI, 400) Precedents 
of the House of Representatives, and to the Congressional Record by 
date and page (e.g., January 3, 1953, p. 500).

          ``This Committee was established in 1820 (IV, 4149). 
        In 1880 the subject of forestry was added to its 
        jurisdiction, and the Committee was conferred authority 
        to receive estimates of and to report appropriations 
        (IV, 4149). However, on July 1, 1920, authority to 
        report appropriations for the U.S. Department of 
        Agriculture was transferred to the Committee on 
        Appropriations (VII, 1860).
          The basic form of the present jurisdictional 
        statement was made effective January 2, 1947, as a part 
        of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 (60 Stat. 
        812). Subparagraph (7) was altered by the 93d Congress, 
        effective January 3, 1975, to include jurisdiction over 
        agricultural commodities (including the Commodity 
        Credit Corporation) while transferring jurisdiction 
        over foreign distribution and nondomestic production of 
        commodities to the Committee on International Relations 
        (H. Res. 988, 93d Cong., Oct. 8, 1974, p. 34470). 
        Nevertheless, the Committee has retained a limited 
        jurisdiction over measures to release CCC stocks for 
        such foreign distribution (Sept. 14, 1989, p. 20428). 
        Previously unstated jurisdictions over commodities 
        exchanges and rural development were codified effective 
        January 3, 1975.
          The 104th Congress consolidated the Committee's 
        jurisdiction over inspection of livestock and meat 
        products to include inspection of poultry, seafood, and 
        seafood products, and added subparagraph (20) relating 
        to water conservation (sec. 202(a), H. Res. 6, Jan. 4, 
        1995, p.464). Clerical and stylistic changes were 
        effected when the House recodified its rules in the 
        106th Congress (H. Res. 5. Jan. 6, 1999, p. 47).
          The Committee has had jurisdiction of bills for 
        establishing and regulating the Department of 
        Agriculture (IV, 4150), for inspection of livestock and 
        meat products, regulation of animal industry, diseases 
        of animals (IV, 4154; VII, 1862), adulteration of 
        seeds, insect pests, protection of birds and animals in 
        forest reserves (IV, 4157; VII, 1870), the improvement 
        of the breed of horses, even with the cavalry service 
        in view (IV, 4158; VII, 1865), and in addition to the 
        Committee on Energy and Commerce, amending Horse 
        Protection Act to prevent the shipping, transporting, 
        moving, delivering, or receiving of horses to be 
        slaughtered for human consumption (July 13, 2006, p. 
        14304).
          The Committee, having charge of the general subject 
        of forestry, has reported bills relating to timber, and 
        forest reserves other than those created from the 
        public domain (IV, 4160). The Committee on Natural 
        Resources, and not this committee, has jurisdiction 
        over a bill to convey land that is part of a National 
        Forest created from the public domain (March 23, 2004, 
        p. 4926). It has also exercised jurisdiction of bills 
        relating to agricultural colleges and experiment 
        stations (IV, 4152), incorporation of agricultural 
        societies (IV, 4159), and establishment of a highway 
        commission (IV, 4153), to discourage fictitious and 
        gambling transactions in farm products (IV, 4161; VII, 
        1861), to regulate the transportation, sale and 
        handling of dogs and cats intended for use in research 
        and the licensing of animal research facilities (July 
        29, 1965, p. 18691); and to designate an agricultural 
        research center (May 14, 1995, p.11070). The Committee 
        shares with the Committee on the Judiciary jurisdiction 
        over a bill comprehensively amending the Immigration 
        and Nationality Act and including food stamp 
        eligibility requirements for aliens (Sept. 19, 1995, p. 
        25533).
          The House referred the President's message dealing 
        with the refinancing of farm-mortgage indebtedness to 
        the Committee, thus conferring jurisdiction (April 4, 
        1933, p. 1209).
          The Committee has jurisdiction over a bill relating 
        solely to executive level position in the Department of 
        Agriculture (Mar. 2, 1976, p. 4958) and has 
        jurisdiction over bills to develop land and water 
        conservation programs on private and non-Federal lands 
        (June 7, 1976, p. 16768).''

    Some of the specific areas in which the Committee on 
Agriculture exercises its jurisdiction or that have been 
created for the Committee by historical reference include:

  (1)  Public Law 480, Eighty-third Congress, the restoration, 
            expansion, and development of foreign markets for 
            United States agricultural products; and the effect 
            of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (and 
            the North American Free Trade Agreement), bilateral 
            free trade agreements, the European Community, and 
            other regional economic agreements and commodity 
            marketing and pricing systems on United States 
            agriculture.

  (2) All matters relating to the establishment and development 
            of an effective Foreign Agricultural Service.

  (3) Matters relating to rural development, including rural 
            telephone companies, farm credit banks, farm rural 
            housing loans, rural water supply, rural flood 
            control and water pollution control programs, and 
            loans for rural firehouses, community facilities, 
            and businesses.

  (4) Production and use of energy from agricultural and 
            forestry resources.

  (5) Matters relating to the development, use, and 
            administration of the National Forests, including, 
            but not limited to, development of a sound program 
            for general public use of the National Forests 
            consistent with watershed protection and sustained-
            yield timber management, study of the forest fire 
            prevention and control policies and activities of 
            the Forest Service and their relation to 
            coordinated activities of other Federal, State, and 
            private agencies; Forest Service land exchanges; 
            and wilderness and similar use designations applied 
            to National Forest land.

  (6) Price spreads of agricultural commodities between 
            producers and consumers.

  (7) The formulation and development of improved programs for 
            agricultural commodities; matters relating to the 
            inspection, grading, and marketing of such 
            commodities, including seafood; and food safety 
            generally.

  (8) Matters relating to trading in futures contracts for all 
            commodities and similar instruments, including 
            commodity options and commodity leverage contracts.

  (9) The administration and operation of agricultural programs 
            through State and county committees and the 
            administrative policies and procedures relating to 
            the selection, election, and operation of such 
            committees.

  (10) The administration and development of small watershed 
            programs under Public Law 566, Eighty-third 
            Congress, as amended, and the development of 
            resource conservation and development programs for 
            rural areas.

  (13) Programs of food assistance or distribution supported in 
            whole or in part by funds of the Department of 
            Agriculture, including but not limited to the food 
            stamp program and the commodity distribution 
            program.

  (12) Aquaculture programs of the Department of Agriculture.

  (13) Sugar legislation, including import control programs 
            that stabilize domestic prices.

  (14) All matters relating to pesticides, the Federal 
            Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act, as 
            amended, the Federal Environmental Pesticide 
            Control Act of 1972, the Federal Insecticide, 
            Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Amendments of 1988, 
            and the Food Quality Protection Act of 1996, 
            including, but not limited to, the registration, 
            marketing, and safe use of pesticides, groundwater 
            contamination, and the coordination of the 
            pesticide program under FIFRA with food safety 
            programs.

  (15) Agricultural research programs, including, but not 
            limited to, the authorization of specific research 
            projects and agricultural biotechnology development 
            efforts.

  (16) All matters relating to the Commodity Credit Corporation 
            Charter Act.

  (17) Legislation relating to the control of the entry into 
            the United States of temporary, nonresident aliens 
            for employment in agricultural production.

  (18) Legislation relating to the general operations and the 
            Organic Act of the Department of Agriculture, the 
            Commodity Credit Corporation, Federal Crop 
            Insurance Corporation, Farm Credit Administration, 
            Farm Credit System, Federal Agricultural Mortgage 
            Corporation, and Commodity Futures Trading 
            Commission.

  (19) Producer-funded research, promotion, and consumer and 
            industry information programs for agricultural 
            commodities.

  (20) Legislation regarding reclamation water projects where 
            the pricing of water delivered by such projects is 
            affected by whether the water will be used in the 
            production of a crop for which an acreage reduction 
            program is in effect.

  (21) Legislation regarding reclamation water projects for 
            which the Secretary of Agriculture is required to 
            make a determination regarding commodity 
            availability prior to the determination of the 
            price to be charged for the delivery of such 
            project water.

  (22) Legislation establishing the level of fees charged by 
            the Federal Government for the grazing of livestock 
            on Federal lands.

  (23) Legislation governing the Federal regulation of 
            transactions involving swaps contracts, hybrid 
            financial instruments, and derivative securities 
            and financial products.

  (24) Legislation regarding the Federal Reserve Board with 
            respect to its authority to regulate the 
            establishment of appropriate levels of margin on 
            stock index futures contracts.

    The Committee also reviews and studies, on a continuing 
basis, the current and prospective application, administration, 
execution, and effectiveness of those laws, or parts of laws, 
the subject matter of which is within the jurisdiction of the 
Committee, and the organization and operation of the Federal 
agencies and entities having responsibilities in or for the 
administration and execution thereof. In addition, the 
Committee, along with other standing Committees of the House, 
has the function of reviewing and studying on a continuing 
basis the effect or probable effect of tax and other fiscal and 
monetary policies affecting subjects within their jurisdiction.

                           c. oversight plan

    The Committee on Agriculture met on January 27, 2017, to 
also fulfill the General Oversight Responsibility reporting 
requirements of Rule X 2(d)(1) of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives.
    The following outline was prepared in consultation with the 
Ranking Minority Member and approved by the Full Committee. It 
was then forwarded to the Committee on Oversight and Government 
Reform and the Committee on House Administration on February 6, 
2017.
    The Committee expects to exercise appropriate oversight 
activity with regard to the following issues:

2014 Farm Bill and Current Agricultural Conditions

   Review the current state of the U.S. farm economy;

   Review the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) 
        implementation of the Agricultural Act of 2014;

   Review programs for waste, fraud, abuse and 
        mismanagement;

   Review the state of credit conditions and 
        availability in rural America;

   Review the effect of weather conditions on crop 
        production;

   Review USDA's implementation of the U.S. Warehouse 
        Act;

   Review of market situation, including effect of crop 
        reports and projections;

   Review USDA's implementation of the U.S. Grain 
        Standards Act;

   Review how Administrative Pay-Go is affecting 
        Department actions; and

   Review discretionary actions by USDA that are not 
        directly authorized by legislation.

Energy

   Assess energy programs authorized by the 
        Agricultural Act of 2014;

   Review administration of the Biomass Crop Assistance 
        Program (BCAP);

   Review activities funded by the Biomass Research and 
        Development Act (BRDA) and input from the external BRDA 
        Advisory Board;

   Review availability of agriculture and forestry 
        feedstocks for renewable energy production;

   Review current status of research on energy crops 
        and feedstocks;

   Review the Rural Utilities Service (RUS) electric 
        loan program;

   Review electricity reliability in rural America;

   Review current provisions in existing law that 
        support agriculture-based energy production and use;

   Review USDA's use of Commodity Credit Corporation 
        funds for the Green Fleet Initiative;

   Review implementation of the Renewable Fuel Standard 
        (RFS); and

   Review renewable fuel programs and their effect on 
        agriculture.

Conservation and the Environment

   Review the effect of regulatory activities by the 
        Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and its effect on 
        agriculture productivity;

   Review EPA grant program activities that impact 
        agriculture;

   Review the effect of regulatory activities carried 
        out pursuant to the Endangered Species Act (ESA), or 
        any proposed legislative changes to such Act, on 
        agricultural producers;

   Review the effect of the Administration's regulatory 
        activity relative to methyl bromide and glyphosate on 
        production of agriculture in the U.S.;

   Review budget and program activities of the Natural 
        Resources Conservation Service (NRCS);

   Review implementation of all of USDA's conservation 
        programs;

   Review USDA's implementation of the conservation 
        compliance provisions in the Agricultural Act of 2014;

   Review EPA's jurisdiction under the Clean Water Act 
        (CWA) and its effect on U.S. agriculture;

   Review of potential effects of EPA's Clean Air Act 
        (CAA) regulatory program on U.S. agriculture;

   Review ongoing discussions and potential 
        consequences for American agriculture under the United 
        Nations Climate Change Conference;

   Review EPA's implementation of the Food Quality 
        Protection Act (FQPA), Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, 
        and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and Pesticide Registration 
        Improvement Renewal Act (PRIA 3);

   Review the effect of litigation and rulemaking 
        concerning FIFRA, ESA, CAA, CWA, the Comprehensive 
        Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act 
        (CERCLA) and the Emergency Planning and Community Right 
        to Know Act (EPCRA) to evaluate these statutes' effects 
        on agricultural operations;

   Review the EPA's regulatory actions in regard to 
        pesticide evaluations;

   Review EPA's regulation of Animal Feeding 
        Operations; and

   Review Total Maximum Daily Load strategies and 
        effects on production agriculture.

Federal Crop Insurance and Risk Management

   Review USDA's implementation of crop insurance 
        provisions of the Agricultural Act of 2014;

   Review the role and effectiveness of Federal crop 
        insurance;

   Review USDA's and the Risk Management Agency's (RMA) 
        administration and oversight of Federal crop insurance;

   Review the availability of crop insurance as a risk 
        management tool;

   Review the adequacy and availability of risk 
        management tools for the livestock and dairy 
        industries;

   Review USDA's activities established to identify and 
        reduce crop insurance waste, fraud, and abuse;

   Review USDA's crop insurance rating methodology and 
        management of the Standard Reinsurance Agreement (SRA) 
        process;

   Review RMA's yield and revenue protection crop 
        insurance products; and

   Review RMA's progress in approving crop insurance 
        products for under-served commodities.

Implementation of Title VII of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and 
        Consumer Protection Act

   In its review of rulemakings required by Title VII 
        of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer 
        Protection Act (P.L. 111-203) (Dodd-Frank Act), the 
        Committee will continue to ensure:

    (1)  The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC)
              rulemaking processes are transparent and that 
            meaningful
              comments are accepted and appropriately reviewed;

    (2)  An adequate cost-benefit analysis is performed by the
              CFTC in accordance with the requirements set 
            forth in the
              Commodity Exchange Act for proposed or final 
            rules;

    (3)  The CFTC properly coordinates with both domestic and
              international financial regulators;

    (4)  Past exemptive relief orders, also referred to as ``no 
            action
              letters,'' issued by the CFTC provide the proper 
            relief for
              market participants; and

    (5)  Any final or proposed regulations will not harm or ad-
              versely affect the U.S. economy or financial 
            markets, in-
              cluding the effect on jobs and competitiveness;

   Examine how Title VII rulemakings have affected U.S. 
        market structure;

   Examine the developing effect of CFTC, SEC, and 
        Prudential Regulator regulations, such as the 
        imposition of new margin and capital requirements, and 
        how they affect the ability of many ``end-users'' to 
        utilize swaps to hedge against legitimate business 
        risks;

   Examine the level of coordination between U.S. and 
        international regulators for potential effects on U.S. 
        financial institutions compared to their foreign 
        counterparts; and

   Examine the feasibility of timetables established by 
        the Dodd-Frank Act in building the data, technology and 
        connectivity necessary to meet regulatory objectives.

The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission and the Derivatives 
        Markets

   Review the operations of the Commodity Futures 
        Trading Commission (CFTC);

   Review the growing consolidation and 
        internationalization of futures exchange trading;

   Review market machinations for exchange traded 
        energy and agricultural futures products;

   Review enforcement and oversight capabilities of the 
        CFTC both domestically and internationally;

   Continue to examine how the CFTC and futures 
        industry as a whole has addressed the MF Global and 
        PFGBest bankruptcies from both an enforcement and 
        regulatory reform standpoint to ensure that proper 
        remedial action is taken to prevent future losses to 
        segregated funds of customers;

   Continue to examine all sectors of the U.S. 
        derivatives and futures markets, including, but not 
        limited to: exchange or swap execution facility 
        trading; the roles of dealers, inter-dealer brokers, 
        data repositories, and clearinghouses; trade and price 
        reporting; and proposals aimed at protecting the 
        segregated funds of futures customers, especially in 
        light of the Commodity Exchange Act statutory 
        authorization of the CFTC which expired at the end of 
        FY 2013;

   Continue to examine the ongoing investigation and 
        enforcement action by the CFTC and other Federal 
        regulators with respect to the manipulation of 
        international financial benchmarks; and

   Review all operations of the CFTC, including, but 
        not limited to: a continued examination of whether the 
        cost-benefit analysis required by section 15a of the 
        CEA is adequate with respect to proposed and finalized 
        rules; the efficiency of internal Commission actions; 
        the Commission's use of its independent leasing 
        authority; stewardship of the Customer Protection Fund.

Agriculture Trade and International Food Aid

   Review tariff and non-tariff trade barriers--
        including domestic subsidies--currently applied by 
        agricultural product producing countries around the 
        world;

   Review ongoing multilateral, regional, and bilateral 
        trade negotiations (including World Trade Organization 
        (WTO) accession agreements) to assess their potential 
        effect on U.S. agriculture;

   Review implementation of existing trade agreements 
        and commitments as well as proposed trade agreements 
        and commitments to determine:

    (1)  whether they are consistent with current U.S. law;

    (2)  whether they will promote economic development in 
            rural
              areas of the U.S.;

    (3)  their effect or potential effect on current production 
            of im-
              port sensitive agricultural commodities, and on 
            exports of
              U.S. agricultural products;

    (4)  their effect or potential effect on the overall 
            competitive-
              ness of the U.S. agricultural sector, including 
            the produc-
              tion, processing and distribution of agricultural 
            products;
              and

    (5)  whether the agreements provide adequate, enforceable
              provisions to minimize non-tariff barriers to 
            U.S. exports;

   Monitor existing trade agreements to ensure trading 
        partners are meeting obligations and enforcing trade 
        commitments;

   Review agricultural export programs to determine how 
        well they are promoting the interests of U.S. 
        agriculture and examine proposals to improve, modify or 
        expand such programs;

   Review U.S. food aid programs to determine their 
        effect or potential effect on the reduction of world 
        hunger--particularly the potential effect of trade 
        negotiations on the effectiveness of U.S. food aid 
        programs;

   Review USDA and USAID's implementation of the Global 
        Food Security Act (GFSA);

   Review the market assessments USDA and USAID use to 
        evaluate the potential impact of U.S. food aid on 
        recipient countries;

   Review USAID's increasing use of cash-based food 
        aid, including financial controls;

   Review monitoring and evaluation activities carried 
        out by USDA and USAID; and

   Review sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) barriers and 
        other technical barriers to U.S. agricultural exports 
        and examine efforts to eliminate such barriers.

Agricultural Research and Promotion

   Review implementation of biosecurity protocols at 
        USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) laboratories;

   Review USDA's implementation of research, education, 
        and extension programs authorized in the Agricultural 
        Act of 2014;

   Review the administration of the ARS research 
        stations and worksites;

   Review USDA's continuing ability to conduct foreign 
        animal disease research, training and diagnostic 
        programs at the National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility 
        following the transfer of the center to the Department 
        of Homeland Security;

   Assess Federal efforts to facilitate research and 
        development of aquacultural enterprises, specifically 
        focusing on the activities of the Joint Subcommittee on 
        Aquaculture;

   Review USDA's regulation of organic standards;

   Review USDA's collection of organic production and 
        market data;

   Review administration of the National Institute of 
        Food and Agriculture (NIFA);

   Review the administration of the Agricultural Food 
        Research Initiative and other competitive research, 
        extension and education grants programs;

   Review efforts to leverage Federal research 
        investment with state, local, and private sources of 
        funding, including a review of the Foundation for Food 
        and Agricultural Research (FFAR);

   Review coordination between ARS, the Economic 
        Research Service (ERS), NIFA and action agencies in 
        USDA--such as NRCS and FSA--in order to prevent 
        duplicative research;

   Review operation of the National Agricultural 
        Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory 
        Board;

   Review USDA's efforts to expand research and 
        development of pathogen reduction technologies;

   Evaluate the current mix of research funding 
        mechanisms to ensure maximum benefits from these 
        investments to producers, processors and consumers;

   Review administration of USDA's agricultural 
        marketing and promotion programs;

   Review coordination between USDA and the Department 
        of Energy on energy research programs;

   Review the sufficiency of research funding under 
        ARS, ERS, the National Agricultural Statistics Service 
        (NASS) and NIFA;

   Review ARS, ERS, NASS and NIFA national program 
        priorities;

   Conduct oversight of the research grant process, 
        generally, and more specifically to coordinate and 
        prevent overlapping research; and

   Review the potential for research and technology 
        transfer to address the needs of both the biofuels and 
        livestock industries.

Biotechnology

   Review current regulations and research regarding 
        animal and plant biotechnology;

   Review FDA's regulatory activities regarding 
        genetically engineered animals;

   Assess USDA's efforts to develop and promote 
        benefits of biotechnology for increasing agricultural 
        productivity and combating hunger globally;

   Review USDA's management and controls over 
        biotechnology-derived material;

   Review the effect of litigation on USDA's timeliness 
        in resolving petitions to deregulate products of 
        biotechnology;

   Review effects of state, county, and municipal 
        regulation of biotechnology on the free-flow of 
        agricultural products in interstate commerce; and

   Review USDA's implementation of biotech labeling 
        standard.

U.S. Forest Service Administration

   Review the U.S. Forest Service's (USFS) strategy for 
        dealing with wildfire, including the effect of 
        hazardous fuels management, forest health efforts and 
        fire preparedness;

   Continue to monitor the effectiveness and efficiency 
        of the USFS fire management program;

   Review the effect of fire expenses on other USFS 
        program delivery;

   Assess the USFS strategy for timber harvesting on 
        Federal lands;

   Review effects of environmental regulations on 
        National Forest land management;

   Review economic effects of National Forest land 
        management on rural communities;

   Review USFS efforts to promote utilization of 
        National Forest timber for renewable energy purposes; 
        and

   Review USFS's management tools contained in the farm 
        bill.

Dairy

   Review USDA's implementation of the dairy risk 
        management provisions in the Agricultural Act of 2014;

   Review options to improve the efficiency and 
        effectiveness of dairy programs; and

   Review efficiency of Federal Milk Marketing Order 
        system.

Outreach and Civil Rights

   Review the operations of the Office of Advocacy and 
        Outreach;

   Monitor USDA's outreach efforts to beginning, small, 
        and minority farmers/ranchers;

   Monitor USDA's outreach efforts to military veterans 
        interested in careers in agriculture;

   Review of the operations of the office of the 
        Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights;

   Review USDA's implementation of the receipt for 
        service provisions in the Agricultural Act of 2014;

   Review USDA's process for settling discrimination 
        claims and evaluating individual claims submitted 
        pursuant to such settlements;

   Review the delivery of USDA services and outreach 
        efforts on Indian reservations and Tribal lands;

   Review the current status of the Agricultural Census 
        and efforts to reach undercounted farmers and ranchers; 
        and

   Review participation of minority farmers in FSA 
        County/Local Committees as well as outreach to increase 
        participation in County Committee elections.

USDA General Administration

   Review confidentiality of information provided to 
        USDA by agricultural producers;

   Review USDA's implementation of field office 
        consolidation for the purpose of effectively and 
        efficiently delivering commodity, conservation, energy 
        and rural development programs;

   Review USDA's efforts to modernize its Information 
        Technology (IT) systems; and

   Review the administrative structure of USDA for 
        effectiveness and efficiency.

Farm Credit, Rural Development, and the Rural Economy

   Review the Farm Credit Administration's (FCA) 
        regulatory program and activities regarding the Farm 
        Credit System (FCS) to assure its safety and soundness;

   Review the activities and programs of the Federal 
        Agricultural Mortgage Corporation (also referred to as 
        Farmer Mac);

   Review FSA's direct and guaranteed loan programs and 
        graduation efforts;

   Review the Rural Electrification Act (REA);

   Review the farm economy and access to credit;

   Review implementation of rural development policies 
        and authorities contained in the Agricultural Act of 
        2014 and the Consolidated Farm and Rural Development 
        Act;

   Conduct oversight of the USDA's Rural Broadband 
        Access Loan and Loan Guarantee Program;

   Review USDA Rural Development's application 
        processes and internal controls related to the farm 
        bill;

   Review the administration of the Rural 
        Microentrepreneur Assistance Program;

   Conduct oversight of the implementation of USDA's 
        telecommunications programs;

   Review the status of the Rural Telephone Bank;

   Assess the state of rural water systems and 
        effectiveness of Federal funding to build and upgrade 
        those systems;

   Assess the effectiveness of USDA programs targeted 
        toward rural infrastructure and business needs;

   Review agricultural lending practices;

   Review public-private partnerships in lending 
        through guaranteed loans;

   Review the definition of ``rural'' under rural 
        development programs;

   Review rural development loan programs and default 
        rates; and

   Review the success of rural development programs in 
        persistent poverty areas.

USDA Food and Nutrition Programs

   Review food and nutrition programs including the 
        Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), fruit 
        and vegetable initiatives, the Emergency Food 
        Assistance Program (TEFAP), the Food Distribution on 
        Indian Reservations (FDPIR) program and other commodity 
        distribution programs;

   Review participant eligibility criteria for SNAP;

   Review the interaction between SNAP and other low-
        income assistance programs such as the Temporary 
        Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, the Low-
        Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), and 
        provisions in the Affordable Care Act;

   Review SNAP work pilots and the efficiency and 
        accountability of the SNAP Employment & Training 
        program;

   Review educative initiatives such as SNAP-Ed and the 
        Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP);

   Review efforts by USDA and the states to combat 
        waste, fraud, and abuse within nutrition programs;

   Review efforts by state SNAP administrators to 
        modernize and streamline their programs; and

   Review the Community Food Project Program to ensure 
        cooperative grants are working.

Specialty Crops

   Review implementation of the Specialty Crop 
        Competitiveness Act;

   Review the Specialty Crop Block Grant program to 
        ensure that the grants awarded are enhancing the 
        specialty crop industry;

   Review farmers' market programs;

   Review implementation and effectiveness of 
        cooperative plant health programs, including Plant Pest 
        and Disease Management and Disaster Prevention and the 
        Clean Plant Network; and

   Review the Specialty Crop Research Initiative.

Food Safety

   Review implementation of the FDA Food Safety 
        Modernization Act;

   Review implementation of the FDA Egg Safety Rule;

   Review USDA's administration of meat and poultry 
        inspection laws and the FDA's food inspection 
        activities to ensure the development of scientifically 
        sound systems for food safety assurance;

   Review USDA's implementation of the catfish 
        inspection program;

   Review USDA's efforts to educate consumers regarding 
        safe food handling practices and streamline the 
        assessment and approval of food safety technologies;

   Review implementation of new protocols for meat, 
        poultry, eggs, or seafood safety inspection;

   Review USDA's enforcement of the Humane Methods of 
        Slaughter Act and humane handling regulations; and

   Review the mechanisms to establish scientifically 
        based international food safety standards.

Plant and Animal Health

   Review enforcement of the Animal Welfare Act;

   Assess Federal efforts to reduce threats to human, 
        animal, and plant health due to predatory and invasive 
        species;

   Review efforts of the Animal and Plant Health 
        Inspection Service (APHIS) to manage wildlife conflicts 
        in order to protect public health and safety;

   Assess USDA's Animal Disease Traceability Plan;

   Review implementation of Sec. 10201 (of the 2008 
        Farm Bill) regarding plant pest and disease management 
        and disaster prevention;

   Review USDA's regulation on horse protection; and

   Review USDA's regulation on organic livestock and 
        poultry practices.

Livestock Marketing

   Assess the effectiveness of the Grain Inspection, 
        Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) in 
        determining market manipulation in the livestock 
        industry;

   Review structural changes in agribusiness and the 
        potential cost and benefits for agricultural producers; 
        and

   Review the USDA's mandatory livestock price 
        reporting system.

Homeland and Agricultural Security

   Examine USDA's preparedness against terrorist 
        threats to production agriculture;

   Review cooperative efforts between the Department of 
        Homeland Security and USDA to prevent against foreign 
        animal disease; and

   Review agricultural inspection activities under the 
        Department of Homeland Security.

Miscellaneous

   Review the effects of sequestration on USDA 
        operations and programs; and

   Review the effect of transportation infrastructure 
        issues on agriculture and forestry;

Consultation With Other Committees To Reduce Duplication

   With Natural Resources on forestry issues, ESA 
        issues and other public land issues;

   With Science on research;

   With Ways and Means and Education and the Workforce 
        on nutrition programs;

   With Ways and Means on tax and trade issues;

   With Homeland Security on importation of animal and 
        plant material and on research related to 
        agroterrorism;

   With Armed Services on global food security;

   With Judiciary on immigrant agricultural labor;

   With Energy and Commerce on food safety and biomass 
        energy programs both existing and new;

   With Transportation and Infrastructure on certain 
        CWA compliance issues and food aid delivery;

   With Financial Services on Dodd-Frank Act issues;

   With Foreign Affairs on food aid and trade issues;

   With Small Business on addressing economic 
        opportunities for rural America; and

   Any other committee as appropriate.

    authorization of programs within the jurisdiction of the house 
                committee on agriculture 115th congress

    In the 115th Congress, the House Committee on Agriculture 
intends to continue to reauthorize all expiring authorities 
within its jurisdiction. In the 114th Congress, the Committee 
passed legislation to reauthorize all of the expired or 
expiring programs and authorities within its jurisdiction. At 
the end of the last Congress, only the Commodity Futures 
Trading Commission (CFTC) remained to be reauthorized. On May 
29, 2015, the Committee passed H.R. 2289, the Commodity End-
User Relief Act, which would have reauthorized the CFTC. H.R. 
2289 was subsequently passed by the House on June 9, 2015, but 
bill was not taken up by the full Senate.
    On January 12, 2017, the House once again passed 
legislation that reauthorizes the CFTC--H.R. 238, the Commodity 
End-User Relief Act. H.R. 238 currently awaits action in the 
Senate.
    There are three items within the Committee's jurisdiction 
that are set to expire in the 115th Congress--the programs 
authorized by the Agricultural Act of 2014 (2014 Farm Bill), 
the National Forest Foundation Act, and the Pesticide 
Registration Improvement Act (PRIA).
    The Committee plans to spend considerable time examining 
the programs that were last authorized in the 2014 Farm Bill. 
The current farm bill expires on September 30, 2018. Farm bill 
preparation will begin with hearings, both in Washington and in 
the field, to hear from producers and USDA about how the 
programs are working. Although dependent on timing in the 
Senate, it is the Committee's goal to reauthorize the farm bill 
before it expires.
    The National Forest Foundation was a lapsed authorization 
in the Committee's jurisdiction identified at the beginning of 
the 114th Congress. While the program was successfully 
reauthorized last Congress, its authority will again expire on 
September 30, 2018, and will most likely be reauthorized during 
the farm bill process.
    In addition to reauthorizing farm bill programs, during the 
first session of the 115th Congress, the Committee will 
reauthorize PRIA before it expires on September 30, 2017. This 
will be the fourth iteration of the pesticide registration 
bill. The Committee anticipates a hearing and markup for 
consideration of the bill. However, the Committee does not 
expect the need for a conference with the Senate.

    authorization of programs within the jurisdiction of the house 
                committee on agriculture 116th congress

    Going forward, the Committee intends to continue the effort 
to avoid lapsed authorizations. Accordingly, the Committee has 
identified two authorities set to expire in the 116th 
Congress--Livestock Mandatory Price Reporting and the U.S. 
Grain Standards Act. Both of these authorities were 
reauthorized in the 114th Congress and the Committee plans to 
reauthorize them during the course of the 116th Congress.

           II. Committee Activities During the 115th Congress


                     a. main legislative activities

    The Committee on Agriculture reported or otherwise 
considered a variety of bills in the 115th Congress covering 
many of the diverse areas within its jurisdiction.
    Some of the major activities of the Committee during the 
115th Congress included the following:

Agenda for the House Agriculture Committee

   The Agriculture Committee approached its business in 
        an open, transparent manner and maintained the strong 
        bipartisan tradition of the Committee. One of the main 
        priorities of the Committee during this Congress was to 
        provide oversight of the various Federal agencies 
        through the hearing process.

   The Agriculture Committee held 32 committee hearings 
        and 7 business meetings during the 115th Congress.

   The Committee heard testimony from nine 
        Administration officials, specifically U.S. Department 
        of Agriculture representatives and Administration 
        officials from the Commodity Futures Trading 
        Commission. Additional testimony heard by the Committee 
        was offered by university researchers, nonprofit 
        organizations, trade groups, and farmers and ranchers 
        from across the United States for a total of 139 
        witnesses.

   The House Agriculture Committee successfully passed 
        out of Committee a total of five bills that ultimately 
        became law:

     P.L. 115-43, Securing our Agriculture and Food 
            Act;

     P.L. 115-156, Removing Outdated Restrictions 
            to Allow for Job Growth Act;

     P.L. 115-157, to rename the Red River Valley 
            Agricultural Research Center in Fargo, North 
            Dakota, as the Edward T. Schafer Agricultural 
            Research Center;

     P.L. 115-277, To rename the Stop Trading on 
            Congressional Knowledge Act of 2012 in honor of 
            Representative Louise McIntosh Slaughter.; and

     P.L. 115-334, Agriculture Improvement Act of 
            2018.

   The House Agriculture Committee held 20 hearings to 
        examine the reauthorization of the farm bill. The 
        hearings reviewed all 12 titles of the Agricultural Act 
        of 2014 and explored the various programs that are 
        working and those that need to be improved upon.

   The House Agriculture Committee traveled across the 
        United States to hear from producers impacted by 
        agricultural policy. The Committee traveled to 
        Gainesville, FL, San Angelo, TX, Morgan, MN, Modesto, 
        CA, Decatur, IL, and Cobleskill, NY. Hundreds of 
        producers and stakeholders participated in these 
        listening sessions.

   The House Agriculture Committee successfully drafted 
        and passed out of the House bipartisan legislation to 
        reauthorize and improve the operations of the Commodity 
        Futures Trading Commission and reduce unnecessary 
        regulatory burdens on end-users. The legislation would 
        also clarify the CFTC's cost-benefit obligations for 
        new rulemakings, as well as address concerns relating 
        to protecting customers from another failure such as MF 
        Global and Peregrine Financial. This legislation was 
        the product of a multi-year process.

                  b. statistical summary of activities


  (1)  Statistics on bills referred to the Committee on 
            Agriculture

    Number of bills referred:


 
 
 
House bills................................................        354
Senate bills...............................................          1
House joint resolutions....................................          0
House concurrent resolutions...............................          1
Senate joint resolutions...................................          0
Senate concurrent resolutions..............................          0
House resolutions..........................................          8
                                                            ------------
  Total....................................................        363
 


  (2)  Disposition of Bills Containing Items Under the 
            Jurisdiction of the Committee on Agriculture


 
 
 
Bills enacted into law.....................................          7
Bills acted on by the Committee included in other bills              2
 that became law...........................................
Bills vetoed...............................................          0
Bills acted on by both Houses, but not enacted.............          0
Bills acted on by the House but not the Senate.............         12
Concurrent Resolutions approved............................          0
Bills reported to the House but not considered.............          1
Bills ordered reported, but not reported...................          0
Bills defeated in the House................................          0
 


  (3)  Statistics on hearings and markups


 
                                                                     Business
                   Full Committee/Subcommittee                       Meetings        Hearings     Field Hearings
 
Full Committee on Agriculture...................................               7              20
Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk Management....                               3
Subcommittee on Commodity Exchanges, Energy, and Credit.........                               2
Subcommittee on Conservation and Forestry.......................                               3
Subcommittee on Nutrition.......................................                               3
Subcommittee on Biotechnology, Horticulture, and Research.......                               2
Subcommittee on Livestock and Foreign Agriculture...............                               2
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
  Total.........................................................               7              35
 

 c. digest of bills within the jurisdiction of the committee on which 
                         action has been taken


1. Bills Enacted into Law

            P.L. 115-334 (H.R. 2)
    Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018

    H.R. 2 was introduced by Chairman K. Michael Conaway on 
April 12, 2018. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Agriculture. On April 18, 2018, the Committee ordered the bill 
to be reported, as amended, by a vote of 26 yeas and 20 nays. 
On April 18, 2018, the bill failed the House by a vote of 198 
yeas to 213 nays. Mr. Ryan moved to reconsider the vote. On 
June 21, 2018, the House passed the bill by a vote of 213 yeas 
to 211 nays.
    On June 29, 2018, the Senate passed the bill by a vote of 
86 yeas to 11 nays. Chairman Conaway requested to go to 
conference on July 18, 2018. The Senate agreed to the 
conference on July 31, 2018.
    On December 11, 2018, the Senate passed the conference 
report by a vote of 87 yeas to 13 nays. On December 12, 2018, 
the House passed the conference report by a vote of 369 yeas to 
47 nays. On December 20, 2018, the President signed the bill.

    Title I: Commodities

    Enhances Farm Policy and Provides Additional Flexibility

    PLC provides assistance to producers when the market price 
for a covered commodity falls to critically low levels (below 
the statutory reference price). ARC provides assistance to 
producers when actual crop revenue for a covered commodity 
falls below 86 percent of the benchmark revenue. Producers 
electing ARC can choose between county (CO) and farm-level (IC) 
coverage.
    Updated election options: The conference report offers 
producers a new choice between ARC and PLC on a crop-by-crop 
and farm-by-farm basis, applied jointly to the 2019 and 2020 
crop years.
    Beginning in crop year 2021, producers will have the 
flexibility to make an annual decision between ARC and PLC on a 
crop-by-crop and farm-by-farm basis.
    Effective Reference Prices: The conference report allows 
PLC Reference Prices to adjust with improvements in market 
prices. This Effective Reference Price is calculated as the 
greater of 85 percent of the 5 year Olympic average price and 
the PLC Reference Price established in the 2014 Farm Bill. In 
no case can the Effective Reference Price be more than 115 
percent of the PLC Reference Price (or less than the PLC 
Reference Price), shown in the table below.

                Reference Prices for Covered Commodities
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                Maximum
                                                      PLC      Effective
        Commodity                  Units           Reference   Reference
                                                     Price      Price*
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Barley                     bu.                         $4.95       $5.69
Chickpeas (Large)          cwt.                       $21.54      $24.77
Chickpeas (Small)          cwt.                       $19.04      $21.90
Corn                       bu.                         $3.70       $4.26
Dry Peas                   cwt.                       $11.00      $12.65
Grain Sorghum              bu.                         $3.95       $4.54
Lentils                    cwt.                       $19.97      $22.97
Minor Oilseeds             cwt.                       $20.15      $23.17
Oats                       bu.                         $2.40       $2.76
Peanuts                    ton                       $535.00     $615.25
Rice (LG/MG/SG)            cwt.                       $14.00      $16.10
Rice (TJ)                  cwt.                       $17.36      $19.96
Seed Cotton                lb.                        $0.367      $0.422
Soybeans                   bu.                         $8.40       $9.66
Wheat                      bu.                         $5.50       $6.33
------------------------------------------------------------------------
*To reach the maximum Effective Reference Price, the 5 year Olympic
  average price of the covered commodity must exceed the statutory
  reference price by 135 percent.

    Optional nationwide yield update: Beginning in crop year 
2020, owners of all farms in the country will have the 
opportunity to update the program yield used on the farm to 
calculate assistance under PLC, similar to the update 
opportunity provided in the 2014 Farm Bill. The update is 
intended to benefit producers who sustained multiple years of 
losses during the 2008-2012 crop years (the previous update 
period) for which the 2014 update was less effective.
    Producers may update the yield on the farm for each covered 
commodity to 90 percent of the average yield per planted acre 
on the farm from 2013-2017--ignoring years where the covered 
commodity was not planted on the farm--multiplied by the yield 
update factor for the covered commodity listed in the table 
below. For any year in which the yield on the farm was less 
than 75 percent of the county average yield from 2013-2017, 
owners may plug 75 percent of the county average yield.
    For example, assume the average yield per planted acre on 
the farm from 2013-2017 for wheat was 35 bu/ac. The producer 
could update the PLC yield to 30.8 bu/ac (or 90%   35 bu/ac   
0.9767).

                    Yield Update Factor by Commodity
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 Yield
                          Commodity                             Update
                                                                Factor*
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Barley                                                            0.9714
Canola                                                            0.9595
Chickpeas (Large)                                                 1.0000
Chickpeas (Small)                                                 0.9767
Corn                                                              0.9000
Cotton (Upland)                                                   0.9000
Dry Peas                                                          0.9988
Flaxseed                                                          1.0000
Grain Sorghum                                                     0.9000
Lentils                                                           1.0000
Mustard                                                           0.9423
Oats                                                              0.9677
Peanuts                                                           0.9273
Rapeseed                                                          1.0000
Rice (LG)                                                         0.9324
Rice (MG/SG)                                                      0.9866
Rice (TJ)                                                         0.9591
Safflower                                                         1.0000
Soybeans                                                          0.9000
Sunflower                                                         0.9378
Wheat                                                             0.9767
------------------------------------------------------------------------
*The yield update factor is the ratio of the national average yield for
  the commodity from 2008-2012 and 2013-2017 (limited to not less than
  90 percent or more than 100 percent).

    ARC-CO improvements: The conference report makes several 
targeted improvements to enhance the efficacy of ARC-CO. The 
conference report:

   Increases the yield plug from 70 percent to 80 
        percent of the county transitional yield.

   Incorporates the Effective Reference Price into the 
        calculation of benchmark revenue.

   Adds a trend adjustment factor that will function 
        similar to the factor utilized in crop insurance 
        policies.

   Creates a pilot program that will allow the 
        Secretary the flexibility to divide up to 25 large 
        counties into sub-county units with independently 
        calculated ARC payment rates.

   Requires the Secretary to establish guarantees for 
        irrigated and non-irrigated yields in each county.

   Prioritizes the use of RMA data for calculating 
        county yields in accordance with H.R. 4654.

   Provides assistance based on the county of the 
        farm's physical location.

   Requires USDA to publish payment rates and program 
        data in a more timely manner.

    Targets assistance to land in active production: The 
conference report suspends ARC and PLC payments on farms that 
have been entirely in grass or pasture since 2009 to ensure the 
farm safety net is targeted to those farms that are producing 
covered commodities. Recognizing that farms in grass are 
conserving natural resources, the conference report guarantees 
those farms an opportunity to participate in a 5 year grassland 
incentive contract under the Conservation Stewardship Program 
(CSP) at a rate of $18 per acre.

    Improves the Marketing Assistance Loan

    Harvest is often the lowest point of the year for commodity 
prices. The marketing loan allows farmers to pledge their crop 
as collateral and receive a loan for a portion of the crop's 
value, providing flexibility to market the crop when prices 
improve. The conference report increases the loan rates for 
certain commodities to more accurately reflect current market 
prices and provide more relevant assistance to farmers.

                       Loan Rate Comparison Table
------------------------------------------------------------------------
             Commodity                2014 Farm Bill     2018 Farm Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Barley                                       $1.95/bu           $2.50/bu
Chickpeas (Large)                          $11.28/cwt         $14.00/cwt
Chickpeas (Small)                           $7.43/cwt         $10.00/cwt
Corn                                         $1.95/bu           $2.20/bu
Cotton (ELS)                               $0.7977/lb           $0.95/lb
Cotton (Upland)                        $0.45-$0.52/lb     $0.45-$0.52/lb
Dry Peas                                    $5.40/cwt          $6.15/cwt
Grain Sorghum                                $1.95/bu           $2.20/bu
Lentils                                    $11.28/cwt         $13.00/cwt
Minor Oilseeds                             $10.09/cwt         $10.09/cwt
Oats                                         $1.39/bu           $2.00/bu
Peanuts                                    $0.1775/lb         $0.1775/lb
Rice                                        $6.50/cwt          $7.00/cwt
Soybeans                                     $5.00/bu           $6.20/bu
Sugar (Raw Cane)                           $0.1875/lb         $0.1975/lb
Wheat                                        $2.94/bu           $3.38/bu
------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Strengthens the Dairy Safety Net

    All sectors of production agriculture have been struggling 
to cope with a period of chronically low prices, but perhaps 
none more so than the dairy sector. Recognizing these 
challenges, in February Congress passed the Bipartisan Budget 
Act of 2018 (BBA) which made an $800 million investment in the 
Margin Protection Program (MPP) and lifted the cap on livestock 
insurance expenditures.
    The conference report renames MPP as Dairy Margin Coverage 
(DMC) and builds on the BBA investment by offering new coverage 
levels for the first 5 million pounds of production, 
drastically reducing premiums on catastrophic coverage levels 
for larger producers, and eliminating the restriction between 
the margin program (formerly MPP, now DMC) and Livestock Gross 
Margin (LGM) insurance.
    Increases coverage options: The conference report adds 
$8.50, $9.00, and $9.50 coverage levels for the first 5 million 
pounds of covered milk production. Additionally, the conference 
report expands the range of production allowed to be covered, 
from five percent up to 95 percent of production history.
    Rewards risk management strategies: For dairy operations 
that choose to make a 5 year decision to lock in a coverage 
level and coverage percentage for the life of the 2018 Farm 
Bill, premium rates are reduced by 25 percent.
    Offers flexibility and reduces certain premiums for large 
operations:

   The conference report allows dairies with covered 
        production in excess of 5 million pounds to enroll in 
        $8.50, $9.00, or

   $9.50 coverage under Tier I and to make an 
        independent coverage level election in Tier II. 
        Additionally, as noted in the table that follows, 
        premiums for $5.00 coverage in Tier II are reduced by 
        88 percent (91 percent if the premium is discounted for 
        5 year coverage) in an effort to make catastrophic 
        coverage levels more affordable.

                                        Premium Comparison Table ($/cwt)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                             Tier I (first 5m pounds)                        Tier II (over 5m pounds)
                ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Coverage Level                                                                                         DMC
                  MPP  Premium    DMC  Premium   DMC  Discounted   MPP  Premium    DMC  Premium     Discounted
                                                     Premium*                                        Premium*
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        $9.50              N/A          $0.150          $0.113              N/A             N/A             N/A
        $9.00              N/A          $0.110          $0.083              N/A             N/A             N/A
        $8.50              N/A          $0.105          $0.079              N/A             N/A             N/A
        $8.00           $0.142          $0.100          $0.075           $1.360          $1.813          $1.360
        $7.50           $0.087          $0.090          $0.068           $1.060          $1.413          $1.060
        $7.00           $0.063          $0.080          $0.060           $0.830          $1.107          $0.830
        $6.50           $0.040          $0.070          $0.053           $0.290          $0.650          $0.488
        $6.00           $0.016          $0.050          $0.038           $0.155          $0.310          $0.233
        $5.50           $0.009          $0.030          $0.023           $0.100          $0.100          $0.075
        $5.00           $0.000          $0.005        $0.00375           $0.040          $0.005        $0.00375
        $4.50           $0.000         $0.0025        $0.00188           $0.020         $0.0025        $0.00188
        $4.00           $0.000          $0.000          $0.000           $0.000          $0.000        $0.00000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*The DMC Discounted Premium would be the premium cost if an operation chooses to lock in the coverage level and
  coverage percentage for 5 years.

    Provides access to more risk management tools: The 
conference report eliminates the restriction on participating 
in DMC and LGM crop insurance. This flexibility, along with the 
new Dairy Revenue Protection (Dairy-RP) insurance policy 
developed by the American Farm Bureau Federation, will provide 
multiple options to address risk for dairy farmers.
    Provides equitable relief for 2018 MPP participation: The 
conference report allows dairy operations that were prohibited 
from participating in MPP following the premium reductions 
enacted via the BBA (due to enrollment in an LGM contract) to 
retroactively enroll in coverage.
    Incentivizes participation in revamped program: Recognizing 
MPP did not provide an adequate safety net for dairy farmers, 
the conference report provides dairy operations the opportunity 
to utilize 75 percent of the net premium paid for MPP from 
2014-2017 as a credit for future DMC premiums. Alternatively, 
operations can elect to receive 50 percent of net premium as a 
direct refund.

    Improves Vital Disaster Programs

    Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP): LIP provides assistance 
to livestock producers in the event of the death or forced sale 
of livestock due to an eligible cause of loss. The conference 
report updates the eligible causes of loss to include disease 
and deaths of unweaned livestock, so all livestock death losses 
are consolidated under one program (whereas certain losses were 
previously covered under ELAP).
    Livestock Forage Program (LFP): LFP provides feed cost 
replacement for livestock producers in the event of forage loss 
due to severe drought. The conference report maintains this 
critical assistance for livestock producers.
    Emergency Assistance For Livestock, Honey Bees, and Farm-
raised Fish (ELAP): ELAP provides assistance to producers of 
livestock, honey bees, and farm-raised fish to aid in the 
reduction of losses not covered under other disaster programs. 
The conference report ensures ELAP assistance will cover the 
inspection of herds for cattle fever tick and removes the 
arbitrary payment limitation on ELAP assistance.
    Tree Assistance Program (TAP): TAP offers cost-share 
assistance to eligible orchardists who suffer loss or damage to 
tree groves. Producers may receive 65 percent of the cost of 
replanting trees or 50 percent of the cost to remove damaged 
limbs and vines. The conference report increases the cost share 
to 75 percent for beginning farmers and veterans.

    Maintains Current Administrative Provisions

    Payment limitations and AGI means testing: The conference 
report maintains the current payment limitation of $125,000 in 
assistance from ARC/PLC per person or entity. The separate 
limit for peanuts is maintained and doubling for spouses 
continues to apply. Additionally, participation continues to be 
limited to persons or entities with less than $900,000 in 
average adjusted gross income (AGI). The conference report 
removes Loan Deficiency Payments (LDPs) and Marketing Loan 
Gains (MLGs) from counting toward the payment limitation.
    Actively Engaged in Farming (AEF) regulations: The 
conference report maintains current AEF regulations and 
continues to ensure all individuals eligible for the farm 
safety net are required to contribute land, labor, or capital 
to the farm operation and provide the necessary amount of labor 
and/or management. The conference report amends the definition 
of family to include first cousins, nieces, and nephews to 
ensure family farms are not subjected to cumbersome regulations 
only intended for non-family operations.

    Title II: Conservation

    The conference report continues the voluntary, locally-led, 
incentive-based conservation model. It builds on the success of 
the 2014 Farm Bill by streamlining, simplifying and improving 
program administration. The conference report also provides 
additional investment in soil health practices, such as cover 
crops, ultimately providing ``downstream'' benefits to 
communities in the form of cleaner water, cleaner air, 
healthier soils, and more wildlife habitat.
    Conservation Reserve Program (CRP): The conference report 
allows for an increased acreage cap of 27 million acres by 
2023, while also addressing the issue of CRP competing with 
farmers for productive land by reducing rental rates and 
incentive payments. The conference report includes House-passed 
provisions to increase the grassland acre floor to 2 million 
acres and provides more flexibility for grazing.
    Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP): The 
conference report continues the commitment to working lands by 
increasing funding for EQIP to $2.025 billion by fiscal year 
2023. Furthermore, the conference report adds producer-focused 
flexibility by establishing incentive contracts and alternative 
funding arrangements for irrigation districts. The conference 
report fosters innovation through Conservation Innovation 
Grants (CIG). Furthermore, it authorizes Conservation 
Innovation Trials and the Soil Health Pilot Project, connecting 
farmers and ranchers in the conservation innovation space with 
public and private entities and reporting findings for public 
review.
    Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP): The conference 
report continues the commitment to comprehensive working lands 
conservation by reforming and adding much needed flexibility to 
CSP. By removing the average $18 per acre funding requirement 
for the program, the conference report intends to better 
incentivize farmers to address local resource concerns. Current 
CSP contracts will be honored with an option for a 1 year 
extension for contracts expiring in 2019. Otherwise, funding 
for CSP is reduced from approximately $1.8 billion per year to 
no more than $1 billion per year with the savings being used to 
fund other higher-priority initiatives like EQIP, ACEP, and 
RCPP.
    Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP): The 
conference report restores funding for ACEP to $450 million per 
year and provides additional flexibility for ACEP to make the 
program more efficient for farmers, stakeholders, and USDA. The 
conference report continues to perform the functions of 
conserving agricultural lands through Agriculture Land 
Easements (ALE) and wetlands through Wetland Reserve Easements 
(WRE). The conference report makes important changes to 
streamline the requirements for ALE plans, add flexibility to 
matching fund requirements, reform the right of enforcement, 
clarify the need for conservation plans, and lift burdens on 
land trust certification.
    Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP): The 2014 
Farm Bill consolidated the authorities of the many regional 
programs into RCPP, where USDA partners with private 
organizations to address natural resource concerns. Targeted 
conservation initiatives are developed on the local level and 
selected by USDA through a competitive, merit-based application 
process. The conference report increases funding for RCPP to 
$300 million per year and streamlines the program to allow 
greater flexibility for NRCS, partners, and producers.
    Watershed and Flood Prevention and Small Watershed 
Rehabilitation: The conference report provides $500 million 
over 10 years for conservation infrastructure initiatives like 
Watershed and Flood Prevention and Small Watershed 
Rehabilitation.
    Additional producer access: The conference report removes 
impediments to conservation adoption by eliminating 
requirements for entities to have a SAM/DUNS number and 
providing USDA the ability to waive AGI limits for 
environmentally sensitive land of special significance.
    Feral Swine Eradication and Control Pilot: According to 
USDA, feral swine cause an estimated $1.5 billion in damage to 
property, crops, and natural resources annually and present a 
risk for the transmission of African Swine Fever (ASF) and 
other potentially catastrophic diseases. The conference report 
establishes the Feral Swine Eradication and Control Pilot with 
$75 million for threat assessment, control methods, and land 
restoration.
    Emphasizes protection of drinking water sources: The 
conference report reserves ten percent of covered conservation 
funding for the protection of sources of drinking water, allows 
community water systems to work with State Technical Committees 
to identify local priority areas for source water protection, 
and allows additional incentives for practices that protect 
source water.
    Other highlights:

   Provides $50 million for the Voluntary Public Access 
        Program.

   Provides $5 million for Grassroots Source Water 
        Protection.

   Reauthorizes the Conservation of Private Grazing 
        Land Program.

   Updates the Technical Service Provider (TSP) 
        definition and the TSP certification process.

    Title III: Trade

    Agricultural Trade Promotion and Facilitation: In an era 
where global agricultural markets are routinely distorted by 
the high and rising subsidies, tariffs, and non-tariff trade 
barriers of foreign governments, U.S. trade promotion programs 
are critical to promoting American agricultural products. The 
conference report streamlines the four existing trade promotion 
programs under one umbrella--as envisioned in the House-passed 
farm bill--to establish and maintain budget baseline for each 
of the programs moving forward. The conference report includes 
$255 million each fiscal year for Agricultural Trade Promotion 
and Facilitation with a Priority Trade Fund of $3.5 million 
annually to be used amongst the four programs at the discretion 
of the Secretary.

   Market Access Program (MAP): MAP provides funding 
        for export market development for U.S. agricultural 
        commodities (both generic and branded) in other 
        countries around the world. The conference report funds 
        MAP at not less than $200 million each year.

    Bill Emerson Humanitarian Trust (BEHT): The BEHT serves as 
a financial reserve allowing the Secretary of Agriculture and 
the Administrator of USAID to respond to unanticipated food 
crises abroad when other resources are not available. The 
conference report extends authority to use the funds of the 
BEHT, which currently holds over $280 million in available 
funds, through fiscal year 2023.
    Cochran Fellowship Program: The Cochran Fellowship Program 
is maintained to provide short-term training opportunities to 
agricultural professionals from middle-income countries, 
emerging markets, and emerging democracies. The conference 
report includes a House provision that allows the Secretary to 
authorize in-country training if deemed more appropriate and 
emphasizes fellowships focused on sanitary and phytosanitary 
standards. The conference report authorizes appropriations of 
up to $13 million each fiscal year to carry out the program.
    Borlaug International Agricultural Science and Technology 
Fellowship Program: The Borlaug Fellowship Program is 
reauthorized to continue promoting food security and economic 
growth through training fellowships for citizens from 
developing and middle-income countries. The conference report 
directs the Secretary to leverage fellowship alumni engagement 
to further improve the program and maintains the current 
authorization of appropriations for the program.
    International Agricultural Education Fellowship Program: 
First proposed in the House-passed farm bill, the International 
Agricultural Education Fellowship Program will enhance 
agricultural capacity in eligible countries by providing 
fellowships to U.S. citizens for the development of school-
based agricultural education and youth extension programs. This 
new initiative will build on the successful 4-H and FFA models 
in the U.S. to encourage young agricultural leaders in 
developing countries. This initiative will also provide real-
world, hands-on experience for recent U.S. college graduates 
who plan to return to the U.S. to pursue careers in 
agriculture. The conference report authorizes appropriations of 
$5 million for the International Agricultural Education 
Fellowship Program each fiscal year.

    Title IV: Nutrition

    The conference report reflects over 30 improvements to the 
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and other 
Federal nutrition programs, many of which reflect House 
priorities and lay the groundwork for improved policy by this 
administration and in future farm bills. The conference report 
includes incremental but significant victories that will 
improve SNAP integrity and make the program more effective for 
recipients.

    Incentivizes Work

    Existing work requirements are strengthened and paired with 
a variety of options and supports to increase opportunities for 
recipients while holding states accountable to administer 
Employment and Training (E&T) programs effectively. The 
conference report:

   Requires state agencies to consult with their state 
        workforce development board or local employers to 
        design the state agency's employment and training (E&T) 
        program to meet state or local workforce needs.

   Requires E&T programs to include case management and 
        allows for additional options including supervised job 
        search, apprenticeships, and subsidized employment.

   Allows the state agency and the Secretary to certify 
        additional training and work programs, known as 
        workforce partnerships, to be operated by a private 
        employer or a nonprofit organization with no use of 
        Federal funds.

   Prioritizes reallocation of unexpended E&T funds, 
        ensuring they go to states with impactful pilots and 
        programs.

   Requires state agencies to advise adults with no 
        earnings of available E&T services at SNAP 
        recertification.

   Expands countable veteran workforce programming to 
        include programs run by the Department of Labor or 
        Department of Veterans Affairs.

   Requires the support of governors for all Able-
        Bodied Adults without Dependents (ABAWD) work 
        requirement waiver requests.

   Reduces monthly exemptions--whereby states can 
        exempt SNAP recipients from the ABAWD work 
        requirements--from 15 percent to 12 percent of the 
        ABAWD population.

    Improves Program Integrity

    While SNAP is impactful and effective at helping those most 
in need, improvements are needed to reduce the almost $700 
million in annual program abuses.
    Participant tracking and access to state information 
systems: The conference report provides minimum standards and 
funding for states to track the length of time participants are 
on SNAP and permits the Secretary to audit and inspect state 
records and information systems.
    Quality control improvements: The conference report 
eliminates $48 million in annual state bonuses while holding 
states accountable for ensuring households receive the accurate 
amount of SNAP benefits and for making certain the program is 
administered in the most effective and efficient manner. States 
will no longer be given bonuses for administering SNAP in a 
manner that should be considered standard operating procedure.
    Interstate data matching to prevent multiple issuances: The 
conference report establishes a National Accuracy 
Clearinghouse, ensuring SNAP recipients are not receiving 
benefits in multiple states. The Congressional Budget Office 
(CBO) estimates that this provision alone will save almost $60 
million per year.
    Evaluation of child support enforcement cooperation 
requirements: The conference report requires USDA to assess the 
feasibility and potential impact of mandatory child support 
enforcement orders across states. This will lay the groundwork 
for future efforts to ensure unpaid child support goes to the 
children who are entitled to it and in many cases desperately 
need it.
    Review of SNAP operations: The conference report authorizes 
a review of certain group facilities, ensuring they are not 
drawing nutrition-related benefits from multiple Federal 
programs.
    Required action on data match information: The conference 
report permits states to pursue additional clarification and 
verification information (e.g., 3rd party income verification 
services) to ensure accurate eligibility and benefit 
determinations.
    Retail food store and recipient trafficking: The conference 
report provides continued support to combat retailer fraud and 
recipient trafficking.
    Improvements to electronic benefit transfer system: The 
conference report limits benefit storage to 3 months and 
benefit expungement to 9 months (down from 6 and 12 months, 
respectively), giving households a reasonable amount of time to 
use benefits if they need them while mitigating concerns about 
high balances on EBT cards and the potential for fraud.

    Promotes Healthy Foods

    More can be done to incentivize healthy food purchases. The 
conference report achieves this by improving existing 
incentives and by expanding coordination between educators, 
retailers, and recipients.
    Retail incentives: The conference report codifies the 
current waiver process by which retail food stores offer 
incentives to households participating in SNAP to purchase 
certain staple foods identified for increased consumption by 
the most recent dietary recommendations.
    Nutrition education: The conference report improves 
nutrition education through coordination, reporting, technical 
assistance, and comprehensive analysis of impact and outcomes.
    The Gus Schumacher Nutrition Incentive Program: The 
conference report permanently establishes projects to increase 
the purchase of fruits and vegetables among low-income 
consumers participating in SNAP by providing incentives at the 
point of purchase. Additionally, the conference report 
establishes a nutrition incentive technical assistance center 
to inform current and future grantees of best practices related 
to the delivery of incentives and the collection and 
dissemination of information related to incentive projects. 
This program was formerly known as the Food Insecurity 
Nutrition Incentive (FINI) program
    Senior Farmers' Market Nutrition Program: The conference 
report extends funding through 2023 to carry out a program 
geared toward low-income seniors that increases consumption of 
agricultural commodities and aids in the development of new 
farmers' markets.
    The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP): The 
conference report provides additional resources for TEFAP, 
assisting emergency feeding organizations (e.g., food banks) in 
meeting the needs of their communities.
    Healthy fluid milk incentives projects: Subject to 
appropriations (and authorized at $20 million), the Secretary 
is required to carry out milk incentive projects that develop 
and test methods to increase the purchase and consumption of 
milk by SNAP households via incentives at the point of 
purchase.

    Title V: Credit

    The conference report ensures access to credit so farmers 
and ranchers have the capital they need to invest in and run 
their operations. Access to credit is essential to production 
agriculture, because most producers utilize loans to buy seed, 
fertilizer, fuel, feed, and other inputs; buy and upgrade 
equipment; access land; and make all the other purchases and 
investments needed to run their business. Because most 
agricultural operations are financed with debt, farmers and 
ranchers borrow more money each year to produce a crop than 
most Americans will borrow in a lifetime.
    The conference report updates credit authorities to meet 
the capital needs of modern production agriculture with an 
emphasis on beginning farmers and ranchers. It also 
reauthorizes the credit programs contained in the Consolidated 
Farm and Rural Development Act, including all Farm Service 
Agency (FSA) loans.

    Provides Additional Incentives for Beginning Farmers and 
Ranchers

    New flexibility for veterans: Under current law, all 
ownership loan applicants must have participated in business 
operations of a farm or ranch for at least 3 years prior to the 
date the application is submitted. The conference report allows 
military and other relevant experience to fulfill a portion of, 
or satisfy entirely, the eligibility requirement.
    Individual Development Accounts: The conference report 
reauthorizes the Beginning Farmer and Rancher Individual 
Development Accounts Pilot Program which authorizes matching-
funds for savings accounts to meet farming-related expenses.
    Reserving loan fund set-asides: The conference report sets 
aside a portion of funds to provide guaranteed farm ownership 
loans and direct operating loans for beginning farmers and 
ranchers.
    Priority for joint financing: The conference report 
continues an existing priority for joint financing 
participation loans and down payment loans within direct farm 
ownership loans. By providing priority to applicants, USDA can 
maximize the number of borrowers served for a given level of 
appropriations.

    Improves FSA Loans

    Increases farm ownership loan limits and operating loan 
limits: Under current law, FSA can guarantee standard operating 
loans and farm ownership loans up to $1,399,000 and make direct 
operating and farm ownership loans for up to $300,000. The 
conference report increases guaranteed loan limits to 
$1,750,000, direct operating loans to $400,000, and direct farm 
ownership loans to $600,000, which enables farmers and ranchers 
to maintain, buy, and enlarge down payments and construction on 
new or existing farms or ranches.
    Extends Conservation Loan and Loan Guarantee Program: FSA 
makes and guarantees loans to promote conservation practices on 
farms and ranches that help protect natural resources 
throughout the United States. The conference report extends the 
Conservation Loan and Loan Guarantee Program to provide access 
to credit for farmers who need and want to implement 
conservation measures on their land but do not have the ``up 
front'' funds available to implement these practices.

    Other Provisions

    Farm Credit Act: The Farm Credit Act of 1933 established 
the Farm Credit System (FCS) as a group of cooperative lending 
institutions to provide short, intermediate, and long-term 
loans for agricultural purposes. The conference report does not 
make any policy or jurisdictional changes to Farm Credit 
Institutions but makes numerous clarifications and modest 
updates to ensure that FCS and its regulated institutions have 
the tools and authorities they need to serve the agricultural 
community.
    Study on loan risk: Under current law, farm mortgages are 
not allowed to be passed on to secondary markets if they are 
over 1,000 acres or $13 million. Secondary markets are a vital 
component of agricultural lending. The conference report 
requires the Farm Credit Administration (FCA) to conduct a 
study assessing the feasibility of increasing the 1,000 acre 
limitation to 2,000 acres. The findings of that report will be 
sent to the committees of jurisdictions in both chambers and 
will highlight any potential lending risks that may occur. Upon 
completion of a favorable study, the cap will be increased to 
2,000 acres.
    Maintains state agricultural mediation programs: State 
mediation programs were developed to assist agricultural 
producers, their creditors, and other persons directly affected 
by the actions of USDA to resolve disputes, thereby reducing 
the participant's cost associated with administrative appeals, 
litigation, and bankruptcy. The conference report reauthorizes 
the mediation program to enable states to assist farmers facing 
economic challenges in the declining farm economy.
    Equitable relief: The conference report authorizes the 
Secretary to provide equitable relief to a farmer or rancher 
whose failure to comply with the terms of a loan was caused by 
an action of USDA.
    Successional land: The conference report authorizes 
relending authority to resolve ownership of successional 
farmland.
    Study on credit needs of certain farmers: The conference 
report requires GAO to report on the agricultural credit needs 
of Indian Tribes and socially disadvantaged farmers and 
ranchers.

    Title VI: Rural Development

    The conference report invests in the heath, infrastructure, 
and economic development projects needed to meet the current 
challenges in rural America. It provides new tools for USDA to 
help meet the opioid and mental health crises roiling our 
communities. It redoubles the Federal commitment to providing 
broadband access to every rural American. It provides many 
rural communities new access to the credit they need to make 
long-term infrastructure investments. Finally, it promotes 
cooperative, regional economic development.

    Addresses the Rural Health Crisis

    Combats opioid addiction through treatment access: The 
conference report prioritizes projects that help communities 
meet the challenges of the opioid crisis, including projects 
that build and upgrade medical facilities, and projects that 
provide access to telehealth services in rural communities. It 
also provides a 33 percent increase in authorized funding for 
grants under the Distance Learning and Telemedicine Program.
    Farm and Ranch Stress Assistance Network: The conference 
report reestablishes the Farm and Ranch Stress Assistance 
Network to direct resources to mental health professionals 
aiding the agricultural community during a time of record 
suicides. During these times of challenging economic conditions 
in farm and ranch country, this network will help bring 
behavioral health services and support to America's farm and 
ranch families.
    Combating other rural health emergencies: The conference 
report also includes additional authority from the House-passed 
farm bill for the Secretary to declare other types of rural 
health emergencies and to prioritize program resources to meet 
those emerging challenges.

    Extends Rural Broadband Networks

    Access to broadband: The conference report continues USDA's 
critical investments in rural broadband. It provides new 
authority for the Secretary to make grants to finally bring 
broadband access to Americans in the most rural corners of our 
nation. Importantly, it includes the House-passed requirements 
for forward-looking broadband standards, to ensure that 
applicants build projects right the first time.
    Extending middle-mile broadband infrastructure: The 
conference report includes the House-passed authority for USDA 
to make loans and grants to middle-mile broadband projects, 
which link rural regions to the Internet backbone connections 
needed to provide high-speed Internet in rural communities.

    Improves Rural Economies

    Expanding rural access to capital for critical 
infrastructure: The conference report gives all rural 
communities access to the credit they need to finance critical 
infrastructure by expanding the guaranteed lending programs 
that bring private capital into rural America. This change, 
included in the House-passed farm bill, will permit these 
larger rural communities to build and upgrade essential 
infrastructure like hospitals, water systems, schools, public 
safety institutions, and telecommunications networks under the 
Community Facilities, Water and Waste Disposal, and Broadband 
Guaranteed Lending Programs.
    Regional economic development: The conference report 
includes House-passed improvements to the Strategic Community 
Economic Development Program, which incentivizes communities to 
work together with a broad coalition of stakeholders to achieve 
durable economic development gains. It also includes a new 
program designed to support emerging economic clusters in rural 
regions.

    Improves Program Integrity and Protects Taxpayers

    Promote better coordination among broadband agencies: The 
conference report includes important House-passed language to 
require coordination among USDA, the Federal Communications 
Commission (FCC), and the National Telecommunications and 
Information Administration (NTIA), the three principal agencies 
with jurisdiction over broadband policy, when administering 
their respective programs.
    Reducing duplication in broadband deployment: The 
conference report makes certain that broadband funds are spent 
where they are most needed, by prioritizing projects to 
communities with less than 10/1 Mbps broadband service and 
requiring that 90 percent of the households in any new 
broadband project receiving a grant or subsided loan be 
unserved. It also includes an expanded process for public 
notification and assessment of proposed broadband projects, to 
ensure that existing providers have the opportunity to protect 
their investments.
    Safeguarding taxpayer investments: The conference report 
includes numerous House-passed tools to promote program 
integrity and protect taxpayer resources, including by creating 
actionable requirements for broadband grant recipients and 
requiring new fees on lenders for certain guaranteed loans.

    Title VII: Research, Extension, and Related Matters

    The farm bill keeps American agriculture at the forefront 
of innovation and productivity through cutting-edge research 
and support of the nation's land grant and non-land-grant 
colleges of agriculture to provide the safest, most abundant, 
most affordable food supply in the world.
    Research is especially critical with the world population 
expected to reach nine billion by 2050.
    Land-Grant Universities: The land-grant university system 
plays a critical role in food and agricultural research, 
extension, and education. While maintaining the investment in 
capacity and competitive funds, the conference report provides 
the framework for future investment in the land-grant system's 
infrastructure and deferred maintenance. The conference report 
also streamlines the plan of work and time and effort reporting 
processes for land-grant formula funds to ensure that 
university research and extension personnel are able to spend 
their time and effort on actual projects rather than on 
completing unnecessary federally-mandated reports.
    The conference report provides new resources to strengthen 
our nation's 1890 land-grant universities. The conference 
report strikes an onerous carryover funding limitation for 1890 
extension programs, directs the Secretary to issue a report 
highlighting the state-level disparity in matching funds, and 
establishes a grant program for each 1890 institution to award 
scholarships to individuals pursuing a career in food and 
agricultural sciences.
    Non-Land-Grant Colleges of Agriculture (NLGCA): The 
conference report reauthorizes competitive grants to support 
the research and outreach capacity at NLGCA institutions and 
makes a key revision to clarify that an NLGCA institution is 
required to have at least two food and agricultural science 
degrees.
    Specialty Crop Research Initiative (SCRI): The conference 
report maintains $80 million per year for SCRI and incorporates 
$25 million per year in additional funding from the creation of 
the Citrus Trust Fund for the Emergency Citrus Disease Research 
and Extension program.
    Organic Agriculture Research and Extension Initiative 
(OREI): To ensure an adequate domestic supply of organically 
produced goods, the conference report makes a historic 
investment in organic agricultural research to ensure organic 
producers have the tools and resources needed to take advantage 
of higher premiums and a robust organic market.
    Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI): AFRI is 
USDA's premier competitive grants program for agricultural 
sciences, providing funding for important research, extension, 
and education. The conference report reauthorizes 
appropriations for AFRI at $700 million per year, repeals the 
matching funds requirement, and refines priorities to ensure 
stakeholder needs can be addressed.
    National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and 
Economics Advisory Board: The Board, its Specialty Crop 
Committee, and Citrus Disease Subcommittee are all reauthorized 
in the conference report. The membership of the Board is 
adjusted to remove duplication and encourage a streamlined 
stakeholder process. The conference report clarifies that the 
purpose of the Board is to provide a stakeholder-driven process 
to make recommendations to the Secretary on Federal research 
priorities. The conference report also clarifies that 
agricultural economists should be represented on the board.
    Pest and disease research: The conference report carries an 
important provision from the House-passed farm bill to increase 
coordination of research for the tactical sciences to help 
address biosecurity threats from pests, diseases, contaminants, 
and disasters.

    Title VIII: Forestry

    Expedites environmental reviews: The conference report 
encourages proper management for healthy and productive 
Federal, state, and private forests and incentivizes 
infrastructure and new market opportunities to revitalize 
communities and healthy landscapes. The conference report 
simplifies environmental reviews while still ensuring robust 
protection of the environment.
    The conference report reduces the threat of catastrophic 
wildfires by renewing the insect and disease categorical 
exclusion (CE) and expanding its purposes to allow for 
expedited reduction of hazardous fuels in our forests. This 
renewal and significant expansion of the existing authority to 
harvest and salvage insect and disease infested timber in 
forests will reduce the wildfire threat to our communities. The 
conference report also expedites treatment of Federal land by 
authorizing a CE of up to 4,500 acres to protect and promote 
habitat for the Greater Sage Grouse and Mule Deer.
    Empowers state and local decision making_Good Neighbor 
Authority (GNA): The conference report also promotes forest 
management by empowering non-Federal partners to remove timber. 
The 2014 Farm Bill allowed the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) to 
enter into cooperative agreements or contracts with states and 
Puerto Rico to perform watershed restoration and forest 
management services on National Forest System lands. Improving 
on the 2014 Farm Bill, the conference report expands that 
authority to include counties and Indian Tribes to provide more 
localized forest management and timber removal on our Federal 
forests.
    This expanded authority also codifies the current practice 
of allowing the states to keep any receipts from these timber 
sales, much of which is used for additional forest management 
and fuel load reduction. Failure to act on this fix could have 
jeopardized the entire Good Neighbor Authority.
    Utility infrastructure rights-of-way vegetation management 
pilot: The conference report authorizes the USFS to create a 
privately-funded pilot program to conduct limited and selective 
vegetation management near electricity infrastructure outside 
of a right-of-way. This pilot program will help reduce fuel 
load, decrease wildfire risk associated with tree contact with 
power lines, and promote electricity reliability.
    Community Wood Energy (and Wood Innovation) Program: 
Markets are essential for forest management and healthy 
forests. The conference report modifies the Community Wood 
Energy Program to support grants for new infrastructure, new 
mills, and added capacity that will use low-value, small-
diameter material.
    Timber Innovation Act: For successful construction, tall 
wood buildings require research to ensure their safety and 
compliance with all building standards. The conference report 
establishes a performance-driven research and development 
program to help advance tall wood building construction in the 
United States.
    Report on wildfire, insect infestation, and disease 
prevention on Federal land: The conference report directs USDA 
to update Congress on Federal forest management efforts to 
address forest health.
    State and Private Forest Landscape-Scale Restoration 
Program: The conference report expands existing authorities to 
focus the Landscape Scale Restoration Program on cross-boundary 
restoration to address concerns such as watershed restoration, 
wildfire risk reduction, and wildlife habitat conservation.
    Promotes cross-boundary wildfire mitigation: The conference 
report authorizes new collaborative tools to treat hazardous 
fuel loads on bordering non-Federal lands.
    Resource Advisory Committees (RAC): The conference report 
empowers local governments and local decision making by 
streamlining the RAC appointment process to allow more 
effective local collaboration on management projects and to 
expedite results.
    Land transfers: The conference report gives the USFS 
additional authority for sale or exchange of small parcels of 
land and authorizes several land transfers, including in the 
Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest, the Kisatchie National 
Forest, the NRCS Riverside County California Property, and the 
Okhissa Lake Rural Economic Development Conveyance.

    Title IX: Energy

    The conference report reauthorizes successful energy 
programs that help diversify our nation's energy supply, 
promote energy efficiency, and create new economic 
opportunities in rural America.
    Rural Energy for America Program (REAP): REAP provides 
financial assistance to agricultural producers and rural small 
businesses for the development of renewable energy systems or 
for energy efficiency improvements. The conference report 
provides $50 million per year and authorizes funding to be used 
for the purchase and installation of energy efficient equipment 
systems.
    Biobased Markets Program: The Biobased Markets Program was 
designed to promote biobased products through mandatory 
purchasing requirements for Federal agencies and their 
contractors and a voluntary product certification and label. 
The conference report modernizes this program by clarifying 
renewable chemical eligibility and streamlining the process 
required to use the biobased label. The conference report also 
ensures that mature markets for biobased products made from 
forestry materials and other biobased products are not put at a 
competitive disadvantage. The Biobased Markets Program is 
funded at $3 million per year.
    Biorefinery, Renewable Chemical, and Biobased Product 
Manufacturing Assistance: Improved in the 2014 Farm Bill, this 
program provides loan guarantees to assist in the development 
of new and emerging technologies for the development of 
advanced biofuels, renewable chemicals, and biobased product 
manufacturing. The conference report expands project 
eligibility and provides $75 million in funding.
    Bioenergy Program for Advanced Biofuels: The conference 
report reauthorizes the Bioenergy Program for Advanced Biofuels 
while ensuring the equitable distribution of payments to 
feedstocks. The Bioenergy Program for Advanced Biofuels is 
funded at $7 million per year.
    Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP): BCAP assists 
agricultural and forest land owners with the collection, 
harvest, storage, and transportation of eligible material for 
use in a biomass conversion facility. The conference report 
reauthorizes this program and adds algae as an eligible crop.
    Biodiesel Fuel Education Program: The conference report 
reauthorizes the Biodiesel Fuel Education Program which 
provides competitive grants to educate individuals about the 
benefits of biodiesel fuel use.
    Carbon Utilization and Biogas Education Program: The 
conference report establishes the Carbon Utilization and Biogas 
Education program to educate producers and rural businesses on 
biogas systems and utilization of carbon dioxide.
    Repealed programs: The conference report repeals the 
Repowering Assistance Program and the Rural Energy Self-
Sufficiency Initiative.

    Title X: Horticulture

    Specialty crops play an important role in the success of 
U.S. agriculture and are an essential component of our nation's 
food supply. Diversity among the crops--ranging from fruits and 
vegetables to tree nuts, nursery crops, and floriculture--makes 
the task of developing the specialty crop safety net 
particularly challenging. The conference report includes 
investments and reforms made in the House-passed farm bill to 
ensure that the specialty crop safety net remains strong.
    Specialty Crop Block Grants Program: The Specialty Crop 
Block Grants Program provides State Departments of Agriculture 
with resources to award promotion and marketing grants to 
enhance the competitiveness of the specialty crop industry. The 
conference report maintains $85 million per year and--at the 
insistence of the House--ensures that Federal bureaucracy does 
not unnecessarily interfere with project implementation at the 
state level.
    Plant Pest & Disease Management Program & National Clean 
Plant Network: The conference report maintains the significant 
advances made in the 2014 Farm Bill for the Plant Pest & 
Disease Management Program and the National Clean Plant 
Network. The programs will continue to be funded at $75 million 
per year.
    National Organic Program: Consumer demand for organically 
produced goods continues to provide market incentives for U.S. 
farmers and ranchers across a broad range of products.
    However, increases in domestic production have not been 
enough to keep up with increases in demand. Inadequate organic 
certification programs among our trading partners has led to 
fraudulent imports of organic products, undercutting domestic 
producers and creating distrust among consumers. To maintain 
program integrity, the conference report provides the National 
Organic Program with authority to require additional 
documentation, to access available data from cross-border 
documentation systems administered by other Federal agencies, 
and to provide oversight and approval for certifying agents 
operating in foreign countries.
    The conference report also requires USDA to modernize the 
trade tracking and data collection systems of the National 
Organic Program and provides funding to maintain and upgrade 
technology systems and data collections.
    National Organic Standard Board (NOSB): The National 
Organic Standards Board (NOSB) is a Federal advisory board made 
up of 15 public volunteers from across the organic community.
    Established by the Organic Foods Production Act (part of 
the 1990 Farm Bill) and governed by the Federal Advisory 
Committee Act, the NOSB considers and makes recommendations to 
USDA on requirements for the production, handling, processing, 
and marketing of organic agricultural products. The NOSB also 
has special responsibilities related to the National List of 
Allowed and Prohibited Substances.
    The conference report improves the structure and 
functioning of the NOSB. First, it allows for an employee of an 
owner or operator of an organic farming operation to represent 
the owner or operator on the NOSB and requires an annual 
authorization. Second, it clarifies that a \2/3\ vote proposing 
to amend the national list shall be considered decisive. The 
conference report also encourages the NOSB to consult with the 
FDA or EPA when deciding on a substance that FDA has determined 
is safe or the EPA has determined will not cause harm, and 
encourages the NOSB to develop procedures for the timely 
consideration and review of materials directly related to food 
safety compliance for inclusion on the national list.
    Hemp: The conference report legalizes the production of 
hemp as an agricultural commodity and removes it from the list 
of controlled substances. The conference report strikes a 
common-sense balance between proper enforcement and the 
flexibility many agricultural producers seek to produce hemp.
    Local Agriculture Market Program (LAMP): The conference 
report combines the existing Farmers' Markets and Local Food 
Promotion Program and the Value-Added Producer Grant Program 
under one umbrella. LAMP is provided $500 million in funding 
over 10 years and is authorized through fiscal year 2023.

    Title XI: Crop Insurance

    At the request of virtually every farmer, rancher, rural 
business owner, and lender in the country, the conference 
report protects crop insurance. Crop insurance, which is 
consistently under budget and today covers 311 million acres 
(or 90 percent of insurable acres) with more than $100 billion 
in liability protection, is vital to ensuring farmers have the 
ability to recover from natural disasters and secure annual 
operating loans.
    The conference report maintains the existing structure of 
crop insurance, allowing for private sector delivery in 
coordination with the Risk Management Agency (RMA). The 
conference report also rejects misguided proposals to apply 
means tests or payment limitations, invests in expanding 
options for under-served commodities and producers, and expands 
the premium discount for new and beginning farmers to assist in 
getting their farms and ranches up and running.
    Insurance for forage and grazing: Crops that can be both 
grazed and harvested--like winter wheat--are now eligible for 
separate policies on each intended use to provide livestock 
producers and pasture owners with additional insurance options.
    Research and development priorities: RMA is instructed to 
focus research and development activities on improving 
insurance for crops affected by hurricanes and tropical storms, 
farms that utilize more efficient irrigation systems, losses in 
crop quality, grain sorghum, different irrigation practices for 
rice, citrus, hops, greenhouse products, and high-risk, highly-
productive batture land.
    Whole Farm Revenue Protection (WFRP): WFRP discounts for 
beginning farmers and ranchers are expanded to 10 years (from 5 
years in current law). The conference report also requires the 
Federal Crop Insurance Corporation (FCIC) Board to review 
modifications to improve the effectiveness of WFRP policies, 
including reducing paperwork burdens on producers and agents, 
removing caps on nursery and livestock production, allowing 
waivers to expand operations, and using alternative record 
keeping like geospatial imaging to document planting and 
production history.
    Rebating: The conference report reaffirms that rebating is 
strictly prohibited, whether in the form of discounts, 
incentives, or other inducements, ensuring fair treatment for 
all producers. The conference report commends RMA for taking 
the rebating prohibition seriously and carrying out the 
prohibition in a manner that is consistent with Congressional 
intent and current law.
    Grandfathered rebating activity is strictly limited to the 
current list of entities in the current list of states.
    Hemp: The conference report makes hemp eligible for crop 
insurance and directs the FCIC Board to streamline the process 
for developing hemp policies.
    Crop insurance education grants: The conference report 
streamlines crop insurance education grants, primarily by 
requiring they be delivered through the National Institute of 
Food and Agriculture (NIFA).

    Title XII: Miscellaneous

    Livestock

    Animal disease prevention and management: Strong food 
security directly impacts national security. The animal 
agriculture sector faces disease threats capable of devastating 
the rural economy and our nation's food supply. The conference 
report takes a historic step toward ensuring USDA and its 
partners have the tools necessary to identify, diagnose, and 
respond to a potential outbreak, by addressing three critical 
components of a robust animal health protection system. The 
conference report provides $300 million over 10 years to be 
allocated amongst these animal disease prevention and 
management programs in addition to authorizing supplemental 
funding through the appropriations process.

   National Animal Health Laboratory Network: The 
        conference report reauthorizes the National Animal 
        Health Laboratory Network for rapid disease diagnosis.

   National Animal Vaccine and Veterinary 
        Countermeasures Bank (FMD Vaccine Bank): The conference 
        report establishes a U.S.-only vaccine bank to respond 
        to the accidental or intentional introduction of animal 
        diseases--foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in particular.

   National Animal Disease Preparedness and Response 
        Program: The conference report establishes the National 
        Animal Disease Preparedness and Response Program to 
        leverage local, state, and national resources to 
        prevent and respond to threats such as FMD, cattle 
        fever tick, avian influenza (AI), porcine epidemic 
        diarrhea virus (PEDv) and more.

    Feral Swine Eradication and Control Pilot: According to 
USDA, feral swine cause an estimated $1.5 billion in damage to 
property, crops, and natural resources annually and present a 
risk for the transmission of African Swine Fever (ASF) and 
other potentially catastrophic diseases. The conference report 
establishes the Feral Swine Eradication and Control Pilot with 
$75 million for threat assessment, control methods, and land 
restoration.
    Sheep Production and Marketing Grant Program: The 
conference report reauthorizes and provides funding to 
strengthen and enhance the production and marketing of sheep 
and sheep products in the United States through improvements to 
infrastructure, business operations, and resource development.
    Study on livestock dealer statutory trust: The conference 
report requires a study on the feasibility of establishing a 
statutory livestock dealer trust to protect unpaid sellers of 
livestock in instances of livestock dealer default.
    Definition of livestock: The conference report includes 
alpacas, llamas, live fish, and crawfish in the definition for 
livestock under the Emergency Livestock Feed Assistance Act. 
This change clarifies the types of livestock that are covered 
under Department of Transportation regulations.
    Veterinary training: The conference report encourages the 
Secretary to maintain veterinary teams capable of providing 
effective services before, during, and after emergencies in all 
regions of the United States.
    Report on FSIS guidance and outreach to small meat 
processors: The conference report directs USDA to evaluate and 
report on the effectiveness of FSIS outreach and guidance to 
small meat processors.
    Regional cattle and carcass grading correlation and 
training centers: The conference report authorizes AMS regional 
cattle and carcass correlation and training centers to limit 
subjectivity in cattle grading nationwide, ensuring accurate 
reporting and transparency.

    Beginning Farmers

    Farming Opportunities Training and Outreach (FOTO) Program: 
The conference report combines two existing programs, the 
Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program (BFRDP) and 
the Outreach and Assistance for Socially Disadvantaged Farmers 
Program, under one umbrella. FOTO is provided $435 million in 
funding over 10 years and is authorized through 2023.
    Commission on Farm Transitions_Needs for 2050: The 
conference report establishes the Commission on Farm 
Transitions--Needs for 2050. This commission--first proposed in 
the House-passed farm bill--will address needs relative to 
maintaining and strengthening a vital farm sector for the 
future. By 2050, we will need to more than double our 
productive capacity to feed the world's population. Ensuring 
the next generation of farmers and ranchers are in place to 
meet that need is the key goal in the creation of the 
Commission.
    Agricultural Youth Organization Coordinator: In early 2017, 
USDA announced a partnership with the National FFA Organization 
to help youth prepare for careers in agriculture. Part of that 
agreement was the creation of an Agricultural Youth 
Organization Coordinator to be the main point of contact for 
USDA programs aimed at helping youth enter the agricultural 
workforce. The conference report formally establishes this 
position.
    Office of Partnerships and Public Engagement: The 
conference report reauthorizes the USDA Office of Partnerships 
and Public Engagement and makes clarifying edits to reflect the 
administration's reorganization efforts. The office was 
established by the 2008 Farm Bill to improve access to USDA 
programs and to improve the viability and profitability of 
small farms and ranches and beginning/socially-disadvantaged 
farmers and ranchers.

    Other Key Provisions

    Pima Cotton Trust Fund and Wool Apparel Manufacturers Trust 
Fund: The conference report reauthorizes and fully funds these 
textile trust funds which compensate for a tariff schedule that 
favors importers of finished fabric goods over domestic 
manufacturers. These trust funds help ensure the domestic 
textile industry remains viable and competitive.
    Grain Standards: The conference report includes House-
passed language to allow certain grain handling facilities to 
restore prior exception agreements that were unilaterally 
terminated by USDA, a practice that Congress did not intend or 
agree with.
    Added Sugars: The conference report directs FDA to not 
require the added sugar declaration on the nutrition facts 
label of any single-ingredient product, including sugar, honey, 
agave, and maple syrup.
    National Oilheat Research Alliance (NORA): The conference 
report includes a 10 year reauthorization for NORA, an 
industry-funded check-off program that provides resources for 
consumer education and research to improve energy efficiency 
and safety.
            P.L. 115-43 (H.R. 1238)
    Securing our Agriculture and Food Act
    H.R. 1238 was introduced by Representative David Young on 
February 28, 2017. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Agriculture. On March 16, 2017, the Committee discharged the 
bill. The bill passed the House under suspension of the rules 
on March 22, 2017. The Senate passed the legislation by 
Unanimous Consent on March 24, 2017. The President signed the 
bill into law on June 30, 2017.
    P.L 115-43 amended the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to 
direct the Assistant Secretary for Health Affairs for the 
Department of Homeland Security to carry out a program to 
coordinate DHS efforts related to defending the food, 
agriculture, and veterinary systems of the United States 
against terrorism and other high-consequence events that pose a 
high risk to homeland security.
            P.L. 115-157 (H.R. 2154)
    To rename the Red River Valley Agricultural Research Center 
in Fargo, North Dakota, as the Edward T. Schafer Agricultural 
Research Center.
    H.R. 2154 was introduced by Representative Kevin Cramer on 
April 26, 2017. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Agriculture. On May 16, 2017, the Committee ordered the bill to 
be reported, as amended, by a voice vote. On May 17, 2017, the 
bill was considered in the House under suspension of the rules 
and passed the bill by a voice vote.
    H.R. 2154 renames the Red River Valley Agricultural 
Research Center in Fargo, North Dakota, as the Edward T. 
Schafer Agricultural Research Center. Edward T. Schafer served 
as North Dakota's Governor from 1992 to 2000, and as our 
nation's Secretary of Agriculture from 2008 to 2009. Renaming 
the Red River Valley Agricultural Research Center in Fargo, 
North Dakota, to honor Secretary Schafer is a fitting tribute 
to this distinguished public servant. Located in Secretary 
Schafer's home state and at one of the nation's premier land-
grant universities, this research center continues to advance 
its vital work on improving crops to strengthen our nation's 
food security.
            P.L. 115-156 (H.R. 1177)
    Removing Outdated Restrictions to Allow for Job Growth Act
    H.R. 1177 was introduced by Representative Bruce Poliquin 
on February 16, 2017, and was referred to the Committee on 
Agriculture that same day. On May 16, 2017, the Committee 
ordered the bill to be reported by a voice vote. On May 17, 
2017, the bill was considered in the House under suspension of 
the rules and passed by a vote of 418 yeas to 1 nay.
    The bill directs the Secretary of Agriculture to release, 
on behalf of the United States, the condition that certain 
lands conveyed to the City of Old Town, Maine, be used for a 
municipal airport.
    In the early 1980s, the City of Old Town, Maine, purchased 
land from the Federal Government to be part of the Old Town 
Airport. The deed included a use restriction, as required by a 
1941 amendment to the Bankhead-Jones Farm Tenant Act of 1937, 
limiting use of the land to a municipal airport or other public 
use. Old Town has invested heavily in this land in order to 
attract businesses, but the deed restriction needs to be lifted 
before further economic development can occur.
    H.R. 1177 provides for the removal of the deed restriction 
on the parcel of land around the Old Town airport to allow for 
business development. The bill allows the City of Old Town to 
send a letter to the Secretary of Agriculture detailing which 
lands it would like released from the deed restriction and 
directs the Secretary to release that land to the City of Old 
Town.
    The Committee believes H.R. 1177 will allow economic 
development in Old Town to move forward, creating 175 much-
needed jobs. This legislation will provide certainty to private 
investors in the community and help the local economy thrive.
            P.L. 115-277 (H.R. 6870)
    To rename the Stop Trading on Congressional Knowledge Act 
of 2012 in honor of Representative Louise McIntosh Slaughter.
    H.R. 6870 was introduced by Representative Paul Tonko on 
September 25, 2018. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Oversight and Government Reform, and in addition to the 
Committees on Financial Services, Agriculture, House 
Administration, and the Judiciary. On September 28, 2018, the 
Committee on Agriculture discharged the legislation. On 
September 28, 2018, the bill passed the House by unanimous 
consent.

2. Bills Acted on by the House But Not the Senate

            H.R. 238, Commodity End-User Relief Act
    H.R. 238 was introduced by Representative K. Michael 
Conaway on January 4, 2017. The bill was referred to the 
Committee on Agriculture, and in addition to the Committee on 
Financial Services. The bill passed the House on January 12, 
2017, by a vote of 239 yeas to 182 nays.
    This legislation reauthorizes the Commodity Futures Trading 
Commission, to better protect futures customers, to provide 
end-users with market certainty, to make basic reforms to 
ensure transparency and accountability at the Commission, to 
help farmers, ranchers, and end-users manage risks, to help 
keep consumer costs low, and for other purposes.
            H.R. 382, 100 Years of Women in Congress Act
    H.R. 382 was introduced by Representative Grace Meng on 
January 9, 2017. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Agriculture. The bill passed the House under suspension of the 
rules on March 20, 2017, by a voice vote.
    This bill amends the Food, Agriculture, Conservation, and 
Trade Act of 1990 to designate as Jeannette Rankin Women and 
Minorities in STEM Fields Program Grants the current research 
and extension grants to increase participation by women and 
underrepresented minorities from rural areas in the fields of 
science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).
            H.R. 953, Reducing Regulatory Burdens Act of 2017
    H.R. 953 was introduced by Representative Bob Gibbs on 
February 7, 2017. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure, and in addition to the 
Committee on Agriculture. On February 16, 2017, the Committee 
on Agriculture ordered the bill to be reported, as amended, by 
a voice vote. On May 24, 2017, the House passed the bill by a 
vote of 25 yeas to 165 nays.
    The Reducing Regulatory Burdens Act of 2017, H.R. 953, 
amends the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act 
and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act to clarify 
Congressional intent regarding the regulation of the use of 
pesticides in, or near, navigable waters.
    This bill amends the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and 
Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and the Federal Water Pollution Control 
Act (commonly known as the Clean Water Act) to prohibit the 
Environmental Protection Agency, or a state, from requiring a 
permit under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination 
System (NPDES) for a discharge of a pesticide from a point 
source into navigable waters if the discharge is approved under 
FIFRA. Point source pollution is waste discharged from a 
distinct place, such as a pipe, channel, or tunnel.
    NPDES permits are required for: (1) a discharge resulting 
from the application of a pesticide in violation of FIFRA that 
is relevant to protecting water quality, if the discharge would 
not have occurred but for the violation or the amount of 
pesticide or pesticide residue contained in the discharge is 
greater than would have occurred without the violation; (2) 
stormwater discharges regulated under the National Pollutant 
Discharge Elimination System (NPDES); and (3) discharges 
regulated under NPDES of manufacturing or industrial effluent 
or treatment works effluent and discharges incidental to the 
normal operation of a vessel, including a discharge resulting 
from operations concerning ballast water held in ships to 
increase stability or vessel biofouling prevention.
            H.R. 1029, Pesticide Registration Improvement Extension Act 
                    of 2017
    H.R. 1029 was introduced by Representative Rodney Davis on 
February 14, 2017. The bill was referred to the Agriculture 
Committee and in addition to the Committee on Energy and 
Commerce. On February 16, 2017, the Committee ordered the bill 
to be reported, as amended, by a voice vote. On March 20, 2017, 
the bill was considered in the House under suspension of the 
rules and passed by a voice vote.
    This bill amends the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and 
Rodenticide Act to improve pesticide registration and other 
activities under the Act, to extend and modify fee authorities, 
and for other purposes.
            H.R. 2936, Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2017
    H.R. 2936 was introduced by Representative Bruce Westerman 
on June 20, 2017. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Agriculture, and in addition, to the Committee on Natural 
Resources. On October 4, 2017, the Committee reported the bill, 
as amended, by voice vote. On November 1, 2017, the bill was 
considered under a rule and passed the House with 232 yeas and 
188 nays.
    H.R. 2936 addresses the declining health of America's 
forested land managed by the United States Forest Service 
(USFS) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) due to a lack of 
active management.
    The most significant result of this diminished forest 
health is the significant increase in catastrophic wildfires in 
the past 15 years. These catastrophic wildfires have a 
significant negative impact on watershed health, wildlife 
habitat, property, and human life. In 2016 alone, a total of 
4,312 structures were destroyed by wildfires, including 3,192 
residences, 1,025 minor structures and 78 commercial 
structures. Most disturbing, agency data indicates that 349 
lives have been lost to catastrophic wildfire in the last 
twenty years.
    The alarming increase in catastrophic wildfire impacts can 
be attributed to the decrease in timber production. From the 
mid-1950s to the mid-1990s, the USFS typically harvested 
between 10 and 12 billion board feet annually. Since 1996, that 
number has declined to a range of 1.5 to 3.3 billion board 
feet. During this same period, the average number of acres 
burned increased to 6.2 million acres.
    The reason for the declining amount of timber production is 
twofold: longer planning periods that result in increased time 
and money and leave our forests vulnerable to insect and 
disease damage, and the effect of unnecessary litigation on 
forest planning decisions.
    A 2012 USFS report estimated between 65 million and 82 
million acres of forest land are facing some level of threat of 
wildfire and are in need of restoration. This is more than \1/
3\ of the National Forest System. In 2014, the USFS treated 2.9 
million acres of land. At this pace, it would take the USFS 
more than 20 years to treat this endangered land.
    Prior to marking up H.R. 2936, the Subcommittee on 
Conservation and Forestry held a hearing to review the 
management of the National Forest System. Members heard 
testimony from former U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell, as 
well as stakeholders representing forestry, sportsmen, and 
conservation industries. The witnesses' testimony highlighted 
the need for active forest management to address the challenges 
the U.S. Forest Service is facing.
    This legislation attempts to address the core issues facing 
the USFS: lengthy and costly planning processes to complete 
needed hazardous fuel reduction projects, and the threat of 
litigation forcing the USFS and BLM to take an overly cautious 
approach to forest management. H.R. 2936 addresses these 
challenges by including categorical exclusions for processes 
that are routine and have known effects, allowing the agencies 
to perform forest management activities sooner to save time and 
taxpayer money. It rewards collaboration, giving all interest 
groups a seat at the table, and minimizes the threat of 
litigation of these collaborative projects.
    H.R. 2936 imposes no new requirements or burdens on the 
USFS or BLM. It expands upon the successes of the 2014 Farm 
Bill and the Healthy Forest Restoration Act.
    H.R. 2936 retains many environmental safeguards to ensure 
the respective land management agencies use these authorities 
in a reasonable and environmentally safe manner.
            H.R. 2941, Kisatchie National Forest Land Conveyance Act
    H.R. 2941 was introduced by Representative Ralph Lee 
Abraham on June 20, 2017. The bill was referred to the 
Committee on Agriculture. On October 4, 2017, the Committee 
reported the bill by voice vote. On October 31, 2017, the bill 
was considered in the House under suspension of the rules and 
passed by a voice vote.
    The U.S. Forest Service (USFS) currently owns tracts of 
land in Louisiana that are inter-mixed with private land and 
heavily impacted by residences. These tracts have lost their 
natural qualities and are isolated from the core lands of 
Kisatchie National Forest. This fragmentation and urbanization 
leaves the land incompatible with National Forest management. 
The Committee believes managing these tracts for public benefit 
and use is a poor use of taxpayer money.
    In disposing of the occupied lots with some minor acreage 
of adjacent Federal land, the USFS eliminates administrative 
and boundary maintenance costs. USFS would then be able to use 
the proceeds to identify and purchase land with recreational 
qualities that is more conducive to National Forest management.
    H.R. 2941, the Kisatchie National Forest Land Conveyance 
Act, will allow the sale of these isolated parcels (two in 
total; 50.08 acres; as identified as desired disposal by the 
USFS). The proceeds from the sale of these parcels will be made 
available for the acquisition of lands and interests in land in 
the Kisatchie National Forest.
    Kisatchie National Forest is rich in renewable wildlife 
resources, and supporting wilderness habitat is vital to their 
sustainability. H.R. 2941 allows Kisatchie National Forest to 
consolidate ownership of natural lands and continues the strong 
tradition of the National Forest Service acting as stewards for 
the environment.
            H.R. 3567, To authorize the purchase of a small parcel of 
                    Natural Resources Conservation Service property in 
                    Riverside, California.
    H.R. 3567 was introduced by Representative Ken Calvert on 
July 28, 2017. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Agriculture. On October 4, 2017, the Committee reported the 
bill by voice vote. On October 31, 2017, the bill was 
considered in the House under suspension of the rules and 
passed by a voice vote.
    Since 1996, the Riverside-Corona Resource Conservation 
District (RCRCD) partnered with the Natural Resources 
Conservation Service (NRCS) to acquire a property vacated by 
the USDA Salinity Lab.
    Although NRCS has not obligated any funds for plant 
materials research at the Glenwood Drive property since they 
acquired it, RCRCD subsequently invested $2.8 million into the 
property with the understanding that NRCS would eventually 
transfer the property.
    H.R. 3567 would authorize transfer of the title to the 
RCRCD, a decision supported by NRCS. The legislation states 
that current NRCS operation at the property shall be allowed to 
continue at no cost to the Federal Government.

3. House Resolutions Considered in the House

    None.

4. Bills Reported by the Committee on Agriculture But Not Considered

    None.

5. Bills Reported by Other Committees Within the Committee on 
        Agriculture's Jurisdiction But Not Considered

            H.R. 10, Financial CHOICE Act of 2017
    H.R. 10 was introduced by Representative Jeb Hensarling on 
April 26, 2017. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Financial Services, and in addition to the Committees on 
Agriculture, Ways and Means, the Judiciary, Oversight and 
Government Reform, Transportation and Infrastructure, Rules, 
the Budget, and Education and the Workforce. On May 25, 2017, 
the Committee on Agriculture discharged the legislation. On 
June 8, 2017, the legislation passed the House by a vote of 233 
yeas to 186 nays.
            H.R. 23, Gaining Responsibility on Water Act of 2017
    H.R. 23 was introduced by Representative David Valadao on 
January 3, 2017. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Natural Resources, and in addition to the Committee on 
Agriculture. On July 12, 2017, the legislation passed the House 
by a vote of 230 yeas to 190 nays.
    This bill would address water operations at Reclamation 
facilities and Federal approval of non-Federal water storage 
facilities on Federal lands.
            H.R. 289, Guides and Outfitters Act (GO Act)
    H.R. 289 was introduced by Representative Doug LaMalfa on 
January 4, 2017. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Natural Resources, and in addition to the Committee on 
Agriculture. On July 10, 2017, the Committee on Agriculture 
discharged the legislation.
    This bill amends the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement 
Act to specify the circumstances in which the Department of the 
Interior and the Department of Agriculture may: (1) issue 
special recreation permits for Federal recreational lands and 
waters, and (2) charge a special recreation permit fee for 
them.
            H.R. 825, Public Land Renewable Energy Development Act of 
                    2017
    H.R. 825 was introduced by Paul Gosar on February 2, 2017. 
The bill was referred to the Committee on Natural Resources, 
and in addition to the Committee on Agriculture. On September 
21, 2017, the Committee on Agriculture discharged the 
legislation. The purpose of H.R. 825 is to promote the 
development of renewable energy on public land.
            H.R. 995, 21st Century Respect Act
    H.R. 995 was introduced by Representative Hakeem Jeffries 
on February 9, 2017. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Natural Resources, and in addition to the Committee on 
Agriculture. On February 9, 2017, the Committee on Agriculture 
discharged the legislation. On November 8, 2017, the Committee 
on Natural Resources ordered the legislation to be reported, as 
amended, by unanimous consent. On November 28, 2017, the 
legislation was considered under suspension of the rules and 
passed the House by a voice vote.
    H.R. 995 would require the Secretary of Agriculture and the 
Secretary of the Interior to amend certain sections of the Code 
of Federal Regulations for racial appropriateness.
    Today the United States is 241 years old. In that time, the 
country has seen an immense amount of change and growth. Over 
the course of history, laws and policies have been updated to 
reflect this growth. However, some decades-old statutes and 
regulations contain antiquated terms. Enacted in 2016, Public 
Law 114-157 modernized antiquated ethnic terms related to 
minorities found in the Office of Minority Economic Impact of 
the Department of Energy (42 U.S.C. 7141) and section 106 of 
the Local Public Works Capital Development and Investment Act 
of 1976 (Minority Business Enterprises, 42 U.S.C. 6705) for 
racial appropriateness. H.R. 995 would make similar changes to 
terms found in certain regulations of the Department of 
Agriculture and the Department of the Interior.
            H.R. 1873, Electricity Reliability and Forest Protection 
                    Act
    H.R. 1873 was introduced by Representative Doug LaMalfa on 
April 4, 2017. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Natural Resources, and in addition to the Committee on 
Agriculture. On June 12, 2017, the Committee on Agriculture 
discharged the legislation. On June 21, 2017, the bill was 
considered under a rule in the House and passed by a vote of 
300 yeas to 118 nays.
    This legislation amends the Federal Land Policy and 
Management Act of 1976 to enhance the reliability of the 
electricity grid and reduce the threat of wildfires to and from 
electric transmission and distribution facilities on Federal 
lands by facilitating vegetation management on such lands.
            H.R. 2425, Public Lands Telecommunications Act
    H.R. 2425 was introduced by Representative Jared Huffman on 
May 16, 2017. the bill was referred to the Committee on Natural 
Resources, and in addition to the Committee on Agriculture, for 
a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each 
case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the 
jurisdiction of the committee concerned. On June 27, 2017, the 
Committee on Natural Resources ordered it reported, amended, by 
voice vote. On December 21, 2018, the Committee on Natural 
Resources reported the bill, as amended.
    This legislation would support the establishment and 
improvement of communications sites on or adjacent to Federal 
lands under the jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Interior 
or the Secretary of Agriculture through the retention and use 
of rental fees associated with such sites, and for other 
purposes.
            H.R. 2939, Water Rights Protection Act of 2017
    H.R. 2939 was introduced by Representative Scott Tipton on 
June 20, 2017. The bill was referred to the Committee Natural 
Resources, and in addition to the Committee on Agriculture. On 
July, 25, 2017, the Committee on Agriculture discharged the 
legislation.
    This legislation would prohibit the conditioning of any 
permit, lease, or other use agreement on the transfer of any 
water right to the United States by the Secretaries of the 
Interior and Agriculture.
            H.R. 3186, Every Kid Outdoors Act
    H.R. 3186 was introduced by Representative Niki Tsongas on 
July 11, 2017. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Natural Resources, and in addition to the Committees on 
Agriculture, and Transportation and Infrastructure. On August 
3, 2018, the Committee on Agriculture discharged the 
legislation. On September 12, 2018, the bill was in the House 
and passed by a vote of 383 yeas to 2 nays.
    Since 2015, the Department of the Interior, through the 
`Every Kid in a Park' initiative, has offered fourth graders 
and their families free entrance to our national parks and 
other Federal lands. The initiative launched prior to the 
National Park Service's Centennial in 2016 as one way to 
connect with and create the next generation of park visitors. 
Funding and support for the initiative comes through the 
National Park Service's budget for youth engagement programs as 
well as from private donations and volunteer hours.
            H.R. 3400, Recreation Not Red-Tape Act
    H.R. 3400 was introduced by Representative Rob Bishop on 
July 26, 2017. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Natural Resources, and in addition to the Committees on 
Agriculture, Transportation and Infrastructure, Energy and 
Commerce, and Armed Services. On April 18, 2018, the Committee 
on Natural Resources ordered the bill to be reported, as 
amended.
    This bill amends the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement 
Act to require the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the 
Forest Service to review the process for the issuance and 
renewal of special recreation permits, including for cross-
jurisdictional trips, with respect to outfitters and guides.
            H.R. 3548, Border Security for America Act of 2017
    H.R. 3548 was introduced by Representative Michael McCaul 
on July 28, 2017. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security, and in addition to the Committees on Armed 
Services, Foreign Affairs, Natural Resources, Agriculture, 
Transportation and Infrastructure, Ways and Means, and 
Oversight and Government Reform. On January 10, 2018, the 
Committee on Agriculture discharged the legislation. The 
legislation makes certain improvements to the security of the 
international borders of the United States.
            H.R. 3668, Sportsmen's Heritage And Recreational 
                    Enhancement Act (SHARE Act)
    H.R. 3668 was introduced by Representative Jeff Duncan on 
January 10, 2018. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Natural Resources, and in addition to the Committees on 
Agriculture, the Judiciary, Energy and Commerce, Transportation 
and Infrastructure, and Ways and Means. On September 18, 2017, 
the Committee on Agriculture discharged the legislation.
    This legislation provides for the preservation of 
sportsmen's heritage and enhancement of recreation 
opportunities on Federal land.
            H.R. 4760, Securing America's Future Act of 2018
    H.R. 4670 was introduced by Representative Bob Goodlatte on 
January 10, 2018. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Judiciary, and in addition to the Committees on Education and 
the Workforce, Homeland Security, Foreign Affairs, Ways and 
Means, Armed Services, Oversight and Government Reform, 
Agriculture, Transportation and Infrastructure, and Natural 
Resources, for a period to be subsequently determined by the 
Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as 
fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned. On 
June 21, 2018, the legislation was considered on the House 
floor and failed by a vote of 193 yeas to 231 nays. This 
legislation amends the Immigration and Nationality Act to 
revise immigrant visa allocation provisions, including family 
related visas.
            H.R. 4824, Rural Broadband Permitting Efficiency Act of 
                    2018
    H.R. 4824 was introduced by Representative John Curtis on 
January 18, 2017. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Natural Resources, and in addition to the Committee on 
Agriculture. On August 30, 2018, the Committee on Agriculture 
discharged the legislation. On September 12, 2018, the bill 
passed the House by a voice vote.
    This legislation would allow certain state permitting 
authority to encourage expansion of broadband service to rural 
communities.
            H.R. 6136, Border Security and Immigration Reform Act of 
                    2018
    H.R. 6136 was introduced by Representative Bob Goodlatte on 
June 19, 2018. The bill was referred to the Committee on the 
Judiciary, and in addition to the Committees on Homeland 
Security, Agriculture, Natural Resources, Transportation and 
Infrastructure, Ways and Means, Energy and Commerce, Armed 
Services, Foreign Affairs, the Budget, and Oversight and 
Government Reform, for a period to be subsequently determined 
by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such 
provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee 
concerned.
    On June 27, 2018, the bill was considered on by the House 
and failed by a vote of 121 yeas to 301 nays.
    This bill directs the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) 
to achieve situational awareness and operational control of the 
border, including by increasing enforcement personnel. The bill 
provides funding for infrastructure, law enforcement, and 
border security, including funds for a border wall along the 
southern border. The bill provides for: (1) an Integrated 
Border Enforcement Team Program within DHS; (2) Tunnel Task 
Forces; (3) a pilot program on the use of electromagnetic 
spectrum to support border control operations; (4) a Biometric 
Identification Transnational Migration Alert Program; (5) 
construction of new border ports of entry; (6) a biometric exit 
data system at certain airports, seaports, and land ports of 
entry; (7) electronic passport screening and biometric 
matching; and (8) protections for children apprehended at the 
border from parental separation and for children in DHS 
custody.
    DHS may provide assistance to a foreign country to address 
migrant flows affecting the United States. DHS may provide 6 
year renewable contingent nonimmigrant status for certain 
aliens who were under the age of 16 when they first entered the 
United States. Adjustment to immigrant status is provided based 
on a point system. Children of long-term temporary foreign 
workers are also eligible for such status adjustment.
    DHS may designate certain groups as a criminal gang. Such 
individuals may not seek asylum, withholding of removal, or 
temporary protected status. Indemnification is provided for law 
enforcement entities sued for complying with DHS detainers. DHS 
detainer authority is revised.
    The bill creates a private right of action against a state 
or local jurisdiction that declines to honor a DHS detainer for 
a convicted illegal alien who then commits murder, rape, or 
sexual abuse of a minor.
    The bill eliminates: (1) the diversity visa program, (2) 
certain family-based visa categories, and (3) the per-country 
limit for employment-based immigrants. The per-country limit 
for family based-immigrants is increased.
    Asylum and visa screening provisions are revised.

6. Bills Ordered Reported by the Committee on Agriculture

    See the bills listed under ``1. Bills Enacted into Law'' 
and ``2. Bills Acted on by the House But Not the Senate.''

7. Bills Ordered Reported but Not Reported by Other Committees Within 
        the Committee on Agriculture's Jurisdiction

    None.

8. Bills Defeated

    None.

9. Bills Acted on by the Committee Included in Other Laws Enacted

            H.R. 2521, South Carolina Peanut Parity Act of 2017
    H.R. 2521 was introduced by Representative Joe Wilson on 
May 18, 2017. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Agriculture. On October 4, 2017, the Committee ordered the bill 
to be reported by voice vote. On October 31, 2017, the bill was 
considered in the House under suspension of the rules and 
passed by a voice vote.
    The Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002 (2002 
Farm Bill) requires the Secretary of Agriculture to establish a 
Peanut Standards Board (Board) for the purpose of advising the 
Secretary on quality and handling standards for domestically 
produced and imported peanuts. The Board is comprised of 18 
members equally divided between producers and industry 
representatives by region.
    The Secretary appoints members to the Board, but is 
required to select three producers from each of the three 
regions (Southeast, Southwest, and Virginia/Carolina). As it is 
currently written, only the states of Virginia and North 
Carolina are considered a part of the Virginia/Carolina region.
    H.R. 2521, the South Carolina Peanut Parity Act of 2017 
would amend the 2002 Farm Bill to add South Carolina to the 
Virginia/Carolina region for purposes of appointments to the 
Peanut Standards Board. The bill would not change the number of 
position available on the board, nor would it impact the 
definitions of any of the other growing regions.
    See P.L. 115-334 (H.R. 2) listed under ``1. Bills Enacted 
into Law''.
            H.R. 2921, National Forest System Vegetation Management 
                    Pilot Program Act of 2017
    H.R. 2921 was introduced by Representative Kevin Cramer on 
June 15, 2017. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Agriculture, and in addition, to the Committee on Natural 
Resources. On October 4, 2017, the Committee reported the bill 
by voice vote. On October 31, 2017, the bill was considered in 
the House under suspension of the rules and passed by a voice 
vote.
    H.R. 2921 addresses the need for collaboration in 
maintaining our U.S. Forest Service (USFS) lands and energy 
infrastructure rights-of-way that local communities and 
businesses rely upon.
    Deteriorating forest health, particularly in the western 
United States, has increased the frequency and severity for 
forest fires in recent years. This has resulted in increased 
fire threat to electric transmission and associated utility 
infrastructure across USFS land.
    The Government Accountability Office has found that fuel 
reduction treatment projects reduce flammable vegetation, 
minimize the severity of wildland fires, increase landscape 
resiliency to fire, and provide firefighter access during fire 
suppression activities.
    If a fire destroys utility infrastructure, there are 
several known and potential costs, including: infrastructure 
replacement, costs to customers for electric outages, 
government disaster funding, and supplemental appropriations.
    H.R. 2921 would create a pilot program to conduct limited 
and selective vegetation management near utility infrastructure 
outside of a right-of-way. To incentivize private 
participation, it creates a separate off-right-of-way liability 
standard from the current strict liability standard to a gross 
negligence standard for this voluntary work. The 10 year 
program--funded entirely by interested utility companies--
allows vegetation management on USFS lands--approved by the 
Secretary of Agriculture--up to 75 beyond the utility's right-
of-way to better protect utility infrastructure and reduce the 
risk of forest fires.
    See P.L. 115-334 (H.R. 2) listed under ``1. Bills Enacted 
into Law''.
            H.R 6720, Dog and Cat Meat Trade Prohibition Act of 2018
    H.R. 6720 was introduced by Representative Vern Buchanan on 
September 6, 2018. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Agriculture. On September 12, 2018, the bill passed by the 
House by voice vote.
    See P.L. 115-334 (H.R. 2) listed under ``1. Bills Enacted 
into Law''.

10. Bills Vetoed

    None.

11. Bills Acted on by Both Houses But Not Enacted

    None

12. Concurrent Resolutions Approved

    Other Bills of Interest: Several bills acted on by other 
committees, but not acted on by the Committee on Agriculture, 
contain provisions relating to matters within the Committee's 
jurisdiction. The following are abbreviated summaries of these 
bills.
            H. Con. Res. 71, Establishing the congressional budget for 
                    the United States Government for FY 2018.
    H. Con. Res. 71 was introduced by Representative Diane 
Black on July 21, 2017, and was referred to the Committee on 
the Budget. The Committee on the Budget ordered the bill 
reported July 21, 2017.
    H. Con. Res. 71 establishes the budget for the United 
States Government for Fiscal Year 2018 and setting forth 
appropriate budgetary levels for Fiscal Years 2019 through 
2027.
            H.R. 2810, National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal 
                    Year 2018
    H.R. 2810 was introduced by Representative Mac Thornberry 
on June 7, 2017. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Armed Services. This legislation contained provisions within 
the Committee on Agriculture's jurisdiction. On July 14, 2017, 
the House passed the bill by a vote of 344 yeas to 81 nays.
    On December 12, 2017, it became Public Law No. 115-91.

                              d. oversight

    The Committee on Agriculture and its subcommittees were 
active in their oversight functions, holding a number of 
oversight hearings and activities during the 115th Congress. 
The hearings related to the application, administration, and 
effectiveness of laws that lie within the Committee's 
jurisdiction as well as the organization and operation of the 
Department of Agriculture and other Federal agencies having 
responsibility for the administration of such laws. The 
hearings often result in recommendations for improvements in 
the administration of the laws, regulations and policies in 
effect in the Executive Branch as they relate to the 
Committee's jurisdiction. Information gathered at these 
hearings was useful in preparing legislation for consideration 
in the House of Representatives.
    As part of its hearings, the Committee and its 
subcommittees reviewed the way the particular Federal agency or 
department (usually the Department of Agriculture) administered 
existing laws related to the subject matter of the legislation 
before, or to be considered by, the Committee. In most cases, 
legislation favorably reported to the House carries a 
termination date (a ``sunset'') to ensure that in the future 
Congress will again review the effectiveness and the methods 
with which the Executive Branch of Government has carried out 
the letter and the spirit of that statute.
    In keeping with the objective of the Oversight Plan, as 
submitted to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform 
and House Administration, and Rule XI, clause 2 of the House of 
Representatives, the Committee and its subcommittees conducted 
the following chronological oversight hearings during the 115th 
Congress (Note: To see a copy of the Oversight Plan as 
submitted, see ``I. Summary of Organization, Jurisdiction, and 
Oversight Plan of the Committee on Agriculture.''):

1. Oversight Hearings

    February 15, 2017: Rural Economic Outlook: Setting the 
Stage for the Next Farm Bill. Full Committee. Serial No. 115-1.
    This hearing focused on the current state of the rural 
economy. Witnesses were five economists from USDA, the Federal 
Reserve, and land-grant universities who provided data and 
perspective on the significant challenges facing American's 
farmers, ranchers, and their rural neighbors. With net farm 
income expected down 50 percent from its peak in 2013, concerns 
on the economic realities are front and center for the upcoming 
discussion on the farm bill. Producers need a reliable farm 
safety net that provides reliable risk management tools in 
periods of low prices. Witnesses described their concerns on 
the economy, but also some bright spots when comparing the 
current situation to the farm crisis of the 1980s. Dairy and 
cotton were both the particular focus of questions, with the 
economists on the panel providing perspective on their concerns 
with markets and current policy for those commodities.
    February 16, 2017: Pros and Cons of Restricting SNAP 
Purchases. Full Committee. Serial No. 115-2.
    In this hearing Members discussed the implications of 
further restricting what can be purchased with SNAP dollars, 
the implementation process for retailers, and the impact that 
restrictions, incentives, and nutrition education have in 
consumer behavior change. The hearing focused on the best 
avenue to improve the diets of low-income Americans. Members 
heard from a variety of perspectives related to the impact of 
restricting food purchases within SNAP and their applicable 
impacts on health, behavior patterns, as well as from a 
representative from the retail industry.
    February 28, 2017: The Next Farm Bill: Conservation Policy. 
Subcommittee on Conservation and Forestry. Serial No. 115-3.
    This Subcommittee hearing evaluated reforms made to the 
conservation title (Title II) in the past farm bill. Under the 
2014 Farm Bill, conservation programs were consolidated and 
reformed to provide flexibility and to reduce duplication 
across programs. The farm bill provides farmers, ranchers, 
foresters, and landowners with voluntary, incentive-based 
financial and technical assistance for conservation practices. 
Testimony provided feedback on consolidation as well as 
suggestions for policy changes in the next farm bill. The need 
for technical assistance was a priority for all the witnesses, 
for working lands programs and land retirement programs. All 
witnesses supported incentive-based, voluntary conservation as 
the best way to provide benefits to the environment, the 
farmer, the public, and wildlife.
    February 28, 2017: The Next Farm Bill: International Market 
Development. Subcommittee on Livestock and Foreign Agriculture. 
Serial No. 115-3.
    Through this hearing, the Committee sought to develop a 
better understanding of, and record of support for, USDA's 
trade promotion and market development programs--namely the 
Market Access Program (MAP) and the Foreign Market Development 
(FMD) program. Witnesses made clear the importance of these 
programs in opening and developing new markets for U.S. 
products overseas, especially in the face of uncertainty 
regarding the status of existing and future trade agreements.
    March 9, 2017: The Next Farm Bill: Rural Development and 
Energy Programs. Subcommittee on Commodity Exchanges, Energy, 
and Credit. Serial No. 115-3.
    Through this hearing, the Committee reviewed the portfolio 
of rural development and energy programs administered by the 
U.S. Department of Agriculture. The Subcommittee heard from a 
broad array of stakeholders who shared their views on how the 
rural development and renewable energy loan and grant programs 
promote economic growth and rural revitalization.
    March 9, 2017: The Next Farm Bill: Specialty Crops. 
Subcommittee on Biotechnology, Horticulture, and Research. 
Serial No. 115-3.
    This hearing continued a series of Subcommittee hearings 
that set the stage for the next farm bill. The hearing 
evaluated the effectiveness of the 2014 Farm Bill programs 
aimed at benefiting specialty crop production, which can be 
found in multiple titles. Witnesses raised concerns on a host 
of different programs, such as research funding, pest and 
disease control, trade promotion programs, and immigration 
policy.
    March 16, 2017: The Next Farm Bill: Agricultural Research. 
Subcommittee on Biotechnology, Horticulture, and Research. 
Serial No. 115-3.
    This hearing explored agricultural research (Title VII of 
the 2014 Farm Bill). The witnesses provided a general overview 
of the topic, stressing the important role that research plays 
in ensuring that American agriculture remains competitive and 
capable of addressing growing needs around the world. The 
witnesses also highlighted growing concerns over declining 
public investment in agricultural research, and the fact that 
other countries are now significantly outpacing the United 
States in terms of agricultural research investment.
    March 16, 2017: The Next Farm Bill: Forestry Initiatives. 
Subcommittee on Conservation and Forestry. Serial No. 115-3.
    In the hearing the witnesses evaluated the effectiveness of 
farm bill authorized provisions that impact Forest Service 
managed lands, as well as state and private forestry. The focus 
was on the Forestry, Conservation, and Energy titles of the 
2014 Farm Bill. A particular interest to members and the 
witnesses was the effect that management decisions had on 
catastrophic wildfires. They discussed challenges to reducing 
fuel loads through the removal of timber and biomass, and 
needed technical assistance for private forests owners to 
manage properly. Witnesses also testified about the importance 
of markets for wood products to drive forest management.
    March 21, 2017: The Next Farm Bill: Nutrition Distribution 
Programs. Subcommittee on Nutrition. Serial No. 115-3.
    This hearing provided Members with operational and policy 
perspectives associated with three food distribution programs 
within the Nutrition title: The Emergency Food Assistance 
Program (TEFAP), the Commodity Supplemental Food Program 
(CSFP), and the Food Distribution Program on Indian 
Reservations (FDPIR). Witnesses provided information on how 
USDA Foods are distributed, associated eligibility criteria and 
legal authority, as well as how these distribution programs 
differ from one another, how they interact, and how TEFAP, 
CSFP, and FDPIR, along with the Supplemental Nutrition 
Assistance Program (SNAP), strengthen the nutrition safety net 
and provide support to citizens in need.
    March 21, 2017: The Next Farm Bill: Livestock Producer 
Perspectives. Subcommittee on Livestock and Foreign 
Agriculture. Serial No. 115-3.
    Despite the lack of a formal ``livestock title'' in the 
most recent farm bill, livestock producers participate in a 
variety of U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) programs and 
initiatives. This hearing gave representatives from four of the 
major livestock producer groups the opportunity to discuss 
their experiences with existing programs and initiatives, as 
well as an opportunity to generally discuss the issues facing 
the livestock industry, and namely, to lay out their priorities 
for the upcoming farm bill.
    March 22, 2017: The Next Farm Bill: Dairy Policy. Full 
Committee. Serial No. 115-3.
    This hearing reviewed current dairy policy and explored 
options to make it more effective for farmers in the next farm 
bill. The witnesses provided a general overview of the state of 
the dairy industry, which is experiencing an extended period of 
low prices. They discussed the effectiveness of the Margin 
Protection Program (MPP), which was crafted in the 2014 Farm 
Bill during a time when dairy farmers were dealing with record 
feed costs that were squeezing margins on the farm. Witnesses 
also touched on international issues that have arisen, 
hindering their ability to sell their products overseas in 
markets that they have become increasingly dependent upon.
    March 28, 2017: The Next Farm Bill: Commodity Policy--Part 
I. Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk 
Management. Serial No. 115-3.
    This was a continuation of a series of Subcommittee 
hearings to set the stage for the next farm bill, and the first 
to concentrate on provisions in the commodities (Title I) and 
crop insurance titles (Title XI). The hearing focused on how 
the farm safety net of the 2014 Farm Bill has performed, thus 
far, and what changes will need to be made in the next farm 
bill. Witnesses highlighted the importance of farm policy to 
farmers and ranchers and provided recommendations to improve 
the safety net. Witnesses were producers representing the 
national associations for corn, soybeans, wheat, barley, and 
grain sorghum.
    March 28, 2017: The Next Farm Bill: The Future of SNAP. 
Subcommittee on Nutrition. Serial No. 115-3.
    The House Committee on Agriculture completed a 
comprehensive review of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance 
Program (SNAP) during the 114th Congress. Known as the Past, 
Present, and Future of SNAP, the purpose of the review was to 
provide a better understanding of SNAP, the population it 
serves, how the program administers food benefits and other 
services to assist that population, and to examine ways the 
program can be improved. This hearing provided an additional 
opportunity for stakeholders and Members to discuss priorities 
for improvements to SNAP in the upcoming farm bill, including 
fostering adequate nutrition, improving self-sufficiency, 
bettering outcomes for children and families via education, and 
continuing to improve program efficiency and integrity.
    March 29, 2017: Review of the Farm Credit System. Full 
Committee. Hearing Serial No. 115-4.
    The purpose of this hearing was twofold. First, the 
committee examined the soundness of the Farm Credit System by 
hearing testimony from the board of the Farm Credit 
Administration. Members focused on the financial soundness of 
the System as well as the bounds of association lending 
authority. Although there has been a decline in net farm 
income, the regulators were confident that the System is 
properly capitalized and diversified to function properly. 
Additionally, representatives from the System's lending 
institutions addressed the credit needs of farmers and 
ranchers, and how the institutions are working to provide 
reliable credit in a declining farm economy.
    April 4, 2017: The Next Farm Bill: Commodity Policy--Part 
II. Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk 
Management. Hearing Serial No. 115-3.
    This was a continuation of a series of Subcommittee 
hearings to set the stage for the next farm bill, and the 
second to concentrate on provisions in the commodities (Title 
I) and crop insurance titles (Title XI). The hearing focused on 
how the farm safety net of the 2014 Farm Bill has performed, 
thus far, and what changes will need to be made in the next 
farm bill. Witnesses highlighted the importance of farm policy 
to farmers and ranchers and provided recommendations to improve 
the safety net. Witnesses were representatives of the national 
associations for cotton, rice, peanut, oilseed, and sugar 
producers.
    April 4, 2017: The Next Farm Bill: Credit Programs. 
Subcommittee on Commodity Exchanges, Energy, and Credit. Serial 
No. 115-3.
    During this hearing the Committee evaluated the 
effectiveness of the Farm Service Agency credit programs 
authorized by the farm bill. The focus stayed on the decline in 
net farm income and how all lending institutions are adjusting 
to the changing needs of producers in these economic times. 
Witnesses spoke to the importance of all programs, both direct 
and guaranteed, and to their ability to provide reliable credit 
to producers of all kinds. Additional discussion focused on the 
use of Farmer Mac as a secondary market for agricultural banks 
to continue to serve customers for years to come.
    April 5, 2017: Agriculture and Tax Reform: Opportunities 
for Rural America. Full Committee. Serial No. 115-5.
    Through this hearing, the Committee sought to prepare for 
the upcoming debate on reforming the nation's Tax Code by 
hearing testimony on tax policies that are important to 
agricultural producers and rural Americans. Witnesses discussed 
the unique challenges of farming, ranching, and forestry, and 
how specific provisions in the code address those concerns. 
Witnesses also discussed how Congress might further consider 
those concerns within the contours of what we currently know 
about potential tax reform.
    May 17, 2017: State of the Rural Economy: Secretary of 
Agriculture Sonny Perdue. Full Committee. Hearing Serial No. 
115-6.
    The purpose of this hearing was to review the status of the 
rural economy and provide the newly confirmed Secretary of 
Agriculture an opportunity to speak directly with the Committee 
about a variety of timely issues. In his testimony, Secretary 
Perdue highlighted that America's farmers and ranchers are 
facing increasing financial stress with little relief on the 
horizon. He also discussed USDA priorities under the new 
Administration and a proposed reorganization within the 
Department. Members' questions for the Secretary largely 
related to agricultural concerns in their districts, with an 
eye toward informing the discussions of the upcoming farm bill.
    June 7, 2017: The Next Farm Bill: The Future of 
International Food Aid and Agricultural Development. Full 
Committee. Serial No. 115-3.
    The purpose of this hearing was to build on extensive work 
done by the Committee during the 114th Congress reviewing U.S. 
international food aid and agriculture development programs. 
Witnesses representing a broad range of stakeholder viewpoints 
discussed how the Administration's recent budget proposal would 
be detrimental to their work. Testimony was provided on behalf 
of a commodity group, a private voluntary organization (PVO), a 
Ready-to-Use-Food (RUTF) manufacturer, a maritime coalition, 
and a nonprofit policy foundation. The hearing explored how 
programs eliminated or reduced within the President's budget 
proposal actually are a strong fit within the current 
Administration's `America First' policy based on job creation, 
national security, commodity usage, and other benefits. Members 
asked questions related to potential policy changes as they 
prepare to craft the upcoming farm bill.
    June 8, 2017: The Next Farm Bill: SNAP Technology and 
Modernization. Subcommittee on Nutrition. Serial No. 115-3.
    The House Committee on Agriculture completed a 
comprehensive review of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance 
Program (SNAP) during the 114th Congress. Known as the Past, 
Present, and Future of SNAP, the purpose of the review was to 
provide a better understanding of SNAP, the population it 
serves, how the program administers food benefits and other 
services to assist that population, and to examine ways the 
program can be improved. This hearing focused on technology and 
modernization, including areas that strengthen program 
integrity, improve the customer experience, streamline delivery 
of services, and ease administrative burden. Witnesses 
reinforced this discussion via testimony on eligibility and 
issuance systems, customer-facing technologies, and business 
enhancements.
    June 13, 2017: Small Watershed Infrastructure: Continuing 
the Mission, Building upon Success. Subcommittee on 
Conservation and Forestry. Serial No. 115-7.
    This Subcommittee hearing evaluated the P.L. 83-566 Small 
Watershed and Dam Rehab program. Members heard firsthand how 
the program has changed since its inception and how the needs 
of today's watersheds have evolved since the 1950s. Testimony 
provided a background on the program and how small watersheds 
differ from large watershed infrastructure. Witnesses shared 
success stories of small watershed infrastructure investments 
and the many benefits that they provide for the protection of 
life and property, water availability, conservation and 
recreation. Citing the backlog of applicants, the witnesses 
asked for continued support and funding of the program today 
and into the future.
    June 22, 2017: The Next Farm Bill: University Research. 
Full Committee. Serial No. 115-3.
    The purpose of this hearing was to highlight the importance 
of agricultural research conducted by the U.S. university 
system, and to discuss pressing issues facing these 
institutions including deferred maintenance of research 
infrastructure and facilities. Witnesses represented a variety 
of university types including a non-land-grant agriculture 
institution, two ``1862s'' conventional land-grant 
institutions, a ``1890s'' historically black institution, a 
representative of the ``1994s'' Tribal institutions, and a 
Hispanic-serving agriculture institution. The hearing explored 
how various funding streams impact university agricultural 
research and examples of successful research innovations. 
Testimony covered areas such as research prioritization, 
infrastructure needs, and funding types. Members asked 
questions related to agricultural research funding and 
potential policy changes as they prepare to craft the upcoming 
farm bill.
    June 27, 2017: Clearing the Next Crisis: Resilience, 
Recovery, and Resolution of Derivative Clearinghouses. Full 
Committee. Serial No. 115-8.
    Through this hearing, the Committee sought to examine the 
possibility of a future financial crisis and how the cleared 
market industry would respond. This hearing provided the 
Committee Members with an understanding of the work industry 
participants have done to prepare for a crisis, as well as to 
consider how regulators would be expected to respond.
    July 12, 2017: The Next Farm Bill: Technology and 
Innovation in Specialty Crops. Full Committee. Serial No. 115-
3.
    The purpose of this hearing was to highlight innovation in 
the specialty crop industry and discuss ways the next farm bill 
can further benefit specialty crop producers. Witnesses 
represented various parts of the specialty crop industry 
including producers, a marketer, a mechanization start-up co-
founder, a state agriculture federation representative, and a 
trade association official. Testimony focused largely on the 
impact of the agricultural labor shortfall on specialty 
producers and the witnesses' experiences with farm bill 
programs such as marketing and promotion, research and 
extension, plant pest and disease protections, and crop 
insurance. The Chairman highlighted that--despite being treated 
differently than many row crops within the farm safety net--a 
variety of supports are in place for specialty crops that 
should not be overlooked. Members asked questions related to 
specialty producers' involvement in current USDA programs and 
potential policy changes as they prepare to craft the upcoming 
farm bill, as well as plant breeding and consumer acceptance of 
new technologies.
    July 13, 2017: The Future of Farming: Technological 
Innovations, Opportunities, and Challenges for Producers. 
Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk Management. 
Serial No. 115-9.
    The purpose of this hearing was to explore how promising 
new information technologies and the increasing utilization of 
data are influencing agriculture. Witnesses representing a 
range of agricultural information entities discussed 
efficiencies, innovations, and challenges impacting this 
sector. Testimony was provided on behalf of a grower 
information cooperative, a data reporting company, and two 
agriculture technology law firms. This hearing allowed the 
Subcommittee to delve more deeply into the opportunities for 
production agriculture when data is used to enhance a 
producer's decision-making abilities, while also allowing 
discussion of privacy concerns. Member questions focused on 
Congress's oversight role as innovation in agricultural data 
progresses, specific examples where new technology is proving 
profitable, and important connections with other sectors of the 
economy.
    July 18, 2017: The Next Farm Bill: Pathways to Success for 
SNAP Households. Subcommittee on Nutrition. Serial No. 115-3.
    The House Committee on Agriculture completed a 
comprehensive review of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance 
Program (SNAP) during the 114th Congress. Known as the Past, 
Present, and Future of SNAP, the purpose of the review was to 
provide a better understanding of SNAP, the population it 
serves, how the program administers food benefits and other 
services to assist that population, and to examine ways the 
program could be improved. This hearing allowed for discussion 
of career and education pathway approaches that could 
facilitate improved opportunities for SNAP recipients and 
households to succeed in the labor market. Witnesses reinforced 
this discussion via testimony on the labor market, curriculum 
development and soft skill education, and the importance of 
case management as an enhancement to work-specific programming.
    July 19, 2017: The State of Infrastructure in Rural 
America. Full Committee. Serial No. 115-10.
    Through this hearing, the Committee examined the state of 
rural infrastructure and considered opportunities to improve 
these systems. Members heard from a broad cross-section of 
organizations who build, use, and rely on this infrastructure 
every day. Witnesses discussed the importance of modernizing 
the roads, waterways, utilities, and research institutions that 
serve rural Americans, and the urban Americans who depend on 
rural America for food, fiber, and energy.
    July 26, 2017: Renegotiating NAFTA: Opportunities for 
Agriculture. Full Committee. Serial No. 115-11.
    The purpose of this hearing was to discuss agriculture's 
critical role in trade as the Administration enters 
renegotiation discussions with Canada and Mexico on the North 
American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Witnesses representing a 
broad range of agricultural export entities discussed expanding 
market opportunities and tightening enforcement. Testimony was 
provided on behalf of dairy, poultry, grains, oilseed, and 
specialty crop trade associations. The hearing explored U.S. 
benefits achieved through the current NAFTA agreement, and 
areas where updates could be beneficial to the agriculture 
industry. Members asked questions related to market access 
programs, trade barriers, and potential policy changes.
    October 11, 2017: Examining the 2017 Agenda for the 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission. Full Committee. Serial 
No. 115-12.
    Through this hearing, the Committee received testimony from 
the Chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, J. 
Christopher Giancarlo, outlining his agenda on modernizing the 
agency to become a ``21st Century Regulator''.
    February 6, 2018: The State of the Rural Economy. Full 
Committee. Serial No. 115-13.
    The purpose of this hearing was to allow Members to speak 
directly with the Secretary of Agriculture about issues 
impacting rural communities and the agriculture industry. In 
his testimony, Secretary Perdue discussed the strain on the 
farm economy from continued low commodity prices. He projected 
further price drops and trade challenges for the coming year. 
The Secretary also discussed Department efforts to combat these 
difficulties including improvements to the farm safety net and 
the President's Interagency Task Force on Agriculture and Rural 
Prosperity. Member questions for the Secretary focused on areas 
of interest in the upcoming farm bill and district-specific 
concerns.
    July 18, 2018: Cryptocurrencies: Oversight of New Assets in 
the Digital Age. Full Committee. Serial No. 115-14.
    Through this hearing, the Committee sought to examine the 
regulatory classification of cryptocurrency tokens and how they 
fit into existing regimes. The Committee heard from a wide 
variety of stakeholders on the purpose, utility, and 
distinctions of these new assets to help members gain a better 
understand of the creation, function, and usage of various 
types of digital assets.
    July 25, 2018: Examining the Upcoming Agenda for the 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission. Full Committee. Serial 
No. 115-15.
    Through this hearing, the Committee received testimony from 
the Chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, J. 
Christopher Giancarlo, outlining his upcoming agenda for the 
Commission. Chairman Giancarlo also summarized his recent white 
paper entitled ``Swaps Regulation Version 2.0: An assessment of 
the Current Implementation of Reform and Proposals for Next 
Steps.'' Throughout the hearing the members learned about 
regulations around derivative clearinghouses, swap reporting 
rules, swap execution rules, swap dealer capital, and the end-
user exemption.

2. Listening Sessions

    Full Committee. Serial No. 115-3, pt. 2, Appendix.

   June 24, 2017: Farm Bill Listening Session: 
        Conversations in the Field; Gainesville, FL

   July 31, 2017: Farm Bill Listening Session: 
        Conversations in the Field; San Angelo, TX

   August 3, 2017: Farm Bill Listening Session: 
        Conversations in the Field; Morgan, MN

   August 5, 2017: Farm Bill Listening Session: 
        Conversations in the Field; Modesto, CA

   August 30, 2017: Farm Bill Listening Session: 
        Conversations in the Field; Decatur, IL

   October 9, 2017: Farm Bill Listening Session: 
        Conversations in the Field; Cobleskill, NY

    As the Committee developed the 2018 Farm Bill, the Members 
traveled across the United States to hear from producers on 
what is and isn't working in U.S. agricultural policy.

                         e. published hearings

   Note: The listening sessions listed in Section D. 2. 
        were published as an appendix (Serial No. 115-3, pt. 2) 
        to The Next Farm Bill, Serial No. 115-3, pt. 1. To 
        avoid duplication they are not listed in the following 
        table of published hearings.

 
 
 
         115-1   Rural Economic Outlook: Setting the Stage for the Next
                  Farm Bill--Full Committee--Wednesday, February 15,
                  2017.
         115-2   --Full Committee--Thursday, February 16, 2017.
  115-3, pt. 1   The Next Farm Bill: Conservation Policy--Subcommittee
                  on Conservation and Forestry--Tuesday, February 28,
                  2017.
  115-3, pt. 1   The Next Farm Bill: International Market Development--
                  Subcommittee on Livestock and Foreign Agriculture--
                  Tuesday, February 28, 2017.
  115-3, pt. 1   The Next Farm Bill: Rural Development and Energy
                  Programs--Subcommittee on Commodity Exchanges, Energy,
                  and Credit--Thursday, March 9, 2017.
  115-3, pt. 1   The Next Farm Bill: Specialty Crops--Subcommittee on
                  Biotechnology, Horticulture, and Research--Thursday,
                  March 9, 2017.
  115-3, pt. 1   The Next Farm Bill: Agricultural Research--Subcommittee
                  on Biotechnology, Horticulture, and Research--
                  Thursday, March 16, 2017.
  115-3, pt. 1   The Next Farm Bill: Forestry Initiatives--Subcommittee
                  on Conservation and Forestry--Thursday, March 16,
                  2017.
  115-3, pt. 1   The Next Farm Bill: Nutrition Distribution Programs--
                  Subcommittee on Nutrition--Tuesday, March 21, 2017.
  115-3, pt. 1   The Next Farm Bill: Livestock Producer Perspectives--
                  Subcommittee on Livestock and Foreign Agriculture--
                  Tuesday, March 21, 2017.
  115-3, pt. 1   The Next Farm Bill: Dairy Policy--Full Committee--
                  Wednesday, March 22, 2017.
  115-3, pt. 1   --Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk
                  Management--Tuesday, March 28, 2017.
  115-3, pt. 1   The Next Farm Bill: The Future of SNAP--Subcommittee on
                  Nutrition--Tuesday, March 28, 2017.
  115-3, pt. 1   --Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk
                  Management--Tuesday, April 4, 2017.
  115-3, pt. 1   The Next Farm Bill: Credit Programs--Subcommittee on
                  Commodity Exchanges, Energy, and Credit--Tuesday,
                  April 4, 2017.
  115-3, pt. 1   The Next Farm Bill: The Future of International Food
                  Aid and Agricultural Development--Full Committee--
                  Wednesday, June 7, 2017.
  115-3, pt. 1   The Next Farm Bill: SNAP Technology and Modernization--
                  Subcommittee on Nutrition--Thursday, June 8, 2017.
  115-3, pt. 1   The Next Farm Bill: University Research--Full
                  Committee--Thursday, June 22, 2017.
  115-3, pt. 1   The Next Farm Bill: Technology and Innovation in
                  Specialty Crops--Full Committee--Wednesday, July 12,
                  2017.
  115-3, pt. 1   The Next Farm Bill: Pathways to Success for SNAP
                  Households--Subcommittee on Nutrition--Tuesday, July
                  18, 2017.
         115-4   Review of the Farm Credit System--Full Committee--
                  Wednesday, March 29, 2017.
         115-5   Agriculture and Tax Reform: Opportunities for Rural
                  America--Full Committee--Wednesday, April 5, 2017.
         115-6   State of the Rural Economy: Secretary of Agriculture
                  Sonny Perdue--Full Committee--Wednesday, May 17, 2017.
         115-7   Small Watershed Infrastructure: Continuing the Mission,
                  Building Upon Success--Subcommittee on Conservation
                  and Forestry--Tuesday, June 13, 2017.
         115-8   Clearing the Next Crisis: Resilience, Recovery, and
                  Resolution of Derivative Clearinghouses--Full
                  Committee--Tuesday, June 27, 2017.
         115-9   The Future of Farming: Technological Innovations,
                  Opportunities, and Challenges for Producers--
                  Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk
                  Management--Thursday, July 13, 2017.
        115-10   The State of Infrastructure in Rural America--Full
                  Committee--Wednesday, July 19, 2017.
        115-11   Renegotiating NAFTA: Opportunities for Agriculture--
                  Full Committee--Wednesday, July 26, 2017.
        115-12   --Full Committee--Wednesday, October 11, 2017.
        115-13   The State of the Rural Economy--Full Committee--
                  Tuesday, February 6, 2018.
        115-14   Cryptocurrencies: Oversight of New Assets in the
                  Digital Age--Full Committee--Wednesday, July 18, 2018.
        115-15   Examining the Upcoming Agenda for the Commodity Futures
                  Trading Commission--Full Committee--Wednesday, July
                  25, 2018.
 

                       f. meetings not published

    February 1, 2017--Full Committee open business meeting. 
Organizational meeting for the 115th Congress. Approval of the 
Committee Rules, Committee staff assignments, and the Oversight 
Plan for the 115th Congress by voice vote.
    February 16, 2017--Full Committee open business meeting. 
Approval of the Budget Views and Estimates Letter, by voice 
vote.
    May 3, 2017--Full Committee open business meeting. Approval 
of H.R. 1177, Removing Outdated Restrictions to Allow for Job 
Growth Act, and H.R. 2154, to rename the Red River Valley 
Agricultural Research Center in Fargo, North Dakota, as the 
Edward T. Schafer Agricultural Research Center, by voice vote.
    October 4, 2017--Full Committee open business meeting. 
Approval of H.R. 2521, South Carolina Peanut Parity Act of 
2017, H.R. 2921, National Forest System Vegetation Management 
Pilot Program Act of 2017, H.R. 2941, Kisatchie National Forest 
Land Conveyance Act, and H.R. 2936, Resilient Federal Forests 
Act of 2017, by voice vote.
    March 1, 2018--Full Committee open business meeting. 
Approval of the Budget Views and Estimates Letter, by voice 
vote.
    April 18, 2018--Full Committee open business meeting. 
Approval of H.R. 2, Agriculture and Nutrition Act of 2018, by a 
recorded vote of 26 yeas to 20 nays.

                          g. committee prints

    Committee on Agriculture Rules. Adopted February 1, 2017. 
Print No. 114-1.

                             h. watersheds

    None.

                             III. Appendix


                      a. executive communications


By Date Published in the Congressional Record

    Note: In April 2013 the Parliamentarian's office altered 
its procedures concerning the referral of Executive 
Communications. In prior Congresses the Communications 
concerning pesticide tolerances submitted from the 
Environmental Protection Agency were referred to the Committee 
on Agriculture; however, beginning in August 2013 this type of 
Communication was referred to the Committee on Energy and 
Commerce. The Parliamentarian's office was notified of this 
discrepancy on November 24, 2014. The following is a list of 
the Executive Communication's numbers along with the date of 
publication in the Congressional Record ((entries marked with 
an asterisk (*) are for Communications concerning an exemption 
from the requirement of a tolerance (when in reference to a 
pesticide) which were also historically referred to the 
Committee on Agriculture):

 
 
 
January 6, 2017: 41, 51.             February 16, 2018: 4034, 4035.
January 20, 2017: 247.               February 23, 2018: 4074, 4078.
February 6, 2017: 499, 500.          March 1, 2018: 4142.
February 16, 2017: 582.              March 19, 2018: 4294.
March 9, 2017: 753, 754, 755.        March 20, 2018: 4315, 4317.
March 23, 2017: 903, 904.            April 10, 2018: 4424, 4425, 4428.
April 17, 2017: 1072.                April 19, 2018: 4628, 4629, 4630,
                                      4631.
April 20, 2017: *1087, 1088, 1089,   May 16, 2018: 4862.
 1090.
April 28, 2017: 1196.                May 22, 2018: 4964.
May 15, 2017: 1353, 1354.            May 24, 2018: 4973.
May 25, 2017: 1426, 1427, 1428.      June 8, 2018: 5095, 5098.
June 15, 2017: 1681, 1683.           June 12, 2018: 5119.
July 10, 2017: 1869, 1872, 1873,     June 14, 2018: 5171.
 1874, 1876.
July 12, 2017: 1932, 1934.           July 11, 2018: 5511, 5517, 5518,
                                      5522, 5523.
July 28, 2017: 2128, 2131, 2132,     July 18, 2018: 5674.
 2134, 2136.
August 15, 2017: 2233, 2234.         July 25, 2018: 5770.
August 29, 2017: 2335.               July 26, 2018: 5791.
September 13, 2017: 2509.            August 31, 2018: 6064, 6065.
October 3, 2017: 2749, 2751, 2752.   September 17, 2018: 6236, 6237.
October 10, 2017: 2810.              September 26, 2018: 6358.
October 31, 2017: 3017, 3018.        October 16, 2018: 6529.
November 1, 2017: 3039.              October 30, 2018: 6656, 6659.
November 6, 2017: 3088.              November 6, 2018: 6714, 6716, 6718.
November 21, 2017: 3198.             November 16, 2018: 6856, 6857.
December 6, 2017: 3304, 3307.        November 27, 2018: 6940.
December 13, 2017: 3374, 3375.       November 28, 2018: 6985.
December 14, 2017: 3392, 3394,       December 13, 2018: 7156, 7163,
 3395, 3396.                          7164.
February 26, 2018: 4100, 4101,       December 19, 2018: 7181.
 4106, 4108, 4109, 4110.
 

    E.C. 3--Jan. 4, 2017: A letter from the PRAO Branch Chief, 
Food and Nutrition Service, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Supplemental 
Nutrition Assistance Program Promotion [FNS-2016-0028] (RIN: 
0584-AE44) received January 3, 2017.
    E.C. 9--Jan. 5, 2017: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Amendment to the Egg 
Research and Promotion Rules and Regulations To Update Patents, 
Copyrights, Trademarks, and Information Provisions [Doc. No.: 
AMS-LPS-15-0042] received January 3, 2017.
    E.C. 34--Jan. 6, 2017: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Almonds Grown in California; Increased Assessment Rate 
[Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0045; SC16-981-2 FR] received January 5, 
2017.
    E.C. 35--Jan. 6, 2017: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
affirmation of interim rule as final rule--Domestic Dates 
Produced or Packed in Riverside County, California; Decreased 
Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0084; SC16-987-1 FIR] 
received January 5, 2017.
    E.C. 36--Jan. 6, 2017: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Cherries Grown in Designated Counties in Washington; 
Increased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0077; SC16-923-1 
FR] received January 5, 2017.
    E.C. 127--Jan. 10, 2017: A letter from the Supervisory 
Regulatory Analyst, GIPSA, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Fees for Official 
Inspection and Official Weighting Services Under the United 
States Grain Standards Act (USGSA) received January 6, 2017.
    E.C. 167--Jan. 12, 2017: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
interim rule--Revisions to Inspection Application Requirements 
[Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0063] received January 10, 2017.
    E.C. 180--Jan. 13, 2017: A letter from the PRAO Branch 
Chief, Food and Nutrition Service, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's Major final rule and interim 
final rule--Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP): 
Eligibility, Certification, and Employment and Training 
Provisions of the Food, Conservation and Energy Act of 2008 
[FNS 2011-0008] (RIN: 0584-AD87) received January 11, 2017.
    E.C. 181--Jan. 13, 2017: A letter from the Supervisory 
Regulatory Analyst, Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards 
Administration, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Fees for Official Inspection and 
Official Weighing Services Under the United States Grain 
Standards Act (USGSA) received January 11, 2017.
    E.C. 323--Jan. 24, 2017: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Walnuts Grown in California; Increased Assessment Rate 
[Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0062; SC16-984-2 FR] received January 19, 
2017.
    E.C. 343--Jan. 27, 2017: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Agricultural Bioterrorism Protection Act of 2002; 
Biennial Review and Republication of the Select Agent and Toxin 
List; Amendments to the Select Agent and Toxin Regulations 
[Doc. No.: APHIS-2014-0095] (RIN: 0579-AE08) received January 
24, 2017.
    E.C. 413--Jan. 30, 2017: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Delay of 
Effective Date for 31 Final Regulations Published by the 
Environmental Protection Agency between October 28, 2016 and 
January 17, 2017 [FRL-9958-87-OP] received January 25, 2017, 
jointly to the Committees on Energy and Commerce, 
Transportation and Infrastructure, and Agriculture.
    E.C. 603--Feb. 24, 2017: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Agricultural Bioterrorism Protection Act of 2002; 
Biennial Review and Republication of the Select Agent and Toxin 
List; Amendments to the Select Agent and Toxin Regulations; 
Delay of Effective Date [Doc. No.: APHIS-2014-0095] (RIN: 0579-
AE08) received February 17, 2017.
    E.C. 830--Mar. 17, 2017: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Further Delay of 
Effective Dates for Five Final Regulations Published by the 
Environmental Protection Agency Between December 12, 2016 and 
January 17, 2017 [FRL-9960-28-OP] received March 16, 2017, 
jointly to the Committees on Energy and Commerce and 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 866--Mar. 21, 2017: A letter from the Director, 
National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--
Competitive and Noncompetitive Non-formula Federal Assistance 
Programs--Specific Administrative Provisions for the Veterinary 
Services Grants Program (RIN: 0524-AA70) received March 20, 
2017.
    E.C. 1188--Apr. 28, 2017: A letter from the Acting Deputy 
Secretary, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's 2016 Packers and Stockyards Program Annual Report, 
pursuant to 7 U.S.C. 228d; Aug. 15, 1921, ch. 64, title IV, 
Sec. 415 (as added by Public Law 106-472, Sec. 312(e)(2)); (114 
Stat. 2077).
    E.C. 1279--May 8, 2017: A letter from the Management 
Analyst, Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards 
Administration, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--United States Standards for Barley 
received May 5, 2017, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 1280--May 8, 2017: A letter from the NIFA Director, 
Office of Grants and Financial Management, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--
Competitive and Noncompetitive Non-formula Federal Assistance 
Programs--General Award Administrative Provisions and Specific 
Administrative Provisions (RIN: 0524-AA69) received May 2, 
2017, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 1281--May 8, 2017: A letter from the Director, 
National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Office of Grants 
and Financial Management, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Hispanic-Serving 
Agricultural Colleges and Universities (RIN: 0524-AA39) 
received May 5, 2017, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 1347--May 15, 2017: A letter from the Director, 
Issuances Staff, Food Safety and Inspection Service, Department 
of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--
Uniform Compliance Date for Food Labeling Regulations [Doc. 
No.: FSIS-2016-0048] (RIN: 0583-AD05) received May 10, 2017, to 
the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 1470--Jun. 2, 2017: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
affirmation of interim rule as final rule--Asian Longhorned 
Beetle: Update List of Regulated Articles [Doc. No.: APHIS-
2015-0097] received May 25, 2017, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 1547--Jun. 8, 2017: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Pesticides; 
Certification of Pesticide Applicators Rule; Delay of Effective 
Date [EPA-HQ-OPP-2011-0183; FRL-9963-34] received June 2, 2017, 
to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 1576--Jun. 12, 2017: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's final rule--Recordkeeping (RIN: 3038-AE36) 
received June 2, 2017, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 1577--Jun. 12, 2017: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's final rule--Whistleblower Awards Process (RIN: 
3038-AE50) received June 2, 2017, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 1578--Jun. 12, 2017: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agriculture Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
affirmation of interim rule as final rule--Pistachios Grown in 
California, Arizona, and New Mexico; Decreased Assessment Rate 
[Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0076; SC16-983-2 FIR] received June 5, 
2017, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 1628--Jun. 13, 2017: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's interim rule--Sweet Onions Grown in the Walla 
Walla Valley of Southeast Washington and Northeast Oregon; 
Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0116; SC17-956-1 
IR] received June 5, 2017, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 1629--Jun. 13, 2017: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
affirmation of interim rule as final rule--Almonds Grown in 
California; Change in Quality Control Requirements [Doc. No.: 
AMS-SC-16-0047; SC16-981-3 FIR] received June 5, 2017, to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 1630--Jun. 13, 2017: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Tomatoes Grown in Florida; Increased 
Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0088; SC16-966-1 FR] 
received June 5, 2017, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 1631--Jun. 13, 2017: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Fruit and Vegetable Programs, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's Major 
final rule--National Organic Program (NOP); Organic Livestock 
and Poultry Practices [Doc. No.: AMS-NOP-15-0012; NOP-15-06 FR] 
(RIN: 0581-AD44) received June 5, 2017, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 1632--Jun. 13, 2017: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Triclopyr; 
Pesticide Tolerances for Emergency Exemptions [EPA-HQ-OPP-2017-
0036; FRL-9961-29] received June 7, 2017, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 1657--Jun. 13, 2017: A letter from the Board Chairman 
and CEO, Farm Credit Administration, transmitting the 
Administration's Fiscal Year 2018 Proposed Budget and 
Performance Plan, pursuant to 31 U.S.C. 1115(b); Public Law 
111-352, Sec. 3; (124 Stat. 3867); jointly to the Committees on 
Agriculture and Oversight and Government Reform.
    E.C. 1764--Jun. 22, 2017: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Marketing Order Regulating the 
Handling of Spearmint Oil Produced in the Far West; Salable 
Quantities and Allotment Percentages for the 2017-2018 
Marketing Year [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0107; SC17-985-1 FR] 
received June 19, 2017, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 1765--Jun. 22, 2017: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's affirmation of the interim rule as final rule--
Changes to Reporting and Notification Requirements and Other 
Clarifying Changes for Imported Fruits, Vegetables, and 
Specialty Crops [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0083; SC16-944/980/999-1 
FIR] received June 19, 2017, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 1766--Jun. 22, 2017: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service; Livestock, 
Poultry, and Seed Program, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Beef Promotion and 
Research Rules and Regulations [Doc. No.: AMS-LPS-15-0084] 
received June 19, 2017, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 1767--Jun. 22, 2017: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Importation of Fresh Pitahaya Fruit From Ecuador Into the 
Continental United States [Doc. No.: APHIS-2015-0004] (RIN: 
0579-AE12) received June 20, 2017, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 1839--Jul. 6, 2017: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's final rule--Commission Delegated Authority 
Provisions and Technical Amendments (RIN: 3038-AE42) received 
June 29, 2017, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 1865--Jul. 10, 2017: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agriculture Marketing Service; Livestock, 
Poultry, and Seed Program, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Beef Promotion and 
Research; Reapportionment [Doc. No.: AMS-LPS-16-0071] received 
June 28, 2017, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 1899--Jul. 11, 2017: A letter from the Chairman, Farm 
Credit System Insurance Corporation, transmitting the 
Corporation's annual report for CY 2016, pursuant to Sec. 5.64 
of the Farm Credit Act of 1971, as amended; to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 2086--Jul. 26, 2017: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's affirmation of interim rule as final rule--Sweet 
Onions Grown in the Walla Walla Valley of Southeast Washington 
and Northeast Oregon; Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-
SC-16-0116; SC17-956-1 FIR] received July 24, 2017, to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 2118--Jul. 28, 2017: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Departments final rule--Irish Potatoes Grown in Certain 
Designated Counties in Idaho, and Malheur County, Oregon; 
Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0111; SC17-945-1 
FR] received July 26, 2017, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 2119--Jul. 28, 2017: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's interim rule--Walnuts Grown in California; 
Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-17-0031; SC17-984-1 
IR] received July 26, 2017, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 2120--Jul. 28, 2017: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Tart Cherries Grown in the States of 
Michigan, et al.; Free and Restricted Percentages for the 2016-
17 Crop Year for Tart Cherries [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0105; SC16-
930-5 FR] received July 26, 2017, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 2461--Sep. 12, 2017: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service; Livestock, 
Poultry, and Seed Program, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Rules of Practice 
Governing Formal Adjudicatory Proceedings Instituted by the 
Secretary Under Various Statutes [Doc. No.: AMS-LPS-16-0051] 
(RIN: 0581-AD58) received August 24, 2017, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 2462--Sep. 12, 2017: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Importation of Hass Avocados From Colombia [Doc. No.: 
APHIS-2016-0022] (RIN: 0579-AE29) received August 24, 2017, to 
the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 2502--Sep. 13, 2017: A letter from the Board Chairman 
and Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Administration's 2016 Annual Report on the 
Farm Credit System, pursuant to Sec. 5.17(a)(3) of the Farm 
Credit Act of 1971, as amended (Public Law 92-181); to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 2537--Sep. 14, 2017: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's direct 
final rule--Black Stem Rust; Additions of Rust-Resistant 
Species and Varieties [Doc. No.: APHIS-2017-0049] received 
September 7, 2017, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 2538--Sep. 14, 2017: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Specialty Crops Program, Specialty Crops 
Inspection Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, Department 
of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--U.S. 
Standards for Grades of Shelled Walnuts and Walnuts in the 
Shell [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0005, SC-16-331] received September 
7, 2017, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 2550--Sep. 18, 2017: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Importation of Bone-In Ovine Meat From Uruguay [Doc. No.: 
APHIS-2015-0050] (RIN: 0579-AE21) received September 12, 2017, 
to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 2551--Sep. 18, 2017: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Cotton and Tobacco Program, Agricultural 
Marketing Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's direct final rule--Cotton Board Rules and 
Regulations: Adjusting Supplemental Assessment on Imports (2017 
Amendments) [Doc. No.: AMS-CN-17-0003] received September 13, 
2017, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 2552--Sep. 18, 2017: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Importation of Fresh Persimmon With Calyxes From Japan 
Into the United States [Doc. No.: APHIS-2015-0098] (RIN: 0579-
AE27) received September 12, 2017, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 2553--Sep. 18, 2017: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Tart Cherries Grown in the States of 
Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Oregon, Utah, Washington and 
Wisconsin; Modification of Allocation of Assessments [Doc. No.: 
AMS-SC-16-0104; SC16-930-4 FR] received September 13, 2017, to 
the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 2579--Sep. 21, 2017: A letter from the Acting 
Congressional Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health 
Inspection Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Importation of Orchids in Growing 
Media From the Republic of Korea Into the Continental United 
States [Doc. No.: APHIS-2015-0091] (RIN: 0579-AE24) received 
September 20, 2017, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 2694--Sep. 28, 2017: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's interim rule--Apricots Grown in Designated 
Counties in Washington; Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: 
AMS-SC-17-0033; SC17-922-1 IR] received September 22, 2017, to 
the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 2744--Oct. 3, 2017: A letter from the Acting Director, 
Program Development and Regulation Analysis, Rural Utilities 
Service, Rural Development, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Water and Waste Loans 
and Grants (RIN: 0572-AC36) received September 27, 2017, to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 2774--Oct. 5, 2017: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Importation of Fresh Persimmons From New Zealand Into the 
United States [Doc. No.: APHIS-2015-0052] (RIN: 0579-AE26) 
received October 4, 2017, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 2804--Oct. 10, 2017: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Tolfenpyrad; 
Pesticide Tolerances for Emergency Exemptions [EPA-HQ-OPP-2017-
0309; FRL-9967-72] received October 5, 2017, to the Committee 
on Agriculture.
    E.C. 2805--Oct. 10, 2017: A letter from the Chairman and 
Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Administration's notification of its 2017 
compensation program adjustments, including the Agency's 
current salary range structure and the performance-based merit 
pay matrix, pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1833b(a); Public Law 101-73, 
Sec. 1206(a); (103 Stat. 523); to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 2872--Oct. 23, 2017: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Pecans Grown in the States of Alabama, 
Arkansas, Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, 
Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, New Mexico, 
Oklahoma, South Carolina, and Texas; Establishment of 
Assessment Rates [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-17-0027; SC17-986-1 FR] 
received October 6, 2017, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 2997--Oct. 31, 2017: A letter from the Board Chairman 
and CEO, Farm Credit Administration, transmitting the 
Administration's direct final rule--Assessment and 
Apportionment of Administrative Expenses (RIN: 3052-AD30) 
received October 26, 2017, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 3136--Nov. 9, 2017: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's direct 
final rule--Black Stem Rust; Additions of Rust-Resistant 
Species and Varieties [Doc. No.: APHIS-2017-0049] received 
November 3, 2017, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 3221--Nov. 29, 2017: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Softwood Lumber Research, Promotion, 
Consumer Education and Industry Information Order; De Minimis 
Quantity Exemption Threshold [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0066] 
received November 27, 2017, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 3222--Nov. 29, 2017: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Services, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's interim rule--Oranges, Grapefruit, Tangerines, and 
Pummelos Grown in Florida; Change in Size Requirements for 
Oranges [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-17-0064; SC17-905-2 IR] received 
November 27, 2017, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 3223--Nov. 29, 2017: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Services, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Minimum Quality and Handling Standards 
for Domestic and Imported Peanuts Marketed in the United 
States; Change to the Quality and Handling Requirements [Doc. 
No.: AMS-SC-16-0102; SC16-996-3 FR] received November 27, 2017, 
to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 3224--Nov. 29, 2017: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's interim rule--Pistachios Grown in California, 
Arizona, and New Mexico; Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: 
AMS-SC-17-0048; SC17-983-2 IR] received November 27, 2017, to 
the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 3277--Dec. 4, 2017: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Importation of Fresh Mango Fruit From Vietnam Into the 
Continental United States [Doc. No.: APHIS-2016-0026] (RIN: 
0579-AE25) received November 29, 2017, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 3390--Dec. 14, 2017: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Extension of 
Tolerances for Emergency Exemptions (Multiple Chemicals) [EPA-
HQ-OPP-2017-0563; FRL-9969-16] received November 28, 2017, to 
the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 3502--Dec. 21, 2017: A letter from the Acting 
Director, PDRA, Rural Utilities Service, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--Distance 
Learning and Telemedicine Loan and Grant Program (RIN: 0572-
AC37) received December 11, 2017to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 3536--Dec. 21, 2017: A letter from the Deputy 
Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Legislative Affairs, Department 
of State, transmitting the Department's CY 2016 annual report 
on activities under the Enterprise for the Americas Initiative 
and the Tropical Forest Conservation Act of 1998, pursuant to 7 
U.S.C. 1738m(a); July 10, 1954, ch. 469, title VI, Sec. 614 (as 
added Public Law 101-624 Sec. 1512); (104 Stat. 3662) and 22 
U.S.C. 2431k(a); Public Law 87-195, Sec. 813(a) (as added by 
Public Law 105-214, Sec. 1); (112 Stat. 893); jointly to the 
Committees on Foreign Affairs and Agriculture.
    E.C. 3801--Jan. 21, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting The 
Department's final rule--Hazelnuts Grown in Oregon and 
Washington; Increased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-17-
0036; SC17-982-1 FR] received January 17, 2018, to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 3802--Jan. 21, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Pecans Grown in the States of Alabama, 
Arkansas, Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, 
Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, North Carolina, New Mexico, 
Oklahoma, South Carolina, and Texas; Establishment of Reporting 
Requirements and New Information Collection [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-
17-0032; SC17-986-2 FR] received January 17, 2018, to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 3816--Jan. 25, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's interim rule--Oranges, Grapefruit, Tangerines, and 
Pummelos Grown in Florida and Imported Grapefruit; Change in 
Size Requirements for Grapefruit [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-17-0063; 
SC17-905-1 IR] received January 17, 2018, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 3817--Jan. 25, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's affirmation of interim rule--Walnuts Grown in 
California; Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-17-
0035; SC17-984-1 FIR] received January 17, 2018, to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 3896--Feb. 7, 2018: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Importation of Orchids in Growing Media From Taiwan 
[Docket No.: APHIS-2016-0005] (RIN: 0579-AE28) received January 
31, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 3982--Feb. 14, 2018: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Heath Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Standardizing Phytosanitary Treatment Regulations: 
Approval of Cold Treatment and Irradiation Facilities; Cold 
Treatment Schedules; Establishment of Fumigation and Cold 
Treatment Compliance Agreements [Doc. No.: APHIS-2013-0081] 
(RIN: 0579-AD90) received February 12, 2018, to the Committee 
on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4065--Feb. 23, 2018: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Director, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Indaziflam; 
Pesticide Tolerances for Emergency Exemptions [EPA-HQ-OPP-2017-
0551; FRL-9973-10] received February 16, 2018, to the Committee 
on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4130--Mar. 1, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Onions Grown in South Texas; Increased 
Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-17-0040; SC17-959-1 FR] 
received February 26, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4131--Mar. 1, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Perishable Agricultural Commodities 
Act (PACA): Guidance on Growers' Trust Protection Eligibility 
and Clarification of ``Written Notification'' [Doc. No.: AMS-
FV-15-0045] (RIN: 0581-AD50) received February 26, 2018, to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4132--Mar. 1, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Marketing Order Regulating the 
Handling of Spearmint Oil Produced in the Far West; Revision of 
the Salable Quantity and Allotment Percentage for Class 3 
(Native) Spearmint Oil for the 2017-2018 Marketing Year [Doc. 
No.: AMS-SC-16-0107; SC17-985-1A FR] received February 26, 
2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4133--Mar. 1, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Specialty Crops Program, Promotion and Economics 
Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--
Watermelon Research and Promotion Plan; Redistricting and 
Importer Representation [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0097] received 
February 26, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4134--Mar. 1, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Apricots Grown in Designated Counties 
in Washington; Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-17-
0033; SC17-922-1 FIR] received February 26, 2018, to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4135--Mar. 1, 2018: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Management Division, Environmental Protection 
Agency, transmitting the Agency's final rule--Methyl Bromide; 
Pesticide Tolerances for Emergency Exemptions [EPA-HQ-OPP-2017-
0447; FRL-9971-19] received February 27, 2018, to the Committee 
on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4151--Mar. 1, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Pears Grown in Oregon and Washington; 
Increased Assessment Rate for Processed Pears [Doc. No.: AMS-
SC-170045; SC17-927-1 FR] received February 26, 2018, to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4219--Mar. 13, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Federal Grain 
Inspection Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Fees for Official Inspection and 
Official Weighing Services Under the United States Grain 
Standards Act (USGSA) received February 28, 2018, to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4272--Mar. 15, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, National Organic Program, Agricultural Marketing 
Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--National Organic Program (NOP); 
Organic Livestock and Poultry Practices [Doc. No.: AMS-NOP-15-
0012; NOP-15-06] (RIN: 0581-AD75) received March 14, 2018, to 
the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4288--Mar. 19, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Congressional Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health 
Inspection Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Viruses, Serums, Toxins, and Analogous 
Products; Expiration Date Required for Serial and Subserials 
and Determination of Expiration Date of Product [Doc. No.: 
APHIS-2009-0028] (RIN: 0579-AD06) received March 15, 2018, to 
the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4289--Mar. 19, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Congressional Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health 
Inspection Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Importation of Campanula spp. Plants 
for Planting in Approved Growing Media From Denmark Into the 
United States [Doc. No.: APHIS-2016-0051] (RIN: 0579-AE31) 
received March 15, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4290--Mar. 19, 2018: A letter from the Director, 
National Institute of Food Agriculture, Office of Grants and 
Financial Management, Department of Agriculture, transmitting 
the Department's final rule--Hispanic-Serving Agricultural 
Colleges and Universities (HSACU) Certification Process (RIN: 
0524-AA39) received March 14, 2018, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 4522--Apr. 13, 2018: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Restructuring of Regulations on the Importation of Plants 
for Planting [Doc. No.: APHIS-2008-0011] (RIN: 0579-AD75) 
received March 21, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4523--Apr. 13, 2018: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Importation of Fresh Cherimoya Fruit From Chile Into the 
United States [Doc. No.: APHIS-2015-0015] (RIN: 0579-AE13) 
received March 29, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4588--Apr. 18, 2018: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Importation of Lemons From Chile Into the Continental 
United States [Doc. No.: APHIS-2015-0051] (RIN: 0579-AE20) 
received April 9, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4638--Apr. 23, 2018: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Rinderpest; Update of Communicable Animal Disease 
Provisions [Doc. No.: APHIS-2017-0070] received April 16, 2018, 
to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4714--May 7, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Promotion and Economics Division, Specialty 
Crops Program, Agricultural Marketing Service, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--Honey 
Packers and Importers Research, Promotion, Consumer Education 
and Information Order; Change in Producer Eligibility 
Requirements and Implementation of Changes for Past Due 
Assessments [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0124] received May 2, 2018, to 
the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4715--May 7, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Cranberries Grown in States of 
Massachusetts, et al.; Free and Restricted Percentages for the 
2017-18 Crop Year for Cranberries [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-17-0061; 
SC17-929-2-FR] received May 2, 2018, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 4716--May 7, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Services, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Subpart Nomenclature Change; Technical 
Amendment [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-17-0083; SC18-915-I FR] received 
May 2, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4717--May 7, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Services, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Oranges and Grapefruit Grown in the 
Lower Rio Grande Valley in Texas; Decreased Assessment Rate 
[Doc. No.: AMS-SC-17-0037; SC17-906-1 FR] received May 2, 2018, 
to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4718--May 7, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Services, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Oranges, Grapefruit, Tangerines, and 
Pummelos Grown in Florida; Change in Size Requirements for 
Oranges [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-17-0064; SC17-905-2 FIR] received May 
2, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4820--May 15, 2018: A letter from the Acting PRAO 
Branch Chief, Food and Nutrition Service, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--
Revisions and Clarifications in Requirements for the Processing 
of Donated Foods [FNS-2017-0001] (RIN: 0584-AE38) received May 
7, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4911--May 18, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Tomatoes Grown in Florida; Decreased 
Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-17-0051; SC17-966-1 FR] 
received May 2, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4912--May 18, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's affirmation of interim rule as final rule--
Oranges, Grapefruit, Tangerines and Pummelos Grown in Florida 
and Imported Grapefruit; Change of Size Requirements for 
Grapefruit [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-17-0063; SC17-905-1 FIR] received 
May 2, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4913--May 18, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Pistachios Grown in California, 
Arizona, and New Mexico; Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: 
AMS-SC-17-0048; SC17-983-2 FIR] received May 2, 2018, to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 4962--May 22, 2018: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--VSTA Records and Reports Specific to International 
Standards for Pharmacovigilance [Doc. No.: APIS-2014-0063] 
(RIN: 0579-AE11) received May 17, 2018, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 4983--Jun. 1, 2018: A letter from the Director, 
Issuances Staff, Food Safety and Inspection Service, Department 
of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--
Elimination of Trichinae Control Regulations and Consolidation 
of Thermally Processed, Commercially Sterile Regulations [Doc. 
No.: FSIS-2015-0036] (RIN: 0583-AD59) received May 31, 2018, to 
the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 5083--Jun. 8, 2018: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Threshold for De Minimis Activity and Exemptions From 
Licensing Under the Animal Welfare Act [Doc. No.: APHIS-2014-
0059] (RIN: 0579-AD99) received June 4, 2018, to the Committee 
on Agriculture.
    E.C. 5084--Jun. 8, 2018: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Importation of Tree Tomatoes From Ecuador Into the 
Continental United States [Doc. No.: APHIS-2015-0072] (RIN: 
0579-AE23) received June 4, 2018, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 5085--Jun. 8, 2018: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures 
[Doc. No.: APHIS-2013-0049] (RIN: 0579-AC60) received May 25, 
2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 5086--Jun. 8, 2018: A letter from the Chairman and 
Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Administration's proposed rule--Standards of 
Conduct and Referral of Known or Suspected Criminal Violations; 
Standards of Conduct (RIN: 3052-AC44) May 24, 2018, to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 5184--Jun. 15, 2018: A letter from the Deputy 
Secretary, Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting 
the Commission's final rule--Amendments to the Swap Data Access 
Provisions of Part 49 and Certain Other Matters (RIN: 3038-
AE44) received June 13, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 5259--Jun. 21, 2018: A letter from the Congressional 
Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--National Poultry Improvement Plan and Auxiliary 
Provisions [Doc. No.: APHIS-2017-0055] (RIN: 0579-AE37) 
received June 19, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 5451--Jul. 6, 2018: A letter from the Assistant 
Secretary, Legislative Affairs, Department of State, 
transmitting CY 2017 annual report on activities under the 
Enterprise for the Americas Initiative and the Tropical Forest 
Conservation Act of 1998, pursuant to 22 U.S.C. 2431k(a); 
Public Law 87-195, Sec. 813(a) (as added by Public Law 105-214, 
Sec. 1); (112 Stat. 893); jointly to the Committees on Foreign 
Affairs and Agriculture.
    E.C. 5537--Jul. 12, 2018: A letter from the Acting PRAO 
Branch Chief, Food and Nutrition Service, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--
Simplified Cost Accounting and Other Actions To Reduce 
Paperwork in the Summer Food Service Program [FNS-2013-0026] 
(RIN: 0584-AD84) received June 11, 2018, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 5542--Jul. 12, 2018: A letter from the Acting Chief of 
Staff, Office of the Chief, Natural Resources Conservation 
Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Conservation Program Recipient 
Reporting (RIN: 0578-AA64) received May 21, 2018, to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 5571--Jul. 13, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Director, Program Development and Regulatory Analysis, Rural 
Development Utilities Programs, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Policy on Audits of 
RUS Borrowers and Grantees (RIN: 0572-AC33) received May 16, 
2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 5572--Jul. 13, 2018: A letter from the Director, 
National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--Matching 
Funds Requirements for Agricultural Research and Extension 
Capacity Funds at 1890 Land-Grant Institutions and at 1862 
Land-Grant Institutions in Insular Areas (RIN: 0524-AA68) 
received May 15, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 5763--Jul. 24, 2018: A letter from the Chairman and 
CEO, Farm Credit Administration, transmitting the 
Administration's final rule--Organization; Funding and Fiscal 
Affairs, Loan Policies and Operations, and Funding Operations; 
Investment Eligibility (RIN: 3052-AC84) received July 18, 2018, 
to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 5772--Jul. 26, 2018: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Dairy Program, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--Milk in 
California; Federal Milk Marketing Order Promulgation [Doc. 
No.: AO-15-0071; AMS-DA-14-0095] received July 25, 2018, to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 5773--Jul. 26, 2018: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Oranges, Grapefruit, Tangerines, and Pummelos Grown in 
Florida; Increased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-17-0074; 
SC18-905-1 FR] received July 25, 2018, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 5774--Jul. 26, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Grapes Grown in a Designated Area of 
Southeastern California; Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: 
AMS-SC-17-0082; SC18-925-1 FR] received July 25, 2018, to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 5775--Jul. 26, 2018: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Fruit and Vegetable Programs, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Rules of Practice and Procedure Governing Marketing 
Orders and Marketing Agreements, and Research, Promotion, and 
Information Programs [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-18-0007] received July 
25, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 5776--Jul. 26, 2018: A letter from the Administrator, 
Specialty Crops Program, Promotion and Economics Division, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Change 
in Assessment Rate Computation [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0115] 
received July 25, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 5777--Jul. 26, 2018: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Cranberries Grown in States of Massachusetts, et al.; 
Establishment of Handler Diversion and Reporting Requirements 
and New Information Collection [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-17-0066; SC17-
929-3 FR] received July 25, 2018, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 5778--Jul. 26, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Dairy Programs, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Milk in Florida Marketing Area; Order Amending the Order 
[AMS-DA-17-0068; AO-18-0008] received July 25, 2018, to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 5779--Jul. 26, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agriculture Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Walnuts Grown in California; Order 
Amending Marketing Order 984 [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0053; SC16-
984-1 FR] received July 25, 2018, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 5780--Jul. 26, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Administrator, Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops 
Program, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--General Regulations for Federal Fruit, 
Vegetable, and Specialty Crop Marketing Agreements and Orders; 
Authority To Meet Via Electronic Communications [Doc. No.: AMS-
SC-17-0086; SC18-900-1 FR] received July 25, 2018, to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 5781--Jul. 26, 2018: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Olives Grown in California; Decreased Assessment Rate 
[Doc. No.: AMS-SC-18-0001; SC18-932-1 FR] received July 25, 
2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 5802--Jul. 27, 2018: A letter from the Director, 
Regulatory Review Group, Farm Service Agency, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's Major final rule--
2017 Wildfires and Hurricanes Indemnity Program (RIN: 0560-
AI39) received July 25, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 5823--Aug. 3, 2018: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Almonds Grown in California; Revision to the Adjusted 
Kernel Weight Computation [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-17-0084; SC18-981-1 
FR] received July 26, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 5824--Aug. 3, 2018: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Tart Cherries Grown in the States of Michigan, et al.; 
Revision of Exemption Requirements [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-17-0047; 
SC17-930-1 FR] received July 26, 2018, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 5825--Aug. 3, 2018: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's 
affirmation of interim rule as final rule--Inspection 
Application Requirements [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-16-0063 FIR] 
received July 31, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 5880--Aug. 7, 2018: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Livestock and Poultry Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's direct 
final rule--Referendum Procedures Under the Sorghum Promotion, 
Research, and Information Order and the Lamb Promotion, 
Research, and Information Order; Removal of Obsolete References 
[Doc. No.: AMS-LPS-17-0052] received August 2, 2018, to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 5881--Aug. 7, 2018: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Marketing Order Regulating the Handling of Spearmint Oil 
Produced in the Far West; Salable Quantities and Allotment 
Percentages for the 2018-2019 Marketing Year [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-
17-0073; SC18-985-1 FR] received August 2, 2018, to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 5915--Aug. 10, 2018: A letter from the Chairman, Farm 
Credit System Insurance Corporation, transmitting the 
Corporation's annual report for calendar year 2017; to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 5916--Aug. 10, 2018: A letter from the Chairman and 
Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Administration's proposed rule--Organization; 
Definitions; Eligibility Criteria for Outside Directors (RIN: 
3052-AC97) received August 2, 2018, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 5969--Aug. 24, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Congressional Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health 
Inspection Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Conditions for Payment of Highly 
Pathogenic Avian Influenza Indemnity Claims [Doc. No. APHIS-
2015-0061] (RIN: 0579-AE14) received August 17, 2018, to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 6203--Sep. 12, 2018: A letter from the Secretary, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's final rule--Chief Compliance Officer Duties and 
Annual Report Requirements for Futures Commission Merchants, 
Swap Dealers, and Major Swap Participants; Amendments (RIN: 
3038-AE56) received September 7, 2018, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 6204--Sep. 12, 2018: A letter from the Administrator, 
Cotton and Tobacco Program, Agricultural Marketing Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's direct 
final rule--Cotton Board Rules and Regulations: Adjusting 
Supplemental Assessment on Imports (2018 Amendments) [Doc. No.: 
AMS-CN-18-0013] received September 10, 2018, to the Committee 
on Agriculture.
    E.C. 6280--Sep. 20, 2018: A letter from the USDA/FSA 
Regulatory Review Group, Commodity Credit Corporation, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's Major 
final rule--Market Facilitation Program (RIN: 0560-AI42) 
received September 10, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 6295--Sep. 24, 2018: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Irish Potatoes Grown in Colorado; Increased Assessment 
Rate for Area No. 2 [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-18-0022; SC18-948-1 FR] 
September 18, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 6296--Sep. 24, 2018: A letter from the Acting 
Congressional Review Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health 
Inspection Service, Department of Agriculture, transmitting the 
Department's final rule--Establishing a Performance Standard 
for Authorizing the Importation and Interstate Movement of 
Fruits and Vegetables [Doc. No.: APHIS-2010-0082] (RIN: 0579-
AD71) received September 18, 2018, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 6336--Sep. 26, 2018: A letter from the Team Lead, 
Regulations Management Team, Rural Development Innovation 
Center, Rural Utilities Service, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Announcement Process 
for Rural Utilities Service Grant Programs (RIN: 0572-AC39) 
received September 18, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 6520--Oct. 16, 2018: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Cranberries Grown in States of Massachusetts, et al.; 
Establishment of 2018-19 Seasonal Volume Regulation [Doc. No.: 
AMS-SC-18-0012; SC18-929-2 FR] received October 9, 2018, to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 6564--Oct. 19, 2018: A letter from the Chairman and 
Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the Administration's notification of its 2018 
compensation program adjustments, including the Agency's 
current salary range structure and the performance-based merit 
pay matrix, pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 1833b(a); Public Law 101-73, 
Sec. 1206(a); (103 Stat. 523); to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 6640--Oct. 30, 2018: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Irish Potatoes Grown in Certain Designated Counties in 
Idaho, and Malheur Country, Oregon; Modification of Handling 
Regulations [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-17-0077; SC18-945-1 FIR] received 
October 16, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 6641--Oct. 30, 2018: A letter from the Regulatory 
Review Group Director, Commodity Credit Corporation, Department 
of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final rule--
Supplemental Agricultural Disaster Assistance Programs, Payment 
Limitation and Payment Eligibility (RIN: 0560-AH69) received 
October 16, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 6642--Oct. 30, 2018: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Tart Cherries Grown in the States of Michigan, et al.; 
Free and Restricted Percentages for the 2017-18 Crop Year for 
Tart Cherries [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-17-0071; SC18-930-1 FR] 
received October 17, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 6643--Oct. 30, 2018: A letter from the Board Chairman 
and Chief Executive Officer, Farm Credit Administration, 
transmitting the 2017 Annual Report on the Farm Credit System, 
pursuant to Sec. 5.17(a)(3) of the Farm Credit Act of 1971, as 
amended (Public Law 92-181); to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 6816--Nov. 15, 2018: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--General Regulations for Federal Fruit, Vegetable, and 
Specialty Crop Marketing Agreements and Orders; Electronic 
Mailing Notice of Hearing [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-18-0066; SC18-900-2 
FR] received October 31, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 6817--Nov. 15, 2018: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Hazelnuts Grown in Oregon and Washington; Order Amending 
Marketing Order No. 982 [Doc. No.: AO-SC-16-0136; AMS-SC-16-
0074; SC16-982-1] received October 31, 2018, to the Committee 
on Agriculture.
    E.C. 6818--Nov. 15, 2018: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Oranges and Grapefruit Grown in Lower Rio Grande Valley 
in Texas; Changing of Container Requirements [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-
17-0049; SC17-906-2 FR] received October 31, 2018, to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 6819--Nov. 15, 2018: A letter from the Administrator, 
Livestock and Poultry Program, Department of Agriculture, 
transmitting the Department's final rule--Soybean Promotion and 
Research: Amend the Order To Adjust Representation on the 
United Soybean Board [Doc. No.: AMS-LPS-18-0015] received 
October 31, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 6820--Nov. 15, 2018: A letter from the Administrator, 
Specialty Crops Program, Specialty Crops Inspection Division, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's direct 
final rule--United States Standards for Grades of Pecans [Doc. 
No.: AMS-FV-14-0101, SC-17-331] received October 29, 2018, to 
the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 6846--Nov. 16, 2018: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Raisins Produced From Grapes Grown in California; Order 
Amending Marketing Order No. 989 [Doc. No.: AO-FV-16-0016; AMS-
SC-16-0011; SC16-989-1] received November 6, 2018, to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 6929--Nov. 27, 2018: A letter from the Deputy 
Secretary, Division of Swap Dealer and Intermediary Oversight, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's final rule--De Minimis Exception to the Swap 
Dealer Definition (RIN: 3038-AE68) received November 15, 2018, 
to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 6930--Nov. 27, 2018: A letter from the Chairman and 
CEO, Farm Credit Administration, transmitting the 
Administration's final rule--Margin and Capital Requirements 
for Covered Swap Entities (RIN: 3052-AD28) received November 
16, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 6931--Nov. 27, 2018: A letter from the Chairman and 
Chief Executive Officer, Office of Secondary Market, Farm 
Credit Administration, transmitting the Administration's final 
rule--Organization; Funding and Fiscal Affairs, Loan Policies 
and Operations, and Funding Operations; Farmer Mac Investment 
Eligibility (RIN: 3052-AC86) received November 13, 2018, to the 
Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 7009--Nov. 29, 2018: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Oranges and Grapefruit Grown in Lower Rio Grande Valley 
in Texas; Decreased Assessment Rate [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-17-0044; 
SC18-906-1 FR] received November 26, 2018, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 7103--Dec. 10, 2018: A letter from the Deputy 
Secretary, Division of Swap Dealer and Intermediary Oversight, 
Commodity Futures Trading Commission, transmitting the 
Commission's final rule--Margin Requirements for Uncleared 
Swaps for Swap Dealers and Major Swap Participants (RIN: 3038-
AE71) received November 28, 2018, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 7104--Dec. 10, 2018: A letter from the Administrator, 
Agricultural Marketing Service, Specialty Crops Program, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--Pears Grown in Oregon and Washington; Increased 
Assessment Rate for Fresh Pears [Doc. No.: AMS-SC-18-0048; 
SC18-927-1 FR] received November 28, 2018, to the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    E.C. 7139--Dec. 12, 2018: A letter from the Team Lead/RD 
Innovation Center, Rural Development, Department of 
Agriculture, transmitting the Department's direct final rule--
Rural Development Environmental Regulation for Rural 
Infrastructure Projects (RIN: 0572-AC44) received December 6, 
2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.
    E.C. 7140--Dec. 12, 2018: A letter from the Team Lead/RD 
Innovation Center, Rural Development--Rural Utilities Service, 
Department of Agriculture, transmitting the Department's final 
rule--``Buy American'' Requirement (RIN: 0572-AC42) received 
December 6, 2018, to the Committee on Agriculture.

                          b. statutory reports

    USAID: U.S. International Food Assistance Report FY 2015, 
as required by Section 407 of the Food for Peace Act, as 
amended by Section 3010 of the 2014 Farm Bill. January 5, 2017.
    USDA: NRCS report on the status of projects funded through 
the Conservation Innovation Grants Program, as required by the 
Food Security Act of 1985 (P.L. 99-198). January 10, 2017.
    USDA: Report on implementation of the provisions on certain 
types of fish in the Agricultural Act of 2014 (P.L. 113-79). 
January 10, 2017.
    USDA: Annual report on the SNAP E&T projects as required by 
Section 4022 of P.L. 113-79. January 11, 2017.
    USDA: NRCS report concerning formal appeals received from 
December 8, 2015 to December 9, 2016, as required under Section 
280 of the Department of Agriculture Reorganization Act of 
1994. January 12, 2017.
    USDA: Committee Charter for the Plant Variety Protection 
Board as required by P.L. 92-463, the Federal Advisory 
Committee At. January 12, 2017.
    USDA: APHIS audits or reviews of countries or regions that 
have received animal health status recognitions as required by 
the Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2016. January 12, 2016.
    EPA: Charter for the Environmental Protection Agency 
Science Advisory Board in accordance with the provisions of the 
Federal Advisory Committee Act. January 17, 2017.
    GAO: Report on a major rule promulgated by the Department 
of Agriculture, FNS entitled SNAP: Eligibility, Certification, 
and Employment and Training Provisions of the Food, 
Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008. January 18, 2017.
    DOC: Report on the export licensing actions taken by the 
Department of Commerce's Bureau of Industry and Security 
relating to exports and reexports of agricultural commodities 
to Cuba from October 1 through December 31, 2016, as required 
by Section 906(b) of the Trade Sanctions Reform and Export 
Enhancement Act of 2000. January 18, 2017.
    FCA: Final Rule adopted by the FCA Board under the 
provisions of the Farm Credit Act of 1971. January 19, 2017.
    USDA: Report regarding use of categorical exclusions under 
the Healthy Forest Restoration Act as amended by Section 8204 
of the Agricultural Act of 2014. January 23, 2017.
    USDA: Report by USDA Food and Nutrition Service on the 
demonstration projects to end childhood hunger and the related 
evaluation authorized and funded by Section 141 of the Healthy, 
Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. February 1, 2017.
    USDA: Committee Charter for the National Advisory Committee 
on Microbiological Criteria for Foods as required by P.L. 92-
463, the Federal Advisory Committee Act. February 3, 2017.
    USDA: Map and perimeter boundary description for the 
Ontonagon Wild and Scenic River, in Michigan, added to the 
National Wild and Scenic Rivers System by P.L. 102-249. March 
2, 2017.
    USDA: Federal Grain Inspection Service Annual Report. March 
27, 2017.
    USDA: Proposed purchase of the Linville Cove tract from the 
Foothills Conservancy of North Carolina by the Forest Service. 
April 5, 2017.
    USDA: Annual Assessment of Cattle and Hog Industries as 
required by the Packers and Stockyards Act, 1921. April 12, 
2017.
    USDA: Notice of the ``NorthMet Project Land Exchange'', a 
proposed land exchange located in the State of Minnesota on the 
Superior National Forest. April 17, 2017.
    USDA: Advisory Committee on Minority Farmers as required by 
the Federal Advisory Committee Act. April 17, 2017.
    DOC: Report on the export licensing actions taken by the 
Department of Commerce's Bureau of Industry and Security 
relating to exports and reexports of agricultural commodities 
to Cuba from January 1 through March 31, 2017, as required by 
Section 906(b) of the Trade Sanctions Reform and Export 
Enhancement Act of 2000. April 17, 2017.
    DOI: Estimate of anticipated wildfire suppression costs for 
each fiscal year during the first weeks of March, May, and July 
as required by the FLAME Act of 2009. April 21, 2017.
    USDA: Notice of the ``NorthMet Project Land Exchange'', a 
proposed land exchange located in the State of Minnesota on the 
Superior National Forest. April 21, 2017.
    USDA: RMA report on progress made in developing and 
improving Federal crop insurance for organic crops. April 25, 
2017.
    USDA: Forest Service letter regarding the NorthMet land 
exchange on the Superior National Forest in Minnesota. May 4, 
2017.
    FCA: Semiannual report prepared by the IG of the FCA for 
the period of October 1, 2016 through March 31, 2017, pursuant 
to section 5 of the Inspector General Act of 1978. May 4, 2017.
    DOE: Charter renewing the Biomass R&D Technical Advisory 
Committee. May 12, 2017.
    DHHS: Report to Congress on Welfare Indicators and Risk 
Factors as required by the Welfare Indicators Act of 1994. May 
17, 2017.
    USDA: AMS letter informing of the release of producer list 
related to the South Texas Market Order as required under 
Section 1663 of the Food Security Act of 1985. May 17, 2017.
    USAID: OIG Semiannual Report for the period ending March 
31, 2017. May 22, 2017.
    USDA: Forest Service proposed Federal acquisition of Tract 
K-1576 located within the boundaries of the Cherokee National 
Forest, TN. May 22, 2017.
    USDA: Forest Service proposed Federal acquisition of the 
Conasauga River tract located within the boundaries of the 
Cherokee National Forest, TN. May 22, 2017.
    USDA: Forest Service proposed acquisition of the American 
Woodlands Tract G-1780 on the George Washington and Jefferson 
National Forest, Virginia. June 1, 2017.
    EPA: Charter establishing the Negotiated Rulemaking 
Committee to Negotiate a Proposed Rule to Limit Chemical Data 
Reporting for Certain Inorganic Byproducts under TSCA Section 
8(a) in accordance with the provisions of the Federal Advisory 
Committee Act. June 5, 2017.
    GAO: Report on a major rule promulgated by the Department 
of Agriculture, AMS entitled ``National Organic Program; 
Organic Livestock and Poultry Practices.'' June 6, 2017.
    USDA: Report on the effectiveness of the Restaurant Meals 
Program, which is operated by states as an option under SNAP. 
June 8, 2017.
    USDA: Forest Service proposed Federal acquisition of Upper 
Ammonoosuc on the White Mountain National Forest in New 
Hampshire. June 15, 2017.
    USDA: Report presenting enrollment data, by state, for 
payments made for easements valued at $250,000 or greater, 
payments made under the Regional Conservation Partnership 
Program subject to the waiter of adjusted gross income 
limitations, and payments made under the Conservation 
Stewardship Program. June 16, 2017.
    U.S. Office of Special Counsel: USDA report based on 
disclosures of wrongdoing at the Office of the Assistant 
Secretary for Civil Rights. June 22, 2017.
    U.S. Office of Special Counsel: Report based on disclosures 
of wrongdoing made by whistleblowers at the USDA, Office of the 
Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights. June 22, 2017.
    USDA: Forest Service proposed acquisition of Brick Church 
on the Francis Marion National Forest, South Carolina. August 
3, 2017.
    EPA: Charter renewing the Clean Air Scientific Advisory 
Committee in accordance with the provisions of the Federal 
Advisory Committee Act. June 5, 2017.
    USDA: Forest Service providing notice of the proposed Brick 
Church acquisition on the Francis Marion National Forest, South 
Carolina. August 3, 2017.
    USDA: Letter outlining the Forest Service estimate of 
wildland fire suppression costs for FY17, as required in the 
Department of Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies 
Appropriations Act, 2010 (P.L. 111-88), as a part of the Title 
V-FLAME Act of 2009. August 23, 2017.
    USDA: Forest Service providing notice of the proposed 
``Santee Road'' acquisition on Francis Marion National Forest, 
South Carolina. August 29, 2017.
    USDA: Forest Service providing notice of the proposed 
``South Eatmon'' acquisition on Francis Marion National Forest, 
South Carolina. August 29, 2017.
    USDA: Committee Charter for the Advisory Committee on 
Beginning Farmers and Ranchers. August 29, 2017.
    USDA: Final map and perimeter boundary description package 
for Tray Mountain Wilderness Area, Chattahoochee-Oconee 
National Forests in Georgia as required by the Wilderness Act. 
September 11, 2017.
    USDA: Progress report on implementation of the provisions 
on certain types of fish in the Agricultural Act of 2014. 
September 13, 2017.
    USDA: Forest Service proposed acquisition of ``A.O. & 
Patricia Curran, Tract #0-6772a, b, & c'' on Ozark St. Francis 
National Forest, Arkansas. September 20, 2017.
    OMB: Global Food Security Budget Crosscut Report as 
required by section 8(b) of the Global Food Security Act of 
2016. September 22, 2017.
    USDA: FOIA request to AMS for a list containing contact 
information for growers of avocados around Homestead, FL. 
September 29, 2017.
    FCA: Final rule adopted by the Farm Credit Administration 
Board under the provisions of the Farm Credit Act of 1972 to 
amend Title 12, Chapter VI of the Code of Federal Regulations. 
October 16, 2017.
    USDA: Notification of a revision to the CCC budget for FY18 
as required by Section 5 of the CCC Charter Act and the 
Government Corporation Control Act. October 18, 2017.
    USDA: Report that describes the annual disbursements and 
expenditures for each state and the number of organic 
operations served by the National Organic Certification Cost-
Share Program. October 19, 2017.
    USDA: Report providing a summary of RCPP activity during 
Fiscal Year 2014-16, and includes the number and types of 
partners; the number of producers receiving assistance; total 
funding committed to projects from Federal and non-Federal 
sources; and a description of how RCPP funds are being 
administered. October 30, 2017.
    USDA: 2017 Conference Transparency Report detailing all 
conferences with costs of $10,000 or more sponsored to held by 
USDA or attended by USDA employees during the period of July 1, 
2016, through June 30, 2017. November 13, 2017.
    USDA: Report providing a description of the extent to which 
the requests for highly erodible land conservation and wetland 
conservation determinations are being addressed in a timely 
manner, as required by Section 1241(c) of the Food Security Act 
of 1985. November 13, 2017.
    USAID: FY 2017 Agency Financial Report for the U.S. Agency 
for International Development. November 20, 2017.
    USDA: Semiannual Report to Congress, which covers the 6 
month reporting period from April 1, 2017 to September 30, 
2017, summarizing the most significant accomplishments of the 
USDA's Office of Inspector General. November 29, 2017.
    USDA: Report to Congress on factors that affect the export 
of specialty crops in accordance with Section 3202(d) of the 
Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008. November 16, 2017.
    USDA: Forest Service letter giving notice of proposed 
``Honey Hill'' acquisition on the Francis Marion National 
Forest, South Carolina. November 30, 2017.
    USAID: Semiannual Report to Congress for the period ending 
September 30, 2017 from the OIG at the US Agency for 
International Development. December 2, 2017.
    EPA: Charter renewing the Local Government Advisory 
Committee in accordance with the provisions of the Federal 
Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. 2. December 8, 2017.
    USDA: Report on the action plans developed by the Animal 
and Plant Health Inspection Service for high consequence plant 
pests and diseases to assist in preventing the introduction and 
widespread dissemination of new threats in the United States. 
December 12, 2017.
    USDA: Report that describes the change in cropland reported 
to the Farm Service Agency for the years of 2016 and 2017 for 
all the counties in the States of Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, 
Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota. December 19, 2017.
    USDA: NRCS report concerning formal appeals received from 
December 10, 2016 to December 11, 2017, as required under 
Section 280 of the Department of Agriculture Reorganization Act 
of 1994. December 22, 2017.
    USDA: Forest Service final map and perimeter boundary 
description package for Dolly Soda Wilderness, Otter Creek 
Wilderness, Cranberry Wilderness, and Laurel Fork South 
Wilderness. January 4, 2018.
    USDA: Forest Service estimate of anticipated wildland fire 
suppression costs for FY 2018, as required by P.L. 111-88, 
FLAME Act of 2009. January 12, 2018.
    USDA: 28th Progress report on implementation of the 
provisions on certain types of fish in the Agricultural Act of 
2014. January 12, 2018.
    USDA: Forest Service proposed Keewenaw Land Association 
acquisition on the Ottawa National Forest in Michigan. January 
18, 2018.
    DOT: Quarterly report for the period October 1-December 31, 
2015 of the Treasury Office Foreign Assets Control in the 
administration of the 1 year licensing regime set forth in 
906(a)(1) of the Act with respect to the exportation of 
agricultural commodities, medicine, and medical devices to Iran 
and Sudan.
    DOT: Quarterly report for the period January 1-March 31, 
2016 of the Treasury Office Foreign Assets Control in the 
administration of the 1 year licensing regime set forth in 
906(a)(1) of the Act with respect to the exportation of 
agricultural commodities, medicine, and medical devices to Iran 
and Sudan.
    DOT: Quarterly report for the period October 1-December 31, 
2017, submitted under 906(b) of the Trade Sanctions Reform and 
Export Enhancement Act of 2000.
    USDA: Report to Congress on the global effort to reduce 
child hunger and increase school attendance for FY15. February 
1, 2018.
    EPA: Charter renewing the Farm, Ranch and Rural Communities 
Advisory Committee in accordance with the provisions of the 
Federal Advisory Committee Act. February 8, 2018.
    USDA: Report to evaluate pilot projects that test 
innovative Federal-state partnerships which identify, 
investigate, and reduce retailer fraud in the SNAP program. 
February 12, 2018.
    DOC: Report to Congress on the export licensing actions 
taken by BIS relating to exports and re-exports of agricultural 
commodities to Cuba from October 1 through December 31, 2017. 
February 13, 2018.
    USDA: Report to Congress on the USDA Local and Regional 
Food Aid Procurement Program. February 21, 2018.
    USDA: Committee Charter for the Recreation Resource 
Advisory Committees for the Eastern Region, Southern Region, 
and the Pacific Southwest Region. February 22, 2018.
    USDA: Report on the SNAP E&T pilot projects as required by 
P.L. 113-79. March 5, 2018.
    USDA: FY 2017 Federal Information Security Modernization 
Act reports. March 8, 2018.
    USDA: Equitable Relief Report as required by the 2002 Farm 
Bill. March 12, 2018.
    GAO: Report on National Organic Program; Organic Livestock 
and Poultry Practices. March 28, 2018.
    EPA: Charter renewing the Human Studies Review Board. March 
28, 2018.
    DOS: Report to Congress on Efforts by Mexico to meet its 
Treaty Deliveries of Water to the Rio Grande in accordance with 
the Treaty between the United States and Mexico. March 29, 
2018.
    EPA: Charter renewing the Science Advisory Committee on 
Chemicals in accordance with the provisions of the Federal 
Advisory Committee Act. March 29, 2018.
    USDA: Report on the marketing methods and challenges with 
reporting livestock and meat markets to help identify 
improvements to the Livestock Mandatory Reporting Program and 
promote an orderly reauthorization of LMR in 2020. March 30, 
2018.
    FCSIC: Annual Report required under the Notification and 
Federal Employee Antidiscrimination and Retaliation Act of 
2002. March 31, 2018.
    FCA: 2017 Annual Report as required under the Notification 
and Federal Employee Antidiscrimination and Retaliation Act of 
2002. March 31, 2018.
    USDA: 2017 Annual Report as required under the Notification 
and Federal Employee Antidiscrimination and Retaliation Act of 
2002. April 3, 2018.
    DHHS: Report to Congress on Welfare Indicators and Risk 
Factors in accordance with the Welfare Indicators Act of 1994. 
April 5, 2018.
    USDA: RMA Report on progress made in developing and 
improving Federal crop insurance for organic crops. April 10, 
2018.
    USDA: Annual report on the Federal Grain Inspection 
Service. April 17, 2018.
    EPA: Charter re-establishing the Environmental Financial 
Advisory Board in accordance with the provisions of the Federal 
Advisory Committee Act. April 18, 2018.
    USDA: Pesticide Data Program Summary of 2016 Data.
    USDA: Committee Charter for the National Organic Standards 
Board. May 4, 2018.
    USDA: Wildland fire suppression costs for FY 2018, as 
required in the Department of the Interior, Environment and 
Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010, as a part of the 
Title V-FLAME Act of 2009.
    EPA: Charter renewing the EPA Board of Scientific 
Counselors in accordance with the provisions of the Federal 
Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. 2. May 9, 2018.
    CFTC: Charter for the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading 
Commission's Market Risk Advisory Committee. Descriptions of 
MRAC's purposes and the subjects it is intended to address are 
included in the enclosed charter. May 9, 2018.
    FCA: Proposed amendments to title 12, chapter VI of the 
Code of Federal Regulations as promulgated by the FCA. May 14, 
2018.
    USDA: Forest Service estimate of anticipated wildland fire 
suppression cost for FY18, as required in the Department of the 
Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 
2010, as a part of the Title V-FLAME Act of 2009. May 17, 2018.
    USDA: Forest Service letter regarding the proposed land 
acquisition of 11.25 acres, located in Hiawatha National Forest 
located in Mackinaw County, Michigan. May 8, 2018.
    USDA: Report on the Agricultural Management Assistance 
Organic Certification Cost-Share Program. July 19, 2018.
    USDA: Forest service letter regarding the acquisition of 
land of 148 acres within the Shawnee National Forest, located 
in Alexander County, Illinois. July 20, 2018.
    GAO: FSA report on promulgate rule 2017 Wildfires and 
Hurricanes Indemnity Program. July 26, 2018.
    USDA: Forest Service letter regarding the acquisition of 
185.55 acres that lie on either side of the Cherokee National 
Forest in a corner that connects Tennessee, Virginia, and North 
Carolina. July 26, 2018.
    USDA: Forest Service letter estimating anticipate wildland 
fire suppression costs for FY 2018 as required by P.L. 111-88. 
August 2, 2018.
    FCSIC: Annual report for 2017 as required by the Farm 
Credit Act of 1971. July 19, 2018.
    FCA: Amendments to title 12, chapter VI of the Code of 
Federal Regulations as promulgated by the FCA. July 24, 2018.
    USDA: Forest Service letter to regarding proposed 
acquisition of 160 acres within Ouachita National Forest, 
located in Scott County, Arkansas. August 6, 2018.
    USDA, USAID: U.S. International Food Assistance Report FY 
2016 as required by Section 407 of the Food for Peace Act. 
August 9, 2018.
    DOC: Report to the Congress on the export licensing actions 
taken by BIS relation to exports and reexports of agricultural 
commodities to Cuba from April 1 through June 30, 2018. August 
20, 2018.
    USDA: Forest Service letter regarding proposed acquisition 
within the boundary of the Uwharrie National Forest in North 
Carolina. August 20, 2018.
    GAO: Seed Cotton Changes to Agriculture Risk Coverage and 
Price Loss Risk Coverage Programs. September 4, 2018.
    GAO: Report on rule entitled ``Market Facilitation 
Program''. September 14, 2018.
    EPA: Charter renewing the national Environmental Justice 
Advisory Council in accordance with the provisions of the 
Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. 2. September 12, 
2018.
    DOI: Estimate of anticipated wildlife suppression costs for 
each fiscal year during the first weeks of March, May, and 
July. September 19, 2018.
    USDA: Report to Congress on the global effort to reduce 
child hunger and increase school attendance. September 20, 
2018.
    DOI: Letter to notify the relevant congressional committees 
if the Secretary estimates that only 60 days worth of funds 
remain in the FLAME fund administered by the Secretary. 
September 21, 2018.
    USDA: Forest Service letter regarding the proposed 
acquisition of 600 acres within the Chequamegon-Nicolet 
National Forest. September 28, 2018.
    USDA: Estimated of anticipated wildlife fire suppression 
costs for FY 2019, as required in the Department of the 
Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 
2010. October 3, 2018.
    USDA: Committee Charter for the Dietary Guidelines Advisory 
Committee. October 5, 2018.
    EPA: Charter renewing the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, 
and Rodenticide Act Scientific Advisory Panel in accordance 
with the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 
U.S.C. App. 2. October 17, 2018.
    USDA: Forest Service report on conveyances of National 
Forest System land made by the Secretary during the period 
covered by the report. October 2, 2018.
    USDA: Letter to notify of the intention to terminate 
Federal Marketing Order No. 953, which regulates the handling 
of Irish potatoes grown in Southeastern states. October 24, 
2018.
    USDA: Committee Charter for the Grain Inspection Advisory 
Committee. October 25, 2018.
    FCA: Final rule to comply with section 939A of the Dodd-
Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. October 
31, 2018.
    EPA: Charter renewing the National Environmental Education 
Advisory Council. November 7, 2018.
    DOC: Export licensing actions taken by the Department of 
Commerce's Bureau of Industry and Security relating to exports 
of agricultural commodities to Cuba during the preceding 2 year 
period of October 1, 2016 through September 30, 2018. November 
13, 2018.
    USAID: Semiannual Report to Congress for the period ending 
September 30, 2018, produced by the Office of the Inspector 
General of the U.S. Agency for International Development. 
November 20, 2018.
    USDA: Report detailing all conferences with costs of 
$10,000 or more sponsored or held by USDA or attended by USDA 
employees during the period of July 1, 2017, through June 30, 
2018.
    EPA: Charter re-establishing the Clean Air Act Advisory 
Committee in accordance with the provisions of the Federal 
Advisory Committee Act. November 27, 2018.
    USDA: Committee Charter for the Secure Rural Schools 
Resource Advisory Committees. December 3, 2018.
    USDA: Committee Charter for the Black Hills National Forest 
Advisory Board. December 3, 2018.
    USDA: Committee Charter for the Forestry Research Advisory 
Council. December 3, 2018.

                              c. memorials

    Memorial No. 15. The Speaker presented a memorial of the 
Legislature of the State of North Dakota, relative to House 
Concurrent Resolution No. 3009, urging Congress to amend the 
2014 Farm Bill to allow counties to use raw yield data from 
insurance companies to supplement the national agriculture 
statistics survey to calculate payments under the Agriculture 
Risk Coverage program when an insufficient number of surveys 
are returned to accurately calculate payments; which was 
referred to the Committee on Agriculture. Submitted March 30, 
2017.
    Memorial No. 19. Also, a memorial of the Legislature of the 
State of Wyoming, relative to Senate Joint Resolution No. 2, 
requesting the Congress to enact legislation requiring revenues 
received by the Federal Government from wind and solar energy 
developments on lands of the United States be shared equally 
with the state in which those developments are located; jointly 
to the Committees on Natural Resources and Agriculture. 
Submitted April 3, 2017.
    Memorial No. 32. Also, a memorial of the Legislature of the 
State of Idaho, relative to House Joint Memorial No. 6, urging 
that United States farmers, ranchers and food processors be 
enabled to compete freely and trade fairly in foreign and 
domestic markets on a strictly level playing field; jointly to 
the Committees on Agriculture and Education and the Workforce. 
Submitted May 1, 2017.
    Memorial No. 75. Also, a memorial of the Senate of the 
State of Louisiana, relative to Senate Concurrent Resolution 
No. 120, memorializing the Congress to take such actions as are 
necessary to support the domestic beef industry; jointly to the 
Committees on Ways and Means and Agriculture. Submitted June 
29, 2017.
    Memorial No. 94. The Speaker presented a memorial of the 
House of Representatives of the State of Louisiana, relative to 
House Resolution No. 129, urging the United States Congress to 
take such actions as are necessary to support the domestic beef 
industry; which was referred to the Committee on Agriculture. 
Submitted July 14, 2017.
    Memorial No. 104. Also, a memorial of the General Assembly 
of the State of New Jersey, relative to Assembly Resolution No. 
211, opposing the nomination of Scott Pruitt as Administrator 
of the United States Environmental Protection Agency; jointly 
to the Committees on Energy and Commerce, Agriculture, 
Transportation and Infrastructure, and Science, Space, and 
Technology. Submitted August 11, 2017.
    Memorial No. 159. The Speaker presented a memorial of the 
Legislature of the State of Texas, relative to House Concurrent 
Resolution No. 31, urging the United States Congress to 
encourage the U.S. Department of Agriculture to revise existing 
policies that promote the waste of water after an irrigated 
crop has been declared a failure; to the Committee on 
Agriculture. Submitted January 8, 2018.
    Memorial No. 189. Also, a memorial of the Senate of the 
State of Arizona, relative to Senate Concurrent Memorial 1007, 
urging the United States Congress to Reauthorize Secure Rural 
Schools and Community Self-Determination Act Funding; jointly 
to the Committees on Agriculture and Natural Resources. 
Submitted April 27, 2018.
    Memorial No. 253. Also, a memorial of the Legislature of 
the State of Utah, relative to House Concurrent Resolution 19, 
urging the President of the United States, the United States 
Congress, and Utah's Congressional delegation to propose and 
secure the passage of legislation that requires PILT payments 
to be a fair and steady source of revenue that would otherwise 
be generated but for the Federal control of Utah lands; which 
was referred jointly to the Committees on Natural Resources and 
Agriculture. Submitted August 7, 2018.
    Memorial No. 254. Also, a memorial of the Legislature of 
the State of Utah, relative to House Joint Resolution 2, 
encouraging the Federal Government to consider moving the 
headquarters for the Department of the Interior and the U.S. 
Forest Service to Utah; which was referred jointly to the 
Committees on Natural Resources and Agriculture. Submitted 
August 7, 2018.
    Memorial No. 266. Also, a memorial of the Legislature of 
the State of New Jersey, relative to State Joint Resolution No. 
73, respectfully urging the Congress of the United States to 
pass the ``Military Hunger Prevention Act''; jointly to the 
Committees on Armed Services and Agriculture. Submitted October 
19, 2018.
    Memorial No. 267. The Speaker presented a memorial of the 
Senate of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, relative to Senate 
Resolution No. 421, urging the Congress of the United States to 
pass the language from the Hemp Farming Act of 2018, as 
contained in the Farm Bill of 2018, removing industrial hemp 
from the Schedule I Controlled Substance List and legalizing 
commercial industrial hemp production in the United States; 
which was referred to the Committee on Agriculture. Submitted 
November 6, 2018.
    Memorial No. 272. Also, a memorial of the Legislature of 
the State of Alaska, relative to House Joint Resolution No. 29, 
urging the United States Congress to reauthorize the Secure 
Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act of 2000; 
which was referred jointly to the Committees on Agriculture and 
Natural Resources. Submitted December 21, 2018.

                              d. petitions

    Petition No. 60. The Speaker presented a petition of David 
Koehler, State Senator, 46th District, Illinois, relative to 
Senate Resolution No. 377, urging the Congress to adopt a farm 
bill that supports and promotes the development of local and 
regional food systems; which was referred to the Committee on 
Agriculture. Submitted July 25, 2017.
    Petition No. 80. The Speaker presented a petition of the 
Senate of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, relative to Senate 
Concurrent Resolution 28, to express the firm and unequivocal 
repudiation and opposition of the Legislative Assembly of 
Puerto Rico to H.R. 4202 of the United States House of 
Representatives that proposes the application of the ``Animal 
Welfare Act'' to United States territories and, consequently, 
prohibits cockfights in Puerto Rico; to the Committee on 
Agriculture. Submitted February 15, 2018.

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