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                                                 Union Calendar No. 894
115th Congress    }                                       {      Report
                       HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES                 
 2d Session       }                                       {    115-1127
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     

     

                  LEGISLATIVE AND OVERSIGHT ACTIVITIES

                                 of the

                     COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY

                             115TH CONGRESS

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                   (Pursuant to House Rule XI, 1(d))







[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]








January 2, 2019.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
                  LEGISLATIVE AND OVERSIGHT ACTIVITIES

                 OF THE COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY

                             115TH CONGRESS





















                                                Union Calendar No. 894
115th Congress   }                                      {       Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session      }                                      {     115-1127

_______________________________________________________________________

                                     


                  LEGISLATIVE AND OVERSIGHT ACTIVITIES

                                 of the

                     COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY

                             115TH CONGRESS

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                   (Pursuant to House Rule XI, 1(d))











[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]














January 2, 2019.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed
              
              
                                   ______
	
	
                     U.S. GOVERNMENT PUBLISHING OFFICE 
		 
34-022                    WASHINGTON : 2019                 
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
              
                         LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

                              ----------                              

                          House of Representatives,
                            Committee on Homeland Security,
                                   Washington, DC, January 2, 2019.
Hon. Karen L. Haas,
Clerk of the House of Representatives,
The Capitol, Washington, DC.
    Dear Ms. Haas: Pursuant to Rule X and clause 1(d)(1) of 
Rule XI of the Rules of the House of Representatives, attached, 
please find the report of the legislative and oversight 
activities of the Committee on Homeland Security during the 
115th Congress.
            Sincerely,
                                         Michael T. McCaul,
                                                          Chairman. 
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                             C O N T E NT S

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
Jurisdiction.....................................................     1
Membership and Organization......................................     5
History..........................................................     7
Legislative Activities of the Committee..........................    18
Oversight Activities
    Full Committee...............................................   161
    Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence............   173
    Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency..........   189
    Subcommittee on Transportation and Protective Security.......   207
    Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security.................   227
    Subcommittee on Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Protection..   239
    Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
      Communications.............................................   249
    Task Force on Denying Terrorists Entry to the United States..   267
Committee Oversight Plan
    Part A, Oversight Plan As Agreed to..........................   271
    Part B, Implementation of the Oversight Plan.................   285
Appendices
    Appendix I--Committee Rules..................................
    Appendix II--Membership Changes to the Committee.............   303
    Appendix III--List of Public Laws............................   311
    Appendix IV--Committee Legislative Reports...................   313
    Appendix V--Presidential Messages, Executive Communications, 
      Memorials, and Petitions...................................   323
    Appendix VI--Committee Staff.................................   327
    Appendix VII--Witnesses......................................   331
    Appendix VIII--Printed Hearings..............................   355
    Appendix IX--Committee Prints................................   361
    Appendix X--Summary of Committee Activities..................   363
Additional Views.................................................   364

















                                                Union Calendar No. 894
115th Congress   }                                      {       Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session      }                                      {     115-1127

======================================================================



 
   LEGISLATIVE AND OVERSIGHT ACTIVITIES OF THE COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND 
                                SECURITY

                                _______
                                

January 2, 2019.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

         Mr. McCaul, from the Committee on Homeland Security, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                                Overview

    The Committee on Homeland Security met on February 1, 2017, 
for an organizational meeting for the 115th Congress under the 
direction of Chairman Michael T. McCaul of Texas. The Committee 
Membership, was set at 32 Members with 18 Republicans and 14 
Democrats.
    The Committee established six Subcommittees: The 
Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence; the 
Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security; the Subcommittee 
on Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Protection; the 
Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency; the 
Subcommittee on Transportation and Protective Security; and the 
Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications.

                              Jurisdiction

    The Committee on Homeland Security was re-established in 
the 115th Congress pursuant to H. Res. 5, the Rules of the 
House of Representatives for the 115th Congress, agreed to on 
January 3, 2017. The jurisdiction of the Committee is as 
follows:

                              HOUSE RULE X

                       organization of committees
Committees and their legislative jurisdictions
    1. There shall be in the House the following standing committees, 
each of which shall have the jurisdiction and related functions 
assigned by this clause and clauses 2, 3, and 4. All bills, 
resolutions, and other matters relating to subjects within the 
jurisdiction of the standing committees listed in this clause shall be 
referred to those committees, in accordance with clause 2 of rule XII, 
as follows:
          * * * * *
    (j) Committee on Homeland Security.
      (1) Overall homeland security policy.
      (2) Organization, administration, and general management of the 
Department of Homeland Security.
      (3) Functions of the Department of Homeland Security relating to 
the following:
        (A) Border and port security (except immigration policy and 
non-border enforcement).
        (B) Customs (except customs revenue).
        (C) Integration, analysis, and dissemination of homeland 
security information.
        (D) Domestic preparedness for and collective response to 
terrorism.
        (E) Research and development.
        (F) Transportation security.
          * * * * *
General oversight responsibilities
    2. (a) The various standing committees shall have general oversight 
responsibilities as provided in paragraph (b) in order to assist the 
House in--
      (1) its analysis, appraisal, and evaluation of--
        (A) the application, administration, execution, and 
effectiveness of Federal laws; and
        (B) conditions and circumstances that may indicate the 
necessity or Desirability of enacting new or additional legislation; 
and
      (2) its formulation, consideration, and enactment of changes in 
Federal laws, and of such additional legislation as may be necessary or 
appropriate.
      (b)(1) In order to determine whether laws and programs addressing 
subjects within the jurisdiction of a committee are being implemented 
and carried out in accordance with the intent of Congress and whether 
they should be continued, curtailed, or eliminated, each standing 
committee (other than the Committee on Appropriations) shall review and 
study on a continuing basis--
        (A) the application, administration, execution, and 
effectiveness of laws and programs addressing subjects within its 
jurisdiction;
        (B) the organization and operation of Federal agencies and 
entities having responsibilities for the administration and execution 
of laws and programs addressing subjects within its jurisdiction;
        (C) any conditions or circumstances that may indicate the 
necessity or desirability of enacting new or additional legislation 
addressing subjects within its jurisdiction (whether or not a bill or 
resolution has been introduced with respect thereto); and
        (D) future research and forecasting on subjects within its 
jurisdiction.
      (2) Each committee to which subparagraph (1) applies having more 
than 20 members shall establish an oversight subcommittee, or require 
its subcommittees to conduct oversight in their respective 
jurisdictions, to assist in carrying out its responsibilities under 
this clause. The establishment of an oversight subcommittee does not 
limit the responsibility of a subcommittee with legislative 
jurisdiction in carrying out its oversight responsibilities.
      (c) Each standing committee shall review and study on a 
continuing basis the impact or probable impact of tax policies 
affecting subjects within its jurisdiction as described in clauses 1 
and 3.
      (d)(1) Not later than February 15 of the first session of a 
Congress, each standing committee shall, in a meeting that is open to 
the public and with a quorum present, adopt its oversight plan for that 
Congress. Such plan shall be submitted simultaneously to the Committee 
on Government Reform and to the Committee on House Administration. In 
developing its plan each committee shall, to the maximum extent 
feasible--
      (A) consult with other committees that have jurisdiction over the 
same or related laws, programs, or agencies within its jurisdiction 
with the objective of ensuring maximum coordination and cooperation 
among committees when conducting reviews of such laws, programs, or 
agencies and include in its plan an explanation of steps that have been 
or will be taken to ensure such coordination and cooperation;
      (B) review specific problems with Federal rules, regulations, 
statutes, and court decisions that are ambiguous, arbitrary, or 
nonsensical, or that impose severe financial burdens on individuals;
      (C) give priority consideration to including in its plan the 
review of those laws, programs, or agencies operating under permanent 
budget authority or permanent statutory authority;
      (D) have a view toward ensuring that all significant laws, 
programs, or agencies within its jurisdiction are subject to review 
every 10 years; and
      (E) have a view toward insuring against duplication of Federal 
programs.
      (2) Not later than March 31 in the first session of a Congress, 
after consultation with the Speaker, the Majority Leader, and the 
Minority Leader, the Committee on Government Reform shall report to the 
House the oversight plans submitted by committees together with any 
recommendations that it, or the House leadership group described above, 
may make to ensure the most effective coordination of oversight plans 
and otherwise to achieve the objectives of this clause.
    (e) The Speaker, with the approval of the House, may appoint 
special ad hoc oversight committees for the purpose of reviewing 
specific matters within the jurisdiction of two or more standing 
committees.
          * * * * *
Special oversight functions
    3. (g)(1) The Committee on Homeland Security shall review and study 
on a continuing basis all Government activities relating to homeland 
security, including the interaction of all departments and agencies 
with the Department of Homeland Security.
    (2) In addition, the committee shall review and study on a primary 
and continuing basis all Government activities, programs and 
organizations related to homeland security that fall within its primary 
legislative jurisdiction.

   Membership and Organization of the Committee on Homeland Security

                                (18-12)

                     COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY

Michael T. McCaul, Texas, Chairman

Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi      Lamar Smith, Texas
Sheila Jackson Lee, Texas            Peter T. King, New York
James R. Langevin, Rhode Island      Mike Rogers, Alabama
Cedric L. Richmond, Louisiana        Lou Barletta, Pennsylvania
William R. Keating, Massachusetts    Scott Perry, Pennsylvania
Donald M. Payne, Jr., New Jersey     John Katko, New York
Filemon Vela, Texas                  Will Hurd, Texas
Bonnie Watson Coleman, New Jersey    Martha McSally, Arizona
Kathleen M. Rice, New York           John Ratcliffe, Texas
J. Luis Correa, California           Daniel M. Donovan, Jr., New York
Val Butler Demings, Florida          Mike Gallagher, Wisconsin
Nanette Diaz Barragan, California    Clay Higgins, Louisiana
                                     Thomas A. Garrett, Jr., Virginia
                                     Brian K. Fitzpatrick, Pennsylvania
                                     Ron Estes, Kansas
                                     Don Bacon, Nebraska
                                     Debbie Lesko, Arizona
                              ----------                              


Appointment of Mr. Michael T. McCaul as Chair, and Mr. Bennie G. 
    Thompson of Mississippi as Ranking Minority Member on January 
    3, 2017, pursuant to H. Res. 6 and H. Res. 7, respectively.
Appointment of Minority Members of the Committee on January 11, 
    2017, pursuant to H. Res. 45.
Appointment of Majority Members of the Committee on January 13, 
    2017, pursuant to H. Res. 51.
Resignation of Mr. Tom Marino of Pennsylvania from the Committee 
    on June 27, 2017, and the election of Mr. Ron Estes of Kansas 
    to the Committee pursuant to H. Res. 410.
Resignation of Mr. Jeff Duncan of South Carolina from the 
    Committee on October 24, 2017.
Appointment of Mr. Don Bacon of Nebraska to the Committee on 
    November 29, 2017, pursuant to H. Res. 634.
Resignation of Mr. John H. Rutherford of Florida from the 
    Committee on May 16, 2018.
Appointment of Mrs. Debbie Lesko of Arizona to the Committee on 
    May 16, 2018, pursuant to H. Res. 897.
                              ----------                              


           SUBCOMMITTEE ON COUNTERTERRORISM AND INTELLIGENCE

 Peter T. King, New York, Chairman

Kathleen M. Rice, New York           Lou Barletta, Pennsylvania
Sheila Jackson Lee, Texas            Scott Perry, Pennsylvania
William R. Keating, Massachusetts    Will Hurd, Texas
Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi (ex officio)llagher, Wisconsin
                                     Michael T. McCaul, Texas (ex 
                                     officio)

          SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND MANAGEMENT EFFICIENCY

    Scott Perry, Pennsylvania, 
             Chairman

J. Luis Correa, California           John Ratcliffe, Texas
Kathleen M. Rice, New York           Clay Higgins, Louisiana
Nanette Diaz Barragan, California    Thomas A. Garrett, Jr., Virginia
Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi (ex officio)es, Kansas
                                     Michael T. McCaul, Texas (ex 
                                     officio)

         SUBCOMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION AND PROTECTIVE SECURITY

  John Katko, New York, Chairman

Bonnie Watson Coleman, New Jersey    Mike Rogers, Alabama
William R. Keating, Massachusetts    Brian K. Fitzpatrick, Pennsylvania
Donald M. Payne, Jr., New Jersey     Ron Estes, Kansas
Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi (ex officio)Lesko, Arizona
                                     Michael T. McCaul, Texas (ex 
                                     officio)

              SUBCOMMITTEE ON BORDER AND MARITIME SECURITY

 Martha McSally, Arizona, Chairman

Filemon Vela, Texas                  Lamar Smith, Texas
Cedric L. Richmond, Louisiana        Mike Rogers, Alabama
J. Luis Correa, California           Lou Barletta, Pennsylvania
Val Butler Demings, Florida          Will Hurd, Texas
Nanette Diaz Barragan, California    Clay Higgins, Louisiana
Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi (ex officio)on, Nebraska
                                     Michael T. McCaul, Texas (ex 
                                     officio)

      SUBCOMMITTEE ON CYBERSECURITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION

  John Ratcliffe, Texas, Chairman

Cedric L. Richmond, Louisiana        John Katko, New York
Sheila Jackson Lee, Texas            Daniel M. Donovan, Jr., New York
James R. Langevin, Rhode Island      Mike Gallagher, Wisconsin
Val Butler Demings, Florida          Clay Higgins, Louisiana
Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi (ex officio). Fitzpatrick, Pennsylvania
                                     Don Bacon, Nebraska
                                     Michael T. McCaul, Texas (ex 
                                     officio)

  SUBCOMMITTEE ON EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND COMMUNICATIONS

Daniel M. Donovan, Jr., New York, 
             Chairman

Donald M. Payne, Jr., New Jersey     Peter T. King, New York
James R. Langevin, Rhode Island      Martha McSally, Arizona
Bonnie Watson Coleman, New Jersey    Thomas A. Garrett, Jr., Virginia
Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi (ex officio)Lesko, Arizona
                                     Michael T. McCaul, Texas (ex 
                                     officio)

                      History of the Committee on 
                           Homeland Security

                 Select Committees on Homeland Security

107th Congress
    In the 107th Congress, the House Select Committee on 
Homeland Security was established on June 19, 2002, pursuant to 
H. Res. 449 (adopted by voice vote).
    The Committee was composed of nine Members of the House: 
Mr. Richard ``Dick'' Armey of Texas, Chairman; Mr. Thomas DeLay 
of Texas; Mr. Julius Caesar ``J.C.'' Watts of Oklahoma; Ms. 
Deborah Pryce of Ohio; Mr. Robert Portman of Ohio; Ms. Nancy 
Pelosi of California; Mr. Jonas Martin Frost of Texas; Mr. 
Robert Menendez of New Jersey; and Ms. Rosa L. DeLauro of 
Connecticut.
    The mandate of the Select Committee in the 107th Congress 
was to ``develop recommendations and report to the House on 
such matters that relate to the establishment of a department 
of homeland security.'' The Select Committee accomplished its 
mandate on November 22, 2002, when the House concurred in the 
Senate amendment to H.R. 5005, a bill establishing the 
Department of Homeland Security, by unanimous consent, and 
cleared H.R. 5005 for the President. The bill was presented to 
the President on November 22, 2002, and was signed on November 
25, 2002, becoming Public Law 107-296.
    The termination date of the House Select Committee on 
Homeland Security was ``after final disposition of a bill [ . . 
. ] including final disposition of any veto message on such 
bill,'' which occurred on November 25, 2002.


------------------------------------------------------------------------
               Law                       Title               Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pub. L. 107-296.................  The Homeland        H.R. 5005
                                   Security Act of
                                   2002.
------------------------------------------------------------------------


108th Congress
    The second House Select Committee on Homeland Security was 
established in the 108th Congress on January 7, 2003, pursuant 
to provisions of H. Res. 5 (adopted by a recorded vote of 221 
yeas and 203 nays).
    The Membership of the Select Committee was established on 
February 12, 2003, as: Mr. Christopher Cox of California, 
Chairman; Ms. Jennifer Dunn of Washington; Mr. William ``Bill'' 
Young of Florida; Mr. Donald ``Don'' Young of Alaska; Mr. F. 
James Sensenbrenner, Jr. of Wisconsin; Mr. Wilbert Joseph 
``Billy'' Tauzin of Louisiana; Mr. David Dreier of California; 
Mr. Duncan Hunter of California; Mr. Harold Rogers of Kentucky; 
Mr. Sherwood Boehlert of New York; Mr. Lamar Smith of Texas; 
Mr. Wayne Curtis ``Curt'' Weldon of Pennsylvania; Mr. 
Christopher Shays of Connecticut; Mr. Porter J. Goss of 
Florida; Mr. David Camp of Michigan; Mr. Lincoln Diaz-Balart of 
Florida; Mr. Robert W. Goodlatte of Virginia; Mr. Ernest James 
Istook, Jr. of Oklahoma; Mr. Peter T. King of New York; Mr. 
John E. Linder of Georgia; Mr. John B. Shadegg of Arizona; Mr. 
Mark E. Souder of Indiana; Mr. William McClellan ``Mac'' 
Thornberry of Texas; Mr. James A. Gibbons of Nevada; Ms. Kay 
Granger of Texas; Mr. Pete Sessions of Texas; Mr. John E. 
Sweeney of New York; Mr. Jim Turner of Texas; Mr. Bennie G. 
Thompson of Mississippi; Ms. Loretta Sanchez of California; Mr. 
Edward J. Markey of Massachusetts; Mr. Norman D. Dicks of 
Washington; Mr. Barney Frank of Massachusetts; Ms. Jane Harman 
of California; Mr. Benjamin L. Cardin of Maryland; Ms. Louise 
M. Slaughter of New York; Mr. Peter A. DeFazio of Oregon; Mrs. 
Nita M. Lowey of New York; Mr. Robert E. Andrews of New Jersey; 
Ms. Eleanor Holmes Norton, a Delegate from the District of 
Columbia; Ms. Zoe Lofgren of California; Ms. Karen McCarthy of 
Missouri; Ms. Sheila Jackson Lee of Texas; Mr. William ``Bill'' 
Pascrell, Jr. of New Jersey; Mrs. Donna M. Christensen, a 
Delegate from the U.S. Virgin Islands; Mr. Bobby ``Bob'' 
Etheridge of North Carolina; Mr. Charles Gonzalez of Texas; Mr. 
Ken Lucas of Kentucky; Mr. James R. Langevin of Rhode Island; 
and Mr. Kendrick B. Meek of Florida.
    The Select Committee was authorized to develop 
recommendations and report to the House by bill or otherwise on 
such matters that relate to the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Public Law 107-296) as may be referred to it by the Speaker, 
and was charged with reviewing and studying on a continuing 
basis laws, programs, and Government activities relating to 
homeland security. In addition, the Select Committee was 
directed to conduct a thorough and complete study of the 
operation and implementation of the Rules of the House, 
including Rule X, with respect to the issue of homeland 
security, and submit its recommendations regarding any changes 
in the Rules of the House to the Committee on Rules not later 
than September 30, 2004.
    On September 30, 2004, the Select Committee on Homeland 
Security submitted its recommendations on jurisdictional 
changes to the Rules of the House of Representatives to the 
Committee on Rules.
    The Committee had six measures signed into law during the 
108th Congress:


------------------------------------------------------------------------
               Law                       Title               Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pub. L. 108-136.................  National Defense    H.R. 1588
                                   Authorization Act
                                   for Fiscal Year
                                   2004.
 
Pub. L. 108-268.................  To provide for the  H.R. 4322
                                   transfer of the
                                   Nebraska Avenue
                                   Naval Complex in
                                   the District of
                                   Columbia to
                                   facilitate the
                                   establishment of
                                   the headquarters
                                   for the
                                   Department of
                                   Homeland
                                   Security, to
                                   provide for the
                                   acquisition by
                                   the Department of
                                   the Navy of
                                   suitable
                                   replacement
                                   facilities..
 
Pub. L. 108-276.................  Project BioShield   S. 15 (H.R. 2122)
                                   Act of 2004.
 
Pub. L. 108-293.................  Coast Guard and     H.R. 2443
                                   Maritime
                                   Transportation
                                   Act of 2004.
 
Pub. L. 108-330.................  Department of       H.R. 4259
                                   Homeland Security
                                   Financial
                                   Accountability
                                   Act.
 
Pub. L. 108-458.................  Intelligence        S. 2845 (H.R.
                                   Reform and          5223)
                                   Terrorism
                                   Prevention Act of
                                   2004.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Indicates measures which were not referred directly to the Committee on
  Homeland Security.

    Pursuant to H. Res. 5, the Select Committee terminated on 
January 2, 2005, with the expiration of the 108th Congress.

                    Committees on Homeland Security

109th Congress
    The 109th Congress marked the first Congress for the 
standing Committee on Homeland Security. During the two 
previous Congresses, the House of Representatives established 
separate Select Committees on Homeland Security: the first to 
establish the Department of Homeland Security, the second to 
monitor the initial activities of the Department and to examine 
the need for a standing committee in the House with 
jurisdictional authority over matters relating to the issue of 
homeland security.
    The Committee on Homeland Security was established as a 
standing Committee of the House with the passage of H. Res. 5, 
on January 4, 2005. The resolution was adopted by a recorded 
vote of 220 yeas and 195 nays.
    The Committee Membership was set at 34 Members with 19 
Republicans and 15 Democrats. The following Members were 
appointed to the Committee on Homeland Security for all or part 
of the Congress: Mr. Christopher Cox of California; Mr. Peter 
T. King of New York; Mr. Don Young of Alaska; Mr. Lamar S. 
Smith of Texas; Mr. Curt Weldon of Pennsylvania; Mr. 
Christopher Shays of Connecticut; Mr. John Linder of Georgia; 
Mr. Mark E. Souder of Indiana; Mr. Tom Davis of Virginia; Mr. 
Daniel E. Lungren of California; Mr. Jim Gibbons of Nevada; Mr. 
Rob Simmons of Connecticut; Mr. Mike Rogers of Alabama; Mr. 
Stevan Pearce of New Mexico; Ms. Katherine Harris of Florida; 
Mr. Bobby Jindal of Louisiana; Mr. David G. Reichert of 
Washington; Mr. Michael T. McCaul of Texas; Mr. Charles W. Dent 
of Pennsylvania; Ms. Ginny Brown-Waite of Florida; Mr. Bennie 
G. Thompson of Mississippi; Ms. Loretta Sanchez of California; 
Mr. Edward J. Markey of Massachusetts; Mr. Norman D. Dicks of 
Washington; Ms. Jane Harman of California; Mr. Peter A. DeFazio 
of Oregon; Ms. Nita M. Lowey of New York; Ms. Eleanor Holmes 
Norton of District of Columbia; Ms. Zoe Lofgren of California; 
Ms. Sheila Jackson Lee of Texas; Mr. Bill Pascrell Jr. of New 
Jersey; Ms. Donna M. Christensen of U.S. Virgin Islands; Mr. 
Bob Etheridge of North Carolina; Mr. James R. Langevin of Rhode 
Island; and Mr. Kendrick B. Meek of Florida.
    On February 9, 2005, the Committee on Homeland Security 
adopted its Rules, which provided for the establishment of five 
Subcommittees. The Subcommittee on Prevention of Nuclear and 
Biological Attack; the Subcommittee on Intelligence, 
Information Sharing, and Terrorism Risk Assessment; the 
Subcommittee on Economic Security, Infrastructure Protection, 
and Cybersecurity; the Subcommittee on Management, Integration, 
and Oversight; and the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, 
Science, and Technology.
    On October 7, 2005, the Committee revised its Rules to 
establish a Subcommittee on Investigations.
    The Committee had eight measures signed into law during the 
109th Congress:


------------------------------------------------------------------------
               Law                       Title               Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pub. L. 109-13..................  Emergency           H.R. 1268
                                   Supplemental
                                   Appropriations
                                   Act for Defense,
                                   the Global War on
                                   Terror, and
                                   Tsunami Relief,
                                   2005.
 
Pub. L. 109-59..................  Safe, Accountable,  H.R. 3
                                   Flexible,
                                   Efficient
                                   Transportation
                                   Equity Act: A
                                   Legacy for Users.
 
Pub. L. 109-163.................  National Defense    H.R. 1815
                                   Authorization Act
                                   for Fiscal Year
                                   2006.
 
Pub. L. 109-241.................  Coast Guard and     H.R. 889
                                   Maritime
                                   Transportation
                                   Act of 2006.
 
Pub. L. 109-295.................  Department of       H.R. 5441
                                   Homeland Security
                                   Appropriations
                                   Act, 2007.
 
Pub. L. 109-347.................  SAFE Port Act.....  H.R. 4954
 
Pub. L. 109-364.................  John Warner         H.R. 5122
                                   National Defense
                                   Authorization Act
                                   for Fiscal Year
                                   2007.
 
Pub. L. 109-367.................  Secure Fence Act    H.R. 6061
                                   of 2006.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Indicates measures which were not referred directly to the Committee on
  Homeland Security.


110th Congress
    The Committee on Homeland Security continued as a standing 
Committee pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 5, agreed to in 
the House on January 4, 2007, by a record vote of 235 yeas and 
195 nays.
    The Committee on Homeland Security met on January 23, 2007, 
for an organizational meeting for the 110th Congress under the 
direction of Chairman Bennie G. Thompson of Mississippi. The 
Committee Membership was set at 34 Members with 19 Democrats 
and 15 Republicans. The following Members were appointed to the 
Committee on Homeland Security for all or part of the Congress: 
Mr. Bennie G. Thompson of Mississippi; Ms. Loretta Sanchez of 
California; Mr. Edward J. Markey of Massachusetts; Mr. Norman 
D. Dicks of Washington; Ms. Jane Harman of California; Mr. 
Peter A. DeFazio of Oregon; Mrs. Nita M. Lowey of New York; Ms. 
Eleanor Holmes Norton a Delegate from the District of Columbia; 
Ms. Zoe Lofgren of California; Ms. Sheila Jackson-Lee of Texas; 
Mrs. Donna M. Christensen a Delegate from the U.S. Virgin 
Islands; Mr. Bob Etheridge of North Carolina; Mr. James R. 
Langevin of Rhode Island; Mr. Henry Cuellar of Texas; Mr. 
Christopher P. Carney of Pennsylvania; Ms. Yvette D. Clarke of 
New York; Mr. Al Green of Texas; Mr. Ed Perlmutter of Colorado; 
Mr. Bill Pascrell, Jr. of New Jersey; Mr. Peter T. King of New 
York; Mr. Lamar Smith of Texas; Mr. Christopher Shays of 
Connecticut; Mr. Mark E. Souder of Indiana; Mr. Tom Davis of 
Virginia; Mr. Daniel E. Lungren of California; Mr. Mike Rogers 
of Alabama; Mr. David G. Reichert of Washington; Mr. Michael T. 
McCaul of Texas; Mr. Charles W. Dent of Pennsylvania; Ms. Ginny 
Brown-Waite of Florida; Mr. Gus M. Bilirakis of Florida; Mr. 
David Davis of Tennessee; Mr. Paul C. Broun of Georgia; Mrs. 
Candice S. Miller of Michigan; Ms. Marsha Blackburn of 
Tennessee; Mr. Kevin McCarthy of California; and Mr. Bobby 
Jindal of Louisiana.
    The Committee established six Subcommittees: the 
Subcommittee on Border, Maritime, and Global Counterterrorism; 
the Subcommittee on Intelligence, Information Sharing, and 
Terrorism Risk Assessment; the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security and Infrastructure Protection; the Subcommittee on 
Emerging Threats, Cybersecurity, and Science and Technology; 
the Subcommittee on Emergency Communications, Preparedness, and 
Response; and the Subcommittee on Management, Investigations, 
and Oversight.
    The Committee had four measures signed into law during the 
110th Congress:


------------------------------------------------------------------------
               Law                       Title               Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pub. L. 110-53..................  Implementing        H.R. 1
                                   Recommendations
                                   of the 9/11
                                   Commission Act of
                                   2007.
 
Pub. L. 110-181.................  National Defense    H.R. 4986
                                   Authorization Act  (H.R. 1585)
                                   for Fiscal Year
                                   2008.
 
Pub. L. 110-388.................  A bill to provide   S. 2816
                                   for the
                                   appointment of
                                   the Chief Human
                                   Capital Officer
                                   of the Department
                                   of Homeland
                                   Security by the
                                   Secretary of
                                   Homeland Security.
 
Pub. L. 110-412.................  Personnel           H.R. 6098
                                   Reimbursement for
                                   Intelligence
                                   Cooperation and
                                   Enhancement of
                                   Homeland Security
                                   Act of 2008.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Indicates measures which were not referred directly to the Committee on
  Homeland Security.


111th Congress
    The Committee on Homeland Security continued as a standing 
Committee pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 5, agreed to in 
the House on January 6, 2009, by a record vote of 235 yeas and 
195 nays.
    The Committee on Homeland Security met on February 4, 2009, 
for an organizational meeting for the 111th Congress under the 
direction of Chairman Bennie G. Thompson of Mississippi. The 
Committee Membership, was set at 34 Members with 21 Democrats 
and 13 Republicans. The following Members were appointed to the 
Committee on Homeland Security for all or part of the Congress: 
Mr. Bennie G. Thompson of Mississippi; Ms. Loretta Sanchez, of 
California; Ms. Jane Harman of California; Mr. Peter A. DeFazio 
of Oregon; Ms. Eleanor Holmes Norton a Delegate from the 
District of Columbia; Ms. Zoe Lofgren of California; Ms. Sheila 
Jackson-Lee of Texas; Mr. Henry Cuellar of Texas; Mr. 
Christopher P. Carney of Pennsylvania; Ms. Yvette D. Clarke of 
New York; Ms. Laura Richardson of California; Mrs. Ann 
Kirkpatrick of Arizona; Mr. Ben Ray Lujan of New Mexico; Mr. 
Bill Pascrell, Jr. of New Jersey; Mr. Emmanuel Cleaver of 
Missouri; Mr. Al Green of Texas; Mr. James A. Himes of 
Connecticut; Ms. Mary Jo Kilroy of Ohio; Mr. Eric J.J. Massa of 
New York; Ms. Dina Titus of Nevada; Mr. William L. Owens of New 
York; Mr. Peter T. King of New York; Mr. Lamar Smith of Texas; 
Mr. Mark E. Souder of Indiana; Mr. Daniel E. Lungren of 
California; Mr. Mike Rogers of Alabama; Mr. Michael T. McCaul 
of Texas; Mr. Charles W. Dent of Pennsylvania; Mr. Gus M. 
Bilirakis of Florida; Mr. Paul C. Broun of Georgia; Mrs. 
Candice S. Miller of Michigan; Mr. Pete Olson of Texas; Mr. Anh 
``Joseph'' Cao of Louisiana; Mr. Steve Austria of Ohio; and Mr. 
Tom Graves of Georgia.
    The Committee established six Subcommittees: the 
Subcommittee on Border, Maritime, and Global Counterterrorism; 
the Subcommittee on Intelligence, Information Sharing, and 
Terrorism Risk Assessment; the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security and Infrastructure Protection; the Subcommittee on 
Emerging Threats, Cybersecurity, and Science and Technology; 
the Subcommittee on Emergency Communications, Preparedness, and 
Response; and the Subcommittee on Management, Investigations, 
and Oversight.
    The Committee had 14 measures signed into law during the 
111th Congress:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
               Law                       Title                Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Pub. L. 111-84.................   National Defense    H.R. 2647
                                   Authorization Act
                                   for Fiscal Year
                                   2010.
 Pub. L. 111-140................   Nuclear Forensics   H.R. 730
                                   and Attribution
                                   Act.
 Pub. L. 111-145................   United States       H.R. 1299
                                   Capitol Police
                                   Administrative
                                   Technical
                                   Corrections Act
                                   of 2009.
 Pub. L. 111-198................   Homebuyer           H.R. 5623
                                   Assistance and
                                   Improvement Act
                                   of 2010.
 Pub. L. 111-207................   Cruise Vessel       H.R. 3360
                                   Security and
                                   Safety Act of
                                   2010.
 Pub. L. 111-245................   First Responder     H.R. 3978
                                   Anti-Terrorism
                                   Training
                                   Resources Act.
 Pub. L. 111-252................   To allow certain    H.R. 1517
                                   U.S. Customs and
                                   Border Protection
                                   employees who
                                   serve under an
                                   overseas limited
                                   appointment for
                                   at least 2 years,
                                   and whose service
                                   is rated fully
                                   successful or
                                   higher throughout
                                   that time, to be
                                   converted to a
                                   permanent
                                   appointment in
                                   the competitive
                                   service..
 Pub. L. 111-258................   Reducing Over-      H.R. 553
                                   Classification
                                   Act.
 Pub. L. 111-259................   Intelligence        H.R. 2701
                                   Authorization Act
                                   for Fiscal Year
                                   2010.
 Pub. L. 111-271................   Redundancy          H.R. 3980
                                   Elimination and
                                   Enhanced
                                   Performance for
                                   Preparedness
                                   Grants Act.
 Pub. L. 111-281................   Coast Guard         H.R. 3619
                                   Authorization Act
                                   of 2010.
 Pub. L. 111-356................   Northern Border     H.R. 4748
                                   Counternarcotics
                                   Strategy Act of
                                   2010.
 Pub. L. 111-376................   Anti-Border         S. 3243
                                   Corruption Act of
                                   2010.
 Pub. L. 111-383................   Ike Skelton         H.R. 6523
                                   National Defense
                                   Authorization Act
                                   for Fiscal Year
                                   2011.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Indicates measures which were not referred directly to the Committee on
  Homeland Security.

112th Congress
    The Committee on Homeland Security continued as a standing 
Committee pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 5, agreed to in 
the House on January 5, 2011, by a record vote of 238 yeas and 
191 nays.
    The Committee on Homeland Security met on January 26, 2011, 
for an organizational meeting for the 112th Congress under the 
direction of Chairman Peter T. King of New York.
    The Committee Membership, was set at 33 Members with 19 
Republicans and 14 Democrats. The following Members were 
appointed to the Committee on Homeland Security for all or part 
of the Congress: Mr. Peter T. King of New York; Mr. Lamar Smith 
of Texas; Mr. Daniel E. Lungren of California; Mr. Mike Rogers 
of Alabama; Mr. Michael T. McCaul of Texas; Mr. Gus M. 
Bilirakis of Florida; Mr. Paul C. Broun of Georgia; Mrs. 
Candice S. Miller of Michigan; Mr. Tim Walberg of Michigan; Mr. 
Chip Cravaack of Minnesota; Mr. Joe Walsh of Illinois; Mr. 
Patrick Meehan of Pennsylvania; Mr. Benjamin Quayle of Arizona; 
Mr. Scott Rigell of Virginia; Mr. Billy Long of Missouri; Mr. 
Jeff Duncan of South Carolina; Mr. Tom Marino of Pennsylvania; 
Mr. Blake Farenthold of Texas; Mr. Mo Brooks of Alabama; and 
Mr. Robert L. Turner of New York.; Mr. Bennie G. Thompson of 
Mississippi; Ms. Loretta Sanchez, of California; Ms. Jane 
Harman of California; Ms. Sheila Jackson Lee of Texas; Mr. 
Henry Cuellar of Texas; Ms. Yvette D. Clarke of New York; Ms. 
Laura Richardson of California; Mrs. Donna M. Christensen a 
Delegate from the U.S. Virgin Islands; Mr. Danny K. Davis of 
Illinois; Mr. Brian Higgins of New York; Ms. Jackie Speier of 
California; Mr. Cedric L. Richmond of Louisiana; Mr. Hansen 
Clarke of Michigan; Mr. William R. Keating of Massachusetts; 
Ms. Kathleen C. Hochul of New York; Ms. Janice Hahn of 
California; and Mr. Ron Barber of Arizona.
    The Committee established six Subcommittees: The 
Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and 
Security Technologies; the Subcommittee on Transportation 
Security; the Subcommittee on Oversight, Investigations, and 
Management; the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, 
Response, and Communications; the Subcommittee on Border and 
Maritime Security; and the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and 
Intelligence.
    The Committee had 10 measures signed into law during the 
112th Congress:

                             112th Congress

------------------------------------------------------------------------
               Law                       Title                Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Pub. L. 112-54.................   Asia-Pacific        S. 1487
                                   Economic            (H.R. 2042)
                                   Cooperation
                                   Business Travel
                                   Cards Act of 2011.
 Pub. L. 112-81.................   National Defense    H.R. 1540
                                   Authorization Act
                                   for Fiscal Year
                                   2012.
 Pub. L. 112-86.................   Risk-Based          H.R. 1801
                                   Security
                                   Screening for
                                   Members of the
                                   Armed Forces Act.
 Pub. L. 112-127................   Border Tunnel       H.R. 4119
                                   Prevention Act of
                                   2012.
 Pub. L. 112-171................   To require the      H.R. 3670
                                   Transportation
                                   Security
                                   Administration to
                                   comply with the
                                   Uniformed
                                   Services
                                   Employment and
                                   Reemployment
                                   Rights Act..
 Pub. L. 112-199................   Whistleblower       S. 743
                                   Protection          (H.R. 3289)
                                   Enhancement Act
                                   of 2012.
 Pub. L. 112-205................   Jaime Zapata        H.R. 915
                                   Border
                                   Enforcement
                                   Security Task
                                   Force Act.
 Pub. L. 112-213................   Coast Guard and     H.R. 2835
                                   Maritime
                                   Transportation
                                   Act of 2012.
 Pub. L. 112-217................   DART Act.........   S. 1998
                                                       (H.R. 5941)
 Pub. L. 112-218................   No-Hassle Flying    S. 3542
                                   Act of 2012.        (H.R. 6028)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Indicates measures which were not referred directly to the Committee on
  Homeland Security.

113th Congress
    The Committee on Homeland Security continued as a standing 
Committee pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 5, agreed to in 
the House on January 3, 2013, by a record vote of 228 yeas and 
196 nays.
    The Committee on Homeland Security met on January 23, 2013, 
for an organizational meeting for the 113th Congress under the 
direction of Chairman Michael T. McCaul of Texas.
    The Committee Membership, was set at 32 Members with 18 
Republicans and 14 Democrats. The following Members were 
appointed to the Committee on Homeland Security for all or part 
of the Congress: Mr. Michael T. McCaul of Texas; Mr. Lamar 
Smith of Texas; Mr. Peter T. King of New York; Mr. Mike Rogers 
of Alabama; Mr. Paul C. Broun of Georgia; Mrs. Candice S. 
Miller of Michigan; Mr. Patrick Meehan of Pennsylvania; Mr. 
Jeff Duncan of South Carolina; Mr. Tom Marino of Pennsylvania; 
Mr. Jason Chaffetz of Utah; Mr. Steven M. Palazzo of 
Mississippi; Mr. Lou Barletta of Pennsylvania; Mr. Chris 
Stewart of Utah; Mr. Keith J. Rothfus of Pennsylvania; Mr. 
Richard Hudson of North Carolina; Mr. Steve Daines of Montana; 
Mrs. Susan W. Brooks of Indiana; Mr. Scott Perry of 
Pennsylvania; Mr. Mark Sanford of South Carolina; Mr. Curtis 
Clawson of Florida; Mr. Bennie G. Thompson of Mississippi; Ms. 
Loretta Sanchez of California; Ms. Sheila Jackson Lee of Texas; 
Ms. Yvette D. Clarke of New York; Mr. Brian Higgins of New 
York; Mr. Cedric L. Richmond of Louisiana; Mr. William R. 
Keating of Massachusetts; Mr. Ron Barber of Arizona; Mr. Donald 
M. Payne, Jr. of New Jersey; Mr. Beto O'Rourke of Texas; Ms. 
Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii; Mr. Filemon Vela of Texas; Mr. Steven 
A. Horsford of Nevada; and Mr. Eric Swalwell of California.
    The Committee established six Subcommittees: the 
Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence; the 
Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security; the Subcommittee 
no Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
Technologies; the Subcommittee on Oversight and Management 
Efficiency; the Subcommittee on Transportation Security; and 
the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications.
    The Committee had 11 measures signed into law during the 
113th Congress:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
               Law                       Title                Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Pub. L. 113-27.................   Helping Heroes      H.R. 1344
                                   Fly Act.            (S. 1367)
                                                       (S. 1403)
 Pub. L. 113-221................   Honor Flight Act.   H.R. 4812
                                                       (S. 2659)
                                                       (S. 2671)
 Pub. L. 113-238................   Aviation Security   H.R. 1204
                                   Stakeholder         (S. 1804)
                                   Participation Act
                                   of 2014.
 Pub. L. 113-245................   Transportation      H.R. 2719
                                   Security            (S. 1893)
                                   Acquisition
                                   Reform Act.
 Pub. L. 113-246................   Cybersecurity       H.R. 2952
                                   Workforce
                                   Assessment Act.
 Pub. L. 113-254................   Protecting and      H.R. 4007
                                   Securing Chemical
                                   Facilities from
                                   Terrorist Attacks
                                   Act of 2014.
 Pub. L. 113-277................   Border Patrol       S. 1691
                                   Agent Pay Reform
                                   Act of 2014.
 Pub. L. 113-282................   National            S. 2519
                                   Cybersecurity       (H.R. 3696)
                                   Protection Act of
                                   2014.
 Pub. L. 113-283................   Federal             S. 2521
                                   Information         (H.R. 1163)
                                   Security
                                   Modernization Act
                                   of 2014.
 Pub. L. 113-284................   DHS OIG Mandates    S. 2651
                                   Revision Act of
                                   2014.
 Pub. L. 113-294................   To amend title      H.R. 5462
                                   49, United States
                                   Code, to provide
                                   for limitations
                                   on the fees
                                   charged to
                                   passengers of air
                                   carriers..
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Indicates measures which were not referred directly to the Committee on
  Homeland Security.

114th Congress

    The Committee on Homeland Security continued as a standing 
Committee pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 5, agreed to in 
the House on January 6, 2015, by a record vote of 234 yeas, 172 
nays, and 1 voting `present' (Roll no. 6).
    The Committee on Homeland Security met on January 21, 2015, 
for an organizational meeting for the 114th Congress under the 
direction of Chairman Michael T. McCaul of Texas.
    The Committee Membership, was set at 32 Members with 18 
Republicans and 12 Democrats. The following Members were 
appointed to the Committee on Homeland Security for all or part 
of the Congress: Mr. Michael T. McCaul of Texas; Mr. Lamar 
Smith of Texas; Mr. Peter T. King of New York; Mr. Mike Rogers 
of Alabama; Mrs. Candice S. Miller of Michigan; Mr. Jeff Duncan 
of South Carolina; Mr. Tom Marino of Pennsylvania; Mr. Steven 
M. Palazzo of Mississippi; Mr. Lou Barletta of Pennsylvania; 
Mr. Scott Perry of Pennsylvania; Mr., Curt Clawson of Florida; 
Mr. John Katko of New York; Mr. Will Hurd of Texas; Mr. Earl L. 
``Buddy'' Carter of Georgia; Mr. Mark Walker of North Carolina; 
Mr. Barry Loudermilk of Georgia; Ms. Martha McSally of Arizona; 
Mr. John Ratcliffe of Texas; Mr. Patrick Meehan of 
Pennsylvania;; Mr. Daniel M. Donovan, Jr. of New York; Mr. 
Bennie G. Thompson of Mississippi; Ms. Loretta Sanchez of 
California; Ms. Sheila Jackson Lee of Texas; Mr. James R. 
Langevin of Rhode Island; Mr. Brian Higgins of New York; Mr. 
Cedric L. Richmond of Louisiana; Mr. William R. Keating of 
Massachusetts; Mr. Donald M. Payne, Jr. of New Jersey; Mr. 
Filemon Vela of Texas; Mrs. Bonnie Watson Coleman of New 
Jersey; Miss Kathleen M. Rice of New York; and Ms. Norma J. 
Torres of California.
    The Committee established six Subcommittees: the 
Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence; the 
Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security; the Subcommittee 
no Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
Technologies; the Subcommittee on Oversight and Management 
Efficiency; the Subcommittee on Transportation Security; and 
the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications.
    The Committee had 24 measures signed into law during the 
114th Congress, consisting of provisions of 40 measures 
referred to the Committee:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
               Law                       Title                Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Pub. L. 114-22.................   Justice for         S. 178
                                   Victims of          (H.R. 460)
                                   Trafficking Act
                                   of 2015.
 Pub. L. 114-29.................   Department of       H.R. 615
                                   Homeland Security
                                   Interoperable
                                   Communications .
 Pub. L. 114-41.................   Surface             H.R. 3236
                                   Transportation
                                   and Veterans
                                   Health Care
                                   Choice
                                   Improvement Act
                                   of 2015.
 Pub. L. 114-43.................   DHS IT              H.R. 1626
                                   Duplication
                                   Reduction Act of
                                   2015.
 Pub. L. 114-50.................   Gerardo Hernandez   H.R. 720
                                   Airport Security
                                   Act of 2015.
 Pub. L. 114-53.................   Continuing          H.R. 719
                                   Appropriations
                                   Act, 2016.
 Pub. L. 114-68.................   Border Jobs for     H.R. 2835
                                   Veterans Act of
                                   2015.
 Pub. L. 114-80.................   DHS Social Media    H.R. 623
                                   Improvement Act
                                   of 2015.
 Pub. L. 114-92.................   National Defense    S. 1356
                                   Authorization Act   (H.R. 1735)
                                   for Fiscal Year
                                   2016.
 Pub. L. 114-113................   Consolidated        H.R. 2029
                                   Appropriations      (H.R. 158)
                                   Act, 2016.          (H.R. 1731)
                                                       (H.R. 3305)
                                                       (H.R. 3313)
 Pub. L. 114-125................   Trade               H.R. 644
                                   Facilitation and    (H.R. 998)
                                   Trade Enforcement   (H.R. 878)
                                   Act of 2015.
 Pub. L. 114-136................   Edward ``Ted''      S. 1172
                                   Kaufman and
                                   Michael Leavitt
                                   Presidential
                                   Transitions
                                   Improvements Act
                                   of 2015.
 Pub. L. 114-143................   Integrated Public   S. 1180
                                   Alert and Warning   (H.R. 1738)
                                   System              (H.R. 1472)
                                   Modernization Act
                                   of 2015.
 Pub. L. 114-150................   Department of       S. 1638
                                   Homeland Security   (H.R. 1640)
                                   Headquarters
                                   Consolidation
                                   Accountability
                                   Act of 2015.
 Pub. L. 114-190................   FAA Extension,      H.R. 636
                                   Safety, and         (H.R. 2843)
                                   Security Act of     (H.R. 4698)
                                   2016.               (H.R. 5388)
 Pub. L. 114-267................   Northern Border     S. 1808
                                   Security Review
                                   Act.
 Pub. L. 114-268................   First Responder     S. 1915
                                   Anthrax             (H.R. 1300)
                                   Preparedness Act.
 Pub. L. 114-278................   Essential           H.R. 710
                                   Transportation
                                   Worker
                                   Identification
                                   Credential
                                   Assessment Act.
 Pub. L. 114-279................   Cross-Border        H.R. 875
                                   Trade Enhancement
                                   Act of 2016.
 Pub. L. 114-285................   Federal Law         H.R. 3842
                                   Enforcement
                                   Training Centers
                                   Reform and
                                   Improvement Act
                                   of 2015.
 Pub. L. 114-293................   Bottles and         H.R. 5065
                                   Breastfeeding
                                   Equipment
                                   Screening Act.
 Pub. L. 114-301................   GAO Mandates        H.R. 5687
                                   Revision Act of
                                   2016.
 Pub. L. 114-304................   United States-      H.R. 5877
                                   Israel Advanced
                                   Research
                                   Partnership Act
                                   of 2016.
 Pub. L. 114-328................   National Defense    S. 2943
                                   Authorization Act   (H.R. 399)
                                   for Fiscal Year     (H.R. 1073)
                                   2017.               (H.R. 3510)
                                                       (H.R. 3572)
                                                       (H.R. 3586)
                                                       (H.R. 4402)
                                                       (H.R. 4408)
                                                       (H.R. 4509)
                                                       (H.R. 4780)
                                                       (H.R. 5064)
                                                       (S. 2976)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Indicates measures which were not referred directly to the Committee on
  Homeland Security.

115th Congress

    The Committee on Homeland Security continued as a standing 
Committee pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 5, agreed to in 
the House on January 3, 2017, by a record vote of 234 yeas and 
193 nays (Roll no. 6).
    The Committee on Homeland Security met on February 1, 2017, 
for an organizational meeting for the 115th Congress under the 
direction of Chairman Michael T. McCaul of Texas.
    The Committee Membership, was set at 32 Members: with 18 
Republicans and 14 Democrats. The following Members were 
appointed to the Committee on Homeland Security for all or part 
of the Congress: Mr. Michael T. McCaul of Texas; Mr. Lamar 
Smith of Texas; Mr. Peter T. King, of New York; Mr. Mike 
Rogers, of Alabama; Mr. Jeff Duncan, of South Carolina; Mr. Tom 
Marino, of Pennsylvania; Mr. Lou Barletta, of Pennsylvania; Mr. 
Scott Perry, of Pennsylvania; Mr. John Katko, of New York; Mr. 
Will Hurd, of Texas; Ms. Martha McSally, of Arizona; Mr. John 
Ratcliffe, of Texas; Mr. Daniel M. Donovan, Jr., of New York; 
Mr. Mike Gallagher, of Wisconsin; Mr. Clay Higgins, of 
Louisiana; Mr. John H. Rutherford, of Florida; Mr. Thomas A. 
Garrett, Jr., of Virginia; Mr. Brian K. Fitzpatrick, of 
Pennsylvania; Mr. Ron Estes of Kansas; Mr. Don Bacon of 
Nebraska; Mrs. Lesko of Arizona; Mr. Bennie G. Thompson of 
Mississippi; Ms. Sheila Jackson Lee, of Texas; Mr. James R. 
Langevin, of Rhode Island; Mr. Cedric L. Richmond, of 
Louisiana; Mr. William R. Keating, of Massachusetts; Mr. Donald 
M. Payne, Jr., of New Jersey; Mr. Filemon Vela, of Texas; Mrs. 
Bonnie Watson Coleman, of New Jersey; Miss Kathleen M. Rice, of 
New York; Mr. J. Luis Correa, of California; Mrs. Val Butler 
Demings, of Florida; and Ms. Nanette Diaz Barragan, of 
California.
    The Committee established six Subcommittees: the 
Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence; the 
Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security; the Subcommittee 
on Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Protection; the 
Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency; the 
Subcommittee on Transportation and Protective Security; and the 
Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications.

                             115th Congress

    The Committee had 14 measures, signed into law during the 
115th Congress, consisting of provisions of 38 measures 
referred to the Committee:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
               Law                       Title                Bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Pub. L. 115-38.................   DHS Stop Asset      H.R. 366
                                   and Vehicle
                                   Excess Act.
 Pub. L. 115-43.................   Securing our        H.R. 1238
                                   Agriculture and
                                   Food Act.
 Pub. L. 115-76.................   Strengthening       H.R. 1616
                                   State and Local
                                   Cyber Crime
                                   Fighting Act of
                                   2017.
 Pub. L. 115-79.................   Asia-Pacific        S. 504
                                   Economic            (H.R. 2805)
                                   Cooperation
                                   Business Travel
                                   Cards Act of 2017.
 Pub. L. 115-112................   International       H.R. 2142
                                   Narcotics
                                   Trafficking
                                   Emergency
                                   Response by
                                   Detecting
                                   Incoming
                                   Contraband with
                                   Technology Act.
 Pub. L. 115-118................   FISA Amendments     S. 139
                                   Reauthorization     (H.R. 4478)
                                   Act of 2017.
 Pub. L. 115-125................   Department of       H.R. 4708
                                   Homeland Security
                                   Blue Campaign
                                   Authorization Act.
 Pub. L. 115-254................   FAA                 H.R. 302
                                   Reauthorization     (H.R. 665)
                                   Act of 2018.        (H.R. 876)
                                                       (H.R. 1309)
                                                       (H.R. 1353)
                                                       (H.R. 2132)
                                                       (H.R. 2825)
                                                       (H.R. 2831)
                                                       (H.R. 3101)
                                                       (H.R. 3328)
                                                       (H.R. 3669)
                                                       (H.R. 4176)
                                                       (H.R. 4467)
                                                       (H.R. 4559)
                                                       (H.R. 4561)
                                                       (H.R. 4577)
                                                       (H.R. 5081)
                                                       (H.R. 5089)
                                                       (H.R. 5131)
                                                       (H.R. 5730)
                                                       (H.R. 5766)
                                                       (H.R. 5869)
                                                       (H.R. 6265)
                                                       (H.R. 6401)
                                                       (H.R. 6459)
                                                       (H.R. 6461)
 Pub. L. 115-278................   Cybersecurity and   H.R. 3359
                                   Infrastructure
                                   Security Agency
                                   Act of 2018.
 Pub. L. 115-331................   Department of       H.R. 2454
                                   Homeland Security
                                   Data Framework
                                   Act of 2018.
 Pub. L. 115-790................   Transportation      H.R. 5729
                                   Worker
                                   Identification
                                   Credential
                                   Accountability
                                   Act of 2018.
 Pub. L. 115-...................   Vehicular           H.R. 4227
                                   Terrorism
                                   Prevention Act of
                                   2018.
 Pub. L. 115-...................   United States       H.R. 6400
                                   Ports of Entry
                                   Threat and
                                   Operational
                                   Review Act.
 Pub. L. 115-...................   Countering          H.R. 7213
                                   Weapons of Mass
                                   Destruction Act
                                   of 2018.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Indicates measures which were not referred directly to the Committee on
  Homeland Security.

                Legislative Activities of the Committee

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee on Homeland 
Security received a referral of 268 measures. 14 Measures were 
signed into law, consisting of provisions of 83 measures 
referred to the Committee.

                                ------                                


                 DHS STOP ASSET AND VEHICLE EXCESS ACT

                     Public Law 115-38    H.R. 366

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to direct the Under 
Secretary for Management of the Department of Homeland Security 
to make certain improvements in managing the Department's 
vehicle fleet, and for other purposes.

Summary

    P.L. 115-38 requires that the Department of Homeland 
Security implement uniform standards for more efficient 
management of vehicle fleets throughout the Department. It also 
makes the Under Secretary for Management (USM) responsible for 
oversight of components' and offices' vehicle fleets. The Act 
requires the USM, among other things, to develop and distribute 
a standardized vehicle allocation methodology and fleet 
management plan for components to use to improve efficiency 
with the goal of yielding cost-savings and minimizing the 
potential for waste, fraud, and abuse.

Legislative History

114th Congress
H.R. 4785

    In the 114th Congress, H.R. 4785 was introduced in the 
House on March 17, 2016, by Mr. Perry, Mr. McCaul, and Mrs. 
Watson Coleman; and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 4785 on March 23, 2016, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 4785 to 
the House on April 14, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-494.
    The House considered H.R. 4785 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 11, 2016, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 4785 was received in the Senate, read twice, and 
referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs.

115th Congress
H.R. 366

    H.R. 366 was introduced in the House on January 6, 2017, by 
Mr. Perry, Mr. McCaul, and Mrs. Watson Coleman; and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The House considered H.R. 366 under Suspension of the Rules 
on January 31, 2017, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 366 was received in the Senate on February 1, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered H.R. 366 on March 15, 2017, and ordered the 
measure to be reported, amended.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported H.R. 366 to the Senate on April 24, 2017, as 
S. Rpt. 115-32.
    The Senate considered H.R. 366 on May 2, 2017, and passed 
the measure, with the Committee amendment.
    The House concurred in the Senate amendments to H.R. 366 on 
May 23, 2017; clearing the measure for the President.
    H.R. 366 was presented to the President on May 25, 2017. 
The President signed H.R. 366 into law on June 6, 2017, as 
Public Law. 115-38.

                                ------                                


                 SECURING OUR AGRICULTURE AND FOOD ACT

                Public Law 115-43    H.R. 1238 (S. 500)

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to make the 
Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security for Health Affairs 
responsible for coordinating the efforts of the Department of 
Homeland Security related to food, agriculture, and veterinary 
defense against terrorism, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The purpose of H.R. 1238 is to amend the Homeland Security 
Act of 2002 to make the Assistant Secretary of Homeland 
Security for Health Affairs responsible for coordinating the 
efforts of the Department of Homeland Security related to food, 
agriculture, and veterinary defense against terrorism.

Legislative History

H.R. 1238
    H.R. 1238 was introduced in the House on February 28, 2017, 
by Mr. Young of Iowa, Mr. Payne, and Mr. Donovan and referred 
to the Committee on Homeland Security, and in addition to the 
Committee on Energy and Commerce and the Committee on 
Agriculture.
    The Committee considered H.R. 1238 on March 8, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Agriculture sent a letter to 
the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on March 10, 
2017, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration on the 
House Floor, the Committee on Agriculture would agree to be 
discharged from further consideration of H.R. 1238. On that 
same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the 
Committee on Agriculture and the agreement to waive further 
consideration. The letter further acknowledged the agreement to 
support a request for conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called.
    The Chair of the Committee on Energy and Commerce sent a 
letter to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on 
March 16, 2017, agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on Agriculture 
would agree to be discharged from further consideration of H.R. 
1238. On that same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security responded acknowledging the jurisdictional interests 
of the Committee on Energy and Commerce and the agreement to 
waive further consideration. The letter further acknowledged 
the agreement to support a request for conferees should a 
House-Senate Conference be called.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1238 to the House on March 16, 
2017, as H. Rpt. 115-41, Pt. I. Subsequently, the Committee on 
Energy and Commerce and the Committee on Agriculture were 
discharged from further consideration of H.R. 1238.
    The House agreed to Suspend the Rules on March 22, 2017, 
and passed H.R. 1238 by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 406 yeas and 6 
nays, (Roll No. 187)
    H.R. 1238 was received in the Senate on March 23, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs was discharged from further consideration of H.R. 1238 
on May 24, 2017.
    The Senate passed H.R. 1238 on May 24, 2017, amended, by 
unanimous consent.
    The House agreed on June 20, 2017, to agree to the Senate 
amendments to H.R. 1238. Clearing the measure for the 
President.
    The President signed H.R. 1238 into law on June 30, 2017, 
as Public Law 115-43.

S. 500
    S. 500, the Senate companion measure, was introduced in the 
Senate on March 2, 2017, by Mr. Roberts and Mrs. McCaskill and 
referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 500 on March 15, 2017, and ordered the 
measure reported to the Senate, without amendment.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 500 to the Senate on April 24, 2017, as S. 
Rpt. 115-29.

                                ------                                


          STRENGTHENING STATE AND LOCAL CYBER CRIME FIGHTING 
                              ACT OF 2017

                Public Law 115-76    H.R. 1616 (S. 904)

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to authorize the 
National Computer Forensics Institute, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This bill amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to 
authorize a National Computer Forensics Institute within the 
U.S. Secret Service for FY2017-FY2022. The Institute is 
required to disseminate information related to the 
investigation and prevention of cyber and electronic crime and 
related threats; and to educate, train, and equip state, local, 
tribal, and territorial law enforcement officers, prosecutors, 
and judges.

Legislative History

    H.R. 1616 was introduced in the House on March 17, 2017, by 
Mr. Ratcliffe and Mr. Palmer, and referred to the Committee on 
the Judiciary and the Committee on Homeland Security. Within 
the Committee, H.R. 1351 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security.
    The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security sent a 
letter to the Chair of the Committee on the Judiciary on May 
15, 2017, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration on 
the House Floor, the Committee on Homeland Security would waive 
further consideration of the measure. On that same date, the 
Chair of the Committee on the Judiciary replied acknowledging 
the jurisdictional interests of the Committee on Homeland 
Security and the agreement to waive further consideration. The 
letter further acknowledge support for Conferees should a 
House-Senate Conference be called.
    The House considered H.R. 1616 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 6, 2017, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 408 yeas and 3 nays (Roll No. 258).
    The Senate Committee on the Judiciary was discharged from 
further consideration of H.R. 1616 by unanimous consent on 
October 2, 2017. The Senate then passed H.R. 1616, with an 
amendment, by voice vote.
    The House considered H.R. 1616, as amended by the Senate, 
on October 12, 2017, and agreed to the Senate amendment by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 1616 was presented to the President on October 24, 
2017, and signed into law on November 2, 2017, as Public Law 
115-76.

S. 904
    S. 904, the Senate companion measure was introduced in the 
Senate on April 7, 2017, by Mr. Grassley, Mrs. Feinstein, Mr. 
Shelby, Mr. Whitehouse, and Mr. Strange; and referred to the 
Committee on the Judiciary.

                                ------                                


  ASIA-PACIFIC ECONOMIC COOPERATION BUSINESS TRAVEL CARDS ACT OF 2017

                Public Law 115-79    S. 504 (H.R. 2805)

To permanently authorize the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation 
Business Travel Card Program.

Summary

Legislative History

H.R. 2805
    H.R. 2805 was introduced in the House on June 7, 2017, by 
Miss Rice of New York, Mr. Donovan, Mr. Reichert, and Mr. 
Larsen of Washington and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 2805 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security.
    The provisions of H.R. 2805 were offered as an amendment to 
H.R. 2825 during Committee consideration, and adopted. See also 
action taken on H.R. 2825.
    The Chair discharged the Subcommittee on Border and 
Maritime Security from further consideration of H.R. 2805 on 
July 26, 2017.
    The Committee considered H.R. 2805 on July 26, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 2805 to the House on August 8, 
2017, as H. Rpt. 115-274.

S. 504
    S. 504, the Senate companion measure was introduced in the 
Senate on March 2, 2017, by Ms. Hirono and Mr. Daines and 
referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 504 on May 17, 2017, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate, without amendment, 
favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 504 to the Senate on August 1, 2017, as S. 
Rpt. 115-140.
    The Senate passed S. 504, with an amendment, by unanimous 
consent on September 26, 2017.
    S. 504 was received in the House on September 27, 2017, and 
held at the Desk.
    The House considered S. 504 under Suspension of the Rules 
on October 23, 2017, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ recorded 
vote of 401 yeas and 2 nays (Roll No. 570).
    S. 504 was presented to the President on October 25, 2017, 
and signed into law on November 2, 2017, as Public Law 115-79.

                                ------                                


  INTERNATIONAL NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING EMERGENCY RESPONSE BY DETECTING 
                INCOMING CONTRABAND WITH TECHNOLOGY ACT

                Public Law 115-112    H.R. 2142 (S. 708)

To improve the ability of U.S. Customs and Border Protection to 
interdict fentanyl, other synthetic opioids, and other 
narcotics and psychoactive substances that are illegally 
imported into the United States, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The INTERDICT Act (H.R. 2142) provides U.S. Customs and 
Border Protection (CBP) with the latest chemical screening 
devices and scientific support to detect and intercept fentanyl 
and other synthetic opioids. Specifically, this bill ensures 
that CBP has additional portable chemical screening devices 
available at ports of entry and at mail and express consignment 
facilities, as well as additional fixed chemical screening 
devices available in CBP laboratories. The INTERDICT Act 
provides CBP with sufficient resources, personnel, and 
facilities--including scientists available during all 
operational hours--to interpret screening results from the 
field.
    The INTERDICT Act also authorizes $9 million for new 
screening devices, laboratory equipment, facilities, and 
support personnel to stop these deadly drugs from entering our 
communities.

Legislative History

H.R. 2142
    H.R. 2142 was introduced in the House on April 25, 2017, by 
Ms. Tsongas and Mr. Fitzpatrick, and referred to the Committee 
on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 2142 was 
referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security.
    The Chair discharged the Subcommittee on Border and 
Maritime Security from further consideration of H.R. 2142 on 
September 7, 2017.
    The Committee considered H.R. 2142 on September 7, 2017, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 2142 to the House on September 
21, 2017, as H. Rpt. 115-317.
    The House considered H.R. 2142 under Suspension of the 
Rules on October 23, 2017, and passed the measure on October 
24, 2017, by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 412 yeas and 3 nays (Roll 
No. 574).
    H.R. 2142 was received in the Senate on October 25, 2017.
    The Senate passed H.R. 2142 by unanimous consent on 
December 21, 2017, without amendment, clearing the measure for 
the President.
    H.R. 2142 was presented to the President on December 29, 
2017, and signed into law on January 10, 2018, as Public Law 
117-112.

S. 708
    S. 708 was introduced in the Senate on March 23, 2017, by 
Mr. Markey, Mr. Rubio, Mr. Brown, and Mrs. Capito, and referred 
to the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs.

                                ------                                


              FISA AMENDMENTS REAUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2017

                 Public Law 115-118    S. 139 H.R. 4478

An Act to amend the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 
1978 to improve foreign intelligence collection and the 
safeguards, accountability, and oversight of acquisitions of 
foreign intelligence, to extend title VII of such Act, and for 
other purposes.

Summary

    The purposes of H.R. 4478 are to reauthorize title VII of 
the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) for four 
years, to enhance surveillance authorities, and to provide 
additional transparency and reporting requirements and privacy 
safeguards. Title VII of FISA is imperative to the national 
security of the United States, assists the armed forces of the 
United States, and supports the President in the execution of 
the foreign policy of the United States, particularly as it 
relates to counterterrorism matters.

Legislative History

H.R. 4478
    H.R. 4478 was introduced in the House on November 29, 2017, 
by Mr. Nunes and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary, 
and in addition to the House Permanent Select Committees on 
Intelligence, the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, 
and the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, 
H.R. 4478 was referred to the Subcommittee on Oversight and 
Management Efficiency.
    The House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence 
reported H.R. 4478 to the House on December 19, 2017, as H. 
Rpt. 115-475, Pt. I.)

S. 139
    S. 139, the Rapid DNA Act of 2017, was introduced in the 
Senate on January 12, 2017, by Mr. Hatch, Mrs. Feinstein Mr. 
Cornyn, Mrs. Gillibrand, Mr. Flake, and Ms. Klobuchar, and 
referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.
    The Senate Committee on the Judiciary considered S. 139 on 
May 11, 2017, and ordered the measure to be reported, without 
amendment.
    The Senate Committee on the Judiciary reported S. 139 to 
the Senate on May 11, 2017, with no written report.
    The Senate considered S. 139 on June 6, 2017, and passed 
the measure by unanimous consent.
    S. 139 was received in the House on June 6, 2017, and held 
at the Desk.
    The Committee on the Rules met on January 9, 2018, and 
granted a rule providing for the consideration of S. 139. Rule 
filed in the House as H. Res. 682 (H. Rpt. 115-504). The Rule 
provided for the consideration of S. 139; waived all points of 
order; and considered an Amendment in the Nature of a 
Substitute as adopted. The Amendment in the Nature of the 
Substitute consisted of the text of H.R. 4478.
    The House considered H. Res. 682 as a privileged matter on 
January 10, 2018, and passed the Rule by a recorded vote of 233 
yeas and 181 nays (Roll No. 8).
    The House considered S. 139 under the provisions of H. Res. 
682 on January 11, 2018, and passed the measure by a recorded 
vote of 256 yeas and 164 nays (Roll No. 16). Subsequent to 
passage, the House agreed to H. Con. Res. 78, directing the 
Secretary of the Senate to make a correction to the enrollment 
of S. 139.
    Cloture motions were made in the Senate on January 11, 
2018, to consider S. 139. Cloture on the motion to concur in 
the House amendment was invoked in the Senate on January 16, 
2018, by a recorded vote of 60 yeas and 38 nays (Record Vote 
No. 11). The Senate considered the House amendments to S. 139 
on January 16, 17, and 18 2018. And on January 18, 2018, 
concurred in the House amendments by a recorded vote of 65 yeas 
and 34 nays (Record Vote No. 12).
    S. 139 was presented to the President on January 19, 2018, 
and signed into law on that same date as Public Law 115-118.

                                ------                                


DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BLUE CAMPAIGN AUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2017

          Public Law 115-125    H.R. 4708 (H.R. 1370, S. 1103)

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to require the 
Secretary of Homeland Security to issue Department of Homeland 
Security-wide guidance and develop training programs as part of 
the Department of Homeland Security Blue Campaign, and for 
other purposes.

Summary

    Human trafficking is a multi-billion-dollar industry that 
enslaves 20 million people around the world whether for the 
purposes of prostitution, sex exploitation, or forced labor. 
According to the FBI, the most effective way to investigate 
human trafficking is through a collaborative, multi-agency 
approach with our Federal, State, local and tribal partners.
    DHS describe the Blue Campaign as a unified effort by the 
Department to conduct outreach to enhance awareness of 
trafficking and provide training and materials to those in the 
best position to identify trafficking victims. The Campaign 
works in collaboration with law enforcement, government, non-
governmental and private organizations to identify victims and 
trains others in identification techniques. The Department uses 
the resources and expertise of the Customs and Border Patrol, 
Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the U.S. Citizenship and 
Immigration Services, and the Federal Law Enforcement Training 
Center to help with this effort.
    This bill adds the Transportation Security Administration 
to this fight by training its personnel to recognize the signs 
of trafficking and serve as a liaison to aviation workers and 
requires the Department to share information across the 
Department and with the National Network of Fusion Centers 
regarding patterns and practices of human trafficking and 
potential connections to terrorist activities.

Legislative History

H.R. 1370
    H.R. 1370 was introduced in the House on March 6, 2017, by 
Mr. McCaul and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security, 
and in addition to the Committee on the Judiciary.
    The Committee considered H.R. 1370 on March 8, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committed on the Judiciary sent a letter 
to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on May 5, 
2017, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration on the 
House Floor, the Committee on the Judiciary would waive further 
consideration of H.R. 1370. The Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security responded on May 11, 2017, acknowledging the 
jurisdictional interests of the Committee on the Judiciary and 
the agreement to waive further consideration of H.R. 1370. The 
letter further agreed to support the request for the 
appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be 
called.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 1370 to 
the House on May 22, 2017, as H. Rpt. 115-143, Pt. I. 
Subsequently, the Committee on the Judiciary was discharged 
from further consideration of H.R. 1370. Placed on the Union 
Calendar, Calendar No. 92.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1370 to the House on May 22, 
2017, as H. Rpt. 115-43, Pt. I.
    The House considered H.R. 1370 under Suspension of the 
Rules on May 23, 2017, and passed the measure, amended, by a 
voice vote.
    H.R. 1370 was received in the Senate on May 24, 2017, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate considered H.R. 1370 on November 6, 2017, and 
passed the measure, amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Rules met on December 20, 2017, and passed 
a Rule providing for the consideration of H.R. 1370.
    The Rule filed in the House on December 20, 2017, as H. 
Res. 670 (H. Rpt. 115-477). The Rule provided for the 
consideration of the Senate amendment to H.R. 1370, with an 
amendment. The House amendment to the Senate amendment inserted 
the text a resolution making further additional continuing 
appropriations for fiscal year 2018.
    The House considered H. Res. 670 as a privileged matter on 
December 21, 2017, and agreed to the Rule by a recorded vote of 
228 yeas and 188 nays (Roll No. 705). Pursuant to the 
provisions of H. Res. 670, the text of H.R. 1370 as passed by 
the Senate was subsequently stricken. See further action on 
H.R. 4780 listed below.

S. 1103
    S. 1103, the Senate companion measure, was introduced in 
the Senate on May 11, 2017, by Mr. Johnson and Mrs. McCaskill 
and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 1103 on May 17, 2017, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate, without amendment, 
favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 1103 to the Senate on September 14, 2017, 
as S. Rpt. 115-157.
    The Senate passed S. 1103 on October 5, 2017, without 
amendment, by unanimous consent.
    S. 1103 was received in the House on October 10, 2017, and 
held at the Desk.

H.R. 4780
    H.R. 4780, consisting of the text of H.R. 1370, as amended 
by the Senate, was introduced in the House on December 21, 
2017, by Mr. McCaul, Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, Mr. Katko, 
and Mr. Higgins of Louisiana and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security.
    On January 11, 2018, the Committee on Homeland Security and 
the Committee on the Judiciary were discharged from further 
consideration of H.R. 4780.
    The House considered H.R. 4780 on January 11, 2018, and 
passed the measure, by unanimous consent.
    The Senate considered H.R. 4780 on January 30, 2018, and 
passed the measure by unanimous consent, clearing the measure 
for the President.
    H.R. 4780 was presented to the President on January 6, 
2018. The President signed H.R. 4708 into Law on February 14, 
2018, as Public law 115-125.

                                ------                                


 TRANSPORTATION WORKER IDENTIFICATION CREDENTIAL ACCOUNTABILITY ACT OF 
                                  2018

                    Public Law 115-230    H.R. 5729

To restrict the department in which the Coast Guard is 
operating from implementing any rule requiring the use of 
biometric readers for biometric transportation security cards 
until after submission to Congress of the results of an 
assessment of the effectiveness of the transportation security 
card program.

Summary

    After 9/11, ports across the United States increased 
security procedures to prevent vulnerabilities in our Nation's 
maritime facilities and deny access to criminals. As a result, 
the Maritime Transportation Security Act of 2002 (Pub L. 107-
295) established the Transportation Worker Identification 
Credential (TWIC) program, requiring a background check and 
issuance of credentials to workers who access secure areas of 
the Nation's maritime facilities and vessels. The 
Transportation Security Administration (TSA) conducts these 
background checks and issues the credentials for eligible 
workers; however, high costs of credentialing, lapses in 
background checks, and poor management hinder the program's 
security effectiveness.
    In 2011 and 2013, two separate Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) reports indicated the TWIC program lacks 
reliability and recommended reassessing the security benefits 
of the program. In addition, the Department of Homeland 
Security (DHS) Office of Inspector General (OIG) released a 
report in 2016 revealing TWIC background checks lack fraud 
detection capabilities and proper internal controls. The House 
Committee on Homeland Security responded in 2016 and passed 
Public Law 114-278, requiring the Department of Homeland 
Security to complete a comprehensive study on the effectiveness 
of the TWIC program. However, Congress did not legislate on the 
requirement for biometric readers.
    In 2016, the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) issued a Federal Rule 
(81 FR 57651) requiring biometric TWIC card readers to be used 
at high risk maritime facilities by August 23, 2018, as an 
access control measure. However, this rule did not specify 
which facilities would require biometric card readers. As a 
result, industry stakeholders did not initiate the necessary 
investments in biometric readers, and manufacturers refrained 
from producing the readers.
    This bill legislates that no further rule making on the 
TWIC program be conducted until after a security effectiveness 
study of the program is complete and can be used to inform 
future rulemaking. Additionally, the requirement to halt 
biometric rule making until after the completion of the study 
allows industry stakeholders the proper time to invest in and 
implement this important technology.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5729 was introduced in the House on May 9, 2018, by 
Mr. Katko, Mr. McCaul, Ms. Jackson Lee, and Mr. Richmond and 
referred to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure 
and the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 5729 on June 6, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as amended, by 
unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5729 to the House on June 27, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-790, Pt. I.
    The House considered H.R. 5729 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 10, 2018, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    Received in the Senate on July 11, 2018 and read twice.
    Passed the Senate, without amendment by unanimous consent 
on July 26, 2018.
    H.R. 5729 was presented to the President on August 1, 2018, 
and signed into law on August 2, 2018, as Public law 115-230.

                                ------                                


 JOHN S. MCCAIN NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2019

                    Public Law 115-232    H.R. 5515

To authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2019 for military 
activities of the Department of Defense, for military 
construction, and for defense activities of the Department of 
Energy, to prescribe military personnel strengths for such 
fiscal year, and for other purposes.

Summary

Legislative History

    H.R. 5155 was introduced in the House on April 13, 2018, by 
Mr. Thornberry and Mr. Smith of Washington, and referred to the 
Committee on Armed Services.
    The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security sent a 
letter to the Chair of the Committee on Armed Services on May 
10, 2018, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration of 
H.R. 5155 on the House Floor, the Committee on Homeland 
Security would not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 5155. The 
Chair of the Committee on Armed Services responded on May 14, 
2018, acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the 
Committee on Homeland Security and the agreement to not seek a 
sequential referral.
    The Committee on Armed Services reported H.R. 5515 to the 
House on May 15, 2018, as H. Rpt. 115-676; a supplemental 
report was filed on May 21, 2018 as H. Rpt. 115-676, Part II.
    The House considered H.R. 5515 under the provisions of H. 
Res. 905 and H. Res. 908 on May 22, 23, and 24, 2018. The House 
passed H.R. 5515 by a recorded vote of 351 yeas and 66 nays 
(Roll No. 230).
    H.R. 5515 was received in the Senate on June 4, 2018, read 
twice and placed on the Senate Calendar.
    The Senate considered H.R. 5515 on June 12, 13, 14, and 18, 
2018. The Senate passed H.R. 5515 on June 18, 2018 by a record 
vote of 85 yeas and 10 nays (Record Vote No. 128).
    The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security sent a 
letter to the Speaker of the House requesting the appointment 
of Conferees to the House-Senate Conference on H.R. 5515. The 
letter specifically requested the appoint of Conferees to the 
following sections: of the House Sec. 880Defending United 
States Government Communications; Sec. 1634, Pilot (Program 
Authority to Enhance Cybersecurity and Resiliency of Critical 
Infrastructure; of the Senate Sec. 1634 Cyberspace Solarium 
commission; Sec. 1638, Identification of Countries of Concern 
Regarding Cybersecurity; Security, Sec. 5802, Developing 
Innovation and Growing the Internet of Things; Sec. 6202 
Treatment of Rwandan Patriotic Front and Rwandan Patriotic Army 
under Immigration and Nationality Act.
    The House agreed to a motion to go to Conference on June 
27, 2018. The Speaker appointed Conferees on June 27, 2018, 
from the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Energy 
and Commerce, the Committee on Financial Services, the 
Committee on Foreign Affairs. On July 3, 2018, the Speaker 
appointed additional Conferees: from the Permanent Select 
Committee on Intelligence, the Committee on the Budget, the 
Committee on Education and the Workforce, the Committee on 
Energy and Commerce, the Committee on Financial Services, the 
Committee on Foreign Affairs, the Committee on Homeland 
Security, the Committee on the Judiciary, the Committee on 
Natural Resources, the Committee on Oversight and Government 
Reform, the Committee on Science Space, the Technology the 
Committee on Small Business, the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure, the Committee on Veterans Affairs, the 
Committee on Ways and Means. From the Committee on Homeland 
Security: for consideration of sec. 1634 of the House bill, and 
modifications committed to conference: Mr. McCaul, Mr. 
Ratcliffe, and Mr. Thompson of Mississippi.
    The Committee of Conference filed the Conference Report to 
accompany H.R. 5515 in the House on July 23, 2018, as H. Rpt. 
115-863.
    The House recommitted the conference report on July 24, 
2018, pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 1019. The House 
Rules Committee reported H. Res. 1027 to the House providing 
for consideration of the conference report to H.R. 5515 on July 
26, 2018. The House agreed to the conference report by a 
recorded vote of 359 yeas and 54 nays (Recorded Vote No. 379). 
The Senate began consideration of the conference report.
    On September 1, 2018, the Senate agreed to the conference 
report by a recorded vote of 87 yeas and 10 nays (Recorded Vote 
No. 181).
    H.R. 5515 was presented to the President on September 3, 
2018. The President signed H.R. 5515 into law on September 13, 
2018, as Public Law 115-232.

                                ------                                


                    FAA REAUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2018

    Public Law 115-254    H.R. 302 (H.R. 665, H.R. 876, H.R. 1309, 
      H.R. 1353, H.R. 2132, H.R. 2825, H.R. 2831, H.R. 3101, H.R. 
     3328, H.R. 3669, H.R. 4176, H.R. 4467, H.R. 4559, H.R. 4561, 
      H.R. 4577, H.R. 5081, H.R. 5089, H.R. 5131, H.R. 5730, H.R. 
      5766, H.R. 5869, H.R. 6265, H.R. 6401, H.R. 6459, H.R. 6461)

To provide protections for certain sports medicine 
professionals, to reauthorize Federal aviation programs, to 
improve aircraft safety certification processes, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    This bill grants the DHS and DOJ the ability to address 
threats posed by unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) to large-scale 
events and certain government facilities utilizing counter UAS 
technology. The bill establishes a collaborative structure for 
DHS and DOJ to work with the FAA to determine the proper type 
of technology to use to protect a target based on the 
circumstances. This bill became law as part of H.R. 302, the 
FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018.

Legislative History

115th Congress
H.R. 302
    In the 115th Congress, H.R. 302 was introduced in the House 
on January 5, 2017, by Mr. Guthrie. The Committee on Homeland 
Security did not consider this measure, however this 
legislation included numerous bills considered by the Committee 
on Homeland Security.
    H.R. 302 was considered under Suspension of the Rules and 
agreed to by voice vote on January 9, 2017.
    On September 6, 2018, H.R. 302 was discharged from the 
Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions by 
Unanimous Consent. It was passed by the Senate by Unanimous 
Consent.
    The House agreed to Senate Amendment with an amendment 
pursuant to H. Res. 1082 on September 26, 2018.
    The Senate agreed to the House amendment to the Senate 
Amendment to H.R. 302 by a recorded vote. 93 yeas and 6 nays 
(Recorded vote No. 220.)
    H.R. 302 was presented to the president on October 4, 2018. 
The President signed the bill into Public Law 115-254 on 
October 5 2018.

                                ------                                


      CYBERSECURITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE SECURITY AGENCY ACT OF 2017

                    Public Law 115-278    H.R. 3359

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to authorize the 
Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency of the 
Department of Homeland Security, and for other purposes.

Summary

    Cyberspace and its underlying infrastructure are vulnerable 
to a wide range of risks stemming from both physical and cyber 
threats and hazards. In light of the risk and potential 
consequences of cyber events, strengthening the security and 
resilience of cyberspace is an essential homeland security 
mission. This bill provides the necessary overarching structure 
for DHS to carry out its cybersecurity mission while also 
providing intradepartmental flexibility to best allow DHS to 
execute its mission in the cybersecurity and infrastructure 
security space. The redesignation and elevation of these 
missions within DHS will better allow DHS to carry out its 
operational mission and recruit the best work force to achieve 
this mission.
    This bill realigns the current NPPD structure so it can 
more effectively carryout the existing authorities provided in 
law, including those provided in the Cybersecurity Act of 2015 
(contained in division N of the Consolidated Appropriations 
Act, 2016, Pub. L. 114-113). The Cybersecurity and 
Infrastructure Security Agency will be structured to best work 
with partners at all levels of government, and from the private 
and non-profit sectors, to share information and build greater 
trust in order to make our cyber and physical infrastructure 
more secure.

Legislative History

114th Congress
H.R. 5390
    In the 114th Congress, H.R. 5390 was introduced in the 
House on June 7, 2016, by Mr. McCaul, Ms. Jackson Lee, and Mr. 
Ratcliffe; and referred to the Committees on Homeland Security, 
Energy and Commerce, Oversight and Government Reform, 
Transportation and Infrastructure.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 5390 on 
June 8, 2016, and ordered the measure to be reported, as 
amended, to the House with a favorable recommendation, as 
amended, by unanimous consent.

115th Congress
    H.R. 3359 was introduced in the House on July 24, 2017, by 
Mr. McCaul, and 10 original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security, the Committee on Energy and 
Commerce, the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, and 
the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
    The Committee considered H.R. 3359 on July 26, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Oversight and Government 
Reform sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security on December 7, 2017, agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Oversight and Government Reform would waive further 
consideration of H.R. 3359. On that same date, the Chair of the 
Committee on Homeland Security responded, acknowledging the 
jurisdictional interests of the Committee on Oversight and 
Government Reform and the agreement to waive further 
consideration of H.R. 3359. The letter further agreed to 
support the request for Conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on December 7, 2017, agreeing that, in order 
to expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would waive further 
consideration of H.R. 3359. On that same date, the Chair of the 
Committee on Homeland Security responded, acknowledging the 
jurisdictional interests of the Committee on Transportation and 
infrastructure and the agreement to waive further consideration 
of H.R. 3359. The letter further agreed to support the request 
for Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be called.
    The Chair of the Committee on Energy and Commerce sent a 
letter to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on 
December 8, 2017, agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on Energy and 
Commerce would waive further consideration of H.R. 3359. On 
that same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded, acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the 
Committee on Energy and Commerce and the agreement to waive 
further consideration of H.R. 3359. The letter further agreed 
to support the request for Conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 3359 to 
the House on December 11, 2017, as H. Rpt. 115-454, Pt. I.
    The House considered H.R. 3359 under Suspension of the 
Rules on December 11, 2017, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 3359 was received in the Senate on December 12, 2017, 
read twice and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs held a hearing on February 7, 2018.
    The Senate considered H.R. 3359 on October 3, 2018. The 
Senate Passed H.R. 3359, as amended, by unanimous consent.
    The House agreed to the Senate amendment on November 13, 
2018, without objection, by unanimous consent.
    H.R. 3359 was presented to the President on November 14, 
2018. The President signed H.R. 3359 into law on November 16, 
2018, as Public Law. 115-278.

                                ------                                


       DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY DATA FRAMEWORK ACT OF 2018

               Public Law 115-331    H.R. 2454 (S. 2397)

To direct the Secretary of Homeland Security to establish a 
framework to provide access for appropriate personnel to 
intelligence information of the Department, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 2454 authorizes the Department of Homeland Security 
Data Framework and directs DHS to integrate existing systems 
and datasets relating to homeland security, terrorism and 
weapons of mass destruction, and to ensure access by 
appropriate personnel while maintaining privacy and civil 
liberty protections. The bill requires employee training in 
order to utilize the Data Framework and measures to ensure the 
data is protected.

Legislative History

H.R. 2454
    H.R. 2454 was introduced in the House on June 6, 2017, by 
Mr. Hurd and Mr. McCaul, and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 2454 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence 
considered H.R. 2454 on May 18, 2017, and reported the measure 
to the Full Committee for consideration with a favorable 
recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The House considered H.R. 2454 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 12, 2017, and passed the measure, as 
amended, by voice vote.
    H.R. 2454 was received in the Senate on September 13, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    This bill passed the Senate with an amendment on December 
6, 2018. The House suspended the rules and agree to the Senate 
amendment by voice vote on December 12, 2018. The bill was 
signed by the President on December 19, 2018, and became 
P.L.115-331.

                                ------                                


               VEHICULAR TERRORISM PREVENTION ACT OF 2017

                 Public Law 115-    H.R. 4227 (S. 2077)

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to examine what 
actions the Department of Homeland Security is undertaking to 
combat the threat of vehicular terrorism, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 4227 requires the Secretary of Homeland Security to 
submit a report detailing DHS actions to combat the threat of 
vehicular terrorism. The report must include an examination of 
the current threat level for vehicular terrorism; what DHS is 
currently doing to guard against vehicular terrorism; how the 
threat of vehicular terrorism may be mitigated; the extent to 
which DHS is doing any outreach or training with private sector 
partners in response to the threat of vehicular terrorism; and, 
any actions that Congress can take to help DHS mitigate this 
threat.

Legislative History

H.R. 4227
    H.R. 4227 was introduced in the House on November 2, 2017 
by Mr. Latta and eight original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 4227 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and 
Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence was 
discharged from further consideration of H.R. 4227 on March 7, 
2018.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4227 on March 7, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as amended, by 
unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4227 to the House on March 19, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-609.
    The House considered H.R. 4227 under Suspension of the 
Rules on March 19, 2018. The House passed H.R. 4227, as 
amended, on March 22, 2018, by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 417 
yeas and 2 nays (Roll Call Vote No. 125).
    H.R. 4227 was received in the Senate on March 22, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate passed H.R. 4227, with amendments, by unanimous 
Consent on December 18, 2018.
    The House suspended the rules and agreed to the Senate 
amendments to H.R. 4227 by a recorded vote of 388 yeas to 2 
nays (Roll No. 456).
    H.R. 4227 was presented to the President on December 21, 
2018. The President signed H.R. 4227 on December 31, 2018.

S. 2077
    S. 2077 was introduced in the Senate on November 6, 2017 by 
Mr. Cassidy and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


          UNITED STATES PORTS OF ENTRY THREAT AND OPERATIONAL 
                               REVIEW ACT

                      Public Law 115-    H.R. 6400

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to conduct a 
threat and operational analysis of ports of entry, and for 
other purposes.

Summary

    The United States Ports of Entry Threat and Operational 
Review Act (H.R. 6400) requires the Secretary of Homeland 
Security to conduct a threat and operational analysis of all 
United States air, land, and sea ports, followed by a strategy 
and implementation plan.
    The analysis would need to include an assessment of current 
and potential threats posed by individuals and organized groups 
seeking to exploit security vulnerabilities at ports of entry 
(POES), and methods and pathways used by such individuals and 
groups. In addition, this assessment will identify improvements 
needed at POEs to prevent the unlawful movement of people, 
illicit drugs, and other contraband across the U.S. border, and 
to reduce wait times. Personnel, technology, and infrastructure 
needs and estimated costs must also be considered in the 
analysis.

Legislative History

    H.R. 6400 was introduced in the House on July 17, 2018, by 
Mrs. Lesko and 15 original cosponsors, and referred to the 
Committee on Ways and Means and in addition to the Committee on 
Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 6400 on July 24, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by unanimous consent.
    The Chair of the Committee on Ways and Means sent a letter 
to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security, agreeing 
that, in order to expedite consideration on the House floor, 
the Committee on Ways and Means would agree to discharge from 
further consideration of H.R. 6640. On September 4, 2018, the 
Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded 
acknowledging the jurisdictional interest of the Committee on 
Ways and Means and the agreement to waive further 
consideration. The letter further acknowledged the agreement to 
support a request for conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 6400 to 
the House on September 4, 2018, as H. Rpt. 115-914, Part I.
    The House Considered H.R. 6400 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 4, 2018, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 6400 was received by the Senate, on September 5, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs discharged H.R. 6400 on December 19, 2018. It was 
passed by the senate, without amendment, by voice vote.
    On December 21, 2018, H.R. 6400 was presented to the 
President and signed in to law, as Public Law 115-

                                ------                                


             COUNTERING WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION OF 2018

                      Public Law 115-    H.R. 7213

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish the 
Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction Office, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    This bill amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to 
establish in the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) a 
Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction Office, headed by an 
Assistant Secretary. The Assistant Secretary shall serve as the 
principal advisor to DHS on weapons of mass destruction matters 
and strategies, and on coordinating efforts to counter weapons 
of mass destruction.
    The office shall coordinate DHS strategy and policy to 
plan, detect, and protect against the importation, possession, 
storage, transportation, development, or use of unauthorized 
chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear materials, 
devices, or agents.
    The Assistant Secretary shall establish the Securing the 
Cities program to detect and prevent terrorist attacks and 
other high consequence events utilizing nuclear or other 
radiological materials that pose a high risk to homeland 
security in high-risk urban areas.
    The bill establishes in the office a Chief Medical Officer 
who shall serve as the principal advisor to DHS on medical and 
public health issues.
    DHS shall transfer to the office all personnel, budget 
authority, and assets of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office 
and the Office of Health Affairs.

Legislative History

    This bill adopts the Senate language that was included in 
H.R. 2825 and H.R. 6198 for Countering Weapons of Mass 
Destruction. It was introduced on December 2, 2018 and 
discharged on December 10, 2018. It passed the House of 
Representatives by voice vote on December 10, 2018 and the 
Senate on December 18, 2018. It was signed by the President on 
December 21, 2018.

                                ------                                


                         SECURE TECHNOLOGY ACT

    Public Law 115-    H.R. 7327 (H.R. 2774, H.R. 6430, H.R. 6735, 
                                S. 1281)

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to establish a 
security vulnerability disclosure policy, to establish a bug 
bounty program for the Department of Homeland Security, to 
amend title 41, United States Code, to provide for Federal 
acquisition supply chain security, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This bill requires the Secretary of Homeland Security to 
establish a security vulnerability disclosure policy, a bug 
bounty program, and provide for Federal Acquisition supply 
chain security.

Legislative History

    H.R. 7327 was introduced in the House by Mr. Will Hurd, Mr. 
James Langevin, Mr. Kevin McCarthy, Mr. Ted Lieu, Mr. John 
Ratcliffe, and Mr. Filemon Vela on December 19, 2018.
    H.R. 7327 was considered by the House under Suspension of 
the Rules and agreed to by a recorded vote of 362 yeas to 1 nay 
(Roll No. 440) on December 19, 2018.
    On December 20, 2018 the Senate passed H.R. 7327, without 
amendment, by Unanimous Consent.
    H.R. 7327 was presented to the President and signed into 
law on December 21, 2018, As Public law 115-

                                ------                                


     FIRST RESPONDER IDENTIFICATION OF EMERGENCY NEEDS IN DISASTER 
                               SITUATIONS

                                H.R. 58

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to submit a study 
on the circumstances which may impact the effectiveness and 
availability of first responders before, during, or after a 
terrorist threat or event.

Summary

    H.R. 58 would analyze what is being done to support the 
needs of first responders-particularly with respect to concerns 
about their families-so that they can continue to do their job 
successfully. The analysis required by this bill will provide 
Congress with relevant information about policies and programs 
at both the State and local levels that support the protection 
and preparedness of first responders and their families during 
emergencies.

Legislative History

114th Congress
    In the 114th Congress, H.R. 2795 was introduced in the 
House on June 16, 2015, by Ms. Jackson Lee and 14 original 
cosponsors; and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 2795 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications.
    On November 4, 2015, the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response and Communications was discharged from 
further consideration of H.R. 2795.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 2795 on November 4, 
2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 2795 to the House on December 
7, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-370.
    The House considered H.R. 2795 under Suspension of the 
Rules on December 10, 2015, and passed the bill, as amended, by 
a 2/3 recorded vote of 396 yeas and 12 nays, (Roll No. 689).
    H.R. 2795 was received in the Senate on December 14, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

115th Congress
    H.R. 58 was introduced in the House on January 3, 2017, by 
Ms. Jackson Lee; and referred to the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure and the Committee on Homeland 
Security.
    The House considered H.R. 58 under Suspension of the Rules 
on January 31, 2017, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 58 was received in the Senate on February 1, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


                SUPPORT FOR RAPID INNOVATION ACT OF 2017

                           H.R. 239 (S. 278)

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to provide for 
innovative research and development, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-296) to provide for innovative research and 
development by requiring the Under Secretary for Science and 
Technology (S&T) to support cybersecurity research, 
development, testing, evaluation and transition and to 
coordinate those activities with other Federal agencies, 
industry, and academia. In service to the components of the 
Department of Homeland Security, the Under Secretary is 
required to: advance the development and deployment of secure 
information systems; improve and create technologies to detect 
attacks or intrusions; improve and create mitigation and 
recovery methodologies; support the review of source code that 
underpins critical infrastructure information systems in 
coordination with the private sector; develop and support tools 
to support cybersecurity research and development efforts; 
assist the development of technologies to reduce 
vulnerabilities in industrial control systems; and develop and 
support forensics and attack attribution capabilities.
    The legislation also requires the Under Secretary to 
support the full life cycle of cyber research and development 
projects, identify mature technologies that address existing or 
imminent cybersecurity gaps, and introduce new cybersecurity 
technologies throughout the homeland security enterprise 
through partnerships and commercialization. The Under Secretary 
is directed to target Federally funded cybersecurity research 
that demonstrates a high probability of successful transition 
to the commercial market within two years.
    This bill also extends the timeframe for the Secretary to 
exercise Other Transaction Authority (OTA) until 2020. If the 
head of a component seeks to have funds expended under OTA, the 
Secretary must provide prior approval after evaluating the 
component's proposal which must include the rationale, funds to 
be spent, and expected outcomes of the project. The Secretary 
is required to submit an annual report to Congress detailing 
those projects for which OTA was authorized.
    Ensuring there are mechanisms in place like S&T's 
cybersecurity research and development programs and OTA to 
support the dynamic nature of cybersecurity research and 
development is essential for addressing homeland security 
capability gaps.

Legislative History

114th Congress
H.R. 5388
    In the 114th Congress, H.R. 5388 was introduced in the 
House on June 7, 2016, by Mr. Ratcliffe and Mr. McCaul; and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5388 on June 8, 2016, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on June 20, 2016, agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 5388. The letter further requested the support 
for Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be called. On 
that same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded, concurring in the agreement to not seek a sequential 
referral and the request for the appointment of Conferees 
should a House-Senate Conference be called.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5388 to the House on June 21, 
2016, as H. Rpt. 114-629.
    The House considered H.R. 5388 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 21, 2016, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 351 yeas and 4 nays, (Roll No. 335).

115th Congress
H.R. 239
    H.R. 239 was introduced in the House on January 4, 2017, by 
Mr. Ratcliffe and Mr. McCaul; and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security.
    The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security sent a 
letter to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
acknowledging the agreement with the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology to not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 
239.
    The House considered H.R. 239 under Suspension of the Rules 
on January 10, 2017, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 239 was received in the Senate on January 11, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

S. 278
    S. 278 was introduced in the Senate on February 2, 2017, by 
Mr. Daines and Mr. Warner, read twice, and referred to the 
Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


              LEVERAGING EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES ACT OF 2017

                                H.R. 240

To encourage engagement between the Department of Homeland 
Security and technology innovators, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation encourages engagement between the 
Department of Homeland Security and technology innovators. The 
bill requires the Secretary of Homeland Security to engage with 
innovative and emerging technology developers and firms, 
including technology-based small businesses and startup 
ventures, to address homeland security needs. The Secretary may 
also identify geographic areas in the United States where high 
concentrations of innovative and emerging technology developers 
and firms exist. H.R. 5389 allows the Secretary to establish 
personnel and office space in these areas, as appropriate. 
Finally, the bill requires the Secretary to develop, implement, 
and submit a strategy to proactively engage innovative and 
emerging technology developers and firms with guidance on 
building and sustaining relationships with such innovator.
    The Department's ability to engage regional and national 
thought leaders across the country and establish a presence in 
a similar manner that has been done via its establishment of an 
office in Silicon Valley will help it target investments and 
promote proven technologies that address homeland security 
needs. Requiring the Department to strategically consider how 
to engage these technology developers across the country will 
strengthen the Department's ability to access innovative and 
emerging technologies in order to combat evolving threats. This 
legislation is intended to ensure that DHS fosters sustainable 
systems, policies and procedures to maintain strong engagement 
with innovative and emerging technology developers and firms 
that continue over time.

Legislative History

114th Congress
H.R. 5389
    In the 114th Congress, H.R. 5389 was introduced in the 
House on June 7, 2016, by Mr. Ratcliffe, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. 
Thompson of Mississippi; and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5389 on June 8, 2016, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology would not seek a sequential referral of 
H.R. 5389. The letter further requested the support for 
Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be called. On that 
same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded, concurring in the agreement to not seek a sequential 
referral and the request for the appointment of Conferees 
should a House-Senate Conference be called.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5389 to the House on June 21, 
2016, as H. Rpt. 114-630.
    The House considered H.R. 5389 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 21, 2016, and passed the measure by a 2/3 
recorded vote of 347 yeas and 8 nays, (Roll No. 336).
    H.R. 5389 was received in the Senate on June 22, 2016, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

115th Congress
H.R. 240
    H.R. 240 was introduced in the House on January 4, 2017, by 
Mr. Ratcliffe, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. Thompson of Mississippi; and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The House considered H.R. 240 under Suspension of the Rules 
on January 10, 2017, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 240 was received in the Senate on January 11, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


          DHS ACQUISITION DOCUMENTATION INTEGRITY ACT OF 2017

                                H.R. 347

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to provide for 
requirements relating to documentation for major acquisition 
programs, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The purpose of H.R. 347, the DHS Acquisition Documentation 
Integrity Act of 2017, requires the Secretary, acting through 
the Under Secretary for Management, to require relevant 
components to maintain specific types of acquisition 
documentation. This bill codifies a narrow set of authorities 
for the Secretary to waive those requirements in limited 
circumstances, which is a similar approach that exists in the 
Department of Defense.

Legislative History

114th Congress
H.R. 4398
    In the 114th Congress, H.R. 4398 was introduced in the 
House on February 1, 2016, by Ms. Watson Coleman; and referred 
to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4398 on February 3, 2016, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4398 to the House on February 
23, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-425.
    The House considered H.R. 4398 under Suspension of the 
Rules on February 23, 2016, and passed the measure by voice 
vote.
    H.R. 4398 was received in the Senate on February 24, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

115th Congress
H.R. 347
    H.R. 347 was introduced in the House on January 5, 2017, by 
Mrs. Watson Coleman, Mr. McCaul, Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, 
and Mr. Perry; and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security.
    The House considered H.R. 347 under Suspension of the Rules 
on January 31, 2017, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 347 was received in the Senate on February 1, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


                 MEDICAL PREPAREDNESS ALLOWABLE USE ACT

                                H.R. 437

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to codify authority 
under existing grant guidance authorizing use of Urban Area 
Security Initiative and State Homeland Security Grant Program 
funding for enhancing medical preparedness, medical surge 
capacity, and mass prophylaxis capabilities.

Summary

    H.R. 437 amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 
107-296) to clarify that State Homeland Security Grant Program 
(SHSGP) and Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) funds may be 
used to enhance medical preparedness, medical surge capacity, 
and mass prophylaxis capabilities. Through hearings and 
briefings held in the Subcommittee in the 112th and 113th 
Congresses, the Committee received information from 
stakeholders at the Federal, State, and local level about the 
importance of medical preparedness. This legislation, and the 
need to ensure that SHSGP and UASI funds remain available for 
medical preparedness, was informed by these events.

Legislative History

112th Congress
H.R. 5997
    In the 112th Congress, H.R. 5997 was introduced in the 
House on June 21, 2012, by Mr. Bilirakis, Mr. Clarke of 
Michigan, Mr. Turner of New York, and Mr. Rogers of Alabama; 
and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 5997 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications.
    The House considered H.R. 5997 under Suspension of the 
Rules on November 27, 2012, and passed the bill, amended, by a 
\2/3\ recorded vote of 397 yeas and 1 nay, (Roll No. 609).

113th Congress
H.R. 1791
    In the 113th Congress, H.R. 1791 was introduced in the 
House on April 26, 2013, by Mr. Bilirakis, Mrs. Brooks of 
Indiana, and Mr. King of New York; and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 1791 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, 
Response, and Communications.
    On October 29, 2013, the Chair discharged the Subcommittee 
on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications from 
further consideration of H.R. 1791.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 1791 on October 29, 
2013, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1791 to the House on November 
21, 2013, as H. Rpt. 113-273.
    The House considered H.R. 1791 under Suspension of the 
Rules on February 3, 2014, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 391 yeas and 2 nays, (Roll No. 32).
    H.R. 1791 was received in the Senate on February 4, 2014, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

114th Congress
H.R. 361

    H.R. 361 was introduced in the House on January 14, 2015, 
by Mr. Bilirakis, Mrs. Brooks of Indiana, and Mr. King of New 
York; and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 361 was referred to the Subcommittee 
on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications.
    The House considered H.R. 361 under Suspension of the Rules 
on February 2, 2015, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ recorded 
vote of 377 yeas and 2 nays, (Roll No. 51).
    H.R. 361 was received in the Senate on February 3, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

115th Congress
H.R. 437
    H.R. 437 was introduced in the House on January 11, 2017, 
by Mr. Bilirakis and Mrs. Brooks of Indiana; and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The House considered H.R. 437 under Suspension of the Rules 
on January 31, 2017, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 437 was received in the Senate on February 1, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 437 were included in section 1606 of 
Title VI of H.R. 2825 as reported by the Committee. See also 
action take on H.R. 2825, below.

                                ------                                


         BORDER SECURITY TECHNOLOGY ACCOUNTABILITY ACT OF 2017

                           H.R. 505 (S. 146)

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to strengthen 
accountability for deployment of border security technology at 
the Department of Homeland Security, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The Border Security Technology Accountability Act of 2017 
(H.R. 505) requires the Secretary of Homeland Security to 
ensure that each border security technology acquisition program 
with an expected lifecycle cost of at least $300 million has a 
program baseline approved by the relevant acquisition decision 
authority. The Secretary is required to document that each 
program is meeting cost, schedule, and performance thresholds 
specified in its baseline, and that each program complies with 
departmental acquisition policies and the Federal Acquisition 
Regulation. The Secretary must also have a plan for meeting 
program implementation objectives by managing contractor 
performance.
    H.R. 505 further requires the DHS Under Secretary for 
Management to work with the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and 
Border Protection (CBP) to implement internal control standards 
and best practices for such programs as identified by the 
Comptroller General. The DHS Under Secretary for Management and 
the CBP Commissioner are required to develop and submit a plan 
to Congress for the testing and evaluation of border security 
technologies, as well as for the use of independent 
verification and validation resources.
    Since 2005, Acquisition Management Activities of the 
Department of Homeland Security have been on the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) ``High-Risk List'' because of their 
high susceptibility to waste and mismanagement. In 2012, GAO 
found that less than one-third of major DHS acquisition 
programs have Acquisition Program Baselines in place, important 
measurements for performance, and cost-control.

Legislative History

114th Congress
H.R. 1634
    H.R. 1634 was introduced in the House on March 25, 2015, by 
Ms. McSally and six original cosponsors; and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 1634 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime 
Security.
    On June 25, 2015, the Chair discharged the Subcommittee on 
Border and Maritime Security from further consideration of H.R. 
1634.
    The Committee considered H.R. 1634 on June 25, 2015, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 1634 to 
the House on July 27, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-226.
    The House considered H.R. 1634 on July 27, 2015, under 
Suspension of the Rules, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 1634 was received in the Senate on July 28, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

S. 1873
    S. 1873, the Senate companion measure, was introduced in 
the Senate on July 28, 2015, by Mr. McCain; and referred to the 
Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 1873 on October 7, 2015, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate with an Amendment in the 
Nature of a Substitute.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 1873 to the Senate on April 4, 2016, as S. 
Rpt. 114-234.

115th Congress
H.R. 505
    H.R. 505 was introduced in the House on January 12, 2017, 
by Ms. McSally, and 14 original cosponsors; and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The House considered H.R. 505 under Suspension of the Rules 
on January 31, 2017, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 505 was received in the Senate on February 1, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

S. 146
    S. 146 was introduced in the Senate on January 12, 2017, by 
Mr. McCain, read twice, and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 146 on October 4, 2017, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate, without amendment.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 146 to the Senate on April 16, 2018, as S. 
Rpt. 115-230.

                                ------                                


              COUNTERTERRORISM ADVISORY BOARD ACT OF 2016

                           H.R. 526 (S. 2258)

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish in the 
Department of Homeland Security a board to coordinate and 
integrate departmental intelligence, activities, and policy 
related to counterterrorism, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-296) to establish a Counterterrorism Advisory 
Board (CTAB) within the Department of Homeland Security to both 
coordinate and integrate Departmental intelligence, activities, 
and policies related to counterterrorism within the Department. 
Upon completion of the final report of the Committee on 
Homeland Security's Task Force on Combating Terrorist and 
Foreign Fighter Travel in September 2015, the task force found 
that Congress should authorize the CTAB and ensure it is 
aligned with the current threat environment related to 
counterterrorism issues.

Legislative History

114th Congress
H.R. 4407
    H.R. 4407 was introduced in the House on February 1, 2016, 
by Mr. Loudermilk and 10 original cosponsors; and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4407 on February 2, 2016, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 4407 to 
the House on April 11, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-481.
    The House considered H.R. 4407 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 6, 2016, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 389 yeas and 5 nays, (Roll No. 195).
    H.R. 4407 was received in the Senate on May 17, 2016, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The text of H.R. 4407, as passed by the House, was included 
in Title III of H.R. 5471, the Countering Terrorist 
Radicalization Act, as introduced.

115th Congress
H.R. 526
    H.R. 526 was introduced in the House on January 13, 2017, 
by Mr. Katko and eight original cosponsors; and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The House considered H.R. 526 under Suspension of the Rules 
on January 31, 2017, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 526 was received in the Senate on February 1, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 526 were included in Title III of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.

                                ------                                


             TRANSIT SECURITY GRANT PROGRAM FLEXIBILITY ACT

                                H.R. 549

To amend the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 
Commission Act of 2007 to clarify certain allowable uses of 
funds for public transportation security assistance grants and 
establish periods of performance for such grants, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    This measure amends the Implementing Recommendation of the 
9/11 Commission Act of 2007 (Pub. L. 110-53) to set the period 
of performance for Transit Security Grant Program (TSGP) 
expenditures and provide flexibility to TSGP eligible transit 
agencies by allowing grant recipients to use funding for 
security training related backfill, consistent with other 
homeland security grants.

Legislative History

114th Congress
H.R. 5943
    In the 114th Congress, H.R. 5943 was introduced in the 
House on September 7, 2016, by Mr. Donovan, Mr. Katko, Mr. King 
of New York, Miss Rice of New York, Mr. Payne, and Mr. McCaul; 
and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5943 on September 14, 
2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5943 to the House, on September 
20, 2016, with an amendment, as H. Rpt. 114-776.
    The House considered H.R. 5943 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 26, 2016, and passed the measure by voice 
vote.
    H.R. 5943 was received in the Senate on September 27, 2016.

115th Congress
H.R. 549
    H.R. 549 was introduced in the House on January 13, 2017, 
by Mr. Donovan, Mr. King of New York, Mr. Katko, Miss Rice of 
New York, Mr. Payne, and Mr. McCaul; and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The House considered H.R. 549 under Suspension of the Rules 
on January 31, 2017, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 549 was received in the Senate on February 1, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 549 were included in Title VI of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.

                                ------                                


                     CYBER PREPAREDNESS ACT OF 2017

                                H.R. 584

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to enhance 
preparedness and response capabilities for cyber-attacks, 
bolster the dissemination of homeland security information 
related to cyber threats, and for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 584 seeks to enhance preparedness and response 
capabilities for cyber attacks and bolster the sharing of 
information related to cyber threats. The bill includes, as a 
function of the National Cybersecurity and Communications 
Integration Center (NCCIC), sharing information about cyber 
best practices, in addition to the sharing of cyber threat 
indicators and defensive measures currently required by law. 
The bill also authorizes representatives from State and major 
urban area fusion centers, as defined in the bill, to be 
assigned to the NCCIC, similar to the assignment of 
representatives from information sharing and analysis centers 
(ISACs) permitted under current law.
    H.R. 584 authorizes the use of State Homeland Security 
Grant Program and Urban Area Security Initiative funds for 
cybersecurity enhancements. Cyber expenditures are currently 
allowable under yearly grant guidance for these programs and 
this section will codify the authorization to highlight the 
importance of these expenditures and ensure they continue to be 
allowable.
    Finally, H.R. 584 expresses the sense of Congress that the 
Department of Homeland Security should work to lessen the 
classification level or provide information in an unclassified 
form, as practicable, to enable greater sharing of actionable 
intelligence related to cyber threats.

Legislative History

114th Congress
H.R. 5459
    H.R. 5459 was introduced in the House on June 13, 2016, by 
Mr. Donovan, Mr. McCaul, Mr. Ratcliffe, and Mr. Payne; and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 5459 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
Technologies and the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, 
Response, and Communications.
    The Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications considered H.R. 5459 on June 14, 2016, and 
passed the measure, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies was discharged from 
further consideration of H.R. 5459 on September 14, 2016.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5459 on September 14, 
2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5459 to the House on September 
19, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-756.
    The House considered H.R. 5459 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 26, 2016, and passed the measure by voice 
vote.
    H.R. 5459 was received in the Senate on September 27, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

115th Congress
H.R. 584
    H.R. 584 was introduced in the House on January 17, 2017, 
by Mr. Donovan, Mr. Payne, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. Ratcliffe; and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The House considered H.R. 584 under Suspension of the Rules 
on January 31, 2017, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 584 was received in the Senate on February 1, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 584 were included in Title VI of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.

                                ------                                


 UNITED STATES-ISRAEL CYBERSECURITY COOPERATION ENHANCEMENT ACT OF 2017

                                H.R. 612

To establish a grant program at the Department of Homeland 
Security to promote cooperative research and development 
between the United States and Israel on cybersecurity.

Summary

    In accordance with the Agreement between the Government of 
the United States of America and the Government of the State of 
Israel on Cooperation in Science and Technology for Homeland 
Security Matters signed on May 29, 2008, this legislation 
requires the Department of Homeland Security to establish a 
grant program to support cybersecurity research, development, 
demonstration, and commercialization of cybersecurity 
technology.

Legislative History

114th Congress
H.R. 5843
    H.R. 5843 was introduced in the House on July 14, 2016, by 
Mr. Langevin and Mr. Ratcliffe; and referred to the Committee 
on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 5843 was 
referred to the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies.
    The Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies was discharged from 
further consideration of H.R. 5843 on September 14, 2016.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5843 on September 14, 
2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 5843 to 
the House on November 15, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-826.
    The House considered H.R. 5843 on November 29, 2016, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 5843 was received in the Senate on November 30, 2016.

115th Congress
H.R. 612
    H.R. 612 was introduced in the House on January 23, 2017, 
by Mr. Langevin and Mr. Ratcliffe; and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The House considered H.R. 612 under Suspension of the Rules 
on January 31, 2017, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 612 was received in the Senate on February 1, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


REPORTING EFFICIENTLY TO PROPER OFFICIALS IN RESPONSE TO TERRORISM ACT 
                                OF 2017

                           H.R. 625 (S. 1884)

To provide for joint reports by relevant Federal agencies to 
Congress regarding incidents of terrorism, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 625 requires the Secretary of Homeland Security, in 
coordination with the Attorney General, the Director of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the head of the National 
Counter Terrorism Center (NCTC) to submit reports to Congress 
within one year of the completion of an investigation into an 
incident of terrorism. The report is required to (1) Include a 
Statement of the facts of the incident; (2) Identify gaps in 
national security that could be addressed to prevent future 
attacks; and (3) Provide any recommendations for additional 
measures that could be taken to improve homeland security 
including potential changes in law enforcement practices or 
changes in law, consistent with the Constitution, that could 
help prevent future attacks. The bill includes an exception to 
the reporting requirement if such report could jeopardize an 
ongoing investigation or prosecution. The bill defines the term 
``incident of terrorism'' as an event declared by the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation to be an act of terrorism.

Legislative History

H.R. 625
    H.R. 625 was introduced in the House on January 24, 2017, 
by Mr. Aguilar and Mr. Calvert and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 625 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence was 
discharged from consideration of H.R. 625 on May 3, 2017.
    The Committee considered H.R. 625 on May 3, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 625 to the House on June 15, 
2017, as H. Rpt. 115-182.
    The House considered H.R. 625 under Suspension of the Rules 
on June 20, 2017, and passed the measure, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    H.R. 625 was received in the Senate on June 21, 2017, read 
twice and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland Security 
and Governmental Affairs.

S. 1884
    S. 1884 was introduced in the Senate by Mrs. McCaskill and 
Mr. Lee and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 1884 on October 4, 2017, and ordered the 
measure to be reported, with an amendment, favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 1884 to the Senate on February 26, 2018, as 
S. Rpt. 115-210.

                                ------                                


                 FUSION CENTER ENHANCEMENT ACT OF 2017

                                H.R. 642

    To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to enhance the 
partnership between the Department of Homeland Security and the 
National Network of Fusion Centers, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation updates the existing language in Section 
210A of the Homeland Security Act (Pub. L. 107-296) to enhance 
State and local partners access to homeland security 
information and coordination with the Department of Homeland 
Security's Components. The bill reflects the evolution of the 
National Network of Fusion Centers, as well as the Office of 
Intelligence and Analysis relationship with fusion centers in 
the Network. The bill adds several new responsibilities for the 
Under Secretary of Intelligence and Analysis to reflect the 
current role of fusion centers in detecting and preventing a 
terrorist attack or other emergency. Additionally, this 
legislation requires the Under Secretary to submit a report on 
the efforts of the Office of Intelligence and Analysis and 
departmental components to support the National Network of 
Fusion Centers.

Legislative History

114th Congress
H.R. 3598
    Prior to introduction, the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism 
and Intelligence considered a Committee Print entitled the 
``Fusion Center Enhancement Act of 2015'' on September 17, 
2015, and reported the measure to the Full Committee with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    H.R. 3598 was introduced in the House on September 24, 
2015, by Mr. Barletta, and Mr. King of New York; and referred 
to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3598 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House, as amended, by voice vote.
    On October 28, 2015, the Chair of the House Permanent 
Select Committee on Intelligence sent a letter to the Chair of 
the Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration of H.R. 3598, the Committee on 
Intelligence would not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 3598. 
The letter further requested the support for Conferees should a 
House-Senate Conference be called. On the following day, the 
Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded, 
acknowledging the jurisdictional interest of the Committee on 
Intelligence and the support for the request to appoint 
Conferees.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3598 to the House on November 
2, 2014 as H. Rpt. 114-324.
    On November 2, 2015, the Chair of the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of 
the Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 3598. The letter further requested the support 
for Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be called. The 
Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded on 
November 2, 2015, acknowledging the jurisdictional interest of 
the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and the 
support for the request to appoint Conferees.
    The House considered H.R. 3598 under Suspension of the 
Rules on November 2, 2015, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 3598 was received in the Senate on November 3, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security 
and Governmental Affairs.

115th Congress
H.R. 642
    H.R. 642 was introduced in the House on January 24, 2017, 
by Mr. Barletta, Mr. King of New York, and Mr. McCaul; and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 642. On that same date, the Chair of the 
Committee on Homeland Security responded acknowledging the 
jurisdictional interests of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure and the agreement to not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 642.
    The House considered H.R. 642 under Suspension of the Rules 
on January 31, 2017, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 642 was received in the Senate on February 1, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 642 were included in Title III of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.

                                ------                                


                    SECURING THE CITIES ACT OF 2017

                                H.R. 655

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish the 
Securing the Cities program to enhance the ability of the 
United States to detect and prevent terrorist attacks and other 
high consequence events utilizing nuclear or other radiological 
materials that pose a high risk to homeland security in high-
risk urban areas, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-296) to establish the Securing the Cities Program 
within the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO). It would 
require the Director of DNDO to assist state and local 
governments by designing, implementing, and enhancing 
capabilities for coordinating detection and interdiction of 
nuclear or other radiological materials. The legislation would 
provide resources to enhance detection, analysis, communication 
and coordination and increased oversight and accountability by 
requiring the Government Accountability Office to conduct a 
review on the effectiveness of the program.

Legislative History

114th Congress
H.R. 3493
    H.R. 3493 was introduced in the House on September 11, 
2015, by Mr. Donovan, Mr. King of New York, and Mr. McCaul; and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 3493 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security 
Technologies.
    The Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure 
Protection, and Security Technologies considered H.R. 3493 on 
September 17, 2015, and reported the measure to the Full 
Committee with a favorable recommendation, without amendment, 
by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3490 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3493 to the House on October 
20, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-295.
    The House considered H.R. 3493 under Suspension of the 
Rules on October 20, 2015, and passed the measure, amended, by 
a 2/3 recorded vote of 411 yeas and 4 nays, (Roll No. 550).
    H.R. 3493 was received in the Senate on October 21, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

115th Congress
H.R. 655
    H.R. 655 was introduced in the House on January 24, 2017, 
by Mr. Donovan, Mr. King of New York, and Mr. McCaul; and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The House considered H.R. 655 under Suspension of the Rules 
on January 31, 2017, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 655 was received in the Senate on February 1, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 655 were included in H.R. 6198, as 
reported by the Committee. See also action taken on H.R. 655, 
below.

                                ------                                


       AIRPORT PERIMETER AND ACCESS CONTROL SECURITY ACT OF 2017

                                H.R. 665

To modernize and enhance airport perimeter and access control 
security by requiring updated risk assessments and the 
development of security strategies, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This measure requires the Administrator of the 
Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to update both the 
Transportation Sector Security Risk Assessment (TSSRA) and the 
Comprehensive Risk Assessment of Perimeter and Access Control 
Security. The bill directs the Administrator to develop 
timeframes for additional updates and complete a sector-wide 
assessment of airport access controls and perimeter security. 
This assessment is required to incorporate the updates to the 
TSSRA, as well as findings from the Joint Vulnerability 
Assessment. Additionally, the Administrator is required to 
include consideration of the overall airport risk environment, 
specific security even data, trend analysis, and existing best 
practices utilized by airports to mitigate security risks.
    In addition to the comprehensive assessment and report 
updates, the legislation requires the Administrator to update 
the National Strategy for Airport Perimeter and Access Control 
Security to include the results of the comprehensive risk 
assessments, as well as information on airport security 
activities, the status of TSA's own security initiatives, 
stakeholder input, and outcome-based performance goals and 
objectives.

Legislative History

114th Congress
H.R. 5056

    H.R. 5056 was introduced in the House on April 26, 2015, by 
Mr. Keating and six original cosponsors; and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5056 on April 28, 2016, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by unanimous 
consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5056 to the House on July 1, 
2016, as H. Rpt. 114-653.
    The House considered H.R. 5056 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 11, 2016, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 5056 was received in the Senate on July 12, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.

115th Congress
H.R. 665
    H.R. 665 was introduced in the House on January 24, 2017, 
by Mr. Keating, Mr. Katko, Miss Rice of New York, Mr. Swalwell 
of California, Mr. Richmond, and Mr. Thompson of Mississippi; 
and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The House considered H.R. 665 under Suspension of the Rules 
on January 31, 2017, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 665 was received in the Senate on February 1, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    Provisions of H.R. 665 were included in Title V of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.
    Provisions of H.R. 665 were included in H.R. 302, the FAA 
Reauthorization Act of 2018.

                                ------                                


 DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INSIDER THREAT AND MITIGATION ACT OF 
                                  2017

                                H.R. 666

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish the 
Insider Threat Program, and for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 666 amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to 
establish an Insider Threat program at the Department of 
Homeland Security (DHS). The bill mandates employee education 
and training programs and establishes an internal DHS Steering 
Committee to manage and coordinate DHS activities related to 
insider threat issues.

Legislative History

114th Congress
H.R. 3361
    H.R. 3361 was introduced in the House on July 29, 2015, by 
Mr. King of New York, Mr. Higgins, Mr. Barletta, Mr. Katko, and 
Mr. Donovan; and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 3361 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence 
considered H.R. 3361 on September 17, 2015, and reported the 
measure to the Full Committee with a favorable recommendation, 
as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3361 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 3361 to 
the House on November 2, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-321.
    The House considered H.R. 3361 on November 2, 2015, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure, amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 3361 was received in the Senate on November 3, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security 
and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered H.R. 3361 on February 10, 2016, and ordered 
the measure to be reported to the Senate, with an Amendment in 
the Nature of a Substitute, favorably.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported H.R. 3361 to the Senate on July 12, 2016, as 
S. Rpt. 114-297.

115th Congress
H.R. 666
    H.R. 666 was introduced in the House on January 24, 2017, 
by Mr. King of New York, Mr. Barletta, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. 
Donovan; and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The House considered H.R. 666 under Suspension of the Rules 
on January 31, 2017, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 666 was received in the Senate on February 1, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 666 were included in Title III of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.

                                ------                                


         CBRN INTELLIGENCE AND INFORMATION SHARING ACT OF 2017

                                H.R. 677

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish 
chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear intelligence 
and information sharing functions of the Office of Intelligence 
and Analysis of the Department of Homeland Security and to 
require dissemination of information analyzed by the Department 
to entities with responsibilities relating to homeland 
security, and for other purposes.

Summary

    Terrorist groups have long strived to employ chemical, 
biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) materials in their 
attacks. This legislation requires the Office of Intelligence 
and Analysis within the Department of Homeland Security to 
enhance intelligence analysis and information sharing on CBRN 
threats and work to ensure that State and local officials get 
the actionable intelligence information necessary to stop an 
attack.

Legislative History

 114th Congress
H.R. 2200
    H.R. 2200 was introduced in the House on May 1, 2015, by 
Ms. McSally, Mr. McCaul, Mr. King of New York, Mr. Meehan, Mr. 
Thompson of Mississippi, and Mr. Payne; and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 2200 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and 
Intelligence and the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, 
Response, and Communications.
    The Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications considered H.R. 2200 on May 14, 2015, and 
forwarded the measure to the Full Committee for consideration, 
as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair discharged the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism 
and Intelligence from further consideration of H.R. 2200 on May 
20, 2015.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 2200 on May 20, 2015, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 2200 to the House on June 17, 
2015, as H. Rpt. 114-164.
    The House considered H.R. 2200 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 23, 2015, and passed the measure, on June 25, 
2015, amended, by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 420 yeas and 2 nays, 
(Roll No. 389).
    H.R. 2200 was received in the Senate on July 7, 2015, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

 115th Congress
H.R. 677
    H.R. 677 was introduced in the House on January 24, 2017, 
by Ms. McSally, Mr. King of New York, Mr. Donovan, and Mr. 
McCaul; and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. The 
House considered H.R. 677 under Suspension of the Rules on 
January 31, 2017, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 677 was received in the Senate on February 1, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    During consideration of H.R. 2825, the Senate included the 
text of H.R. 677 in section 1119. For further action see H.R. 
2825 listed below.

                                ------                                


 DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY SUPPORT TO FUSION CENTERS ACT OF 2017

                                H.R. 678

To require an assessment of fusion center personnel needs, and 
for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation requires an assessment of Department of 
Homeland Security support to fusion centers, including 
Departmental personnel assigned to fusion centers and whether 
such assignments are sufficient. Additionally, the bill 
supports ongoing efforts by the Office of Intelligence and 
Analysis to sponsor Top Secret/Sensitive Compartmented 
Information (TS/SCI) clearances for appropriate State and local 
analysts at fusion centers and report on whether a higher 
clearance level improves threat awareness and information 
sharing.

Legislative History

 114th Congress
H.R. 3503
    H.R. 3503 was introduced in the House on September 11, 
2015, by Ms. McSally, Mr. McCaul, Mr. King of New York, Mr. 
Loudermilk, and Mr. Barletta; and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 3503 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence 
considered H.R. 3503 on September 17, 2015, and reported the 
measure to the Full Committee with a favorable recommendation, 
without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3503 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    On October 28, 2015, the Chair of the House Permanent 
Select Committee on Intelligence sent a letter to the Chair of 
the Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration of H.R. 3503, the Committee on 
Intelligence would not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 3503. 
The letter further requested the support for Conferees should a 
House-Senate Conference be called. On the following day, the 
Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded, 
acknowledging the jurisdictional interest of the Committee on 
Intelligence and the support for the request to appoint 
Conferees.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3503 to the House on November 
2, 2014 as H. Rpt. 114-322.
    The House considered H.R. 3503 under Suspension of the 
Rules on November 2, 2015, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 3503 was received in the Senate on November 3, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security 
and Governmental Affairs.

 115th Congress
H.R. 678
    H.R. 678 was introduced in the House on January 24, 2017, 
by Ms. McSally, Mr. Barletta, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. King of New 
York; and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The House considered H.R. 678 under Suspension of the Rules 
on January 31, 2017, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 678 was received in the Senate on February 1, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 678 were included in Title III of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.

                                ------                                


         FIRST RESPONDER ACCESS TO INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES ACT

                                H.R. 687

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish a 
process to review applications for certain grants to purchase 
equipment or systems that do not meet or exceed any applicable 
national voluntary consensus standards, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This measure amends Subsection (f) of section 2008 of the 
Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 609) by adding at the 
end a review process for applications seeking to purchase 
equipment or systems that do not meet or exceed applicable 
national voluntary consensus standards using funds from the 
Urban Area Security Initiative or the State Homeland Security 
Grant Program. This bill addresses complaints raised by 
stakeholder groups that Federal Emergency Management Agency 
lacks a uniform, predictable, and transparent process to review 
grantee requests to use grant funding to purchase equipment 
that does not meet or exceed voluntary consensus standards or 
for which no voluntary consensus standard exists.

Legislative History

 114th Congress
H.R. 5460
    H.R. 5460 was introduced in the House on June 13, 2016, by 
Mr. Payne and Mr. Donovan; and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 5460 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications.
    On June 16, 2016, the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Communications, Preparedness, and Response considered H.R. 5460 
and reported the measure to the Full Committee, without 
amendment, by voice vote.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5460 on September 16, 
2016, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5460 to the House on September 
26, 2016, as H. Rpt. 114-788.
    The House considered H.R. 5460 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 26, 2016, and passed the measure by voice 
vote.
    H.R. 5460 was received in the Senate on September 27, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

 115th Congress
H.R. 687
    H.R. 687 was introduced in the House on January 24, 2017, 
by Mr. Payne, Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, and Mr. Donovan; and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The House considered H.R. 687 under Suspension of the Rules 
on January 31, 2017, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 687 was received in the Senate on February 1, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 687 were offered as an amendment during 
Committee consideration and included in Title III of H.R. 2825 
as reported by the Committee.

                                ------                                


           GAINS IN GLOBAL NUCLEAR DETECTION ARCHITECTURE ACT

                                H.R. 690

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to enhance certain 
duties of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-295), to direct the Domestic Nuclear Detection 
Office (DNDO) to develop and maintain documentation that 
provides information on how the Office's research investments 
align with gaps in the Global Nuclear Detection Architecture 
(GNDA) and the research challenges identified by the DNDO 
Director. It further directs DNDO to document the rationale for 
selecting research topics and to develop a systematic approach 
for evaluating how the outcomes of the Office's individual 
research projects collectively contribute to addressing the 
research challenges.

Legislative History

 114th Congress
H.R. 5391
    H.R. 5391 was introduced in the House on June 8, 2016, by 
Mr. Richmond; and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5391 on June 8, 2016, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5391 to the House on July 1, 
2016, as H. Rpt. 114-652.
    The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security sent a 
letter to the Speaker of the House on September 8, 2016, 
expressing disagreement to a jurisdictional claim by the 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology over H.R. 5391.
    The House considered H.R. 5391 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 27, 2016, and passed the measure, as 
amended, by voice vote.
    H.R. 5391 was received in the Senate on September 28, 2016, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

 115th Congress
H.R. 690
    H.R. 690 was introduced in the House on January 24, 2017, 
by Mr. Richmond; and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security.
    The Chair of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on January 30, 2017, that, in order to 
expedite consideration of H.R. 690 on the House floor, the 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology would not seek a 
sequential referral of H.R. 690. On the same date, the Chair of 
the Committee on Homeland Security responded agreeing to the 
jurisdictional interests of the Committee on Science, Space, 
and Technology and the expedited consideration on the House 
Floor.
    The House considered H.R. 690 under Suspension of the Rules 
on January 31, 2017, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 690 was received in the Senate on February 1, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CLEARANCE MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 
                                  ACT

                                H.R. 697

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to improve the 
management and administration of the security clearance 
processes throughout the Department of Homeland Security, and 
for other purposes.

Summary

    This legislation amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 
(Pub. L. 107-296) to require the Secretary of Homeland Security 
to conduct a review of the sensitivity level designations of 
national security positions within the Department to ensure 
employees with security clearances continue to need access to 
such sensitive information. The bill requires the Department 
conduct an accounting of workforce needs to better manage the 
costs of unnecessary background investigations and limit the 
number of positions that may be vulnerable to insider threats 
and targeting by foreign intelligence services.

Legislative History

 114th Congress
H.R. 3505
    H.R. 3505 was introduced in the House on September 15, 
2015, by Mr. Thompson of Mississippi; and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 3505 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and 
Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence 
considered H.R. 3505 on September 17, 2015, and reported the 
measure to the Full Committee with a favorable recommendation, 
without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 3505 on 
September 30, 2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House with a favorable recommendation, without amendment, 
by voice vote.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 3503 to 
the House on November 2, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-323.
    The House considered H.R. 3503 on November 2, 2015, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure, amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 3505 was received in the Senate on November 3, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security 
and Governmental Affairs.

 115th Congress
H.R. 697
    H.R. 697 was introduced in the House on January 24, 2017, 
by Mr. Thompson of Mississippi; and referred to the Committee 
on Homeland Security.
    The House considered H.R. 697 under Suspension of the Rules 
on January 31, 2017, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 697 was received in the Senate on February 1, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


    AVIATION EMPLOYEE SCREENING AND SECURITY ENHANCEMENT ACT OF 2017

                                H.R. 876

To reform programs of the Transportation Security 
Administration, and for other purposes. [To amend the Homeland 
Security Act of 2002 to reform programs of the Transportation 
Security Administration, and for other purposes.]

Summary

    This legislation is the culmination of an investigation by 
the Subcommittee on Transportation and Protective Security into 
airport access controls and the insider threat. Over the course 
of its multi-year investigation, the Subcommittee found 
numerous lapses in employee security at various airports across 
the country and issued a majority staff investigative report in 
February 2017 entitled ``America's Airports: The Threat From 
Within.'' The report included a number of proposed solutions to 
help mitigate the insider threat to aviation security, as well 
as detailed accounts of examples of insider threats posed to 
the aviation sector from employees with access to secure and 
sterile areas of airports. The legislation is needed in order 
to diminish these threats to aviation security.
    The bill requires the Comptroller General of the United 
States to review the cost and feasibility study required under 
Section 3 for its reliability and efficiency. This review is 
directed to be delivered to the appropriate Congressional 
committees. The bill also directs the Administrator to report 
to the appropriate Congressional committees on the results of 
the required assessment of credentialing standards, policies 
and practices for aviation workers. Additionally, the 
Administrator is required to report to the appropriate 
Congressional committees on the frequency, methodology and 
strategy of Administration-led employee inspection efforts, as 
well as a plan to conduct recurring reviews of the operational, 
technical, and management security controls for Administration 
information technology systems at airports.

Legislative History

    H.R. 876 was introduced in the House on February 6, 2017, 
by Mr. Katko and eight original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 876 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Transportation and 
Protective Security.
    The Subcommittee on Transportation and Protective Security 
was discharged from further consideration of H.R. 876 on March 
8, 2017.
    The Committee considered H.R. 876 on March 8, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Ways and Means sent a letter 
on April 25, 2017, agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on Ways and 
Means would not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 876. On that 
same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded, agreeing to the jurisdictional interests of the 
Committee on Ways and Means and the agreement to not seek a 
sequential referral.
    The Committee reported H.R. 876 to the House on April 25, 
2017, as H. Rpt. 115-94.
    The House considered H.R. 876 under Suspension of the Rules 
on April 25, 2017, and passed the measure, amended, by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 409 yeas and 0 nays (Roll No. 223). During 
consideration, the House agreed to amend the title so as to 
read: ``To reform programs of the Transportation Security 
Administration, and for other purposes.''.
    H.R. 876 was received in the Senate on April 26, 2017, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    Provisions of H.R. 876 were included in Title V of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.
    Provisions of H.R. 876 also were included in H.R. 302, the 
FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018.

                                ------                                


         COUNTERTERRORISM SCREENING AND ASSISTANCE ACT OF 2017

                           H.R. 1196 (S. 942)

To require a plan to combat international travel by terrorists 
and foreign fighters, accelerate the transfer of certain border 
security systems to foreign partner governments, establish 
minimum international border security standards, authorize the 
suspension of foreign assistance to countries not making 
significant efforts to comply with such minimum standards, and 
for other purposes.

Summary

Legislative History

H.R. 1196
    H.R. 1196 was introduced in the House on February 16, 2017, 
by Mr. Zelden, Mr. McCaul, and Ms. Sinema, and referred to the 
Committee on Foreign Affairs, the Committee on Homeland 
Security, and the Committee on the Judiciary. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 1196 was referred to the Subcommittee on Border 
and Maritime Security and the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism 
and Intelligence.
    The Committee on Foreign Affairs considered H.R. 1196 on 
July 19, 2017, and ordered the measure to be reported to the 
House, amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security sent a 
letter to the Chair of the Committee on Foreign Affairs on 
October 10, 2017, agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on Homeland 
Security would waive further consideration of H.R. 1196. The 
letter further requested the appointment of Conferees should a 
House-Senate Conference be called. On that same date, the Chair 
of the Committee on Foreign Affairs responded, acknowledging 
the jurisdictional interests of the Committee on Homeland 
Security and the agreement to waive further consideration, and 
support for the appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called.

S. 942
    S. 942, the Senate companion measure was introduced in the 
Senate on April 27, 2107, by Mr. Rubio and Mr. Coons, and 
referred to the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations.

                                ------                                


             DHS MULTIYEAR ACQUISITION STRATEGY ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 1249

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to require a 
multiyear acquisition strategy of the Department of Homeland 
Security, and for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 1249 requires DHS to develop a multi-year acquisition 
strategy as part of each Future Years Homeland Security Program 
to guide the overall direction of DHS acquisitions, while also 
allowing flexibility to deal with ever-changing threats and 
risks. Specifically, the strategy shall include, among other 
things, a prioritized list of acquisition investments based on 
mission, a plan to develop a reliable DHS-wide inventory of 
investments, and an identification of capabilities required to 
leverage emerging technology. This will help industry better 
understand, plan, and align resources to meet the future 
acquisition needs of the Department.

Legislative History

    H.R. 1249 was introduced in the House on February 28, 2017, 
by Mr. Fitzpatrick and Mr. McCaul and referred to the Committee 
on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 1249 on March 8, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1249 to the House on March 20, 
2017, as H. Rpt. 115-46.
    The House considered H.R. 1249 under Suspension of the 
Rules on March 20, 2017, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
a \2/3\ recorded vote of 409 yeas and 0 nays (Roll No. 174).
    H.R. 1249 was received in the Senate on March 21, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 1249 were included in Title II of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.

                                ------                                


                DHS ACQUISITION AUTHORITIES ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 1252

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to provide for 
certain acquisition authorities for the Under Secretary of 
Management of the Department of Homeland Security, and for 
other purposes.

Summary

    The purpose of H.R. 1252 is to amend the Homeland Security 
Act of 2002 to provide for certain acquisition authorities for 
the Under Secretary of Management of the Department of Homeland 
Security and for other purposes.
    H.R. 1252 establishes the Undersecretary for Management 
(USM) as the Department's Chief Acquisition Officer responsible 
for approving, pausing, modifying, or canceling major 
acquisition programs, as needed. The bill authorizes the USM to 
lead the Department's acquisition oversight body, the 
Acquisition Review Board, which oversees major acquisition 
programs, as well as establish acquisition policies to which 
all Department components shall comply.

Legislative History

    H.R. 1252 was introduced in the House on February 28, 2017, 
by Mr. Higgins of Louisiana and Mr. McCaul and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 1252 on March 8, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on March 10, 2017, agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 1252. On that same date, the Chair of the 
Committee on Homeland Security responded acknowledging the 
agreement to not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 1252 and 
the support for a request for Conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1252 to the House on March 20, 
2017, as H. Rpt. 115-47.
    The House considered H.R. 1252 under Suspension of the 
Rules on March 20, 2017, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
a \2/3\ recorded vote of 407 yeas and 1 nay (Roll No. 175).
    H.R. 1252 was received in the Senate on March 21, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 1252 were included in Title II of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.

                                ------                                


                     HSA TECHNICAL CORRECTIONS ACT

                               H.R. 1258

To make technical corrections to the Homeland Security Act of 
2002.

Summary

    The purpose of H.R. 1258 is to make technical corrections 
to the Homeland Security Act of 2002.

Legislative History

114th Congress
H.R. 3859
    H.R. 3859 was introduced in the House on October 29, 2015, 
by Mr. Perry and Mr. McCaul and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 3859 on November 4, 
2015, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, 
without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3859 to the House on November 
16, 2015, as H. Rpt. 114-333.
    The House considered H.R. 3859 under Suspension of the 
Rules on December 8, 2015, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 3859 was received in the Senate on December 9, 2015, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

115th Congress
H.R. 1258
    H.R. 1258 was introduced in the House on February 28, 2017, 
by Mr. Perry and Mr. McCaul and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 1258 on March 8, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1258 to the House on April 12, 
2017, as H. Rpt. 115-90.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on May 31, 2017, agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 1258.
    Provisions of H.R. 1258 were included in Title VII of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.

                                ------                                


                DHS ACQUISITION REVIEW BOARD ACT OF 2017

                           H.R. 1282 (S. 886)

To amend the Homeland Security of 2002 to establish Acquisition 
Review Boards in the Department of Homeland Security, and for 
other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 1282, the DHS Acquisition Review Board Act of 2017, 
seeks to ensure that the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) 
provide the accountability and consistency in oversight needed 
to manage components' major acquisition programs by authorizing 
the Acquisition Review Board (ARB).

Legislative History

    H.R. 1282 was introduced in the House on March 1, 2017, by 
Mr. Garrett and Mr. McCaul and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 1282 on March 8, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1282 to the House on March 23, 
2017, amended, as H. Rpt. 115-57.
    The House considered H.R. 1282 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 21, 2017, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 1282 was received in the Senate on June 22, 2017.
    Provisions of H.R. 1282 were included in Title II of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.

S. 886
    S. 886 was introduced in the Senate on April 6, 2017, by 
Mr. Daines and Mrs. McCaskill and referred to the Senate 
Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 886 on July 26, 2017, and ordered it 
reported to the Senate, without amendment.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 886 to the Senate on October 16, 2017, as 
S. Rpt. 115-170.
    The Senate passed S. 886 on November 9, 2017, as amended.
    S. 886 was received in the House on November 13, 2017, and 
held at the Desk.

                                ------                                


                REDUCING DHS ACQUISITION COST GROWTH ACT

                           H.R. 1294 (S. 906)

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to provide for 
congressional notification regarding major acquisition program 
breaches, and for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 1294 requires that DHS's major acquisition programs 
(those worth $300 million or more) be subject to greater 
Departmental and congressional oversight when they fail to meet 
(i.e. ``breach'') key cost, schedule, or performance 
requirements. H.R. 1294 will provide greater accountability to 
major acquisition programs and provides Congress with greater 
oversight of failing acquisition programs to prevent the waste 
of taxpayer dollars.

Legislative History

H.R. 1294
    H.R. 1294 was introduced in the House on March 1, 2017, by 
Mr. Rutherford and Mr. McCaul and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 1294 on March 8, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1294 to the House on March 20, 
2017, as H. Rpt. 115-45.
    The House considered H.R. 1294 under Suspension of the 
Rules on March 20, 2017, and passed the measure, without 
amendment, by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 408 yeas and 0 nays 
(Roll No. 173).
    H.R. 1294 was received in the Senate on March 21, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 1294 were included in Title II of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.

S. 906
    S. 906 was introduced in the Senate on April 7, 2017, by 
Mrs. McCaskill and Mr. Daines and referred to the Senate 
Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 906 on July 26, 2017, and ordered it 
reported to the Senate with an amendment.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 906 to the Senate on October 5, 2017, as S. 
Rpt. 115-165.
    The Senate passed S. 906 on November 9, 2017, as amended.
    S. 906 was received in the House on November 13, 2017, and 
held at the Desk.

                                ------                                


 QUADRENNIAL HOMELAND SECURITY REVIEW TECHNICAL CORRECTIONS ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 1297

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to make technical 
corrections to the requirement that the Secretary of Homeland 
Security submit quadrennial homeland security reviews, and for 
other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 1297, the Quadrennial Homeland Security Review 
Technical Corrections Act of 2017, amends the Homeland Security 
Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 107-296), revises the requirements for the 
Quadrennial Homeland Security Review (QHSR) to improve the 
quality and timeliness of the review that the Department of 
Homeland Security carries out. Namely, this legislation 
requires the Department of Homeland Security (``DHS'' or ``the 
Department'') to conduct a risk assessment to inform the QHSR, 
to complete more robust stakeholder engagement, and to maintain 
all documentation regarding the QHSR, including, but not 
limited to, all written communications sent out by the 
Secretary and feedback submitted to the Secretary, information 
on how feedback received by the Secretary informed the QHSR, 
and information regarding the risk assessment. Maintaining such 
documentation should allow Congress to conduct more effective 
oversight of DHS's decision-making process regarding the QHSR.

Legislative History

114th Congress
H.R. 5385

    H.R. 5385 was introduced in the House on June 7, 2016, by 
Mrs. Watson Coleman and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 5385 on June 8, 2016, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5385 to the House on July 5, 
2016, as H. Rpt. 114-662.
    The House considered H.R. 4785 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 11, 2016, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 4785 was received in the Senate on July 12, 2016, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

115th Congress
H.R. 1297
    H.R. 1297 was introduced in the House on March 1, 2017, by 
Mrs. Watson Coleman and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 1297 on March 8, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1297 to the House on March 16, 
2017, as H. Rpt. 115-41.
    The House considered H.R. 1297 under Suspension of the 
Rules on March 20, 2017, and passed the measure, without 
amendment, on March 21, 2017, by a recorded vote of 415 yeas 
and 0 nays, (Roll No. 181).
    H.R. 1297 was received in the Senate on March 22, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 1297 were included in Title I of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.

                                ------                                


       TERRORIST AND FOREIGN FIGHTER TRAVEL EXERCISE ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 1302

To require an exercise related to terrorist and foreign fighter 
travel, and for other purposes.

Summary

    In September 2015, the final report of the Committee on 
Homeland Security's Task Force on Combating Terrorist and 
Foreign Fighter Travel was published (Committee Print 114-B). 
The report, produced by a bipartisan panel, issued 32 findings 
and provided more than 50 recommendations for enhancing U.S. 
security. Among other conclusions, the Task Force report found 
that the growing complexity and changing nature of the foreign 
fighter security challenge may be creating unseen gaps in our 
defenses, yet it has been years since any large-scale ``stress 
test'' has been conducted on U.S. government protection and 
prevention programs against terrorist travel.
    The last major government exercise on terrorist travel 
occurred in 2009. That year, the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency (FEMA) managed an exercise centered on the ``aftermath 
of a notional terrorist event outside of the United States'' 
and how to prevent ``subsequent efforts by the terrorists to 
enter the United States and carry out additional attacks.'' The 
exercise tested how agencies at all levels of government would 
respond in such a scenario.
    The threat environment has since changed. The 2009 exercise 
centered on terrorists attempting to enter the country, but as 
the Task Force report noted, officials today should be just as 
concerned about Americans leaving the country to train overseas 
with terrorist groups as foreign fighters. Such individuals can 
represent a serious security threat to the United States, 
particularly upon their return to the country; thus, preventing 
them from joining extremists abroad in the first place should 
be a top law enforcement goal.
    Accordingly, the Task Force report recommended that the 
Administration should conduct an exercise designed around the 
foreign fighter threat to test all phases of extremist planning 
and travel in order to determine how partners at all levels of 
government in the United States and abroad are currently 
responding to these scenarios. Such an exercise would help 
identify weaknesses at home and abroad that may be exploited by 
terrorists and foreign fighters seeking to travel to and from 
the United States and overseas terrorist sanctuaries.

Legislative History

114th Congress
H.R. 4404
    H.R. 4404 was introduced in the House on February 1, 2016, 
by Ms. McSally and eight original cosponsors, and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4404 on February 2, 2016, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on March 9, 2016, agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 4404. The letter further requested the 
appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be 
called. The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security 
responded on March 11, 2016, acknowledging the cooperation of 
the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure with respect 
to the consideration of H.R. 4404.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4404 to the House on March 16, 
2016, as H. Rpt. 114-456.
    The House considered H.R. 4404 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 11, 2016, and passed the measure by voice vote.

115th Congress
H.R. 1302
    H.R. 1302 was introduced in the House on March 2, 2017, by 
Ms. McSally and nine original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 1302 on March 8, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 1302.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1302 to the House on March 16, 
2017, as H. Rpt. 115-40.
    The House considered H.R. 1302 under Suspension of the 
Rules on March 22, 2017, and on March 24, 2017, the House 
passed the measure, without amendment, by voice vote.
    H.R. 1302 was received in the Senate on March 27, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


              TSA ADMINISTRATOR MODERNIZATION ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 1309

To streamline the office and term of the Administrator of the 
Transportation Security Administration, and for other purposes.

                                SUMMARY

    The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) was 
originally created in 2001 as part of the Department of 
Transportation (DOT). However, when TSA and its functions were 
transferred from DOT to DHS via the Homeland Security Act of 
2002, the Administrator's position and 5-year term officially 
terminated. Since the Administrator's position and term did not 
transfer, DHS has been using one of the available Assistant 
Secretary positions for the Administrator.
    This creates problems with transparency and consistency. 
Since 2015, five different people have served as the TSA 
Administrator-both as appointees and as acting administrators. 
Additionally, Administrator Neffenger offered his resignation 
to President Trump in January 2017 after less than 2 years of 
service, since the 5-year term was no longer in effect. This 
bill addresses these issues and gaps by re-establishing the 
Administrator's position, level, and term, which will ensure 
more consistent leadership at TSA.

Legislative History

H.R. 1309
    H.R. 1309 was introduced in the House on March 2, 2017, by 
Mr. Katko, Mr. McCaul, Mr. Keating, and Mr. King of New York 
and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 1309 on March 8, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on March 13, 2017, agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 1309.
    The Chair of the Committee on Oversight and Government 
Reform sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security on March 13, 2017, agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 1309.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 1309 to 
the House on March 15, 2017, as H. Rpt. 1174-37.
    The House considered H.R. 1309 under Suspension of the 
Rules on March 20, 2017, and passed the measure, without 
amendment, by voice vote.
    H.R. 1309 was received in the Senate on March 21, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    Provisions of H.R. 1309 were included in Title V of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.
    Provisions of H.R. 876 were included in H.R. 302, the FAA 
Reauthorization Act of 2018.

                                ------                                


         STRENGTHENING OVERSIGHT OF TSA EMPLOYEE MISCONDUCT ACT

                               H.R. 1351

To amend title 49, United States Code, to direct the 
Administrator of the Transportation Security Administration 
(TSA) to make certain improvements in managing TSA's employee 
misconduct, and for other purposes.

Summary

    In July 2016, the Majority staff of the Subcommittee on 
Oversight and Management Efficiency and the Subcommittee on 
Transportation Security released their findings from a joint 
investigation into TSA's efforts to address employee misconduct 
in a report entitled ``Misconduct at TSA Threatens the Security 
of the Flying Public.'' In particular, the staff found that, 
according to TSA data, employee misconduct has grown over time-
by almost 29 percent from Fiscal Year 2013 to 2015. Moreover, 
the report detailed that most disciplinary and non-disciplinary 
penalties are given by lower level managers at airport 
checkpoints with potentially very little oversight by the 
airport's Federal Security Director (FSD), much less by 
headquarters.
    In order to ensure that TSA effectively delegates authority 
to the local level, TSA needs mechanisms to ensure that 
employees are adhering to guidance. If these are not 
implemented, TSA will likely be unable to ensure that 
misconduct declines over time. Although TSA has issued guidance 
related to employee conduct and expects that all employees 
review and adhere to it, it does not have mechanisms in place 
to ensure that the policy is implemented at the local level.
    H.R. 1351 is intended to better ensure consistency in the 
way TSA airport managers administer agency actions in response 
to employee misconduct and better position TSA to identify 
causes behind persistent employee misconduct. Specifically, 
H.R. 1351 requires the TSA Administrator to designate a senior 
official to oversee unannounced inspections at airports of 
agency actions taken to address employee misconduct to be 
completed at all airports within 5 fiscal years. The bill also 
requires the Administrator to designate a separate official to 
review the inspection results to identify causes of any 
variances or trends in the way actions are taken in response to 
TSA misconduct and to develop corrective actions to address 
such variances. H.R. 1351 also requires TSA to provide 
inspection results to the Department's Chief Human Capital 
Officer to review the results, identify trends, and make 
recommendations on ways to improve TSA employee misconduct. 
Finally, the bill requires the TSA Administrator to provide 
inspection results and any corrective actions to certain 
Congressional committees.

Legislative History

    H.R. 1351 was introduced in the House on March 2, 2017, by 
Mr. Perry and Mr. McCaul, and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 1351 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Transportation and Protective Security.
    The Subcommittee on Transportation and Protective Security 
was discharged from consideration of H.R. 1351 on May 3, 2017.
    The Committee considered H.R. 1351 on May 3, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by a recorded vote of 14 
yeas and 10 nays (Roll No. 8).

                                ------                                


         TRANSPARENCY IN TECHNOLOGICAL ACQUISITIONS ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 1353

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to require certain 
additional information to be submitted to Congress regarding 
the strategic 5-year technology investment plan of the 
Transportation Security Administration.

Summary

    Congress previously enacted legislation to require a 5-year 
technology investment plan for the Transportation Security 
Administration (TSA), in order to provide greater transparency 
for policymakers and stakeholders into the direction TSA 
intends to go in technology procurement. Unfortunately, TSA 
issued disparate strategic guidance among different documents, 
thus continuing to cause confusion among industry stakeholders. 
This legislation will ensure that TSA's 5-year plan is updated 
more consistently and that Congress and stakeholders are 
informed of any changes in procurement costs.

Legislative History

    H.R. 1353 was introduced in the House on March 2, 2017, by 
Miss Rice of New York, Mrs. Watson Coleman, and Mr. Keating, 
and Mr. Katko and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 1353 on March 8, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1353 to the House on March 20, 
2017, as H. Rpt. 115-44.
    The House considered H.R. 1353 under Suspension of the 
Rules on March 20, 2017, and passed the measure, without 
amendment, on March 21, 2017, by a recorded vote of 414 yeas 
and 2 nays, (Roll No. 178).
    H.R. 1353 was received in the Senate on March 22, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    Provisions of H.R. 1353 were included in Title V of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee.

                                ------                                


       DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ACQUISITION INNOVATION ACT

                               H.R. 1365

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to require certain 
acquisition innovation, and for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 1365 allows the Under Secretary for Management (USM) 
to designate an official to manage acquisition innovation 
activities in the Department. It also allows the USM to test 
emerging acquisition best practices, develop and distribute 
best practices and lessons learned, engage with private 
industry, and establish performance metrics to assess the 
effectiveness of acquisition innovation efforts. Additionally, 
H.R. 1365 requires the Secretary to provide a report to the 
House and Senate homeland security committees on the USM's 
implementation of acquisition innovation activities.

Legislative History

    H.R. 1365 was introduced in the House on March 6, 2017, by 
Mr. Correa and Mr. Thompson of Mississippi and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 1365 on March 8, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1365 to the House on March 20, 
2017, as H. Rpt. 115-48.
    The House considered H.R. 1365 under Suspension of the 
Rules on March 22, 2017, and on March 24, 2017, passed the 
measure, as amended, by a ? record vote of 424 yeas and 0 nays, 
(Roll No. 193).
    H.R. 1365 was received in the Senate on March 27, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 1365 were included in Title I of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, Below.

                                ------                                


                   HOMELAND SECURITY FOR CHILDREN ACT

                          H.R. 1372 (S. 1842)

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to ensure that the 
needs of children are considered in homeland security planning, 
and for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 1372 seeks to ensure that the needs of children are 
considered in homeland security planning. Specifically, the 
bill authorizes a technical expert at the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency (FEMA) to identify and integrate the needs of 
children into preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation 
activities. The bill would also include the consideration of 
children's needs into Departmental policy through the Office of 
Strategy, Policy, and Plans.

Legislative History

H.R. 1372
    H.R. 1372 was introduced in the House on March 6, 2017, by 
Mr. Payne and Mr. Thompson of Mississippi and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security, and in addition to the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
    The Committee considered H.R. 1372 on March 8, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on March 10, 2017, agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would waive further 
consideration of H.R. 1372. The Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security responded on March 16, 2017, agreeing to the 
jurisdictional interests of the Committee on Transportation 
Security and the agreement to waive further consideration.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1372 to the House on April 24, 
2017, as H. Rpt. 115-92, Pt. I.
    The House considered H.R. 1327 under Suspension of the 
Rules on April 25, 2017, and passed the measure, amended, by a 
voice vote.
    H.R. 1372 was received in the Senate on April 26, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 1372 were included in Title I of 
Division A and Division F of H.R. 2825, as reported by the 
Committee. See also action taken on H.R. 2825, below.

S. 1842
    S. 1842, the Senate companion measure was introduced in the 
Senate on September 19, 2017, by Mr. Daines and Ms. Hassan and 
referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 1842 on October 4, 2017, and ordered the 
measure reported with an Amendment in the Nature of a 
Substitute.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 1842 to the Senate on January 30, 2018, as 
S. Rpt. 115-201.

                                ------                                


  SECURING AMERICAN NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS AGAINST TERRORISM ACT OF 
                                  2017

                               H.R. 1486

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to provide funding 
to secure non-profit facilities from terrorist attacks, and for 
other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 1486 authorizes the Non-Profit Security Grant Program 
for the first time, recognizing the impact of this program on 
the security of non-profit organizations at risk of terrorist 
attacks, many of which have seen an increase in threats.

Legislative History

    H.R. 1486 was introduced in the House on March 9, 2017 by 
Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 1486 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications.
    The Committee considered H.R. 1486 on December 13, 2017, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, with a favorable recommendation, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 1486 to the House on January 9, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-495.
    The House considered H.R. 1486 on January 9, 2018, under 
Suspension of the Rules, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 1486 was received in the Senate on January 10, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 1486 were included in Title VI of H.R. 
2825, as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.

                                ------                                


               FIXING INTERNAL RESPONSE TO MISCONDUCT ACT

                               H.R. 2131

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to direct the Chief 
Human Capital Officer of the Department of Homeland Security to 
improve consistency regarding discipline and adverse actions in 
the Department's workforce, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The purpose of H.R. 2131 is to amend the Homeland Security 
Act of 2002 to direct the Chief Human Capital Officer of the 
Department of Homeland Security to improve consistency 
regarding discipline and adverse actions in the Department's 
workforce, and allows the Chief Human Capital Officer (CHCO) 
greater Departmental oversight of employee misconduct. This 
legislation requires the CHCO to establish a process to oversee 
Department compliance with policies regarding discipline and 
adverse actions and requires components to submit misconduct 
data to the CHCO which will then allow the CHCO to identify 
trends and causes of persistent employee misconduct. 
Additionally, H.R. 2131 directs the CHCO to establish, as 
necessary, working groups to address employee misconduct within 
the Department.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2131 was introduced in the House on April 25, 2017, by 
Mr. Higgins of Louisiana and Mr. McCaul, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 2131 on May 3, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Oversight and Government 
Reform sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security on June 21, 2017, agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on Oversight 
and Government Reform would not seek a sequential referral of 
H.R. 2131. On that same date, the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security responded, acknowledging the jurisdictional 
interests of the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, 
and the agreement to not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 
2131.
    The House considered H.R. 2131 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 21, 2017, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 2131 was received in the Senate on June 22, 2017, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


                TRAVELER REDRESS IMPROVEMENT ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 2132

To require the implementation of a redress process and review 
of the Transportation Security Administration's intelligence-
based screening rules for aviation security, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 2132 seeks to ensure a traveler, who has repeatedly 
received enhanced security screening at Transportation Security 
Administration checkpoints and believes they have wrongly been 
identified as posing a threat to aviation security, can receive 
timely redress from the Department of Homeland Security's 
Traveler Redress Inquiry Program, or DHS TRIP program.
    Specifically, this bill directs TSA to ensure that an 
individual who has received enhanced screening from TSA more 
than three times in a 60-day period can access the Department's 
redress process.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2132 was introduced in the House on April 25, 2017, by 
Mr. Katko, Mr. McCaul, and Mrs. Watson Coleman, and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 2132 on May 3, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The House considered H.R. 2132 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 20, 2017, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 2132 was received in the Senate on June 21, 2017, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    Provisions of H.R. 2132 were included in H.R. 302, the FAA 
Reauthorization Act of 2018.

                                ------                                


          IMPROVING FUSION CENTERS' ACCESS TO INFORMATION ACT

                               H.R. 2169

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to enhance 
information sharing in the Department of Homeland Security 
State, Local, and Regional Fusion Center Initiative, and for 
other purposes

Summary

    H.R. 2169 amends Section 210A of the Homeland Security Act 
of 2002 (Pub. L. 107-296) which pertains to the Department of 
Homeland Security State, Local and Regional Fusion Center 
Initiative. The bill requires the Secretary to conduct outreach 
to fusion centers to proactively identify gaps in information 
sharing and coordinate with the appropriate Federal agency to 
deploy or provide access to these systems or information 
sources as appropriate.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2169 was introduced in the House on April 26, 2017, by 
Mr. Katko, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. Keating, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 2169 on May 3, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 2169 to the House on June 6, 
2017, as H. Rpt. 115-120.
    The House considered H.R. 2169 under Suspension of the 
Rules on May 17, 2017, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 2169 was received in the Senate on May 18, 2017, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 2169 were included in Title III of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.

                                ------                                


                      PLUM ISLAND PRESERVATION ACT

                               H.R. 2182

To require the Comptroller General of the United States to 
submit a report to Congress on the alternatives for the final 
disposition of Plum Island, including preservation of the 
island for conservation, education, and research, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 2182 requires the Government Accountability Office 
(GAO) to assess the Department of Homeland Security's study 
regarding options for the disposition of Plum Island. The 
legislation requires GAO to assess the methodologies used by 
the Department in the study, determining whether these 
methodologies adequately support the study's findings. 
Additionally, the legislation suspends the requirement to sell 
Plum Island until a further review of the analysis of 
alternatives is conducted by the Department and the GAO.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2182 was introduced in the House on April 26, 2017, by 
Mr. Zelden, and seven original cosponsors and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on July 25, 2017, agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 2182. On that same date, the Chair of the 
Committee on Homeland Security responded, acknowledging the 
jurisdictional interests of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure and the agreement to expedite consideration. The 
letter further agreed to support the request for Conferees 
should a House-Senate Conference be called.
    The House considered H.R. 2182 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 25, 2017, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 2182 was received in the Senate on July 25, 2017.

                                ------                                


              COMMUNITY COUNTERTERRORISM PREPAREDNESS ACT

                               H.R. 2188

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish the 
major metropolitan area counterterrorism training and exercise 
grant program, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The Community Counterterrorism Preparedness Act (H.R. 2188) 
authorizes $39 million for emergency response providers in 
major metropolitan areas to conduct training and exercises to 
prevent, prepare for, and respond to emerging terrorist attack 
scenarios, including complex, coordinated attacks and active 
shooters.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2188 was introduced in the House on April 27, 2017, by 
Mr. McCaul and 17 original cosponsors, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 2188 on May 3, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 2188 to the House on June 15, 
2017, as H. Rpt. 115-181.
    Provisions of H.R. 2188, as amended, were included in Title 
VI of H.R. 2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action 
taken on H.R. 2825, below.

                                ------                                


                     STREAMLINING DHS OVERHEAD ACT

                               H.R. 2190

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to direct the Under 
Secretary for Management of the Department of Homeland Security 
to make certain improvements in managing the Department's real 
property portfolio, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The purpose of H.R. 2190 is to amend the Homeland Security 
Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 107-296) to direct the Under Secretary for 
Management of the Department of Homeland Security to make 
certain improvements in managing the Department's real property 
portfolio. The Streamlining DHS Overhead Act mandates the 
development of regional real property strategies that focus on 
co-locating components and consolidating the number of leases 
and square footage within the DHS real property portfolio. It 
also requires the components to share more data on their real 
property portfolios with headquarters and gives the Under 
Secretary for Management additional oversight authorities, 
which will help DHS make more informed management decisions 
with respect to its real property portfolio. Finally, the bill 
authorizes a Chief Facilities and Logistics Officer within the 
Department.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2190 was introduced in the House on April 27, 2017, by 
Mr. Rutherford, and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 2190 on May 3, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 2190 to the House on June 20, 
2017, as H. Rpt. 115-184.
    The House considered H.R. 2190 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 20, 2017, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 2190 was received in the Senate on June 21, 2017, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


           ANTI-BORDER CORRUPTION REAUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2017

                           H.R. 2213 (S. 595)

To amend the Anti-Border Corruption Act of 2010 to authorize 
certain polygraph waiver authority, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The Anti-Border Corruption Reauthorization Act of 2017 
(H.R. 2213) expands the authority of U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection (CBP) to waive the administration of polygraph 
examinations for civilian and military applicants for law 
enforcement positions within CBP. This expanded waiver 
authority terminates five years after the enactment of the 
bill.
    U.S. Border Patrol Agents and Office of Field Operations 
Officers are the most important border security resource we 
have. The technology and infrastructure deployed along the 
southwest border is useless without well-trained agents or 
officers present to make an arrest, interdict a drug load, 
screen cargo from a country of concern, or facilitate 
legitimate transit through a port of entry.
    However, CBP is critically understaffed and well below its 
congressionally mandated staffing levels. Even with a recent 
push to hire more officers and agents, the process is slow and 
arduous, as attrition remains a problem, without the ability to 
quickly hire new ones. At the current hiring rate, 
approximately 150-200 applicants go through the process to hire 
just one agent or officer. This means CBP needs to have 
hundreds of thousands of people apply just to meet their 
current needs. Hiring more agents and officers will boost our 
national security and support our economy.
    The Committee believes that these small changes will 
provide CBP with immediate, albeit temporary, relief so that 
they are able to quickly, yet judiciously, hire officers and 
agents from a pool of applicants that already maintain the 
public's trust and put their lives on the line for our security 
and safety on a daily basis.

Legislative History

H.R. 2213
    H.R. 2213 was introduced in the House on April 27, 2017, by 
Ms. McSally, Mr. McCaul, Mr. Hurd, Mr. Carter of Texas, Mr. 
Cuellar, Mr. Roe of Tennessee, and Mr. Vela, and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 2213 on May 3, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 2213 to the House on June 6, 
2017, as H. Rpt. 115-121.
    The Committee on Rules met on June 6, 2017, and granted a 
Rule providing for the consideration of H.R. 2213. Rule filed 
in the House as H. Res. 374, H. Rpt. 115-162.
    The House considered H. Res. 374 on June 7, 2017, and 
adopted the Rule by a recorded vote of 231 yeas and 185 nays 
(Roll No. 289). The House then considered H.R. 2213 under the 
provisions of H. Res. 374 and passed the measure, as amended, 
by a recorded vote of 282 yeas and 137 nays (Roll No. 294).
    H.R. 2213 was received in the Senate on June 8, 2017, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

S. 595
    S. 595 was introduced in the Senate on March 9, 2017, by 
Mr. Flake, Mr. McCain, and Mr. Johnson; read twice, and 
referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 595 on May 17, 2017, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate, amended.

                                ------                                


   BORDER ENFORCEMENT SECURITY TASK FORCE REAUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2017

                          H.R. 2281 (S. 1199)

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to reauthorize the 
Border Enforcement Security Task Force program within the 
Department of Homeland Security, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The Border Enforcement Security Task Force Reauthorization 
Act of 2017 (H.R. 2281) reauthorizes BEST units originally 
established in 2005, in response to the significant increase in 
violence along the southwest border. BEST units are led by U.S. 
Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Homeland Security 
Investigations (HSI), in partnership with U.S. Customs and 
Border Protection, as well as other federal, state, local, and 
international law enforcement officials.
    H.R. 2281 would update these units by mandating the 
participation of both a Coast Guard Investigative Service 
Special Agent, and a uniformed Coast Guard Intelligence Officer 
on every maritime BEST unit. Requiring the Coast Guard to 
assign personnel to maritime BEST units will allow for the 
dissemination of maritime-based intelligence to other 
participating agencies, furthering the interdiction of illicit 
maritime activity within Coast Guard's unique jurisdiction, 
where other Federal, State, or local entities may be better 
positioned to act.
    Transnational Criminal Organizations (TCOs) have actively 
competed for control of various drug and human trafficking 
corridors along the southwest border of the United States, 
which has led to an escalation of violence on the Mexican side 
of the border.
    BEST criminal investigations focus on TCOs that operate 
drug distribution networks across the borders and throughout 
the interior of the United States.
    To date, a total of 44 BESTs have been initiated across 16 
States and in Puerto Rico. These teams comprise over 1,000 
members who represent over 100 law enforcement agencies who 
have jointly committed to investigate transnational criminal 
activity along the southwest and northern borders and at major 
U.S. seaports.
    While BESTs have been highly successful with over 13,000 
criminal arrests and large amounts of seized narcotics, 
contraband, weapons, and bulk cash, the current authorization 
does not reflect changes in the border security landscape. An 
update to BESTs is necessary to account for the establishment 
of DHS Joint Task Forces and the shift in strategic priorities 
toward securing our border and coastal waters, and dismantling 
TCOs.

Legislative History

H.R. 2281
    H.R. 2281 was introduced in the House on May 2, 2017, by 
Mr. Vela, Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, Mr. Richmond, Ms. 
McSally, Mr. Correa, and Ms. Barragan, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 2281 on May 3, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 2281 to the House on June 6, 
2017, as H. Rpt. 115-122.
    The House agreed on May 17, 2017, to Suspend the Rules and 
passed H.R. 2281, as amended, by voice vote.
    H.R. 2281 was received in the Senate on May 18, 2017, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

S. 1199
    S. 1199 was introduced in the Senate on May 22, 2017, by 
Ms. McCaskill, read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee 
on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 1199 on July 26, 2017, and on October 30, 
2017, reported S. 1199 to the Senate as S. Rpt. 115-179.

                                ------                                


   DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MORALE, RECOGNITION, LEARNING AND 
                         ENGAGEMENT ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 2283

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to improve morale 
within the Department of Homeland Security workforce by 
conferring new responsibilities to the Chief Human Capital 
Officer, establishing an employee engagement steering 
committee, requiring action plans, and authorizing an annual 
employee award program, and for other purposes

Summary

    The purpose of H.R. 2283 is to amend the Homeland Security 
Act of 2002 to improve morale, employee engagement, and 
communications within the Department of Homeland Security 
workforce by conferring new responsibilities to the Chief Human 
Capital Officer, establishing an employee engagement steering 
committee, requiring action plans, authorizing an annual 
employee award program, and directing an independent, 
Department-wide review of how discipline is applied by 
components.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2283 was introduced in the House on May 2, 2017, by 
Mr. Thompson of Mississippi and 11 original cosponsors, and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 2283 on May 3, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The House considered H.R. 2283 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 20, 2017, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 2283 was received in the Senate on June 21, 2017, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 2283 were included in Title I of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.

                                ------                                


            PATHWAYS TO IMPROVING HOMELAND SECURITY AT THE 
                            LOCAL LEVEL ACT

                               H.R. 2427

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002, to direct the 
Assistant Secretary for State and Local Law Enforcement to 
produce and disseminate an annual catalog on Department of 
Homeland Security training, publications, programs, and 
services for State, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies, 
and for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 2427, the Pathways to Improving Homeland Security at 
the Local Level Act, ensures that State and local law 
enforcement will continue to receive valuable information on 
DHS resources and programs available to law enforcement.
    The bill requires the Office for State and Local Law 
Enforcement to produce and disseminate an annual catalog that 
summarizes opportunities for training, publications, programs, 
and services available to non-Federal law enforcement agencies 
from the Department of Homeland Security, and to disseminate 
the catalog to State and local law enforcement entities within 
30 days of production.
    This also requires DHS to share the catalog through the 
Homeland Security Information Network. By requiring the Office 
to share this catalog through this existing information sharing 
platform, it will expand the number of State and local law 
enforcement partners who receive it.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2427 was introduced in the House on June 6, 2017, by 
Mrs. Demings and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security 
and the Committee on the Judiciary. Within the Committee, H.R. 
2427 was referred to the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and 
Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence 
considered H.R. 2427 on May 18, 2017, and reported the measure 
to the Full Committee for consideration with a favorable 
recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on the Judiciary sent a letter 
to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on September 
5, 2017, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration of 
H.R. 2427, the Committee on the Judiciary would waive further 
consideration of H.R. 2427. The letter further requested 
support for the appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called.
    The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security sent a 
letter to the Chair of the Committee on the Judiciary on 
September 6, 2017, acknowledging the jurisdictional interests 
of the Committee on the Judiciary and the agreement to waive 
further consideration of H.R. 2427. The letter further stated 
the support for the appointment of Conferees should a House-
Senate Conference be called.
    The House considered H.R. 2427 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 12, 2017, and passed the measure, as 
amended, by voice vote.
    H.R. 2427 was received in the Senate on September 13, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 2427 were included in Title III of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.

                                ------                                


 HOMELAND SECURITY ASSESSMENT OF TERRORISTS USE OF VIRTUAL CURRENCIES 
                                  ACT

                               H.R. 2433

To direct the Under Secretary of Homeland Security for 
Intelligence and Analysis to develop and disseminate a threat 
assessment regarding terrorist use of virtual currency.

Summary

    H.R. 2433 directs the Department of Homeland Security Under 
Secretary for Intelligence and Analysis, in coordination with 
other federal partners, to develop and disseminate a threat 
assessment regarding the actual and potential threat posed by 
individuals using virtual currency to carry out activities in 
furtherance of an act of terrorism, including the provision of 
material support to a foreign terrorist organization. The bill 
requires the Department to share the assessment with relevant 
state and local law enforcement partners.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2433 was introduced in the House on June 6, 2017, by 
Miss Rice of New York and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 2433 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence 
considered H.R. 2433 on May 18, 2017, and reported the measure 
to the Full Committee for consideration with a favorable 
recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The House considered H.R. 2433 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 12, 2017, and passed the measure, without 
amendment, by voice vote.
    H.R. 2433 was received in the Senate on September 13, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 2433 were included in Title III of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.

                                ------                                


 FEDERAL INFORMATION RESOURCE TO STRENGTHEN TIES WITH STATE AND LOCAL 
                      LAW ENFORCEMENT ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 2442

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to require an annual 
report on the Office for State and Local Law Enforcement.

Summary

    H.R. 2442 amends Section 2006(b) of the Homeland Security 
Act to require the Office for State and Local Law Enforcement 
(OSLLE) to provide an annual report on their activities for 
next 5 years. This report must include details of the efforts 
of the office to coordinate with and improve information 
sharing between the DHS component agencies, and State, local, 
and tribal law enforcement; a review of efforts made to improve 
information sharing through the DHS Homeland Security 
Information Network (HSIN); the status of performance metrics 
OSLLE uses; feedback they receive from State, local, and tribal 
partners; and a description of other ongoing efforts to meet 
their statutory mandates.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2442 was introduced in the House on June 6, 2017, by 
Ms. Jackson Lee and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security and the Committee on the Judiciary. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 2442 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Counterterrorism and Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence 
considered H.R. 2442 on May 18, 2017, and reported the measure 
to the Full Committee for consideration with a favorable 
recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on the Judiciary sent a letter 
to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on September 
5, 2017, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration of 
H.R. 2442, the Committee on the Judiciary would waive further 
consideration of H.R. 2442. The letter further requested 
support for the appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called.
    The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security sent a 
letter to the Chair of the Committee on the Judiciary on 
September 6, 2017, acknowledging the jurisdictional interests 
of the Committee on the Judiciary and the agreement to waive 
further consideration of H.R. 2442. The letter further stated 
the support for the appointment of Conferees should a House-
Senate Conference be called.
    The House considered H.R. 2442 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 12, 2017, and passed the measure, as 
amended, by voice vote.
    H.R. 2442 was received in the Senate on September 12, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 2442 were included in Title III of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.

                                ------                                


   DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CLASSIFIED FACILITY INVENTORY ACT

                               H.R. 2443

To require an inventory of all facilities certified by the 
Department of Homeland Security to host infrastructure or 
systems classified above the Secret level, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 2443 requires the Secretary of Homeland Security, to 
the extent practicable, to maintain and update an inventory of 
all facilities certified by the Department to house classified 
infrastructure or systems above the SECRET level. The bill also 
requires the Secretary to share the inventory, as appropriate, 
with Departmental and other governmental personnel.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2443 was introduced in the House on June 6, 2017, by 
Mr. Barletta and Mr. McCaul, and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security and the Committee on the Judiciary. Within 
the Committee, H.R. 2443 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Counterterrorism and Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence 
considered H.R. 2443 on May 18, 2017, and reported the measure 
to the Full Committee for consideration with a favorable 
recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The House considered H.R. 2443 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 12, 2017, and passed the measure, as 
amended, by voice vote.
    H.R. 2443 was received in the Senate on September 12, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 2443 were included in Title III of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.

                                ------                                


       DHS INTELLIGENCE ROTATIONAL ASSIGNMENT PROGRAM ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 2453

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish the 
Intelligence Rotational Assignment Program in the Department of 
Homeland Security, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This bill requires the Secretary of Homeland Security to 
establish the ``Intelligence Rotational Assignment Program'' to 
be administered by the Department's Chief Human Capital 
Officer, in conjunction with the Chief Intelligence Officer. 
The rotation program shall to be open to employees serving in 
existing analyst positions with the Department's Intelligence 
Enterprise (DHS IE), as well as other DHS employees, as 
appropriate. The responsibilities and requirements that apply 
to the DHS Rotation Program shall also apply to the 
Intelligence Rotational Assignment Program.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2453 was introduced in the House on June 6, 2017, by 
Mr. Gallagher and Mr. McCaul, and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 2453 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence 
considered H.R. 2453 on May 18, 2017, and reported the measure 
to the Full Committee for consideration with a favorable 
recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the House Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence sent a letter on September 8, 2017, to the Chair 
of the Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order 
to expedite consideration of H.R. 2453 on the House Floor, the 
Select Committee on Intelligence would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 2453. The Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security responded on September 11, 2017, acknowledging the 
jurisdictional interests of the Select Committee on 
Intelligence and the agreement to forego a request for a 
sequential referral of H.R. 2453. The letter further agreed to 
support the request for Conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called.
    H.R. 2453 was received in the Senate, read twice, and 
referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs.
    The House considered H.R. 2453 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 11, 2017, and passed the measure, without 
amendment, by voice vote.

                                ------                                


                UNIFYING DHS INTELLIGENCE ENTERPRISE ACT

                               H.R. 2468

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish a 
homeland intelligence doctrine for the Department of Homeland 
Security, and for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 2468 requires the Secretary, acting through the Chief 
Intelligence Officer and in coordination with other DHS 
entities, to develop and disseminate Department-wide guidance 
regarding the processing, analysis, production, and 
dissemination of homeland security information and terrorism 
information. The bill also amends section 201(e)(1) of the 
Homeland Security Act to include the requirement that the 
Secretary provide the Chief Intelligence Officer with an 
experienced and qualified staff.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2468 was introduced in the House on June 6, 2017, by 
Mr. Perry and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security 
and the Committee on the Judiciary. Within the Committee, H.R. 
2468 was referred to the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and 
Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence 
considered H.R. 2468 on May 18, 2017, and reported the measure 
to the Full Committee for consideration with a favorable 
recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the House Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence sent a letter on September 8, 2017, to the Chair 
of the Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order 
to expedite consideration of H.R. 2468 on the House Floor, the 
Select Committee on Intelligence would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 2468. The Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security responded on September 11, 2017, acknowledging the 
jurisdictional interests of the Select Committee on 
Intelligence and the agreement to forego a request for a 
sequential referral of H.R. 2468. The letter further agreed to 
support the request for Conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called.
    The House considered H.R. 2468 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 12, 2017, and passed the measure, as 
amended, by voice vote.
    H.R. 2468 was received in the Senate on September 13, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 2468 were included in Title III of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.

                                ------                                


                     HOMELAND THREAT ASSESSMENT ACT

                               H.R. 2470

To require an annual homeland threat assessment, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    Within 180 days of enactment and then annually for five 
years, H.R. 2468 requires the Secretary to conduct a terror 
threat assessment to the homeland. This assessment must utilize 
information gathered by the Department of Homeland Security 
(DHS), and its component agencies as well as information 
provided through National Network of Fusion Centers.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2470 was introduced in the House on June 6, 2017, by 
Mr. Rogers and Mr. McCaul, and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 2470 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence 
considered H.R. 2470 on May 18, 2017, and reported the measure 
to the Full Committee for consideration with a favorable 
recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the House Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence sent a letter on September 8, 2017, to the Chair 
of the Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order 
to expedite consideration of H.R. 2470 on the House Floor, the 
Select Committee on Intelligence would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 2470. The Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security responded on September 11, 2017, acknowledging the 
jurisdictional interests of the Select Committee on 
Intelligence and the agreement to forego a request for a 
sequential referral of H.R. 2470. The letter further agreed to 
support the request for Conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called.
    The House considered H.R. 2470 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 12, 2017, and passed the measure, without 
amendment, by voice vote.
    H.R. 2470 was received in the Senate on September 13, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 2470 were included in Title III of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.

                                ------                                


  TERRORIST RELEASE ANNOUNCEMENTS TO COUNTER EXTREMIST RECIDIVISM ACT

                               H.R. 2471

To direct the Secretary of Homeland Security to share with 
State, local, and regional fusion centers release information 
from a Federal correctional facility, including name, charging 
date, and expected place and date of release, of certain 
individuals who may pose a terrorist threat, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 2471 directs the Secretary, in coordination with other 
appropriate Federal officials, to provide fusion centers and 
other law enforcement entities, as appropriate, with release 
information related to individuals incarcerated for terror-
related offenses as defined under Title 18 U.S.C. Section 
2332b.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2471 was introduced in the House on June 6, 2017, by 
Mr. Rutherford and Mr. McCaul, and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 2471 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence 
considered H.R. 2471 on May 18, 2017, and reported the measure 
to the Full Committee for consideration with a favorable 
recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The House considered H.R. 2471 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 12, 2017, and passed the measure, as 
amended, by voice vote.
    H.R. 2471 was received in the Senate on September 13, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 2471 were included in Title III of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.

                                ------                                


               STRONG VISA INTEGRITY SECURES AMERICA ACT

                               H.R. 2626

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 and the Immigration 
and Nationality Act to improve visa security, visa applicant 
vetting, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The Strong Visa Integrity Secures America Act (H.R. 2626) 
enhances visa screening procedures at U.S. Embassy posts 
overseas. The bill authorizes the Department of Homeland 
Security (DHS) to assign counterterrorism personnel and 
biometric screening technology to at least thirty U.S. Embassy 
posts around the world to vet and screen all visa applicants 
against the appropriate criminal, national security, and 
terrorism databases maintained by the federal government. The 
bill also requires U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to 
utilize facial recognition and other biometric technology when 
available to screen Visa Waiver Program travelers at airports.
    Despite a series of improvements made to the visa security 
screening process since 2001, terrorists and other malicious 
actors continue to seek to exploit the visa process to enter 
the United States. No fewer than 37 terror attacks and plots 
may have been stopped by increased visa security measures. The 
Homeland Security Act of 2002 authorized the creation of U.S. 
Immigration and Customs Enforcement's Visa Security Program 
(VSP) for the purpose of interdicting individuals who seek to 
exploit the visa process to enter the United States.
    ICE agents assigned to the VSPs provide an additional layer 
of security beyond the existing background security checks 
against intelligence community holdings. VSP Agents help 
adjudicate discrepancies, resolve false name matches, conduct 
additional investigations, liaise with host government security 
officials and, in the process, keep suspected terrorists from 
landing on American soil.
    Supporting these efforts is ICE's PATRIOT program. The 
PATRIOT system remotely vets visa applications against law 
enforcement, intelligence and immigration databases to confirm 
identity, reduce false positives, and quickly identify 
applicants of concern. This early vetting gives ICE critical 
lead time to develop new investigations, advance ongoing 
operations, and coordinate with State Department officers to 
fill any information gaps through interviews of the applicants.
    Imposters, or those who present valid travel documents 
belonging to another person, have long been a detection 
challenge for CBP Officers at ports of entry. To confirm 
identity and reduce the fraudulent documents accepted at the 
Nation's ports of entry, CBP has conducted a series of pilots 
to test facial recognition matching technology at several 
international airports. Electronic passports contain a 
photograph that can be read and then matched to ensure that the 
person attempting entry is in fact the true bearer of the 
travel documents. Preventing imposters from using another's 
legitimate travel document increases security.
    Other gaps addressed in H.R. 2626 include the student visa 
process, which requires matching of a paper-based I-20 form 
issued by colleges and universities, along with the computer-
based Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS), 
to identify whether a student qualifies to be admitted into the 
United States. This two-part system of paper I-20 and computer-
based SEVIS matching revealed a gap in the course of the Boston 
Marathon bombing investigation.
    Specifically, Azamat Tazhayakov, a national of Kazakhstan 
and friend of the Tsarnayov brothers, departed the United 
States in December 2012 after he was academically dismissed 
from the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. Tazhayakov's I-
20 document was terminated as a result of his dismissal, but he 
nonetheless retained it. Tazhayakov was able to reenter the 
United States through a port of entry on January 20, 2013, 
presenting the no-longer valid I-20. As a result, H.R. 2626 
requires DHS to make SEVIS information available to CBP 
Officers conducting primary inspections at each port of entry 
to close this gap. SEVIS access by CBP would be limited under 
H.R. 2626 to screening at ports of entry and conducting primary 
and secondary inspections.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2626 was introduced in the House on May 24, 2017, by 
Mr. Hurd, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. Katko and referred to the 
Committee on the Judiciary and in addition to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 22626 was 
referred to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security.
    The Chair discharged the Subcommittee on Border and 
Maritime Security from further consideration of H.R. 2626 on 
July 26, 2017.
    The Committee considered H.R. 2626 on July 26, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 2626 to the House on August 8, 
2017, as H. Rpt. 115-273, Pt. I.
    Provisions of H.R. 2626 were included in Title III of H.R. 
4760 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 4760.
    Provisions of H.R. 2626 were included in Title III of H.R. 
6136 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 6136.

                                ------                                


       DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2017

     H.R. 2825 (H.R. 437, H.R. 526, H.R. 549, H.R. 584, H.R. 642, 
      H.R. 665, H.R. 666, H.R. 677, H.R. 678, H.R. 687, H.R. 876, 
      H.R. 1249, H.R. 1252, H.R. 1258, H.R. 1282, H.R. 1282, H.R. 
     1294, H.R. 1297, H.R. 1309, H.R. 1353, H.R. 1372, H.R. 1486, 
      H.R. 2132, H.R. 2169, H.R. 2188, H.R. 2283, H.R. 2427, H.R. 
     2433, H.R. 2442, H.R. 2443, H.R. 2454, H.R. 2468, H.R. 2470, 
         H.R. 2471, H.R. 2543, H.R. 2805, H.R. 2831, H.R. 3284)

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to make certain 
improvements in the laws administered by the Secretary of 
Homeland Security, and for other purposes.

Summary

    In the aftermath of the September 11th terrorist attacks on 
our Nation, President Bush and Congress examined ways to 
improve our national security. This led to the creation of the 
Department of Homeland Security through the passage of the 
Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 107-296). Since this 
original authorization 15 years ago, DHS has never been 
reauthorized. It has received guidance from annual 
appropriations legislation, but it has not received the 
thorough guidance that comes from a comprehensive authorization 
of its activities.
    One of the most important responsibilities of Congress is 
to assert its Article I authority and pass authorizing 
legislation that provides direction to key offices and missions 
of Federal agencies.
    The United States faces dynamic national security 
challenges brought forth by terrorists, human traffickers, drug 
smugglers, and state and non-state actors waging a silent war 
in cyberspace. America's enemies are agile and are constantly 
looking for ways to inflict damage. Our government and our 
nation must stay ahead of these ever-evolving threats by 
reforming and improving the Department of Homeland Security 
through a first ever reauthorization.
    The purpose of H.R. 2825 is to authorize the activities of 
the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) by asserting 
Congress's Article I authority to legislate and provide 
authority and direction to DHS. It is the proper role of 
Congress to provide proper guidance to ensure that the 
Department's structure and focus are best linked to securing 
the homeland. This bill provides oversight of and direction to 
the Department in numerous areas to ensure that it is 
effectively carrying out the mission of securing the homeland.
    H.R. 2825 aims to create efficiencies and streamline 
programs and offices by clarifying and uniting the offices that 
constitute ``DHS Headquarters.''
    Further, this legislation integrates existing DHS 
intelligence systems and data sets into the data framework; 
creates a FEMA Chief Management Official to achieve further 
efficiencies and accountability modernizing internal functions; 
strengthens the role of the Under Secretary for Management to 
implement efficiencies across components to better ensure 
proper oversight and accountability; and requires DHS to review 
the organization of its offices with research and development 
and chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosives 
activities to ensure an efficient and streamlined 
organizational structure that eliminates duplication.
    This legislation protects taxpayer dollars and holds DHS 
accountable by directing the Department to develop a multi-year 
acquisition strategy resulting in major acquisitions programs 
be subject to greater Departmental oversight throughout the 
acquisition process to ensure they meet key cost, schedule and 
performance requirements.
    Further, H.R. 2825 mandates DHS to find cost savings 
through real property consolidation and other common sense 
efforts, strengthens the role of the Chief Information Officer 
to forge stronger information technology collaboration to save 
taxpayer dollars; empowers the Chief Financial Officer to 
continue progress made on the Department's financial statement 
audits and improve internal controls to better safeguard 
against waste, fraud, and abuse; and ensures terrorism grant 
funds are used efficiently to close identified capability gaps 
while mandating a transparent system that measures the return 
on these investments.
    Finally, H.R. 2825 support America's front-line defenders 
and first responders and improves the security of our Nation.
    The legislation provides resources, including training and 
equipment, to first responders to counter existing and evolving 
terrorist threats; improves agency morale by implementing 
workforce planning efforts; eliminates unnecessary and 
duplicative human capital policies; better addresses employee 
misconduct; maintains support for State and local law 
enforcement presence at airports; ensures the FEMA 
Administrator has the benefit of expert law enforcement advice; 
and allows DHS to better focus on recruiting, retraining, and 
training a qualified workforce.
    The legislation makes important enhancements to information 
sharing efforts within DHS and between the Department and 
State, local, Tribal and territorial partners. It provides 
resources to secure passenger surface transportation and 
improve security at our Nation's ports; directs the Department 
to share with State, local and regional fusion centers release 
information of certain individuals convicted of terrorism; 
improves airport access controls, employee vetting, perimeter 
security, and insider threat mitigation efforts; and expands 
the use of explosive-detecting K-9 teams.

Legislative History

    H.R. 2825 was introduced in the House on June 8, 2017, by 
Mr. McCaul and Mr. Higgins of Louisiana, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 2825 on June 14, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence 
sent a letter to the Chair of Committee on Homeland Security on 
June 22, 2017, agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration of H.R. 2825 on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Intelligence would not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 2825. 
On that same date, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security responded acknowledging the jurisdictional interests 
of the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and the 
agreement to not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 2825. The 
letter further agreed to support the request for Conferees 
should a House-Senate Conference be called.
    The Chair of the Committee on Oversight and Government 
Reform sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security on June 22, agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on Oversight 
and Government Reform would not seek a sequential referral of 
H.R. 2825.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on June 23, agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 2825.
    The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security sent a 
letter to the Chair of the Committee on Oversight and 
Government Reform on June 27, 2017, acknowledging the 
jurisdictional interests of Committee on Oversight and 
Government Reform and the agreement to not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 2825. The letter further agreed to support the 
request for Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be 
called.
    The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security sent a 
letter to the Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure on June 27, 2017, acknowledging the 
jurisdictional interests of Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure and the agreement to not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 2825. The letter further agreed to support the 
request for Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be 
called.
    The Chair of the Committee on Ways and Means sent a letter 
to the Chair of Committee on Homeland Security on June 27, 
2017, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration of H.R. 
2825 on the House Floor, the Committee on Ways and Means would 
not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 2825. On that same date, 
the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded 
acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the Committee on 
Ways and Means and the agreement to not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 2825. The letter further agreed to support the 
request for Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be 
called.
    The Committee reported H.R. 2825 to the House on June 28, 
2017, as H. Rpt. 115-198.
    As reported, the text of the following measures was 
included in H.R. 2825, for prior actions see above: H.R. 526, 
H.R. 549, H.R. 584, H.R. 642, H.R. 665, H.R. 666, H.R. 678, 
H.R. 687, H.R. 876, H.R. 1249, H.R. 1252, H.R. 1258, H.R. 1282, 
H.R. 1282, H.R. 1294, H.R. 1297, H.R. 1309, H.R. 1353, H.R. 
2132, H.R. 2169, H.R. 2188, H.R. 2283, H.R. 2427, H.R. 2433, 
H.R. 2442, H.R. 2443, H.R. 2454, H.R. 2468, H.R. 2470, H.R. 
2471, H.R. 2543, H.R. 2805, and H.R. 2831.
    The Committee on Rules met on July 18, 2017, and granted a 
Rule providing that it shall be in order at any time on the 
legislative day of July 20, 2017, for the Speaker to entertain 
motions that the House suspend the rules relating to the bill 
H.R. 2825. Rule filed in the House as H. Res. 454, H. Rpt. 115-
235.
    The Chair of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology would not seek a sequential referral of 
H.R. 2825. On that same date, the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security responded acknowledging the jurisdictional 
interests of the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology 
and the agreement to not seek a sequential referral of H.R. 
2825. The letter further agreed to support the request for 
Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be called.
    The House considered H. Res. 454 on July 19, 2017, and 
passed the Rule by a recorded vote of 234 yeas and 194 nays 
(Roll No. 397).
    The House considered H.R. 2825 under Suspension of the 
Rules on July 20, 2017, and passed the measure, amended, by a 
recorded vote of 386 yeas and 41 nays, (Roll No. 403).
    H.R. 2825 was received in the Senate on July 20, 2017, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs held a hearing on February 7, 2018.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered H.R. 2825 on February 28, and March 7, 2018, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the Senate, as 
amended, by voice vote.
    As reported by the Senate Committee on Homeland Security 
and Governmental Affairs, H.R. 2825 included the texts of H.R. 
677, H.R. 1302, and H.R. 3284, as passed by the House.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported H.R. 2825 to the Senate on April 16, 2018, 
with no written report.

H.R. 2805
    H.R. 2805 was introduced in the House on June 7, 2017, by 
Miss Rice of New York, Mr. Donovan, Mr. Reichert, and Mr. 
Larsen of Washington, and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security.
    The text of H.R. 2805 was offered as amendment during 
Committee consideration of H.R. 2825, and adopted.

H.R. 2831
    H.R. 2831 was introduced in the House on June 8, 2017, by 
Mr. Rutherford, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. Donovan, and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security, and in addition to the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
    The text of H.R. 2831 was included in Title IV of H.R. 
2825, as reported by the Committee.
    Additionally, H.R. 2770, H.R. 3572 from the 114th Congress, 
as passed by the House, were included within the text of H.R. 
2825, as reported by the Committee. Provisions of this bill 
were also included in H.R. 302, the FAA Reauthorization Act of 
2018.

                                ------                                


   PROMOTING RESILIENCE AND EFFICIENCY IN PREPARING FOR ATTACKS AND 
                     RESPONDING TO EMERGENCIES ACT

                               H.R. 2922

To reform and improve the Federal Emergency Management Agency, 
the Office of Emergency Communications, and the Office of 
Health Affairs of the Department of Homeland Security, and for 
other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 2922 seeks to reform and improve the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency, the Office of Emergency Communications, and 
the Office of Health Affairs of the Department of Homeland 
Security through the authorization of critical first responder 
grant and training programs, enhancements to information 
sharing, and the establishment of reporting requirements, 
performance measures and metrics for DHS programs.

Legislative History

H.R. 2922
    H.R. 2292 was introduced in the House on June 15, 2017, by 
Mr. Donovan and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security, 
and in addition to the Committees on Transportation and 
Infrastructure, and Energy and Commerce. Within the Committee, 
H.R. 2922 was referred to the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response, and Communications.
    Provisions of H.R. 2922 were included in Title V of H.R. 
2825 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 2825, below.

                                ------                                


STRENGTHENING CYBERSECURITY INFORMATION SHARING AND COORDINATION IN OUR 
                           PORTS ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 3101

To enhance cybersecurity information sharing and coordination 
at ports in the United States, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The Strengthening Cybersecurity Information Sharing and 
Coordination in our Ports Act of 2017 (H.R. 3101) requires the 
Secretary of Homeland Security to develop and implement a 
maritime risk assessment model that focuses on cybersecurity 
vulnerabilities at our Nation's seaports. This bill also 
requires the Secretary to seek participation of information 
sharing and analysis organizations and the National and Area 
Maritime Security Advisory Committees in analyzing the 
cybersecurity risks in the maritime domain and addressing the 
cyber vulnerabilities at each port.
    The United States Coast Guard is the government agency 
responsible for the physical security of our Nation's seaport 
infrastructure, but its authority for cybersecurity is less 
clear. Under the Maritime Transportation Security Act (MTSA) of 
2002 (Pub. L. 107-295), the U.S. Coast Guard was granted 
responsibility for the protection of ``communication systems,'' 
including information that flows through the Marine 
Transportation System but does not clearly spell out the Coast 
Guard's responsibility for cybersecurity at seaports.
    This bill removes this ambiguity by including cybersecurity 
as an enumerated responsibility under MTSA. While this bill 
clarifies that the Coast Guard is the appropriate agency for 
reviewing cybersecurity in the maritime domain, the Committee 
believes the Coast Guard should coordinate with other DHS 
entities as appropriate.
    In recent years there have been many high-profile cyber-
related attacks on the United States. These include the U.S. 
Office of Personnel Management breach (July 2015), the release 
of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) ``Vault 7'' by 
Wikileaks (March 2017), the WannaCry ransomware attack (July 
2017), and Equifax breach (September 2017).
    The maritime domain is not immune from such cyber threats. 
While they may not have been as newsworthy as other notable 
cyber incidents, the maritime industry--including both 
individual companies and maritime authorities--has been the 
target of several cyber-related crimes and attacks.
    More than $1 trillion in goods, from cars to oil to corn 
and everything in between, move through the Nation's seaports 
every year. Terror groups, nation-states, criminal 
organizations, hackers and even disgruntled employees could 
breach computer systems at the Nation's ports, resulting in 
major detrimental effects on global trade and shipping, and 
damage to the domestic economy.
    Increasingly, cargo is moving through our ports using 
automated industrial control systems. These computer systems 
are controlling machinery in port facilities that move 
containers, fill tanks, and on-load and off-load ships. The 
growing automation of business operation systems, industrial 
control systems and onboard vessel control systems at the 
Nation's ports, while fostering efficiencies, have created 
cybersecurity vulnerabilities in areas that were previously 
safe from these threats.
    For instance, in 2017, a major U.S. shipping carrier 
suffered a system disruption that shut down a significant 
number of its computer systems for days. In fact, the Petya 
cyberattack forced the largest terminal at the Port of Los 
Angeles to shut down operations for several days while port 
operators contained the impact of the attack. In Europe, drug 
smugglers attempted to hack into cargo tracking systems to 
rearrange containers and hide illicit narcotics. Similarly, a 
foreign military is suspected of compromising several systems 
aboard a commercial ship contracted by the U.S. Transportation 
Command.
    Despite the fact that the Government Accountability Office 
(GAO) has placed cybersecurity of our Nation's critical 
infrastructure on the ``High Risk'' list since 2003, the Coast 
Guard, and DHS as a whole, have been slow to fully engage on 
cybersecurity efforts at the Nation's many seaports.

Legislative History

    H.R. 3101 was introduced in the House on June 28, 2017, by 
Mrs. Torres, and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security, and in addition to the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure. Within the Committee, H.R. 3101 was 
referred to the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity and 
Infrastructure Protection.
    The Chair discharged the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity and 
Infrastructure Protection from further consideration of H.R. 
3101 on September 7, 2017.
    The Committee considered H.R. 3101 on September 7, 2017, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on October 19, 2017, agreeing that, in order 
to expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would agree to waive further 
consideration of H.R. 3101. The letter further requested 
support for the appointment of Conferees should a House, Senate 
Conference be called. On that same date, the Chair of the 
Committee on Homeland Security responded acknowledging the 
jurisdictional interests of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure and the agreement to waive further consideration 
of H.R. 3101, and support the request for Conferees should a 
House-Senate Conference be called.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3101 to the House on October 
19, 2017, as H. Rpt. 115-356, Pt. I. Subsequently, the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure was discharged 
from further consideration of H.R. 3101.
    The House considered H.R. 3101 under Suspension of the 
Rules on October 24, 2017, and passed the measure by voice 
vote.
    H.R. 3101 was received in the Senate on October 25, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    Provisions of H.R. 3101 were included in H.R. 302, the FAA 
Reauthorization Act of 2018.

                                ------                                


              CYBER VULNERABILITY DISCLOSURE REPORTING ACT

                               H.R. 3202

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to submit a 
report on Cyber Vulnerability Disclosures, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    The Nation's critical infrastructure is diverse and 
complex. It includes distributed networks, interdependent 
functions and systems in both the physical space and 
cyberspace. The Department of Homeland Security was given the 
authority by the Cybersecurity Act of 2015 to improve 
cybersecurity in the United States through enhanced sharing of 
information about cybersecurity threats.
    The Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Section 227(m)) allows 
the Secretary to coordinate with industry to develop Department 
policies and procedures for coordinating the disclosure of 
cyber vulnerabilities. This disclosure is important as it 
highlights vulnerabilities and allows the public and private 
sector to work to prevent and mitigate cyber threats.
    H.R. 3202 directs the Secretary of the Department of 
Homeland Security to produce a report that describes the 
policies and procedures developed to coordinate the disclosure 
of cyber vulnerabilities.

Legislative History

    H.R. 3202 was introduced in the House on July 12, 2017, by 
Ms. Jackson Lee and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 3202 on July 26, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3202 to the House on September 
1, 2017, as H. Rpt. 115-283.
    The House considered H.R. 3202 under Suspension of the 
Rules on January 9, 2018, and passed the measure, without 
amendment, by voice vote.
    H.R. 3202 was received in the Senate on January 10, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


      JOINT COUNTERTERRORISM AWARENESS WORKSHOP SERIES ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 3284

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish a Joint 
Counterterrorism Awareness Workshop Series, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    In response to the coordinated terrorist attack on multiple 
targets in Mumbai, India in 2008, the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency (FEMA), the National Counterterrorism Center 
(NCTC), and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) developed 
the Joint Counterterrorism Awareness Workshop Series (JCTAWS) 
to assist States and localities in preparing for this new 
threat. JCTAWS brings together a wide range of first responders 
including law enforcement, fire, emergency medical services, 
and public health officials, as well as the private sector and 
non-governmental organizations, to prepare for, prevent 
against, and respond to a coordinated terrorist attack. Since 
2011, over 30 cities have hosted these workshops, where they 
test their current plans, policies, and procedures, while 
identifying gaps and best practices. After each workshop, the 
host city, with its Federal partners, develops a Summary report 
with key findings and possible gap mitigation strategies.
    H.R. 3284 authorizes this program to ensure FEMA, NCTC, and 
the FBI continue to provide State and local jurisdictions with 
this vital resource.

Legislative History

    H.R. 3284 was introduced in the House on July 18, 2017, by 
Mr. Fitzpatrick, Mr. Donovan, and Mrs. Murphy of Florida, and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 3284 on July 26, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3284 to the House on September 
1, 2017, as H. Rpt. 115-284.
    The House considered H.R. 3284 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 12, 2017, and passed the measure on 
September 14, 2017, as amended, by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 398 
yeas and 4 nays (Roll Call Vote No. 529).
    H.R. 3284 was received in the Senate on September 18, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    During consideration of H.R. 2825, the Senate included the 
text of H.R. 3284 in section 1420. For further action see H.R. 
2825 listed above.

                                ------                                


                   CUBAN AIRPORT SECURITY ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 3328

To require a study regarding security measures and equipment at 
Cuba's airports, require the standardization of Federal Air 
Marshal Service agreements, require efforts to raise 
international aviation security standards, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    On December 17, 2014, President Obama announced a change in 
U.S. policy towards Cuba. After four rounds of talks and the 
bilateral meeting, on July 1, 2015, President Obama announced 
that ``the United States has agreed to formally re-establish 
diplomatic relations with the Republic of Cuba, and re-open 
embassies in our respective countries.'' On July 20, 2015, the 
``Interests'' sections located in Washington D.C. and Havana 
were converted into embassies and on August 14, 2015, Secretary 
of State Kerry traveled to Havana to raise the U.S. flag at the 
new embassy. On February 16, 2016, an agreement was signed that 
would allow ``more than 100 daily round-trip flights between 
the United States and Cuba.'' The Department of Transportation 
awarded 110 routes between Cuba and the United States to ten 
different U.S. air carriers. The first scheduled commercial 
flight from Fort Lauderdale, Florida, to Villa Clara, Cuba, 
took place on August 31, 2016.
    On March 17, 2016, the Transportation Security and 
Oversight and Management Subcommittees held a joint Member-
level briefing on aviation security in Cuba with the 
Transportation Security Administration (TSA). Due to concerning 
information that was brought to light during that briefing, the 
Transportation Security Subcommittee held a public hearing on 
May 17, 2016. The Administration witnesses declined to respond 
to Members' questions in an open setting, asserting that 
answers contained Security Sensitive Information (SSI) despite 
having briefed Committee members in March. Chairman McCaul 
planned to lead a Congressional delegation to the island in 
June to examine first-hand the security at Cuba's airports, but 
all of the delegation's visas were denied.
    Despite the change in President Trump's June 2017 
announcement that travel and tourism would, again, be 
restricted, the Committee remains concerned about the security 
of Cuba's airport. Most notably, U.S. air carriers operating in 
Cuba must contract a vast majority of their operations support 
positions. These contracts are with the Empresa Cubana de 
Aeropuertos y Servicios is an entity run by the communist Cuban 
government. The airlines have no visibility into who the 
workers are, how they are vetted and how much they are paid. 
This raises serious concerns about the extent of the vetting of 
workers with access to sensitive areas of the airport given the 
potentially catastrophic security threat posed by a radicalized 
or corrupted individual with insider access.
    This bill also addresses concerns about the baseline 
security standards for airports that serve as Last Points of 
Departure to the United States by requiring that the U.S. 
representative to the International Civil Aviation Organization 
(ICAO) work to raise security standards globally. It also 
increases Congressional oversight of Federal Air Marshal 
Service agreements by requiring that the agreements be written 
and transmitted to Congress once signed. Currently, the 
Administration is not required to share information on these 
agreements with Congress and has been resistant to Committee 
oversight in the past.

Legislative History

    H.R. 3328 was introduced in the House on July 20, 2017, by 
Mr. Katko, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. Sires and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security, the Committee on Foreign 
Affairs, and the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure.
    The Committee considered H.R. 3328 on July 26, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by voice vote.
    The Chair of the Committee on Foreign Affairs sent a letter 
to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on August 
30, 2017, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration on 
the House Floor, the Committee on Foreign Affairs would agree 
to waive further consideration of H.R. 3328. The letter further 
requested support for the appointment of Conferees should a 
House, Senate Conference be called. The Chair of the Committee 
on Homeland Security responded on September 13, 2017, 
acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the Committee on 
Foreign Affairs and the agreement to waive further 
consideration of H.R. 3328, and support the request for 
Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be called.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on September 13, 2017, agreeing that, in 
order to expedite consideration on the House Floor, the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure would agree to 
waive further consideration of H.R. 3328. The letter further 
requested support for the appointment of Conferees should a 
House, Senate Conference be called. On that same date, the 
Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded 
acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure and the agreement to waive 
further consideration of H.R. 3328, and support the request for 
Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be called.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3328 to the House on September 
13, 2017, as H. Rpt. 115-308, Pt. I. Subsequently, the 
Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure were discharged from further 
consideration of H.R. 3328.
    The House considered H.R. 3328 under Suspension of the 
Rules on October 23, 2017, and passed the measure by voice 
vote.
    H.R. 3328 was received in the Senate on October 24, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    Provisions of H.R. 2132 were included in H.R. 302, the FAA 
Reauthorization Act of 2018.

                                ------                                


                BORDER SECURITY FOR AMERICA ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 3548

To make certain improvements to the security of the 
international borders of the United States, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    The goal of the Border Security for America Act of 2017 
(H.R. 3548) is to gain full situational awareness and 
operational control of the borders of the United States through 
the deployment of physical infrastructure, technology, and 
personnel, as well as leveraging partnerships between various 
federal, state, and local entities.
    The security of our Nation hinges on how effectively our 
government controls who and what enters the country both at, 
and between, official ports of entry. The Department of 
Homeland Security (DHS) is charged with the important mission 
to secure the United States borders and ports of entry against 
a wide array of threats. A porous border is a conduit for 
transnational criminal organizations, smugglers and human 
traffickers, and a vulnerability that terrorists may exploit.
    H.R. 3548 provides $10 billion for the deployment and 
construction of tactical infrastructure and technology to the 
southern and northern border to achieve operational control and 
situational awareness. It also specifically authorizes the 
construction of wall, levee wall, and other barriers along the 
southern border in a manner the Secretary of Homeland Security 
deems ``most practical and effective.''
    This legislation mandates a sector-by-sector technology 
capability deployment tailored to the specific threats and 
needs of each Border Patrol sector. The Committee is cognizant 
of the changing nature of the threat landscape along the border 
and was purposeful in its grant of tactical flexibility to the 
Secretary.
    Tactical infrastructure and technology are powerful force 
multipliers, but the goal of border security is, and will 
always be, successful apprehension or interdiction. For this 
reason, this bill authorizes an additional 5,000 Border Patrol 
Agents and 5,000 Customs and Border Protection Officers. Hiring 
and retention have been serious challenges for DHS, so this 
bill also streamlines the way that veterans of the United 
States Armed Forces, and existing law enforcement officers can 
be hired in an attempt to help the agency meet these lofty 
personnel goals.
    While much of the narrative surrounding border security is 
rightly focused on efforts to secure the southern border, last 
year there were almost twice as many individuals present in the 
United States on an expired visa as those apprehended crossing 
the border. While the law has been clear since 2004 that DHS is 
required to complete a biometric exit system, a lack of a 
definitive timeline and benchmarks for success have allowed 
Administrations of both parties to avoid compliance with the 
law. This bill remedies those challenges and mandates full 
deployment of an exit system at all air, land, and sea ports of 
entry with timelines and benchmarks to finally make this 9/11 
Commission recommendation a reality.

Legislative History

    H.R. 3548 was introduced in the House on July 28, 2017, by 
Mr. McCaul and 44 original cosponsors, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security, and in addition to the 
Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Foreign Affairs, 
the Committee on Natural Resources, the Committee on 
Agriculture, the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure, the Committee on Ways and Means, and the 
Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 3548 was referred to the Subcommittee on Border 
and Maritime Security.
    The Chair discharged the Subcommittee on Border and 
Maritime Security from further consideration of H.R. 3548 on 
October 4, 2017.
    The Committee considered H.R. 3548 on October 4, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by a recorded vote of 18 
yeas and 12 nays (Roll Call Vote No. 36).
    The Chair of the Committee on Natural Resources sent a 
letter to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on 
October 10, 2017, agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on Natural 
Resources would waive further consideration of H.R. 3548. On 
the following day, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security responded, acknowledging the jurisdictional interests 
of the Committee on Natural Resources and the agreement to 
waive further consideration of H.R. 3548.
    The Chair of the Committee on Foreign Affairs sent a letter 
to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on November 
14, 2017, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration on 
the House Floor, the Committee on Foreign Affairs would waive 
further consideration of H.R. 3548. On the following day, the 
Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded, 
acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the Committee on 
Foreign Affairs and the agreement to waive further 
consideration of H.R. 3548.
    The Chair of the Committee on Agriculture sent a letter to 
the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on November 15, 
2017, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration on the 
House Floor, the Committee on Agriculture would waive further 
consideration of H.R. 3548. The Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security responded on December 7, 2017, acknowledging 
the jurisdictional interests of the Committee on Agriculture 
and the agreement to waive further consideration of H.R. 3548.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on December 7, 2017, agreeing that, in order 
to expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would waive further 
consideration of H.R. 3548. On that same date, the Chair of the 
Committee on Homeland Security responded, acknowledging the 
jurisdictional interests of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure and the agreement to waive further consideration 
of H.R. 3548. The letter further agreed to support the request 
for Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be called.
    The Chair of the Committee on Oversight and Government 
Reform sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security on January 3, 2018, agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Oversight and Government Reform would waive further 
consideration of H.R. 3548. On that same date, the Chair of the 
Committee on Homeland Security responded, acknowledging the 
jurisdictional interests of the Committee on Oversight and 
Government Reform and the agreement to waive further 
consideration of H.R. 3548. The letter further agreed to 
support the request for Conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called.
    The Chair of the Committee on Ways and Means sent a letter 
to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on January 
9, 2018, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration on 
the House Floor, the Committee on Ways and Means would waive 
further consideration of H.R. 3548. On that same date, the 
Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded, 
acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the Committee on 
Ways and Means and the agreement to waive further consideration 
of H.R. 3359. The letter further agreed to support the request 
for Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be called.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 3548 to 
the House on January 10, 2018, as H. Rpt. 115-505, Pt. I.
    On January 10, 2017 the Committee on Foreign Affairs, the 
Committee on Natural Resources, the Committee on Agriculture, 
the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, the Committee 
on Transportation and Infrastructure, and the Committee on Ways 
and Means were discharged from further consideration of H.R. 
3548. The Speaker announced that the referral of H.R. 3548 to 
the Committee on Armed Services was extended for a period 
ending not later than March 23, 2018.
    The Committee on Armed Services was discharged from further 
consideration of H.R. 3548 on March 23, 2018. Placed on the 
Union Calendar, No. 471.
    Provisions of H.R. 3548 were included in Title I of H.R. 
4760 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 4760.
    Provisions of H.R. 3548 were included in Title V of H.R. 
6136 as reported by the Committee. See also action taken on 
H.R. 6136.

                                ------                                


 TO REAUTHORIZE THE CUSTOMS-TRADE PARTNERSHIP AGAINST TERRORISM PROGRAM

                               H.R. 3551

To amend the Security and Accountability for Every Port Act of 
2006 to reauthorize the Customs-Trade Partnership Against 
Terrorism Program, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT) 
Reauthorization Act of 2017 (H.R. 3551) reauthorizes the 
program for the first time in 11 years to ensure it is ready to 
meet the dynamic threats currently facing the global supply 
chain, and that 
C-TPAT participants receive tangible benefits for their 
partnership with CBP working toward a more secure supply chain.
    Established under the SAFE Port Act of 2006 (Pub. L. 109-
347), C-TPAT is CBP's flagship global supply chain security 
program.
    When a participant joins C-TPAT, they agree to work with 
CBP to protect the supply chain, identify security gaps, and 
implement specific security measures and best practices. 
Applicants must enhance security throughout their supply chain. 
Applicants undergo vetting by CBP and then a site visit to 
validate the implementation of security criteria in order to 
receive benefits, such as shorter wait times and fewer 
inspections at ports of entry.

Legislative History

    H.R. 3551 was introduced in the House on July 28, 2017, by 
Ms. McSally, Mr. Reichert, Mr. McCaul, Mr. King of New York, 
Mr. Hurd, and Mr. Garrett, and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 3551 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security.
    The Chair discharged the Subcommittee on Border and 
Maritime Security from further consideration of H.R. 3551 on 
September 7, 2017.
    The Committee considered H.R. 3551 on September 7, 2017, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3551 to the House on September 
25, 2017, as H. Rpt. 115-323.
    The Chair of the Committee on Ways and Means sent a letter 
to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on October 
23, 2017, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration on 
the House Floor, the Committee on Ways and Means would not seek 
a sequential referral of H.R. 3551. On that same date, the 
Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded 
acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the Committee on 
Ways and Means and agreement to not seek a sequential referral. 
The letter further agreed to support the request for Conferees 
should a House-Senate Conference be called.
    The House considered H.R. 3551 under Suspension of the 
Rules on October 23, 2017, and passed the measure by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 402 yeas and 1 nay (Roll No. 569).
    H.R. 3551 was received in the Senate on October 24, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Finance.

                                ------                                


                SECURING OUR BORDERS AND WILDERNESS ACT

                               H.R. 3593

To amend the Wilderness Act to authorize U.S. Customs and 
Border Protection to conduct certain activities to secure the 
international land borders of the United States, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    The Securing Our Borders and Wilderness Act amends the 
Wilderness Act to empower CBP to conduct certain necessary 
border security activities in designated wilderness areas. 
These border security activities having the purpose of securing 
the international land borders of the United States, include: 
accessing structures, installations, and roads; executing 
search and rescue operations; using motor vehicles, aircraft, 
motorboats, and motorized equipment; conducting patrols on foot 
and on horseback; deploying tactical infrastructure and 
technology; and constructing and maintaining roads and physical 
barriers. The bill requires CBP to carry out these actions in a 
way that preserves wilderness areas to the best of CBP's 
ability, as circumstances permit. Federal- and tribal-owned 
land represent approximately 693 miles, or about 35 percent, of 
the southern border, the overwhelming majority of which is 
managed by the Department of the Interior (DOI) and the U.S. 
Forest Service (USFS). The rugged, isolated character of most 
federally-owned borderland makes patrolling and the 
installation and maintenance of security infrastructure 
difficult. Regulatory delays and reliance on federal land 
managers for appropriate access to federally-owned borderland 
further hampers Border Patrol's efforts to adequately patrol, 
as well as build and maintain border security infrastructure. 
The same factors that hinder CBP's operations make federally-
owned borderland a popular, but dangerous, crossing point for 
illicit activity.

Legislative History

    H.R. 3593 was introduced in the House on July 28, 2017 by 
Mr. Mike Johnson and was referred to the Committee on Natural 
Resources and the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee on Homeland Security referred H.R. 3593 to 
the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security on August 29, 
2017.
    On December 3, 2018, The Chair of the Committee on Natural 
Resources sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security, agreeing that in order to expedite 
consideration of H.R. 3593, the Committee on Homeland Security 
would waive further consideration of H.R. 3593, but not its 
jurisdiction over the subject matter. The letters also support 
Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be called. On 
December 4, 2018, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security responded to the Chair of the Committee on Natural 
Resources agreeing to waive consideration on H.R. 3593.
    On December 10, 2018, the Committee on Natural Resources 
reported H.R. 3593 as H. Rpt. 115-1070, Part I.
    Provisions of H.R. 3593 were included in

                                ------                                


 SECURING GENERAL AVIATION AND COMMERCIAL CHARTER AIR CARRIER SERVICE 
                              ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 3669

To improve and streamline security procedures related to 
general aviation and commercial charter air carrier utilizing 
risk-based security standards, and for other purposes.

Summary

    General aviation and commercial charter air carriers 
represent a small fraction of TSA's stakeholder community, 
often causing their issues and concerns to fall to the bottom 
of the agency's priorities. This bill seeks to elevate some of 
these important, but often overlooked, security issues.
    Commercial airlines pay tens of thousands of dollars to 
install the necessary software for airlines to connect to TSA's 
Secure Flight system for vetting passengers. However, smaller 
operators do not have the passenger volume to absorb the cost 
of installing this software. Currently, TSA emails them the 
necessary data in spreadsheet format for the operators to check 
their passenger manifests against. This presents a serious 
information security risk for this data to be handled in this 
manner. TSA should explore creating a web-based program that 
these operators could access that would have real time 
passenger vetting information and would prevent the unintended 
distribution of sensitive security information.
    Currently, private charter air carriers must use their own 
flight crews or private screening companies to screen 
passengers. In certain instances, these carriers would like to 
use on or off duty TSA agents to screen passengers; however, 
when private charters are performed on short notice carriers 
are unable to bring off-duty TSA screeners onto their own 
program due to certain FAA regulations. Language in this bill 
would allow private charters the flexibility to do so without 
cost to the Federal Government.
    Additionally, the Aviation Security Advisory Committee has 
approved several recommendations regarding improvements to 
security rules and regulations for general aviation and 
commercial charter air carrier programs. However, these 
recommendations have yet to be implemented by TSA. This 
legislation requires TSA to develop an implementation plan and 
timeline in which to execute these outstanding recommendations.
    The bill also addresses the lack of a full time subject 
matter expert at TSA to interact with general aviation 
stakeholders and handle general aviation security issues. The 
industry has been forced to rely on individuals that are often 
given this portfolio temporarily and struggles to find a 
reliable point of contact for matters that arise. This bill 
authorizes the appointment of a full-time employee to handle 
this portfolio, thus giving industry a knowledgeable and 
reliable liaison with TSA.

Legislative History

    H.R. 3669 was introduced in the House on September 1, 2017, 
by Mr. Estes of Kansas and Mr. McCaul, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 3669 on September 7, 2017, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 3669 to the House on October 
12, 2017, as H. Rpt. 117-346.
    The House considered H.R. 3669 under Suspension of the 
Rules on December 11, 2017, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    Provisions of H.R. 2132 were included in H.R. 302, the FAA 
Reauthorization Act of 2018.

                                ------                                


                   DHS ACCOUNTABILITY ENHANCEMENT ACT

                               H.R. 4038

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to reassert article 
I authorities over the Department of Homeland Security, and for 
other purposes.

Summary

    This bill amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to 
repeal provisions limiting the authority of the Secretary of 
Homeland Security to allocate or reallocate functions among 
Department of Homeland Security (DHS) officers and to 
establish, consolidate, alter, or discontinue organizational 
units within DHS. Specifically, the bill removes the following 
requirements: (1) that the pertinent reorganization plan 
submitted to Congress contain specified elements; and (2) 60 
days have expired after the Secretary has provided notice of, 
including the rationale for, the action to the appropriate 
congressional committees.

Legislative History

    H.R. 4038 was introduced in the House on October 12, 2017, 
by Mr. McCaul and Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The House considered H.R. 4038 under Suspension of the 
Rules on October 23, 2017, and passed the measure by voice 
vote.
    H.R. 4038 was received in the Senate on October 24, 2017, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


               AIR CARGO SECURITY IMPROVEMENT ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 4176

To strengthen air cargo security, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act 
of 2007 (Pub. L. 110-53) mandated TSA to screen and inspect 100 
percent of air cargo transported on passenger aircraft. 
However, the Act did not require TSA to screen 100 percent of 
air cargo on all-cargo aircraft, nor does it require TSA to 
personally screen all pieces of cargo. Therefore, TSA takes a 
risk-based approach to the screening of all-cargo flights and 
leverages trusted partners in the private sector to screen 
cargo on some passenger flights--via the Certified Cargo 
Screening Program and the Known Shipper Program.
    Even though the majority of TSA's resources focus on 
screening travelers and securing passenger aircraft, air cargo 
security remains a major concern. The failed 2010 Yemen plot to 
detonate explosive devices in cargo packages--after transport 
on both cargo and passenger aircraft--highlights the threat 
posed to this sector. [Leyne, Jon. `Printer cartridge bomb plot 
planning revealed,' BBC. November 22, 2010. http://www.bbc.com/
news/world-middle-east-11812874.] For years, aviation 
stakeholders have highlighted air cargo as an area of 
vulnerability that often gets neglected by TSA. Indeed, recent 
aviation threats indicate the need for a renewed focus on 
ensuring the security of air cargo. Therefore, throughout the 
115th Congress, this Committee has sought to elevate air cargo 
security within TSA and address any necessary reforms, as 
evidenced by this bill and the Committee's House-passed H.R. 
2825, the Department of Homeland Security Authorization Act.
    The purpose of H.R. 4176 is to prioritize and reform air 
cargo security at the Transportation Security Administration 
(TSA) by establishing the air cargo security division within 
the TSA to carry out all air cargo security policy and 
stakeholder engagement. Additionally, this bill requires the 
TSA Administrator to conduct a feasibility study--and 
subsequent pilot program--on expanding the use of computed 
tomography (CT) and other emerging technology for air cargo 
screening. Lastly, the bill requires a review of the Certified 
Cargo Screening Program and the Known Shipper Program.

Legislative History

    H.R. 4176 was introduced in the House on October 31, 2017 
by Mr. Thompson of Mississippi and Mrs. Watson Coleman and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 4176 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security.
    The Subcommittee on Transportation and Protective Security 
was discharged from further consideration of H.R. 4176 on 
February 28, 2018.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4176 on February 28, 2018, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4176 to the House on March 19, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-605.
    The House considered H.R. 4176 under Suspension of the 
Rules on March 19, 2018, and passed the measure, amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 4176 was received in the Senate on March 20, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    Provisions of H.R. 4176 were included in H.R. 302, the FAA 
Reauthorization Act of 2018.

                                ------                                


           SECURING DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY FIREARMS 
                              ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 4433

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to require the Under 
Secretary for Management of the Department of Homeland Security 
to achieve security of sensitive assets among the components of 
the Department of Homeland Security, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The purpose of H.R. 4433 is to require the Under Secretary 
for Management of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to 
develop and oversee policies meant to secure firearms and other 
sensitive assets among the components of DHS.
    H.R. 4433, the Securing Department of Homeland Security 
Firearms Act of 2017, requires the Under Secretary for 
Management at the Department to disseminate a Department-wide 
directive for achieving adequate security over firearms and 
other sensitive assets across the Department. This directive 
shall include descriptions of what equipment is classified as a 
sensitive asset, requirements for securing Department-issued 
firearms and other sensitive assets, and reporting requirements 
for lost firearms and other sensitive assets, among other 
items. H.R. 4433 requires the Under Secretary for Management to 
update and disseminate the Personal Property Asset Management 
Program Manual and requires component personnel to safeguard 
firearms and other sensitive assets in accordance with the 
directive, among other items. The Inspector General shall 
review the implementation of this Act.

Legislative History

    H.R. 4433 was introduced in the House on November 16, 2017 
by Mr. Correa and Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 
1486 was referred to the Subcommittee on Oversight and 
Management Efficiency.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4433 on December 13, 2017, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, with a favorable recommendation, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4433 to the House on January 9, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-496.
    The House considered H.R. 4433 on January 9, 2018, under 
Suspension of the Rules, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 4433 was received in the Senate on January 10, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


              STRENGTHENING AVIATION SECURITY ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 4467

To require the Federal Air Marshal Service to utilize risk-
based strategies, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The Federal Air Marshal Service is a Federal law 
enforcement agency within TSA that is responsible for 
detecting, deterring, and defeating hostile acts against 
aviation. Federal air marshals (FAMs) are armed law enforcement 
officers who are deployed on passenger flights worldwide to 
protect airline passengers and crew against criminals and 
terrorists. Given the high volume of daily flights--both 
domestic and international--and the limited resources and 
personnel at TSA, FAMs are not able to deploy on every flight 
departing from or landing in the U.S.
    Accordingly, TSA's ability to maximize the limited number 
of FAMs in order to achieve security effectiveness is an 
ongoing challenge. In September 2017, GAO reported that TSA 
does not measure data on the effectiveness and deterrence value 
of FAMs. [Government Accountability Office, Aviation Security: 
Actions Needed to Systematically Evaluate Cost and 
Effectiveness Across Security Countermeasures, GAO-17-794. 
September 11, 2017.] This is a major problem for 
accountability--since FAMs deployment costs taxpayers $800 
million in Fiscal Year 2015--as well as for the value of the 
program itself, where the primary goal is to deter threats and 
minimize risk to passengers and crew.
    This bill will ensure that TSA utilizes risk-based 
strategies when allocating FAMs on passenger flights in order 
to increase the effectiveness of the program and gain the 
maximum value from its limited resources. It will also ensure 
that the seating of FAMs onboard passenger aircraft is 
determined in a risk-based manner that enables them to respond 
effectively to security threats.

Legislative History

    H.R. 4467 was introduced in the House on November 28, 2017 
by Mr. Jody B. Hice of Georgia, Mr. Katko, and Mr. McCaul and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 4467 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security.
    The Subcommittee on Transportation and Protective Security 
was discharged from further consideration of H.R. 4467 on 
February 28, 2018.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4467 on February 28, 2018, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4467 to the House on March 19, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-608.
    The House considered H.R. 4467 under Suspension of the 
Rules on March 19, 2018. The House passed H.R. 4467, as 
amended, on March 22, 2018, by a ? recorded vote of 408 yeas an 
0 nays (Roll Call Vote No. 128).
    H.R. 4467 was received in the Senate on March 22, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation considered H.R. 4467 on June 27, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the Senate.
    Provisions of H.R. 4467 were included in H.R. 302, the FAA 
Reauthorization Act of 2018.

                                ------                                


          TERRORIST SCREENING AND TARGETING REVIEW ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 4553

To require a review of the authorization, funding, management, 
and operation of the National Targeting Center and the 
Terrorist Screening Center, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The Terrorist Screening Center (TSC) is a multi-agency body 
administered by the Department of Justice (DOJ) and is 
responsible for maintaining the Terrorist Screening Data base 
(TSDB). The TSC facilitates information sharing and 
coordination among law enforcement, the intelligence community, 
and international agencies by offering one central point where 
all known terrorist-related information can be reviewed against 
the information of an encountered individual. However, the TSC 
lacks permanent statutory authorization; and DOJ, which 
currently administers the TSC through the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation (FBI), has an institutional focus on criminal and 
national security investigations rather than border security, 
screening, and vetting.
    U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) operates the NTC, 
a critical resource for screening and vetting individuals 
seeking to enter the country. The Department of Homeland 
Security (DHS) is also the largest consumer of TSDB 
information, which CBP uses (via the NTC) to vet over a million 
travelers every day and the Transportation Security 
Administration (TSA) uses to screen aircraft passengers as well 
as transportation and other sensitive access workers. Given 
these similar but critical missions and functions, ensuring 
appropriate coordination among the TSC, the NTC, and the 
relevant agencies is imperative.
    The GAO review required under H.R. 4553 will enable 
Congress to better assess the status and relationship of the 
Centers and facilitate any necessary improvements in resources, 
efficiency, and management to improve the U.S.'s screening and 
vetting apparatus

Legislative History

    H.R. 4553 was introduced in the House on December 5, 2017 
by Mr. Garrett, and 6 original cosponsors, and referred to the 
Committee on the Judiciary, and in addition to the Committee on 
Ways and Means, and the Committee on Homeland Security,
    The Committee considered H.R. 4553 on December 13, 2017, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, with a favorable recommendation, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4553 to the House on January 9, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-494, Pt. I.
    H.R. 4553 was received in the Senate on January 10, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


        DHS INTERAGENCY COUNTERTERRORISM TASK FORCE ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 4555

To authorize the participation in overseas interagency 
counterterrorism task forces of personnel of the Department of 
Homeland Security, and for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 4555 authorizes the Secretary to assign DHS personnel 
to overseas interagency counterterrorism task forces to 
facilitate counterterrorism information sharing and combat the 
threat of terrorism stemming from overseas sources of conflict 
or terrorism.

Legislative History

    H.R. 4555 was introduced in the House on December 5, 2017 
by Rutherford and six original cosponsors, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4555 on December 13, 2017, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, with a favorable recommendation, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4555 to the House on January 9, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-499.
    The House considered H.R. 4555 on January 9, 2018, under 
Suspension of the Rules, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 4555 was received in the Senate on January 10, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


           GLOBAL AVIATION SYSTEM SECURITY REFORM ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 4559

    To establish a global aviation security task force, and for 
other purposes.

Summary

    Over the last several months, the Department of Homeland 
Security and the Transportation Security Administration have 
been engaged in efforts to raise the global baseline of 
aviation security, out of stark concerns for the aviation 
threat landscape posed particularly towards international 
inbound civil aviation. A key goal in mitigating the threat to 
aviation security is working more effectively to improve 
security at overseas Last Point of Departure (LPD) airports and 
engaging in efforts to raise security standards at airports 
across the globe.
    The purposes of H.R. 4559 is to conduct a global aviation 
security review by improving global aviation security 
standards. This legislation directs the Administrator of the 
Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to conduct a 
comprehensive review of aviation security implementation and 
challenges across the global aviation system. Specifically, 
this review cuts across multiple offices and components of the 
Department of Homeland Security (DHS), as well as relevant 
partner agencies of the Federal Government. The goal of this 
legislation is to improve coordination and outreach both within 
the United States government and with foreign partners 
regarding improvements to aviation security.

Legislative History

    H.R. 4559 was introduced in the House on December 6, 2017 
by Mr. Estes of Kansas, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. Katko and referred 
to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4559 on December 13, 2017, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, with a favorable recommendation, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4559 to the House on January 9, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-497.
    The House considered H.R. 4559 on January 9, 2018, under 
Suspension of the Rules, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 4559 was received in the Senate on January 10, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation considered H.R. 4559 on June 27, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the Senate.
    Provisions of H.R. 4559 were included in H.R. 302, the FAA 
Reauthorization Act of 2018.

                                ------                                


SECURITY ASSESSMENT FEASIBILITY FOR EQUIPMENT TESTING AND EVALUATION OF 
                   CAPABILITIES FOR OUR HOMELAND ACT

                               H.R. 4561

To provide for third party testing of transportation security 
screening technology, and for other purposes.

Summary

    Technology stakeholders consistently face challenges in 
partnering with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and 
the TSA to test and validate their screening technologies for 
procurement. This is due in large part to current bottlenecks 
at the Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate's 
Transportation Security Laboratory and TSA's Transportation 
Systems Integration Facility, where new technologies are tested 
and evaluated before they can be purchased and deployed at 
passenger screening checkpoints. These bottlenecks and 
bureaucratic hurdles have often cut out small or startup 
technology businesses and stifled innovations in passenger 
screening, all while the threat landscape facing transportation 
has continued to evolve rapidly and put the traveling public at 
risk. Most recently, this has been observed in TSA's struggle 
to develop and deploy Computed Tomography technology at 
checkpoints, which provides greater imaging and enhanced 
screening capabilities. This legislation will hopefully spur 
more rapid and efficient technology testing while saving TSA 
money in testing costs.
    H.R. 4561 directs the Administrator of the Transportation 
Security Administration (TSA) to establish a program and 
framework for enabling third party testing for advanced 
security screening technologies, in order to alleviate existing 
bureaucratic hurdles and bottleneck's in the TSA's testing and 
evaluation process. This legislation will seek to increase 
efficiencies while decreasing costs to TSA, while also having a 
positive impact on the acquisitions and procurement process for 
mitigating the rapidly evolving threats to transportation 
security. Lastly, this bill seeks to align various security 
standards and protocols with the European Civil Aviation 
Conference, in order to streamline international security 
standards and raise the global baseline of aviation security.

Legislative History

    H.R. 4561 was introduced in the House on December 6, 2017 
by Mr. Bilirakis, Mr. McCaul, Mr. Katko, and Mr. Dunn, and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4561 on December 13, 2017, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, with a favorable recommendation, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4561 to the House on January 9, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-498.
    The House considered H.R. 4561 on January 9, 2018, under 
Suspension of the Rules, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 4561 was received in the Senate on January 10, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    Provisions of H.R. 4561 were included in H.R. 302, the FAA 
Reauthorization Act of 2018.

                                ------                                


              POST-CALIPHATE THREAT ASSESSMENT ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 4564

To require a threat assessment on current foreign terrorist 
fighter activities, and for other purposes.

Summary

    This bill directs the Department of Homeland Security 
(DHS), in coordination with the Department of State and the 
Office of the Director of National Intelligence, to conduct a 
threat assessment of current foreign terrorist fighter 
activities. Such assessment shall include: (1) a detailed 
summary of current foreign terrorist fighter travel and trends, 
(2) an analysis of any country or region with a significant 
increase in foreign terrorist fighter activity, and (3) an 
analysis of foreign terrorist fighter travel trends in and out 
of Iraq and Syria

Legislative History

    H.R. 4564 was introduced in the House on December 6, 2017 
by Mr. Higgins of Louisiana, Mr. McCaul, Mr. Katko, Mr. 
Gallagher, Mr. Rutherford, and Mr. Fitzpatrick, and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4564 on December 13, 2017, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, without 
amendment, with a favorable recommendation, by unanimous 
consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4564 to the House on January 9, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-489
    The House considered H.R. 4564 on January 9, 2018, under 
Suspension of the Rules, and passed the measure, without 
amendment, by a ? recorded vote of 413 yeas and none voting 
``nay'' (Roll No. 3).
    H.R. 4564 was received in the Senate on January 10, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Foreign 
Relations.

                                ------                                


             DHS OVERSEAS PERSONNEL ENHANCEMENT ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 4567

To require a Department of Homeland Security overseas personnel 
assessment and enhancement strategy, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The ability for DHS personnel to effectively collaborate, 
share information, and establish partnerships overseas plays a 
critical role in the Department's overall ability to achieve 
its counterterror mission and protect the Homeland. However, 
challenges remain with ensuring that personnel deployment is 
risk-based and sufficiently collaborative with other Federal 
partners.
    This legislation seeks to build on existing requirements 
for an updated strategy for the Department of Homeland 
Security's (DHS) overseas footprint, while identifying barriers 
to information sharing and collaboration among DHS components 
and other partner entities on issues directly relating to the 
Department's counterterror mission. The bill also grants 
accountability and transparency to how DHS trains, deploys, and 
utilizes personnel at overseas locations.

Legislative History

    H.R. 4567 was introduced in the House on December 6, 2017 
by Mr. Katko, Mr. McCaul, Mrs. Watson Coleman, Mr. Vela, and 
Ms. Meng, and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4567 on December 13, 2017, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, with a favorable recommendation, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4567 to the House on January 9, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-490.
    The House considered H.R. 4567 on January 9, 2018, under 
Suspension of the Rules. The House passed H.R. 4567 on January 
10, 2018, by a ? recorded vote of 415 yeas and none voting 
``nay'' (Roll No. 12).
    H.R. 4567 was received in the Senate on January 11, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered H.R. 4567 on June 13, 2018, and reported the 
measure to the Senate, with an Amendment in the Nature of a 
Substitute.

                                ------                                


      COUNTERTERRORISM INFORMATION SHARING IMPROVEMENT ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 4569

To require counterterrorism information sharing coordination, 
and for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 4569 requires the President, acting through the 
Department of Homeland Security (DHS), to ensure that DHS has 
access to biographic and biometric data collected by the U.S. 
government on individuals associated with a terrorist 
organization. The bill further directs the President to ensure 
relevant federal agencies to coordinate with DHS to minimize 
and overcome any administrative, technical, capacity, or 
classification challenges to carrying out such requirement. DHS 
must ensure that all relevant laws, rules, and procedures 
regarding classification levels and civil rights and civil 
liberties are followed in carrying out such requirement.

Legislative History

    H.R. 4569 was introduced in the House on December 6, 2017 
by Mr. Gallagher and six original cosponsors, and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4569 on December 13, 2017, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, without 
amendment, with a favorable recommendation, by unanimous 
consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4569 to the House on January 9, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-491.
    The House considered H.R. 4569 on January 9, 2018, under 
Suspension of the Rules, and passed the measure, without 
amendment, by voice vote.
    H.R. 4569 was received in the Senate on January 10, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


   DOMESTIC EXPLOSIVES DETECTION CANINE CAPACITY BUILDING ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 4577

To establish a working group to determine ways to develop a 
domestic canine breeding network to produce high quality 
explosives detection canines, and for other purposes.

Summary

    Canines serve a variety of roles in the Federal 
Government's national security infrastructure, including 
detecting concealed humans, narcotics, currency, firearms, 
electronics, chemicals associated with weapons of mass 
destruction, and prohibited agricultural products, and in 
search and rescue missions. Explosives detection canines are a 
critical part of the TSA's multi-layered security strategy. 
Canines are more mobile, flexible, and accurate than many 
mechanical explosives detection devices currently employed by 
TSA.
    Currently, the TSA procures the majority of its canines 
from European vendors in conjunction with the Department of 
Defense. The global rise in attacks on soft targets has 
drastically increased canine demand and prices. Given that the 
supply of canines is dwindling worldwide, the United States is 
especially vulnerable because it relies primarily on brokers 
who source dogs from Eastern Europe. American canine breeders 
produce exceptional working dog lines, but TSA's arcane 
procurement rules and training requirements create barriers to 
entry for American breeders and vendors. In October 2017, the 
Subcommittee on Transportation and Protective Security 
conducted a joint Subcommittee hearing to gather information 
from canine industry representatives and veterinary 
researchers. The Subcommittee heard testimony substantiating 
prior oversight concerns regarding TSA's poor record of 
engaging domestic canine breeders and vendors. The difficulties 
associated with procuring highly qualified dogs capable of 
explosive detection suggest that the development of a 
decentralized domestic canine breeding network and modernized 
canine training standards are long overdue.
    This legislation directs the Administrator of the 
Transportation Security Administration (Administrator) to 
create a working group on behavioral, medical, and technical 
standards for explosives detection working dog breeding and 
training. The working group will consist of the Transportation 
Security Administration (TSA), the Office of Science and 
Technology (S&T) within the Department of Homeland Security 
(DHS), leading industry associations, academics with first-hand 
working dog knowledge, and private canine breeders and vendors. 
The working group's standards will be presented to the 
Administrator to inform further development of the breeding 
network and for use in future TSA canine procurements.

Legislative History

    H.R. 4577 was introduced in the House on December 6, 2017 
by Mr. Rogers of Alabama and six original cosponsors, and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4577 on December 13, 2017, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, with a favorable recommendation, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4577 to the House on January 9, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-488.
    The House considered H.R. 4577 on January 9, 2018, under 
Suspension of the Rules, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 4577 was received in the Senate on January 10, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    Provisions of H.R. 4577 were included in H.R. 302, the FAA 
Reauthorization Act of 2018.

                                ------                                


                     COUNTER TERRORIST NETWORK ACT

                               H.R. 4578

To authorize certain counter terrorist networks activities of 
U.S. Customs and Border Protection, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The Counter Terrorist Network Act (H.R. 4578) amends the 
Homeland Security Act of 2002 to expand the duties of the 
National Targeting Center of U.S. Customs and Border Protection 
(CBP). Specifically, the center must collaborate with 
appropriate agencies to enhance border security through such 
operations as those that seek to disrupt and dismantle networks 
that pose terrorist or other threats.
    Transnational Criminal Organizations (TCOs) and foreign 
terrorism networks pose significant threats to our national 
security. CBP, due to its border security mission, is uniquely 
situated to combat threats that originate far from our shores. 
However, CBP currently has no explicit statutory authority to 
combat these threats, or detail CBP personnel to other U.S. 
agencies both domestically and internationally to support the 
work to `push our borders out.' This bill seeks to provide such 
explicit authorization.

Legislative History

    H.R. 4578 was introduced in the House on December 6, 2017 
by Mr. Vela, Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, and Mr. Katko, and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4578 on December 13, 2017, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, without 
amendment, with a favorable recommendation, by voice vote.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4578 to the House on January 9, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-492.
    The House considered H.R. 4578 on January 9, 2018, under 
Suspension of the Rules, and on January 11, 2018, passed the 
measure, as amended, by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 410 yeas and 2 
nays (Roll No. 17).

                                ------                                


          SCREENING AND VETTING PASSENGER EXCHANGE ACT OF 2017

                               H.R. 4581

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to develop best 
practices for utilizing advanced passenger information and 
passenger name record data for counterterrorism screening and 
vetting operations, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The purpose of H.R. 4581 is to require the Secretary of 
Homeland Security to develop best practices for utilizing 
advanced passenger information (API) and passenger name record 
(PNR) data for counterterrorism screening and vetting 
operations. This bill directs the Secretary of Homeland 
Security to develop best practices for utilizing API and PNR 
data for counterterrorism screening and vetting purposes. It 
also directs the Secretary to make the best practices available 
to foreign partners and provide assistance to those countries 
in implementing the best practices.
    API, or biographic information about a traveler, and PNR, 
or data about a traveler's reservation and itinerary, are 
valuable tools used for screening and vetting potential 
criminals and terrorists. The Department of Homeland Security 
(DHS), especially U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and 
the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), utilize these 
data sets to confirm the identities and travel patterns of 
travelers before they are able to enter the U.S.
    In April 2016, the European Union (EU) adopted a new 
directive requiring its member States to utilize PNR data for 
the prevention, detection, investigation, and prosecution of 
terrorist offenses and serious crime. While this is a positive 
step by our European allies, many EU countries lack the 
knowledge, expertise, or capability to implement this directive 
by the May 2018 deadline. Therefore, H.R. 4581 directs DHS to 
leverage its expertise and experience utilizing API and PNR 
data by developing best practices and making them available to 
Visa Waiver Program (VWP) countries--many of which are in the 
EU. This will not only strengthen the security and capabilities 
of our foreign partners, but will also have a major impact on 
the security of the homeland.

Legislative History

    H.R. 4581 was introduced in the House on December 7, 2017 
by Mr. Fitzpatrick and seven original cosponsors and referred 
to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4581 on December 13, 2017, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, without 
amendment, with a favorable recommendation, by unanimous 
consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4581 to the House on January 9, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-493.
    The House considered H.R. 4581 on January 9, 2018, under 
Suspension of the Rules, and passed the measure, without 
amendment, by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 415 yeas and 1 nay (Roll 
No. 4).
    H.R. 1486 was received in the Senate on January 10, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered H.R. 4581 on June 13, 2018, and reported the 
measure to the Senate, with an Amendment in the Nature of a 
Substitute.

                                ------                                


          SHIELDING PUBLIC SPACES FROM VEHICULAR TERRORISM ACT

                               H.R. 4627

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to authorize 
expenditures to combat emerging terrorist threats, including 
vehicular attacks, and for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 4627 amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 
107-296) to authorize expenditures to combat emerging terrorist 
threats, including vehicular attacks. H.R. 4627 amends the 
responsibilities of the Under Secretary of the Department of 
Homeland Security's (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate 
(S&T) to include research and development to combat emerging 
terrorist threats, such as vehicular attacks. In addition, the 
bill permits grants awarded under the State Homeland Security 
Grant Program and Urban Area Security Initiative to be used to 
address security vulnerabilities of public spaces. Finally, the 
bill codifies current DHS policy that grant funding may not be 
used to purchase firearms or for training on the use of 
firearms.

Legislative History

    H.R. 4627 was introduced in the House on December 12, 2017 
by Mr. Donovan, Mr. Payne, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. King of New York 
and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 4627 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Emergency Preparedness, Response and Communications.
    The Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response and 
Communications was discharged from further consideration of 
H.R. 4627 on June 6, 2018.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4627 on June 6, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as amended, by 
unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4627 to the House on June 14, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-757.
    The House considered H.R. 4627 on June 19, 2018, under 
Suspension of the Rules, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.

                                ------                                


                 SECURING AMERICA'S FUTURE ACT OF 2018

                               H.R. 4760

To amend the immigration laws and the homeland security laws, 
and for other purposes.

Summary

Legislative History

    H.R. 4760 was introduced in the House on January 10, 2018, 
by Mr. Goodlatte, Mr. McCaul, Mr. Labrador, Ms. McSally, Mr. 
Sensenbrenner, and Mr. Carter of Texas, and referred to the 
Committee on the Judiciary, and in addition to the Committee on 
Education and the Workforce, the Committee on Homeland 
Security, the Committee on Foreign Affairs, the Committee on 
Ways and Means, the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee 
on Oversight and Government Reform, the Committee on 
Agriculture, the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure, and the Committee on Natural Resources.
    The Chair of the Committee on Armed Services sent a letter 
to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on March 8, 
2018, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration on the 
House Floor, the Committee on Armed Services would waive 
further consideration of H.R. 3548. The letter further 
acknowledges an agreement to modify provisions relating to the 
National Guard and the Department of Defense as the measure 
proceeded and an agreement relating to the inclusion of H.R. 
4760 within H.R. 3548. The Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security responded on March 14, 2018, acknowledging the 
jurisdictional interests of the Committee on Armed Services; 
the agreement to waive further consideration of H.R. 3548; and 
the inclusion of H.R. 4760 as the measures proceed. The letter 
further agreed to support the request for Conferees should a 
House-Senate Conference be called.
    The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security sent a 
letter to the Chair of the Committee on the Judiciary on June 
20, 2018, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration on 
the House Floor, the Committee on Homeland Security would agree 
to be discharged from further consideration of H.R. 4760. On 
that same date, the Chair of the Committee on the Judiciary 
responded, acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the 
Committee on Homeland Security and the agreement to be 
discharged from further consideration. The letter further 
agreed to support the request for Conferees should a House-
Senate Conference be called.
    The Committee on Rules met on June 20, 2018, and reported a 
Rule providing for the consideration of H.R. 4760. Rule filed 
in the House as H. Res. 951 (H. Rpt. 115-770).
    The Committee on Rules met on June 20, 2018, and reported a 
second Rule providing for the consideration of H.R. 4760. Rule 
filed in the House as H. Res. 953 (H. Rpt. 115-771).
    The House considered H. Res. 954, the Rule providing for 
the consideration of H.R. 4760 on June 21, 2018, and passed the 
rule by a recorded vote of 232 yeas and 190 nays (Roll No. 
279).
    The House considered H.R. 4760 under the provisions of H. 
Res. 954 on June 21, 2018, and failed to pass the measure by a 
recorded vote of 193 yeas and 231 nays (Roll No. 282).
    The House considered H. Res. 961, the rule providing for 
consideration of H.R. 6157, and H.R. 2083. The House agreed to 
the Rule by a recorded vote of 222 yeas and 172 noes, (Roll No. 
292). Pursuant to Sec. 5 of H. Res. 961, H. Res. 952 was laid 
on the table.

                                ------                                


      SUPPORTING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FOR FIRST RESPONDERS ACT

                               H.R. 4991

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish the 
National Urban Security Technology Laboratory, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 4991 authorizes the National Urban Security Technology 
Laboratory (NUSTL) within the Department of Homeland Security's 
Science and Technology Directorate (S&T). NUSTL is a one of a 
kind test and evaluation laboratory for the first responder 
community. Additionally, NUSTL conducts radiological and 
nuclear research and development (R&D).

Legislative History

    H.R. 4991 was introduced in the House on February 8, 2018, 
by Mr. Donovan, Mr. Payne, Miss Rice, and Mr. King of New York 
and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 4627 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Emergency Preparedness, Response and Communications.
    The Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response and 
Communications was discharged from further consideration of 
H.R. 4991 on June 6, 2018.
    The Committee considered H.R. 4991 on June 6, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House, without 
amendment, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 4991 to the House on June 14, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-756.
    The Chair of the Committee on Science, Space, and 
Technology sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security on June 14, 2018, agreeing that, in order to 
expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Science, Space, and Technology would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 4991. On that same date, the Chair of the 
Committee on Homeland Security responded acknowledging the 
jurisdictional interests of the Committee on Science, Space, 
and Technology, and the agreement to not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 4991. The letter further agreed to support the 
request for Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be 
called.
    The House considered H.R. 4991 on June 19, 2018, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.

                                ------                                


                 DHS CYBER INCIDENT RESPONSE TEAMS ACT

                               H.R. 5074

To authorize cyber incident response teams at the Department of 
Homeland Security, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The purpose of H.R. 5074 is to amend the Homeland Security 
Act of 2002 to authorize cyber incident response teams at the 
Department of Homeland Security, and for other purposes. The 
Cyber Incident Response Teams Act of 2018 codifies and shapes 
the cyber incident response teams at the Department of Homeland 
Security (DHS). These teams will exist within the National 
Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) at 
DHS and shall provide upon request, as appropriate, assistance 
to asset owners and operators following a cyber-incident. In 
order to allow for private sector technical experts to be 
leveraged in the response to cyber incidents these teams may 
include cybersecurity specialists from the private sector. This 
program would allow industry professionals to bring innovative 
approaches and ideas into the federal government and makes 
progress in bringing the technical expertise and skills that 
help execute the DHS role in cybersecurity. This legislation 
further directs the NCCIC to continually assess and evaluate 
the cyber incident response teams and their operations and to 
periodically provide to Congress the collected information on 
the metrics used for evaluation and assessment of the cyber 
response teams and operations.
    The DHS's NCCIC currently utilizes cyber incident response 
expertise in a number of ways. The United States Computer 
Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT), operated within the NCCIC, 
brings advanced network and digital media analysis expertise to 
bear on malicious activity targeting our nation's networks. US-
CERT develops timely and actionable information for 
distribution to federal departments and agencies, state and 
local governments, private sector organizations, and 
international partners. The critical mission activities of US-
CERTs include: providing cybersecurity protection to Federal 
civilian executive branch agencies; responding to incidents and 
analyzing data about emerging cyber threats; and collaborating 
with foreign governments and international entities to enhance 
the nation's cybersecurity posture.
    The NCCIC's Hunt and Incident Response Teams (HIRT) provide 
onsite incident response, free of charge, to organizations that 
require immediate investigation and resolution of cyber 
attacks. Hunt and Incident Response Teams provide DHS's front 
line response for cyber incidents and proactively hunting for 
malicious cyber activity. Upon notification of a cyber 
incident, HIRT will perform a preliminary diagnosis to 
determine the extent of the compromise. When requested, HIRT 
can deploy a team to meet with the affected organization to 
review network topology, identify infected systems and collect 
other data as needed to perform thorough follow on analysis. 
Hunt and Incident Response Teams are able to provide mitigation 
strategies and assist asset owners and operators in restoring 
service and provide recommendations for improving overall 
network and control systems security.
    H.R. 5074 will codify the work of US-CERT and the HIRT 
while providing DHS flexibility to also call upon outside 
expertise.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5074 was introduced in the House on February 20, 2018 
by Mr. McCaul, Mr. Ratcliffe, Mr. Donovan, Mr. Gallagher, Mr. 
Fitzpatrick, and Mr. Bacon; and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 5074 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity and Infrastructure 
Protection.
    The Subcommittee on Cybersecurity and Infrastructure 
Protection was discharged from further consideration of H.R. 
5074 on February 28, 2018.
    The Committee considered H.R. 5074 on February 28, 2018, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, without 
amendment, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5074 to the House on March 19, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-607.
    The House considered H.R. 5074 under Suspension of the 
Rules on March 19, 2018, and passed the measure, amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 5074 was received in the Senate on March 20, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


                DHS FIELD ENGAGEMENT ACCOUNTABILITY ACT

                               H.R. 5079

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to require the 
Department of Homeland Security to develop an engagement 
strategy with fusion centers, and for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 5079 requires the Secretary to develop a DHS-wide 
fusion center engagement strategy, ensure metrics are in place 
to hold field personnel from the Office of Intelligence and 
Analysis (I&A) accountable for their performance at fusion 
centers, and leverage the Homeland Security Information Network 
(HSIN) to promote greater engagement between DHS components and 
fusion centers.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5079 was introduced in the House on February 23, 2018 
by Mr. Bacon, Mr. McCaul, Mr. Keating, Mr. Fitzpatrick, Mr. 
Katko, Mr. Higgins of Louisiana, and Mr. Gallagher and referred 
to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, 
H.R. 5079 was referred to the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism 
and Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence was 
discharged from further consideration of H.R. 5079 on February 
28, 2018.
    The Committee considered H.R. 5079 on February 28, 2018, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5079 to the House on March 19, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-606.
    The House considered H.R. 5079 under Suspension of the 
Rules on March 19, 2018, and passed the measure, amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 5079 was received in the Senate on March 20, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


 SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY AND TECHNOLOGY ACCOUNTABILITY ACT OF 
                                  2018

                               H.R. 5081

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish within 
the Transportation Security Administration the Surface 
Transportation Security Advisory Committee, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    The Committee has seen a significant positive impact from 
the establishment of the Aviation Security Advisory Committee 
for TSA to receive valuable input from stakeholders across the 
aviation sector. In establishing a similar entity for the 
surface transportation environment, the Committee hopes to 
create critical lines of communication on security-related 
issues among surface transportation stakeholders and the 
Administrator. The Committee recognizes that the surface 
transportation sector is multi-modal and different from the 
aviation sector, but like the aviation sector, it has 
government and sector coordinating councils to foster 
collaboration. The Committee also believes that the advisory 
committee established by this legislation can serve a valuable 
role in raising awareness within TSA of surface transportation 
security issues and challenges, and can be a critical help to 
the Administrator in determining policies and strategies aimed 
at protecting surface transportation systems. The Committee in 
no way intends to direct policymaking authority away from the 
Administrator or other relevant government entities for the 
surface transportation sector, but desires to implement a model 
similar to that of the Aviation Security Advisory Committee.
    The Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 107-296) 
mandated that the TSA Administrator develop a Five-Year 
Technology Investment Plan and submit an update of the Plan 
biennially to Congress. The purpose of the Plan is to 
communicate TSA's framework for technology investments and 
outline transportation security risks and associated capability 
gaps that would be best addressed by security-related 
technology. However, both the Plan, which was published in 
August 2015, and the first Biennial Refresh, which was 
published in December 2017, focus exclusively on aviation 
investments and neglect investments related to surface 
transportation or air cargo security.
    While TSA is responsible for securing all of America's 
transportation systems, the agency serves in a regulatory and 
oversight capacity with respect to surface transportation and 
air cargo. As such, TSA does not procure security-related 
technology for these sectors. Rather, TSA's investments related 
to surface transportation and air cargo support the research, 
development, testing, and evaluation of security-related 
technology. These investments do not appear in the Plan or 
Biennial Refresh because TSA interprets the statute very 
narrowly and thus equates ``investment'' with ``procurement.'' 
However, this interpretation does not accurately reflect the 
broad range of TSA's responsibilities or Congress's statutory 
intent. Consequently, this bill clarifies the meaning of 
``investments'' to include research, development, testing, and 
evaluation, and requires TSA to incorporate investments related 
to surface transportation and air cargo in future Biennial 
Refreshes.
    The purpose of H.R. 5081 is to prioritize the 
Transportation Security Administration's (TSA) responsibility 
to secure surface transportation systems and bring 
accountability to its technology investments. This bill 
establishes a Surface Transportation Security Advisory 
Committee within TSA to provide stakeholders and the public the 
opportunity to coordinate with the agency and comment on policy 
and pending regulations. It also amends reporting requirements 
for biennial updates to TSA's Strategic Five-Year Technology 
Investment Plan by requiring the Administrator to: consult with 
the Surface Transportation Security Advisory Committee, include 
information related to technology investments for aviation, air 
cargo, and surface transportation security, and include a 
classified addendum to report transportation security risks and 
capability gaps.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5081 was introduced in the House on February 23, 2018 
by Mr. Katko, Mrs. Watson Coleman, and Mr. McCaul and referred 
to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, 
H.R. 5081 was referred to the Subcommittee on Transportation 
and Protective Security.
    The Subcommittee on Transportation and Protective Security 
was discharged from further consideration of H.R. 5081 on 
February 28, 2018.
    The Committee considered H.R. 5081 on February 28, 2018, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, without 
amendment, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5081 to the House on March 19, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-611.
    The House considered H.R. 5081 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 25, 2018, and passed the measure, without 
amendment, by voice vote.
    H.R. 5081 was received in the Senate on June 26, 2018, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    Provisions of H.R. 5081 were included in H.R. 302, the FAA 
Reauthorization Act of 2018.

                                ------                                


  STRENGTHENING LOCAL TRANSPORTATION SECURITY CAPABILITIES ACT OF 2018

                               H.R. 5089

To improve threat information sharing, integrated operations, 
and law enforcement training for transportation security, and 
for other purposes.

Summary

    More so than the aviation sector, State and local law 
enforcement, as well as owners and operators of transportation 
assets, play a major role in securing surface transportation 
modes. A common complaint by these stakeholders is that TSA-and 
the federal government in general-does not provide sufficient 
information for them to adequately prepare for threats. This is 
primarily due to the classified nature of the information and 
the lack of security clearances for many of these stakeholders.
    This bill seeks to address these issues by increasing 
information sharing and making security clearances available to 
appropriate stakeholders. In addition, stakeholders have noted 
that active shooter and other incidents at transportation 
venues--such as the shooting at Los Angeles International 
Airport in November 2013 and false reports of a shooting at 
John F. Kennedy International Airport in August 2016--have led 
to chaotic evacuations and mismanaged communications. In 
January 2017, DHS called for airports to establish unified 
operations centers to address these issues. This bill seeks to 
assist airports by directing TSA to make available a framework 
for an operations center for transportation facilities. 
Finally, it seeks to assist surface transportation asset owners 
and operators to secure their systems by, developing a training 
program for law enforcement with a focus on surface 
transportation threats. It is imperative that TSA collaborate 
with both public and private stakeholders in order to 
sufficiently overcome the unique challenges to securing surface 
transportation.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5089 was introduced in the House on February 26, 2018 
by Ms. Barragan, Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, and Mrs. Watson 
Coleman and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 5089 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Transportation and Protective Security.
    The Subcommittee on Transportation and Protective Security 
was discharged from further consideration of H.R. 5089 on 
February 28, 2018.
    The Committee considered H.R. 5089 on February 28, 2018, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, without 
amendment, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5089 to the House on March 19, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-604.
    The House considered H.R. 5089 under Suspension of the 
Rules on March 19, 2018. The House passed, H.R. 5089 on March 
22, 2018, by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 397 yeas and 1 nay (Roll 
Call Vote No. 129).
    H.R. 5089 was received in the Senate on March 20, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    Provisions of H.R. 5089 were included in H.R. 302, the FAA 
Reauthorization Act of 2018.

                                ------                                


         ENHANCING SUSPICIOUS ACTIVITY REPORTING INITIATIVE ACT

                               H.R. 5094

To direct the Secretary of Homeland Security to improve 
suspicious activity reporting to prevent acts of terrorism, and 
for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 5094 directs the Secretary of Homeland Security to 
develop a strategy for improving the Department of Homeland 
Security operations and activities related to training, 
outreach, and information sharing for suspicious activity 
reporting to prevent acts of terrorism, as well as to establish 
a suspicious activity reporting working group to develop 
recommendations for improvement that will be utilized to 
develop this strategy.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5094 was introduced in the House on February 26, 2018 
by Mr. King of New York, Mr. McCaul, Mr. Gallagher, Mr. 
Fitzpatrick, Mr. Katko, and Mr. Higgins and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 5094 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and 
Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence was 
discharged from further consideration of H.R. 5094 on February 
28, 2018.
    The Committee considered H.R. 5094 on February 28, 2018, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5094 to the House on March 19, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-610.
    The House considered H.R. 5094 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 25, 2018, and passed the measure, amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 5094 was received in the Senate on June 26, 2018, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


       ENHANCING DHS' FUSION CENTER TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

                               H.R. 5099

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish in the 
Department of Homeland Security a fusion center technical 
assistance program.

Summary

    H.R. 5099 authorizes and enhances the Department of 
Homeland Security's fusion center technical assistance program. 
The bill requires the program to focus on providing the 79 
fusion centers across the United States with technical 
assistance regarding intelligence and information sharing, 
terrorism prevention activities and the State Homeland Security 
Grant Program and the Urban Area Security Initiative grant 
program.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5099 was introduced in the House on February 27, 2018 
by Mr. Estes of Kansas, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. Gallagher and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the 
Committee, H.R. 5099 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Counterterrorism and Intelligence.
    The Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence was 
discharged from further consideration of H.R. 5099 on February 
28, 2018.
    The Committee considered H.R. 5099 on February 28, 2018, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, without 
amendment, by unanimous 5099 to the House on March 19, 2018, as 
H. Rpt. 115-603.
    The House considered H.R. 5099 under Suspension of the 
Rules on March 19, 2018, and passed the measure by voice vote.
    H.R. 5099 was received in the Senate on March 20, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


        SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY IMPROVEMENT ACT OF 2018

                               H.R. 5131

To improve the effectiveness of Federal efforts to identify and 
address homeland security risks to surface transportation, 
secure against vehicle-based attacks, and conduct a feasibility 
assessment of introducing new security technologies and 
measures, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The TSA was originally established in 2001 in response to 
the terrorist attacks of September 11th. While the impetus 
behind its creation was the threat to aviation security, TSA is 
responsible for securing all transportation modes, including 
surface transportation assets such as railroads, mass transit, 
pipelines, buses, and ports. However, due to the nature of the 
9/11 attacks, as well as the persistent threat since, TSA's 
main focus has been securing the aviation sector.
    Nevertheless, attacks on transportation modes in recent 
years have often targeted surface transportation hubs, due to 
their porous and accessible configuration and large numbers of 
passengers and, on average, result in larger numbers of 
casualties. Unsophisticated lone wolf attacks are especially 
difficult for TSA and security stakeholders to protect against 
since they generally occur without prior warning. Such targets 
are more attractive to lone wolf or homegrown violent 
extremists since they often require less sophistication. The 
most recent example is the attempted pipe bomb attack in 
December 2017 at New York City's Port Authority Bus 
Terminal.\1\ This bill seeks to review TSA's approach to 
securing all transportation modes, including its utilization of 
innovative security technologies, and prioritize surface 
transportation security in the face of evolving threats.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\Gingras, Brynn. ``Suspect in attempted `terrorist attack' 
pledged allegiance to ISIS, officials say,'''CNN, December 12, 2017, 
https://www.cnn.com/2017/12/11/us/new-york-possible-explosion-port-
authority-subway/index.html.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Legislative History

    H.R. 5131 was introduced in the House on February 27, 2018 
by Mrs. Watson Coleman, Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, and Mr. 
Katko and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 5131 on February 28, 2018, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as 
amended, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5131 to the House on March 19, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-602.
    The House considered H.R. 5131 under Suspension of the 
Rules on March 19, 2018. The House passed H.R. 5131, as 
amended, on March 22, 2018, by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 409 
yeas and 5 nays (Roll Call Vote No. 125).
    H.R. 5131 was received in the Senate on March 22, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    Provisions of H.R. 5131 were included in H.R. 302, the FAA 
Reauthorization Act of 2018.

                                ------                                


   OFFICE OF BIOMETRIC IDENTITY MANAGEMENT AUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2018

                               H.R. 5206

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish the 
Office of Biometric Identity Management, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    The Office of Biometric Identity Management (OBIM) 
Authorization Act of 2018 (H.R. 5206) authorizes the office 
within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). OBIM is the 
lead agency within the Department that handles biometric 
identity services in support of anti-terrorism, 
counterterrorism, border security, credentialing, national 
security, and public safety efforts.
    OBIM's biometric matching services support the storing, 
sharing, and analyzing of biometric data, such as fingerprint 
records. OBIM provides DHS and other Federal agencies with 
biometric identity services that enable national security and 
public safety decision making across the U.S. Government.
    The office also supports the Department's efforts to 
complete a biometric exit system, which is one of the 
recommendations of the 9/11 Commission. The completion of the 
biometric exit system is vital in order to prevent visa 
overstays and assist with investigations of visa overstays.
    Biometric identity technology enhances the security of our 
citizens, facilitates legitimate travel and trade, and bolsters 
the integrity of our immigration system.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5206 was introduced in the House on March 7, 2018, by 
Ms. McSally, Mr. Bacon, Mr. Gallagher, Mr. Higgins of 
Louisiana, and Mr. McCaul and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 5206 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security.
    The Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security was 
discharged from further consideration of H.R. 5206 on June 6, 
2018.
    The Committee considered H.R. 5206 on June 6, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as amended, by 
unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5206 to the House on June 21, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-773.
    The House considered H.R. 5206 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 25, 2018, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 5206 was received in the Senate on June 26, 2018, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


         IMMIGRATION ADVISORY PROGRAM AUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2018

                               H.R. 5207

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish the 
immigration advisory program, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The Immigration Advisory Program (IAP) Authorization Act of 
2018 (H.R. 5207) authorizes the IAP within U.S. Customs and 
Border Protection (CBP). The IAP sends CBP Officers to last 
point of departure airports to assist air carriers and security 
employees with preventing security risks from boarding 
aircraft. Under the IAP, these CBP Officers have authority to 
(1) be present during the processing of flights bound for the 
United States; (2) assist air carriers and security employees 
with document examination and traveler security assessments; 
(3) provide training to air carrier and host-country authority 
staff; (4) analyze electronic passenger information and 
passenger reservation data to identify potential threats; (5) 
engage air carriers and travelers to confirm potential 
terrorist watchlist matches; (6) make recommendations to air 
carriers to deny potentially inadmissible passengers boarding 
flights bound for the United States; and (7) conduct other 
activities to secure flights bound for the United States, as 
directed by the CBP Commissioner.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5207 was introduced in the House on March 7, 2018, by 
Ms. McSally, Mr. Gallagher, Mr. Higgins of Louisiana, and Mr. 
McCaul and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 5207 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security.
    The Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security was 
discharged from further consideration of H.R. 5207 on June 6, 
2018.
    The Committee considered H.R. 5207 on June 6, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as amended, by 
unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5207 to the House on June 21, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-774.
    The House considered H.R. 5207 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 25, 2018, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 5207 was received in the Senate on June 26, 2018, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


    TRANSPORTATION SECURITY TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION REFORM ACT OF 2018

                               H.R. 5730

To require testing and evaluation of advanced transportation 
security screening technologies related to the mission of the 
Transportation Security Administration, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) 
continuously struggles to effectively and efficiently test, 
evaluate, acquire, and deploy new security technologies at 
domestic airports to keep pace with evolving threats to 
transportation security. Through recent oversight, the House 
Committee on Homeland Security identified significant 
bureaucratic inefficiencies within TSA's existing processes 
that prevent technology stakeholders from receiving timely 
testing and evaluation. Since 2009, the GAO consistently cites 
the Department of Homeland Security's technology procurement 
process in their biannual High Risk List. A lack of consistent 
leadership along with longstanding bureaucratic delays fail to 
meet transportation security performance objectives and 
discourage security equipment manufacturers from investing in 
new screening technologies.
    These outdated and underperforming procurement processes 
cause TSA to miss opportunities to improve checkpoint 
throughput and overall transportation security. Evolving 
threats to transportation security are not properly mitigated 
without updated technology. This legislation will authorize key 
functions of the Transportation Systems Integration Facility 
(TSIF), enabling the TSA to be more efficient and transparent 
throughout the development and acquisition of new 
transportation security technology.
    Further, the TSA Administrator is to ensure adequate 
staffing and resource allocation for the TSIF to prevent 
unnecessary delays in testing and evaluation. TSA must notify 
Congress of extended delays in testing of new technology, and 
conduct a review of procurement practices to uncover 
bottlenecks within the process. In addition, the TSA 
Administrator will collaborate with stakeholders to promote 
innovation and the deployment of advanced technologies to meet 
the agency's mission needs and mitigate threats to 
transportation security.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5730 was introduced in the House on May 9, 2018, by 
Mr. Katko, Mr. McCaul, and Mrs. Watson Coleman and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 5730 on June 6, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as amended, by 
unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5730 to the House on June 22, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-776.
    The House considered H.R. 5730 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 25, 2018, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 5730 was received in the Senate on June 26, 2018, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    Provisions of H.R. 5730 were included in H.R. 302, the FAA 
Reauthorization Act of 2018.

                                ------                                


  DHS INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEMS CAPABILITIES ENHANCEMENT ACT OF 2018

                               H.R. 5733

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to provide for the 
responsibility of the National Cybersecurity and Communications 
Integration Center to maintain capabilities to identify threats 
to industrial control systems, and for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 5733 codifies the role of the Department of Homeland 
Security's (DHS) National Cybersecurity and Communications 
Integration Center (NCCIC) in addressing the security of both 
information technology and operational technology for 
industrial control systems. NCCIC will maintain capabilities to 
identify and address threats and vulnerabilities to products 
and technologies intended for use in the automated control of 
critical infrastructure processes by leading Federal government 
efforts to mitigate cybersecurity threats to industrial control 
systems (ICS), and maintaining cross-sector incident response 
capabilities to respond to ICS cybersecurity incidents. NCCIC 
can provide cybersecurity technical assistance to ICS end 
users, product manufacturers and other stakeholders to mitigate 
and identify vulnerabilities. NCCIC will also collect, 
coordinate and provide vulnerability information to the ICS 
community.
    As part of this legislation, DHS is directed to 
periodically provide to the House Committee on Homeland 
Security and the Senate Homeland Security and Government 
Affairs Committee regarding the industrial control systems 
capabilities at NCCIC.
    H.R. 5733 will codify the work NCCIC already performs 
regarding identifying and mitigating ICS vulnerabilities while 
ensuring that private industry has a centralized and permanent 
place for assistance with addressing cybersecurity risk in 
nationwide industrial control systems.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5733 was introduced in the House on May 9, 2018, by 
Mr. Bacon, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. Ratcliffe and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 5733 on June 6, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House, as amended, by 
unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5733 to the House on June 22, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-776.
    The House considered H.R. 5733 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 25, 2018, and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 5733 was received in the Senate on June 26, 2018, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


       JOINT TASK FORCE TO COMBAT OPIOID TRAFFICKING ACT OF 2018

                               H.R. 5762

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to authorize a Joint 
Task Force to enhance integration of the Department of Homeland 
Security's border security operations to detect, interdict, 
disrupt, and prevent narcotics, such as fentanyl and other 
synthetic opioids, from entering the United States, and for 
other purposes.

Summary

    The Joint Task Force to Combat Opioid Trafficking Act of 
2018 (H.R. 5762) provides the Department of Homeland Security 
(DHS) with authorization to establish a Joint Task Force (JTF) 
to enhance the integration of DHS border security operations to 
detect, interdict, disrupt, and prevent narcotics, such as 
fentanyl and other synthetic opioids, from entering the United 
States.
    H.R. 5762 will help DHS track and interdict synthetic 
opioids, and prevent their proliferation into our communities. 
In 2016, approximately 42,000 people in the United States died 
due to opioid related drug overdoses. A 2017 Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention report studied opioid overdoses 
in 10 states and found that more than half of the deaths were 
related to illicitly produced fentanyl. Ninety percent of 
illegally produced fentanyl is manufactured in China.
    JTF-O will prioritize its resources on targeting the 
illicit flow of opioids across our borders. By leveraging the 
JTF structure to engage all DHS components in a ``unity of 
effort'' campaign, JTF-O will conduct integrated investigations 
and operations with the sole intent of countering narcotics, 
specifically synthetic opioids, from being trafficked into the 
United States. This bill encourages DHS to collaborate with 
Federal partners, such as the U.S. Postal Service, as well as 
private sector entities, such as parcel carriers, to carry out 
the task force's mission.
    The establishment of JTF-O could help address the issue of 
opioid trafficking through ports of entry, between ports of 
entry, and on our waterways to bolster DHS's ability to stem 
the flow of opioids entering the United States. The 
establishment of the JTF-O, its ability to work with other 
JTFs, and the leveraging of private sector resources and 
expertise could help DHS identify gaps in its abilities, 
develop solutions to identified problems, and implement 
solutions across the Department.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5762 was introduced in the House on May 10, 2018, by 
Mr. Langevin and Mr. King of New York and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. The Committee considered H.R. 
5762 on June 6, 2018, and ordered the measure to be reported to 
the House, as amended, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5762 to the House on June 14, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-755.
    The House considered H.R. 5762 on June 19, 2018, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 5762 was received by the Senate on June 20, 2018, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Subcommittee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


     SECURING PUBLIC AREAS OF TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES ACT OF 2018

                               H.R. 5766

To improve the security of public areas of transportation 
facilities, and for other purposes.

Summary

    Recent and persistent threats to public areas of 
transportation have proliferated to include targeting of public 
areas of transportation facilities. These crowded spaces, also 
known as soft targets, are often highly vulnerable to attack, 
due to their lower levels of security and high volume of 
passenger traffic. The 2016 terror attack in Brussels Zaventem 
airport reveal the vulnerabilities of non-sterile areas of 
public transportation facilities. In addition, the recent trend 
in use of vehicular terror attacks indicate a need to focus on 
protecting susceptible soft targets.
    This legislation aims to increase dialogue and research on 
how to prevent criminal activities and terrorist attacks at 
public transportation facilities. The working group that is 
established by this bill will require collaboration across 
public and private stakeholders with the Department of Homeland 
Security to research new strategies that will enhance security 
at public transportation sites and protect soft target areas. 
The reports submitted will provide Congress new opportunities 
to provide oversight and proper implementation of these new 
findings established by the working group. The bill also 
requires the Transportation Security Administration to conduct 
and provide to Congress a review of regulations and policies 
regarding the transportation of firearms and ammunition.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5766 was introduced in the House on May 10, 2018, by 
Mr. Payne and Mrs. Watson Coleman and referred to the Committee 
on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 5576 on June 6, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House, without 
amendment, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee reported H.R. 5576 to the House on June 22, 
2018, as H. Rpt. 115-777.
    The House considered H.R. 5576 under Suspension of the 
Rules on June 25, 2018, and passed the measure, without 
amendment, by voice vote.
    H.R. 5766 was received in the Senate on June 26, 2018, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    Provisions of H.R. 5766 were included in H.R. 302, the FAA 
Reauthorization Act of 2018.

                                ------                                


      SECURING THE INTERNATIONAL MAIL AGAINST OPIOIDS ACT OF 2018

                               H.R. 5788

To provide for the processing by U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection of certain international mail shipments and to 
require the provision of advance electronic information on 
international mail shipments of mail, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The Securing the International Mail Against Opioids Act of 
2018 (H.R. 5788) prevents dangerous and illegal contraband such 
as synthetic opioids from entering the United States through 
the international mail. This legislation amends the Trade Act 
of 2002 and mandates that the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) obtain 
advance electronic data (AED) on international mail shipments, 
allowing U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to target 
opioid shipments and other illegal imports and prevent their 
entry into the United States. The advance information required 
includes information that CBP uses to ensure cargo safety and 
security, such as the name and address of the shipper and 
recipient, as well as the package contents. While the Trade Act 
required advance data for all shipments by private carriers, 
including express delivery carriers, it did not require advance 
data for international mail shipments through USPS. As a 
result, international mail shipments arrive in the United 
States with no information, making it difficult for CBP to 
target high-risk shipments, including those containing 
synthetic opioids. This lack of information has created a 
significant vulnerability that allows criminals to ship 
synthetic opioids into the United States with ease. H.R. 5788 
would address this vulnerability and tighten up requirements on 
AED for international mail shipments.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5788 was introduced in the House on May 15, 2018, by 
Mr. Bishop, Mr. Pascrell, Mr. Reichert, and Mr. Kelly of 
Pennsylvania and referred to the Committee on Ways and Means 
and in addition to the Committee on Oversight and Government 
Reform and the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security sent a 
letter to the Chair of the Committee on Ways and Means on June 
6, 2018, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration on 
the House Floor, the Committee on Homeland Security would waive 
further consideration of H.R. 5788. On that same date, the 
Chair of the Committee on Oversight and Governmental Affairs 
responded acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the 
Committee on Homeland Security and the agreement to waive 
further consideration of H.R. 5788. On that same date, the 
Chair of the Committee on Ways and Means responded 
acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the Committee on 
Homeland Security and the agreement to waive further 
consideration. The letter further agreed to support the request 
for Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be called.
    The Committee on Ways and Means reported H.R. 5788 to the 
House on June 8, 2018, as H. Rpt. 115-722, Pt. I. Subsequently, 
the referral of H.R. 5788 to the Committee on Oversight and 
Government Reform extended for a period ending not later than 
June 11, 2018; and the Committee on Homeland Security was 
discharged from further consideration. On June 11, 2018, the 
Committee on Oversight and Government Reform was discharged 
from further consideration of H.R. 5788.
    The Committee on Rules met on June 12, 2018, and granted a 
Rule providing for the consideration of H.R. 2851, H.R. 3735, 
and H.R. 5788. Rule filed in the House as H. Res. 934 (H. Rpt. 
115-751).
    The House considered H. Res. 934 on June 13, 2018, and 
passed the rule by a recorded vote of 233 yeas and 175 nays 
(Roll No. 261).
    The House considered H.R. 5788 on June 14, 2018, under the 
provisions of H. Res. 934.
    The House passed H.R. 5788 on June 14, 2018, by a recorded 
vote of 353 yeas and 52 nays (Roll No. 265).
    H.R. 5788 was received in the Senate on June 18, 2018, read 
twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Finance.

                                ------                                


                  MARITIME BORDER SECURITY REVIEW ACT

                               H.R. 5869

To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to conduct a 
maritime border threat analysis, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The Maritime Border Security Review Act (H.R. 5869) 
requires the Secretary of Homeland Security to conduct a threat 
analysis of the United States maritime border.
    The bill defines ``maritime border'' as the borders and 
territorial waters of Puerto Rico and the United States Virgin 
Islands, as well as the Transit Zone, a seven million square-
mile area that includes the sea corridors of the western 
Atlantic Ocean, the Caribbean Sea, the Gulf of Mexico, and the 
eastern Pacific Ocean. The United States Coast Guard has 
primary jurisdiction over patrolling the maritime border, 
conducting counter-drug and migrant interdiction operations, as 
well as search and rescue missions.
    The region has long been exploited as both a destination 
and a transshipment point for illicit drugs heading ``customs 
free'' to the continental United States, endangering the lives 
of Americans in the two territories and the mainland.
    The unprecedented destruction caused by hurricanes Harvey, 
Irma, Maria, and Nate during the 2017 hurricane season has only 
exasperated the problem, diminishing local law enforcement 
operational capabilities and resources available to combat 
these threats. This combined with increased interdiction 
efforts at the Southwest Border has led to a shift in some 
smuggling traffic to the United States maritime border.

Legislative History

    H.R. 5869 was introduced in the House on May 17, 2018, by 
Miss Gonzalez-Colon of Puerto Rico and seven original 
cosponsors and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security. 
Within the Committee, H.R. 5869 was referred to the 
Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security.
    The Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security was 
discharged from further consideration of H.R. 5869 on July 24, 
2018.
    The Committee considered H.R. 5869 on July 24, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 5869 on 
September 4, 2018, as H. Rpt. 115-918.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security, agreeing that, in order to expedite 
consideration on the House floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would agree to discharge from 
further consideration of H.R. 5869. On the same date, the Chair 
of the Committee on Homeland Security responded acknowledging 
the jurisdictional interest of the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure and the agreement to waive further 
consideration. The letter further acknowledged the agreement to 
support a request for conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called.
    The House Considered H.R. 5869 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 4, 2018, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 5869 was received in the Senate on September 5, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 5869 were included in H.R. 302, the FAA 
Reauthorization Act of 2018.

                                ------                                


           BORDER SECURITY AND IMMIGRATION REFORM ACT OF 2018

                               H.R. 6136

To amend the immigration laws and provide for border security, 
and for other purposes.

Summary

    This bill eliminates the visa lottery green card program; 
eliminates green card programs for relatives (other than 
spouses and minor children); creates a renewable temporary visa 
for parents of citizens to unite families at no cost to 
taxpayers and reduces immigration levels (now averaging over 
1,060,000 a year) by about 260,000 a year--a decrease of about 
25%. It includes increases to the number of green cards 
available in the three skilled worker green card categories 
from about 120,000 a year to about 175,000--an increase of 45%. 
The bill also creates a workable agricultural guest worker 
program to grow our economy.
    HR 6136 sends additional ICE agents to more high-risk 
embassies overseas to vet visitors and immigrants and 
authorizes border wall construction. The bill provides 
additional technology, roads and other tactical infrastructure 
to secure the border and improves, modernizes, and expands 
ports of entry along the southern border.
    It authorizes 5,000 Border Patrol Agents and 5,000 CBP 
Officers and the use of the Guard to provide aviation and 
intelligence support for border security operations. It 
authorizes full implementation of a biometric entry-exit system 
at all air, land, and sea ports of entry and requires employers 
to check to see that they are only hiring legal workers. It 
authorizes the Department of Justice to withhold law 
enforcement grants from sanctuary cities and allows victims to 
sue the sanctuary cities that released their attackers.
    The bill establishes probable cause standards for ICE 
detainers and indemnifies localities that comply. It also 
requires ICE enter into 287(g) agreements requested by 
localities. It allows DHS to detain dangerous illegal 
immigrants who cannot be removed and enhances criminal 
penalties for deported criminals who illegally return. The bill 
tightens the ``credible fear'' standard to root out frivolous 
claims and increases penalties for fraud and terminates asylum 
for individuals who voluntarily return home. It allows illegal 
immigrants to be removed for being gang members/makes those 
with convictions for aggravated felonies, not registering as 
sex offenders, and multiple DUIs.
    The bill includes provisions to make illegal presence a 
federal misdemeanor (illegally crossing the border already is a 
crime) and ensures the safe and quick return of unaccompanied 
minors apprehended at the border; allows for the detention of 
minors apprehended at the border with their parents.
    Finally, it includes provisions for individuals who 
received deferred action on the basis of being brought to the 
U.S. as minors to get a 3-year renewable legal status allowing 
them to work and travel overseas (without advance parole). 
There is no special path to a green card. Recipients may only 
make use of existing paths to green cards and it allows for 
prosecutions for fraud.

Legislative History

    H.R. 6136 was introduced in the House on June 19, 2018, by 
Mr. Goodlatte, Mr. Curbelo of Florida, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. 
Denham and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary, and in 
addition to the Committee on Homeland Security, the Committee 
on Agriculture, the Committee on Natural Resources, the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, the Committee 
on Ways and Means, the Committee on Energy and Commerce, the 
Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Foreign Affairs, 
the Committee on the Budget, and the Committee on Oversight and 
Government Reform.
    The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security sent a 
letter to the Chair of the Committee on the Judiciary on June 
20, 2018, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration on 
the House Floor, the Committee on Homeland Security would agree 
to be discharged from further consideration of H.R. 6136. On 
that same date, the Chair of the Committee on the Judiciary 
responded, acknowledging the jurisdictional interests of the 
Committee on Homeland Security and the agreement to be 
discharged from further consideration. The letter further 
agreed to support the request for Conferees should a House-
Senate Conference be called.
    The Committee on Rules met on June 20, 2018, and reported a 
Rule providing for the consideration of H.R. 6136. Rule filed 
in the House as H. Res. 953 (H. Rpt. 115-771).
    The House considered H. Res. 953, the rule providing for 
the consideration of H.R. 6136 and adopted the Rule by a 
recorded vote of 227 yeas and 195 nays (Roll No. 286).
    The House considered H.R. 6136 under the provisions of H. 
Res. 953 on June 21, 2018. The House failed to pass H.R. 6136 
on June 27, 2018, by a recorded vote of 121 yeas and 301 nays 
(Roll Call Vote No. 297).

                                ------                                


           COUNTERING WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION ACT OF 2018

                               H.R. 6198

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish the 
Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction Office, and for other 
purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 6198 seeks to ensure the Department of Homeland 
Security (DHS or Department) has the structure, authority, and 
tools it needs to counter the threat of weapons of mass 
destruction. It consolidates the Office of Health Affairs and 
Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, along with some other 
Department programs and personnel, into a Countering Weapons of 
Mass Destruction Office to ensure coordination and unity of 
effort at the Department on these threats. The bill also 
includes the text of H.R. 655, the Securing the Cities Act, 
which passed the House in 2017.

Legislative History

    H.R. 6198 was introduced in the House on June 22, 2018, by 
Ms. Donovan and Mr. McCaul, and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security and in addition to the Committee on Energy 
and Commerce. Within the Committee, H.R. 6198 was referred to 
the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications.
    The Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications was discharged from further consideration of 
H.R. 6198 on July 24, 2018.
    The Committee considered H.R. 6198 on July 24, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 6198 to 
the House on September 7, 2018, as H. Rpt. 115-923 Part I.
    The Chair of the Committee on Energy and Commerce sent a 
letter to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on 
September 10, 2018, agreeing that, in order to be considered on 
the House floor, the Committee on Energy and Commerce will 
waive further consideration on the measure. The letter 
continues to acknowledge that the Committee on Energy and 
Commerce does not waive jurisdictional interest and reserves 
the right to seek conferees should the House-Senate Conference 
be called. On September 11, 2018, the Chair of the Committee on 
Homeland Security sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee 
on Energy and Commence to acknowledge the Committee on Energy 
and Commerce waiving further consideration of H.R. 6198. The 
letter also acknowledges the Committee on Energy and Commerce's 
jurisdictional interest and the right to seek conferees should 
a House-Senate Conference be called.
    The House considered H.R. 6198 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 12, 2018, and passed the measure, as amended 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 6198 was received in the Senate on September 17, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    H.R. 6198 was also considered as H.R. 7213. See H.R. 7213 
for further information.

                                ------                                


                    PRECHECK IS PRECHECK ACT OF 2018

                               H.R. 6265

To ensure that only travelers who are members of a trusted 
traveler program use Transportation Security Administration 
security screening lanes designated for trusted travelers, and 
for other purposes.

Summary

    As airport passenger volumes continue to climb, the 
Transportation Security Administration (TSA) will need to 
increase throughput at checkpoints to prevent another wait 
times crisis. This coupled with TSA's recent struggles to 
increase the number of travelers enrolled in trusted traveler 
programs, such as TSA PreCheck, has forced TSA to take 
additional actions to prevent a surge in checkpoint wait times. 
Through methods such as intelligence-based rules and the use of 
canines, TSA has expanded the population of travelers who are 
eligible to use PreCheck lanes--even though these individuals 
are not members of a trusted traveler program--with the end 
goal of increasing checkpoint throughput.
    This is problematic for several reasons, primarily because 
PreCheck was designed to enhance security, not manage traffic 
at the checkpoint. However, passengers who receive expedited 
screening via a rule or canines have not undergone the same 
vetting as PreCheck members, resulting in a potential security 
vulnerability. In addition, by giving Precheck ``away for 
free,'' TSA is undermining its own efforts to increase PreCheck 
enrollment. H.R. 6265 seeks to ensure that PreCheck and 
expedited screening is being used as a security tool and not to 
manage checkpoint throughput.
    H.R. 6265 requires the Transportation Security 
Administration (TSA) to ensure--with very narrow exceptions--
that PreCheck lanes are only being utilized by members of 
trusted traveler programs. The bill also directs TSA to conduct 
a pilot of ``risk modified screening'' for low risk passengers. 
If successful, this program should allow TSA to increase 
throughput at checkpoints while mitigating some of the 
vulnerabilities that exist under the current system. Finally, 
H.R. 6265 requires TSA to take several steps to increase 
PreCheck enrollment. For example, the bill directs TSA to 
partner with airlines to better market the program, increase 
enrollment flexibility via the use of innovative technologies, 
and make PreCheck enrollment centers more accessible.

Legislative History

    H.R. 6265 was introduced in the House on June 28, 2018, by 
Mr. Katko, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. Keating, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 6265 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Transportation and 
Protective Security.
    The Subcommittee on Transportation and Protective Security 
was discharged from further consideration of H.R. 6265 on July 
24, 2018.
    The Committee considered H.R. 6265 on July 24, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 6265 to 
the House on September 4, 2018, as H. Rpt. 115-912.
    The House Considered H.R. 6265 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 4, 2018, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 6265 was received by the Senate, on September 5, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    Provisions of H.R. 6265 were included in H.R. 302, the FAA 
Reauthorization Act of 2018.

                                ------                                


              FITNESS INFORMATION TRANSPARENCY ACT OF 2018

                               H.R. 6374

    To require the Department of Homeland Security to 
streamline Federal contractor fitness determinations, and for 
other purposes.

Summary

    The purpose of H.R. 6374 is to require the Department of 
Homeland Security to consolidate, streamline, and publish the 
standards by which a contractor employee may be deemed fit to 
work for the Department and provide status updates regarding 
fitness determinations. H.R. 6374 enables DHS to provide 
greater transparency to the contractor workforce, which will, 
in turn, increase efficiency.

Legislative History

    H.R. 6374 was introduced in the House on June 28, 2018, by 
Mr. Perry and Mr. McCaul, and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. Within the Committee, H.R. 6374 was referred 
to the Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency.
    The Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency was 
discharged from further consideration of H.R. 6374 on July 24, 
2018.
    The Committee considered H.R. 6374 on July 24, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 6374 to 
the House on September 4, 2018, as H. Rpt. 115-913.
    The House Considered H.R. 6374 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 4, 2018, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 6374 was received by the Senate, on September 5, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


                PREVENTING EMERGING THREATS ACT OF 2018

                               H.R. 6401

To assist the Department of Homeland Security in preventing 
emerging threats from unmanned aircraft and vehicles, and for 
other purposes.

Summary

    This bill grants the DHS and DOJ the ability to address 
threats posed by unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) to large-scale 
events and certain government facilities utilizing counter UAS 
technology. The bill establishes a collaborative structure for 
DHS and DOJ to work with the FAA to determine the proper type 
of technology to use to protect a target based on the 
circumstances. This bill became law as part of H.R. 302, the 
FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018.

Legislative History

    H.R. 6401 was introduced in the House on July 17, 2018, by 
Mr. McCaul of Texas and referred to the Committee on Judiciary, 
the Committee on Homeland Security, and the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure.
    Provisions of H.R. 6401 were included in H.R. 302, the FAA 
Reauthorization Act of 2018.

                                ------                                


        SECURING THE HOMELAND SECURITY SUPPLY CHAIN ACT OF 2018

                               H.R. 6430

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to authorize the 
Secretary of Homeland Security to implement certain 
requirements for information relating to supply chain risk, and 
for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 6430 grants the Secretary of Homeland Security with 
the authority to restrict certain procurements related to 
information technology and associated products if, following a 
risk assessment, it is determined the vendor poses a threat to 
the DHS supply chain. If such a restriction is made, the 
Secretary is permitted to limit the amount of information 
disclosed about the decision-making process.

Legislative History

    H.R. 6430 was introduced in the House on July 17, 2018, by 
Mr. King of New York, Mr. Perry, Miss Rice of New York, Mr. 
Correa, Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, Mr. McCaul, and Mr. Payne, 
and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 6430 on July 24, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by unanimous 
consent.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 6430 to 
the House on September 4, 2018, as H. Rpt. 115-907.
    The House Considered H.R. 6430 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 4, 2018, and passed the measure, by voice 
vote.
    H.R. 6430 was received by the Senate, on September 5, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


        DHS COUNTERING UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS COORDINATOR ACT

                               H.R. 6438

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish in the 
Department of Homeland Security an Unmanned Aircraft Systems 
Coordinator, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The purpose of H.R. 6438 is to amend the Homeland Security 
Act of 2002 to establish in the Department of Homeland Security 
a Countering Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Coordinator. H.R. 
6438 enables DHS to centralize the coordination of counter-
drone threat planning efforts at DHS under one official. Under 
H.R. 6438, the Countering UAS Coordinator is responsible for 
coordinating with relevant DHS components on the development of 
policies and plans to counter threats from UAS. The Coordinator 
will also serve as the principal Department official 
responsible for disseminating information to the private sector 
regarding DHS counter-drone measures and will ensure that DHS 
counter-drone activities are carried out in accordance with 
Federal laws.

Legislative History

    H.R. 6438 was introduced in the House on July 19, 2018, by 
Mr. Perry and Mr. McCaul, and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 6438 on July 24, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by unanimous 
consent.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 6438 on 
August 28, 2018, as H. Rpt. 115-908.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter on September 4, 2018 to the Chair 
of the Committee on Homeland Security agreeing that, in order 
to expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would not seek a sequential 
referral of H.R. 239. The letter further requested the 
appointment of Conferees should a House-Senate Conference be 
called. On the same day, the Chair of the Committee on Homeland 
Security sent a letter to the Chair of the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure acknowledging that in order 
to expedite consideration on the House Floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure will not seek a sequential 
referral of the bill. The letter further acknowledged that the 
Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security would support the 
appointment of Conferees from the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure should the House-Senate Conference be 
called.
    The House Considered H.R. 6438 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 4, 2018, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 6438 was received by the Senate on September 5, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    Provisions of H.R. 6438 were included in H.R. 302, the FAA 
Reauthorization Act of 2018.

                                ------                                


    BIOMETRIC IDENTIFICATION TRANSNATIONAL MIGRATION ALERT PROGRAM 
                       AUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2018

                               H.R. 6439

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish in the 
Department of Homeland Security the Biometric Identification 
Transnational Migration Alert Program, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The Biometric Identification Transnational Migration Alert 
Program (BITMAP) Authorization Act of 2018 (H.R. 6439) 
authorizes BITMAP within the Department of Homeland Security 
(DHS). This bill seeks to codify a U.S. Immigration and Customs 
Enforcement--Homeland Security Investigations (ICE-HSI) led 
program that was established in 2011 under the Obama 
Administration.
    BITMAP enables international partner-country law 
enforcement officers to collect and share biometric and 
biographic data on special interest individuals and identifies 
potential threat actors transiting through participating 
countries. BITMAP further provides infrastructure and 
capability for host governments to collect biometric data on 
individuals they encounter transiting through illicit pathways. 
The information collected under the auspices of BITMAP is 
shared with U.S. law enforcement and Intelligence Community 
members; DHS in turn provides information back to the host 
countries concerning the individuals whom they enrolled. 
Through this process, ICE is able to track U.S. bound illegal 
migration patterns, take joint action with partner countries, 
and deter human smuggling through South and Central America. 
Comparisons of biometric data through BITMAP serve to identify 
criminal persons, wanted subjects (including international 
fugitives), and known or suspected terrorists. BITMAP is 
currently deployed in 14 countries, with near-term plans to 
expand to additional countries.

Legislative History

    H.R. 6439 was introduced in the House on July 19, 2018, by 
Mr. McCaul and 10 original cosponsors, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 6439 on July 24, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by unanimous 
consent.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 6439 to 
the House on August 28, 2018, as H. Rpt. 115-909.
    The House Considered H.R. 6439 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 4, 2018, and passed H.R. 6439 by a ? 
recorded vote of 272 yeas and 119 nays, (Roll No. 381)
    H.R. 6265 was received by the Senate, on September 5, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs ordered the measure to be reported with an amendment 
favorably on September 26, 2018.

                                ------                                


         ADVANCING CYBERSECURITY DIAGNOSTICS AND MITIGATION ACT

                               H.R. 6443

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to authorize the 
Secretary of Homeland Security to establish a continuous 
diagnostics and mitigation program at the Department of 
Homeland Security, and for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 6443 the ``Advancing Cybersecurity Diagnostics and 
Mitigation Act,'' codifies and defines the continuous 
diagnostics and mitigation (CDM) program at the Department of 
Homeland Security (DHS). The bill requires the Secretary of 
Homeland Security to deploy, operate, and maintain the CDM 
program.
    H.R. 6443 requires the Secretary to make CDM capabilities 
available (with or without reimbursement). The Secretary is 
also required to develop policies and procedures for reporting 
systemic cybersecurity risks and potential incidents based upon 
data collected under CDM. The bill requires the Secretary to 
regularly deploy new CDM technologies and modify existing CDM 
capabilities to continuously improve the program. Finally, the 
bill requires DHS to develop a strategy to ensure the program 
continues to evolve and adjust to the changing cyber threat 
landscape and requires the strategy to be shared with Congress.
    CDM tools and data provide individual agencies improved 
visibility and understanding of their systems and networks. The 
CDM program also provides DHS with broad situational awareness 
and places DHS in a strong position to leverage individual 
agency data to identify, respond to, and mitigate cybersecurity 
vulnerabilities and threats. In this way, DHS can utilize CDM 
to consolidate some of the federal government's cybersecurity 
responsibilities, allowing agencies to focus on the specific 
and unique cybersecurity risks their agency is facing.
    H.R. 6443 will codify the work of CDM to date, while 
ensuring DHS continues to update CDM technologies to regularly 
improve the program and develops a long-term strategy to 
strengthen the future of the program.

Legislative History

    H.R. 6443 was introduced in the House on July 19, 2018, by 
Mr. Ratcliffe, Mr. Richmond, Mr. McCaul, Mr. Katko, and Mr. 
Fitzpatrick, and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 6443 on July 24, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 6443 on 
August 28, 2018, as H. Rpt. 115-910.
    The House Considered H.R. 6443 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 4, 2018, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 6443 was received by the Senate on September 5, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


  DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CHIEF DATA OFFICER AUTHORIZATION ACT

                               H.R. 6447

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish the 
position of Chief Data Officer of the Department of Homeland 
Security, and for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 6447 requires the Secretary, in consultation with the 
Chief Information Officer, to designate a Chief Data Officer of 
the Department. The Chief Data Officer is responsible for 
overseeing data management and analytics efforts at the 
Department and serves as the liaison with other federal 
agencies regarding the use of Department data. H.R. 6447 also 
requires the heads of operational components, in consultation 
with the Chief Data Officer and component Chief Information 
Officers, to appoint component Chief Data Officers to assist 
the Chief Data Officer of the Department with data management 
and analytics efforts within their respective components.

Legislative History

    H.R. 6447 was introduced in the House on July 19, 2018, by 
Mr. Carter of Texas and Mr. McCaul, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 6447 on July 24, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, as amended, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 6447 on 
September 4, 2018, as H. Rpt. 115-915.
    The House Considered H.R. 6447 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 4, 2018, and passed the measure, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    H.R. 6447 was received by the Senate on September 5, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


     TSA OPPORTUNITIES TO PURSUE EXPANDED NETWORKS FOR BUSINESS ACT

                               H.R. 6459

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to require a 
strategy to diversify the technology stakeholder marketplace 
regarding the acquisition by the Transportation Security 
Administration of security screening technologies, and for 
other purposes.

Summary

    Navigating the Transportation Security Administration's 
(TSA) procurement and acquisition process is a complicated and 
lengthy undertaking. Over the years, the Committee has 
repeatedly received testimony from the private sector that 
participating in these processes is an extremely costly 
endeavor for vendors. As a result, businesses with limited 
resources, including innovative small businesses, often find 
themselves at a disadvantage as they may not have the capital 
needed to pursue an acquisition through TSA's lengthy 
processes. Small businesses provide some of the most innovative 
security solutions; greater participation of small business 
innovators in a larger and more diverse marketplace of 
technology stakeholders has the potential to drive greater 
competition and lead to TSA acquiring more effective and 
innovative security solutions. Given the evolving nature of the 
threat to our nation's transportation systems, it is imperative 
that TSA drives technology innovations and procures cutting-
edge security technology. Small businesses have an important 
role to play in helping address and mitigate the wide array of 
threats that TSA faces. As such, the procurement and 
acquisition process must be as fair and accessible as possible.
    H.R. 6459 seeks to increase industry participation in the 
Transportation Security Administration's (TSA) acquisitions and 
procurements. The bill requires TSA to develop and submit to 
Congress a strategy to diversify the technology stakeholder 
marketplace that TSA relies upon to acquire security screening 
technologies, including by increased participation of small 
business innovators. The strategy shall include specific 
actions the TSA Administrator will take to foster 
diversification within the marketplace and plans for how the 
Administrator may, to the extent practicable, assist a small 
business innovator at certain points in acquisitions processes, 
including by addressing resource limitations. The bill also 
requires a feasibility assessment of increasing TSA engagement, 
through the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and 
Technology Directorate or by TSA setting up its own venture 
capital partnership modeled after the In-Q-tel program, a 
program maintained by the Intelligence Community. Finally, H.R. 
6459 prohibits TSA from lowering security technology standards 
to meet the requirements of the bill and requires the 
Comptroller General to review the strategy TSA submits under 
the bill.

Legislative History

    H.R. 6459 was introduced in the House on July 19, 2018, by 
Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, Mrs. Watson Coleman, Mr. Payne, 
and Mr. Keating, and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 6459 on July 24, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by unanimous 
consent.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 6459 on 
September 4, 2018, as H. Rpt. 115-916.
    The House Considered H.R. 6459 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 4, 2018, and passed the measure by voice 
vote.
    H.R. 6459 was received by the Senate on September 5, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    Provisions of H.R. 6459 were included in H.R. 302, the FAA 
Reauthorization Act of 2018.

                                ------                                


                   TSA NATIONAL DEPLOYMENT FORCE ACT

                               H.R. 6461

To amend title 49, United States Code, to establish in the 
Transportation Security Administration a National Deployment 
Office, and for other purposes.

Summary

    TSA's National Deployment Force (NDF) is a rapid response 
force of Transportation Security Officers (TSOs) and other TSA 
employees, based at airports around the country, who can be 
deployed around the country in support of homeland security 
operations. TSOs on the NDF typically serve one-year terms. 
Examples of situations where the NDF has been or could be 
deployed include National Special Security Events and the 
aftermath of natural disasters or terrorist attacks. The NDF 
has also been used to support airports across that country that 
have experienced hiring shortfalls or require additional 
personnel due to seasonal demands.
    H.R. 6461 codifies and authorizes the National Deployment 
Force (NDF) within the Transportation Security Administration 
(TSA). The bill establishes the National Deployment Office and 
tasks it with managing the NDF, recruiting Transportation 
Security Officers (TSOs) to participate, and training the TSOs 
who join the NDF. Finally, H.R. 6461 requires TSA to provide 
Congress with an annual report on the NDF, including its 
activities, collaboration with other Department of Homeland 
Security components, staffing, and recruitment and training 
activities.

Legislative History

    H.R. 6461 was introduced in the House on July 19, 2018, by 
Mrs. Watson Coleman and Mr. Katko, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 6461 on July 24, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by unanimous 
consent.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 6461 on 
September 4, 2018, as H. Rpt. 115-917.
    The House Considered H.R. 6461 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 4, 2018, and passed the measure by voice 
vote.
    H.R. 6461 was received by the Senate on September 5, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.
    Provisions of H.R. 6461 were included in H.R. 302, the FAA 
Reauthorization Act of 2018.

                                ------                                


PROTECTING CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE AGAINST DRONES AND EMERGING THREATS 
                                  ACT

                               H.R. 6620

To require the Department of Homeland Security to prepare a 
threat assessment relating to unmanned aircraft systems, and 
for other purposes.

Summary

Legislative History

    H.R. 6620 was introduced in the House on July 26, 2018, by 
Mr. Cedric Richmond and Mr. John Ratcliffe, and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H.R. 6620 on September 4, 2018, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by unanimous 
consent.
    The Chair of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter on September 21, 2018 to the Chair 
of the Committee on Homeland Security, agreeing that, in order 
to expedite consideration on the House floor, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure would agree to discharge from 
further consideration of H.R. 6620. On the same date, the Chair 
of the Committee on Homeland Security responded acknowledging 
the jurisdictional interest of the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure and the agreement to waive further 
consideration. The letter further acknowledged the agreement to 
support a request for conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called.
    The Committee reported H.R. 6620 to the House on September 
24, 2018, as H. Rpt. 115-960.
    The House considered H.R. 6620 on September 25, 2018, under 
Suspension of the Rules and passed the measure, as amended, by 
voice vote.
    H.R. 6620 was received in the Senate on September 26, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


              PUBLIC-PRIVATE CYBERSECURITY COOPERATION ACT

                               H.R. 6735

To direct the Secretary of Homeland Security to establish a 
vulnerability disclosure policy for Department of Homeland 
Security internet websites, and for other purposes.

Summary

    H.R. 6735, the ``Public-Private Cybersecurity Cooperation 
Act'' requires the Secretary of Homeland Security to establish 
a policy for the reporting of security vulnerabilities on 
appropriate information systems within 90 days. The policy must 
include an understanding of the information technology that the 
policy applies to, the conditions under which individuals or 
organizations legally may discover and report vulnerabilities, 
and how those vulnerabilities are to be reported and disclosed.
    Additionally, the bill requires DHS to identify the process 
for mitigating and remediating the security vulnerabilities 
reported through this policy. In developing the policy, the 
Secretary must consult with the Attorney General, the Secretary 
of Defense, the Administrator of the General Services 
Administration, and non-governmental security researchers. 
Finally, the bill lays out the specifics for reporting the 
policy to Congress, as well as a report to Congress on the 
effectiveness of the policy.
    H.R. 6735 directs the Secretary of Homeland Security to 
develop and implement a vulnerability disclosure program to 
keep pace with the constantly evolving threats the Department 
faces. Additionally, H.R. 6735 will ensure that the Department 
continues to lead by example in the government's efforts to 
improve its cybersecurity posture.

Legislative History

    H.R. 6735 was introduced in the House on September 7, 2018, 
by Mr. Kevin McCarthy, Mr. Will Hurd, Mr. James Langevin, and 
Mr. John Ratcliffe, and referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 6735 on September 13, 
2018, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, with amendment, by unanimous 
consent.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 6735 to 
the House on September 25, 2018, as H. Rpt. 115-961.
    The House considered H.R. 6735 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 25, 2018, and passed by voice vote.
    H.R. 6735 was received in the Senate on September 26, 2018, 
read twice, and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


                      BORDER TUNNEL TASK FORCE ACT

                               H.R. 6740

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish Border 
Tunnel Task Forces, and for other purposes.

Summary

    The Border Tunnel Task Force Act of 2018 (H.R. 6740) 
formally authorizes the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) 
Border Tunnel Task Forces to enhance DHS capacity to detect and 
eliminate cross-border tunnels used for the illicit smuggling 
of drugs, people, and weapons underneath the border of the 
United States. Border Tunnel Task Force teams are jointly 
constructed of ICE-HSI, CBP, other Departmental personnel, as 
well as other Federal, State, local, and tribal law enforcement 
agencies. This legislation authorizes the Secretary to 
establish new teams as needed.
    The Border Tunnel Task Force teams are deployed in 
jurisdictions that are significantly impacted by cross-border 
threats and participate in a comprehensive law enforcement 
effort to detect, investigate, and destroy the illicit 
international highways used for trafficking drugs, humans, and 
weapons in and out of the United States. Border Tunnel Task 
Forces enhance the sharing of critical national security 
related intelligence among DHS and other law enforcement 
agencies.

Legislative History

    H.R. 6740 was introduced in the House on September 7, 2018, 
by Mr. Pete Sessions and Mr. Michael McCaul.
    The Full Committee considered H.R. 6740 on September 13, 
2018, and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with 
a favorable recommendation, with amendment, by unanimous 
consent.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 6740 on 
September 25, 2018, as H. Rpt 115-962.
    The House considered H.R. 6740 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 25, 2018, and passed by voice vote.
    H.R. 6740 was received in the Senate on September 26, 2018, 
read twice and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


                    SECURE BORDER COMMUNICATIONS ACT

                               H.R. 6742

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to ensure that 
appropriate officers and agents of U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection are equipped with secure radios or other two-way 
communication devices, supported by system interoperability, 
and for other purposes.

Summary

    The Secure Border Communications Act (H.R. 6742) ensures 
appropriate officers and agents of U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection (CBP) are equipped with secure radios or other two-
way communication devices, supported by system 
interoperability.
    The bill requires that CBP communication devices allow 
officers and agents to communicate between ports of entry and 
inspection stations, and with other Federal, State, Tribal, and 
local law enforcement entities operating in the same area of 
responsibility. In addition, the bill requires that Border 
Patrol Agents operating in remote mission critical locations 
and at border checkpoints be outfitted with multi- or dual-band 
encrypted portable radios. The radios and communication devices 
acquired by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) shall 
have the option to connect to appropriate commercial mobile 
broadband networks when feasible. The Secretary may evaluate 
new or emerging communication technology to determine whether 
they are suitable for border security operational needs as 
well.

Legislative History

    H.R. 6742 was introduced in the House on September 7, 2018, 
by Mr. Brian Mast and Mr. Michael McCaul and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security, and in addition to the 
Committee on Ways and Means.
    The Committee considered H.R. 6742 on September 13, 2018, 
and ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, without amendment, by unanimous 
consent.
    The Chair of the Committee on Ways and Means sent a letter 
to the Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security on September 
24, 2018, agreeing that, in order to expedite consideration of 
the House Floor, The Committee on Ways and Means would agree to 
be discharged from further consideration. On September 25, 
2018, The Chair of the Committee on Homeland Security responded 
acknowledging the jurisdictional interest of the Committee on 
Ways and Means and the agreement to waive further 
consideration. The letter further acknowledged the agreement to 
support a request for conferees should a House-Senate 
Conference be called.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 6742 on 
September 25, 2018, as H. Rpt. 115-963.
    The House considered H.R. 6742 under Suspension of the 
Rules on September 25, 2018, and passed by voice vote.
    H.R. 6742 was received in the Senate on September 26, 2018, 
read twice and referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs.

                                ------                                


                         RESOLUTION OF INQUIRY

                              H. Res. 235

Directing the Secretary of Homeland Security to transmit 
certain documents to the House of Representatives relating to 
the Department of Homeland Security's research, integration, 
and analysis activities relating to Russian Government 
interference in the elections for Federal office held in 2016.

Legislative History

    H. Res. 235 was introduced in the House on March 30, 2017, 
by Mr. Thompson of Mississippi and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H. Res. 238 on April 5, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House adversely, by a 
recorded vote of 14 yeas and 12 nays (Roll No. 6).
    The Committee reported H. Res. 235 to the House on April 7, 
2017, with an adverse recommendation, as H. Rpt. 115-89.

                                ------                                


                         RESOLUTION OF INQUIRY

                              H. Res. 447

Directing the Secretary of Homeland Security to transmit 
certain documents to the House of Representatives relating to 
Department of Homeland Security policies and activities 
relating to businesses owned or controlled by President Donald 
J. Trump.

Legislative History

    H. Res. 447 was introduced in the House on July 14, 2017, 
by Mrs. Watson Coleman, Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, Mr. Payne, 
Mrs. Demings, Ms. Barragan, and Mr. Langevin and referred to 
the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H. Res. 447 on July 26, 2017, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House adversely, by a 
recorded vote of 18 yeas and 11 nays (Roll No. 15).
    The Committee reported H. Res. 447 to the House on July 28, 
2017, with an adverse recommendation, as H. Rpt. 115-270.

                                ------                                


                         RESOLUTION OF INQUIRY

                              H. Res. 898

Directing the Secretary of Homeland Security to transmit 
certain documents to the House of Representatives relating to 
Department of Homeland Security policies and activities 
relating to homeland security information produced and 
disseminated regarding cybersecurity threats posed by the ZTE 
Corporation, headquartered in Shenzhen, China.

Legislative History

    H. Res. 898 was introduced in the House on May 16, 2018, by 
Mr. Thompson of Mississippi and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H. Res. 898 on June 6, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House adversely, by a 
recorded vote of 16 yeas and 11 nays (Roll No. 37).
    The Committee reported H. Res. 898 to the House on June 8, 
2018, with an adverse recommendation, as H. Rpt. 115-714.

                                ------                                


                         RESOLUTION OF INQUIRY

                              H. Res. 990

Supporting the officers and personnel who carry out the 
important mission of the United States Immigration and Customs 
Enforcement.

Summary

Legislative History

    H. Res. 990 was introduced in the House on July 11, 2018, 
by Mr. Higgins of Louisiana and referred to the Committee on 
the Judiciary, and in addition to the Committee Ways and Means, 
the Committee on Homeland Security, and the Committee on Armed 
Services.
    H. Res. 990 was considered in the House under Suspension of 
the Rules on July 18, 2018, and passed, as amended, by a \2/3\ 
recorded vote of 244 yeas, 35 nays, and 133 voting ``present'' 
(Roll Call Vote No. 337).

                                ------                                


                         RESOLUTION OF INQUIRY

                              H. Res. 1005

Directing the Secretary of Homeland Security to transmit 
certain documents to the House of Representatives relating to 
the border security policies, procedures, and activities as 
such relate to the interdiction of families by the U.S. Border 
Patrol between ports of entry.

Legislative History

    H. Res. 1005 was introduced in the House on July 19, 2018, 
by Mr. Thompson of Mississippi and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered H. Res. 1005 on July 24, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House adversely, by a 
recorded vote of 16 yeas and 11 nays (Roll No. 40).
    The Committee reported H. Res. 1005 to the House on July 
26, 2018, with an adverse recommendation, as H. Rpt. 115-877.

                                ------                                


                        SENATE MEASURES REFERRED


          HACK THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ACT OF 2017

                          S. 1281 (H.R. 2774)

To establish a bug bounty pilot program within the Department 
of Homeland Security, and for other purposes.

Summary

    S.1281, the Hack the Department of Homeland Security Act of 
2018, directs the Department of Homeland Security to establish 
a bug bounty pilot program within 180 days of enactment. To be 
located within the Office of the Chief Information Officer, the 
bug bounty program would allow participants to probe the 
appropriate information systems, as identified by the 
Department, to identify vulnerabilities. The pilot program 
authorizes the Secretary to provide compensation for reports of 
previously unidentified security vulnerabilities.
    The bill addresses possible security concerns by directing 
the Secretary to designate appropriate information systems that 
should be included by the program. Additionally, the bill 
directs the Secretary to consult with the Attorney General to 
ensure program participants that comply with the requirements 
of the pilot program are protected from prosecution and to 
develop a background check process for eligible program 
participants. The bill requires the Department to submit a 
report, within 180 days upon completion of the program, to 
Congress providing an overview on the pilot program.

Legislative History

S. 1281
    S. 1281 was introduced in the Senate on May 25, 2017, by 
Ms. Hassan, Mr. Portman, Mrs. McCaskill, and Ms. Harris; and 
referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs considered S. 1281 on October 4, 2017, and ordered the 
measure to be reported to the Senate, with an Amendment in the 
Nature of a Substitute.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs reported S. 1281 to the Senate on February 26, 2018, as 
S. Rpt. 115-209.
    The Senate considered S. 1281 on April 17, 2018, and passed 
the measure, with an amendment by voice vote.
    S. 1281 was received in the House on April 18, 2018, and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security.
    The Committee considered S. 1281 on September 13, 2018, and 
ordered the measure to be reported to the House with a 
favorable recommendation, with amendment, by unanimous consent.
    The Committee on Homeland Security reported H.R. 6742 on 
September 25, 2018, as H. Rpt. 115-964.

H.R. 2774
    H.R. 2774 was introduced in the House on June 6, 2017, by 
Mr. Ted Lieu of California and Mr. Taylor and referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee H.R. 2774 
was referred to the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity and 
Infrastructure Protection.

                                ------                                


                 ABOLISH HUMAN TRAFFICKING ACT OF 2017

                          S. 1311 (H.R. 2803)

To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish the 
immigration advisory program, and for other purposes.

Summary

Legislative History

S. 1311
    S. 1311 was introduced in the Senate on June 2, 2017, by 
Mr. Cornyn and 12 original co-sponsors; and referred to the 
Senate Committee on the Judiciary.
    The Senate Committee on the Judiciary considered S. 1311 on 
June 29, 2017, and ordered the measure to be reported to the 
Senate, with an Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute.
    The Senate Committee on the Judiciary reported S. 1331 to 
the Senate on August 1, 2017, with no written report.
    The Senate considered S. 1311 on September 11, 2017, and 
passed the measure, with an amendment by unanimous consent.
    S. 1311 was received in the House on September 12, 2017, 
and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary, and in addition 
to the Committee on Foreign Affairs, the Committee on Energy 
and Commerce, and the Committee on Homeland Security. Within 
the Committee, S. 1311 was referred to the Subcommittee on 
Border and Maritime Security.

H.R. 2803
    H.R. 2803 was introduced in the House on June 7, 2017, by 
Mr. Poe of Texas and referred to the Committee on the 
Judiciary, and in addition to the Committee on Foreign Affairs, 
the Committee on Energy and Commerce, and the Committee on 
Homeland Security.

                                ------                                


           AUTHENTICATING LOCAL EMERGENCIES AND REAL THREATS 
                              ACT OF 2018

                          S. 2385 (H.R. 4965)

To establish best practices for State, tribal, and local 
governments participating in the Integrated Public Alert and 
Warning System, and for other purposes.

Summary

    S. 2385 requires the Federal Emergency Management Agency 
(FEMA) to: share best practices regarding use of the Integrated 
Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS) by State, Tribal, and 
local governments; establish minimum requirements for State, 
Tribal, and local government IPAWS participation; and establish 
a process to validate IPAWS tools. Finally, the bill rests 
authority to originate missile launch alerts and warnings with 
the Federal government.

Legislative History

    S. 2385 was introduced in the Senate on February 6, 2018, 
by Mr. Schatz, Ms. Harris, Mr. Gardner, Mr. Sullivan, and Ms. 
Hirono and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs.
    The Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs was discharged from further consideration of S. 2385, 
on June 26, 2018., and the Senate then passed the measure, with 
an amendment by unanimous consent.
    S. 2385 was received in the House on June 27, 2018, and 
referred to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, 
and the Committee on Homeland Security. Within the Committee, 
S. 2385 was referred to the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response, and Communications.

               Oversight Activities of the Full Committee

MICHAEL T. McCAUL, Texas, Chairman

Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi      Lamar Smith, Texas
Sheila Jackson Lee, Texas            Peter T. King, New York
James R. Langevin, Rhode Island      Mike Rogers, Alabama
Cedric L. Richmond, Louisiana        Lou Barletta, Pennsylvania
William R. Keating, Massachusetts    Scott Perry, Pennsylvania
Donald M. Payne, Jr., New Jersey     John Katko, New York
Filemon Vela, Texas                  Will Hurd, Texas
Bonnie Watson Coleman, New Jersey    Martha McSally, Arizona
Kathleen M. Rice, New York           John Ratcliffe, Texas
J. Luis Correa, California           Daniel M. Donovan, Jr., New York
Val Butler Demings, Florida          Mike Gallagher, Wisconsin
Nanette Diaz Barragan, California    Clay Higgins, Louisiana
                                     Thomas A. Garrett, Jr., Virginia
                                     Brian K. Fitzpatrick, Pennsylvania
                                     Ron Estes, Kansas
                                     Don Bacon, Nebraska
                                     Debbie Lesko, Arizona

                              ----------                              


    During the 115th Congress, the Committee on Homeland 
Security held 12 hearings, receiving testimony from 49 
witnesses; and considered 83 measures, resulting in 14 Public 
Laws.
                              ----------                              


                Organizational Meeting of the Committee

    The Committee on Homeland Security met on February 1, 2017, 
for an organizational meeting for the 115th Congress under the 
direction of Chairman Michael T. McCaul of Texas.
    The Full Committee met, pursuant to notice, and adopted the 
Committee Rules for the 115th Congress by a recorded vote of 18 
yeas and 10 nays (Roll Call Vote No. 5). The Committee also 
approved the Committee on Homeland Security's Oversight Plan 
for the 115th Congress and Committee Resolution No. 1, relating 
to staff hiring, by unanimous consent.
                              ----------                              


                            BORDER SECURITY

    On February 7, 2017, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``Ending the Crisis: America's Borders and the Path to 
Security.'' The Committee received testimony from Hon. John F. 
Kelly, Secretary, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. 
Steve C. McCraw, Director, Texas Department of Homeland 
Security; Mr. Joe Frank Martinez, Sheriff, Val Verde County, 
Texas; Mr. Leon N. Wilmot, Sheriff, Yuma County, Arizona; and 
The Honorable Eddie Trevino, Jr., County Judge, Cameron County, 
Texas.
    The hearing focused on security at the nation's southern 
border with Mexico, which is almost 2,000 miles long. Terrain 
that varies from desert to mountains, high cliffs, and the Rio 
Grande River make a one-size fits all border security solution 
largely impractical. The Committee examined illicit flow across 
the border and the threat to our national security.

             SECURITY SCREENING AND TERRORIST WATCHLISTING

    On February 27, 2017, the Chairman of the Full Committee, 
Chairman of the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and 
Intelligence, and the Chairman of the Subcommittee on Border 
and Maritime Security, requested the Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) conduct a fraud review of the Department of 
Homeland Security's Student and Exchange Visitor Program 
(SEVP). GAO provided a Sensitive but Unclassified (SBU) version 
of the report to the Committee on November 20, 2018 and is in 
the process of producing a public version of the report.
    On March 15, 2017, the Members of the Committee conducted a 
site visit to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection's (CBP) 
National Targeting Center (NTC) and the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation's (FBI) Terrorist Screening Center (TSC) both in 
Virginia to examine passenger screening and terrorist 
watchlisting procedures. The TSC, established in 2003, is 
responsible for maintaining the Terrorist Screening Database 
(TSDB)--also known as the terrorist watchlist--a sensitive but 
unclassified list used by Federal, State, and local law 
enforcement to track known or suspected terrorists. The NTC, 
established in October 2001, operates 24 hours a day/7 days a 
week to provide tactical targeting information aimed at 
interdicting terrorists, criminal actors, and contraband at the 
earliest point possible. CBP's Automated Targeting System (ATS) 
is the primary tool used at the NTC to match travelers, 
conveyances, and shipments against law enforcement, 
intelligence, and travel pattern databases.
    On September 5, 2017, the Chairman of the Full Committee 
and Chair of the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security, 
sent a letter to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services 
(USCIS) regarding concerns with applicant vetting related to 
immigration benefits awarded under the Department of Defense's 
Military Accessions Vital to National Interest (MAVNI) program. 
On November 29, 2017, the USCIS Director responded and included 
copies of memorandums between DOD and USCIS regarding the 
program.
    On November 16, 2017, the Chairman of the Full Committee 
sent a letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security and the 
Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation regarding the 
importance of integrating data collected in conflict areas, 
particularly where terror groups are active, for use in 
vetting. On March 14, 2018, DHS responded that they concur it 
is important to capture this information. On May 9, 2018, the 
Chairman of the Full Committee sent a follow up letter to the 
Secretary of Homeland Security requesting additional 
information on efforts to improve battlefield biometric 
information sharing. On July 30, 2018, the DHS Deputy Under 
Secretary of Office of Strategy, Policy and Plans provided a 
Law Enforcement Sensitive (LES) response providing additional 
background information and noting that the National Vetting 
Center (NVC), which is currently being created, will further 
pursue progress on this issue.
    On June 13, 2018, the Chairman of the Full Committee sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security requesting 
additional background on information provided during an April 
26, 2018, CHS hearing regarding the number of known or 
suspicious terrorists (KSTs) encountered by DHS personnel each 
day. On June 20, 2018, representatives from U.S. Customs and 
Border Protection provided a briefing for staff.
    On October 10, 2017, the Chairman of the Full Committee 
sent a letter to the Attorney General, Acting Secretary of 
Homeland Security and Director of the FBI raising concerns 
about Senate Bill 54, legislation passed in California that 
could significantly reduce information sharing between Federal, 
state and local partners related to immigration. The letter 
noted how a significant number of terrorism cases have an 
immigration nexus and could thus be impacted by the law.

                          U.S. SECRET SERVICE

    On March 20, 2017, the Members of the Committee received a 
classified briefing from the Secretary of Homeland Security on 
recent security breaches, including trespassers at The White 
House Complex and stolen equipment. The Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Services conducted oversight of 
the U.S. Secret Service through numerous site visits, 
briefings, and Subcommittee hearings.

                             CYBERSECURITY

    On March 1, 2017, the Members of the Committee received a 
briefing on cybersecurity and combatting digital threats from 
private sector cyber stakeholders.
    On March 22, 2017, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``A Borderless Battle: Defending Against Cyber Threats.'' The 
Committee received testimony from GEN Keith B. Alexander (Ret. 
USA), President and Chief Executive Officer, IronNet 
Cybersecurity; Mr. Michael Daniel, President, Cyber Threat 
Alliance; Mr. Frank J. Cilluffo, Director, Center for Cyber and 
Homeland Security, George Washington University; and Mr. Bruce 
W. McConnell, Global Vice President, EastWest Institute.
    This hearing examined the evolving cyber threat landscape 
and the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) civilian cyber 
defense mission. This hearing examined the current cyber threat 
environment in an effort to guide the Committee's legislative 
and oversight efforts in defending America's domestic networks 
here in the Homeland.
    In 2015, Congress passed the Cybersecurity Act which 
authorized DHS to protect both Federal networks and U.S. 
critical infrastructure from cyber risks. Building on that 
recently passed law, the Committee moved legislation to 
establish a cybersecurity agency at DHS so it can most 
effectively carry out these civilian cyber defense statutory 
authorities. H.R. 3359, the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure 
Security Agency Act was signed into law on November 16, 2018 
(P.L. 115-278).
    On July 27, 2017, the Members of the Committee on Homeland 
Security received a briefing on the Global Internet Forum to 
Counter Terrorism, a private sector initiative to combat and 
remove terrorism-related content from digital platforms.
    On October 11, 2017, the Members of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing and demonstration on the 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security's cyber incident response 
capabilities.

                           AVIATION SECURITY

    On March 22, 2017, the Members of the Committee received a 
classified briefing from representatives of the Department of 
Homeland Security Office of Intelligence and Analysis; the 
Transportation Security Administration; the Department of 
State, and the National Counterterrorism Center on aviation 
security. The classified briefing addressed aviation security 
enhancements for select last point of departure (LPD) 
airports--airports with direct flights to the United States.
    On November 8, 2017, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``Preventing the next Attack: TSA's Role in Keeping Our 
Transportation Systems Secure.'' The Committee heard testimony 
from Mr. David Pekoske, Administrator, Transportation Security 
Administration on ways to keep our airports safe and questioned 
him on technology to improve aviation security.
    The Subcommittee on Transportation and Protective Security 
conducted oversight of TSA and aviation security through 
numerous hearings, briefings, and site visits.

                 DEPARTMENT REAUTHORIZATION AND BUDGET

    On June 7, 2017, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``Department of Homeland Security Reauthorization and the 
President's FY 2018 Budget Request.'' The Committee received 
testimony from the Hon. John F. Kelly, Secretary, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security. This hearing provided an 
opportunity for Members to question the Secretary on the FY 
2018 Budget Request for the Department (the budget), to examine 
how the budget reflects the Committee's oversight priorities 
and the Secretary's vision for the Department, and how Congress 
can ensure the Department runs more efficiently and spends 
taxpayer dollars more effectively while better protecting our 
homeland security. Additionally, this hearing allowed Members 
to discuss Department of Homeland Security Reauthorization 
efforts.
    On April 26, 2018, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``Strengthening the Safety and Security of Our Nation: The 
President's FY2019 Budget Request for the Department of 
Homeland Security.'' The Committee received testimony from the 
Hon. Kirstjen M. Nielsen, Secretary, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security. This hearing allowed Members to question the 
Secretary on the specifics of the President's FY19 Budget 
Request for the Department (the budget), to examine how the 
budget reflects the Committee's oversight priorities and the 
Secretary's vision for the Department, and how Congress can 
ensure the Department runs more efficiently and spends taxpayer 
dollars more effectively while better protecting our homeland 
security.
    On November 16, 2018, the Chair and Ranking Member, along 
with bipartisan Members of Congress, sent a letter to the 
Chairs and Ranking Members of the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees advocating for $60 million for the 
Non-Profit Security Grant Program in Fiscal Year 2019.

                     SECURITY AT OUR NATION'S PORTS

    On October 20, 2017, the Committee held a field hearing in 
San Pedro, California, entitled ``Examining Physical Security 
and Cybersecurity at Our Nation's Ports.'' The Committee 
received testimony from RADM Todd A. Sokalzuk, Commander, 
Eleventh Coast Guard District, U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security; Mr. Carlos C. Martel, Director 
of Field Operations, Los Angeles Field Office, U.S. Customs and 
Border Protection (CBP), U.S. Department of Homeland Security; 
Mr. Eugene D. Seroka, Executive Director, The Port of Los 
Angeles; Mr. Mario Cordero, Executive Director, The Port of 
Long Beach; and Mr. Ray Familathe, International Vice-
President, International Longshore and Warehouse Union.
    The Committee examined how the U.S. government mitigates 
physical security and cybersecurity risks at U.S. and last 
point of departure overseas seaports by partnering closely with 
port security stakeholders. Specifically, how the U.S. Coast 
Guard and CBP determines the risk profile of inbound 
containers, scans high risk containers overseas, ensures the 
security of containers and their cargo throughout the supply 
chain, and how CBP inspects the containers once they arrive in 
the United States. Also, the hearing addressed how the Coast 
Guard mitigates cyber threats and vulnerabilities at seaports, 
and the role cybersecurity plays in their overall security 
plan, as well as information sharing partnerships between 
government and industry stakeholders on current cyber risks and 
threats to the maritime industry.

                    TRANSPORTATION SECURITY SYSTEMS

    On November 8, 2017, the Members of the Committee received 
a classified briefing from the Inspector General of the 
Department of Homeland Security and the Administrator of the 
Transportation Security Administration (TSA) on the results of 
a study by the Inspector General on the security of 
transportation systems.
    On that same date the Full Committee held a hearing 
entitled ``Preventing the Next Attack: TSA's Role in Keeping 
Our Transportation Systems Secure.'' The Committee received 
testimony from Hon. David P. Pekoske, Administrator, 
Transportation Security Administration, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security. The Committee examined concerns about TSA 
employee morale, technology acquisitions and procurement, 
enrollment in trusted traveler programs, and the persistent 
terror threats to transportation security. Additionally, this 
hearing provided Members the opportunity to identify and 
discuss the solutions Administrator Pekoske plans to implement 
in order to address bureaucratic challenges at TSA.
    On November 15, 2017, the Committee visited the 
Transportation Security Integration Facility at Ronald Reagan 
Washington National Airport to examine TSA passenger screening 
protocols.

                           WORLD WIDE THREATS

    On November 30, 2017, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``World Wide Threats: Keeping America Secure in the New Age of 
Terror.'' The Committee received testimony from Hon. Elaine C. 
Duke, Acting Secretary, Department of Homeland Security; Hon. 
Christopher A. Wray, Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation, 
U.S. Department of Justice; Nicholas J. Rasmussen, Director, 
The National Counterterrorism Center, Office of the Director of 
National Intelligence; Mr. David B. Rausch, Chief of Police, 
City of Knoxville, Tennessee, testifying on behalf of the 
International Association of Chiefs of Police; Rabbi Abraham 
Cooper, Associate Dean, Director Global Social Action Agenda, 
Simon Wiesenthal Center; and Mr. J. Richard Cohen, President, 
Southern Poverty Law Center.
    The Committee examined the current threats to the U.S. 
Homeland, especially those from Islamist terrorism, domestic 
terrorism, nation-state-led cyber warfare, and border security 
and efforts of the Federal Government to counter these threats, 
as well as the steps Congress has taken to assist in its 
efforts. A second panel of experts allowed the Committee to 
examine the twin threats of jihadist terrorism and domestic 
extremist groups, particularly those involved in the 
Charlottesville conflict on August 12, 2017.

          COUNTERING THE THREAT FROM UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS

    On Wednesday, January 10, 2018, at 10:00 am in HVC-301, the 
Committee on Homeland Security held a Classified Member-only 
briefing, at the TS/SCI level, on risks associated with non-
traditional aviation technology, such as small unmanned aerial 
systems (UAS), and the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) 
efforts to mitigate this threat. The Committee heard from rb
    Representatives from DHS's Office of the General Counsel 
and Office of Strategy, Policy, and Plans; the Department of 
Justice; the Department of Transportation and Federal Aviation 
Administration (FAA); and the National Counterterrorism Center.
    The Committee examined the threat to national security and 
discussed efforts being made by the various federal agencies to 
address the threat as well as legislative tools law enforcement 
might need to address the threat effectively.

                           HUMAN TRAFFICKING

    On January 17, 2018, the Members of the Committee received 
a briefing from the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. 
Immigration and Customs Enforcement, DHS Office of Partnership 
and Engagement--Blue Campaign, Federal Law Enforcement Training 
Centers, and other industry and association stakeholders on 
efforts to combat human trafficking.

                               DISASTERS

    On September 9, 2017, the Full Committee Chair visited the 
Federal Emergency Management Agency's National Response 
Coordination Center to meet with the Administrator and receive 
an update on response operations to Hurricane Harvey and 
preparations for Hurricane Irma.
    On March 15, 2018, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``Preparedness, Response, and Rebuilding: Lessons from the 2017 
Disasters.'' The Committee received testimony from Hon. William 
B. ``Brock'' Long, Administrator, Federal Emergency Management 
Agency, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; MG Donald E. 
``Ed'' Jackson, Jr., Deputy Commanding General, Civil and 
Emergency Operations, United States Army Corps of Engineers, 
Department of the Army, U.S. Department of Defense; Mr. John V. 
Kelly, Acting Inspector General, Office of the Inspector 
General, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. Reed Clay, 
Chief Operating Officer, Office of the Governor, State of 
Texas; Mr. Wesley Maul, Director, Division of Emergency 
Management, State of Florida; Hon. Jose E. Melendez-Ortiz, 
Vice-Chairman, Committee on Federal and International 
Relations, and Status, Commonwealth of Puerto Rico; and Ms. 
Jeanne-Aimee De Marrais, Senior Director, Save the Children. 
The Committee examined lessons learned from last year's 
disasters, including the preparedness, response, and recovery 
efforts for Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria as well as the 
wildfires in California, in order to better prepare for future 
disasters. This hearing gave Members the opportunity to 
question Administrator Long regarding his priorities and vision 
for the future of FEMA.
    On April 9, 2018, the Full Committee held a field hearing 
in Cypress, Texas entitled ``Houston Strong: Hurricane Harvey 
Lessons Learned and the Path Forward.'' The Committee received 
testimony from Mr. George A. `Tony' Robinson, Regional 
Administrator, Region VI, Federal Emergency Management Agency, 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security; RADM Paul F. Thomas, 
Commander, Eighth Coast Guard District, United States Coast 
Guard, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Col. Lars N. 
Zetterstrom, Commanding Officer, Galveston District, United 
States Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, U.S. 
Department of Defense; Ms. Beth Van Duyne, Regional 
Administrator, Region 6, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban 
Development; Hon. R. Jack Cagle, Commissioner, Harris County, 
Texas; Hon. Sylvester Turner, Mayor, City of Houston, Texas; 
Hon. Allen Owen, Mayor, Missouri City, Texas; Mr. Mark Sloan, 
Emergency Management Coordinator, Harris County, Texas; and Ms. 
Carol Moore, Disaster Chair, Texas State Conference, NAACP. The 
Committee explored the lessons learned from the 2017 hurricane 
season by specifically focusing on efforts to respond to and 
recover from Hurricane Harvey. In addition, Members had the 
opportunity to hear from local officials on their needs and 
from federal representatives on how they are supporting Texans 
in the wake of the storm and in preparation for the 2018 
hurricane season.
    Following the hearing, on May 21, 2018, the Full Committee 
Chair and Ranking Member, joined by other Members who attended 
the field hearing, sent a letter to General Todd Semonite, 
Commanding General and Chief of Engineers, U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers regarding the release of water from the Addicks and 
Barker Reservoirs during Hurricane Harvey.
    On May 22, 2018, the Full Committee Chair and the Chair of 
the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications sent a letter to the Comptroller General 
requesting to be added as requesters of GAO's 2017 hurricane 
season review.

                           ELECTION SECURITY

    On March 6, 2018, the Chairman of the Full Committee sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security regarding Russian 
interference in our electoral institutions and processes and 
requesting a number of items including a classified briefing 
for Committee Members regarding cybersecurity threats facing 
state's election systems.
    On April 13, 2018, representatives from the Department of 
Homeland Security provided the Members of the Committee a 
classified briefing on cybersecurity threats facing election 
infrastructure.
    This briefing focused on Russian attempts to meddle in 
election systems in 2016 as well as efforts to protect the 
security of the election infrastructure for the 2018 elections. 
The Committee heard specific information regarding attempts by 
Russia to infiltrate election systems in 2016 and was informed 
that there was no evidence that voting machines were 
compromised or that any votes had been changed or miscounted. 
The Committee also examined specific actions DHS was 
undertaking to protect the infrastructure from Russia as well 
as any other foreign adversaries in 2018 elections.
    On July 11, 2018, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``DHS's Progress in Securing Election Systems and Other 
Critical Infrastructure.'' The Committee received testimony 
from the Hon. Christopher Krebs, Under Secretary, National 
Protection and Programs Directorate, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; and Hon. Nellie M. Gorbea, Secretary of 
State, State of Rhode Island.
    The Committee examined the efforts by Russian hackers to 
infiltrate the 2016 general election on behalf of or under the 
direction of the Russian government by targeting a number of 
systems integral to conducting elections. The Committee also 
examined Department of Homeland Security (DHS) efforts to 
assist state and local officials to secure election 
infrastructure, including voting machines, vote tallying 
systems, and voter databases. The hearing provided Members an 
opportunity to hear about DHS's role working across all 16 
critical infrastructure sectors because a cyber threat to 
elections may pose a similar threat to other critical 
infrastructure sectors. Members were given the opportunity to 
question the Under Secretary of the National Protection and 
Programs Directorate (NPPD) on his plans for addressing 
cybersecurity and critical infrastructure challenges across all 
sectors going forward.

                       BOSTON AND AUSTIN BOMBINGS

    On April 18, 2018, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``From Boston to Austin: Lessons Learned on Homeland Threat 
Information Sharing.'' The Committee received testimony from 
Mr. Brian Manley, Chief, Austin Police Department, Austin, 
Texas; Mr. William B. Evans, Commissioner, Boston Police 
Department, Boston, Massachusetts; Mr. Peter Newsham, Chief of 
Police, Washington Metropolitan Police Department, testifying 
on behalf of the Major Cities Chiefs Association; Mr. Kerry 
Sleeper, Assistant Director, Partnership and Engagement, 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, U.S. Department of Justice; 
and Mr. James E. McDermond, Assistant Director, Office of 
Strategic Intelligence and Information Bureau, Bureau of 
Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, U.S. Department of 
Justice.
    The Committee examined the current status of information 
sharing and cooperation between federal agencies and state, 
local, tribal and territorial partners by reviewing interagency 
responses to the Boston Marathon bombings and the recent series 
of bombings in Austin, Texas. Members questioned state and 
local law enforcement on partnership with and support from 
federal agencies, and the evolution of information sharing 
programs and policies.
    On July 11, 2018, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``DHS's Progress in Securing Election Systems and Other 
Critical Infrastructure.'' The Committee received testimony 
from the Hon. Christopher Krebs, Under Secretary, National 
Protection and Programs Directorate, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; and Hon. Nellie M. Gorbea, Secretary of 
State, State of Rhode Island.
    The Committee examined the efforts by Russian hackers to 
infiltrate the 2016 general election on behalf of or under the 
direction of the Russian government by targeting a number of 
systems integral to conducting elections. The Committee also 
examined Department of Homeland Security (DHS) efforts to 
assist state and local officials to secure election 
infrastructure, including voting machines, vote tallying 
systems, and voter databases. The hearing provided Members an 
opportunity to hear about DHS's role working across all 16 
critical infrastructure sectors because a cyber threat to 
elections may pose a similar threat to other critical 
infrastructure sectors. Members were given the opportunity to 
question the Under Secretary of the National Protection and 
Programs Directorate (NPPD) on his plans for addressing 
cybersecurity and critical infrastructure challenges across all 
sectors going forward.

                                  ISIS

    On May 23, 2018, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``ISIS Post-Caliphate: Threat Implications for America and the 
West.'' The Committee received testimony from Hon. Ryan C. 
Crocker, Former Ambassador of the United States; Gen. John M. 
``Jack'' Keane (Ret.-U.S. Army), Chairman of the Board, 
Institute for the Study of War; Dr. Daveed Gartenstein-Ross, 
Senior Fellow, Foundation for Defense of Democracies; and Dr. 
Joshua A. Geltzer, Former Senior Director for Counterterrorism, 
National Security Council.
    The Committee examined the near-term and long-term homeland 
implications of the recent territorial losses by ISIS. Members 
and witnesses discussed the current state of ISIS in Iraq and 
Syria, the heightened threat posed by the foreign fighter 
diaspora, the growing role of ISIS affiliates and the 
significance of the ``virtual caliphate.''

                         SUPPLY CHAIN SECURITY

    On May 17, 2018, Committee Chairman Michael McCaul sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security raising questions 
about the potential threat posed by ZTE and Huawei equipment to 
U.S. national security and DHS efforts to keep it out of 
federal supply chains. The Committee received a written 
response on October 9, 2018.
    The decision by the Department of Defense (DOD) to prohibit 
the sale of ZTE products on military installations has once 
again drawn attention to the threats posed by ZTE and similar 
firms (such as Huawei) to federal communications networks, and 
to the privacy of U.S. persons or businesses which utilize such 
equipment or services. As a result of this decision, the 
Members of the Committee received a classified briefing on June 
13, 2018, to examine the threat posed to federal networks by 
the use of services and equipment provided by foreign 
telecommunications firms which could be working under the 
direction or influence of the People's Republic of China (PRC) 
and the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). The Members were briefed 
by representatives from the Department of Homeland Security, 
Office of Intelligence and Analysis; the Department of Defense, 
Defense Security Service; and the Office of the Director of 
National Intelligence.
    On October 18, 2018, the Chairman of the Full Committee 
sent a letter to the Director of National Security, Secretary 
of Homeland Security, and Director of the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation regarding media allegations regarding possible 
supply chain vulnerabilities that may have been exploited by 
China to implant malicious computer chips onto computer 
hardware. The letter requests information on the veracity of 
the threat and any mitigation measures the agencies may be 
undertaking. A response has not been received.
    In response to the Binding Operational Directive (BOD) 
issued by the Department directing Federal agencies to remove 
from their networks all Kaspersky Lab products, Members of the 
Committee received a briefing on October 25, 2017 from DHS 
officials on counterintelligence concerns related to Kaspersky. 
On February 23, 2018, staff received an update briefing from 
DHS regarding Kaspersky Labs and implementation of the BOD.

                          FAMILY REUNIFICATION

    On July 18, 2018, the Members of the Committee on Homeland 
Security received a briefing on family reunification efforts at 
the U.S. border. Representatives from Customs and Border 
Protection, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the U.S. 
Citizenship and Immigration Services, all of the Department of 
Homeland Security, the Department of Justice, and the 
Department of Health and Human Services were present to respond 
to Member concerns.
    On June 26, U.S. District Court Judge Dana Sabraw (District 
Court Judge for the Southern District of California) mandated 
that the administration reunite families that were separated at 
the border. The Committee examined the efforts of DHS and DOJ 
to meet the timeline and reunify families that had been 
separated.

                       CONGRESSIONAL DELEGATIONS

CODEL McCAUL May 4-12, 2017

    From May 4 through 12, 2017, the Chair of the Full 
Committee led a Congressional Delegation to the French 
Republic, the Republic of Poland, the Republic of Estonia and 
Ukraine. The Delegation examined: Cybersecurity threats from 
the Russian Federation and prospects for regional cooperation; 
Russian influence and aggression towards Eastern Europe and the 
United States; counterterrorism and security cooperation 
amongst our European allies; foreign fighter flows from Europe 
into the Middle East and back; U.S. Defense posture in Eastern 
Europe and evolving security threats to the United States.

CODEL KATKO October 15-22, 2017

    From October 15 through 22, 2017, the Chair of the 
Subcommittee of Transportation and Protective Security led a 
Congressional Delegation to the Kingdom of the Netherlands, the 
Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, and the Federal Republic of 
Germany. The Delegation examined: international cooperation 
with foreign partners to enhance aviation security, the 
deployment of advanced technologies at overseas airport 
checkpoints, aviation employee screening and vetting at last 
point of departure airports with flights to the United States, 
as well as counterterrorism programs in Europe and the Middle 
East. The Delegation met with a number of deployed U.S. 
Government personnel, as well as foreign dignitaries and 
government officials to discuss areas of mutual security 
interest and cooperation.
                              ----------                              


                        Committee Hearings Held

``Ending the Crisis: America's Borders and the Path to 
        Security.'' February 7, 2017. (Serial No. 115-2)
``A Borderless Battle: Defending Against Cyber Threats.'' March 
        22, 2017. (Serial No. 115-9)
``Department of Homeland Security Reauthorization and the 
        President's FY 2018 Budget Request.'' June 7, 2017. 
        (Serial No. 115-18)
``Examining Physical Security and Cybersecurity at Our Nation's 
        Ports.'' (San Pedro, California) October 30, 2017. 
        (Serial No. 115-35)
``Preventing the Next Attack: TSA's Role in Keeping Our 
        Transportation Systems Secure.'' November 8, 2017. 
        (Serial No. 115-37)
``World Wide Threats: Keeping America Secure in the New Age of 
        Terror.'' November 30, 2017. (Serial No. 115-41)
``Preparedness, Response, and Rebuilding: Lessons from the 2017 
        Disasters.'' March 20, 2018. (Serial No. 115-53)
``Houston Strong: Hurricane Harvey Lessons Learned and the Path 
        Forward'' (Cypress, Texas) April 9, 2018. (Serial No. 
        115-56)
``From Boston to Austin: Lessons Learned on Homeland Threat 
        Information Sharing.'' April 18, 2018. (Serial No. 115-
        60)
``Strengthening the Safety and Security of Our Nation: The 
        President's FY2019 Budget Request for the Department of 
        Homeland Security'' April 26, 2018. (Serial No. 115-63)
``ISIS Post-Caliphate: Threat Implications for America and the 
        West.'' May 23, 2018. (Serial No. 115-66)
``DHS's Progress in Securing Election Systems and Other 
        Critical Infrastructure.'' July 11, 2018. (Serial No. 
        115-70)

   Oversight Activities of the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and 
                              Intelligence

 Peter T. King, New York, Chairman

Kathleen M. Rice, New York           Lou Barletta, Pennsylvania
Sheila Jackson Lee, Texas            Scott Perry, Pennsylvania
William R. Keating, Massachusetts    Will Hurd, Texas
Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi (ex officio)llagher, Wisconsin
                                     Michael T. McCaul, Texas (ex 
                                     officio)
                              ----------                              

    During the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee on 
Counterterrorism and Intelligence held 8 hearings, receiving 
testimony from 38 witnesses; and considered 9 measures, 
resulting in 0 Public Laws.
                              ----------                              


                            COUNTERTERRORISM

    Throughout the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee on 
Counterterrorism and Intelligence focused on threats to 
homeland from foreign terrorist organizations (FTOs). Members 
and staff conducted hearings, briefings and site visits to 
gather information on current and future threats associated 
with the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), al Qaeda, 
Hezbollah and other FTOs.
    On January 9, 2017, January 10, 2017 and January 19, 2017 - 
Committee Majority staff met with a number of academic and 
subject matter experts regarding the role of women and children 
in the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS).
    On February 21, 2018, Majority staff received a briefing 
from the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) regarding 
Foreign Terrorist Organization (FTO) financing through the sale 
of illegal drugs, including Captagon. Based on information 
received during the initial meeting, staff attended a site 
visit at DEA's Special Operations Division for additional 
information on April 5, 2018.
    On February 24, 2017 and February 28, 2017, Committee staff 
conducted telephone calls with academics from D.C.-based think 
tanks regarding terrorism threats in Yemen. Further activity 
related to Yemen occurred on February 28, 2017 and March 3, 
2017, when staff met with former U.S. Ambassadors to Yemen to 
discuss terrorism threats from the region.
    On February 28, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``The Future of Counterterrorism: Addressing the 
Evolving Threat to Domestic Security.'' The Subcommittee 
received testimony from Mr. Edward F. Davis III, Chief 
Executive Officer, Edward Davis, LLC; Mr. Thomas Joscelyn, 
Senior Fellow, The Foundation for the Defense of Democracies; 
Mr. Robin Simcox, Margaret Thatcher Fellow, Margaret Thatcher 
Center for Freedom, Davis Institute for National Security and 
Foreign Policy, Heritage Foundation; and Mr. Peter Bergen, Vice 
President, Director, International Security and Fellows 
Programs, New America.
    On March 1, 2017, March 7, 2017, March 8, 2017 and March 9, 
2018, Majority staff conducted telephone calls and meetings 
with academics and subject matter experts regarding terrorism 
threats in North Africa and the Sahel.
    On Thursday, March 9, 2017, the Subcommittee held a 
Classified Member-only briefing with representatives from the 
DHS Office of Intelligence and Analysis (I&A) and the National 
Counterterrorism Center (NCTC) on the persistent threat from al 
Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP).
    On March 29, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Terrorism in North Africa: An Examination of the Threat.'' 
The Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. J. Peter Pham, 
Vice President for Research and Regional Initiatives, Director 
for the Africa Center, Atlantic Council; Dr. Geoff D. Porter, 
President, North Africa Risk Consulting, Inc.; Mr. Laith 
Alkhouri, Co-founder and Director, Flashpoint; and Dr. Frederic 
Wehrey, Senior Fellow, Middle East Program, Carnegie Endowment 
for International Peace.
    On Thursday, July 13, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``The Persistent Threat: al Qaeda's Evolution and 
Resilience.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Ms. 
Katherine Zimmerman, Research Fellow, American Enterprise 
Institute; Ms. Jennifer Cafarella, Lead Intelligence Planner, 
Institute for the Study of War; and Dr. Seth Jones, Director, 
International Security and Defense Policy Center, RAND 
Corporation.
    On October 3, 2017, the Members of the Subcommittee on 
Counterterrorism and Intelligence of the Committee on Homeland 
Security received a briefing from representatives from the New 
York Police Department. This briefing provided Members 
information regarding the investigation and arrest of Jamaica-
based Trevor William Forrest aka Shaikh Abdullah Faisal on New 
York State terrorism charges.
    The Majority staff did an extensive review of travel routes 
of foreign fighters exiting ISIS territory and seeking access 
to Europe and potentially the United States. Between February 
and April 2018, staff conducted a series of meetings with 
experts on the Balkan region, including with officials from 
Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, the 
RAND Corporation, the Council on Foreign Relations, experts 
from the University of Sarajevo, the Atlantic Initiative, the 
International Republican Institute, and other foreign policy 
and security analyst with a regional expertise.
    In early 2017, thousands of bomb threats were made against 
Jewish Community Centers (JCCs) across the United States and in 
other countries. Members and staff met with a number of JCCs 
and other stakeholder groups regarding the potential threat. In 
response to concerns from JCCs on Long Island and surrounding 
communities, The Chairman of the Subcommittee arranged for a 
teleconference between Department of Homeland Security (DHS) 
officials and relevant participants from JCCs to receive 
information on available DHS tools and resources.
    On April 3, 2018, April 4, 2018 and April 6, 2018, Majority 
staff met with subject matter experts regarding terrorism 
threats stemming from Iran.
    On April 17, 2018, the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and 
Intelligence held a hearing entitled ``State Sponsors of 
Terrorism: An Examination of Iran's Global Terrorism Network.'' 
The Subcommittee received testimony from Dr. Emanuele 
Ottolenghi, Senior Fellow, Foundation for Defense of 
Democracies; Mr. Michael Pregent, Adjunct Fellow, The Hudson 
Institute; Mr. Nader Uskowi, Visiting Fellow, The Washington 
Institute for Near East Policy; and Mr. Brian Katulis, Senior 
Fellow, Center for American Progress.
    Based on the above oversight and other activities, Members 
introduced several pieces of legislation. On January 13, 2017, 
Representative John Katko introduced H.R. 526, the 
``Counterterrorism Advisory Board Act,'' which passed the House 
of Representatives on January 31, 2017. On May 16, 2017, the 
Ranking Member of the Subcommittee, Representative Kathleen 
Rice, introduced H.R. 2433, the ``Homeland Security Assessment 
of Terrorists Use of Virtual Currencies Act.'' This measure 
passed the House of Representatives on September 12, 2017.

              INTERNATIONAL COUNTERTERRORISM PARTNERSHIPS

    On February 14, 2017, the Chairman of the Subcommittee sent 
a letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security regarding the 
maturation of the ``Five County Ministerial and Quintet of 
Attorneys General'' partnership with the United Kingdom, 
Canada, New Zealand, and Australia. On March 24, 2017 the 
Committee received a written response. On July 18, 2017, the 
Chairman of the Subcommittee sent a follow up letter to the 
Department of Homeland Security with additional questions on 
the five-country ministerial.
    On March 26, 2017, Majority staff met with officials from 
Australia regarding the new Australian Home Affairs Department 
to review similarities and differences with the Department of 
Homeland Security.
    On March 27, 2017, Members of the Subcommittee received a 
briefing from representatives of the Department of State and 
the National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC) regarding 
counterterrorism partnership with the Republic of Italy and 
security threats in the Mediterranean region.
    On September 21, 2017, the Committee hosted a briefing for 
Committee Member staff with officials from the United Kingdom 
focused on the Prevent Strategy, counter-messaging initiatives, 
and terrorist use of the Internet.

             MS-13 AND TRANSNATIONAL CRIMINAL ORGANIZATIONS

    At the invitation of the Chairman of the Subcommittee, on 
April 28, 2017, the Attorney General held a round table in 
Central Islip, New York, with Federal, state and local law 
enforcement and prosecutors regarding threats from designated 
transitional criminal organization MS-13. Additionally, the 
Subcommittee Chairman hosted a meeting with the Attorney 
General and family members of MS-13 victims.
    On May 9, 2017, Subcommittee staff received a briefing from 
representatives of the Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) 
Safe Streets Gang Unit on the evolution of transnational 
criminal organizations.
    On May 16, 2017 Subcommittee staff received a briefing from 
representatives from Immigration and Customs Enforcement 
Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) Gang Unit on the threat 
posed by Mara Salvatrucha (MS), better known as MS-13.
    On June 20, 2017, the Subcommittee held a field hearing in 
Central Islip, New York, entitled ``Combating Gang Violence on 
Long Island: Shutting Down the MS-13 Pipeline.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. William Sweeney, 
Assistant Director in Charge, New York Field Office, Federal 
Bureau of Investigation, U.S. Department of Justice; Mr. Angel 
Melendez, Special Agent in Charge, Homeland Security 
Investigations, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security; Mr. Timothy Sini, Police 
Commissioner, Suffolk County, New York; Mr. Michael Marino, 
Commanding Officer, Gang Investigations Squad, Nassau County 
Police Department, Nassau County, New York; Mr. Thomas C. 
Krumpter, Acting Commissioner, Nassau County Police Department, 
Nassau County, New York; Mr. Vincent DeMarco, Sheriff, Suffolk 
County New York; Mrs. Evelyn Rodriguez, Suffolk County 
Resident; Mr. Robert Mickens, Suffolk County Resident; Dr. 
Howard Koenig, Superintendent of Schools, Central Islip Union 
Free School District; and Patrick Young, Esq., Program 
Director, Central American Refugee Center.
    On July 13, 2017, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to then-Attorney General Sessions regarding the need for 
additional Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSAs) in the 
Eastern District of New York in order to more effectively 
address threats posed by MS-13.
    Based on information received from state and local law 
enforcement regarding MS-13 leadership in El Salvador allegedly 
directing gang members to enter the United States as 
unaccompanied alien children (UAC) and US-based cliques to 
recruit new membership from the influx of UACs, on July 27, 
2017, staff met with officials from the Office of Refugee 
Resettlement (ORR) within the Department of Health and Human 
Services (HHS), U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and 
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). The purpose of 
the meeting was to review the entire process a UAC will go 
through upon entering the United States through placement with 
a sponsor in a U.S. community with a focus on vetting and 
information sharing related to potential gang membership.
    On January 18, 2018, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Combating Transnational Gangs Through Information 
Sharing.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Stephen 
E. Richardson, Assistant Director, Criminal, Investigative 
Division, Federal Bureau of Investigation, U.S. Department of 
Justice; Mr. Raymond Villaneuva, Assistant Director in Charge, 
International Operations, U.S. Immigration and Customs 
Enforcement, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and Mr. 
Richard Glenn, Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of 
International Narcotics and Law, Enforcement Affairs, U.S. 
Department of State.
    Following the hearing, the Members of the Subcommittee 
received a classified briefing on efforts to combat 
transnational gangs. The Members were briefed by 
representatives from the Department of Justice, the Department 
of Homeland Security, the Department of State, and the Office 
of the Director of National Intelligence.
    On August 8, 2017, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) 
requesting additional information on how the Office of Refugee 
Resettlement (ORR) addresses possible gang ties for certain 
UACs.

               CENTRAL AMERICAN COUNTERTERRORISM EFFORTS

    On October 10, 2017, Committee Staff met with 
representatives of the U.S. Department of State regarding a 
Committee staff delegation to Trinidad and Tobago, Panama City, 
Panama and San Salvador, El Salvador.
    From October 16-20, 2017, the Staff of the Subcommittee 
conducted a staff delegation to the Department of Defense 
Southern Command in Miami, Florida, the Republics of Trinidad 
and Tobago, Panama, and El Salvador to examine Known or 
Suspected Terrorist activity in central American countries an 
assess the regional counterterrorism information and 
intelligence sharing efforts. Additionally, the staff examined 
Transnational Criminal Organization specifically, Mara 
Salvatrucha. The delegation also received a briefing and tour 
of U.S. Customs and Border Protection activities at Miami 
International Airport focused on secondary inspection 
operations.
    On May 15, 2018, staff had a follow up meeting with a 
delegation from Trinidad and Tobago regarding radicalization 
challenges.

               RADICALIZATION, PROPAGANDA, AND INFLUENCE

    Throughout the Congress, Members and staff reviewed ongoing 
programs at the Department of Homeland Security, as well as 
organizational changes, related to countering violent extremism 
(CVE). Staff also met with a number of outside experts on 
radicalization from think tanks and academia. On June 22, 2017, 
Committee staff received a briefing from Department of Homeland 
Security officials on the status of the Countering Violent 
Extremism Grant Program (CVEGP). On January 31, 2018, staff 
received a briefing from the DHS Office of Terrorism Prevention 
Partnerships (OTPP), which also has responsibility for the 
CVEGP. On September 28, 2018, staff received an update briefing 
on the CVEGP and status of OTPP. On October 24, 2018, staff 
participated in a meeting with the DHS Office of Partnership 
Engagement, which includes a number of DHS offices focused on 
engaging outside stakeholders. OTPP provided an update during 
the briefing.
    Committee staff also conducted oversight on the threat of 
prison radicalization. On September 1, 2017, staff conducted a 
conference call with officials from the Bureau of Prisons 
regarding policies and initiatives focused on identify and 
disrupting Federal inmates who may be radicalized to an 
extremist ideology. On August 28-29, 2018, Committee staff 
received briefings and tours of the Federal Correctional 
Complex (FCC) Terre Haute located in Terre Haute, IN and United 
States Penitentiary (USP) Marion, located in Marion, IL. 
Committee staff met with prison officials to discuss their 
efforts to identify, monitor and mitigate radicalization and 
other terrorism threats emanating from the prison system. On 
September 10, 2018, Committee Staff received a briefing from 
representatives of the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP), Federal 
Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to discuss BOP efforts to 
identify, monitor and mitigate radicalization and other 
terrorism threats emanating from the prison system. Committee 
staff also discussed BOP and FBI coordination and information 
sharing with federal, state and local partners.
    On January 9, 2018, the Chairman of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security, Attorney General, 
and the Secretary of State, raising questions regarding whether 
certain academic influence activities described in press 
reports constitute violations of student visa terms for foreign 
students studying in the United States. The Committee received 
a response from the Department of State on February 12, 2018, 
and from the Department of Homeland Security on November 6, 
2018. The Committee has not yet received a response from the 
Department of Justice.
    On January 18, 2018, Majority staff met with 
representatives of the US and China Security and Economic 
Review Commission to discuss efforts of the Chinese Communist 
Party (CCP) and the People's Republic of China (PRC) to conduct 
influence efforts in the United States and threats posed by 
intellectual property theft. Staff conducted similar briefings 
with a number of outside experts, think tanks, and academia. 
Additionally, staff met with experts and stakeholders regarding 
the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States 
(CFIUS).

               HOMELAND SECURITY INTELLIGENCE ENTERPRISE

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Intelligence 
Enterprise (IE) refers to the intelligence and information 
collection and analytical capabilities across the Department. 
The Committee prioritized oversight over the DHS IE to ensure 
robust capabilities while protecting privacy and civil rights 
and civil liberties.
    On January 23, 2017, the Chairmen of the Full Committee and 
the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and Intelligence sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security requesting 
information on the statutorily-mandated reports the Department 
is responsible for creating annually and the cost associated 
with producing each report. On April 26, 2017, the Department 
responded in writing that there are 33 mandated plans and 
reports that could be eliminated or modified and included 
information about each report.
    On February 22, 2017, the Subcommittee held a briefing for 
Committee Members' legislative staff on the Office of 
Intelligence and Analysis (I&A) to provide an overview of I&A's 
functions and capabilities with special focus on state and 
local law enforcement information sharing, outreach to the 
private sector, and DHS-wide intelligence coordination.
    On March 24, 2017, the Chairman of the Subcommittee on 
Counterterrorism and Intelligence joined the Chair of the Full 
Committee and the other five Subcommittees in a letter to the 
Secretary of Homeland Security regarding the importance of the 
Quadrennial Homeland Security Review (QHSR) process. The letter 
included sections on the importance of a robust DHS 
Intelligence Enterprise.
    On May 16, 2017, Committee staff met with officials from 
the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), 
previously named National Protection and Programs Directorate 
(NPPD), regarding the responsibilities for intelligence and 
analysis, as well as infrastructure protection, mandated in 
Section 201 of the Homeland Security Act (P.L. 107-296).
    On December 6, 2017, staff received a briefing with 
Homeland Security and Investigations (HSI) officials regarding 
HSI's roles and responsibilities on Joint Terrorism Task Forces 
(JTTFs) across the country. Staff received an update briefing 
on April 24, 2018.
    Committee staff received classified briefings from DHS I&A, 
Office of Operations Coordination, and the Chief Security 
Office on the President's annual budget requests. The briefing 
on the FY2018 budget request was held on June 6, 2017 and the 
FY2019 budget request was held on February 8, 2018.
    On April 23, 2018, Committee staff participated in a 
briefing at I&A to receive an update on each office and major 
program within the agency.
    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Data Framework is 
an ongoing initiative at the Department to connect many of data 
sets collected by DHS component agencies to improve vetting 
across the DHS and with the Intelligence Community. Committee 
staff met with DHS officials multiple times during the 115th 
Congress to receive updates on implementation of the Data 
Framework, including a March 30, 2017, meeting between Majority 
staff and DHS officials to review draft legislation to 
authorize the program. Staff also met with a number of outside 
experts and private sector entities regarding the program.
    Since the early years of the Department of Homeland 
Security, the Committee has been aware of an interest by U.S. 
Customs and Border Protection (CBP), and later by U.S. 
Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), to become members of 
the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC). To date, the Committee 
has not received satisfactory justification to support this 
effort. On November 30, 2017, staff met with officials from 
U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), including the CBP 
Office of Intelligence, to understand the rationale for CBP's 
interest in IC membership. On December 19, 2017, the Chairman 
of the Full Committee sent a letter to the Office of 
Intelligence and Analysis (I&A) requesting information on how 
I&A, as the Department's IC representative, supports the needs 
of DHS component agencies. On March 22, 2018, staff met with 
officials from Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), 
including the Intelligence Office within Homeland Security 
Investigations (HSI), regarding ICE's interest in joining the 
Intelligence Community.
    On September 28, 2018, the Chair and Ranking Member of the 
Full Committee sent a letter to the Secretary of Homeland 
Security with a number of questions about the need for IC 
membership for CBP and ICE. On the same day, both Members also 
sent a letter to the Director of National Intelligence raising 
the same questions. On October 19, 2018, the Chair and Ranking 
Member received a response from the Office of the Director of 
National Intelligence (ODNI) noting that ODNI has similar 
concerns to those expressed by the Committee related to CBP's 
interest in Intelligence Community membership. On November 13, 
2018, the Under Secretary for Intelligence and Analysis 
responded on behalf of the Secretary of Homeland Security 
informing the Committee that DHS does not currently support IC 
membership for the Component agencies. The Subcommittee expects 
to continue to track this issue during the 116th Congress to 
ensure that DHS component agencies receive the support and 
access to intelligence they need from the IC and are being 
fully represented by I&A.
    During the 115th Congress, Committee staff monitored 
Department of Homeland Security implementation of Executive 
Order 13556 related to the Controlled Unclassified Information 
(CUI) to ensure DHS is consistently applying document 
protection standards. On February 9, 2017, staff met with the 
DHS Chief Security Officer to receive an update on the office, 
including information on their role in assessing appropriate 
classification levels of DHS products. On March 13, 2017, 
Committee staff met with representatives from the National 
Archives (NARA) regarding the CUI program and efforts to reform 
and streamline Federal polices for safeguarding and labeling 
sensitive but unclassified information. On April 6, 2017, 
Subcommittee Chairmen for the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism 
and Intelligence, Subcommittee on Oversight and Management 
Efficiency, Subcommittee on Cybersecurity and Infrastructure 
Protection, and Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, 
Response, and Communication sent a letter the Secretary of 
Homeland Security requesting an update on DHS implementation of 
Executive Order 13556. The Members received a response on May 
15, 2017, from the Acting Under Secretary for Management 
providing a timeline for anticipated DHS compliance with the 
Executive Order.
    Members of the Subcommittee introduced several pieces of 
legislation related to reform and enhanced the DHS IE. The 
following bills were reported favorably by the Committee and 
passed by the House of Representatives. Representative Mike 
Gallagher introduced H.R. 2453, the ``DHE Intelligence 
Rotational Assignment Program Act.'' Representative Will Hurd 
introduced H.R. 2454, the ``Department of Homeland Security 
Data Framework Act.'' Representative Scott Perry introduced 
H.R. 2468, the ``Unifying DHS Intelligence Enterprise Act.'' 
Representative Mike Rogers introduced H.R. 2470, the ``Homeland 
Threat Assessment Act.''

                         SCREENING AND VETTING

    On February 27, 2017, the Chairman of the Full Committee, 
Chairman of the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and 
Intelligence, and the Chairman of the Subcommittee on Border 
and Maritime Security, requested the Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) conduct a fraud review of the Department of 
Homeland Security's Student and Exchange Visitor Program 
(SEVP). On June 5, 2017, September 8, 2017, and February 2, 
2018, Majority staff met with officials from the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) to scope the SEVP review and on 
February 8, 2018, GAO provided the Committee with a commitment 
letter to begin the engagement. On May 30, 2018, Majority staff 
met with GAO to receive an update on the review and on August 
31, 2018, staff had a final briefing from GAO on the outcome of 
the audit in advance of the report release. GAO provided a 
Sensitive but Unclassified (SBU) version of the report to the 
Committee on November 20, 2018 and is in the process of 
producing a public version of the report.
    On September 5, 2017, the Chairman of the Full Committee 
and Chair of the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security, 
sent a letter to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services 
(USCIS) regarding concerns with applicant vetting related to 
immigration benefits awarded under the Department of Defense's 
Military Accessions Vital to National Interest (MAVNI) program. 
On November 29, 2017, the USCIS Director responded and included 
copies of memorandums between DOD and USCIS regarding the 
program.
    On November 16, 2017, the Chairman of the Full Committee 
sent a letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security and the 
Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation regarding the 
importance of integrating data collected in conflict areas, 
particularly where terror groups are active, for use in 
vetting. On March 14, 2018, DHS responded that they concur it 
is important to capture this information. On May 9, 2018, the 
Chairman of the Full Committee sent a follow up letter to the 
Secretary of Homeland Security requesting additional 
information on efforts to improve battlefield biometric 
information sharing. On July 30, 2018, the DHS Deputy Under 
Secretary of Office of Strategy, Policy and Plans provided a 
Law Enforcement Sensitive (LES) response providing additional 
background information and noting that the National Vetting 
Center (NVC), which is currently being created, will further 
pursue progress on this issue.
    On April 21, 2017, and January 24, 2018, Committee staff 
received briefings from U.S. Immigration and Customs 
Enforcement (ICE) officials regarding the Student Exchange and 
Visitor Information System (SEVIS).
    On April 26, 2018, staff received a briefing from ICE 
Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) Visa Security Program 
office.
    In response to the development of a National Vetting 
Center, pursuant to National Security Presidential Memorandum 
9, staff received a classified briefing on April 4, 2018, on 
the rationale, mission and proposed capability of the office. 
On September 7, 2018, staff had a follow up briefing with NVC 
staff.
    On June 13, 2018, the Chairman of the Full Committee sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security requesting 
additional background on information provided during an April 
26, 2018, CHS hearing regarding the number of known or 
suspicious terrorists (KSTs) encountered by DHS personnel each 
day. On June 20, 2018, representatives from U.S. Customs and 
Border Protection provided a briefing for staff.
    On March 3, 2017, May 18, 2018, and August 30, 2018, staff 
met with officials from Immigration and Customs Enforcement 
(ICE) regarding the BITMAP program and concerns related to 
special interest aliens.

                          INFORMATION SHARING

    The Committee conducted significant outreach to and 
oversight on issues relevant to the 79 state and local fusion 
centers across the U.S. and the National Fusion Center 
Association (NFCA). On January 13, 2017, Committee staff hold a 
conference call with the FBI's Criminal Justice Information 
Services Division regarding fusion center access to the 
National Crime Information Center (NCIC). On the same day, 
Committee staff held a call with the NFCA Board of Directors to 
discuss a wide range of information sharing issues. On March 
23, 2017, Committee staff met with the Program Manager for the 
Information Sharing Environment to discuss the Northeast 
Regional Fusion Center Initiative.
    During the 115th Congress, Committee staff visited a number 
of fusion centers across the country. On April 10, 2017 and 
April 11, 2017, Committee staff conducted site visits and 
received briefings from representatives of three fusion centers 
located in the southeast region of the country. During the site 
visits, Committee staff also met with a representative of the 
Regional Information Sharing Systems (RISS) to discuss how the 
RISS interacts with the National Network of Fusion Centers and 
with representatives of a High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area 
(HIDTA) located in the southeast region of the country to 
discuss how they interact with the National Network of Fusion 
Centers. On April 12, 2017, Committee staff visited and met 
with officials from an FBI Joint Terrorism Taskforce (JTTF) 
located in the southeast region of the country to discuss how 
they interact with their local fusion center.
    Additionally, on June 5-6, 2017, Committee staff conducted 
site visits and received briefings from representatives of two 
fusion centers located in the Central region of the country. On 
August 3-4, 2017, Committee staff visited with and received 
briefings from officials from two fusion centers located in the 
Midwest. On August 18, 2017, Committee staff received a 
briefing and tour of a fusion center located on the East Coast. 
On September 21-22, 2017, Committee staff visited and met with 
representatives of two fusion centers located on the West 
Coast.
    On July 13, 2017, Majority staff held a call with the 
National Governors' Association's Governor's Homeland Security 
Advisory Council Executive Committee to discuss the health of 
the national network of fusion centers. Staff also met with a 
number of current and former fusion center stakeholders and 
other information sharing experts.
    On October 5, 2017, Committee staff met with 
representatives of the Office of Intelligence and Analysis of 
the Department of Homeland Security to discuss their work with 
fusion centers.
    On November 6, 2017, the Committee released a majority 
staff report entitled, ``Advancing the Homeland Security 
Information Sharing Environment: A Review of the National 
Network of Fusion Centers.'' After the release of the report, 
Majority staff conducted a number of meetings with fusion 
centers and think tanks regarding the findings and 
recommendation from the report.
    On March 19, 2018, Committee staff met with the Board of 
Directors of the National Fusion Center Association.
    On April 12, 2018, Majority staff met with NCFA 
representatives and received an update on school security 
initiatives.
    The Committee also conducted oversight on Department of 
Homeland Security policies and efforts to share information and 
conduct outreach to state and local law enforcement and other 
partners. This effort included meeting with each agency within 
DHS with a responsibility for working with state and local 
enforcement. On February 6, 2017, Committee staff met with 
officials from the DHS Office of Law Enforcement Policy. On 
February 22, 2017, Committee staff received a briefing from the 
DHS Office Of Science and Technology's First Responder Group. 
On March 2, 2017, Committee staff received a briefing from the 
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Law Enforcement 
Advisor. On April 7, 2017, staff met with the DHS Office of 
State and Local Law Enforcement to receive an update on ongoing 
initiatives to communicate DHS tools, resources, and activities 
to state and local law enforcement. On April 7, 2017, staff 
also met with officials from the Office of Intelligence and 
Analysis (I&A) regarding programs and initiatives related to 
outreach to state and local law enforcement.
    On May 18, 2017 the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and 
Intelligence and the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, 
Response, and Communications held a Joint Member Roundtable 
entitled ``DHS Programs and Efforts to Conduct Outreach to Law 
Enforcement Stakeholders.''
    On October 10, 2017, the Chairman of the Full Committee 
sent a letter to the Attorney General, Acting Secretary of 
Homeland Security and Director of the FBI raising concerns 
about Senate Bill 54, legislation passed in California that 
could significantly reduce information sharing between Federal, 
state and local partners related to immigration. The letter 
noted how a significant number of terrorism cases have an 
immigration nexus and could thus be impacted by the law.
    On October 24, 2018, staff participated in a meeting with 
the DHS Office of Partnership Engagement, which includes a 
number of DHS offices focused on engaging outside stakeholders. 
The Office of State and Local Law Enforcement provided an 
update during the meeting.
    Members of the Committee introduced several pieces of 
legislation related to improving information sharing between 
DHS, state and local law enforcement, and other key first 
responder stakeholders. The following bills were reported 
favorably by the Committee and passed by the House of 
Representatives. Representative Lou Barletta introduced H.R. 
642, the ``Fusion Center Enhancement Act.'' Representative 
Martha McSally introduced H.R. 678, the ``Department of 
Homeland Security Support to Fusion Centers Act.'' 
Representative John Katko introduced H.R. 2169, the ``Improving 
Fusion Centers' Access to Information Act.'' Representative Val 
Demings introduced H.R. 2427, the ``Pathways to Improving 
Homeland Security At the Local Level Act.'' Representative 
Sheila Jackson Lee introduced H.R. 2442, the ``FIRST State and 
Local Law Enforcement Act.'' Representative Lou Barletta 
introduced H.R. 2443, the ``Department of Homeland Security 
Classified Facility Inventory Act.'' Representative John 
Rutherford introduced H.R. 2471, the ``Terrorist Release 
Announcements to Counter Extremist Recidivism Act.''

                 SUSPICIOUS ACTIVITY REPORTING EFFORTS

    On August 22, 2017, Committee staff met with officials from 
the Department of Homeland Security regarding the Department of 
Homeland Security's See Something, Say Something campaign.
    On August 24, 2017, staff met with officials from the 
Office of Intelligence and Analysis (I&A) regarding the 
Department of Homeland Security's responsibilities within the 
Nationwide Suspicious Activity Reporting (SAR) Initiative 
(NSI). The Federal Bureau of Investigation is also a partner 
agency in this initiative.
    On August 24, 2017, Majority staff conducted a phone 
briefing with representatives from the FEMA regarding a 2012 
report sponsored by FEMA and developed by the International 
Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) regarding See Something, 
Say Something.
    On September 13, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Sixteen Years After 9/11: Assessing Suspicious 
Activity Reporting Efforts.'' The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Mr. Robin Taylor, Acting Deputy Secretary, 
Intelligence Operations, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; 
Mr. Rick Fuentes, Superintendent, State Police, State of New 
Jersey; Mr. William B. Evans, Police Commissioner, City of 
Boston, Commonwealth of Massachusetts; and Mr. Joseph M. Flynn, 
Deputy Director, Northern Virginia Regional Intelligence 
Center.
    On October 17, 2018, staff received an update briefing from 
the Office of Intelligence and Analysis on enhancements to the 
NSI program.
    On October 24, 2018, staff participated in a meeting with 
the DHS Office of Partnership Engagement, which includes a 
number of DHS offices focused on engaging outside stakeholders. 
The official responsible for the See Something Say Something 
Campaign provided an update during the meeting.
    The Chairman of the Subcommittee introduced H.R. 5094, the 
``Enhancing Suspicious Activity Reporting Initiative Act,'' on 
February 26, 2018. This measure passed the House of 
Representatives on June 25, 2018.

                       SOCIAL MEDIA AND SECURITY

    On January 3, 2017, Committee staff held a meeting with 
Twitter regarding the firm's policy on the use of analytical 
tools being used by law enforcement entities.
    On March 6, 2018, the Members of the Subcommittee received 
a briefing on commercially-available social media data for 
counterterrorism and public safety purposes. Representatives 
from Federal, State, and local law enforcement, as well as 
fusion centers were present.
    On April 19, 2017 Committee staff held a conference call 
with representatives from the National Fusion Center 
Association (NFCA) regarding challenges various law enforcement 
agencies have had in utilizing certain social media analytical 
tools.
    The Members of the Subcommittee received a briefing on May 
22, 2018, by representatives from Twitter on law enforcement 
access to publicly available information on Twitter.

                 INSIDER THREAT AND COUNTERINTELLIGENCE

    On February 3, 2017, Committee staff met with 
representatives from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) 
regarding an audit of the various offices of professional 
responsibility of DHS components.
    On September 27, 2017, staff conducted a conference call 
with representatives from the DHS Office of the Chief Security 
Officer (OCSO) regarding DHS-wide policies on vetting and 
screening employees and contractors.
    On June 25, 2018, Committee staff participated in a call 
with the DHS Office of the Chief Security Officer to review 
potential changes in the DHS security clearance process 
pursuant to the June 21, 2018 security clearance reorganization 
plan issued by the White House whereby more responsibility for 
background investigations may be transferred to the Department 
of Defense.
    During the 114th Congress, Ranking Member of the Full 
Committee requested a Government Accountability Office audit of 
the Executive Branch's efforts to develop policy regarding 
continuous evaluation. On February 8, 2017, staff met with GAO 
to receive an update and on February 16, 2017, the Chairman of 
the Subcommittee sent a letter to GAO to become a co-requestor 
of the review. This report was released in November 2017.
    The Chairman of the Subcommittee, Representative Peter 
King, introduced H.R. 666, the ``Department of Homeland 
Security Insider Threat and Mitigation Act,'' on January 24, 
2017. This measure passed the House of Representatives on 
January 31, 2017.

                         SUPPLY CHAIN SECURITY

    For several years, the Subcommittee has been concerned 
about the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) capability to 
detect vulnerabilities throughout its supply chain and 
authorities to mitigate any potential threats.
    On January 17, 2017, the DHS Chief Procurement Officer 
(CPO) provided staff with an overview of the contractor vetting 
process. To further gather information on the threat, 
appropriate DHS officials provided staff with a supply chain 
security briefing. Throughout the 115th Congress, Members and 
staff held multiple meetings with think tanks, security 
experts, and private sector entities on potential threats to 
the DHS supply chain and recommendations on additional 
authorities that may be necessary to mitigate the threat.
    On February 16, 2017, the Chairman of the Subcommittee sent 
a letter to Federal Communications Commission Chairman Pai 
regarding potential security vulnerabilities in the Number 
Portability Administration Center (NPAC) contract.
    On March 30, 2017, Committee staff received a briefing from 
representatives of DHS regarding the Department's supply chain 
security efforts.
    On May 17, 2018, the Chairman of the Full Committee sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security raising questions 
about the potential threat posed by ZTE and Huawei equipment to 
U.S. national security and DHS efforts to keep it out of 
federal supply chains. The Committee received a written 
response on October 9, 2018.
    On May 24, 2018, Committee staff met with DHS Chief 
Procurement Officer, Chief Information Officer, and individuals 
from the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency 
(CISA) (previously known as the National Protection and 
Programs Directorate) to understand DHS's current authorities 
to identify and deny a procurement action if the vendor is 
determined to pose a security risk and review a legislative 
draft to provide DHS with similar SCRM authorities to those 
held by the Department of Defense.
    On Wednesday, June 13, 2018, the Members of the Committee 
on Homeland Security received a classified briefing on the risk 
to the U.S. Government's supply chain from certain Chinese 
telecommunications companies from representatives from the 
Department of Defense, the DHS, and the FBI.
    On June 28, 2018, Majority staff met with representatives 
from the Congressional Research Service to receive an overview 
of the Federal Suspension and Debarment Process.
    On June 28, 2018, Majority staff met with representatives 
from the Rural Broadband Association to discuss the impacts of 
provisions related to certain Chinese telecommunications 
companies' equipment included in the National Defense 
Authorization Act.
    On July 12, 2018, the Subcommittee on Counterterrorism and 
Intelligence and the Subcommittee on Oversight and Management 
Efficiency held a joint hearing entitled ``Access Denied: 
Keeping Adversaries Away from the Homeland Security Supply 
Chain.'' The Subcommittees received testimony from Ms. Soraya 
Correa, Chief Procurement Officer, Office of the Chief 
Procurement Officer, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Dr. 
John Zangardi, Chief Information Officer, Office of the Chief 
Information Officer, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Ms. 
Jeanette Manfra, Assistant Secretary, Office of Cybersecurity 
and Communications, National Protection and Programs 
Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Ms. Tina W. 
Gabbrielli, Acting Deputy Under Secretary, Intelligence 
Enterprise Operations, Office of Intelligence and Analysis, 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and Mr. Gregory 
Wilshusen, Director of Information Security Issues, U.S. 
Government Accountability Office.
    On July 18, 2018, the Chairman and Ranking Member of the 
Subcommittee, along with the Chair and Ranking Member of the 
Full Committee introduced H.R. 6430, the Securing the Homeland 
Security Supply Chain Act of 2018. The bill was favorably 
reported by the Full Committee and passed on the House Floor by 
voice vote on September 4, 2018.
    On October 18, 2018, the Chairman of the Full Committee 
sent a letter to the Director of National Intelligence, 
Secretary of Homeland Security, and Director of the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation regarding media allegations regarding 
possible supply chain vulnerabilities that may have been 
exploited by China to implant malicious computer chips onto 
computer hardware. The letter requests information on the 
veracity of the threat and any mitigation measures the agencies 
may be undertaking. A response has not been received.
    In response to the Binding Operational Directive (BOD) 
issued by the Department directing Federal agencies to remove 
from their networks all Kaspersky Lab products, Members of the 
Committee received a briefing on October 25, 2017 from DHS 
officials on counterintelligence concerns related to Kaspersky. 
On February 23, 2018, staff received an update briefing from 
DHS regarding Kaspersky Labs and implementation of the BOD.
                              ----------                              


                       Subcommittee Hearings Held

``The Future of Counterterrorism: Addressing the Evolving 
        Threat to Domestic Security.'' February 28, 2017. 
        (Serial No. 115-6)
``Terrorism in North Africa: An Examination of the Threat.'' 
        March 29, 2017. (Serial No. 115-11)
``Combating Gang Violence on Long Island: Shutting Down the MS-
        13 Pipeline.'' Field hearing in Central Islip, New 
        York. June 20, 2017. (Serial No. 115-20)
``The Persistent Threat: al Qaeda's Evolution and Resilience.'' 
        July 13, 2017. (Serial No. 115-21)
``Sixteen Years After 9/11: Assessing Suspicious Activity 
        Reporting Efforts.'' September 13, 2017. (Serial No. 
        115-27)
``Combating Transnational Gangs Through Information Sharing.'' 
        January 18, 2018. (Serial No. 115-45)
``State Sponsors of Terrorism: An Examination of Iran's Global 
        Terrorism Network.'' April 17, 2018. (Serial No. 115-
        59)
``Access Denied: Keeping Adversaries Away from the Homeland 
        Security Supply Chain.'' July 12, 2018. (Serial No. 
        115-71)

 Oversight Activities of the Subcommittee on Oversight and Management 
                               Efficiency

    Scott Perry, Pennsylvania, 
             Chairman

J. Luis Correa, California           John Ratcliffe, Texas
Kathleen M. Rice, New York           Clay Higgins, Louisiana
Nanette Diaz Barragan, California    Thomas A. Garrett, Jr., Virginia
Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi (ex officio)es, Kansas
                                     Michael T. McCaul, Texas (ex 
                                     officio)
                              ----------                              

    During the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee on Oversight 
and Management Efficiency held 11 hearings, receiving testimony 
from 39.

    DEPARTMENTAL EFFICIENCY AND WASTE, FRAUD ABUSE, AND DUPLICATION

    The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 forced the 
United States to fundamentally rethink the threats it faces and 
its approach to defending the Nation. Given the current 
financial climate and importance of the mission, it is 
imperative the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) be a good 
steward of taxpayer dollars and operate in an effective and 
efficient manner. As such, the Subcommittee conducted rigorous 
oversight to identify and remedy waste, fraud, abuse, and 
duplicative programs at DHS.
    On February 9, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with the 
Department of Homeland Security's Chief Security Officer to 
discuss a proposed reorganization of the office structure, to 
better serve the Department's mission needs.
    On February 3, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) to discuss the 
Department's vulnerabilities to fraud, waste, abuse, and 
mismanagement identified in GAO's high risk list series. On 
February 10, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with DHS's Executive 
Director of Management Integration to discuss how DHS is 
working to address those issues identified as ``high risk.'' On 
February 15, 2017, GAO issued its biennial high risk list, HIGH 
RISK SERIES: Progress on Many-High Risk Areas, While 
Substantial Efforts Needed on Others, (GAO-17-317), which 
listed a number of management issues within DHS.
    On February 16, 2017 the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled, ``Watchdog Recommendations: A Better Way Ahead to 
Manage the Department of Homeland Security.'' The Subcommittee 
received testimony from the Honorable John Roth, Inspector 
General, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and, Ms. Rebecca 
Gambler, Director, Homeland Security and Justice Issues, U.S. 
Government Accountability Office. The purpose of the hearing 
was to examine areas at DHS that are at high-risk of waste, 
fraud, abuse and mismanagement and recommendations from the DHS 
Office of Inspector General and Government Accountability 
Office to improve DHS' management and operations.
    On April 21, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with DHS 
officials to receive an updated briefing on the Student and 
Exchange Visitor Program (SEVIS).
    On May 9, 2017, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a letter 
to the Acting Commissioner of Customs and Border Protection 
regarding vehicle utilization standards. The letter requested 
CBP develop a written plan to increase the utilization of CBP 
vehicles, and to develop a disposal plan for vehicles that do 
not meet utilization standards. The letter also called for CBP 
to develop better evaluation criteria using telematics in CBP 
vehicles. A response was received on June 23, 2017.
    On July 28, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with DHS to 
discuss how DHS is implementing requirements set forth in 
Executive Order 13781, Enhancing the Effectiveness of Agency 
Chief Information Officers.
    On February 6, 2018, majority Subcommittee staff met with 
the Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) regarding their 
management of the Department's use of Federally Funded Research 
and Development Centers (FFRDC). On May 10, 2018, majority 
Subcommittee staff met with TSA to discuss TSA's use of FFRDCs, 
and on June 28, 2018, majority Subcommittee staff was briefed 
by USCG regarding how USCG intended to implement findings from 
an FFRDC report on USCG's cost estimating capabilities. On 
October 16, 2018, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a letter 
to the GAO Comptroller General requesting GAO assess DHS's use 
of FFRDC products. The letter requested GAO assess to what 
extent DHS implements recommendations or findings resulting 
from FFRDC work.
    On May 23, 2018, Subcommittee staff met with DHS's Office 
of Inspector General (OIG) to discuss an OIG report released on 
March 6, 2018, entitled, Fiscal Year 2016 Audit of the DHS 
Bankcard Program Indicates Moderate Risk Remains (OIG-18-57).

                         ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) invests 
extensively in major acquisition programs to develop new 
systems that help the Department execute its many critical 
missions. These programs have major implications for the 
American taxpayer, costing hundreds of billions of dollars in 
costs over the life of a program. Given the current budget 
climate, the Subcommittee conducted oversight on the 
Department's management of its acquisition programs to ensure 
taxpayer dollars were not wasted.
    On January 17, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with DHS's 
Office of the Chief Procurement Officer to discuss how DHS 
reviews contract vendors for unpaid federal tax debts.
    On January 26, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with DHS's 
National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD) to review 
NPPD's current acquisition and procurement structures, and 
NPPD's major and non-major acquisition programs.
    On February 2, 2017, the Office of the Chief Financial 
Officer's Cost Analysis Division briefed Subcommittee staff on 
cost estimates for major acquisitions and intended outcomes of 
a new annual review.
    On March 10, 2017, the Chair and Ranking Member of the 
Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency, the Chair 
and Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on Cyber and 
Infrastructure Protection, and the Chair and Ranking Member of 
the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications sent a letter to GAO's Comptroller General 
requesting GAO assess DHS's test and evaluation activities for 
major acquisition programs. The letter requested GAO examine 
how DHS evaluates its acquisition programs, and how these 
acquisition programs meet cybersecurity requirements. A 
response was received on March 23, 2017, and on June 7, 2018, 
Subcommittee staff received a briefing from GAO regarding the 
on-going report.
    On April 5, 2017, the Chair of the Subcommittee on 
Oversight and Management Efficiency and the Chair of the 
Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications 
Subcommittee sent a letter to GAO's Comptroller General 
requesting GAO evaluate DHS's research and development efforts. 
A response was received on April 25, 2017, and on July 13, 
2018, Subcommittee staff received a briefing from GAO regarding 
preliminary findings from the requested review.
    On April 18, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with DHS to 
receive an updated briefing on the current structure and role 
of the Joint Requirements Council (JRC). Subcommittee staff 
received an additional update regarding the JRC on April 10, 
2018. Additionally, on September 7, 2017, Subcommittee staff 
met stakeholders to discuss how DHS's Joint Requirements 
Council is supported by contract staff.
    On May 11, 2017, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from DHS's Program Analysis and Risk Management (PARM) office 
to discuss how the office assists in keeping major acquisition 
programs on schedule and on budget.
    On May 17, 2017, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Deputy Under Secretary for Management regarding 
DHS's acquisition failures. The letter requested information on 
DHS's efforts to mitigate acquisition risk. The letter also 
requested support for legislation to prevent waste, fraud, and 
abuse in acquisitions. An initial response was received on June 
4, 2017, and a follow-up response was received on June 7, 2017.
    On June 22, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with stakeholders 
to discuss the value of using independent validation and 
verification methods early on in acquisition testing.
    On June 29, 2017, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from DHS regarding the Department's use of other transactional 
agreements (OTAs).
    On July 19, 2017, Subcommittee staff were briefed by the 
Office of the Chief Procurement Officer on the cancellation of 
the Flexible Agile Support for the Homeland (FLASH) 
procurement. According to DHS, the cancellation was due to 
``significant errors and missteps in the procurement process.''
    On August 7, 2017, the Chair and Ranking Member of the 
Subcommittee sent a letter to the Acting Secretary regarding 
the development and implementation of the Department's 
Performance and Learning Management System (PALMS). The letter 
requested information about delayed implementation, 
mismanagement, and over spending on the PALMS program. A 
response was received on September 14, 2017.
    On August 9, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with the United 
States Coast Guard to discuss on-going major acquisitions.
    On January 29, 2018, Subcommittee staff met with GAO to 
review its initial findings relating to DHS's acquisition 
management. GAO published the final report, HOMELAND SECURITY 
ACQUISITIONS: Leveraging Programs' Results Could Further DHS's 
Progress to Improve Portfolio Management (GAO-18-339SP), on May 
17, 2018. On June 29, 2018 Subcommittee staff met with GAO to 
discuss the finalized report.
    On May 4, 2018, Subcommittee staff received a briefing from 
DHS's Chief Procurement Officer to discuss an Office of the 
Inspector General report, DHS Needs to Strengthen its 
Suspension and Debarment Program (OIG-18-41), which was 
released on January 25, 2018.
    On March 30, 2017, Subcommittee staff received a classified 
briefing from DHS officials on threats to the security of the 
Department's supply chain. On May 24, 2018, Committee staff 
received a briefing from DHS officials on the procurement 
authorities needed to mitigate threats to the Department's 
supply chain. Continuing oversight on this issue, the 
Subcommittee held a joint hearing with the Subcommittee on 
Counterterrorism and Intelligence entitled, ``Access Denied: 
Keeping Adversaries Away from the Homeland Security Supply 
Chain'' on July 12, 2018. The Subcommittees received testimony 
from Ms. Soraya Correa, Chief Procurement Officer, Office of 
the Chief Procurement Officer, Management Directorate, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security; Dr. John Zangardi, Chief 
Information Officer, Office of the Chief Information Officer, 
Management Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; 
Ms. Jeanette Manfra, Assistant Secretary, Office of 
Cybersecurity and Communications, National Protection and 
Programs Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. 
Gregory Wilshusen, Director of Information Security Issues, 
U.S. Government Accountability Office; and Ms. Tina Gabbrielli, 
Acting Deputy Under Secretary for Intelligence Enterprise 
Operations, Office of Intelligence and Analysis, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security. Due to the nature of the 
testimony received at this hearing, the Subcommittee Chairs 
moved to close part of the hearing and continue in a classified 
Executive Session.
    On August 2, 2018, the Chair of the Subcommittee and the 
Chair of the full Committee sent a letter to the GAO 
Comptroller General regarding Component Acquisition Executives. 
The letter requested information on DHS's adherence to 
acquisition policies and the strength of acquisition programs 
following recent reorganizations. The Comptroller General 
accepted the request on August 21, 2018.
    On September 4, 2018, GAO released a report entitled, Polar 
Icebreaker Program Needs to Address Risks before Committing 
Resources (GAO-18-600). On September 12, 2018, Subcommittee 
staff held a teleconference with GAO to review the results and 
recommendations of the report.

                          FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

    DHS is currently in the process of modernizing its 
financial systems Department-wide. Many of the components and 
agencies within DHS use different systems and oftentimes, the 
data in these different systems are not compatible, making it 
nearly impossible for senior officials at headquarters to get 
an enterprise-wide view of its lines of business. Without 
knowing where and what the Department is spending its money on, 
it is impossible for DHS to operate as efficiently as possible.
    On February 13, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with U.S. 
Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to discuss a Federal 
Protective Service payment issue with ICE and gain a better 
understanding of financial management modernization efforts at 
ICE.
    On May 3, 2017, The Chair of the Subcommittee sent a letter 
to the Acting Undersecretary for Management regarding 
ineffective financial management systems. The letter requested 
information about DHS' efforts to modernize the financial 
systems of the USCG and ICE. An initial response was received 
on May 24, 2017, and an additional response was received on 
August 14, 2017.
    Throughout the 115th Congress, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives from DHS's Office of the Chief Financial 
Officer to discuss delays in updating the financial management 
systems of the Department, and specifically to discuss delays 
associated with the financial management systems of TSA, USCG, 
and the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office.
    On May 9, 2017, Subcommittee staff held a teleconference 
with GAO to discuss its on-going audit of DHS's attempt to 
modernize its financial systems.
    Additionally, to provide further oversight, Subcommittee 
staff met with other government entities that assisted DHS with 
its financial modernization efforts. On June 16, 2017, 
Subcommittee staff met with the Department of Interior's 
Interior Business Center (IBC) to discuss IBC's role in working 
with DHS to modernize its financial systems. On September 11, 
2017, Subcommittee staff met with the Unified Shared Services 
Management team from the General Services Administration to 
discuss their work with DHS and IBC regarding the project.
    On September 26, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled, ``DHS Financial Systems: Will Modernization Ever Be 
Achieved.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Chip 
Fulghum, Deputy Under Secretary for Management, U.S. Department 
of Homeland Security; Ms. Michelle Singer, Director, Interior 
Business Center, U.S. Department of the Interior; Ms. Elizabeth 
Angerman, Executive Director, Unified Shared Services 
Management, Office of Government-wide Policy, General Services 
Administration; and, Mr. Asif Khan, Director, Financial 
Management and Assurance, U.S. Government Accountability 
Office. The purpose of the hearing was to examine DHS's failure 
to achieve financial systems modernization for three of its 
components, despite spending over $100 million in tax payer 
funds.

               INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND DATA MANAGEMENT

    Given the rapidly changing nature of the threats facing the 
Homeland, it is imperative that the Department of Homeland 
Security (DHS) has the technology systems it needs in order to 
combat these threats. Procuring these systems, however, are 
significant investments; if they are not maintained properly, 
these systems can quickly become outdated or obsolete. The 
Subcommittee's oversight efforts on this topic focused on 
ensuring DHS had the systems needed, verifying that the systems 
functioned effectively, and confirming that the systems were 
being procured and updated in an efficient and cost-effective 
manner. Additionally, the Subcommittee conducted oversight to 
ensure that DHS improves the management of data collected by 
technology systems.
    On March 2, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with the Office of 
the Chief Information Officer, and the Office of the Chief 
Human Capital Officer, among others, to receive an update on 
the current status of the Human Resources Information 
Technology (HRIT) system. On August 2, 2017 and May 22, 2018, 
Subcommittee staff received follow-up briefings regarding 
progress made on HRIT.
    On March 16, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled, ``Immigration Benefits Vetting: Examining Critical 
Weaknesses in USCIS Systems.'' The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Ms. Lori Scialabba, Acting Director, U.S. 
Citizenship and Immigration Services, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Ms. Carol Harris, Director, Information 
Technology Acquisition Management Issues, U.S. Government 
Accountability Office; and, the Honorable John Roth, Inspector 
General, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The purpose of 
the hearing was to examine the United States Citizenship and 
Immigration Services (USCIS) information technology (IT) 
systems that may not have been properly processing immigrant 
and non-immigrant applications. On June 22, 2017, Subcommittee 
staff met with DHS's new Chief Information Officer, Richard 
Staropoli, to discuss his vision for managing DHS's vast IT 
portfolio.
    On April 6, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with GAO to 
discuss findings from a GAO report relating to the Federal 
Information Technology Acquisition Reform Act (FITARA). The 
report, HOMELAND SECURITY: Progress Made to Implement IT 
Reform, but Additional Chief Information Officer Involvement 
Needed, was publicly released on May 18, 2017.
    On April 13, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with TSA to 
discuss issues related to cost, schedule, and performance of 
the Electronic Bag Screening Program. Public Law 114-113 
required DHS's Office of Inspector General (OIG) to review 
DHS's data strategy and inventory component data investments. 
On August 14, 2017, the OIG released a report on its findings 
entitled, Improvements Needed to Promote DHS Progress toward 
Accomplishing Enterprise-wide Data Goals (OIG-17-101). The 
report contained two recommendations for executive action. On 
September 7, 2017, Subcommittee staff were briefed by 
representatives from the OIG on its report. Additionally, on 
December 29, 2017, the DHS OIG released its report entitled, 
DHS' Implementation of the DATA Act (OIG-18-34). The report 
contained six recommendations for executive action. On February 
8, 2018, Subcommittee staff received a briefing from OIG 
representatives on the report.
    On September 12, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with GAO to 
discuss TSA's Technology Infrastructure Modernization (TIM) 
program. On October 17, 2017, GAO released a report entitled, 
TSA MODERNIZATION: Use of Sound Program Management and 
Oversight Practices is Needed to Avoid Repeating Past Problems 
(GAO-18-46). The report contained 14 recommendations.
    On September 13, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with DHS to 
receive a briefing on the current status of United States 
Citizenship and Immigration Service's (USCIS) 
``Transformation'' efforts. Transformation is an agency-wide 
effort to move the processing of immigration benefits from 
paper-based to an electronic environment.
    On October 27, 2017, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Acting Commissioner of the U.S. Customs and 
Border Protection regarding IT systems used to secure the 
border. The letter requested information on inefficient and 
inoperable IT systems, and their impacts on CBP's budget and 
law enforcement capabilities. A response was received on 
December 7, 2017.
    On October 30, 2017, the Chair and Ranking Member of the 
Subcommittee sent a letter to the GAO Comptroller General 
regarding DHS's use of Agile software development. The letter 
requested GAO investigate DHS's transition to Agile 
development, and the potential risk that may occur during the 
transition. The Comptroller General accepted the request on 
November 8, 2017. On April 10, 2018, Subcommittee staff 
received a briefing from GAO regarding the structure of the 
audit, and on August 20, 2018, Subcommittee staff received a 
briefing from GAO on their preliminary observations regarding 
DHS's transition to using an agile development method for IT 
projects. Moreover, on October 10, 2018, Subcommittee staff 
received a briefing from DHS's Acting Chief Technology Officer 
on the Department's transition to using agile development as 
its preferred development method for IT projects.
    On January 4, 2018, Subcommittee staff were briefed by the 
Chief Data Officer of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) 
on the functions of the Chief Data Officer's role. Continuing 
oversight over chief data officers at DHS, on March 5, 2018, 
Committee staff received a briefing from the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency's (FEMA) Chief Data Officer and Chief 
Technology Officer regarding ongoing data efforts at FEMA. 
Additionally, on July 20, 2018, Subcommittee majority staff 
received a subsequent briefing provided by ICE's Acting Chief 
Data Officer on the potential expanding role of chief data 
officers across DHS.
    On January 10, 2018, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Director of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration 
Services regarding the mismanagement of its Electronic 
Immigration System (ELIS). The letter requested information on 
background checks conducted through ELIS, solutions to fix 
mismanagement, and how to address GAO recommendations. A 
response was received on March 2, 2018.
    On March 13, 2018, Subcommittee staff met with DHS's new 
Chief Information Officer, Dr. John Zangardi, to discuss Dr. 
Zangardi's short term and long term goals to modernize DHS's IT 
portfolio.
    On April 10, 2018, Subcommittee staff met with DHS's Office 
of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO) and the National 
Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD) to receive an 
updated briefing on the status of Continuous Diagnostics 
Mitigation (CDM).
    On May 3, 2018, Subcommittee staff received a briefing from 
the United States Coast Guard regarding the Coast Guard's 
partnership with the Department of Defense to create a new 
electronic health record system. On June 28, 2018, the Chair of 
the Subcommittee sent a letter to the Undersecretary for 
Management of the Department and the Chief Acquisition Officer 
of the United States Coast Guard regarding the Coast Guard's 
adoption of the same electronic health record (EHR) system used 
by the Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans 
Affairs. A response was received on September 7, 2018.

             DEPARTMENTAL WORKFORCE AND EMPLOYEE INTEGRITY

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is the third 
largest agency in the Federal Government, with hundreds of 
thousands of full time employees. Despite the importance of the 
mission, DHS continually ranks towards the bottom in both 
employee engagement and global satisfaction in the annual 
Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey. This is especially troubling 
given the numerous initiatives DHS has launched to improve 
employee morale over the past few years.
    Given the seriousness of its mission, it is also imperative 
that employees of DHS conduct themselves with the utmost 
integrity. Although the vast majority of employees conduct 
themselves appropriately, even one corrupt employee represents 
a management challenge. Unfortunately, recent years have seen 
DHS employees, including some senior officials, embroiled in 
several high profile scandals.
    On January 17, 2017, the Director of the U.S. Government 
and Accountability's (GAO) Homeland Security and Justice team 
sent a letter to the Chair of the Subcommittee accepting a 
request to examine the Federal Emergency Management Agency's 
(FEMA) policies and procedures for managing employee 
misconduct. Subcommittee staff received an update on this 
request on March 30, 2017. On July 18, 2017, GAO released its 
report (GAO-17-613) entitled, Federal Emergency Management 
Agency: Additional Actions Needed to Improve Handling of 
Employee Misconduct Allegations. The report contained 6 
recommendations for executive action. In order to review the 
report's findings and recommendations, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing entitled, ``Employee Misconduct: How can FEMA Improve 
the Integrity of its Workforce,'' on July 27, 2017. The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. David Grant, Acting 
Deputy Administrator, Federal Emergency Management Agency, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security; Mr. Chris Currie, Homeland 
Security and Justice Issues, U.S. Government Accountability 
Office; and, Ms. Jacqueline Simon, Director of Policy, American 
Federation of Government Employees. The purpose of the hearing 
was to review how FEMA did not have documented policies and 
procedures regarding proper handling of employee misconduct for 
all of its workforce classifications.
    On April 18, 2017, Subcommittee majority staff were briefed 
by representatives from DHS's Office of the Chief Human Capital 
Officer on processes for investigating and disciplining 
employee misconduct.
    On August 2, 2017, the Director of GAO's Homeland Security 
and Justice team sent a letter to the Chair of the Subcommittee 
accepting a request to examine processes for employee 
misconduct investigation and discipline implemented by the 
Offices of Professional Responsibility and other offices within 
CBP, ICE, and TSA. On August 30, 2018, GAO released its report 
entitled Department of Homeland Security: Components Could 
Improve Monitoring of the Employee Misconduct Process (GAO-18-
405). The report contained eighteen recommendations for 
executive action.
    On August 15, 2017, the Chair of the Committee sent a 
letter to the Acting Commissioner of Customs and Border 
Protection (CBP) congratulating CBP employees for being named 
Finalists in Management Excellence for the Partnership for 
Public Service's Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Medals.
    On August 30, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with TSA to 
discuss how TSA is addressing employee misconduct.
    On December 4, 2017, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Acting Inspector General of DHS's Office of 
Inspector General (OIG) thanking the OIG for keeping Congress 
informed on its investigation relating to misconduct by current 
and former OIG employees. The Chairman expressed concern over 
the employee breach of trust uncovered by the investigation 
that allowed the copying of an OIG information technology 
system and the exposure of the personally identifiable 
information of nearly 250,000 DHS employees.
    On December 11, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with DHS to 
discuss the Department's ``Year of Leadership'' initiative.
    On December 12, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with DHS's 
Chief Learning and Engagement Officer (CLEO) to gain insight 
into the CLEO's initiatives for FY 18.
    On January 25, 2018, the OIG issued a Management Alert, 
entitled ICE's Training Model Needs Further Evaluation (OIG-18-
42). Following up on this Management Alert, on April 12, 2018, 
the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a letter to the Deputy 
Director and Senior Official Performing the Duties of the 
Director of ICE expressing concern over ICE's decision to 
decentralize personnel training programs. The Chairman 
requested additional information regarding the decision to 
decentralize training programs after programs had recently been 
centralized under ICE's Office of Tactical Training and 
Programs. On June 29, 2018, the Subcommittee received a 
response.
    On February 6, 2018, the GAO released its report entitled 
Cybersecurity Workforce: Urgent Need for DHS to Take Actions to 
Identify Its Position and Critical Skill Requirements (GAO-18-
175). GAO's report included six recommendations for executive 
action for DHS to meet its cybersecurity workforce requirements 
under Public Law 113-277. To examine the findings and 
recommendations from GAO's report, the Subcommittee held a 
joint hearing with the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity and 
Infrastructure Protection entitled, ``Examining DHS' Efforts to 
Strengthen its Cybersecurity Workforce'' on March 7, 2018. The 
Subcommittees received testimony from Mr. Gregory Wilshusen, 
Director of Information Security Issues, Government 
Accountability Office; Ms. Angela Bailey, Chief Human Capital 
Officer, Management Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security; and Ms. Rita Moss, Director, Office of Human Capital, 
National Protection and Programs Directorate, U.S. Department 
of Homeland Security.
    On May 22, 2018, DHS OIG released its report, entitled 
Certain Findings Relating to the OIG's Investigation of 
Allegations Involving FLETC Senior Officials (OIG-18-65). On 
July 10, 2018, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a letter to 
the Secretary of Homeland Security expressing concerns over the 
misconduct detailed in OIG's report involving senior leadership 
at DHS's Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers (FLETC). The 
Chairman requested additional information regarding internal 
DHS safeguards against employee misconduct, including senior 
leadership. Continuing oversight on information found in the 
report, Subcommittee staff received a briefing from FLETC 
officials on July 26, 2018. Additionally, representatives from 
DHS's OIG briefed Subcommittee staff on the report and its 
findings on July 31, 2018.
    On September 26, 2018, Subcommittee staff received a 
briefing provided by representatives from DHS OIG on its 
ongoing investigation concerning misconduct by senior FEMA 
officials. In response to information learned at this briefing, 
Committee staff continued oversight by reviewing documents from 
OIG's Report on Investigations on October 29, 2018.

                      PRIVACY AND CIVIL LIBERTIES

    The protection of the privacy and civil liberties of 
American citizens is critically important, especially when 
implementing programs and policies to secure the Nation. It is 
the responsibility of the Chief Privacy Officer to establish 
privacy standards that all Department of Homeland Security 
(DHS) programs must follow. The Officer of Civil Rights and 
Civil Liberties is charged with promoting civil liberties in 
DHS policy development and implementation. This Congress, the 
Subcommittee conducted extensive oversight to ensure DHS 
programs are constitutional and adhere to the standards 
established by the Chief Privacy Officer and Officer for Civil 
Rights and Civil Liberties.
    On February 6, 2017 and October 19, 2017, officials from 
DHS's Office of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties briefed 
Subcommittee staff on ongoing efforts within the office.
    On August 22, 2017, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from the DHS Chief Privacy Officer on the Office of Privacy's 
ongoing efforts.
    On October 23, 2017, Subcommittee staff were briefed by 
officials from the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board 
to learn about their functions and work with DHS.
    On December 11, 2017, DHS's Office of Inspector General 
(OIG) released its report entitled, Concerns about ICE Detainee 
Treatment and Care at Detention Facilities (OIG-18-32), 
containing findings relating to conditions at Immigration and 
Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention centers. The report 
contained one recommendation for executive action. In response 
to information provided in the report, Subcommittee staff 
received a briefing by officials from DHS's Office of Civil 
Rights and Civil Liberties on ICE detention center oversight on 
April 19, 2018. Subcommittee staff received a subsequent 
briefing from CRCL on oversight at CBP detention centers on 
June 7, 2018.

                       UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS

    Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), colloquially known as 
drones, are one of today's fastest emerging technologies. While 
UASs have the potential to save lives and revolutionize 
industry, nefarious actors can also utilize them to cause harm 
and violate American citizens' right to privacy. Given its 
mission, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) will play an 
important role in countering any threat posed by this new 
technology.
    On April 5, 2017, Committee staff received a briefing from 
representatives of DHS's Science and Technology Directorate 
(S&T) on efforts to counter the nefarious use of UASs.
    On July 17, 2017, Members of the Subcommittee received a 
classified briefing on the risks associated with non-
traditional aviation technology, such as small UAS, and 
mitigation efforts. Representatives from the Department of 
Homeland Security's S&T and Office of Intelligence and Analysis 
were present to brief Members and respond to any Member 
questions.
    Continuing oversight of DHS's efforts to detect and 
mitigate UAS threats, Subcommittee staff received a classified 
briefing from the U.S. Secret Service on February 20, 2018.
    Throughout the 115th Congress, Subcommittee staff received 
numerous briefings from stakeholders on various counter-UAS 
measures available to deploy across the continental United 
States.
    On November 29, 2018, Members of the Subcommittee conducted 
a site visit to the United States Secret Service Headquarters. 
During the site visit, Members were briefed by representatives 
from the agency on counter unmanned aircraft system (UAS) 
capabilities and emerging UAS threats.

        DHS HEADQUARTERS CONSOLIDATION PROJECT AT ST. ELIZABETHS

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is the third 
largest department in the Federal Government. However, unlike 
other large departments DHS does not have all of its components 
and agencies located in one central area. For example, DHS 
components and offices are located in 50 different locations 
throughout the National Capital Region. In an effort to 
consolidate locations and increase a unified organization, 
construction is currently underway for a new headquarters 
facility at St. Elizabeths in Southeast Washington, DC. The 
construction at the St. Elizabeths campus is the largest 
Federal construction project to occur in the National Capital 
Region since the construction of The Pentagon and has been 
plagued with cost overruns and schedule delays since inception.
    On August 10, 2017, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Under Secretary for Management of DHS expressing 
concerns regarding plans for the reconfiguration of the Munro 
building at St. Elizabeths. The letter emphasized the 
importance of any plans at St. Elizabeths to achieve cost 
savings given the project's history of schedule slips and 
budget overruns. On August 28, 2017, the Subcommittee received 
a response. Additionally, on October 4, 2017, Subcommittee 
staff received a briefing from U.S. Coast Guard officials 
regarding the Coast Guard's concerns over DHS's plans for the 
reconfiguration of the Munro building.
    On August 22, 2017, the Committee received a letter from 
DHS's Deputy Under Secretary for Management providing an update 
on DHS's requirements under Public Law 114-150 to submit to 
Congress updated information on construction and planning at 
St. Elizabeths. The letter detailed delays to the Department's 
efforts to provide Congress with this information by the 
statutory deadline. In response to information received in this 
letter, Subcommittee staff received a briefing from DHS 
officials on August 29, 2017.
    On September 18, 2017, Committee staff visited DHS's 
Headquarters Consolidation Project at the St. Elizabeths 
campus. Committee staff toured construction progress and campus 
facilities at St. Elizabeths and were provided a briefing by 
officials from DHS and the U.S. General Services Administration 
(GSA) on the status of the project.
    Continuing oversight over the St. Elizabeths project, 
Subcommittee staff received periodic briefings from DHS and GSA 
on construction and planning from October 2017 through April 
2018.
    On April 12, 2018, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled, ``Building for the Future: Examining Challenges 
Facing the Department of Homeland Security's Consolidated 
Headquarters Project.'' The Subcommittee received testimony 
from Mr. Thomas Chaleki, Chief Readiness Support Officer, 
Management Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; 
Mr. Michael Gelber, Deputy Commissioner, Public Buildings 
Service, General Services Administration; and Mr. Chris Currie, 
Director, Homeland Security and Justice Team, U.S. Government 
Accountability Office. Additionally, on June 14, 2018, 
Subcommittee Members conducted a site visit to the St. 
Elizabeths campus to follow up on testimony heard from this 
hearing. Representatives from DHS and GSA provided the tour and 
answered Member questions.

                      THREAT MITIGATION MANAGEMENT

    A rapidly evolving threat environment challenges the 
Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in its mission to protect 
the Nation from a variety of risks. Nation state adversaries 
like North Korea pose increasing threats to the homeland, with 
risks including cyber and kinetic attacks. Additionally, non-
state adversaries continue to probe weaknesses at the Nation's 
borders and in our immigration systems. This Congress, the 
Subcommittee conducted extensive oversight of DHS's management 
of the variety of threats facing the Nation in order to ensure 
that the Department remains mission ready.
    On April 11, 2017, the Director of the U.S. Government 
Accountability Office's (GAO) Homeland Security and Justice 
team sent the Chair of the Subcommittee a letter accepting a 
request to examine the electricity industry's preparedness for 
EMP events. GAO provided Subcommittee staff an update on this 
request on January 8, 2018. On February 7, 2018, GAO released 
its report entitled, Critical Infrastructure Protection: 
Electricity Suppliers Have Taken Actions to Address 
Electromagnetic Risks, and Additional Research is Ongoing (GAO-
18-67).
    On May 5, 2017, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
provided by officials from DHS's Science and Technology 
Directorate (S&T) on its Explosives Detection Canine Program. 
On May 18, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled, 
``From the Border to Disasters and Beyond: Critical Canine 
Contributions to the DHS Mission.'' The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Mr. Damian Montes, Director, Canine Training 
Program, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security; Mr. Peter Jaquez, Acting 
Deputy Chief, Law Enforcement Operations Specialty Programs, 
CBP, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Ms. Melanie Harvey, 
Director, Threat Assessment Division, Transportation Security 
Administration (TSA), U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Dr. 
Patrick Carrick, Director, Homeland Security Advanced Research 
Projects Agency, S&T, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and 
Dr. Jennifer Brown, Canine Search Specialist and Team 
Veterinarian, Urban Search and Rescue--Florida Task Force 2.
    On June 9, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with stakeholders 
to discuss how K9s aid DHS in searching for explosive material 
and illicit drugs.
    On June 26, 2017, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security to express 
concerns over DHS's progress in producing a strategy to respond 
to electromagnetic pulse events, as required by Public Law 114-
328. On September 22, 2017, the Subcommittee received a 
response. Subcommittee staff continued oversight on EMP 
threats, receiving briefings from DHS and industry stakeholders 
throughout 2017 and 2018. On October 9, 2018, DHS released its 
strategy entitled, Strategy for Protecting and Preparing the 
Homeland Against Threats of Electromagnetic Pulse and 
Geomagnetic Disturbances.
    On October 12, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled, ``Empty Threat or Serious Danger: Assessing North 
Korea's Risk to the Homeland.'' The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Mr. Frank Cilluffo, Director, Center for Cyber 
and Homeland Security, George Washington University; Mr. 
Anthony Ruggiero, Senior Fellow, Foundation for Defense of 
Democracies; Mr. Patrick Terrell, Senior Research Fellow, 
Center for the Study of Weapons of Mass Destruction, National 
Defense University; Mr. Jeff Greene, Senior Director, Global 
Government Affairs and Policy, Symantec; and Dr. Peter Vincent 
Pry, Executive Director of the EMP Task Force on National and 
Homeland Security. Following up on this hearing, the Chair of 
the Subcommittee sent a letter to the Acting Secretary of 
Homeland Security expressing concerns regarding the testimony 
received and DHS's ability to prepare and mitigate the threats 
from North Korea.
    To follow up on the October 12, 2017 hearing, on November 
2, 2017, Members of the Subcommittee received a briefing on 
threats from North Korea by Mr. Thae Yong-ho, a former high-
ranking diplomat from North Korea who defected to South Korea 
in 2016. Additionally, on November 29, 2017, Members of the 
Subcommittee received a classified briefing on DHS's efforts to 
mitigate threats posed by North Korea. Representatives from 
DHS's Office of Intelligence and Analysis; Federal Emergency 
Management Agency; Office of Strategy, Policy, and Plans; 
National Protection and Programs Directorate; Domestic Nuclear 
Detection Office; Office of Health Affairs; and S&T were 
present to provide the briefing and respond to any Member 
questions.
    On November 1, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with OIG in a 
classified setting to discuss OIG reports regarding TSA covert 
testing.
    On January 23, 2018, Subcommittee staff toured DHS's Office 
of Operations Coordination.
    On January 30, 2018, Subcommittee Members received a 
classified briefing on DHS's efforts to mitigate the threat of 
special interest aliens and transnational criminal 
organizations transferring nuclear and radiological materials 
into the homeland via established pathways along the northern 
and southern borders. Representatives from DHS's Countering 
Weapons of Mass Destruction Office; Office of Strategy, Policy, 
and Plans; Office of Intelligence and Analysis; Customs and 
Border Protection; and Immigration and Customs Enforcement 
briefed Members and responded to Member questions.
    On March 15, 2018, Members of the Subcommittee were briefed 
on DHS's oversight of the immigration process of chain 
migration. Representatives from U.S. Citizenship and 
Immigration Services were present to brief Members and respond 
to Member questions. Continuing oversight over the immigration 
system, on June 21, 2018, majority Subcommittee staff received 
a briefing from ICE officials on a DHS pilot program to collect 
DNA samples from all individuals under ICE custody.

                     DEPARTMENT POLICY AND PLANNING

    The policies and strategies implemented by the Department 
of Homeland Security (DHS) are integral to its ability to 
successfully carry out its varying mission sets. DHS's Office 
of Strategy, Policy, and Plans (OSPP) is the office charged 
with developing, coordinating, and unifying Department 
policies, plans, and strategies. Additionally, OSPP is 
responsible for the Quadrennial Homeland Security Review (QHSR) 
and supplemental report to Congress mandated every four years 
by Public Law 110-53. The QHSR is DHS's foundational strategic 
document, which leverages input from public and private 
stakeholders to offer long-term strategic and budget priorities 
for homeland security.
    On March 22, 2017, the Chair and Ranking Member of the 
Subcommittee sent a letter to the Comptroller General of the 
U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) requesting that GAO 
conduct a review of OSPP. Among other items, the letter 
requested GAO examine the extent to which OSPP oversees its 
policies to determine whether components incorporate, 
implement, or comply with them. Subcommittee staff received 
subsequent briefings from GAO on this review on August 22, 
2017, February 5, 2018, August 13, 2018, and August 28, 2018. 
On September 19, 2018, GAO released its report entitled 
Homeland Security: Clearer Roles and Responsibilities for the 
Office of Strategy, Policy, and Plans and Workforce Planning 
Would Enhance Its Effectiveness (GAO-18-590). The report 
contained four recommendations for executive action.
    On March 24, 2017, the Chairs of the Committee; 
Subcommittee on Oversight and Management Efficiency; 
Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security; Subcommittee on 
Counterterrorism and Intelligence; Subcommittee on 
Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Protection; Subcommittee on 
Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications; and 
Subcommittee on Transportation and Protective Security sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security expressing 
concerns over DHS's efforts regarding the 2018 QHSR. The letter 
detailed homeland security mission areas that the 2018 QHSR 
report should examine. In response to this letter, on April 10, 
2017, Subcommittee staff received a briefing provided by 
officials from OSPP on the 2018 QHSR. Subcommittee staff 
continued oversight over the 2018 QHSR by receiving follow-up 
briefings from Department officials throughout 2017. The 2018 
QHSR report was due to Congress by December 31, 2017, however, 
DHS failed to meet this deadline.
    On January 24, 2018, the Chair of the Subcommittee sent a 
letter expressing concern over the delay in the release of the 
2018 QHSR, which was due to Congress by December 31, 2017. In 
response to this letter, on March 20, 2018, Subcommittee staff 
received a briefing from DHS officials to receive an update on 
the delayed 2018 QHSR.
    On June 6, 2017, Subcommittee staff were briefed by 
officials from DHS on proposed reorganizations of OSPP and the 
Office of Partnership and Engagement.
    On September 28, 2017, Subcommittee staff were briefed by 
the Assistant Secretary for Strategy, Plans, Analysis, and Risk 
within DHS's Office of Strategy, Policy, and Plans to discuss 
ongoing efforts.
    On January 25, 2018, Subcommittee staff met with DHS's new 
Under Secretary for Management, Claire Grady, to discuss her 
priorities for the management directorate.
    On June 6, 2018, the Chair and Ranking Member of the 
Subcommittee sent a letter to the GAO Comptroller General 
requesting that GAO conduct a review of DHS's 2018 QHSR upon 
release.

                      CONTRACTOR EMPLOYEE VETTING

    The Department of Homeland Security relies on thousands of 
contractor employees every day to provide necessary services 
from building United States Coast Guard (USCG) ships to 
providing information technology (IT) support. Contractor 
employees that require access to DHS facilities, IT systems, or 
sensitive information require a fitness determination--a 
decision by the component-level Personnel Security Division 
(PSD) that an individual has or does not have the level of 
character and conduct required to perform work on a designated 
contract or task order on behalf of DHS. Industry 
representatives have voiced concerns for years that the 
criteria used to make a fitness determination are unclear and 
vary from component to component.
    On February 15, 2018, Subcommittee staff met with the 
Office of the Chief Security Officer to discuss DHS's current 
policies regarding fitness determinations of contractor 
employees.
    Throughout January and February 2018, Subcommittee staff 
met with stakeholders to discuss how DHS's inefficient fitness 
determination process provides challenges for industry and 
impacts small businesses working with DHS.
    On February 27, 2018, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled, ``Doing Business with DHS: Industry Recommendations 
to Improve Contractor Employee Vetting.'' The Committee 
received testimony from Mr. Charles E. Allen, Senior 
Intelligence Advisor, Intelligence and National Security 
Alliance; Mr. Marc Pearl, President and CEO, Homeland Security 
and Defense Business Council; Mr. David J. Berteau, President 
and CEO, Professional Services Council; and, Mr. Brandon 
LaBonte, President and CEO, ArdentMC. The purpose of this 
hearing was to examine the extent to which DHS and its 
components have unified policies, processes, and procedures for 
vetting the character and conduct of contractor employees, 
known as a fitness determination.
    On March 16, 2018, the Chair and Ranking Member of the 
Subcommittee sent a letter to the Undersecretary for Management 
regarding streamlining fitness standards between DHS 
components. The letter requested the Undersecretary for 
Management examine the application of fitness standards across 
all DHS components, and how they can be consolidated. A 
response was received on April 13, 2018.

               DHS'S ROLE IN CURBING THE OPIOID EPIDEMIC

    The United States is in the midst of an opioid epidemic. 
Since 1999, the annual number of overdose deaths due to opioids 
has more than quadrupled, according to the Centers for Disease 
Control (CDC). In 2016, 63,000 people died from a drug 
overdose, and of those deaths, 42,000 or 67%, involved 
prescription or illicit opioids. A November 2017 report by the 
President's Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the 
Opioid Crisis also observed that ``[t]he crisis in opioid 
overdose deaths has reached epidemic proportions in the United 
States . . . and currently exceeds all other drug-related 
deaths or traffic fatalities.''
    DHS and several of its components aid in combatting the 
opioid epidemic. U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) plays 
a critical role in preventing illicit narcotics from reaching 
the American public while facilitating lawful travel, trade, 
and preventing the illegal entry of inadmissible persons and 
contraband at ports of entry (POEs) and international mail 
facilities. Additionally, U.S. Immigration and Customs 
Enforcement's (ICE) investigative agency, Homeland Security 
Investigations (HSI) works with CBP to investigate smuggling 
attempts and uses data to target packages that may contain 
illicit opioids.
    On May 24, 2018, Subcommittee staff were briefed by CBP to 
gain a better understanding of CBP's efforts to interdict 
illicit opioids at POEs.
    On June 1, 2018, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) 
briefed Subcommittee staff to discuss how DEA and DHS work 
together to address the opioid epidemic. Additionally, on June 
1, 2018, Subcommittee staff were briefed by employees at the 
Pennsylvania Department of Health to gain insight into how DHS 
works with state partners regarding preventing illicit opioids 
from entering the country.
    Furthermore, on June 12, 2018, CBP briefed Subcommittee 
staff regarding their work in international mail facilities and 
with express consignment couriers to prevent illicit opioids 
entering the country.
    On June 19, 2018, the Subcommittee held a hearing in 
Harrisburg, PA, entitled, ``Opioids in the Homeland: DHS 
Coordination with State and Local Partners to Fight the 
Epidemic.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Marlon 
Miller, Special Agent in Charge-Philadelphia, U.S. Immigration 
and Customs Enforcement, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; 
Ms. Casey Durst, Director, Field Operations, Baltimore Field 
Office, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Mr. David W. Sunday Jr., District Attorney, 
York County, Pennsylvania; and, Mr. Raymond Singley, Director, 
Bureau of Records and Identification, Pennsylvania State Police 
Department. The focus of this hearing was to better understand 
DHS's partnerships with state and local entities in response to 
the opioid epidemic.
                              ----------                              


                       Subcommittee Hearings Held

``Watchdog Recommendations: A Better Way Ahead to Manage the 
        Department of Homeland Security.'' February 16, 2017. 
        (Serial No. 115-5)
``Immigration Benefits Vetting: Examining Critical Weaknesses 
        in USCIS Systems.'' March 16, 2017. (Serial No. 115-8)
``From the Border to Disasters and Beyond: Critical Canine 
        Contributions to the DHS Mission.'' May 18, 2017. 
        (Serial No. 115-16)
``Employee Misconduct: How Can FEMA Improve the Integrity of 
        its Workforce?'' July 27, 2017. (Serial No. 115-25)
``DHS Financial Systems: Will Modernization Ever Be Achieved?'' 
        September 26, 2017. (Serial No. 115-29)
``Empty Threat or Serious Danger: Assessing North Korea's Risk 
        to the Homeland'' October 12, 2017. (Serial No. 115-33)
``Doing Business with DHS: Industry Recommendations to Improve 
        Contractor Employee Vetting.'' February 27, 2018. 
        (Serial No. 115-51)
``Examining DHS' Efforts to Strengthen its Cybersecurity 
        Workforce.'' March 7, 2018. Joint with the Subcommittee 
        on Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Protection. (Serial 
        No. 115-52)
``Building for the Future: Examining Challenges Facing the 
        Department of Homeland Security's Consolidated 
        Headquarters Project.'' April 12, 2018. (Serial No. 
        115-57)
``Opioids in the Homeland: DHS Coordination with State and 
        Local Partners to Fight the Epidemic.'' Harrisburg, 
        Pennsylvania. June 19, 2018. (Serial No. 115-68)
``Access Denied: Keeping Adversaries Away from the Homeland 
        Security Supply Chain.'' Joint with the Subcommittee on 
        Counterterrorism and Intelligence. July 12, 2018. 
        (Serial No. 115-71)

    Oversight Activities of the Subcommittee on Transportation and 
                          Protective Security

  John Katko, New York, Chairman

Bonnie Watson Coleman, New Jersey    Mike Rogers, Alabama
William R. Keating, Massachusetts    Brian K. Fitzpatrick, Pennsylvania
Donald M. Payne, Jr., New Jersey     Ron Estes, Kansas
Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi      Debbie Lesko, Arizona
                  (ex officio)       Michael T. McCaul, Texas
                                                       (ex officio)
                              ----------                              

    During the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security held 14 hearings, 
receiving testimony from 37 witnesses.
                              ----------                              


               THE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION

    The Transportation Security Administration was created by 
the Aviation and Transportation Security Act of 2001 (ATSA) and 
transferred from the Department of Transportation to the newly-
created Department of Homeland Security in the Homeland 
Security Act of 2002 (HSA). Since its creation, TSA has never 
been reauthorized by Congress, which has led to challenges in 
asserting Congressional priorities for the agency. 
Additionally, TSA has experienced frequent turnover in its 
highest ranks, with having six administrators since its 
creation. Primary jurisdiction of TSA lies with the House 
Committee on Homeland Security and the Senate Committee on 
Commerce, Science, and Transportation, although some 
jurisdiction is shared with the House Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure and the Senate Committee on 
Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
    On February 2, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``The Future of the Transportation Security 
Administration.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. 
Roger Dow, CEO, U.S. Travel Association; Ms. Nina E. Brooks, 
Head of Security, Airports Council International; and Mr. J. 
David Cox, National President, American Federation of 
Government Employees.
    This hearing examined how the Transportation Security 
Administration can better adjust to an ever-changing threat 
landscape and combat internal organizational challenges. 
Stakeholders were provided an opportunity to elaborate on 
measures TSA can take to effectively achieve its mission of 
protecting the nation's transportation systems.
    On May 23, 2017, the Subcommittee on Transportation and 
Protective Security of the Committee on Homeland Security held 
a Member briefing on the perspectives of the Honorable Peter 
Neffenger, the former Transportation Security Administrator.
    On May 25, 2017, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from representatives of 
the Transportation Security Administration on the legislative 
process and timeline underpinning the reauthorization of the 
Transportation Security Administration.
    On November 2, 2017, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from representatives of 
TSA on the agency's progress with the implementation of new 
initiatives as required by statute.
    On December 11, 2017, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from representatives of 
TSA on the agency's strategic 5-Year plan.
    On December 18, 2017, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from representatives of 
TSA on the development and implementation of screening 
protocols specific to passengers with disabilities.
    On January 31, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security met with GAO. The purpose of the meeting was 
to discuss GAO's ongoing work related to the TSA Academy.
    On February 5, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security met with TSA. The purpose of the meeting was 
to discuss TSA's public engagement strategy.
    On February 7, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security met with the TSA Administrator. The purpose 
of the meeting was to receive an intelligence brief and discuss 
TSA's new capital investment strategy.
    On February 22, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from TSA on the FY 19 TSA 
budget request.
    On April 3, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security participated in a conference call with TSA. 
The purpose of the call was to discuss TSA's policies related 
to voluntarily abandoned property at TSA security checkpoints.
    On April 18, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from GAO. The briefing 
covered GAO's work on TSA's training of new Transportation 
Security Officers at the Federal Law Enforcement Training 
Center.
    On May 10, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security staff received a briefing from TSA. The 
briefing was on TSA's plans for the summer travel season.
    On May 18, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security held a meeting with the GAO team responsible 
for GAO's TSA-related work. The purpose of the meeting was to 
discuss relevant ongoing work in GAO's portfolio as well topics 
for potential future work related to TSA.
    On May 25, the staff of the Subcommittee on Transportation 
and Protective Security of the Committee on Homeland Security 
received a briefing from TSA. The briefing covered TSA's 
universal enrollment contract.
    On June 6, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security held a meeting with TSA. In the meeting, TSA 
provided an update on the procurement and deployment of 
computed tomography screening technology.
    On June 7, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from TSA. Staff were 
briefed on TSA's new security procedures for last point of 
departure airports.
    On June 14, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security met with TSA. The purpose of the meeting was 
to discuss an ongoing personnel issue within TSA.
    On July 11, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security met with TSA. The purpose of the meeting was 
to gain TSA's perspective on the DHS' Science and Technology 
Directorate.
    On July 17, 2018, the Members of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a classified briefing from TSA.
    On July 24, the staff of the Subcommittee on Transportation 
and Protective Security of the Committee on Homeland Security 
received a briefing from TSA. The briefing covered employee 
engagement, morale, and the TSA Administrator's new Career 
Progression Plan for Transportation Security Officers.
    On July 26, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security met with TSA. In the meeting, staff received 
an update on the procurement and deployment of computed 
tomography screening technology.
    On August 1, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from TSA on the new 
concept of operations for the Federal Air Marshals. TSA's Quiet 
Skies program was also briefed to staff in the meeting.
    On August 17, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security participated in a site visit to TSA's 
Transportation Systems Integration Facility.
    On August 21, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security met with TSA's Office of Security Operations. 
In the meeting, staff were briefed on TSA's plans to further 
segment passengers at TSA checkpoints based on risk.
    On September 12, 2017, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from representatives of 
TSA on the agency's security operations at last point of 
departure airports.
    On September 20, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received another update on TSA's procurement 
and deployment of computed tomography screening technology.
    On October 3, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a classified threat briefing from 
TSA.
    On October 30, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security met with TSA. The purpose of the meeting was 
to discuss TSA's newly released Biometric Roadmap.
    On October 30, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from TSA. The briefing 
was focused on the delay of TSA's employee vetting rulemaking.

                      TSA VETTING AND WATCHLISTING

    On February 6, 2017, the Members of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a classified briefing on TSA's 
vetting and watchlisting procedures.
    On July 20, 2017, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from representatives of 
the Transportation Security Administration on the 
implementation of updated Security Directives and Emergency 
Amendments.

                          PASSENGER WAIT TIMES

    On March 29, 2017, the Members of Subcommittee received a 
briefing by representatives from the aviation private sector 
and the Transportation Security Administration on passenger 
wait times at airports.

                      ACTIVE SHOOTERS AT AIRPORTS

    On January 6, 2017, a lone shooter opened fire in the 
baggage claim area in Terminal 2 of Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood 
International Airport killing five people and injuring dozens. 
The shooter, 26 year-old Esteban Santiago, was traveling from 
Alaska to Fort Lauderdale and had checked his firearm in 
accordance with Transportation Security Administration (TSA) 
rules and regulations. Santiago had been undergoing treatment 
for mental health issues when the incident occurred.
    On August 14, 2016, mistaken reports of an active shooter 
caused widespread panic and the self-evacuation of Terminals 1, 
2 and 8 at the John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK). 
After reviewing the videotape, airport officials believe that 
the first report of an active shooter in Terminal 8 came as a 
result of patrons at the Juan Valdez Cafe loudly celebrating 
the victory of Olympic track star Usain Bolt. Shortly 
thereafter, 911 operators received reports of active shooters 
in Terminals 1 and 2 resulting in the evacuation of those 
terminals, as well.
    On November 1, 2013, a gunman opened fire in the area 
before the security checkpoint at the Los Angeles International 
Airport (LAX). The shooter killed TSA Agent Gerardo Hernandez 
and wounded two other TSA personnel and one passenger before 
being apprehended. The response to the incident effected about 
1,500 flights, 171,000 passengers and had a ripple effect 
across the entire air transportation system.
    Following the shooting at LAX, President Obama signed into 
law the Gerardo Hernandez Airport Security Act (Pub. L. 114-50) 
which directed TSA to verify that airports across the country 
have incorporated procedures for responding to active shooters 
targeting security checkpoints into their existing incident 
plans. It also required TSA to evaluate the levels of 
preparedness at airports, and establish a mechanism by which 
best practices in security incident mitigation can be shared 
with airports across the country. Finally, it required TSA to 
conduct a review of the interoperable communications 
capabilities of the law enforcement, fire, and medical 
personnel responsible for responding to a security incident at 
airports in the United States.
    After the Fort Lauderdale shooting, DHS encouraged airports 
to establish Airport Operations Centers (AOC) staffed by 
airport operators and security, local law enforcement, the 
airlines, as well as TSA and Customs and Border Protection to 
respond to security incidents that may arise. However, airports 
must bear the cost of establishing AOCs themselves.
    On April 4, 2017, the Members of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security and the Subcommittee on 
Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications received a 
briefing by the Broward County (Florida) Aviation Department 
and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey on recent 
active shooter and perceived active shooter incidents at the 
Nation's airports.

   THE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION INNOVATION TASK FORCE 
                               INITIATIVE

    As aviation and transportation security threats evolve, the 
TSA must meet these threats with new innovative security 
solutions. In response, TSA created the Innovation Task Force 
(ITF) to foster a culture of innovation focused on engaging 
with stakeholders to increase security, efficiency within the 
TSA, and passenger experience. To accomplish these goals, the 
ITF focuses on piloting technology that is directly related to 
transportation security and may be acquired by TSA in the 
future, new technology that is security related but may not 
presently be in TSA's jurisdiction, and future solutions that 
address capability gaps.
    By utilizing the ITF, TSA has been able to deploy and begin 
to procure next generation security technology. For example, 
the ITF is focusing on deployment of Automated Screening Lanes 
(ASLs), which offer enhanced efficiency at security checkpoints 
by allowing for multiple people to be screened. In addition, 
the ITF facilitated demonstrations of computed tomography (CT), 
which are currently being implemented in airports across the 
U.S.
    On April 26, 2017, the Subcommittee on Transportation and 
Protective Security of the Committee on Homeland Security held 
a Member briefing on the Transportation Security 
Administration's Innovation Task Force initiative. The briefing 
was held as a roundtable with representatives of various 
aviation industry groups.
    On April 27, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Checkpoint of the Future: Evaluating TSA's Innovation Task 
Force Initiative'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. 
Steve Karoly, Acting Assistant Administrator, Office of 
Requirements and Capabilities Analysis, Transportation Security 
Administration, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. 
Roosevelt Council, Jr., General Manager, Hatsfield-Jackson 
Atlanta International Airport, Department of Aviation, City of 
Atlanta, Georgia; Ms. Jeanne M. Olivier, A.A.E., Assistant 
Director, Aviation Security & Technology, Security Operations 
and Programs Department, The Port Authority of New York and New 
Jersey.
    This hearing examined the effectiveness of Transportation 
Security Administration's (TSA) Innovation Task Force 
initiative which was stood up in the spring of 2016 to help 
test and deploy more innovative technology solutions to 
transportation security.

                      UNITED STATES SECRET SERVICE

    When the United States Secret Service was established, its 
main duty was to prevent the illegal production of currency. On 
the advice of Secretary of the Treasury Hugh McCulloch, 
President Lincoln established a commission to stop this rapidly 
growing problem that was destroying the nation's economy, and 
on April 14, 1865, he created the United States Secret Service 
to carry out the commission's recommendations. It wasn't until 
1901 when the Secret Service received the mandate to protect 
the President of the United States.
    Today, the Secret Service is tasked with protecting the 
President and their family, past presidents, and investigating 
illicit currency crimes. On April 25, 2017, President Trump 
appointed Randolph D. Alles as the 25th Director of the United 
States Secret Service. The Subcommittee on Transportation and 
Protective Security remains committed to providing oversight to 
the U.S. Secret Service, particularly in regards to securing 
adequate resources to maintain proper staffing levels.
    On February 15, 2017, the Subcommittee on Transportation 
and Protective Security of the Committee on Homeland Security 
conducted a Member-only site visit to the United States Secret 
Service (USSS) Headquarters located in Washington, DC. The 
purpose of this visit was to provide Members a chance to learn 
about the different missions and operations of the USSS and 
interact with officials within the agency. The Member site 
visit was classified at the TS/SCI level.
    On June 8, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``How Can the United States Secret Service Evolve to Meet the 
Challenges Ahead?'' The Subcommittee received testimony from 
Hon. Randolph D. ``Tex'' Alles, Director, United States Secret 
Service, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and Hon. John 
Roth, Inspector General, Office of the Inspector General, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security.
    This hearing examined how the United States Secret 
Service's integrated mission is served by the agency's current 
workforce structure. The hearing also provided an opportunity 
for the director of the USSS to elaborate on efforts to improve 
employee morale and how the Secret Service can more effectively 
achieve its mission of protecting the nation's leaders and 
financial systems.
    On June 20, 2017, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security conducted a site visit to the White House 
perimeter fence with the U.S. Secret Service in response to the 
White House fence jumping incident.
    On July 17, 2017, the Members of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security conducted a site visit to the U.S. Secret 
Service James J. Rowley Training Center. The purpose of this 
visit was to provide Members with the opportunity to receive 
briefings on: canine programs, a simulated attack on a 
principal, and weapons systems. Members also had the ability to 
participate in a protective driving simulation.
    On October 18, 2017, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from representatives of 
the United States Secret Service on domestic and foreign 
counterfeit currency operations.
    On October 18, 2017, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from representatives of 
the Government Accountability Office on the challenges of 
managing the USSS' information technology systems and data.
    On April 5, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from the Secret Service. 
The briefing covered the Secret Service's National Threat 
Assessment Center, which provides threat analysis for public 
areas and academic institutions.
    On July 27, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security participated in a briefing with the Secret 
Service. Staff were briefed on Secret Service human resources 
issues, including the pay cap for Secret Service Special 
Agents.

                           AIR CARGO SECURITY

    On October 29, 2010, two explosive devices concealed in 
cargo packages were discovered on separate cargo planes 
originating from Yemen and bound for the United States. One was 
discovered on a stopover in the United Kingdom and the other on 
a stopover in Dubai. The explosives--disguised as printer 
cartridges--had each been transported on passenger planes 
before they were finally discovered aboard the cargo planes: 
highlighting the major risk posed to both passenger and cargo 
aircraft.
    In August 2010, the Transportation Security Administration 
(TSA) met the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 
Commission Act of 2007 (P.L. 110-53) mandate to physically 
screen and inspect 100 percent of air cargo transported on 
passenger aircraft for domestic flights and flights departing 
the United States. The 
9/11 Commission Act did not require TSA to screen 100 percent 
of air cargo on all-cargo aircraft; therefore, TSA has chosen 
to take a risk-based approach to all-cargo aircraft.
    TSA has been challenged in meeting the same 100 percent 
screening mandate for inbound cargo on international passenger 
aircraft but has worked closely with numerous foreign nations, 
as well as the International Civil Aviation Organization 
(ICAO), to develop and execute programs that aid in 
accomplishing a high percentage of screening for cargo entering 
the country. Securing air cargo is not only vital for national 
security, but also for economic prosperity and maintaining the 
global supply chain.
    On July 25, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Securing Air Cargo: Industry Perspectives.'' The Subcommittee 
received testimony from Mr. Stephen A. Alterman, President, 
Cargo Airline Association; Mr. Brandon Fried, Executive 
Director, Airforwarders Association; Mr. Michael C. Mullen, 
Executive Director, Express Association of America; and Mr. 
Bart Elias, Specialist in Aviation Policy, Resources, Science 
and Industry Division, Congressional Research Service, Library 
of Congress.
    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the current 
challenges to air cargo security and assess DHS policies and 
industry perspectives in order to better protect air cargo.
    On September 13, 2017, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from representatives of 
the Government Accountability Office on the status and findings 
of a report on TSA's security efforts in the air cargo domain.
    On February 1, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security met with GAO. The purpose of the meeting was 
to discuss GAO's cargo security engagement.
    On May 11, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security participated in a site visit with TSA and CBP 
at Dulles International Airport. The site visit included a tour 
of Dulles' air cargo operations.

                        GLOBAL AVIATION SECURITY

    Since 9/11, the international aviation sector remains a 
target of terrorist organizations around the world. These 
evolving threats require the Department of Homeland Security to 
constantly assess security capabilities and fix vulnerabilities 
within the aviation security sector. Security concerns at 
airports pose unique challenges and demands a high degree of 
collaboration between the Transportation Security 
Administration (TSA), Customs and Border Protection and 
stakeholders to collaborate to protect U.S. citizens and 
identify threats that may be coming to the United States from 
international locations.
    Using new more effective, well-coordinated, and 
sophisticated tactics, terrorist attacks remain a challenge for 
global aviation security, as terrorists have exploited lapses 
in security at vulnerable airports abroad in recent years. For 
example, two ISIS-linked individuals, who were living in 
Sydney, Australia, attempted to place an Improvised Explosive 
Device (IED) aboard an Etihad Airways flight on July 15, 2017. 
The plot failed only because the luggage was overweight and 
unable to be brought on board.
    In addition, three suicide bombers attacked soft targets at 
the Brussels airport and at a metro station in Belgium on March 
22, 2016. The attack killed 32 individuals and injured more 
than 300 people. A similar attack occurred at a terminal in 
Istanbul's Ataturk Airport on June 28, 2016. Three attackers 
killed 45 people and injured more than 230 after opening fire 
and later detonating themselves with suicide bombs, once 
security officials started returning fire. Both attacks were 
either claimed by ISIS or inspired by the terrorist 
organization.
    These attacks are just a few examples of the threat that 
remains globally towards aviation the sector. Other attacks 
were perpetrated by terrorist organizations in Somalia, and in 
a Russian airliner above Egypt. With threats continuing to 
evolve, it is crucial that DHS and stakeholders remain vigilant 
and correct security vulnerabilities at airports.
    On March 22, 2017, the Members of the Committee on Homeland 
Security received a classified briefing from the 
representatives of the Department of Homeland Security Office 
of Intelligence and Analysis; the Transportation Security 
Administration; the Department of State, and the National 
Counterterrorism Center on aviation security. The briefing was 
classified at the TS/SCI level.
    On September 6, 2017, the Members of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security and the Subcommittee on 
Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications received a 
joint classified Member briefing on recent threats to 
international civil aviation security and how the U.S. 
Government is working with foreign partners to mitigate threats 
to civil aviation. Representatives from the Transportation 
Security Administration, the Department of Homeland Security, 
and the National Counterterrorism Center were present to 
respond to Member questions.
    On September 7, 2017, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from representatives of 
Denver International Airport on the relationship between TSA 
and airports in furtherance of their mutual goal of aviation 
security.
    On September 26, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Raising the Standard: DHS's Efforts to Improve 
Aviation Security Around the Globe.'' The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Mr. Craig Lynes, Director of Global Compliance, 
Office of Global Strategies, Transportation Security 
Administration, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. Todd 
C. Owen, Executive Assistant Commissioner, Office of Field 
Operations, Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; and Ms. Jennifer Grover, Director, Homeland 
Security and Justice, U.S. Government Accountability Office.
    The purpose of this hearing was to assess existing security 
capabilities and capacity-building efforts of the Department of 
Homeland Security (DHS) in order to enhance security at last 
point of departure (LPD) airports--those airports with direct 
flights to the United States--and raise the global aviation 
security standard.
    On October 26, 2017, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from representatives of 
the Transportation Security Administration on TSA's plans to 
enforce a 120-day deadline to raise the global aviation 
security standard.
    On November 3, 2017, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from representatives of 
the Department of Homeland Security, TSA, and CBP on the 
Department's overseas presence at last point of departure 
airports, and specifically airports with Preclearance.
    On March 26, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security met with TSA's Office of Intelligence and 
Analysis. The meeting focused on TSA's involvement in DHS's 
international information sharing program.
    On June 20, 2018, the Members of Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from aviation 
stakeholders, including airports and air carriers on insider 
threats to aviation security.
    On August 29, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from ICE's Homeland 
Security Investigations. The purpose of the briefing was to 
provide an update on national security threats emanating from 
the Caribbean.

                 CANINE USE FOR TRANSPORTATION SECURITY

    Canines are a critical part of the U.S. government's 
national security infrastructure. Canines are used by federal 
agencies to detect concealed humans, narcotics, currency, 
firearms, electronics, chemicals associated with weapons of 
mass destruction, and prohibited agricultural products, and in 
search and rescue missions. They serve as valuable tools to 
helps officers detect threats and contraband attempting to be 
smuggled in the United States.
    Increased demand and decreased supply for working canines 
has led to price increases in recent years. In addition, many 
breeders of the types of trained canines needed for security 
screening are from Europe, and not the United States. The 
Subcommittee on Transportation and Protective Security is 
committed to the use of canines to enhance transportation 
security.
    On September 25, 2017, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from representatives of 
TSA on domestic explosives detection canine capacity building.
    On October 3, 2017, the Subcommittee on Intergovernmental 
Affairs of the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform and 
the Subcommittee on Transportation and Protective Security held 
a joint hearing entitled ``Innovations in Security: Examining 
the Use of Canines.'' The Subcommittees received testimony from 
Mr. Scott Smith, Lieutenant, Orlando Police Department, 
Orlando, Florida; Ms. Cynthia M. Otto, Director, Penn Vet 
Working Dog Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University 
of Pennsylvania; Ms. Sheila Goffe, Vice President of Government 
Relations, American Kennel Club.
    This hearing examined on the use of canines for security 
purposes, shortages in the supply of qualified canines, 
challenges to use and procurement of domestic canines, 
innovations in canine detection and security traits and 
techniques, and efforts to improve collaboration on these 
issues. The witnesses also discussed opportunities to expand 
the visibility of canines at soft targets and transportation 
hubs throughout the country.
    On March 1, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security met with representatives from TSA. The 
purpose of the meeting was to discuss TSA efforts to procure 
and deploy explosive detection canines.

                    SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY

    The attacks of September 11, 2001 exploited the weaknesses 
inherent in aviation security measures at that time; however, 
other modes of transportation have been and remain a top target 
for transnational terrorist groups. Terrorist attacks against 
all modes of surface transportation have occurred across the 
globe including train bombings in Belarus, India, Russia, 
Spain, the United Kingdom, France, and metro station in 
Belgium. For example, in Madrid, Spain, an Al-Qaeda inspired 
attack killed 191 people and injured over 1,800 in 2004. The 
most recent well known attack against public transportation 
systems occurred at the airport and metro station in Brussels, 
Belgium, killing 32 people and injuring another 330 in 2016. 
These attacks are only successful attacks and do not encompass 
unsuccessful attempts, such as multiple cases in New York in 
the last fifteen years.
    Surface transportation systems, encompassing passenger 
rail, freight rail, mass transit, ferries, highways, over-the-
road buses, and trucking, are integral components to the 
nation's broader transportation network. Surface transportation 
systems are largely owned and operated by state and local 
entities, which presents unique challenges for the Department 
of Homeland Security's responsibility as the primary federal 
agency responsible for securing the numerous and diverse modes 
of transit. Attacks in Europe at public surface transportation 
systems demonstrate the need to better understand the threat 
and build an appropriate security apparatus.
    On June 19, 2017, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from representatives of 
the Government Accountability Office on the status and findings 
of two reports on TSA's airport inspections and TSA's surface 
transportation inspections.
    On November 14, 2017, the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response, and Communications and the Subcommittee 
on Transportation and Protective Security held a joint Member 
roundtable on the development of technology to address threats 
to the surface transportation sector.
    On November 28, 2017, the Subcommittee held a field hearing 
in Trenton, New Jersey, entitled ``Securing Public Areas of 
Transportation Systems: Stakeholder Perspectives.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Charles Cunningham, 
Director, Homeland Security and Emergency Management, Delaware 
River Port Authority (DRPA) Public Safety/PATCO; Mr. Thomas J. 
Nestel, III, Chief, Transit Police, Southeastern Pennsylvania 
Transportation Authority (SEPTA); Mr. Douglas Lemanowicz, 
Lieutenant, Special Operations Section, New Jersey State 
Police, State of New Jersey; and Mr. Christopher Trucillo, 
Chief, Transit Police, New Jersey Transit.
    This field hearing provided Members an opportunity to 
examine security threats facing mass transit systems; 
challenges that stakeholders and law enforcement personnel face 
to effectively mitigate such threats; and the role of 
technology in public area security.
    On January 30, 2018, the Subcommittee on Transportation and 
Protective Security and the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Communications, Preparedness, and Response held a joint hearing 
entitled ``Securing Our Surface Transportation Systems: 
Examining the Department of Homeland Security's Role in Surface 
Transportation Technologies.'' The Subcommittees received 
testimony from Ms. Sonya Proctor, Director, Surface Division, 
Office of Security Policy and Industry Engagement, 
Transportation Security Administration, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Mr. Robert Pryor, Director, Intermodal 
Division, Office of Requirements and Capabilities Analysis, 
Transportation Security Administration, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Mr. Donald E. Roberts, Program Manager, 
Explosive Threat Detection, Explosives Division, Homeland 
Security Advanced Research Projects Agency, Science and 
Technology Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; 
and Mr. Brian Michael Jenkins, Director, National 
Transportation Security Center of Excellence, Mineta 
Transportation Institute.
    This hearing continued Committee efforts to gain a holistic 
understanding of the challenges facing surface transportation 
operators, industry stakeholders, and DHS components in their 
mutual goal of using technology to address the unique security 
threats facing transit systems. Members will have the 
opportunity to discuss the bureaucratic hurdles, impractical 
acquisition timeframe, fickle testing requirements, R&D 
challenges, and other difficulties previously identified by 
operators and stakeholders with representatives from the 
Department of Homeland Security.
    On April 16, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security met with the Department of Transportation's 
Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. The purpose of the 
meeting was to discuss threats associated with the use of 
electronic logging devices.
    On April 27, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security participated in a conference call with GAO. 
The topic of the call was GAO's engagement related to pipeline 
security.
    On June 20, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security staff received a briefing from the U.S. Coast 
Guard. The topic of the briefing was the new Transportation 
Worker Identification Credential reader rule.

                     TECHNOLOGY ACQUISITIONS REFORM

    TSA's technology procurement process has been under 
prolonged scrutiny by Congress, the Government Accountability 
Office (GAO), and the DHS Inspector General (IG). GAO has 
flagged DHS's management and procurement practices in their 
biannual High Risk List report since 2009. GAO and the IG have 
cited lax baseline budgeting, shifting technical capabilities 
requirements, and failure to observe DHS-wide guidelines as 
issues in TSA procurements.
    As a result of not implementing government best practices 
and DHS policies for acquiring new security capabilities, TSA's 
technology acquisitions have failed to meet security 
performance objectives and have wasted taxpayer dollars. 
Additionally, industry stakeholders have consistently expressed 
concern regarding TSA's communication and long-term technology 
planning. While transportation security technology represents a 
substantial opportunity for many stakeholders, some have been 
hesitant to make additional research and development 
investments in the transportation security space because they 
view TSA's procurement process as inconsistent and poorly 
managed.
    In response to these challenges, Congress passed the 
Transportation Security Acquisition Reform Act in 2014. While 
this legislation brought about many necessary reforms, TSA 
continues to struggle with acquisition efficiency, budgeting, 
and planning due to a lack of consistent leadership and other 
longstanding bureaucratic challenges. Therefore, it is 
paramount that Congress maintains oversight over this critical 
issue, which greatly impacts the security of the traveling 
public.
    On October 6, 2017, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from representatives of 
CBP and TSA on the implementation of a biometric pilot program 
in domestic airports.
    On November 15, 2017, Members of the Committee on Homeland 
Security conducted a site visit to the Transportation Security 
Integration Facility at the Ronald Reagan Washington National 
Airport in Arlington, Virginia. Members examined the 
Transportation Security Administration's passenger screening 
equipment in various stages of research and development.
    On January 18, 2018, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Innovation at TSA: Examining Threat Mitigation 
Through Technology Acquisitions Reform.'' The Subcommittee 
received testimony from Hon. David P. Pekoske, Administrator, 
Transportation Security Administration, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security.
    This hearing examined TSA's acquisition process, increase 
its use of innovative technology, and enhance coordination with 
industry stakeholders in order to mitigate the ever-evolving 
threat to transportation security.
    On March 23, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from TSA's Office of 
Requirements and Capabilities Analysis. The briefing covered 
surface transportation technology and TSA's five-year 
technology investment plan.
    On July 26, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security participated in a teleconference with GAO. 
The topics of the teleconference included GAO's engagement on 
TSA's implementation of the Transportation Security Acquisition 
Reform Act, and GAO's review of TSA and DHS science and 
technology research and development efforts for surface 
transportation security needs.

                              TSA OUTREACH

    The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is 
arguably the most public facing component of the Department of 
Homeland Security (DHS). Every day, Transportation Security 
Officers (TSOs) screen and interact with over 2 million 
passengers across the United States. To further engage with the 
public to both improve security at airports and foster a 
positive relationship between the TSA and the public, TSA uses 
multiple engagement programs. For example, TSA posts on its 
Instagram pictures of TSA canines, unique confiscated items, 
and interesting events to engage with the traveling public. TSA 
also utilizes a Twitter account for more traditional purposes, 
such as policy change announcement and press releases.
    Although TSA's social media accounts have gained a large 
following of nearly one million accounts, public engagement 
challenges remain, specifically regarding increasing Precheck 
enrollment. TSA remains far from their goal of 25 million 
Precheck enrollees, as enrollment has stalled around 8 million 
passengers. Continued improvement for TSA's outreach with the 
public and marketing of programs, such as Precheck, is critical 
to maintaining a positive relationship with the traveling 
public, while increasing enrollment into these programs that 
transportation security and throughput at the security 
checkpoint.
    On February 27, 2018, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``The Public Face of TSA: Examining the Agency's 
Outreach and Traveler Engagement Efforts.'' The Subcommittee 
received testimony from Ms. Christine Griggs, Acting Assistant 
Administrator, Civil Rights and Liberties, Ombudsman and 
Traveler Engagement, Transportation Security Administration, 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Ms. Stacey Fitzmaurice, 
Deputy Assistant Administrator, Office of Security Operations, 
Transportation Security Administration, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; and Ms. Harper Jean Tobin, Director of 
Policy, National Center for Transgender Equality.
    The purpose of this hearing was to examine TSA's public 
engagement strategy, identify areas for improvement, and 
discuss how innovative methods and techniques can be used to 
increase the effectiveness of TSA's public engagement efforts.

       STATE AND LOCAL PERSPECTIVES ON HUMAN AND DRUG TRAFFICKING

    On April 10, 2018, the Members of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security conducted a site visit 
to Syracuse, New York and received briefings on how the 
Department of Homeland Security works with State and local 
partners to mitigate the exploitation of transportation systems 
for human and drug trafficking. The Members met with 
representatives from the McMahon/Ryan Child Advocacy Center.

                       TSA FY 2019 BUDGET REQUEST

    The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) was 
created in the aftermath of 9/11 to strengthen the security of 
the nation's transportation systems and ensure the freedom of 
movement for people and commerce. America's transportation 
sector has long been, and continues to be, a top target for 
terrorism, further underscoring the importance of TSA's 
mission. Given the array of threats currently facing the 
homeland, it is imperative that TSA is properly resourced.
    The President's FY 19 budget requests a topline budget of 
$7.7 billion for TSA. This is a $143.8 million increase from 
the Fiscal Year 2018 (FY 18) request, a $200 million decrease 
from the enacted FY 18 level, and a $76.3 million increase from 
the enacted Fiscal Year 2017 (FY 17) level. The request also 
proposes increasing the Aviation Passenger Security Fee, 
raising it a dollar from $5.60 to $6.60, per one-way trip. 
According to the Administration, this will generate an 
additional $557 million in revenue for TSA.
    The FY 2019 budget also expands the amount of 
Transportation Security Officers (TSOs) who staff security 
checkpoints at airports. With high attrition rates, it is 
essential that proper staffing levels allow TSA to efficiently 
screen passengers, one of TSA's core responsibility. In 
addition, the Passenger Screening Program allows for the 
purchase and installment of innovative screening technologies, 
such as Computer Tomography (CT) systems. Funding and utilizing 
new technology is essential to staying up to date on changing 
threats of the aviation sector. The Subcommittee is committed 
to providing oversight of TSA's budget requests.
    On May 31, 2017, the Subcommittee on Transportation and 
Protective Security of the Committee on Homeland Security 
received a briefing from representatives of the Transportation 
Security Administration on the President's Fiscal Year 2019 
budget request to Congress.
    On April 12, 2018, the Subcommittee on Transportation and 
Protective Security held a hearing entitled ``Examining the 
President's FY 2019 Budget Request for the Transportation 
Security Administration.'' The Subcommittee received testimony 
from the Hon. David P. Pekoske, Administrator, Transportation 
Security Administration, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; 
Mr. Kevin M. Burke, President, Office of Security Operations, 
Airports Council International-North America; and Mr. Jeffrey 
David Cox, National President, American Federation of 
Government Employees.
    The purpose of this hearing was to examine TSA's Fiscal 
Year 2018 (FY 19) budget request and provide Members with an 
opportunity to ask questions of the TSA Administrator regarding 
his plans and priorities.

                       TSA SCREENING AND PRECHECK

    The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) employs 
about 43,000 Transportation Security Officers (TSOs) who screen 
over 2 million passengers and their baggage each day at 
airports across the United States. In the 2018 spring travel 
season, TSA experienced a record breaking number of passengers, 
with over 400,000 passengers per day than previous years across 
the country.
    Year after year, passenger volumes continue to grow at a 
steady pace, causing challenges at security checkpoints. In 
2016, passengers missed flights due to excessive wait times at 
domestic checkpoints. These long lines were prompted by a DHS 
Office of Inspector General audit in 2015, revealing lapses in 
security at TSA checkpoints. As a result to the increased 
security, wait times began exceeding 75 minutes during peak 
hours.
    In October 2011, TSA introduced the TSA PreCheck program in 
response to congressional authorization to implement a trusted 
traveler program. The Precheck initiative is an expedited 
screening program that enables TSA to assess passenger risk 
prior to their arrival at the airport checkpoint.
    When used properly, PreCheck is a valuable tool that 
increases security and decreases wait times at checkpoints. 
However, due to increased wait times from increased passenger 
volumes and changes made at the agency, TSA began improperly 
using the Precheck program by allowing non-Precheck passengers 
into expedited security lanes. This discourages new passengers 
from enrolling into the Precheck program and decreases aviation 
security.
    With a record number of passengers expected in the summer 
of 2018, the Subcommittee focus is on ensuring that security is 
upheld and there are not excessive wait times that forces 
passengers to miss flights. These concerns prompted the 
PreCheck is Precheck Act of 2018, which ensures that only 
travelers who are members of a trusted traveler program are 
permitted to use TSA Precheck security lanes. This bill was 
passed in the House of Representatives on September 4, 2018, 
and later most of the bill's text was signed into law with the 
2018 FAA Reauthorization.
    On October 12, 2017, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from representatives of 
the Transportation Security Administration on the TSA PreCheck 
Program and associated fees.
    On March 1, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security met with TSA's Office of Security Operations. 
The meeting focused on the PreCheck program and TSA's use of 
expedited screening at security checkpoints.
    On March 16, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security met with TSA's Office of Security Operations. 
Subcommittee staff received a briefing on TSA's Risk Assessment 
Rules as they relate to the PreCheck program.
    On April 25, 2018, the Members of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a classified briefing from the 
Transportation Security Administration on the TSA's risk-based 
screening of passengers and the PreCheck program.
    The Subcommittee continued to examine this issue with a 
hearing on May 17, 2018, entitled ``Assessing the TSA 
Checkpoint: The PreCheck Program and Airport Wait Times.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Darby LaJoye, 
Assistant Administrator, Office of Security Operations, 
Transportation Security Administration, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Mr. William Russell, Acting Director, 
Homeland Security & Justice Team, U.S. Government 
Accountability Office; Ms. Lorraine Howerton, Senior Director 
of Government Relations, U.S. Travel Association; Ms. Sharon L. 
Pinkerton, Senior Vice President, Legislative and Regulatory 
Policy, Airlines for America; Ms. Wendy Reiter, Director of 
Aviation Security, Seattle/Tacoma International Airport, 
testifying on behalf of the American Association of Airport 
Executives; and Mr. Michael McCormick, Executive Director and 
Chief Operating Officer, Global Business Travel Association.
    This hearing examined TSA's plan to expand the Precheck 
program and mitigate excessive wait times at airports for the 
Summer of 2018, while addressing stakeholders' concerns.

                   CYBERSECURITY THREATS IN AVIATION

    The growth experienced across the aviation sector is 
expected to continue to continue in the foreseeable future. To 
give context to the size of the industry in the United States, 
the Department of Transportation estimates that U.S. serving 
airlines transported 928.9 million domestic and international 
travelers in 2016. As volume of demand continues to increase, 
carriers, airports and manufacturers will be forced to adapt 
with new technology. These new innovations and technologies 
have created far greater interconnectivity.
    If a cyber incident were to heavily effect flights or 
elements of the aviation sector, passengers may lose confidence 
in the industry. With higher interconnectivity and new security 
risks, cybersecurity will play a larger role in protecting 
airport infrastructure and aviation security. Many of the 
likely threats come in the form of malware that could be used 
by criminals or nation-state hackers who seek financial gain, 
spyware that could potentially steal valuable data, attacks 
that would hinder services at airports, or jamming that could 
affect radar operations.
    DHS has taken steps to further address cyber threats to the 
aviation sector by releasing the National Strategy for Aviation 
Security (NSAS) in March of 2017 to identify threats in this 
sector. In addition, this Subcommittee continues to provide 
oversight to mitigate cyber threats, specific to the aviation 
sector.
    On July 27, 2017, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security received a briefing from representatives of 
the National Protection and Programs Directorate and TSA on the 
aviation cybersecurity initiative, as well as TSA cybersecurity 
issues.
    On August 22, 2018, the staff of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security met with DHS's National Protection and 
Programs Directorate. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss 
the intersection of cyber and aviation security.
    On Thursday, September 6, 2018, the Subcommittee on 
Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Protection and the 
Subcommittee on Transportation and Protective Security of the 
Committee on Homeland Security held a joint hearing entitled 
``Understanding Cybersecurity Threats to America's Aviation 
Sector.'' The Subcommittees received testimony from Mr. 
Christopher Porter, Chief Intelligence Strategist, FireEye; Mr. 
Jeffrey Troy, Executive Director, Aviation Information Sharing 
and Analysis Center; And Mr. Michael Stephens, Executive Vice 
President, IT and General Counsel, Tampa International Airport.
    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the current 
cybersecurity threats facing the aviation sector and to explore 
ways in which the aviation industry is looking at cybersecurity 
in general. The hearing features individuals from the private 
sector who discussed the current threat environment, as well as 
ways stakeholders attempting to mitigate any identified 
vulnerabilities.

                  INSIDER THREATS TO AVIATION SECURITY

    Approximately 900,000 people work at the approximately 450 
airports across the United States. Due to the nature of their 
employment, many of these individuals can bypass traditional 
screening requirements that travelers undergo prior to entering 
secure areas of the airport. Very few airports have full 
employee screening at secure access points, instead opting for 
randomized screening by TSA officers or airport law enforcement 
personnel. Unfortunately, the current randomized screening 
model has not proven to be a sufficient deterrent for employees 
with malicious intent, as over the last several years, numerous 
insider threats have manifested at airports across the United 
States.
    Recent examples have included aviation sector employees 
utilizing access to smuggle weapons, drugs, and other illicit 
items into and across the United States. For example, Richard 
Russell stole a commercial aircraft from Seattle-Tacoma 
International Airport and flew the aircraft for nearly an hour 
before crashing in an apparent suicide in August 2018. Mr. 
Russell held a valid security credential and used his access to 
gain entry to the aircraft. In another case, ten Dallas/Fort 
Worth International Airport airline employees were indicted as 
part of an undercover FBI operation in May 2018. These workers 
were suspected of smuggling 66 kilograms of methamphetamines to 
Newark Liberty International Air, Charlotte Douglas 
International Airport, and Phoenix Sky Harbor International 
Airport. After being interrogated, one of the workers indicated 
that for the right price, he would be willing to smuggle 
explosives as well.
    During the 114th and 115th Congresses, the Transportation 
and Protective Security Subcommittee conducted oversight to 
better secure airports from insider threats. An in-depth 
investigation conducted by Majority staff from 2015 to 2017 on 
airport access controls produced recommendations to address 
such vulnerabilities. In the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee 
introduced H.R. 876, the Aviation Employee Screening and 
Security Enhancement Act of 2017, which streamlines TSA 
screening procedures for airport and airline employees to 
ensure that only individuals authorized to have access to 
secure areas of the airports are granted such access. The bill 
passed the House and many its provisions were included in the 
2018 FAA Reauthorization, which was signed into law.
    On Thursday, September 27, 2018, the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the Committee on 
Homeland Security held a hearing entitled ``Insider Threats to 
Aviation Security: Airline and Airport Perspectives.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Ms. Wendy Reiter, 
Director, Aviation Security, Port of Seattle; Mr. Stephen A. 
Alterman, President, Cargo Airline Association; Ms. Lauren 
Beyer, Vice President, Security and Facilitation, Airlines for 
America; and Mr. Tim Canoll, President, Air Line Pilots 
Association.
    This hearing examined security efforts to mitigate insider 
threats from airport employees, airline employees, TSA 
personnel, and others who have access to sterile areas of 
domestic airports. Specifically, the hearing focused on 
existing access control measures (employee vetting, random 
screening, etc.) and the work of airport operators and airlines 
to vet employees, enable secure access controls, and mitigate 
insider threats to aviation security at airports across the 
United States. The relationship and cooperation between airport 
operators, airlines, state and local law enforcement, and 
Federal entities, with respect to ameliorating insider threats, 
was also examined.
                              ----------                              


                       Subcommittee Hearings Held

``The Future of the Transportation Security Administration.'' 
        February 2, 2017. (Serial No. 115-1)
``Checkpoint of the Future: Evaluating TSA's Innovation Task 
        Force Initiative.'' April 27, 2017. (Serial No. 115-14)
``How Can the United States Secret Service Evolve to Meet the 
        Challenges Ahead?'' June 8, 2017. (Serial No. 115-19)
``Securing Air Cargo: Industry Perspectives.'' July 25, 2017. 
        (Serial No. 115-24)
``Raising the Standard: DHS's Efforts to Improve Aviation 
        Security Around the Globe.'' September 26, 2017. 
        (Serial No. 115-28)
``Innovations in Security: Examining the Use of Canines.'' 
        Joint with the Subcommittee on Intergovernmental 
        Affairs of the Committee on Oversight and Government 
        Reform. October 3, 2017. (Serial No. 115-31)
``Securing Public Areas of Transportation Systems: Stakeholder 
        Perspectives.'' Field hearing in Trenton, New Jersey, 
        November 28, 2017. (Serial No. 115-40)
``Innovation at TSA: Examining Threat Mitigation Through 
        Technology Acquisitions Reform.'' January 18, 2018. 
        (Serial No. 115-46)
``Securing Our Surface Transportation Systems: Examining the 
        Department of Homeland Security's Role in Surface 
        Transportation Technologies.'' Joint with the 
        Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
        Communications. January 30, 2018. (Serial No. 115-47)
``The Public Face of TSA: Examining the Agency's Outreach and 
        Traveler Engagement Efforts.'' February 27, 2018. 
        (Serial No. 115-50)
``Examining the President's FY 2019 Budget Request for the 
        Transportation Security Administration.'' April 12, 
        2018. (Serial No. 115-58)
``Assessing the TSA Checkpoint: The PreCheck Program and 
        Airport Wait Times.'' May 17, 2018. (Serial No. 115-64)
``Understanding Cybersecurity Threats to America's Aviation 
        Sector.'' September 6, 2018. (Serial No. 115-75)
``Insider Threats to Aviation Security: Airline and Airport 
        Perspectives.'' September 27, 2018. (Serial No. 115-77)

    Oversight Activities of the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime 
                                Security

 Martha McSally, Arizona, Chairman

Filemon Vela, Texas                  Lamar Smith, Texas
Cedric L. Richmond, Louisiana        Mike Rogers, Alabama
J. Luis Correa, California           Lou Barletta, Pennsylvania
Val Butler Demings, Florida          Will Hurd, Texas
Nanette Diaz Barragan, California    Clay Higgins, Louisiana
Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi      Don Bacon, Nebraska
  (ex officio)                       Michael T. McCaul, Texas
                                       (ex officio)
                              ----------                              

    During the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee on Border and 
Maritime Security held 12 hearings, receiving testimony from 48 
witnesses.
                              ----------                              


                             BORDER ISSUES

    Members of the Subcommittee received periodic classified 
briefings on the current border threats.

           THE THREAT OF TRANSNATIONAL CRIMINAL ORGANIZATIONS

    Transnational Criminal Organizations (TCOs), or cartels, 
have turned the movement of humans and narcotics into a roughly 
$30 billion-dollar business. Illicit activity that moves across 
the border is explicitly directed by the major TCOs that 
control such smuggling routes. These organizations pose a 
serious national security threat to the United States, and 
actively attempt to circumvent the Department of Homeland 
Security's border security efforts on a daily basis.
    In recent years, the cartels have used innovative methods 
to bypass our border to deliver narcotics to the United States, 
including a propane powered `drug cannon,' semi-submersible 
submarines, ultralight aircraft, and tunnels. In addition to 
these smuggling methods, cartels also engage in systematic 
counter-surveillance of Border Patrol Agents to guide alien and 
drug loads past barriers, checkpoints, and patrols.
    Profit margins for narcotics are so large that the cartels 
can afford to lose several loads of drugs for each one that 
successfully makes it into the interior of the United States. 
These profits fund and drive the level of innovation and 
surveillance seen in recent years. The street prices for 
cocaine and heroin have also remained fairly stable over the 
last 10 years, which is an indicator that the supply is steady 
relative to demand.
    As law enforcement responds to activity along the land and 
maritime borders, TCOs can quickly shift operations, finding 
the easiest routes to smuggle both people and illicit 
contraband into the United States.
    On February 16, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled, ``A Dangerous and Sophisticated Adversary: The Threat 
to the Homeland Posed by Cartel Operations.'' The Subcommittee 
received testimony from Vice Admiral Charles Ray, Deputy 
Commandant for Operations, U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Chief Paul A. Beeson, Commander, Joint Task 
Force-West, Arizona, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. 
Matt Allen, Assistant Director for HSI Investigative Programs, 
Homeland Security Investigations, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security; and Mr. Luis E. Arreaga, Principal Deputy Assistant 
Secretary, Bureau of International Narcotics and Law 
Enforcement Affairs, U.S. Department of State.
    This hearing provided a venue to explore the trends agents 
and officers charged with securing the border are seeing on a 
daily basis.

                       BORDER SECURITY TASK FORCE

    In an effort to mitigate the threats posed by Transnational 
Criminal Organizations (TCOs), joint task forces were 
established in 2014 to harness and more effectively coordinate 
the assets and personnel of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, 
U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement, U.S. Citizenship and 
Immigration Services, the U.S. Coast Guard, and other resources 
of the Department. The intent of this campaign was to degrade 
TCOs through enforcement and interdiction across land, sea, and 
air while facilitating the flow of lawful trade, travel, and 
commerce across our borders. To date, this campaign has been 
executed by three Joint Task Forces (JTF); JTF-West, JTF-East, 
and JTF-Investigations, which focus on (1) the southern 
maritime border; (2) the southern land border and West Coast; 
and (3) investigations in support of the geographic task 
forces, respectively.
    The Joint Task Force model was the first step in creating a 
geographic combatant command (COCOM) model similar to that of 
the Department of Defense under the Goldwater-Nichols Act. 
These task forces became operational on February 6, 2015.
    On April 4, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled, 
``Defeating a Sophisticated and Dangerous Adversary: Are the 
New Border Security Task Forces the Right Approach?'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Vice Admiral Karl Schultz, 
Director, Joint Task Force-East, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security; Chief Paul A. Beeson, Commander, Joint Task Force-
West, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Ms. Janice Ayala, 
Director, Joint Task Force-Investigations Homeland Security 
Investigations; and Ms. Rebecca Gambler, Director, Homeland 
Security and Justice Issues, U.S. Government Accountability 
Office.
    This hearing examined the effectiveness of the Joint Task 
Force structure in combating the threat posed by Transnational 
Criminal Organizations.

                   VISA OVERSTAYS AND BIOMETRIC EXIT

    One recommendation from the 9/11 Commission that is ongoing 
is establishing a biometric exit system at major international 
airports within the United States. Visa overstays remain a gap 
in national security, as visa overstays far surpass 
apprehensions along the border. According to the most recent 
data released by DHS, more than 600,000 individuals overstayed 
their travel visas in FY 2017 and were believed to still be in 
the United States, while 303,916 individuals were apprehended 
at the Southwest Border in FY 2017.
    With as many as four of the 9/11 hijackers overstaying 
their visas, or violating the terms of the visa, gaining 
situational awareness of who is entering the country, the 
length of stay, and identifying when a foreign national exits 
the U.S. is vital to our national security. Mandates for an 
electronic biometric exit system designed to verify when aliens 
on a valid visa depart the country have existed since 1996. 
While progress has been made strengthening the collection of 
information, including fingerprints and photographs, DHS is 
still in the process of evaluating and implementing pilot 
biometric programs, such as facial recognition for exiting air, 
land, and sea travelers.
    Utilizing a biometric exit system would allow DHS to know 
in real time when a foreign national has exited the country so 
investigations would not be opened on individuals who have in 
fact left. Each year since 2015, DHS has released an Entry/Exit 
Overstay Report, providing data on overstay rates separated 
into different categories including: visa waiver program 
country overstays, non-visa waiver program participant 
overstays, student or exchange overstays, and Canada and Mexico 
overstay rates. In the FY 2017 report, the suspected in-country 
overstay rate of individuals from non-visa waiver countries was 
1.91 percent of the 14,659,249 expected departures.
    Without an effective biometric exit system, CBP Officers 
and ICE agents are left with incomplete data of individuals 
possibly overstaying their visit to the U.S. In May 2017, DHS's 
Office of Inspector General released a report entitled, ``DHS 
Tracking of Visa Overstays is Hindered by Insufficient 
Technology,'' which indicated that ICE agents are forced to use 
dozens of systems and databases that are not integrated and do 
not share information, causing inefficiencies and backlogs. 
Furthermore, another DHS OIG report entitled, ``Progress Made, 
but CBP Faces Challenges Implementing a Biometric Capability to 
Track Air Passenger Departures Nationwide'' released in 
September 2018, determined that CBP improved implementation of 
biometric capabilities, specifically tracking air passenger 
exits using racial recognition. However, the report also found 
that CBP experienced operational challenges, such as poor 
network availability, lack of staff, and lengthened boarding 
times due to delays.
    On May 23, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled, 
``Visa Overstays: A Gap in the Nation's Border Security.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Michael Dougherty, 
Assistant Secretary, Border, Immigration, and Trade, Office of 
Policy, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. John Wagner, 
Deputy Executive Assistant Commissioner, U.S. Customs and 
Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. 
Clark Settles, Assistant Director, National Security Division, 
Homeland Security Investigations, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security; and Hon. John Roth, Inspector General, Office of the 
Inspector General, U.S. Department of Homeland Security.
    This hearing examined the Fiscal Year 2016 Visa Overstay 
Report to Congress and the Administration's plans for the 
implementation of a Biometric Exit System.

                       BORDER SECURITY TASK FORCE

    Border security technology, such as cameras, night vision 
devices, sensors, and surveillance equipment, has become a key 
element of increasing situational awareness, interdictions, and 
operational control along the rugged terrain of the southwest 
and northern borders. Technology enhances agent safety, 
provides constant monitoring of remote areas, and provides an 
important aspect of the multi-layered approach to border 
security.
    On July 25, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled, 
``Deter, Detect and Interdict: Technology's Role in Securing 
the Border.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Todd 
C. Owen, Executive Assistant Commissioner, Office of Field 
Operations, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department 
of Homeland Security; Mr. Scott A. Luck, Acting Deputy Chief, 
U.S. Border Patrol, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. 
Dennis J. Michelini, Acting Executive Director of Operations, 
Air and Marine Operations, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and Ms. Rebecca Gambler, 
Director, Homeland Security and Justice, U.S. Government 
Accountability Office.
    This hearing examined the role that technology plays in 
enhancing U.S. Customs and Border Protection's (CBP) ability to 
secure the border. The Subcommittee also examined the increased 
budgetary investment in technologies that improve CBP's ability 
to detect, track, and apprehend/interdict illicit activity.

                        NORTHERN BORDER SECURITY

    The U.S.-Canada border is the longest land boundary shared 
between two countries in the world. It stretches about 4,000 
miles from Washington to Maine, and 1,500 miles in Alaska. CBP 
operates more than 120 land ports of entry (POEs) and 17 ferry 
land crossings, and processes on average over 60 million 
international travelers and 27 million vehicles annually. 
Despite the vast landscape and volume of travel, there are just 
over 2,000 U.S. Border Patrol Agents assigned to the northern 
border, compared to over 17,000 at the southwest border.
    The geographic diversity along the northern border inhibits 
a single set of uniform security measures from being deployed. 
The rough terrain of the Cascades and Rocky Mountain ranges in 
the Pacific Northwest makes radar more difficult to use, 
presenting opportunities for low-flying aircraft to transit the 
border unmonitored. In the sparsely populated areas of vast 
wilderness, minimal infrastructure and limited road networks 
inhibit the rapid deployment of response personnel and 
resources. More than 2,000 miles of the border also cut across 
waterways including four of the five Great Lakes.
    On November 14, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled, ``Looking North: Assessing the Current Threat at the 
U.S.-Canada Border.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from 
Mr. Michael Dougherty, Assistant Secretary for Border, 
Immigration, and Trade Policy, Office of Strategy, Policy, and 
Plans, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. Scott A. Luck, 
Acting Deputy Chief, U.S. Border Patrol, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Mr. Kevin Kelly, Special Agent in Charge, 
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; and Dr. Michael Marchand, Chairman, Colville 
Business Council, testifying on behalf of the National Congress 
of American Indians.
    This hearing examined the current threat landscape and the 
challenges we face at our northern border. In June 2017, the 
Department submitted a Northern Border Threat Analysis report 
to Congress, as required by the Northern Border Security Review 
Act. The Subcommittee examined the major themes of the report, 
including: DHS operational capabilities and gaps on the 
northern border; the bilateral illicit drug flow between Canada 
and the United States; jurisdictional challenges along the 
northern border; and intelligence sharing cooperation among 
DHS, State, Local, Tribal and Canadian law enforcement 
agencies. Then, in June 2018, the Department submitted a 
Northern Border Security Strategy. The Subcommittee looks 
forward to reviewing the final Northern Border Security 
Implementation Plan in the future.

            U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION STAFFING AND 
                            RETENTION ISSUES

    On January 25, 2017, President Trump issued an Executive 
Order directing the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to 
hire an additional 5,000 Border Patrol Agents. On February 20, 
2017, the Secretary of DHS issued an implementing memorandum in 
support of the Executive Order. The Secretary directed CBP to 
ensure consistency in training and standards while taking 
action immediately to begin the hiring process. The memorandum 
also provided guidance for CBP to hire mission support staff to 
assist the 5,000 new agents.
    At the end of Fiscal Year 2018, the USBP staffing level was 
at 19,555 Agents, with just over 2,000 assigned to the northern 
border, and over 17,000 at the southern border. USBP's mission 
between the ports-of-entry is to detect and apprehend illegal 
entrants into the United States including aliens, drug 
smugglers, potential terrorists, wanted criminals, and persons 
seeking to avoid inspection at the designated POEs due to their 
undocumented status.
    Representative McCaul introduced the Border Security for 
America Act (H.R. 3548) in July 2017 that would authorize the 
hiring of an additional 5,000 Border Patrol Agents and an 
additional 5,000 CBP Officers, recognizing the challenges posed 
both on the border and at our POEs. To meet the increased 
hiring demands and retention challenges, H.R. 3548 authorizes 
recruitment and retention bonuses for CBP Officers and Border 
Patrol Agents assigned to remote locations that are 
historically difficult to staff locations. This would assist 
CBP's ability to meet staffing targets, while attracting and 
retaining qualified law enforcement personnel.
    To assist CBP with recruitment and hiring goals, CBP 
awarded a $297 million contract to Accenture Federal Services 
in November 2017. This contract aims to streamline CBP's 
applicant process to add additional Border Patrol Agents, CBP 
Officers, and Agents of the Office of Air and Marine 
Operations. The Committee conducted oversight of CBP hiring 
processes and the Accenture contract by holding multiple check-
in briefings, along with receiving updates from DHS.
    On January 9, 2018, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled, ``On the Line: Border Security from an Agent and 
Officer Perspective.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from 
Mr. Brandon Judd, National President, National Border Patrol 
Council; Mr. Jon Anfinsen, President, Local 2366--Del Rio, 
Texas, National Border Patrol Council; Ms. Rosemarie 
Pepperdine, Union Representative, Local 2544--Tucson, Arizona, 
National Border Patrol Council; and Mr. Anthony M. Reardon, 
National President, National Treasury Employees Union.
    This hearing examined the challenges Border Patrol Agents 
and Customs Office of Field Operations Officers face in 
carrying out their mission to secure the Nation's borders and 
POEs. In addition, members heard from witnesses regarding 
hiring and retention challenges.

                              BORDER WALL

    The border wall system is a critical capability that gives 
the Border Patrol the ability to deter illicit activity in the 
first place, makes it more difficult for illegal cross-border 
activity, and assists Border Patrol by directing illicit 
activity to more remote areas of the border, away from 
population centers. The border wall system is not just a wall; 
it includes a combination of wall, technology, all-weather 
patrol roads, access roads, lighting, enforcement cameras, and 
sensors. Incorporating such infrastructure and technology plays 
a vital role for Border Patrol to gain situational awareness of 
threats across the border.
    In January 2018, CBP submitted a border security priority 
funding request to Congress, which would address CBP's 
requirements to adequately secure the border. The CBP priority 
funding request identified four key pillars including funding 
for wall, technology, road construction and maintenance access 
and mobility. It also highlighted the need for additional law 
enforcement staff. To fully implement the priority funding 
request, CBP has calculated that it will need a total of $33.25 
billion over the next 10 fiscal years. This funding would 
greatly increase border security by fully funding CBP and the 
resources needed to secure the border from illicit activity.
    On March 15, 2018, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled, ``Bang for the Border Security Buck: What do we get 
for $33 billion?'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Ms. 
Claire M. Grady, Under Secretary for Management, Directorate 
for Management, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. 
Ronald D. Vitiello, Acting Deputy Commissioner, U.S. Customs 
and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; 
Ms. Rebecca Gambler, Director, Homeland Security and Justice, 
U.S. Government Accountability Office; Mr. Brandon Judd, 
National President, National Border Patrol Council; and Mr. 
Anthony M. Reardon, National President, National Treasury 
Employees Union.
    This hearing examined critical infrastructure, technology, 
and personnel funding needed by U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection to secure the border.

              FUTURE OF THE CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION

    On March 20, 2018, Kevin McAleenan was sworn in as 
Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection. As 
Commissioner, he is in charge of the law enforcement 
organization tasked with safeguarding our Nation's borders from 
dangerous people and materials, while facilitating lawful 
international travel and trade.
    On January 4, 2018, CBP released a report entitled, 
``Border Security Improvement Plan'' that includes a 
comprehensive overview of its top border security goals and 
objectives for the agency, discusses its investment strategy, 
prioritizes the agency's initiatives, discusses implementation 
plans for the initiatives, and defines measurements of 
effectiveness to assess progress. The Plan discusses in detail 
31 improvement initiatives between POEs, 16 at the POEs, and 5 
enterprise-wide.
    On April 25, 2018, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled, ``Border Security, Commerce and Travel: Commissioner 
McAleenan's Vision for the Future of CBP.'' The Subcommittee 
received testimony from Hon. Kevin K. McAleenan, Commissioner, 
U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security.
    This hearing examined Commissioner McAleenan's vision for 
U.S. Customs and Border Protection. During the hearing, the 
Commissioner discussed CBP priorities that range from how he 
intends to secure our borders, including the recent deployment 
of the National Guard to the Southwest border, the construction 
of new border wall system, and other high-level topics 
involving the agency.

                            MIGRANT CARAVANS

    In October 2018, a caravan of individuals originating in 
San Pedro Sula, Honduras assembled via a social media campaign 
organized by a former Honduran elected official. Their goal was 
to travel to the United States to either claim asylum or reach 
the border without having to pay the cartels and coyotes. As 
the caravan gained media attention, thousands joined and began 
the dangerous journey by foot. Migrants believed that merging 
into a large group would help avoid the dangers posed by the 
cartels including trafficking, assault, kidnapping, and 
extortion; however, their route proved to be perilous, as 
migrants walked in the heat for hundreds of miles, traveled on 
the tops of trucks and crossed moving rivers. In total, more 
than 8,000 migrants have made their way from Honduras to the 
southern border of the United States in the fall of 2018. Also, 
more than three-thousand migrants claimed asylum in Mexico and 
more than seven-thousand were repatriated to their countries of 
origin by Mexican or Guatemalan authorities.
    With POEs already backlogged from the volume of asylum 
seekers, CBP, ICE, and USCIS attempted to prepare for the large 
influx of migrants; however, resource allocation proved 
difficult due to the uncertainty of where these migrants were 
headed. On October 26, 2018 the Pentagon approved a Request for 
Assistance from DHS, approving the deployment of thousands of 
troops to the Southwest Border to support CBP.
    In addition, on March 25, 2018, a caravan of nearly 1,500 
migrants left Tapachula, along the Mexico/Guatemalan border on 
a more than 2,000 mile journey north by foot, bus and freight 
train, toward the southern border of the United States. The 
caravan was organized by Pueblo Sin Fronteras (People Without 
Borders) and made up of mostly Central Americans from Honduras, 
El Salvador, and Guatemala.
    Before 2013, approximately 1 out of 100 arriving aliens 
claimed credible fear, or asylum. Today, more than 1 out of 10 
do so. According to the Secretary of Homeland Security, less 
than 10 percent of individuals from Honduras, El Salvador, and 
Guatemala who pass credible fear screening and appear for their 
asylum hearing are granted asylum. Meanwhile, they are allowed 
to wait for their immigration hearing in the United States, 
which could be for multiple years. Furthermore, border 
apprehension demographics are shifting from single adults to 
family units and unaccompanied children. For instance, Border 
Patrol apprehended 107,212 family units in FY 2018 compared to 
75,802 in FY 2017. In FY 2013, Border Patrol apprehended 15,056 
family units, a fraction of the amount seen in recent years.
    On May 22, 2018, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled, 
``Stopping the Daily Border Caravan: Time to Build a Policy 
Wall.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Hon. Ronald 
Vitiello, Acting Deputy Commissioner, U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Hon. Thomas 
Homan, Acting Director, U.S. Immigration and Customs 
Enforcement, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and Hon. Lee 
Francis Cissna, Director, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration 
Services, U.S. Department of Homeland Security.
    This hearing examined the legal loopholes and other factors 
contributing to the increase in asylum claims and illegal 
immigration. Members had the opportunity to discuss how migrant 
caravans are exploiting the current loopholes in the U.S. 
immigration laws and investigate the policies and resources 
needed to address illegal immigration.

                             OPIOID CRISIS

    Every day in the United States more than 115 people die 
from an opioid overdose. This serious national health crisis 
affects public health as well as social and economic welfare. 
The misuse of and addiction to opioids, including prescription 
pain relievers, heroin, and synthetic opioids such as fentanyl, 
affects Americans from all backgrounds. The Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention estimates that the total ``economic 
burden'' of prescription opioid misuse alone in the United 
States is $78.5 billion a year, including the costs of 
healthcare, lost productivity, addiction treatment, and 
criminal justice activity.
    On May 30, 2018, the Subcommittee held a field hearing in 
Phoenix, Arizona entitled, ``An Unsecure Border and the Opioid 
Crisis: The Urgent Need for Action to Save Lives.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Hon. Doug Ducey, Governor, 
State of Arizona; Mr. Guadalupe Ramirez, Acting Director of 
Field Operations, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Tucson, 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. Scott Brown, Special 
Agent in Charge, Homeland Security Investigations, Phoenix, 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. Doug Coleman, Special 
Agent in Charge, Phoenix Field Division, Drug Enforcement 
Agency, U.S. Department of Justice; Mr. Tim Roemer, Deputy 
Director, Department of Homeland Security, State of Arizona; 
Dr. Cara M. Christ, Director, Department of Health Services, 
State of Arizona; Dr. Glorinda Segay, Health Director, Division 
of Health, The Navajo Nation; Ms. Debbie Moak, Co-Founder, 
notMYkid; Mr. Jay Cory, CEO and President, Phoenix Rescue 
Mission; and Mr. Wayne Warner, Dean of Men, Teen Challenge 
Christian Life Ranch.
    This hearing examined the rise of opioid addiction in the 
United States and specifically the state of Arizona. Federal, 
state and local officials discussed key topics driving this 
public health emergency, including: widespread over-
prescription by healthcare professionals; misinformation pushed 
by pharmaceutical companies about the addictive effects of 
opioids; the efforts of law enforcement to stop the illicit 
flow of opioids across our southwest border; and the resources 
that are available to those individuals who are struggling with 
opioid dependency.

                      NATIONAL GUARD ON THE BORDER

    On April 4, 2018, President Trump issued a Presidential 
Memorandum that directs the Secretary of Defense to deploy 
National Guard personnel to support CBP in securing the 
southwest border by conducting homeland defense activities, as 
well as to stop the flow of deadly drugs and gang activity. 
This was not the first time the National Guard was deployed to 
the southwest border to support border security. In 2006, 
former President Bush launched Operation Jump Start by 
deploying 6,000 Guardsmen to assist DHS and former President 
Obama also authorized 1,200 National Guard troops to be 
deployed during Operation Phalanx in 2010. Both deployments 
served as a force multiplier by providing surveillance, 
logistical and administrative support, allowing for more Border 
Patrol Agents to be deployed to the field.
    During this current deployment, National Guard units from 
around the country began to assist CBP with logistical and 
administrative support, operating sensor and image detection 
systems, providing mobile communications, augmenting border-
related intelligence analysis efforts, and building and 
installing border security infrastructure. In addition, Air 
National Guard units support CBP during rescue operations and 
general surveillance. Not only are these air units enhancing 
border security and saving lives, they are also completing 
valuable flight hours.
    Although National Guard personnel are not engaging in 
direct law enforcement activities, their valuable support has 
allowed at least 350 Border Patrol Agents to return to 
traditional frontline duties, rather than administrative or 
support duty. As of July 16, 2018, National Guard personnel 
contributed to nearly 11,000 apprehensions of individuals 
crossing the border illegally and seized over 11,500 pounds of 
marijuana by freeing up Border Patrol Agents.
    On July 24, 2018, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled, 
``Boots at the Border: Examining the National Guard Deployment 
to the Southwest Border.'' The Subcommittee received testimony 
from Mr. Rodolfo Karisch, Chief Patrol Agent, Tucson Sector, 
U.S. Border Patrol, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; MG 
John F. Nichols, Adjutant General, Texas National Guard; and MG 
Michael T. McGuire, Adjutant General, Arizona National Guard.
    This hearing examined the deployment of National Guard 
personnel to the southwest border, their ability to enhance 
U.S. Customs and Border Protection operations in each border 
patrol sector, the specific duties they are conducting at the 
border, and coordination efforts between DHS and DOD.

                           HUMAN TRAFFICKING

    Human trafficking, or trafficking in persons (TIP), is the 
fastest growing criminal industry in the world and an evolving 
global epidemic. Every day, federal, state and local law 
enforcement officers uncover and investigate human trafficking 
cases across the United States and abroad. Trafficking in 
persons is an international and domestic crime involving labor, 
public health, and criminal law violations. This form of 
modern-day slavery involves the use of force, fraud, or 
coercion to lure victims and force them into labor or 
commercial sexual acts. There isn't one specific profile of a 
typical trafficking victim, as human traffickers look to 
exploit, recruit, or coerce vulnerable populations of a range 
of ages and circumstances.
    With human trafficking occurring within and across our 
borders, multiple law enforcement agencies combat human 
trafficking, including Immigration and Customs Enforcement's 
(ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI). Working with 
domestic counterparts, such as the Department of Justice, HSI 
investigates international and domestic cases of human 
trafficking, while collaborating with the State Department and 
foreign governments to dismantle international human 
trafficking organizations.
    On September 26, 2018, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled, ``Hidden in Plain Sight: Understanding Federal 
Efforts to Stop Human Trafficking.'' The Subcommittee received 
testimony from John Hill, Assistant Secretary, Office of 
Partnership and Engagement, Department of Homeland Security; 
Steven Cagen, Special Agent in Charge, Denver Field Office, 
Homeland Security Investigations, Department of Homeland 
Security; John Gore, Acting Assistant Attorney General, Civil 
Rights Division, Department of Justice; and Michelle Demmert, 
Chief Justice, Central Council, Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes 
of Alaska.
    The hearing assessed Federal efforts to combat human 
trafficking in the United States. The subcommittee explored how 
DHS and its interagency task force partners are involved in 
investigating, prosecuting, and educating law enforcement 
officers on human trafficking operations, and ways to enhance 
the government's ability to combat this issue.
                              ----------                              --
--


                       Subcommittee Hearings Held

``A Dangerous and Sophisticated Adversary: The Threat to the 
        Homeland Posed by Cartel Operations.'' February 16, 
        2017. (Serial No. 115-4)
``Defeating a Sophisticated and Dangerous Adversary: Are the 
        New Border Security Task Forces the Right Approach?'' 
        April 4, 2017. (Serial No. 115-13)
``Visa Overstays: A Gap in the Nation's Border Security.'' May 
        23, 2017. (Serial No. 115-17)
``Deter, Detect and Interdict: Technology's Role in Securing 
        the Border.'' July 25, 2017. (Serial No. 115-23)
``Looking North: Assessing the Current Threat at the U.S.-
        Canada Border.'' November 14, 2017. (Serial No. 115-38)
``On the Line: Border Security from an Agent and Officer 
        Perspective.'' January 9, 2018. (Serial No. 115-43)
``Bang for the Border Security Buck: What do we get for $33 
        billion?'' March 15, 2018. (Serial No. 115-54)
``Border Security, Commerce and Travel: Commissioner 
        McAleenan's Vision for the Future of CBP.'' April 25, 
        2018. (Serial No. 115-62)
``Stopping the Daily Border Caravan: Time to Build a Policy 
        Wall.'' May 22, 2018. (Serial No. 115-65)
``An Unsecure Border and the Opioid Crisis: The Urgent Need for 
        Action to Save Lives.'' May 30, 2018 (Serial No. 67)
``Boots at the Border: Examining the National Guard Deployment 
        to the Southwest Border.'' July 24, 2018. (Serial No. 
        115-72)
``Hidden in Plain Sight: Understanding Federal Efforts to Stop 
        Human Trafficking.'' September 26, 2018 (Serial No. 
        115-76)

     Oversight Activities of the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity and 
                       Infrastructure Protection

  John Ratcliffe, Texas, Chairman

Cedric L. Richmond, Louisiana        John Katko, New York
Sheila Jackson Lee, Texas            Mike Gallagher, Wisconsin
James R. Langevin, Rhode Island      Clay Higgins, Louisiana
Val Butler Demings, Florida          Thomas A. Garrett, Jr., Virginia
Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi      Brian K. Fitzpatrick, Pennsylvania
                   (ex officio)      Don Bacon, Nebraska
                                     Michael T. McCaul, Texas
                                                        (ex officio)
                              ----------                              --
--

    During the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee on 
Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Protection held 13 hearings, 
receiving testimony from 42 witnesses.
                              ----------                              --
--


                     FEDERAL CYBERSECURITY MISSION

    On July 18, 2017, the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response, and Communications and the Subcommittee 
on Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Protection of the Committee 
on Homeland Security held a joint Member briefing on the 
cybersecurity of emergency communications systems.
    On July 20, 2017 the Chairmen of the full committee and the 
subcommittee sent a letter to Secretary of Health and Human 
Services Tom Price and the Director of the Office of Management 
and Budget Mick Mulvaney on developments by the Department of 
Health and Human Services to operationalize the Health 
Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center. The 
Committee had concerns that this institution could hamper 
ongoing efforts by DHS to build and maintain strong information 
sharing relationships with all sectors, including healthcare, 
and to streamline crisis management in the wake of cyber-
attacks.
    On October 3, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Examining DHS's Cybersecurity Mission.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Christopher Krebs, 
Senior Official Performing the Duties of the Under Secretary, 
National Protection and Programs Directorate, U.S. Department 
of Homeland Security; Ms. Jeanette Manfra, Assistant Secretary 
for Cybersecurity and Communications, National Protection and 
Programs Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and 
Ms. Patricia Hoffman, Acting Assistant Secretary, Office of 
Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of 
Energy.
    On February 23, 2018 the subcommittee staff were briefed by 
Department of Homeland Security officials on the FY2019 budget 
request for the National Protection and Programs Directorate. 
The briefing provided staff with an understanding of what 
programs the Department prioritized moving forward.
    On May 21, 2018 subcommittee staff were briefed by 
Department of Homeland Security Officials on the Department of 
Homeland Security Cybersecurity Strategy. The Strategy, 
released on May 15, 2018 provides the Department with a 
framework to execute its cybersecurity responsibilities over 
the next five years to keep pace with the evolving cyber risk 
landscape by reducing vulnerabilities and building resilience; 
countering malicious actors in cyberspace; responding to 
incidents; and making the cyber ecosystem more secure and 
resilient.
    On June 7, 2018 subcommittee staff were briefed by 
Department of Homeland Security officials on Supply Chain Risk 
Management initiatives underway at the Department. 
Specifically, the subcommittee wanted to understand how DHS is 
ensuring that the supply chain of cybersecurity products 
remains protected after incidents such as the banning of 
Kaspersky Labs products.
    On October 16, 2018 subcommittee staff were briefed by 
Department of Homeland Security (DHS) officials on Project 
Pathfinder. The project is a joint initiative between DHS, the 
Department of Defense and the Treasury Department to keep the 
financial sector safe from cyber-attacks. Staff wanted to 
understand DHS' role in this project and how it works with the 
other departments in completing this mission.
    On November 14, 2018 the subcommittee held a joint hearing 
with the Subcommittee on Emerging Threats and Capabilities of 
the Committee on Armed Services. The Subcommittees heard 
testimony from Ms. Jeanette Manfra, Assistant Secretary for 
Cybersecurity and Communications, National Protection and 
Programs Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. 
Kenneth P. Rapuano, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland 
Defense and Global Security, U.S. Department of Defense; Mr. 
Bradford J. Shwedo, Director for Command, Control, 
Communications and Computers/Cyber, Chief Information Officer, 
U.S. Department of State.

                INTERNATIONAL CYBERSECURITY ENGAGEMENTS

    On August 9, 2017 the subcommittee staff were briefed by 
Department of Homeland Security officials on the Department of 
Homeland Security's level of international engagement in the 
cybersecurity realm. This includes working to sign 
international partners up in the Automated Indicator Sharing 
(AIS) program as well as potential analyst exchanges with 
certain countries.
    On February 27, 2018 the subcommittee chair sent a letter 
to Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security Kirstjen 
Nielsen requesting an update on U.S.-Israel cyber cooperation 
including the implementation of the United States-Israel 
Advanced Research Partnership Act of 2016 (P.L. 114-304) which 
was signed into law in 2016. This law permitted the Department 
of Homeland Security (DHS) to enter into certain partnerships 
with Israel to enhance the cybersecurity capabilities of our 
two nations. Specifically, this act amends the Homeland 
Security Act of 2002 and the United States-Israel Strategic 
Partnership Act of 2014 to expand the successful binational 
research and development program within the Homeland Security 
Advanced Research Projects Agency (HSARPA) to include 
cybersecurity technologies and solidifies further research 
programs by removing the `pilot' designations previously 
assigned to them.
    In August 2018, the subcommittee led a Staff Delegation to 
Europe to examine overall European cybersecurity posture and 
current initiatives in place. The agenda included:
    Helsinki, Finland--August 27-28, 2018: The Delegation met 
with Ambassador Pence and officials from the U.S. Embassy in 
Helsinki, receiving an overview of U.S. relations with Finland 
and the nation's cybersecurity posture. The briefing also 
included discussions of Finnish civil society and national 
security posture in relation to Russia and regional partners. 
The Delegation also met with Fin-
nish government officials from the nation's Security Committee, 
the National Cyber Security Centre Finland, the Ministry of 
Foreign Affairs, North American Unit, and a researcher from the 
Jyvaskyla University of Applied Science Security Technologies. 
Additionally, the Delegation met with the Finnish Ambassadors 
for Hybrid Issues and Cyber Issues, as well as members of the 
Finnish Parliamentary Administration Committee to discuss 
issues of cybersecurity, domestic security, law enforcement and 
international engagement on issues of internet governance.
    Oslo, Norway--August 27-29, 2018: The Delegation met with 
the U.S. Ambassador to Norway, Admiral Braithwaite, for an 
introductory briefing on Norwegian domestic and cybersecurity 
priorities as well as a country team briefing. The Delegation 
went on to meet with the Norwegian Water Resources and Energy 
Directorate for a briefing on securing critical infrastructure, 
and then had a panel discussion with representatives of the 
Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Justice and Defense on 
issues of domestic and international cybersecurity. The 
Delegation visited the Norwegian Institute of International 
Affairs to discuss academic perspectives on issues of 
cybersecurity, privacy and telecommunications. The Delegation 
toured the Norwegian National Cyber Security Center and had a 
briefing with National Security Authority representatives on 
efforts to share cyber threat information, specifics on a 
recent data breach at a major healthcare provider, and their 
views on Russian and Chinese cyber activity in the region.
    Paris, France--August 29-30, 2018: Upon landing in France, 
the Delegation held a joint meeting with Mr. Come Berbain, the 
Cybersecurity Advisor to the Digital State Secretary, and Yves 
Verhoeven, the Chief Engineer of the Corpes des Mines, as well 
as representatives from the French Cybersecurity Agency. The 
meeting included a discussion on the growth of the French 
technology sector, the role of domestic regulation in the tech 
and telecommunications sectors, and how regulation impacts the 
cybersecurity of products and devices. The next day, the 
Delegation met with the U.S. Embassy in Paris's Cybersecurity 
Working Group for a classified briefing and discussion of 
French domestic and cybersecurity priorities. The meeting 
covered a variety of cybersecurity topics including regional 
concerns with an emphasis on the quality and reliability of the 
French national security partnership with the U.S, and the 
upcoming G7 summit. After the embassy meeting, the Delegation 
toured the French National Assembly and learned the structure 
and processes of the French legislative system. In the 
afternoon the Delegation met with Frederick Douzet, the 
Cybersecurity Chair of the Institute of National Defense, to 
discuss geopolitics and conflict in the digital space, 
specifically regarding the difficulty of developing norms of 
behavior. Finally, the Delegation met with officials of the 
French Department of International Relations and Defense 
Strategy on broad issues of cyber policy, including the 
development of French strategic cyber defense documents and the 
role of French intelligence in the ``Five Eyes'' relationship. 
The Delegation returned to Washington on September 1, 2018.

                        FEDERAL NETWORK SECURITY

    On March 28, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``The Current State of DHS Efforts to Secure the Federal 
Networks.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Ms. 
Jeanette Manfra, Acting Deputy Undersecretary for 
Cybersecurity, National Protection and Programs Directorate, 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. Gregory C. Wilshusen, 
Director, Information Security Issues, U.S. Government 
Accountability Office; and Mr. Chris A. Jaikaran, Analyst, 
Cybersecurity Policy, Congressional Research Service, Library 
of Congress.
    On January 10, 2018 subcommittee staff were briefed by the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) on its 
Cybersecurity Framework. A second iteration of the Framework 
was under development, and staff wanted to examine ways in 
which the federal government could leverage the capabilities of 
the Framework.
    On January 18, 2018, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``CDM, the Future of Federal Cybersecurity?'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Frank Dimina, Area 
Vice President, Federal, Splunk; Mr. Dan Carayiannis, Public 
Sector Director, RSA Archer; Mr. Gregg T. Mossburg, Senior Vice 
President for Strategic Operations, CGI Federal; and Mr. A.R. 
``Trey'' Hodgkins, III, Senior Vice President, Public Sector, 
Information Technology Alliance for Public Sector.
    On March 20, 2018, the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity and 
Infrastructure Protection of the Committee on Homeland Security 
and the Subcommittee on Information Technology of the Committee 
on Oversight and Government Reform held a joint hearing 
entitled ``CDM: Government Perspectives on Security and 
Modernization.'' The Subcommittees received testimony from Mr. 
Max Everett, Chief Information Officer, U.S. Department of 
Energy; Mr. Scott Blackburn, Executive in Charge, Office of 
Information and Technology, U.S. Department of Veterans 
Affairs; Mr. David Garcia, Chief Information Officer, U.S. 
Office of Personnel Management; and Mr. Kevin Cox, Program 
Manager, Continuous Diagnostics and Mitigation, Office of 
Cybersecurity and Communications, National Protection and 
Programs Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland Security.
    On April 10, 2018 subcommittee staff were briefed by 
Department of Homeland Security officials on the Continuous 
Diagnostic and Mitigation (CDM) program. The CDM Program 
provides DHS, along with Federal Agencies with capabilities and 
tools and identify cybersecurity risks on an ongoing basis, 
prioritize these risks based on potential impacts, and enable 
cybersecurity personnel to mitigate the most significant 
problems first. The Department provided an update on the 
implementation of the program across federal networks.
    On July 13, 2018, the Members of the Subcommittee received 
a classified briefing from the Department of Homeland Security, 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the Office of the 
Director of National Intelligence on the roles and 
responsibilities for the Federal Government's cybersecurity 
operations.
    On July 25, 2018, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Assessing the State of Federal Cybersecurity Risk 
Determination.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. 
Ken Durbin, Senior Strategist, Global Government Affairs, 
Symantec; Ms. Summer C. Fowler, Technical Director, 
Cybersecurity Risk and Resilience, Software Engineering 
Institute CERT, Carnegie Mellon University; and Mr. Ari 
Schwartz, Managing Director of Cybersecurity Services, 
Cybersecurity Risk Management Group, Venable LLP testifying on 
behalf of the Cybersecurity Coalition and Center for 
Cybersecurity Policy and Law.

                       INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION

    On September 20 and October 10, 2017 subcommittee staff 
were briefed by the Department of Homeland Security on the 
Department's National Infrastructure Coordinating Center 
(NICC), operating as part of their overall National 
Infrastructure Plan (NIP). The NICC is the dedicated 24/7 
coordination and information sharing operations center that 
maintains situational awareness of the nation's critical 
infrastructure for the federal government.
    On March 12, 2018 subcommittee staff were briefed by 
Department of Homeland Security officials on the Department's 
roles and responsibilities for school security. The committee 
learned of the senior steering committee being put in place 
within the Department to examine school security and guide 
discussion on how the Department can better protect soft 
targets.
    On April 11, 2018, the Members of the Subcommittee on 
Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications and the 
Subcommittee on Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Protection 
received a briefing on Department of Homeland Security programs 
and activities related to school security. Representatives from 
the National Protection and Programs Directorate, the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency, and the Office of Partnership and 
Engagement will be present to respond to Member questions.

                        CYBERSECURITY WORKFORCE

    On September 7, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Challenges of Recruiting and Retaining a 
Cybersecurity Workforce.'' The Subcommittee received testimony 
from Dr. Frederick R. Chang, Executive Director, Darwin Deason 
Institute for Cyber Security, Southern Methodist University; 
Mr. Scott Montgomery, Vice President and Chief Technical 
Strategist, McAfee; Dr. Michael Papay, Vice President and Chief 
Information Security Officer, Northrop Grumman; and Ms. Juliet 
``Jules'' Okafor, Vice President, Global Business Development, 
Fortress Information Security.
    On October 23, 2017, the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity and 
Infrastructure Protection of the Committee on Homeland Security 
and the Subcommittee on Higher Education and Workforce 
Development of the Committee on Education and the Workforce 
held a joint hearing entitled ``Public-Private Solutions to 
Educating a Cyber Workforce.'' The Subcommittees received 
testimony from Hon. Stephen Cambone, Associate Vice Chancellor, 
Texas A&M University System; Mr. Douglas C. Rapp, President, 
Rofori Corporation-DEFCON Cyber, testifying on behalf of the 
Cyber Leadership Alliance; Mr. David Jarvis, Security and CIO 
Lead, IBM Institute for Business Value; and Dr. R. Scott Ralls, 
President, Northern Virginia Community College.
    On March 7, 2018, the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity and 
Infrastructure Protection and the Subcommittee on Oversight and 
Management Efficiency held a joint hearing entitled ``Examining 
DHS' Efforts to Strengthen its Cybersecurity Workforce.'' The 
Subcommittees received testimony from Mr. Gregory Wilshusen, 
Director of Information Security Issues, Government 
Accountability Office; Ms. Angela Bailey, Chief Human Capital 
Officer, Management Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security; and Ms. Rita Moss, Director, Office of Human Capital, 
National Protection and Programs Directorate, U.S. Department 
of Homeland Security.

               CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS

    On May 18 and June 29, 2017, the Members of the 
Subcommittee received briefings on the Department of Homeland 
Security's Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS) 
Program.
    On December 12, 2017 subcommittee staff were updated on the 
Government Accountability Office's report on the Chemical 
Facilities Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS) program. The GAO 
provided an update on the progress of the report which was 
released July 14, 2018.
    On December 19, 2017 subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from the Department of Homeland Security on the Chemical 
Facilities Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS) program. The 
briefing allowed subcommittee staff to engage with 
representatives from the Department on the program's efficacy 
prior to its expiration in December 2018.
    On February 15, 2018, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Industry Views of the Chemical Facility Anti-
Terrorism Standards Program.'' The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Mr. Chet Thompson, President, American Fuel & 
Petrochemical Manufacturers; Ms. Kirsten Meskill, Director, 
Corporate Security, BASF Corporation, testifying on behalf of 
the American Chemistry Council; Mr. Pete Mutschler, 
Environment, Health and Safety Director, CHS Inc.; and Mr. Paul 
Orum, Chemical Safety Advocate, Coalition to Prevent Chemical 
Disasters.

                     CYBERSECURITY RISK MANAGEMENT

    On February 26, 2018 subcommittee staff were briefed by 
Department of Homeland Security officials on the Cyber Risk 
Economics (CYRIE) project in the Science and Technology 
Directorate. The project supports research into the business, 
legal, technical and behavioral aspects of the economics of 
cyber-threats, vulnerabilities and controls.
    On April 13, 2018 subcommittee staff were briefed by 
Department of Homeland Security (DHS) officials on the 
Department's Section 9 list. DHS, in coordination with relevant 
Sector Specific Agencies (SSAs), annually identifies and 
maintains a list of critical infrastructure entities that meet 
the criteria specified in Executive Order (EO) 13636, Improving 
Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity, Section 9(a) (``Section 
9 entities'') utilizing a risk-based approach. The subcommittee 
wanted to better understand how that list was formulated and 
what support was being provided to those entities.
    On July 30, 2018 subcommittee staff traveled to New York 
City, New York to attend the rollout of the National Risk 
Management Center (NRMC) at the Department of Homeland 
Security. At the summit, subcommittee staff heard from speakers 
including Vice President Mike Pence, Secretary of Homeland 
Security Kirstjen Nielsen, Secretary of Energy Rick Perry, and 
Director of the National Security Agency Paul Nakasone on 
systemic risks to the nation's critical infrastructure. 
Furthermore, staff met with Undersecretary of the National 
Protection and Programs Directorate Christopher Krebs on how 
the NRMC will function within the Department.
    On September 12, 2018 subcommittee staff were briefed by 
Department of Homeland Security officials on the National Risk 
Management Center (NRMC). Staff received an update on the NRMC 
mission after its announcement a month earlier, as well as what 
initiatives the Center plans to take.

                       PRIVATE SECTOR ENGAGEMENT

    On March 9, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``The Current State of DHS Private Sector Engagement for 
Cybersecurity.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. 
Daniel Nutkis, Chief Executive Officer, HITRUST Alliance; Mr. 
Scott Montgomery, Vice President and Chief Technical 
Strategist, Intel Security Group, Intel Corporation; Mr. 
Jeffrey Greene, Senior Director, Global Government Affairs and 
Policy, Symantec; Mr. Ryan M. Gillis, Vice President of 
Cybersecurity Strategy and Global Policy, Palo Alto Networks; 
and Ms. Robyn Greene, Policy Counsel and Government Affairs 
Lead, Open Technology Institute, New America.
    On June 29, 2017 subcommittee staff were briefed by 
Department of Homeland Security officials on the Department's 
Cyber Incident Response mission. Specifically, staff received 
an update on how the United States Computer Emergency Readiness 
Team (US-CERT) and Hunt and Incident Response Teams (HIRT) work 
together to provide support to private sector companies in the 
lead up to and after a cyber attack.
    On November 3, 2017 subcommittee staff were briefed on 
current efforts underway at the Electricity Information Sharing 
and Analysis Center (E-ISAC). The briefing examined ways that 
the department could better build relationships within the 
electric utility community to more efficiently share cyber 
threat information.
    On November 15, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Maximizing the Value of Cyber Threat Information 
Sharing.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Robert 
K. Knake, Whitney Shepardson Senior Fellow, Council on Foreign 
Relations, testifying on behalf of the Global Resilience 
Institute; Ms. Ann Barron-Dicamillo, Vice President, Cyber 
Intel & Incident Response, American Express; Ms. Patricia 
Cagliostrom, Federal Solutions Architect Manager, Anomali; and 
Mr. Robert H. Mayer, Senior Vice President for Cybersecurity, 
USTelecom Association.
    On June 4, 2018 subcommittee staff received a briefing from 
Department of Homeland Security officials on ways in which the 
Department is mitigating the threats from botnets. On May 20, 
2018 the U.S. Department of Commerce and DHS released a report, 
entitled Enhancing the Resilience of the Internet and 
Communications Ecosystem Against Botnets and Other Automated, 
Distributed Threats, that offers a guide to government, civil 
society and industry actions that would dramatically reduce the 
threat of botnets and similar cyberattacks. The subcommittee 
wanted to better understand how the report and how DHS are 
working to mitigate vulnerabilities that botnets pose to 
Internet of Things (IoT) devices.
    On Thursday, September 6, 2018, the Subcommittee on 
Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Protection and the 
Subcommittee on Transportation and Protective Security of the 
Committee on Homeland Security held a joint hearing entitled 
``Understanding Cybersecurity Threats to America's Aviation 
Sector.'' The Subcommittees received testimony from Mr. 
Christopher Porter, Chief Intelligence Strategist, FireEye; Mr. 
Jeffrey Troy, Executive Director, Aviation Information Sharing 
and Analysis Center; and Mr. Michael Stephens, Executive Vice 
President, IT and General Counsel, Tampa International Airport.
                              ----------                              --
--


                       Subcommittee Hearings Held

``The Current State of DHS Private Sector Engagement for 
        Cybersecurity.'' March 9, 2017. (Serial No. 115-7)
``The Current State of DHS Efforts to Secure the Federal 
        Networks.'' March 28, 2017. (Serial No. 115-10)
``Challenges of Recruiting and Retaining a Cybersecurity 
        Workforce.'' September 7, 2017. (Serial No. 115-26)
``Examining DHS's Cybersecurity Mission.'' October 3, 2017. 
        (Serial No. 115-30)
``Public-Private Solutions to Educating a Cyber Workforce.'' 
        October 23, 2017. Joint with the Subcommittee on Higher 
        Education and Workforce Development of the Committee on 
        Education and the Workforce. (Serial No. 115-34)
``Maximizing the Value of Cyber Threat Information Sharing.'' 
        November 15, 2018. (Serial No. 115-39)
``CDM, the Future of Federal Cybersecurity?'' January 18, 2018. 
        (Serial No. 115-44)
``Industry Views of the Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism 
        Standards Program.'' February 15, 2018. (Serial No. 
        115-49)
``Examining DHS's Efforts to Strengthen its Cybersecurity 
        Workforce.'' March 7, 2018. Joint with the Subcommittee 
        on Oversight and Management Efficiency. (Serial No. 
        115-52)
``CDM: Government Perspectives on Security and Modernization.'' 
        March 20, 2018. Joint with the Subcommittee on 
        Information Technology of the Committee on Oversight 
        and Government Reform (Serial No. 115-55)
``Assessing the State of Federal Cybersecurity Risk 
        Determination.'' July 25, 2018. (Serial No. 115-73)
``Understanding Cybersecurity Threats to America's Aviation 
        Sector.'' September 6, 2018. (Serial No. 115-75)
``Interagency Cyber Cooperation: Roles, Responsibilities and 
        Authorities of the Department of Defense & the 
        Department of Homeland Security.'' November 14, 2018. 
        (Serial No. 115-78)

  Oversight Activities of the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, 
                      Response, and Communications

Daniel M. Donovan, Jr., New York, 
             Chairman

Donald M. Payne, Jr., New Jersey     Peter T. King, New York
James R. Langevin, Rhode Island      Martha McSally, Arizona
Bonnie Watson Coleman, New Jersey    Thomas A. Garrett, Jr., Virginia
Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi      Debbie Lesko, Arizona
                   (ex officio)      Michael T. McCaul, Texas
                                                        (ex officio)
                              ----------                              --
--

    During the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response, and Communications held 11 hearings, 
receiving testimony from 48 witnesses.
                              ----------                              --
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             DISASTER PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND RECOVERY

    Since the beginning of the 115th Congress, States, 
territories, and localities have experienced a number of 
disasters including: terrorist attacks, devastating hurricanes, 
wildfires, and flooding. It is imperative that the Federal 
Government, along with its partners at the State, territorial, 
and local levels, and the private sector, work together to 
prepare for and respond to terrorist attacks, natural 
disasters, and other emergencies.
    On January 10, 2017, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from representatives of the Trust for America's Health 
regarding the nation's preparedness for emerging infectious 
diseases.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the 
Transportation Security Administration (TSA) on January 18, 
2017 to receive a briefing regarding TSA's framework on the 
establishment of airport emergency operations centers.
    On February 8, 2017, Subcommittee staff held a conference 
call with representatives from the Department of Homeland 
Security's (DHS or Department) Office of Inspector General to 
discuss ongoing work and recommendations related to FEMA.
    On February 14, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``The Future of the FEMA: Stakeholder Recommendations 
for the Next Administrator.'' The Subcommittee received 
testimony from Captain Chris A. Kelenske, Deputy State 
Director/Commander, Emergency Management and Homeland Security, 
Michigan State Police, testifying on behalf of the National 
Governors Association; Chief John Sinclair, Fire Chief, 
Kittitas Valley Fire and Rescue (WA), testifying on behalf of 
the International Association of Fire Chiefs; and Richard F. 
Bland, J.D., M.T.S. National Director, Policy, Advocacy and 
Development, Save the Children. This hearing was the first in 
series of hearings to gather recommendations to provide to the 
in-coming Administrator of the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency (FEMA) from experts in emergency management. The hearing 
afforded an opportunity for stakeholders in the emergency 
management and first responder communities to provide their 
insights into what they believe should be priorities for the 
future of FEMA.
    The Subcommittee continued its examination of FEMA with a 
hearing on February 28, 2017, entitled ``The Future of FEMA: 
Recommendations of Former Administrators.'' The Subcommittee 
received testimony from the Hon. W. Craig Fugate, Former 
Administrator, Federal Emergency Management Agency, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security; and the Hon. R. David 
Paulison, Former Administrator, Federal Emergency Management 
Agency, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. This hearing was 
the second in a series of hearings to gather recommendations 
for the in-coming FEMA Administrator. The Subcommittee received 
testimony from previous FEMA leadership regarding their 
experiences ensuring the United States remained resilient in a 
post-9/11 and post-Hurricane Katrina environment and provided a 
forum for previous leadership to impart key insights needed to 
take FEMA into the future.
    On March 29, 2017, the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces of 
the Committee on Armed Services and the Subcommittee on 
Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications of the 
Committee on Homeland Security held a joint hearing entitled 
``Threats to Space Assets and Implications for Homeland 
Security.'' The Subcommittees received testimony from Gen. 
William Shelton, Former Commander, U.S. Air Force Space 
Command; ADM Thad Allen, Former Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard, 
Member, GPS Advisory Board; and Hon. Joseph Nimmich, Former 
Deputy Administrator, Federal Emergency Management Agency. This 
hearing provided Subcommittee Members with an opportunity to 
discuss the critical role of space-based capabilities in 
emergency preparedness and response efforts and the threats to 
the space systems providing such capabilities. In preparation 
for the hearing, on March 2, 2017, Subcommittee staff received 
a classified briefing from the National Air and Space 
International Center. In addition, staff held a number of 
discussions with subject matter experts in preparation for the 
hearing.
    On April 5, 2017, the Members of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security and the Subcommittee on 
Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications received a 
briefing by representatives of the Broward County (Florida) 
Aviation Department and the Port Authority of New York and New 
Jersey on active shooter and perceived active shooter incidents 
at the Nation's airports.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of FEMA on May 
30, 2017 to receive a briefing on the President's Fiscal Year 
2018 budget request for FEMA.
    On June 1, 2017, Subcommittee staff attended a briefing 
with representatives from FEMA, the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration, and the American Red Cross on the 
outlook for the 2017 hurricane season.
    Subcommittee staff received a briefing from the Pew 
Charitable Trusts on June 2, 2017 on their work regarding 
disaster spending.
    The Members of the Subcommittee conducted a site visit to 
FEMA's National Response Coordination Center in Washington, DC 
on July 24, 2017, including a meeting with the Administrator of 
FEMA. At this meeting, the Subcommittee Chair and Ranking 
Member provided a copy of their report containing 
recommendations on the future of FEMA to the Administrator.
    While on a site visit in California, on August 18, 2017, 
Subcommittee staff visited FEMA Region IX and received a 
briefing from FEMA officials.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the 
Government Accountability Office on August 22, 2017 to receive 
an update on open recommendations related to the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency. On August 23, 2017, Subcommittee 
staff held a similar meeting with representatives of the Office 
of Inspector General.
    Throughout August, September, October, and November 2017, 
Subcommittee staff participated in numerous conference calls 
and briefings related to efforts by FEMA and its State, 
territorial, and local partners to respond to and recover from 
Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria.
    On October 30, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Government Accountability Office to 
discuss their 2017 hurricane season oversight work.
    On November 14, 2017, the Subcommittee Chair met with Dr. 
Robert Kadlec, Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and 
Response, Department of Health and Human Services.
    The Subcommittee Chair met with Mr. Daniel Kaniewski, 
Deputy Administrator for Protection and National Preparedness, 
Federal Emergency Management Agency, on February 6, 2018.
    Subcommittee staff traveled to Puerto Rico and the U.S. 
Virgin Islands from February 20-23, 2018 to observe response 
and recovery efforts from Hurricanes Irma and Maria.
    On March 1, 2018, Subcommittee staff met with FEMA 
representatives to receive a briefing on the President's Fiscal 
Year 2019 budget request for FEMA.
    Subcommittee staff participated in a conference call with 
FEMA representatives on March 10, 2018 regarding the 
establishment of FEMA Resilience, formerly Protection and 
National Preparedness.
    On May 22, 2018, the Full Committee and Subcommittee Chairs 
sent a letter to the Comptroller General requesting to join as 
requesters of GAO's review of the 2017 hurricane season. The 
request was accepted, and this work is underway.
    On May 25, 2018, Subcommittee staff attended a briefing 
with representatives from FEMA, the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration, and the American Red Cross on the 
outlook for the 2018 hurricane season.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the 
Government Accountability Office on June 13, 2018 to receive a 
briefing on grid recovery and resilience.
    On June 29, 2018, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Government Accountability Office to 
discuss preliminary findings of GAO's 2017 hurricane response 
review, including disaster acquisitions.
    Subcommittee staff participated in a conference call with 
FEMA representatives on July 16, 2018 regarding the 2017 
Hurricane Season After Action Review.
    On July 25, 2018, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Using Innovative Technology and Practices to Enhance the 
Culture of Preparedness.'' The Subcommittee received testimony 
from the Hon. Daniel Kaniewski, Deputy Administrator for 
Resilience, Federal Emergency Management Agency, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security; Mr. Daniel Cotter, Director, 
First Responders Group, Science and Technology Directorate, 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. Dereck Orr, Division 
Chief, Public Safety Communications Division, National 
Institute of Standards and Technology, U.S. Department of 
Commerce; Mr. John V. Kelly, Senior Official, Performing the 
Duties of the Inspector General, Office of Inspector General, 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security. This hearing provided the 
Subcommittee Members with an opportunity to hear from the 
Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) on their efforts 
to develop innovative policies and technology to better 
prepare, equip, and train first responders and the public to 
mitigate and address the threats we face.
    Throughout September, October, and November 2018, 
Subcommittee staff participated in numerous conference calls 
and briefings related to efforts by FEMA and its State and 
local partners to respond to and recover from Hurricanes 
Florence and Michael.
    The Members of the Subcommittee conducted a site visit to 
FEMA's National Response Coordination Center in Washington, DC 
on September 7, 2018, including a meeting with the 
Administrator of FEMA, to receive an update on current 
operations.
    On September 20, 2018, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Government Accountability Office 
regarding federal disaster assistance.

   OUTREACH TO STATE, LOCAL, AND TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS, AND THE PRIVATE 
                                 SECTOR

    Throughout the 115th Congress, Subcommittee staff met with 
various Federal agencies and stakeholder groups representing 
the first responder and emergency management communities and 
the private sector to discuss issues of concern to their 
membership. These meetings included the International 
Association of Fire Chiefs, National Emergency Management 
Association, International Association of Emergency Managers, 
National Governors Association, National Association of 
Counties, National Fusion Center Association, Major County 
Sheriffs Association, Major Cities Chiefs, National Sheriffs 
Association, National Association of State Chief Information 
Officers, Homeland Security and Defense Business Council, 
Security Industry Association, Business Executives for National 
Security, National Association of Broadcasters, CTIA, and the 
American Red Cross. The engagement provides valuable insights 
for the Subcommittee and has contributed to the development of 
legislative and oversight activities.
    On February 6, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Department of Homeland Security's Office 
of Law Enforcement Policy to discuss policy development and 
outreach efforts related to State and local law enforcement.
    Subcommittee staff met with the FEMA Senior Law Enforcement 
Advisor on March 2, 2017 to discuss efforts to engage with 
State and local law enforcement.
    On March 23, 2017, Subcommittee staff participated in a 
panel discussion at the National Emergency Management 
Association (NEMA) Mid-Year Conference in Alexandria, VA. 
Subsequently, on March 24, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with 
NEMA's leadership to receive an update on their priorities.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the 
Department of Homeland Security's Office of State and Local Law 
Enforcement and Office of Intelligence and Analysis on April 7, 
2017 to discuss the Offices' outreach efforts to law 
enforcement.
    On May 18, 2017, the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response, and Communications and the Subcommittee 
on Counterterrorism and Intelligence held a Member Roundtable 
with representatives of State and local law enforcement to 
discuss their engagement and experience with the Department of 
Homeland Security.
    On March 22, 2018, Subcommittee staff participated in a 
panel discussion at the National Emergency Management 
Association (NEMA) Mid-Year Conference in Alexandria, VA.

     EFFICIENCY AND EFFECTIVENESS OF ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL 
                    GOVERNMENTS AND FIRST RESPONDERS

    The Department of Homeland Security has distributed more 
than $40 billion in grants to States and localities since the 
September 11th attacks. Administered by FEMA's Grant Programs 
Directorate, this funding is used to help jurisdictions 
prevent, prepare for, mitigate, and respond to terrorist 
attacks.
    On January 12, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Department of Homeland Security to 
receive a briefing on Countering Violent Extremism Grant 
Program awards.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of FEMA's 
National Preparedness Assessment Division on April 12, 2017 to 
receive a briefing on the impact of homeland security grant 
programs on our Nation's security.
    On June 1, 2017, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from FEMA representatives on the release of grant guidance and 
allocations for Fiscal Year 2017. Subsequent to this briefing, 
on August 31, 2017, Subcommittee staff received a briefing on 
Homeland Security Grant Program, Transit Security Grant 
Program, Port Security Grant Program, and Emergency Management 
Performance Grants awards.
    The Subcommittee Chair met with Mr. Thomas DiNanno, 
Assistant Administrator of FEMA's Grant Programs Directorate, 
on June 21, 2017.
    On June 22, 2017, Subcommittee staff participated in a 
conference call with representatives of the Department of 
Homeland Security to receive an update on the Countering 
Violence Extremism Grant Program awards.
    Subcommittee staff received a briefing from FEMA 
representatives on July 12, 2017 on the Presidential Residence 
Security Grant Program and the release of program guidance. 
Subsequent to this briefing, on August 16, 2017, Subcommittee 
staff received a briefing on grant awards under this program.
    On July 26, 2017, the Subcommittee held a Member briefing 
on homeland security grant programs administered by FEMA. The 
Assistant Administrator of FEMA's Grant Programs Directorate 
was present to respond to Member questions.
    Subcommittee staff participated in a conference call with 
representatives of the Government Accountability Office of 
November 8, 2017 regarding GAO's review of FEMA's preparedness 
grants and associated risk formula.
    On January 31, 2018, Subcommittee staff received an update 
from the DHS Office of Terrorism Prevention Partnerships 
regarding the Countering Violent Extremism Grant Program.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of FEMA's Grant 
Programs Directorate on April 3, 2018 regarding changes to the 
risk assessment used to inform the State Homeland Security 
Grant Program and Urban Area Security Initiative.
    On April 23, 2018, the Subcommittee held a field hearing in 
Staten Island, New York entitled ``Securing Our Communities: 
Federal Support to High-Risk Urban Areas.'' The Subcommittee 
received testimony from Mr. William F. Sweeney, Jr., Assistant 
Director In Charge, New York Field Office, Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, U.S. Department of Justice; Mr. Brian Murphy, 
Acting Principal Deputy Under Secretary, Office of Intelligence 
and Analysis, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. Thomas 
DiNanno, Assistant Administrator, Grant Programs Directorate, 
Federal Emergency Management Agency, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Mr. Chris P. Currie, Director, Homeland 
Security and Justice Team, U.S. Government Accountability 
Office; Mr. John Miller, Deputy Commissioner, Intelligence and 
Counterterrorism, New York Police Department, City of New York, 
New York; Mr. Joseph Pfeifer, Chief, Counterterrorism and 
Emergency Preparedness, New York City Fire Department, City of 
New York, New York; Mr. Joseph Esposito, Commissioner, New York 
City Emergency Management Department, City of New York, New 
York; Mr. John Bilich, Chief Security Officer, The Port 
Authority of New York and New Jersey; and Mr. Jared M. Maples, 
Director, Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness, State 
of New Jersey. This hearing examined the current terrorism 
threat to our Nation's high-risk metropolitan areas and the 
importance of federal support to these cities and communities.
    The Subcommittee held a classified Member briefing with 
representatives from FEMA, the Office of Intelligence and 
Analysis, Office of Operations Coordination, and National 
Protection and Programs Directorate on May 8, 2018 regarding 
recent updates to the Federal Emergency Management Agency's 
risk formula used to allocate State Homeland Security Grant 
Program and Urban Area Security Initiative grants.
    On May 18, 2018, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from FEMA representatives on the release of grant guidance and 
allocations for Fiscal Year 2018. Subsequent to this briefing, 
on August 23, 2018, Subcommittee staff received a briefing on 
Homeland Security Grant Program, Transit Security Grant 
Program, Port Security Grant Program, and Emergency Management 
Performance Grants awards.
    On July 10, 2018, the Subcommittee Chair sent a letter to 
the Assistant Administrator of FEMA's Grant Programs 
Directorate regarding the New York City Police Department's use 
of certain Urban Area Security Initiative funded assets. The 
Subcommittee received a response on September 4, 2018.
    Subcommittee staff participated in a conference call with 
representatives of the DHS Office of Terrorism Prevention 
Partnerships on September 28, 2018 to receive an update on the 
Countering Violent Extremism Grant Program.
    On October 16, 2018, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from representatives of FEMA's Grant Programs Directorate 
regarding the National Priorities Security Grant Program 
proposal.

CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL, RADIOLOGICAL, AND NUCLEAR PLANNING, PREPAREDNESS, 
                              AND RESPONSE

    Terrorists have actively plotted to use chemical, 
biological, radiological, and nuclear agents to attack the 
United States. To address this threat, during the 115th 
Congress, the Department of Homeland Security established the 
Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction Office. This new office 
consolidated the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, the Office 
of Health Affairs, along with some other Department programs 
and personnel, to ensure coordination and unity of effort at 
the Department on these threats.
    Subcommittee staff visited the Domestic Nuclear Detection 
Office (DNDO) on February 10, 2017 to meet with DNDO leadership 
and receive a briefing on current programs and operations.
    On February 24, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives from the National Nuclear Security 
Administration to receive a briefing on nuclear smuggling.
    On March 13, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives from the Departments of Homeland Security, 
Defense, Health and Human Services, and Agriculture to receive 
an update on efforts to develop the National Biodefense 
Strategy required by section 1086 of the Fiscal Year 2017 
National Defense Authorization Act (P.L. 114-328).
    Subcommittee staff received a briefing from representatives 
of the Office of Health Affairs and Science and Technology 
Directorate on March 14, 2017 on the status of efforts to 
upgrade biodetection efforts, including the BioWatch Program.
    On March 21, 2017, the Members of the Subcommittee received 
a classified briefing on chemical threats and the programs of 
the Office of Health Affairs to manage and address them. 
Representatives from the National Counterterrorism Center and 
the Department of Homeland Security were present to respond to 
Member questions.
    On April 25, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Office of Health Affairs and Science and 
Technology Directorate to receive an additional briefing on the 
future of the BioWatch Program.
    Subcommittee staff received a briefing from representatives 
of DNDO's Assessment Division on April 26, 2017.
    On April 27, 2017, the Members of the Subcommittee received 
a classified briefing on radiological and nuclear threats and 
the programs DNDO manages to address them. Representatives from 
the Department and DNDO were present to respond to Member 
concerns.
    Subcommittee staff received a briefing on DNDO's research 
and development authority on April 28, 2017.
    On May 1, 2017, Subcommittee staff received a briefing on 
DNDO's Technical Nuclear Forensics Program.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives from the 
Departments of Homeland Security, Defense, Health and Human 
Services, and Agriculture on May 22, 2017 to receive an update 
on efforts to develop the National Biodefense Strategy.
    On May 31, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office and 
Office of Health Affairs to receive briefings on the 
President's Fiscal Year 2018 budget request for DNDO and OHA.
    On June 27, 2018, the Subcommittee Chair sent a letter to 
the Comptroller General requesting the Government 
Accountability Office conduct a review of the Securing the 
Cities Program. The review is underway with an estimated March 
2019 report release.
    Subcommittee staff again met with representatives from the 
Departments of Homeland Security, Defense, Health and Human 
Services, and Agriculture on July 20, 2017 to receive an update 
on efforts to develop the National Biodefense Strategy.
    On August 17, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Government Accountability Office 
regarding its review of DHS' chemical security programs.
    On September 6, 2017, the Members of the Subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security and the Subcommittee on 
Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications received a 
joint classified Member briefing on threats to international 
civil aviation security and how the U.S. Government is working 
with foreign partners to mitigate such threats. Representatives 
from the Transportation Security Administration, DHS, and the 
National Counterterrorism Center were present to respond to 
Member questions.
    Subcommittee staff met with DHS representatives on October 
3, 2017 to receive a briefing on the then-Acting Secretary's 
intent to use her authority under section 872 of the Homeland 
Security Act to establish a new Countering Weapons of Mass 
Destruction Office.
    On October 17, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Office of Health Affairs regarding the 
BioWatch Program.
    Subcommittee staff received a classified briefing from DHS 
representatives of the regarding the threat of weapons of mass 
destruction on November 7, 2017.
    On November 14, 2017, Subcommittee staff received a 
classified briefing from representatives of Los Alamos National 
Laboratory regarding biological threats.
    Subcommittee staff received a classified briefing from DNDO 
representatives on November 16, 2017 regarding the Democratic 
People's Republic of Korea.
    On November 27, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Blue Ribbon Study Panel on Biodefense 
regarding the establishment of the Countering Weapons of Mass 
Destruction Office.
    On December 7, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Examining the Department of Homeland Security's 
Efforts to Counter Weapons of Mass Destruction.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. James F. McDonnell, 
Assistant Secretary for Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction, 
Director of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security; Mr. William Bryan, Acting 
Under Secretary, Science and Technology Directorate, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security; and Mr. Chris P. Currie, 
Director, Emergency Management, National Preparedness, and 
Critical Infrastructure Protection, Homeland Security and 
Justice Team, U.S. Government Accountability Office. This 
hearing provided Subcommittee Members with an opportunity to 
examine DHS' organization and ability to meet the threats posed 
by weapons of mass destruction, including its proposal to 
establish a Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction Office.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the 
Government Accountability Office on January 19, 2018 regarding 
GAO's review of the Securing the Cities Program.
    On February 1, 2018, Subcommittee staff attended a 
classified interagency briefing on the ``Plan for Verification, 
Detection, and Monitoring of Nuclear Weapons and Fissile 
Material'' required under section 3136 of the FY18 National 
Defense Authorization Act.
    On February 14, 2018, the Members of the Subcommittee 
received a classified briefing on the threat of weapons of mass 
destruction by representatives of the National Counterterrorism 
Center, the Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction Office, and 
the Office of Intelligence and Analysis.
    On March 5, 2018, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction 
Office to receive a briefing on the President's Fiscal Year 
2019 budget request for CWMD.
    Subcommittee staff received a briefing on the Securing the 
Cities Program from representatives of the Countering Weapons 
of Mass Destruction Office of May 8, 2018.
    On September 19, 2018, Subcommittee staff received a 
classified chemical and biological threat briefing from 
representatives of Sandia National Laboratory.
    Subcommittee staff participated in a conference call with 
representatives of the Government Accountability Office of 
October 4, 2018 regarding preliminary findings of GAO's review 
of the Securing the Cities Program. Subsequently, on October 
18, 2018, Subcommittee staff received an additional briefing 
from GAO on this review.

                        EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS

    The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 exposed 
communications failures with catastrophic implications. 
Communications challenges persisted during Hurricane Katrina. 
Since that time, great strides have been made in interoperable 
communications, including through the National Emergency 
Communications Plan and the establishment of the First 
Responder Network Authority (FirstNet). However, more recent 
disasters have demonstrated that communications challenges 
remain. Within the Department of Homeland Security, the Office 
of Emergency Communications (OEC) is charged with assisting 
State and local first responders in the achievement and 
maintenance of interoperable communications.
    On March 24, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Government Accountability Office to 
discuss emergency communications issues and the Subcommittee's 
request for a review of the Office of Emergency Communications.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of FirstNet on 
May 25, 2017 to receive an update on efforts to develop and 
deploy the Nationwide Public Safety Broadband Network.
    On July 18, 2017, the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response, and Communications and the Subcommittee 
on Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Protection of the Committee 
on Homeland Security held a joint Member briefing on the 
cybersecurity of emergency communications systems. 
Representatives from DHS, FirstNet, and stakeholder 
organizations were present to respond to Member questions. In 
advance of this briefing, Subcommittee staff had discussions 
with a number of subject matter experts on this topic.
    On October 12, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Assessing First Responder Communications.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Rear Admiral Ronald Hewitt 
(USCG, Ret.), Director, Office of Emergency Communications, 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. Ed Parkinson, 
Director, Government Affairs, First Responder Network 
Authority; and Mr. Mark Goldstein, Physical Infrastructure 
Issues, U.S. Government Accountability Office. This hearing 
provided Subcommittee Members with an opportunity to receive an 
update on the efforts of OEC and FirstNet to work with Federal, 
State, local, territorial, and tribal stakeholders to ensure 
the continued enhancement of first responder communications 
capabilities.
    Subsequent to the hearing, on November 28, 2017, the 
Subcommittee Chair and Ranking Member sent a letter to the 
Comptroller General requesting the Government Accountability 
Office review the requirement that first responders move their 
communications networks from the T-Band spectrum. This work is 
underway.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the 
Government Accountability Office on November 9, 2017 to discuss 
its review of the OEC.
    On February 26, 2018, Subcommittee staff met with OEC 
representatives to receive a briefing on the President's Fiscal 
Year 2019 budget request for OEC.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the 
Government Accountability Office on May 23, 2018 regarding the 
Subcommittee Chair and Ranking Members' request that GAO review 
the requirement that first responders move their communications 
networks from the T-Band spectrum.
    On September 26, 2018, Subcommittee staff received a 
briefing from the Government Accountability Office regarding 
OEC.
    Subcommittee staff received a briefing on the Border 
Interoperability Demonstration Project on October 29, 2018.
    On November 27, 2018, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Government Accountability Office 
regarding their review of the T-Band.

                         TRAINING AND EXERCISES

    FEMA, through its National Exercise Division and Center for 
Domestic Preparedness, and with partners such as the National 
Domestic Preparedness Consortium, supports training and 
exercises for emergency response providers. As terrorists 
continually change their tactics, these programs are vital for 
emergency response providers so they are prepared for the 
threats and hazards they face.
    On January 10, 2017, subcommittee staff participated in a 
conference call with representatives from FEMA regarding live 
agent training at the Center for Domestic Preparedness.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the Center 
for Domestic Preparedness on February 24, 2017 to receive a 
briefing on its review of practices related to the use of live 
agents in training.
    On May 16, 2017, Subcommittee staff again received a 
briefing from representatives of the Center for Domestic 
Preparedness regarding plans to reinstate its live agent 
training program.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the National 
Domestic Preparedness Consortium on May 17, 2017 to receive an 
update on NDPC training programs. Subcommittee staff again met 
with NDPC representatives on October 25, 2017.
    On January 4, 2017, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from representatives of the Center for Domestic Preparedness on 
their live agent training program.
    Subcommittee staff attended a counterterrorism tabletop 
exercise in Baltimore, Maryland on January 13, 2018.
    On June 7, 2018, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives from the National Domestic Preparedness 
Consortium to discuss current training curricula and 
authorization of the Consortium.

                        RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    The Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) is DHS' 
primary research and development (R&D) arm and is responsible 
for managing science and technology research, from development 
through transition, for DHS' operational components and first 
responders to protect the homeland. Throughout the 115th 
Congress, Subcommittee staff engaged with DHS components and 
other S&T stakeholders to assess S&T's performance and 
determine its appropriate mission and structure for the future.
    On January 4, 2017, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from S&T and the Federal Bureau of Investigation regarding the 
National Bioforensics Analysis Center.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of S&T's 
Research and Development Partnership Office on January 31, 2017 
to receive an update on S&T engagement with Centers of 
Excellence, National Laboratories, and the private sector.
    On February 16, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with S&T 
representatives to receive an overview briefing on S&T 
operations.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives from S&T's 
Cybersecurity Division on February 21, 2017 to learn about the 
Division's R&D activities.
    On February 22, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives from S&T's First Responder Group to discuss the 
Group's engagement with and efforts in support of emergency 
response providers.
    Subcommittee staff attended S&T's EMERGE 2016: Wearable 
Technology Showcase on March 1, 2017 to learn more about S&T's 
efforts to enhance wearable technology for first responders.
    On March 3, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with S&T 
representatives to receive an update on the programs and 
projects of the Homeland Security Advanced Research Projects 
Agency.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the S&T 
Border and Maritime Security Division on March 10, 2017 to 
receive a briefing on the Division's programs.
    On March 17, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives from S&T to receive a briefing on the use of 
Integrated Product Teams to prioritize the DHS' R&D activities.
    Also on March 17, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with S&T's 
Chemical and Biological Defense Program to receive an update on 
efforts to enhance the Department's ability to address chemical 
and biological threats.
    On March 20, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of S&T's Explosives Division to learn about the 
Division's efforts to assist DHS components in addressing these 
threats.
    Subcommittee staff received a briefing on the operations of 
the S&T Capability Development Support Division on March 23, 
2017.
    On March 27, 2017, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from S&T officials on the Maritime Security Sub-Integrated 
Product Team.
    On March 28, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives from the Office of University Programs to 
receive a briefing on the Centers of Excellence program.
    Subcommittee staff received a briefing on April 5, 2017 on 
the Science and Technology Directorate's efforts to counter 
threats from unmanned aerial systems.
    On April 25, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of Los Alamos National Lab, Lawrence Livermore 
National Lab, and Sandia National Lab to discuss their work 
with the Department of Homeland Security.
    On May 2, 2017, the Subcommittee held a Member-only 
briefing on the Department of Homeland Security's Science and 
Technology Directorate. The then-acting Undersecretary for 
Science and Technology was present to respond to Member 
questions.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the Blue 
Ribbon Study Panel on Biodefense regarding the National 
Bioforensics Analysis Center on May 24, 2017.
    Subcommittee staff met with S&T representatives on May 31, 
2017 to receive a briefing on the President's Fiscal Year 2018 
budget request for S&T.
    On June 27, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Department's Office of the Chief 
Procurement Officer to receive a briefing on the use of Other 
Transaction Authority.
    Subcommittee staff attended the S&T Cybersecurity R&D 
Showcase and Technical Workshop on July 11, 2017 to observe 
cybersecurity related projects being funded by S&T.
    The Subcommittee Chair visited the National Urban Security 
Technology Laboratory in New York, New York on August 1, 2017.
    On August 8, 2017, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
on the National Bio- and Agro-Defense Facility.
    Subcommittee staff received a briefing from representatives 
of the SAFETY Act office on August 10, 2017.
    Subcommittee staff traveled to California from August 16-
18, 2017 and received briefings at Lawrence Livermore National 
Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkley 
National Laboratory, and S&T's Silicon Valley Innovation 
Program.
    On August 30, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives from S&T regarding the proposed closure of the 
National Bioforensics Analysis Center, Chemical Security 
Analysis Center, and National Urban Security Technology 
Laboratory.
    Subcommittee staff received a briefing from representatives 
of the Silicon Valley Innovation Program on September 8, 2017.
    On October 18, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of Sandia National Laboratories to receive a 
briefing on their cybersecurity research.
    On November 7, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``How Effective is the Science and Technology 
Directorate?: Stakeholder Perspectives.'' The Subcommittee 
received testimony from Mr. Timothy Rice, Battalion Chief, 
Weapons of Mass Destruction Branch Coordinator, City of New 
York Fire Department; Dr. Gerald W. Parker, Jr., Associate Dean 
for Global One Health, College of Veterinary Medicine & 
Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, testifying on his 
own behalf; Mr. Jake Parker, Director of Government Relations, 
Security Industry Association; and the Hon. Reginald Brothers, 
Principal, The Chertoff Group, LLC, testifying as Former Under 
Secretary, Science and Technology Directorate, U.S. Department 
of Homeland Security. This hearing provided Members of the 
Subcommittee with an opportunity to hear from S&T's 
stakeholders from academia, industry, and the first responder 
community about their perspectives on the benefits and 
challenges of working with the Directorate. Prior to the 
hearing, Subcommittee staff had discussions with relevant 
subject matter experts to hear their perspectives of S&T.
    On November 14, 2017, the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response, and Communications and the Subcommittee 
on Transportation and Protective Security held a joint Member 
roundtable on the development of technology to address threats 
to the surface transportation sector.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the 
Government Accountability Office on December 18, 2017 regarding 
GAO's review of the Department's R&D capabilities.
    On January 30, 2018, the Subcommittee on Transportation and 
Protective Security and the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Response, and Communications held a joint hearing 
entitled ``Securing Our Surface Transportation Systems: 
Examining the Department of Homeland Security's Role in Surface 
Transportation Technologies.'' The Subcommittees received 
testimony from Ms. Sonya Proctor, Director, Surface Division, 
Office of Security Policy and Industry Engagement, 
Transportation Security Administration, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Mr. Robert Pryor, Director, Intermodal 
Division, Office of Requirements and Capabilities Analysis, 
Transportation Security Administration, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; Mr. Donald E. Roberts, Program Manager, 
Explosive Threat Detection, Explosives Division, Homeland 
Security Advanced Research Projects Agency, Science and 
Technology Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; 
and Mr. Brian Michael Jenkins, Director, National 
Transportation Security Center of Excellence, Mineta 
Transportation Institute. This hearing continued Committee 
efforts to gain a holisticunderstanding of the challenges 
facing surface transportation operators, industry stakeholders, 
and DHS components in their mutual goal of using technology to 
address the unique security threats of transit systems.
    Subsequent to the hearing, on March 5, 2018, the 
Subcommittee Chair sent a letter to the Senior Official 
Performing the Duties of the Under Secretary for Science and 
Technology regarding the effectiveness of the Homeland Security 
Advanced Research Projects Agency. The Subcommittee received a 
response on March 27, 2018.
    Subcommittee staff met with S&T representatives on February 
6, 2018 regarding S&T's management of Federal Funded Research 
and Development Centers (FFRDCs). Subsequently, on May 10, 2018 
and June 28, 2018, Subcommittee staff met with representatives 
of TSA and the United States Coast Guard regarding their use of 
FFRDCs.
    On February 26, 2018, Subcommittee staff received a 
briefing on S&T's projects related to cyber risk economics.
    On March 1, 2018, Subcommittee staff met with S&T 
representatives to receive a briefing on the President's Fiscal 
Year 2019 budget request for S&T.
    Subcommittee staff received a briefing from S&T 
representatives on March 9, 2018 regarding cybersecurity and 
the SAFETY Act.
    On March 13, 2018, the Subcommittee Chair met with Mr. 
William ``Bill'' Bryan, the Senior Official Performing the 
Duties of the Undersecretary for Science and Technology.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the 
Government Accountability Office on March 19, 2018 to receive 
an update on their R&D engagement.
    On March 28, 2018, Subcommittee staff met with S&T 
representatives to receive a briefing on the new vision for 
S&T.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the Joint 
Requirements Council on March 28, 2018 to discuss the 
prioritization of research and development.
    On May 7, 2018, Subcommittee staff met with representatives 
of Sandia National Laboratory regarding their work in support 
of DHS.
    Subcommittee staff received an update from the Government 
Accountability Office on GAO's review of S&T's test and 
evaluation programs on June 7, 2018.
    On June 25, 2018, Subcommittee staff attended a briefing 
regarding DHS Centers of Excellence and met with a number of 
current Centers.
    Subcommittee staff received a briefing from S&T 
representatives on July 16, 2018 regarding the S&T workforce.
    On September 25, 2018, Subcommittee staff attended an S&T 
technology demonstration regarding hurricane resilience.
    Subcommittee staff met with S&T representatives on October 
5, 2018 to receive an update on the revitalization effort.
    On November 7, 2018, Subcommittee staff attended an S&T-
funded Disaster Resilience Assessment Workshop.

                          ALERTS AND WARNINGS

    Terrorist attacks and natural disasters can occur at any 
time, often with little-to-no notice. Alerts and warnings 
provided in advance of potential threats and hazards can direct 
the public to seek safety or assist in the investigation.
    On February 27, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of Houston Public Television to discuss ways 
public television stations are assisting localities with alerts 
and warnings.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of FEMA's 
Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS) program 
office on March 16, 2017 to receive a briefing on efforts to 
implement the requirements of the IPAWS Modernization Act (P.L. 
114-143).
    On November 27, 2017, Subcommittee staff received a 
briefing from representatives of the IPAWS Program.
    On January 17, 2018, the Subcommittee Chair sent a letter 
to the Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission 
regarding the need to enhance the geographic accuracy of 
wireless emergency alerts. The Subcommittee received a response 
on June 7, 2018.
    The Subcommittee Chair sent a letter to the Administrator 
of the Federal Emergency Management Agency on January 17, 2018 
regarding the erroneous emergency alert issued by the State of 
Hawaii. The Subcommittee received a response on February 2, 
2018.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the IPAWS 
Program on January 18, 2018 regarding the erroneous emergency 
alert issued by the State of Hawaii on January 13, 2018.
    Subcommittee staff attended a briefing by representatives 
from FEMA and the Federal Communications Commission on February 
1, 2018 regarding the erroneous emergency alert issued by the 
State of Hawaii on January 13, 2018.
    On February 6, 2018, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Ensuring Effective and Reliable Alerts and 
Warnings.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. 
Antwane Johnson, Director of Continuity Communications, Federal 
Emergency Management Agency, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security; Ms. Lisa M. Fowlkes, Chief, Public Safety and 
Homeland Security Bureau, U.S. Federal Communications 
Commission; Mr. Benjamin J. Krakauer, Assistant Commissioner, 
Strategy and Program Development, New York City Emergency 
Management, City of New York, New York; Mr. Peter T. Gaynor, 
Director, Rhode Island Emergency Management Agency, State of 
Rhode Island; Mr. Scott Bergmann, Senior Vice President, 
Regulatory Affairs, CTIA; and Mr. Sam Matheny, Chief Technology 
Officer, National Association of Broadcasters. This hearing 
provided Members of the Subcommittee with an opportunity to 
hear from government and industry stakeholders about the 
current state of emergency alerts and warnings.
    On June 21, 2018 Subcommittee staff, along with staff from 
the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, met with 
Antwane Johnson to discuss the IPAWS Program plans for the fall 
nationwide test of the Emergency Alert System and Wireless 
Emergency Alerts.
    On November 26, 2018, Subcommittee staff participated in a 
conference call with FEMA representatives to receive a briefing 
on the October 3, 2018 nationwide test of the Emergency Alert 
System and Wireless Emergency Alerts.

                            SCHOOL SECURITY

    The Department of Homeland Security, in coordination with 
the Department of Education, Department of Justice, and 
Department of Health and Human Services, provides numerous 
resources to enhance State and local school security resources. 
These resources include guidance, security assessments, as well 
as grant funding to prevent, protect against, mitigate, respond 
to, and recover from potential emergencies.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the 
Department's Office of Academic Engagement on February 10, 2017 
to receive an update on current operations.
    On May 30, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Government Accountability Office to 
receive an update on GAO's review of preparedness and security 
at colleges and universities.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the National 
Protection and Programs Directorate's (now the Cybersecurity 
and Infrastructure Security Agency) Office of Infrastructure 
Protection on March 12, 2018 regarding IP programs and 
resources to assist with school security.
    On March 16, 2018, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Office of Academic Engagement regarding 
the expansion of the Office's activities to K-12 schools.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the United 
States Secret Service's National Threat Assessment Center on 
April 5, 2018 to discuss their work on school security.
    On April 11, 2018, the Members of the Subcommittee on 
Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Communications and the 
Subcommittee on Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Protection 
received a briefing on DHS programs and activities related to 
school security. Representatives from the National Protection 
and Programs Directorate, the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency, and the Office of Partnership and Engagement were 
present to respond to Member questions.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the National 
Fusion Center Association on April 12, 2018 to learn about 
fusion centers' efforts to support school security.
    On July 9, 2018, the Subcommittee held a field hearing in 
Newark, New Jersey, entitled ``Protecting Our Future: 
Addressing School Security Challenges in America.'' The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Mr. Jason Botel, Principal 
Deputy Assistant Secretary, Office of Elementary and Secondary 
Education, U.S. Department of Education; Mr. Alan Hanson, 
Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General, Office of Justice 
Programs, U.S. Department of Justice; Mr. Robert Kolasky, 
Deputy Assistant Secretary, Office of Infrastructure 
Protection, National Protection and Programs Directorate, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security; Mr. Jared Maples, Director, 
Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness, State of New 
Jersey; Mr. Ben Castillo, Director, Office of School 
Preparedness and Emergency Planning, Department of Education, 
State of New Jersey; Major Jeanne Hengemuhle, Commanding 
Officer, Division of Human Resources Section, New Jersey State 
Police; Mr. Timothy Gerity, President, New Jersey Association 
of School Resource Officers; and Mr. Michael Reilly, President, 
Community Education Council 31, Staten Island, New York. This 
hearing provided Members of the Subcommittee with an 
opportunity to hear from Federal, state, and local witnesses on 
current and proposed efforts to enhance school security. Prior 
to the hearing, Subcommittee staff held discussions with a 
number of subject matter experts in the field of school 
security.

  MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS OF THE FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY

    Efficient and effective management of FEMA is vital to 
ensuring its ability to meet its mission. While FEMA has made 
great strides since Hurricane Katrina in agency transformation, 
challenges remain in FEMA's management functions.
    On January 11, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with FEMA's 
Chief Information Officer to receive an update on efforts to 
modernize FEMA's information technology (IT) systems.
    Subcommittee staff met with FEMA's Chief Procurement Office 
on January 13, 2017 to receive an update on acquisitions.
    On January 26, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the DHS Office of Inspector General 
regarding reviews of FEMA Mission Support operations and open 
recommendations.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of the 
Government Accountability Office on March 30, 2017 to receive a 
briefing on GAO's review of efforts to address employee 
misconduct at FEMA.
    On April 25, 2017, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Government Accountability Office to 
receive an update on GAO's work related to FEMA's workforce.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of FEMA Mission 
Support on January 31, 2018 regarding the implications of the 
2017 hurricane season on employee pay cap rules.
    On November 28, 2017, the Subcommittee Chair and Ranking 
Member sent a letter to the Comptroller General requesting GAO 
review FEMA's grants management modernization efforts. This 
review is underway.
    On March 1, 2018, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of FEMA's Chief Procurement Officer regarding 
disaster procurement.
    Subcommittee staff met with representatives of FEMA on 
March 5, 2018 to receive a briefing on the role of the Chief 
Data Officer.
    On April 10, 2018, Subcommittee staff met with 
representatives of the Government Accountability Office to 
discuss their work regarding FEMA's grants management 
modernization program.
    Subcommittee staff participated in a conference call with 
FEMA representatives on July 11, 2018 regarding the reservist 
program and staffing levels.
    On August 13, 2018, Subcommittee staff received a briefing 
from FEMA representatives regarding allegations of misconduct 
by the Chief Component Human Capital Officer. Subsequently, on 
August 21, 2018, Subcommittee staff participated in a 
conference call with representatives of the Office of Inspector 
General regarding this matter.
    Subcommittee staff received an update on GAO's review of 
FEMA's grants management modernization efforts on August 28, 
2018.
    On September 26, 2018, Subcommittee staff met with the 
Office of Inspector General regarding its Report of 
Investigation related to FEMA Administrator Brock Long's use of 
home to work transportation in government owned vehicles. 
Subsequent to this meeting, on October 29, 2018, Subcommittee 
Staff again met with OIG staff regarding this issue.
                              ----------                              


                       Subcommittee Hearings Held

``The Future of the FEMA: Stakeholder Recommendations for the 
        Next Administrator.'' February 14, 2017. (Serial No. 
        115-3)
``The Future of the FEMA: Recommendations of Former 
        Administrators.'' February 28, 2017. (Serial No. 115-3)
``Threats to Space Assets and Implications for Homeland 
        Security.'' March 29, 2017. Joint with the Subcommittee 
        on Strategic Forces of the Committee on Armed Services. 
        (Serial No. 115-12)
``Assessing First Responder Communications.'' October 12, 2017. 
        (Serial No. 115-32)
``How Effective is the Science and Technology Directorate?: 
        Stakeholder Perspectives.'' November 7, 2017. (Serial 
        No. 115-36)
``Examining the Department of Homeland Security's Efforts to 
        Counter Weapons of Mass Destruction.'' December 7, 2017 
        (Serial No. 115-42)
``Securing Our Surface Transportation Systems: Examining the 
        Department of Homeland Security's Role in Surface 
        Transportation Technologies.'' Joint with the 
        Subcommittee on Transportation and Security 
        Technologies. January 30, 2018. (Serial No. 115-47)
``Ensuring Effective and Reliable Alerts and Warnings.'' 
        February 6, 2018. (Serial No. 115-48)
``Securing Our Communities: Federal Support to High-Risk Urban 
        Areas.'' (Staten Island, New York) April 23, 2018. 
        (Serial No. 115-61)
``Protecting Our Future: Addressing School Security Challenges 
        in America.'' Field hearing on Newark, New Jersey. July 
        9, 2018. (Serial No. 115-69)
``Using Innovative Technology and Practices to Enhance the 
        Culture of Preparedness.'' July 25, 2018. (Serial No. 
        115-74)

      Task Force on Denying Terrorists Entry to the United States

    Mike Gallagher, Wisconsin, 
             Chairman

Bonnie Watson Coleman, New Jersey    Clay Higgins, Louisiana
Sheila Jackson Lee, Texas            John H. Rutherford, Florida
Nanette Diaz Barragan, California    Thomas A. Garrett, Jr., Virginia
Bennie G. Thompson, Mississippi      Brian K. Fitzpatrick, Pennsylvania
                   (ex officio)      John Katko, New York
                                                        (ex officio)
                                     Michael T. McCaul, Texas
                                                        (ex officio)
                              ----------                              

    The Chair of the Committee established the Task Force on 
Denying Terrorists Entry to the United States for a period of 
six months beginning on March 15, 2017.
                              ----------                              


                      Activities of the Task Force

               VISA SECURITY AND THE VISA WAIVER PROGRAM

    On May 2, 2017, the Members of the Task Force received a 
Classified Member-only briefing with representatives from the 
Department of Homeland Security and the Department of State on 
visa security and the visa waiver program.
    On May 3, 2017, the Task Force held a hearing entitled 
``Denying Terrorists Entry to the United States: Examining Visa 
Security.'' The Task Force received testimony from Mr. Edward 
J. Ramotowski, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Office of Visa 
Services, U.S. Department of State; Mr. Michael Dougherty, 
Acting Assistant Secretary, Border, Immigration, and Trade 
Policy, Office of Policy, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; 
Mr. John Wagner, Deputy Executive Assistant Commissioner, U.S. 
Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security; Mr. Clark E. Settles, Assistant Director, National 
Security Investigations Division, Immigration and Customs 
Enforcement, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and Ms. 
Rebecca Gambler, Director, Homeland Security and Justice, 
Government Accountability Office.

                   NATIONAL TARGETING CENTER PROGRAMS

    On March 15, 2017, the Members of the Task Force received a 
Classified Member-only briefing with representatives from the 
Department of Homeland Security U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection on the national targeting Center Programs.
    On June 12, 2017, the Members of the Task Force conducted a 
Classified Member-only site visit to the Department of Homeland 
Security U.S. Customs and Border Protection National Targeting 
Center and the Federal Bureau of Investigations Terrorist 
Screening Center.
    On July 12, 2017, the Members of the Task Force received a 
Classified Member-only briefing with representatives from the 
Department of Homeland Security U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection on the national targeting Center Programs.

                   INTERNATIONAL PASSENGER SCREENING

    On September 14, 2017, the Members of the Task Force 
conducted a Classified-in-Part, Member-only site visit to 
Dulles International Airport with representatives from the 
Department of Homeland Security U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection on systems and procedures for screening arriving 
international passengers.

                           TERRORIST DIASPORA

    On July 13, 2017, the Task Force held a hearing entitled 
``The Terrorist Diaspora: After the Fall of the Caliphate.'' 
The Task Force received testimony from Mr. Thomas Joscelyn, 
Senior Fellow, Foundation for Defense of Democracies; Mr. Robin 
Simcox, Margaret Thatcher Fellow, The Heritage Foundation; and 
Dr. Colin P. Clarke, Political Scientist, The RAND Corporation.

            AMBASSADORIAL ROUNDTABLE ON TERRORISM IN EUROPE

    On July 25, 2017, the Members of the Task Force received a 
briefing from Ambassadors to the United States from the 
European Union, the Republic of France, and the Federal 
Republic of Germany to examine the increase in terror attacks 
in Europe and threats to the United States.

                       TASK FORCE OFFICIAL TRAVEL

    From July 29 to August 6, 2017, the Members of the Task 
Force directed staff to travel to Jordan, Belgium, the 
Netherlands and United Kingdom for the purposes of meeting with 
foreign partners to discuss countering foreign terrorist 
fighter travel, information sharing, screening and vetting 
procedures, visa security, and the Visa Waiver Program.
    In Jordan, staff met with representatives of the U.S. 
Embassy, Department of Defense, U.S. Immigration and Customs 
Enforcement, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, and the 
Jordanian Directorate of Military Security.
    In Belgium, staff met with representatives of the U.S. 
Embassy Tri-Mission for the European Union, North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization and Belgium, the European Commission 
Directorate General for Migration and Home Affairs, INTERPL, 
NATO Counterterrorism Coordination Office, Belgian Ministry of 
Foreign Affairs, Belgian Ministry of the Interior, Belgian 
Ministry of Justice, and the Belgian Security Services (law 
enforcement and intelligence).
    In the Netherlands, staff met with representatives of the 
U.S. Embassy, Europol, European Counterterrorism Center, and 
the Dutch Ministry of Security and Justice.
    In the United Kingdom, staff met with the U.S. Embassy, 
U.K. Home Office, MI5 and the Metropolitan Police.
                              ----------                              


                        Task Force Hearings Held

``Denying Terrorists Entry to the United States: Examining Visa 
        Security.'' May 3, 2017. (Serial No. 115-15)
``The Terrorist Diaspora: After the Fall of the Caliphate.'' 
        July 13, 2017. (Serial No. 115-22)

  Oversight Plan of the Committee on Homeland Security for the 115th 
                                Congress

    Clause 2(d), Rule X of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives for the 115th Congress requires each standing 
Committee to adopt an oversight plan for the two-year period of 
the Congress and to submit the plan to the Committees on 
Oversight and Government Reform and House Administration not 
later than February 15th of the first session of the Congress.
    Rule XI, clause 1(2)(d)(1) requires each Committee to 
submit to the House of Representatives not later than January 
2, of each odd-numbered year, a report on the activities of 
that committee under Rule X and Rule XI during the Congress 
ending on January 3 of such year. Clause 1(2)(d)(3) of Rule XI 
also requires that such report include a summary of the action 
taken and recommendations made with respect to each such plan; 
and a summary of any additional oversight activities undertaken 
by the Committee, and any recommendations made or actions taken 
thereon.
    Part A of this section contains the Committee on Homeland 
Security Oversight Plan for the 115th Congress which the Full 
Committee considered and adopted by voice vote on January 21, 
2015, a quorum being present.
    Part B of this section contains a summary of the actions 
taken by the Committee on Homeland Security to implement the 
Oversight Plan for the 115th Congress and the recommendations 
made with respect to this plan. Part B also contains a summary 
of the additional oversight activities undertaken by the 
Committee, and the recommendations made or actions taken 
thereon.
                              ----------                              


         PART A--COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY OVERSIGHT PLAN

 AUTHORIZATION AND OVERSIGHT PLAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY

                             115TH CONGRESS

    Clause 2(d), Rule X of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives for the 115th Congress requires each standing 
Committee to adopt an authorization and oversight plan for the 
two-year period of the Congress and to submit the plan to the 
Committees on Oversight and Government Reform, House 
Administration, and Appropriations not later than February 15th 
of the first session of the Congress.
    This is the oversight plan for the Committee on Homeland 
Security for the 115th Congress. It includes the areas in which 
the Committee expects to conduct oversight during the 115th 
Congress, but does not preclude oversight or investigation of 
additional matters as needs arise. The Full Committee will 
examine the following key priorities, among other issues.

                        SECURE AMERICA'S BORDERS

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee will conduct 
rigorous oversight on the Department's efforts to secure land 
and maritime borders of the United States, including but not 
limited to personnel, technology, infrastructure, and 
coordination between components. The Committee will monitor the 
extent to which the Department can measure its performance in 
securing the borders and how these measures reflect the state 
of border security. The Committee will also examine the 
technologies used to secure the borders and the Department's 
acquisitions efforts regarding border security technologies. 
The Committee will address the illegal flow at our POEs, 
between our POEs, and in the maritime environment.

      ENSURE THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY RUNS EFFECTIVELY

    Previous leadership of the Department undertook a number of 
reviews and reforms to address a series of well-documented 
management challenges, many of which harken back to the days 
when twenty-two agencies were brought together to form this 
Federal agency in 2003. Key management challenges include 
acquisitions management and chronically low morale. In the 
115th Congress, the Committee will continue to conduct 
oversight to ensure that DHS effectively conducts its 
operations, which guard against waste, fraud, abuse and 
duplication. Also, close scrutiny will be given to the 
Department's efforts to improve acquisition and procurement 
outcome, bolster employee morale and effectively address 
instances of employee corruption. Moreover, the Committee will 
examine various programs related to the Department of Homeland 
Security to determine whether such programs should be 
reauthorized, including those included in the Homeland Security 
Act of 2002 and those programs with expiring authorizations in 
the ``Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act 
of 2007''.

PREVENT TERRORIST ATTACKS ON THE HOMELAND AND SHUT DOWN TERROR PATHWAYS 
                              INTO AMERICA

    The Committee will continue to conduct rigorous oversight 
of the Federal government's counterterrorism efforts, including 
monitoring ongoing and emerging terror threats to the United 
States, both foreign and domestic. The Committee will also 
continue its focused oversight of Federal efforts to prevent 
terrorist travel to the United States. In particular, the 
Committee will give keen attention to U.S. activities to deny 
terrorists entry into the United States and will consider 
designating a panel to focus on the matter.

                     PROTECT AGAINST CYBER ATTACKS

    Everything from the banking system to the electrical grid 
remains susceptible to cyber attacks. Terrorist organizations 
and state-sponsored cyber attackers continue to target 
America's personal information in addition to sensitive 
national security information on a daily basis. The Committee 
will focus on the oversight of the landmark cyber laws enacted 
during the 113th and 114th Congress as well as on fostering 
private sector information sharing and better protecting 
federal networks.
    Additionally, the Committee will conduct oversight to 
elevate and strengthen the cybersecurity mission at DHS and how 
it can most effectively align to carry out its cybersecurity 
mission.
    Finally, the Committee will continue to conduct oversight 
on the intricacies of encryption. It has become well known that 
terrorists have successfully begun to communicate via platforms 
that US law enforcement are unable to shine a light on. 
Unfortunately, there are no simple answers to this terrorism 
and law enforcement problem. The Committee believes that in 
order to examine the issue of encryption, it will take 
collaboration between the best technical, legal and policy 
minds from the technology sector, the privacy and civil 
liberties community, academia, computer science and 
cryptography, economics, law enforcement and intelligence.

                   SUPPORT AMERICA'S FIRST RESPONDERS

    First responders and those who support their efforts with 
information and intelligence are on the front lines of our 
efforts to secure the homeland. Through oversight of 
information sharing, grants and other DHS programs, the 
Committee will continue to support the community of first 
responders in their vital homeland security mission.
                              ----------                              


          SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND MANAGEMENT EFFICIENCY

    DEPARTMENTAL EFFICIENCY AND WASTE, FRAUD, ABUSE, AND DUPLICATION

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee will oversee the 
Department of Homeland Security's day-to-day operations to 
ensure that it is operating in the most efficient and effective 
manner possible. Pursuant to Rule X, clause 2(d)(1)(F) of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives, the Committee will work 
to identify potential opportunities to eliminate duplicative or 
unnecessary programs, find efficiencies that will contribute to 
the Department's ability to meet its vital missions, and 
identify areas for cost savings. The Committee will investigate 
homeland security programs and practices, as warranted. The 
Committee will also conduct rigorous oversight to ensure the 
Department conducts effective outreach to the private sector 
and utilize commercial best practices, as appropriate.

                         ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee will review the 
efforts of the Department of Homeland Security to improve 
acquisition outcomes, and to ensure that effective management 
controls are put in place to prevent contract waste, fraud, and 
abuse while promoting efficiency and effectiveness. The 
Committee will review the authorities and activities of the 
Undersecretary for Management and Chief Procurement Officer to 
ensure the effective management of these key functions. The 
Committee will monitor the cost, schedule, and performance 
status of major Department acquisition programs. The Committee 
will also examine the impact of the Department's acquisition 
initiatives to enhance processes and improve outcomes related 
to its major acquisition programs.
    Moreover, the Committee will review the Department's 
implementation of Section 831(a) of the Homeland Security Act 
of 2002 (Pub. L. 107-296), which grants the Secretary authority 
with respect to research and development projects to use more 
flexible contracting mechanisms in an effort to attract 
``nontraditional government contractors'' for needed homeland 
security technologies, as well as the Secretary's use of other 
streamlined acquisition practices. The Committee will continue 
to monitor the Department's efforts to leverage strategic 
sourcing, as outlined in Federal guidance, to increase 
efficiencies.

                          FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee will continue its 
oversight of the Department of Homeland Security's progress to 
properly manage financial systems and data to minimize 
inefficient and wasteful spending, make more informed decisions 
to manage its programs, and implement Department policies. The 
Committee will also review the Department's efforts to enhance 
its managerial cost accounting, address internal control 
weaknesses in financial reporting, achieve a clean audit 
opinion on its financial statements, and reduce the reliance on 
manual data calls to collect cost information from the various 
components and compile consolidated, reliable data.

                   INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee will review the 
Department's efforts to address information technology (IT) 
challenges, including the management and integration of the 
Department's IT systems. The Committee will review the 
authorities and activities of the Chief Information Officer 
(CIO) and component CIOs to ensure the effective management, 
oversight, and coordination of these key functions. The 
Committee will monitor the Department's progress in IT 
architectural planning, investment management, cloud computing, 
policy development, operations, and related personnel 
management. The Committee will also continue its oversight of 
the Department's efforts to establish centralized and 
modernized human resources IT program.

                         DEPARTMENTAL WORKFORCE

    Throughout the 115th Congress, the Committee will monitor 
the Department's efforts to recruit and retain personnel and to 
address employee concerns set forth in the Office of Personnel 
Management's Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey and the 
Department's own personnel surveys, which have indicated morale 
problems across the Department. The Committee will also examine 
the Department's fairness in hiring and promotion practices. In 
addition, the Committee will continue to examine the 
Department's efforts to ensure an appropriate balance is struck 
between Federal employees and private contracts and guard 
against any unnecessary elimination of private sector jobs.
    The Committee will continue to monitor the Department's 
efforts to effectively and efficiently consolidate its 
headquarters from more than 40 locations throughout the 
National Capital Region, known as the St. Elizabeths 
Headquarters Consolidation Project. Additionally, the Committee 
will continue to examine the Department's efforts to 
consolidate the Department's real property footprint to better 
achieve administrative, logistical, and operational 
efficiencies in the field.

                           EMPLOYEE INTEGRITY

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee will examine employee 
corruption and misconduct issues and their effect on homeland 
security. Although the vast majority of Department employees 
reflect the agency's core values, even one corrupt employee 
represents a significant management challenge. The Committee 
will review Department statistics and case studies associated 
with employee integrity issues, as well as, the effectiveness 
of policies, procedures, and practices the Department utilizes 
to address such employee integrity issues.

                      PRIVACY AND CIVIL LIBERTIES

    Section 222 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 
107-296) created a Privacy Officer for the Department of 
Homeland Security to ensure that the Department's information 
gathering and analysis functions and other programs across its 
components adhere to established standards for the protection 
of privacy. Section 705 of the Act also established an Officer 
for Civil Rights and Liberties to review and assess information 
alleging abuses of civil rights or civil liberties by employees 
and officials of the Department of Homeland Security. During 
the 115th Congress, the Committee will continue to monitor the 
Department's efforts under such laws to strike an appropriate 
balance between the need to combat terrorist attacks against 
the United States with the privacy expectations and civil 
rights of US citizens. Also, the Committee will examine the 
extent to which the Department is transparent with the American 
people, including its process for managing Freedom of 
Information Act (FOIA) requests.
                              ----------                              


  SUBCOMMITTEE ON EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND COMMUNICATIONS

                       PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee will examine the 
Administration's efforts to accomplish the National 
Preparedness Goal through the National Preparedness System and 
its various frameworks. Additionally, the Committee will review 
the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA) response and 
recovery efforts for declared disasters to ensure capabilities 
are enhanced by lessons learned and Federal resources are used 
appropriately. The Committee will investigate issues, if any, 
of waste, fraud, and abuse associated with FEMA's disaster 
response efforts.

     ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS AND FIRST RESPONDERS

    Throughout the 115th Congress, the Committee will examine 
FEMA's allocation and administration of grants to enhance the 
ability of state and local governments and emergency response 
providers to prevent, prepare for, respond to, mitigate, and 
recover from a terrorist attack. The Committee will review the 
coordination of grant programs within the Department of 
Homeland Security in developing guidance and administering 
grants; the ability of state and local governments to access, 
obligate, and expend funds; the strength of regional 
partnerships developed through grants; and the risk-based 
distribution and expenditure of such grants at the state and 
local levels. The Committee will examine options to increase 
the efficiency and effectiveness of grant programs. The 
Committee will also review ongoing efforts to comprehensively 
assess these investments and the impact on preparedness 
capabilities through the lens of the National Preparedness 
Goal, National Preparedness Report, State Preparedness Reports, 
and other related assessments.

CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL, RADIOLOGICAL, AND NUCLEAR PLANNING, PREPAREDNESS, 
                              AND RESPONSE

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee will examine the 
significant challenges posed by chemical, biological, 
radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) agents to homeland security 
and will assess the Department's progress in implementing 
security strategies to reduce the likelihood and impact of CBRN 
attacks, and, thus, the CBRN risk to the Nation. The Committee 
will assess the Department's organization to respond to these 
threats. In addition, the Committee will oversee the 
Department's efforts to predict and respond to the evolving 
CBRN threat landscape, and ensure that CBRN expenditures are 
risk-based, coordinated, and, in general, represent the wise 
use of taxpayer dollars.

                             COMMUNICATIONS

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee will examine the 
coordination of various communications programs and offices 
within the Department of Homeland Security, including the 
achievement and maintenance of interoperable communications 
capabilities among the Department's components, as required by 
the Department of Homeland Security Interoperable 
Communications Act (Pub. Law 114-29). The Committee will 
monitor activities of the First Responder Network Authority 
(FirstNet) and the development of the public safety 
interoperable wireless broadband network. In addition, the 
Committee will review the Department's Integrated Public Alert 
and Warning System to ensure timely and effective alerts and 
warnings are provided to the public in the event of an 
emergency and the Department fully implements the requirements 
of the Integrated Public Alert and Warning System Modernization 
Act of 2015 (Pub. Law 114-143).

                         TRAINING AND EXERCISES

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee will review the 
Department's training and exercise programs, including 
awareness of these resources among first responders and state 
and local governments. The Committee will review existing 
training centers and determine whether the Department is 
optimally utilizing these facilities to enhance first responder 
terrorism preparedness. The Committee will also examine the 
Department's efforts to streamline and improve the National 
Exercise Program to ensure the program enhances the 
preparedness of the Nation. The Committee will monitor the 
extent to which FEMA is incorporating lessons learned from 
national exercises into future training, planning, and 
response, recovery, and mitigation activities.

                        RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    Throughout the 115th Congress, the Committee will focus on 
the Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) and its ability to 
provide DHS components with the technology advancements needed 
to effectively carry out their respective missions. The 
Committee will also examine S&T's collaboration with the 
Federally Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDC) and 
the transparency with which S&T reports this work to Congress. 
During the 115th Congress, the Committee will also examine the 
effectiveness of the S&T Centers of Excellence to provide the 
DHS components with advanced technologies that help them carry 
out their respective missions. The Committee will also provide 
oversight on the effectiveness of the Integrated Product Teams 
(IPT) and the process established to ensure the most urgent 
needs of the DHS components are met in a timely fashion.
                              ----------                              


         SUBCOMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION AND PROTECTIVE SECURITY

                     ADVANCING RISK-BASED SECURITY

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee will continue to 
examine TSA's long-term goals for TSA PreCheck and assess the 
effectiveness of TSA's passenger, baggage and cargo screening 
operations. The Committee will evaluate TSA's successes and 
challenges in expanding enrollment in TSA PreCheck, including 
through contracts with private sector entities, and examine 
TSA's methodology to decide which passengers are eligible for 
TSA PreCheck. Additionally, the Committee will monitor TSA's 
efforts to protect passenger privacy.
    The Committee will also examine how TSA is ensuring that 
passengers that are designated high-risk are receiving enhanced 
screening at the checkpoint. Finally, the Committee will assess 
whether there are additional ways for TSA to enhance security 
and implement risk-based strategies at the screening checkpoint 
or in other areas of security, such as checked baggage 
screening operations, cargo security, and aviation access 
control points at domestic airports.

                  ENHANCING PRIVATE SECTOR ENGAGEMENT

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee will conduct oversight 
to ensure that TSA is effectively engaging the private sector 
to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of its operations. 
Specifically, the Committee will evaluate the contracting 
process and management of TSA's Screening Partnership Program 
(SPP) and the use of third party canine teams. The Committee 
will work to ensure that stakeholders are properly consulted on 
major security policy decisions and airport staffing 
allocations, through the Aviation Security Advisory Committee 
or other means. The Committee will encourage TSA to find new 
ways to leverage private sector expertise, innovation, and 
technologies in its mission to secure the Nation's critical 
transportation systems in the most effective and efficient 
manner possible.

                   TARGETING WASTE, FRAUD, AND ABUSE

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee will conduct 
oversight to identify and prevent waste, fraud, or abuse within 
TSA. As part of this overall effort, the Committee will 
continue to conduct oversight on the implementation of the 
Transportation Security Acquisition Reform Act (Pub. Law 113-
245), and monitor whether TSA is complying with the provisions 
outlined in the Act. This includes, among other things, better 
private sector engagement, strategic planning, and utilizing 
innovation opportunities within the private sector from small 
businesses, and transparency in how tax dollars are spent to 
avoid wasteful spending on technologies that do not perform as 
intended. The Committee will also look at instances of employee 
misconduct and agency retaliation against whistleblowers. 
Finally, the Committee will also examine TSA's process of 
designating information as Sensitive Security Information to 
determine if the designation is being abused.

       STREAMLINING AND IMPROVING SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee will review TSA's 
efforts to secure surface transit systems, including the 
highest-risk mass transit and rail systems. The Committee's 
oversight will include a review of the Visible Intermodal 
Prevention and Response Program, the Surface Transportation 
Security Inspection Program, and TSA's surface transportation 
security regulations. The Committee will review the extent to 
which TSA effectively coordinates with its Federal, State, 
local, and private sector partners to secure our Nation's 
transportation systems and to help prevent conflicting or 
unnecessarily redundant regulations. The Committee will also 
assess the effectiveness of TSA's efforts to secure the 
Nation's pipeline systems through TSA's oversight and 
inspection activities.

                      UNITED STATES SECRET SERVICE

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee will examine the 
homeland security operations of the United States Secret 
Service. The Committee will conduct oversight on the Secret 
Service's complete integrated mission, including protecting the 
President of the United States and other Executive branch 
officials and investigating financial and cybercrime. The 
Committee will also examine the Secret Service's lead role in 
planning and executing security operations for National Special 
Security Events, such as the 2017 Presidential Inauguration. 
The Committee will also examine the agency's staffing model, 
including whether it has adequate resources to meet its current 
and projected needs as well as the agency's flexibility to 
handle unanticipated events. The Committee will also give 
robust oversight to the steps the agency is taking to address 
its longstanding concerns with hiring practices, promotion 
policies and morale. Finally, the Committee will monitor the 
ongoing efforts to reform the management of the agency and 
implement the recommendations from the 2014 Protective Mission 
Panel.
                              ----------                              


      SUBCOMMITTEE ON CYBERSECURITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee will conduct 
oversight of all the cybersecurity activities of the Department 
of Homeland Security (DHS) and, in particular, on activities 
within the National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD), 
the U.S. Secret Service, and the Science and Technology 
Directorate. Areas of examination will include the President's 
Executive Orders 13636, Improving Critical Infrastructure 
Cybersecurity, and the Presidential Policy Directive 41 (PPD-
41), United States Cyber Incident Coordination, and operations 
of NPPD's EINSTEIN and Continuous Diagnostics and Mitigation 
(CDM) programs for securing Federal networks.
    The Committee will also consider the organization of NPPD 
to ensure that the component is properly structured to carry 
out the Cybersecurity and Information Sharing Act of 2015 as 
efficiently as possible. The Committee will also examine ways 
to further build the Department's cybersecurity capability and 
capacity, in order to implement newly assigned cyber statutory 
authorities.
    Finally, the Committee will examine the implementation of 
cybersecurity legislation enacted during the 113th Congress 
including the National Cybersecurity Protection Act of 2014, 
(Pub. L. 113-282) (authorizing the National Cybersecurity 
Communications and Integration Center, or NCCIC); the Federal 
Information Security Modernization Act of 2014, Pub. L. 113-283 
(authorizing DHS to carry out federal information security 
activities); the Cybersecurity Enhancement Act of 2014, (Pub. 
L. 113-274) (providing for improvements to cybersecurity 
through public-private partnerships, education, awareness, and 
development of standards and best practices); and the 
Cybersecurity Workforce Assessment Act, (Pub. L. 113-246) 
(calling for a comprehensive cyber workforce strategy with 
workforce assessments every three years) to, among other 
things, authorize the National Cybersecurity Communications and 
Integration Center (NCCIC), help improve the cybersecurity 
workforce, and grant DHS the authority to carry out protection 
of Federal civilian networks (Pub. Laws 113-246, 113-274, 113-
277, 113-282, and 113-283).
    During the 115th Congress the Committee will conduct 
oversight into DHS' engagement with the private sector on cyber 
risks to the Internet of Things.
    The Committee will continue to monitor the security of 
Federal buildings and facilities, including the role and 
effectiveness of the Federal Protective Service (FPS). The 
Committee will also examine the general management of FPS, 
including its vehicle fleet, personnel policies, and training 
program. Additionally, the Committee will monitor FPS's 
oversight and management of federal facility contract guard 
personnel.

                 PROTECTION OF CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee will examine NPPD's 
programs to protect critical infrastructure, with key focus on 
internal coordination mechanisms to ensure that expertise from 
both the cyber and physical `sides of the house' can be 
leveraged efficiently and effectively, specifically with 
respect to the work of the Office of Cyber and Infrastructure 
Analysis (OCIA). The Committee will also review how DHS, 
through NPPD, works with the various critical infrastructure 
sectors pursuant to Presidential Policy Directive 21, Critical 
Infrastructure Security and Resilience (PPD-21).
    During the 115th Congress the Committee will continue to 
oversee the Department's implementation of the Chemical 
Facility Anti-Terrorism Standard (CFATS) program, which 
requires high risk chemical facility owners and operators to 
report chemical holdings, perform vulnerability assessments, 
and adopt risk-based security measures to protect against the 
threat of a terrorist attack. The Protecting and Securing 
Chemical Facilities from Terrorism Act of 2014, (Pub. L. 113-
254), conveys CFATS statutory authority until December 18, 
2018, at which point the Committee will rely on these oversight 
activities and findings to consider improvements or 
modifications to the CFATS program which can be achieved 
through reauthorization.
    Further the Committee will continue to monitor the 
Department's efforts to establish a program to secure the sale 
and transfer of ammonium nitrate, as required by the Secure 
Handling of Ammonium Nitrate Act of 2008 (
563, Consolidated Appropriations Act, Pub. L. 110-161). After 
being unable to implement a program for several years, the 
Department is currently reviewing how common Improvised 
Explosive Device (IED) chemical precursors move through 
commerce to better inform a solution that considers many IED 
precursors of concern. DHS is also continuing to develop a 
program to secure ammonium nitrate against the threat of 
terrorist misuse.
                              ----------                              


              SUBCOMMITTEE ON BORDER AND MARITIME SECURITY

                 BORDER SECURITY BETWEEN PORTS OF ENTRY

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee will examine the 
Department's efforts to secure land and maritime borders of the 
United States, including but not limited to personnel, 
technology, infrastructure, and coordination between 
components. The Committee will also assess the status of 
programs and international agreements to secure US borders from 
illegal entry by persons or contraband. The Committee will 
monitor the extent to which the Department can measure its 
performance in securing the borders and how these measures 
reflect the state of border security. The Committee will also 
examine the technologies used to secure the borders and the 
Department's acquisitions efforts regarding border security 
technologies.
    Finally, the Committee will examine the Department's 
efforts to identify, detain, prioritize, and remove criminal 
aliens from the United States, including those apprehended at 
or near US borders and POEs who are subject to removal, and 
particularly those from special interest countries.

                   BORDER SECURITY AT PORTS OF ENTRY

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee will examine the 
integration and effectiveness of transportation and border 
security screening systems at POEs for detecting high-risk 
passengers and cargo transported within the United States and 
across our borders, including efforts to better facilitate 
travel and trade such as implementation of ``trusted traveler'' 
programs, expansion of CBP Preclearance locations and the 
Beyond the Border Agreement with Canada.
    The Committee will continue its rigorous oversight of the 
Department of Homeland Security's biometric programs including 
the accuracy and completeness of databases and the development 
and implementing of a biometric exit system in the air, sea and 
land environments. The biometric entry system was a 9/11 
Commission recommendation and was first implemented in 2003 
with the creation of US-VISIT. The recommendation to support a 
biometric exit system has not been completed, and, for the 
first time, Congress has provided the Department with a 
dedicated funding stream to complete an exit system at the 
nation's largest airports by 2018.
    The Committee will examine the technology and 
infrastructure needs at POEs to better facilitate trade and 
travel while also strengthening border security. Congress 
recently authorized U.S. Customs and Border Protection to enter 
into Public Private Partnership agreements that leverage 
private dollars to enhance services at the nation's air, land 
and sea POEs, which will also be a key area of oversight.

                             VISA SECURITY

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee intends to review 
efforts to ensure the deployment and implementation of training 
and infrastructure enhancements to assist border and consular 
officials in identifying, intercepting, and disrupting 
terrorists or others who would do the Nation harm by attempting 
to enter the United States. The Committee will address any 
security-related deficiencies in the immigration and 
naturalization process that terrorists could use to gain entry 
to or remain in the country for illegitimate purposes.
    The Committee will continue to review visa security 
programs and policies to ensure adequate screening and vetting 
by DHS law enforcement including the Visa Security Program, the 
Preadjudicated Threat Recognition and Intelligence Operations 
Teams (PATRIOT), as well as reviewing the criteria for 
admission under the Visa Waiver Program's Electronic System for 
Travel Authorization (ESTA). These programs are critical to 
countering the growing threat of foreign fighters, including 
Americans and Europeans, who may attempt to join ISIS or its 
affiliates in Syria or Iraq, and who may return or travel to 
the United States to commit acts of terrorism.
    The Committee will also examine the integration, security, 
and reliability of criminal immigration and terrorist databases 
used to screen persons seeking to enter and exit this country, 
to include advanced passenger information, and will assess the 
development of secure travel documents.

                       PORT AND MARITIME SECURITY

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee will examine various 
aspects of port and maritime security, including the security 
of port facilities; the screening of vessels, passengers, 
cargo, and crew, for potential terrorists, terrorist weapons, 
and contraband. Specifically, the Committee will examine 
nuclear detection efforts and the development of international 
security standards for shipping and containers. The Committee 
will also analyze and conduct oversight on the statutorily 
required security assessment of the Transportation Worker 
Identification Credential (TWIC) program.
    The Committee also plans to review how the Department 
manages risks emerging from maritime threats and 
vulnerabilities such as small ``go-fast'' boats, panga vessels, 
yola boats, and semi-submersible vessels. The Committee will 
continue its oversight of the increasing maritime smuggling 
threat along the California coast and the impact of fewer 
interdiction assets and holding platforms in the source and 
transit zones.
    The Committee plans to review the efficiency and 
effectiveness of the Department's supply chain security 
programs, such as the Customs Trade Partnership Against 
Terrorism (C-TPAT), the Container Security Initiative (CSI), 
and the need to utilize a risk-based methodology and the future 
of the Radiation Portal Monitor program to ensure a proper 
balance between the facilitation of lawful trade and the 
security of the homeland. This will include an assessment of 
implementation of certain provisions of the Maritime and 
Transportation Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 107-295), the 
Security and Accountability for Every (SAFE) Port Act of 2006 
(Pub. L. 109-347), relevant provisions of the Intelligence 
Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (Pub. L. 108-458), 
and the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act 
of 2007 (Pub. L. 110-53).
    The Committee will examine the operations and procedures of 
U.S. Customs and Border Protection's Air and Marine Operations 
(AMO), specifically looking at AMO's interagency working 
relationships with law enforcement and Department partners and 
its specific capabilities and authorities. The Committee will 
review AMO's operational platforms and future acquisition 
programs to ensure both aviation and maritime assets are 
capable of meeting future mission needs and service 
requirements.
    The Committee plans to review the Coast Guard's statutorily 
defined homeland security missions, to include ports, 
waterways, and coastal security; drug interdiction; migrant 
interdiction; law enforcement; and defense readiness. The 
Committee will examine Coast Guard operations to ensure that 
the service is using a risk-based, layered strategy to enforce 
laws and keep America's waters secure. This will include a 
specific assessment of the Coast Guard's counter terrorism 
capabilities, including the Maritime Safety and Security Teams 
(MSST), Port Security Units, Tactical Law Enforcement Teams, 
and the Maritime Security Response Team (MSRT).
    The Committee will review resource and asset needs within 
the Coast Guard to determine whether the service is 
operationally ready to address the varied threats to America's 
ports and waterways while pursuing a long-term sustainable path 
of fleet recapitalization.
    Finally, the Committee will investigate the Coast Guard's 
specific maritime security operations and initiatives, such as 
the International Port Security Program and the inspection of 
vessels originating from ports with inadequate anti-terrorism 
measures. The Committee will examine these and other programs 
to ensure that the service is improving its maritime domain 
awareness and executing all of its missions in the most 
effective manner possible to keep America secure.
                              ----------                              


           SUBCOMMITTEE ON COUNTERTERRORISM AND INTELLIGENCE

    The security of the United States is undeniably linked to 
international security. Vulnerabilities in one part of the 
world can quickly become security threats in another; to 
include the U.S. Homeland. During the 115th Congress, the 
Committee will examine the capabilities and efforts of the 
Federal government, particularly the Department of Homeland 
Security (DHS), to identify, prevent, deter, and respond to 
threats to the Homeland.

       EMERGING THREATS AND HOMELAND COUNTERTERRORISM ACTIVITIES

    The Committee will examine worldwide threats to the U.S. 
Homeland from terrorist groups, including the Islamic State of 
Iraq and Syria (ISIS), al Qaeda core, al Qaeda in the Arabian 
Peninsula (AQAP), al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), al 
Shabaab, Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), Lashkar-e-Taiba 
(LeT), Boko Haram, and other emerging groups that seek to 
establish safe havens or plot attacks against U.S. citizens and 
the Homeland. The Committee will also examine the threat from 
homegrown violent extremists and terrorist networks in the 
United States. Additionally, the Committee will monitor issues 
related to foreign fighter travel and trends, economic threats, 
and terrorist financing.

              INTERNATIONAL COUNTERTERRORISM PARTNERSHIPS

    The Committee will review U.S. counterterrorism cooperation 
with major foreign partners, with the goal of improving the 
efficiency and effectiveness of international information 
sharing, training and best practices, and coordination. The 
Committee will examine international counterterrorism 
agreements and gather data from Departments and Agencies, as 
well as foreign partners.

               RADICALIZATION, PROPAGANDA, AND INFLUENCE

    The Committee will examine the security implications of 
foreign influence and propaganda directed at the Homeland, 
including the recruiting and radicalization by terrorist 
networks and propaganda developed and distributed by foreign 
adversaries. The Committee will assess homegrown terror threats 
and Federal, State and local efforts to address those threats. 
The Committee will continue to review Federal efforts to combat 
radicalization, particularly in prisons, to include how Federal 
agencies share information on potentially radicalized inmates 
with other appropriate entities.

               HOMELAND SECURITY INTELLIGENCE ENTERPRISE

    The Committee will conduct oversight of DHS's Intelligence 
Enterprise (DHS IE), including intelligence activities 
throughout the Department and component agencies. This will 
include a focus on the coordination and collaboration across 
intelligence offices and personnel within the Headquarters' 
elements and component agencies. Additionally, the Committee 
will review efforts to build the intelligence, analytical, and 
assessment capabilities of the Department and to ensure its 
full participation in the Intelligence Community as part of its 
homeland security mission. This will include an examination of 
the hiring authorities, practices, and career-development of 
intelligence analysts and professionals within Headquarters 
elements and component agencies.
    The Committee will examine the Department's role in 
managing, distributing, and using terrorist threat information 
in furtherance of its homeland security mission. The Committee 
will monitor the extent to which DHS effectively coordinates 
and collaborates with other Federal, State, and local agencies 
to mitigate threats to the Homeland. The Committee will also 
review how DHS agencies collect and share information, 
including through vital security vetting programs.
    The Committee will continue to assess the development of 
DHS counterintelligence and insider threat programs, including 
Departmental organizational changes, resources, monitoring 
programs, and training initiatives. DHS's counterintelligence 
efforts are intended to prevent adversaries from penetrating 
the Department to exploit sensitive information, operations, 
programs, personnel, and resources.

                          INFORMATION SHARING

    The Committee will examine the Department's efforts to 
improve homeland security and terrorism information sharing 
among Federal, state, and local governments; law enforcement 
entities; first responders and emergency management personnel; 
and the private sector. The Committee will examine the 
Department's initiatives to coordinate information sharing to 
and from state and local fusion centers throughout the country, 
and will continue to evaluate the efficacy and efficiency of 
the National Network of Fusion Centers to determine their 
impact on securing the homeland. The Committee will also review 
coordination and information sharing procedures between state 
and local fusion centers and Joint Terrorism Task Forces.
    The Committee will examine the Department's role in 
managing, distributing, and otherwise using terrorist threat 
information in furtherance of its homeland security mission. 
The Committee will also examine how the Department's component 
agencies conduct outreach to state and local law enforcement 
agencies, as well as other emergency response agencies, to 
identify best practices as well as address ongoing 
deficiencies.
                              ----------                              


PART B--IMPLEMENTATION OF THE COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY OVERSIGHT 
                      PLAN FOR THE 114TH CONGRESS

    Part B of this section contains a summary of the actions 
taken by the Committee on Homeland Security to implement the 
Oversight Plan for the 115th Congress and the recommendations 
made with respect to this plan. Part B also contains a summary 
of the additional oversight activities undertaken by the 
Committee, and the recommendations made or actions taken 
thereon.

                        SECURE AMERICA'S BORDERS

    Throughout the 115th Congress the Committee held multiple 
hearings, briefings, and site visits focused on securing the 
United States land and maritime borders. The first Full 
Committee hearing of the Congress was on security at the 
southwest border, and the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime 
Security held over 13 hearings and briefings relating to this 
topic. Through these activities, the Committee heard from 
agents and officers stationed in the field, as well as numerous 
stakeholders. Oversight also focused on how border security 
affects the opioid crisis, and its relation to human 
trafficking.

      ENSURE THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY RUNS EFFECTIVELY

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee on Homeland 
Security held numerous hearings on operations of the 
Department. The Committee examined leadership and management 
challenges that continue to plague the Department. The 
Committee held hearings to review Department management 
policies and priorities of the Department and examine its 
budget request. The Committee requested and Department provided 
input to the Committee on the reauthorization of programs at 
the Department. The Committee also received numerous briefings 
on the budget requests of the components.

PREVENT TERRORIST ATTACKS ON THE HOMELAND AND SHUT DOWN TERROR PATHWAYS 
                              INTO AMERICA

    During the 115th Congress, the Chair of the Committee 
established the Task Force on Denying Terrorists Entry to the 
United States for a period of six months beginning on March 15, 
2017. The Task Force and the Full Committee on Homeland 
Security held numerous hearings and briefings on preventing the 
next terrorist attack in the homeland and ways to deny 
terrorist entry into the United States. Additionally, the 
Committee had numerous threat briefings and site visits to 
examine countering violent extremism. The Committee examined 
the increase in terror attacks in Europe and threats to the 
United States and also examined threats from terrorists across 
the globe.

                     PROTECT AGAINST CYBER ATTACKS

    In the 115th Congress, the full Committee on Homeland 
Security held six hearings and briefings on how to protect the 
homeland from the ever-growing threat from cyber attacks. 
Additionally, the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity and 
Infrastructure Protection held 22 hearings and briefings. The 
Committee explored the threat from cyber attacks by foreign 
actors to our elections, cyber threats posed by foreign actors 
and governments to critical infrastructure, and actions being 
taken by the Department to combat these threats.

                   SUPPORT AMERICA'S FIRST RESPONDERS

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee examined the 
Department's preparedness and response capabilities and lessons 
learned from the 2017 disasters. The Committee reviewed the 
response of the Department to Hurricane Harvey, Irma, Jose and 
Maria. The Committee questioned the Department about its 
response to the various storms and how preparedness and 
response could be improved in the future. Additionally, the 
Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response and 
Communications held 20 hearings and briefings to explore the 
efforts of the Department to prepare for and respond to 
disasters.
                              ----------                              


          SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND MANAGEMENT EFFICIENCY


    DEPARTMENTAL EFFICIENCY AND WASTE, FRAUD, ABUSE, AND DUPLICATION

    During the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee on Oversight 
and Management Efficiency investigated programs and practices 
of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to ensure 
efficient and effective management was being conducted. The 
Subcommittee conducted several hearings to identify cost 
savings, find efficiencies, and eliminate duplicative or 
unnecessary programs. These hearings included examinations of 
watchdog recommendations, inefficiencies associated with DHS 
contractor employee vetting, and failures with the United 
States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) information 
technology systems that process immigration benefits. 
Subcommittee Members introduced several pieces of legislation 
to better ensure efficient and effective management of DHS on 
issues such as misconduct, streamlining DHS overhead, and 
better management of the Federal Protective Service's vehicle 
fleet, which became public law. Subcommittee Members requested 
that the DHS Office of Inspector General and Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) conduct numerous audits on a 
variety of issues to probe DHS management and operations.

                         ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT

    The Subcommittee conducted oversight to improve acquisition 
outcomes at DHS. The Subcommittee held a hearing with DHS on 
threats to the security of the Department's supply chain. 
Committee Members introduced several pieces of legislation to 
reform the Department's acquisition processes and increase 
transparency and accountability of DHS's purchases. The 
Committee sent several letters to GAO to review DHS acquisition 
management, including to review test and evaluation activities 
for major acquisitions, DHS's research and development efforts, 
and performance of Component Acquisition Executives. 
Subcommittee staff received several updates from senior 
management officials regarding the performance of DHS 
acquisition programs.

                          FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

    The Subcommittee continued its oversight of the progress in 
properly managing financial systems and data. The Subcommittee 
Chair sent a letter to the Acting Undersecretary for Management 
regarding ineffective financial management systems of the 
United States Coast Guard and Immigration and Customs 
Enforcement. Subcommittee staff received several briefings from 
the Office of Chief Financial Officer regarding its efforts to 
modernize DHS financial systems. The Subcommittee conducted a 
hearing regarding the Department's failed attempts at 
modernizing its financial systems.

                   INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT

    In the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee reviewed 
information technology (IT) challenges across the Department 
and at specific DHS components. At the request of the 
Committee, GAO examined IT issues including the Transportation 
Security Agency's (TSA) Technology Infrastructure Modernization 
program, and the United States Secret Service's (USSS) IT 
workforce planning and management practices. The Chair of the 
Subcommittee sent a letter to the Undersecretary for Management 
of the Department and the Chief Acquisition Officer of the 
United States Coast Guard regarding the Coast Guard's adoption 
of the same electronic health record (EHR) system used by the 
Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs. 
The Subcommittee staff held briefings with senior DHS 
officials, such as the Chief Information Officer, on efforts to 
implement the Federal Information Technology Reform Act and 
efforts to update Human Resources Information Technology 
(HRIT). Additionally, the Chair and Ranking Member of the 
Subcommittee sent a letter to the GAO Comptroller General 
regarding DHS's use of Agile software development.

                         DEPARTMENTAL WORKFORCE

    The Subcommittee continued its oversight of DHS's efforts 
to consolidate its headquarters at the St. Elizabeths campus in 
Washington DC. The Subcommittee conducted a hearing to hear 
from witnesses on the continued schedule delays and cost 
overruns of the headquarters project. In addition, Committee 
Members toured the site and received a briefing on the 
construction progress. Subcommittee staff received several 
briefings from the Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer to 
review DHS's efforts to improve morale and recruit and retain a 
talented workforce. To further this oversight, the Subcommittee 
conducted a joint hearing to examine DHS' efforts to strengthen 
its cybersecurity workforce. The Subcommittee Chair sent a 
letter to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), requesting 
information on ICE's personnel training programs and the 
reorganization of their Office of Tactical Training Programs. 
Additionally, the Subcommittee conducted a hearing to learn 
about the contributions of DHS's canine workforce.

                           EMPLOYEE INTEGRITY

    Throughout the 115th Congress, the Committee investigated 
allegations of employee misconduct at DHS. Employee misconduct 
represents a major management challenge at the Department. The 
Subcommittee held a joint hearing regarding misconduct at the 
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The Subcommittee 
Chair wrote to the Secretary of the Department regarding 
misconduct by the former Federal Law Enforcement Training 
Centers (FLETC) Director, requesting information on the 
tracking of travel irregularities of DHS employees, among other 
items. The Subcommittee Chair also sent a letter to the Acting 
Inspector General of DHS's Office of Inspector General (OIG) 
thanking the OIG for keeping Congress informed on its 
investigation relating to misconduct by current and former OIG 
employees. Furthermore, Committee Members passed legislation to 
improve consistency regarding discipline and adverse actions in 
the Department's workforce.

                      PRIVACY AND CIVIL LIBERTIES

    The Subcommittee continued its oversight of issues 
associated with privacy and civil liberties. The Subcommittee 
staff received a briefing from the Chief Privacy Officer on the 
office's efforts to safeguard the privacy of American citizens. 
Additionally, the Subcommittee staff received several briefings 
from the Office of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties on ongoing 
efforts within their office, including briefings on their 
oversight over Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and 
Customs and Border Protection (CBP) detention centers.
                              ----------                              


  SUBCOMMITTEE ON EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND COMMUNICATIONS


                       PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE

    Throughout the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee conducted 
oversight of efforts at the Federal, State, territorial, local, 
and private sector levels to prepare for, respond to, and 
recover from terrorist attacks and natural disasters. Through a 
series of hearings, field hearings, briefings, and site visits, 
the Subcommittee worked to ensure that the whole community is 
engaged in these efforts. The Subcommittee held hearings to 
examine recommendations for the future of the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency (FEMA); assess efforts to enhance school 
security; discuss the critical role of space-based capabilities 
in emergency preparedness and response efforts; assess 
preparedness for events impacting transportation systems; and 
examine efforts to integrate innovative policies and 
technologies to better prepare, equip, and train first 
responders and the public to mitigate and address the threats 
the Nation faces. The Subcommittee also supported two Full 
Committee events assessing the response to the 2017 hurricane 
season. Subcommittee Members visited FEMA's National Response 
Coordination Center to observe response capabilities and 
operations. The Department of Homeland Security Authorization 
Act (H.R. 2825) included a number of provisions that resulted 
from the Subcommittee's oversight: requiring a review of the 
National Incident Management System, the establishment of 
performance measures and metrics related to Federal response 
efforts; requiring FEMA to regularly update its Strategic Human 
Capital Plan and report on systems modernization efforts, and 
authorizations of FEMA's Senior Law Enforcement Officer, 
Children's Technical Expert, Disability Coordinator, Office of 
Faith Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, and Mission Support 
functions.

     ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS AND FIRST RESPONDERS

    The Department of Homeland Security has awarded more than 
$40 billion to State and local governments and first responders 
since the September 11th terrorist attacks. In the 115th 
Congress, the Subcommittee continued its oversight of the 
terrorism preparedness grant programs administered by FEMA 
through a field hearing, two Member briefings, and numerous 
staff briefings. The Subcommittee once again opposed proposed 
cuts to these programs and included provisions to reauthorize 
these programs and establish needed performance measures and 
metrics in H.R. 2825, which was passed by the House.

CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL, RADIOLOGICAL, AND NUCLEAR PLANNING, PREPAREDNESS, 
                              AND RESPONSE

    Preparedness for and response to chemical, biological, 
radiological, and nuclear events has remained a focus for the 
Subcommittee in the 115th Congress. The Subcommittee held a 
hearing on the appropriate organization of chemical, 
biological, radiological, and nuclear offices and programs 
within the Department of Homeland Security and the 
establishment of the Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction 
Office (CWMD Office). In addition, Subcommittee Members 
participated in several classified briefings related to the 
threat of weapons of mass destruction. The Subcommittee also 
received briefings on the establishment and functions of the 
CWMD Office, the development of the National Biodefense 
Strategy, BioWatch, Securing the Cities, and the Department's 
Chemical Defense Program. This oversight culminated in the 
Committee's passage of the Countering Weapons of Mass 
Destruction Act (H.R. 6198) and the Securing the Cities Act 
(H.R. 655), both of which passed the House with bipartisan 
input and support.

                             COMMUNICATIONS

    In the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee continued its 
oversight of communications issues with briefings on the Office 
of Emergency Communications, the First Responder Network 
Authority (FirstNet) and the implementation of the Public 
Safety Broadband Network, the impact of the requirement that 
first responders vacate the T-Band, and the Integrated Public 
Alert and Warning System (IPAWS). Subcommittee Members received 
briefings on the cybersecurity of emergency communications 
systems and held hearings assessing first responder 
communications and ensuring effective and reliable alerts and 
warnings. This oversight also resulted in the inclusion of a 
communications title in the Department of Homeland Security 
Authorization Act.

                         TRAINING AND EXERCISES

    As part of its oversight of first responder training and 
exercise programs, the Subcommittee received numerous briefings 
on DHS-funded training and exercise programs from federal and 
State training providers. The Subcommittee also observed 
Federally-conducted exercises. This oversight resulted in the 
inclusion of a number of provisions in the Department of 
Homeland Security Authorization Act: the authorization of the 
National Domestic Preparedness Consortium, provisions related 
to oversight of the Center for Domestic Preparedness, and the 
establishment of a remedial action management program to 
address gaps identified by Federal agencies during exercises 
and the response to real world events.

                        RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    Throughout the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee considered 
the role and performance of the Department of Homeland 
Security's Science and Technology Directorate to determine its 
appropriate mission and structure for the future. Subcommittee 
Members received a briefing from S&T officials on the 
Directorate's programs. In addition, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing with stakeholders to receive their input into S&T's 
operations and outreach. The Subcommittee also held a hearing 
on innovative practices and technologies employed by the 
Department to bolster preparedness activities. Subcommittee 
staff received numerous briefings on the various programs and 
offices of S&T, including S&T outreach efforts to DHS 
components and stakeholders. This oversight resulted in the 
Committee's passage of the Supporting Research and Development 
for First Responders Act (H.R. 4991).
                              ----------                              


                  SUBCOMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION AND 
                          PROTECTIVE SECURITY


                     ADVANCING RISK-BASED SECURITY

    The Subcommittee on Transportation and Protective Security 
fulfilled this provision of the oversight plan in the 115th 
Congress by conducting oversight of the TSA PreCheck program in 
the form of Member and staff briefings, a Subcommittee hearing, 
as well as legislation to expand and improve the program. The 
Subcommittee also implemented a number of reforms relating to 
TSA's technology development and acquisitions processes and 
conducted oversight of TSA's enhanced security measures put in 
place at overseas airport locations with direct flights to the 
United States.

                  ENHANCING PRIVATE SECTOR ENGAGEMENT

    The Subcommittee worked to improve TSA's collaboration and 
engagement with the private sector by conducting multiple 
roundtable format stakeholder briefings discussing TSA's 
efforts to work with the private sector on mitigating insider 
threats to aviation security and improving surface 
transportation security efforts. Additionally, the Subcommittee 
enacted legislation and held hearings relating to TSA's private 
sector engagement efforts to develop and deploy advanced 
screening technologies at checkpoints and improve small 
business interactions.

                   TARGETING WASTE, FRAUD, AND ABUSE

    The Subcommittee passed legislation and conducted oversight 
relating to TSA employee misconduct, while also developing 
legislation to ensure comprehensive reviews of TSA programs and 
operations in order to streamline the agency and gain 
efficiencies. The Subcommittee worked to oversee TSA's 
development of its strategic investment plan and sought to 
implement acquisition reform and eliminate unnecessary 
redundancies.

       STREAMLINING AND IMPROVING SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY

    The Subcommittee held multiple hearings, briefings, and 
enacted multiple pieces of legislation focusing on DHS and TSA 
efforts to improve surface transportation security and mitigate 
evolving threats to the surface sector. These efforts included 
renewed focus on surface transportation sector preparedness, 
TSA's surface inspector program, as well as TSA's Visible 
Intermodal Prevention and Response (VIPR) teams.

                      UNITED STATES SECRET SERVICE

    The Subcommittee conducted multiple site visits and 
briefings to oversee and improve the dual protective and 
investigative missions of the United States Secret Service. 
These efforts included visits to the White House Complex where 
new fencing barriers are being designed and constructed to 
better secure the White House perimeter, as well as a Member 
site visit to the Rowley Training Center where Members of the 
Subcommittee witnessed and participated in demonstrations of 
USSS counterassault canines, tactical driving, firearms 
qualification, and protective strategy. The Subcommittee also 
participated in oversight of the USSS financial crime 
investigations and the successful protection of major national 
security events, such as the Presidential Inauguration and the 
United Nations General Assembly. The Subcommittee also received 
briefings on USSS staffing recruitment and retention 
challenges.
                              ----------                              


      SUBCOMMITTEE ON CYBERSECURITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION


                             CYBERSECURITY

    The Subcommittee conducted rigorous oversight and 
authorized many functions within the Department of Homeland 
Security (DHS) throughout the 115th Congress. The 
Subcommittee's efforts focused on a broad array of topics which 
encompass a wide range of issues.
    In conducting oversight of DHS' role in protection of 
Federal networks, the Subcommittee focused on the efficacy of 
the Continuous Diagnostic and Mitigation (CDM) program. The 
Subcommittee held three hearings on the topic. The first on 
March 28, 2017, titled ``The Current State of DHS Efforts to 
Secure the Federal Networks,'' the second on January 18, 2018, 
titled ``CDM, the Future of Federal Cybersecurity?'' and the 
third was held on March 20, 2018 jointly with the Information 
Technology of the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform 
which was titled ``CDM: Government Perspectives on Security and 
Modernization.'' These hearings led the Subcommittee to pass 
H.R. 6443: Advancing Cybersecurity Diagnostics and Mitigation 
Act. H.R. 6443 will codify the work of CDM to date, while 
ensuring DHS continues to update CDM technologies to regularly 
improve the program and develops a long-term strategy to 
strengthen the future of the program.
    In addition, the Subcommittee ensured that DHS will have 
the tools necessary to carry out the Cybersecurity and 
Information Sharing Act of 2015 as efficiently as possible. 
Holding the hearing ``Examining DHS's Cybersecurity Mission'' 
on October 3, 2017 the Subcommittee brought senior staff from 
NPPD to determine what the Directorate needs to carry out its 
cybersecurity mission to the best of its ability. This, in 
part, assisted in the drafting, and eventual passage of H.R. 
3359: Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency Act of 
2018 (CISA) which reorganized and renamed NPPD to streamline 
and strengthen the cybersecurity mission of DHS. CISA also 
provided the Secretary of Homeland Security the ability to 
determine where the Federal Protective Service (FPS) best fits 
within the organizational structure of the Department. 
Moreover, in oversight of the Department's cybersecurity 
mission and in its work at the intersection of cybersecurity 
and infrastructure protection, the Subcommittee supported a 
full committee classified briefing and a full committee hearing 
focusing on DHS's activities towards securing election 
infrastructure.
    Further, the Subcommittee sought to shed light on the roles 
and responsibilities of federal departments and agencies as 
defined under Presidential Policy Directive 41 (PPD-41) and 
Executive Orders 13636 regarding the Department's roles and 
responsibilities for federal cybersecurity policies and 
practices. The Subcommittee passed H.R. 5074: DHS Cyber 
Incident Response Teams Act of 2018 which codifies the work of 
US-CERT and the HIRT teams while providing DHS flexibility to 
also call upon outside expertise. Additionally, the 
subcommittee held two hearings on the topic. On September 6, 
2018 the Subcommittee, in coordination with the subcommittee on 
Transportation and Protective Security of the House Committee 
on Homeland Security held the hearing titled ``Understanding 
Cybersecurity Threats to America's Aviation Sector.'' This 
hearing was intended to define the lanes of the road when it 
comes to aviation cybersecurity. Secondly, the Subcommittee 
held a joint hearing with the Emerging Threats and Capabilities 
Subcommittee of the House Armed Services Committee on November 
14, 2018 titled ``Interagency Cyber Cooperation: Roles, 
Responsibilities and Authorities of Department of Defense & the 
Department of Homeland Security.'' This hearing was intended to 
delineate the roles and responsibilities between DHS and DoD in 
the cybersecurity realm.
    Additionally, the Subcommittee continued to prioritize the 
development and growth of the federal cybersecurity workforce, 
and the nation's growing skills gap. The Subcommittee oversaw 
and monitored progress of the Cybersecurity Workforce 
Assessment Act (Pub. L. 113-246) and held multiple oversight 
hearings on the issue. On September 7, 2017 the Subcommittee 
held the hearing titled ``Challenges of Recruiting and 
Retaining a Cybersecurity Workforce.'' On October 23, 2017 the 
Subcommittee held a joint hearing with the Subcommittee on 
Higher Education and Workforce Development of the Committee on 
Education and the Workforce titled ``Public-Private Solutions 
to Educating a Cyber Workforce.'' Finally, on March 7, 2018 the 
Subcommittee held another joint hearing with the Subcommittee 
on Oversight and Management Efficiency titled ``Examining DHS' 
Efforts to Strengthen its Cybersecurity Workforce.'' Bringing 
in a mixture of private sector experts and government 
officials, the Subcommittee was able to examine ways the 
Department and federal government are attempting to close the 
cybersecurity skills gap.
    The Subcommittee also examined ways in which DHS supports 
and shares information with the private sector. The first 
hearing the Subcommittee held on this topic was on March 9, 
2017 which was entitled ``The Current State of DHS Private 
Sector Engagement for Cybersecurity.'' Secondly, a hearing was 
held on November 15, 2018 titled ``Maximizing the Value of 
Cyber Threat Information Sharing.'' Both of these hearings 
examined ways in which the department can assist the private 
sector on cybersecurity matters ranging from the threat of 
botnets to IoT systems to streamlining information sharing 
through offering more security clearances. This, in part, led 
to legislation that passed the committee including H.R. 5733: 
DHS Industrial Control Systems Capabilities Enhancement Act of 
2018 and H.R. 6735: Public-Private Cybersecurity Cooperation 
Act.

                 PROTECTION OF CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE

    The Subcommittee conducted oversight of the critical 
infrastructure mission of NPPD. This includes examining how DHS 
can better assist soft targets, such as schools, in bolstering 
protection from a wide range of threats. On April 11, 2018, the 
Members of the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, 
Response, and Communications and the Subcommittee on 
Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Protection received a briefing 
on Department of Homeland Security programs and activities 
related to school security. Representatives from the National 
Protection and Programs Directorate, the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency, and the Office of Partnership and Engagement 
attended this briefing. In part, this briefing led to the 
development of H.R. 5731: Securing Our Schools Act, that would 
require NPPD to work across the Department to create a 
Department-wide strategy on efforts and activities related to 
securing elementary schools, secondary schools, and 
institutions of higher education from acts of terrorism, active 
shooters, and other homeland security threats
    The Subcommittee conducted oversight on the Chemical 
Facilities Anti-Terrorism Standards (CFATS) program which is 
due to expire. On May 18 and June 29, 2017, the Members of the 
Subcommittee received briefings on the CFATS Program, and on 
February 15, 2018, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Industry Views of the Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism 
Standards Program.'' The Subcommittee received testimony from 
private sector experts.
                              ----------                              


              SUBCOMMITTEE ON BORDER AND MARITIME SECURITY


                 BORDER SECURITY BETWEEN PORTS OF ENTRY

    In the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee on Border and 
Maritime Security examined the Department of Homeland 
Security's efforts to secure the border between ports of entry 
(POE) in the United States by utilizing technology, personnel, 
infrastructure, and coordination among the Department of 
Homeland Security. The Subcommittee held hearings on these 
border security topics on February 16, 2017, July 25, 2017, 
November 14, 2017, March 15, 2018, and May 30, 2018.
    To gain better understanding and situational awareness of 
the contraband being smuggled across the southwest border and 
of the tactics used by cartels against Border Patrol, the 
Subcommittee held a hearing on February 16, 2017 entitled ``A 
Dangerous and Sophisticated Adversary: The Threat to the 
Homeland Posed by Cartel Operations.'' This hearing provided 
Subcommittee Members the opportunity to hear from different 
components of DHS, including Coast Guard and HSI, and the 
Department of State on how cartels employ tactics to subvert 
law enforcement to smuggle contraband in the United States.
    Furthermore, in order to provide oversight on border 
security technology used by Border Patrol agents between the 
POE, such as sensors, cameras, night vision devices, the 
Subcommittee held a hearing on July 25, 2017, entitled ``Deter, 
Detect and Interdict: Technology's Role in Securing the 
Border.'' During this hearing, officials from the Department of 
Homeland Security, Customs and Border Protection, and the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) testified before Members 
of the Subcommittee on what new technology enhances securement 
of the border. The Subcommittee also examined CBP's investment 
into new technology with the aim to detect, track, and 
apprehend/interdict illicit activity. On February 22, 2018 the 
Subcommittee received a staff briefing on the U.S. Customs and 
Border Protection budget request in which technology budgets 
were discussed in depth. As a follow-up, on June 12, 2018, the 
Subcommittee received a technology deep-dive staff briefing 
from U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials on the 
current technologies deployed in the field and the vision for 
technology acquisition in the future.
    To provide an update and oversight on northern border 
security, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled ``Looking 
North: Assessing the Current Threat at the U.S.-Canada Border'' 
on November 14, 2017. This hearing examined the current threat 
landscape and the challenges faced at the northern border. 
Officials from multiple components of DHS, including the Office 
of Strategy, Policy, and Plans, Border Patrol, and ICE, along 
with a witness from the Colville Business Council on behalf of 
the National Congress of American Indians, testified to the 
Subcommittee.
    The Subcommittee also provided oversight on the Department 
of Homeland Security's plan to update technology and build new 
border wall emplacements between POE. On July 9, 2018, the 
Subcommittee received a briefing from Customs and Border 
Protection on appropriated new border wall construction plans, 
technology to better detection along the southwest border of 
individuals attempting to gain illegal entry into the United 
States, and FY 2019 budget requests for border security between 
POE.
    The Subcommittee's oversight on border security between POE 
informed legislation to gain better situational awareness of 
the border, specifically the southwest border. For example, 
H.R. 505, the Border Security Technology Accountability Act of 
2017, requires DHS to strengthen accountability of border 
security technology that has an expected lifecycle cost of at 
least $300 million. H.R. 505 was introduced and referred to the 
Subcommittee on January 12, 2017, and passed by the House of 
Representatives on January 31, 2017. In addition, H.R. 6740 
authorizes the Department of Homeland Security to establish the 
Border Tunnels Task Forces to detect and eliminate cross-border 
tunnels used to smuggle drugs, weapons, and people below the 
U.S. border. H.R. 6740 was introduced on September 7, 2018, and 
the Full Committee on Homeland Security considered the measure 
on September 13, 2018. The measure was passed by the House of 
Representatives on September 25, 2018.
    To provide comprehensive improvement to border security and 
immigration policy, H.R. 4760, the Secure America's Future Act 
of 2018, was introduced on January 10, 2018. This bill aimed to 
secure the southwest border by: authorizing $18 billion for the 
deployment of a border wall system; providing $5.8 billion for 
technological improvements along the border, such as 
helicopters, maritime patrol aircraft, ground sensors, tunnel 
detection, and other surveillance technology; authorizing the 
hiring of an additional 5,000 Border Patrol Agents and 5,000 
CBP Officers; supporting local law enforcement by doubling the 
Stonegarden grant program at $110 million; and other provisions 
to further strengthen border security. On June 21, 2018, the 
House of Representatives voted on H.R. 4760.
    On March 15, 2018 the Subcommittee on Border and Maritime 
Security held a hearing entitled ``Bang for the Border Security 
Buck: What do we get for $33 billion?'' This hearing allowed 
members to examine critical infrastructure, technology, and 
personnel funding needs of CBP to enhance border security.
    The Subcommittee provided oversight on border security 
threats occurring between POEs by requesting multiple briefings 
and updates from CBP. On September 25, 2018, Border Patrol 
provided a briefing to Subcommittee staff on threats that occur 
across the southwest border, specifically in the Rio Grande 
Valley Sector.
    To better enhance communication among CBP officers and 
agents between POEs and decrease response times to threats 
along the border, the Subcommittee considered H.R. 6742, the 
Secure Border Communications Act. This measure directs the 
Department of Homeland Security to ensure officers and agents 
of U.S. Customs and Border Protection are equipped with secure 
radios or other two-way communication devices, supported by 
interoperability. H.R. 6742 was introduced on September 7, 
2018; considered by the Full Committee on September 13, 2018. 
The measure was then passed by the House of Representatives on 
September 25, 2018.
    In addition, the Subcommittee investigated the link between 
the opioid crisis and drugs that are smuggled into the U.S. 
through the border. On May 30, 2018 the Subcommittee held a 
field hearing in Phoenix, Arizona entitled ``An Unsecure Border 
and the Opioid Crisis: The Urgent Need for Action to Save 
Lives.'' The Subcommittee heard from the Governor of Arizona, 
law enforcement officials tasked with investigating drug 
crimes, and private sector stakeholders on opioid dependency 
and the law enforcement perspective.

                   BORDER SECURITY AT PORTS OF ENTRY

    During the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee reviewed 
efforts to improve infrastructure and update Ports of Entry 
(POEs) into the United States, as many were built decades ago 
and were not designed for post-9/11 security measures. In 
addition, POEs remain a highly effective route for smugglers to 
transport illicit drugs into the United States. The 
Subcommittee held hearings on staffing at POEs, Customs and 
Border Protection's improvement plans for POEs and threats that 
may pass through POEs on January 9, 2018, April 25, 2018, May 
22, 2018, July 24, 2018 and September 26, 2018.
    The Subcommittee dug deeper on securing and improving POEs 
during a hearing held on January 9, 2018 entitled ``On the 
Line: Border Security from an Agent Perspective.'' This hearing 
examined the challenges U.S. Customs Office of Field Operations 
Officers face in carrying out their mission to secure the 
Nation's POE. The Subcommittee held its second hearing related 
to CBP's modernization plans throughout the agency and at POE 
on April 25, 2018, entitled ``Border Security, Commerce and 
Travel: Commissioner McAleenan's Vision for the Future of 
CBP.'' The purpose of this hearing was to examine CBP's 
``Border Security Improvement Plan,'' which outlines 31 
improvement initiatives to 16 POEs. The hearing was also 
intended to examine Commissioner McAleenan's vision for CBP.
    With migrant caravans continuing to show up at the border 
and, specifically at POEs, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Stopping the Daily Border Caravan: Time to Build a 
Policy Wall'' on May 22, 2018. This hearing examined the 
factors causing the increase in illegal immigration, and the 
policies and resources needed to address the increase. 
Officials from U.S. Customs and Border Protection, U.S. 
Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Citizenship and 
Immigration Services testified before the Subcommittee.
    On April 4, 2018, President Trump issued a Presidential 
Memorandum for the Secretary of Defense, Attorney General, and 
Secretary of Homeland Security to deploy National Guard 
personnel to support CBP in securing the southern border. To 
provide oversight of this deployment, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing entitled ``Boots at the Border: Examining the National 
Guard Deployment to the Southwest Border'' on July 24, 2018. 
This hearing examined the deployment of National Guard 
personnel to the southern border, their ability to enhance U.S. 
Customs and Border Protection Operations in each border patrol 
sector, their specific duties at the border, and coordination 
efforts between DHS and DOD. During this hearing, Subcommittee 
Members received testimony from officials of the U.S. Border 
Patrol, Texas National Guard and Arizona National Guard.
    To address the evolving threat of human trafficking, the 
Subcommittee held a hearing entitled ``Hidden in Plain Sight: 
Understanding Federal Efforts to Stop Human Trafficking.'' 
Subcommittee Members heard from DHS officials from the Office 
of Partnership and Engagement and ICE-HSI, the Civil Rights 
Division of the Department of Justice and the Chief Justice of 
the Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of 
Alaska. This hearing assessed the federal efforts to combat 
human trafficking in the United States and was held on 
September 26, 2018.
    Furthermore, the Subcommittee conducted oversight of port 
of entry security by receiving briefings from different DHS 
components and the Government Accountability Office on plans to 
modernize POEs. On November 16, 2018 the Subcommittee received 
an update briefing from the GAO on an ongoing study of land 
port of entry infrastructure plans.
    The Subcommittee also considered legislation to conduct a 
threat and operational analysis of POEs. H.R. 6400, the United 
States Port of Entry Threat and Operational Review Act, was 
introduced in the House on July 17, 2018; considered by the 
Full Committee on July 24, 2018. The measure was then passed by 
the House of Representatives on September 4, 2018. Furthermore, 
H.R. 4760, the Securing America's future Act of 2018 included 
provisions to expand vehicle, cargo and pedestrian inspection 
lanes on the southern border by installing additional primary 
and secondary inspection lanes. This bill would also require an 
upgrade of existing license plate readers on incoming and 
outgoing lanes at POE along the northern and southern borders. 
Lastly, H.R. 4760 would have funded $3 billion in much needed 
construction and modernization at POE.

                             VISA SECURITY

    In the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee examined various 
aspects of visa security and the implementation of biometrics 
to enhance national security by determining when foreign 
nationals attempt to gain entry into or fail to leave the 
United States. With visa overstays outnumbering the amount of 
apprehensions at the border, determining who is overstaying and 
who is exiting the country is of vital importance to our 
national security. The Subcommittee held a hearing on different 
aspects of visa security on May 23, 2017 and conducted 
oversight with the introduction of legislation to establish 
biometrics within DHS.
    On May 23, 2017, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Visa Overstays: A Gap in the Nation's Border Security.'' The 
purpose of this hearing was to understand the challenges and 
threat visa overstays pose to our national security and to 
examine plans for the implementation of a biometric exit 
system. During the hearing, Subcommittee Members heard 
testimony from CBP, ICE, and other components of DHS, including 
the Office of the Inspector General.
    The Subcommittee also provided oversight on the 
implementation of biometrics systems by receiving briefings 
from different agencies within DHS. On July 10, 2018, the U.S. 
Coast Guard briefed the Subcommittee staff on the use of 
biometrics on Coast Guard vessels, specifically when 
apprehending individuals at sea. Furthermore, the Subcommittee 
received a joint briefing from the Department of Homeland 
Security and Department of State on visa security vetting 
measures and their cooperation, specifically dealing with the 
PATRIOT System, on February 6, 2018. In addition, the 
Department of State and Department of Homeland Security also 
briefed the Subcommittee on Mexico's repatriation and visa 
vetting programs on September 12, 2018. Finally, on August 31, 
2018, the Subcommittee received a briefing from the GAO on a 
study being conducted on the Student and Exchange Visa Program 
at ICE.
    Furthermore, the Subcommittee considered legislation to 
codify and establish biometric systems within the Department of 
Homeland Security. H.R. 5206, the Office of Biometric Identity 
Management Authorization Act of 2018, establishes the Office of 
Biometric Identity Management to support counterterrorism, 
border security, credentialing, national security and public 
safety efforts through the use of biometrics. The measure was 
introduced on March 7, 2018, referred to the Subcommittee on 
March 19, 2018, and passed by the House of Representatives on 
June 25, 2018. In addition, H.R. 6439, the Biometric 
Identification Transnational Migration Alert Program 
Authorization Act of 2018, codifies a U.S. Immigration and 
Customs Enforcement--Homeland Security Investigations led 
program that enables international partner-country law 
enforcement officers to collect and share biometric an