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 115th Congress   }                                  {   Report
    
                         HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES        
 1st Session      }                                  {   115-200
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     


        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2018

                               ----------                              

                              R E P O R T

                                 OF THE

                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                                   ON

                               H.R. 2810

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]
      


                                     
[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

                                     


  July 6, 2017.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed
              
              
              

                                      

        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2018
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
115th Congress   }                                          {    Report
                         HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES                
1st Session      }                                          {   115-200
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     


        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2018

                               __________

                              R E P O R T

                                 OF THE

                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES

                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                                   ON

                               H.R. 2810

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]
      

                                     
[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

                                     

  July 6, 2017.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed
              
              
              
                              _________ 
                               
                    U.S. GOVERNMENT PUBLISHING OFFICE
 26-108                     WASHINGTON : 2017                   
              
              
              
              
              
                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES
                     One Hundred Fifteenth Congress

             WILLIAM M. ``MAC'' THORNBERRY, Texas, Chairman

WALTER B. JONES, North Carolina      ADAM SMITH, Washington
JOE WILSON, South Carolina           ROBERT A. BRADY, Pennsylvania
FRANK A. LoBIONDO, New Jersey        SUSAN A. DAVIS, California
ROB BISHOP, Utah                     JAMES R. LANGEVIN, Rhode Island
MICHAEL R. TURNER, Ohio              RICK LARSEN, Washington
MIKE ROGERS, Alabama                 JIM COOPER, Tennessee
TRENT FRANKS, Arizona                MADELEINE Z. BORDALLO, Guam
BILL SHUSTER, Pennsylvania           JOE COURTNEY, Connecticut
K. MICHAEL CONAWAY, Texas            NIKI TSONGAS, Massachusetts
DOUG LAMBORN, Colorado               JOHN GARAMENDI, California
ROBERT J. WITTMAN, Virginia          JACKIE SPEIER, California
DUNCAN HUNTER, California            MARC A. VEASEY, Texas
MIKE COFFMAN, Colorado               TULSI GABBARD, Hawaii
VICKY HARTZLER, Missouri             BETO O'ROURKE, Texas
AUSTIN SCOTT, Georgia                DONALD NORCROSS, New Jersey
MO BROOKS, Alabama                   RUBEN GALLEGO, Arizona
PAUL COOK, California                SETH MOULTON, Massachusetts
JIM BRIDENSTINE, Oklahoma            COLLEEN HANABUSA, Hawaii
BRAD R. WENSTRUP, Ohio               CAROL SHEA-PORTER, New Hampshire
BRADLEY BYRNE, Alabama               JACKY ROSEN, Nevada
SAM GRAVES, Missouri                 A. DONALD McEACHIN, Virginia
ELISE M. STEFANIK, New York          SALUD O. CARBAJAL, California
MARTHA McSALLY, Arizona              ANTHONY G. BROWN, Maryland
STEPHEN KNIGHT, California           STEPHANIE N. MURPHY, Florida
STEVE RUSSELL, Oklahoma              RO KHANNA, California
SCOTT DesJARLAIS, Tennessee          TOM O'HALLERAN, Arizona
RALPH LEE ABRAHAM, Louisiana         THOMAS R. SUOZZI, New York
TRENT KELLY, Mississippi             TIMOTHY J. WALZ, Minnesota
MIKE GALLAGHER, Wisconsin
MATT GAETZ, Florida
DON BACON, Nebraska
JIM BANKS, Indiana
LIZ CHENEY, Wyoming

                   Jenness B. Simler, Staff Director
                   
                            C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page

Purpose of the Legislation.......................................     1
Rationale for the Committee Bill.................................     2
Hearings.........................................................     6
Committee Position...............................................     6
Explanation of the Committee Amendments..........................     6
Relationship of Authorization to Appropriations..................     7
Summary of Discretionary Authorizations in the Bill..............     7
Budget Authority Implication.....................................     7

DIVISION A--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AUTHORIZATIONS.................     8
TITLE I--PROCUREMENT.............................................     8
    Aircraft Procurement, Army...................................     8
      Items of Special Interest..................................     8
        Health and Usage Monitoring Systems......................     8
    Missile Procurement, Army....................................     8
      Items of Special Interest..................................     8
        Lethal Miniature Aerial Missile Systems..................     8
    Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicles, Army.....     9
      Items of Special Interest..................................     9
        Armored brigade combat team modernization................     9
        M240B medium machine gun inventory assessment............    11
        Small arms magazine procurement..........................    11
        Small arms production industrial base....................    12
        Vehicle active protection systems........................    12
    Procurement of Ammunition, Army..............................    13
      Items of Special Interest..................................    13
        Ammunition production base support.......................    13
        Clean disposal of conventional munitions.................    13
    Other Procurement, Army......................................    13
      Items of Special Interest..................................    13
        Army land mobile radio acquisition.......................    13
        Army personal dosimeters.................................    14
        Heavy Equipment Transport System modernization strategy..    14
        Personnel and cargo parachute acquisition and management.    14
        Rough Terrain Container Handler recapitalization.........    15
        Small unit support vehicle recapitalization strategy.....    15
        Tactical network review..................................    16
        Vehicle medical kits.....................................    16
    Aircraft Procurement, Navy...................................    17
      Items of Special Interest..................................    17
        EA-18G ALQ-99 tactical jamming system modernization......    17
        Implications of a 355-ship Navy on Naval and Marine Corps 
          Aviation force structure requirements..................    17
        Maritime intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance 
          capabilities demonstration.............................    17
        MQ-4C Triton unmanned aircraft system....................    18
        MV-22 upgrades...........................................    19
        Naval aircraft physiological episodes....................    19
    Procurement of Ammunition, Navy and Marine Corps.............    20
      Items of Special Interest..................................    20
        Advanced Low Cost Munition Ordnance......................    20
    Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy............................    21
      Items of Special Interest..................................    21
        America-class amphibious assault ships...................    21
        Columbia-class submarine program.........................    21
        Guided missile patrol boats..............................    22
        High-pressure Cold Spray repair..........................    22
        Increased standardization and commonality for U.S. Navy 
          shipbuilding programs..................................    22
        Littoral Combat Ships capability enhancements............    23
        Propeller shafts.........................................    23
        Protection of Navy ships against High-Altitude 
          Electromagnetic Pulse..................................    24
    Aircraft Procurement, Air Force..............................    24
      Items of Special Interest..................................    24
        A-10 to F-16 transition at Fort Wayne, Indiana...........    24
        A-10 wing replacement program............................    24
        B-52 modernization.......................................    25
        Bomber modernization.....................................    25
        C-130H Aircraft Modernization Program Increments 1 and 2.    26
        C-130H propulsion systems upgrades.......................    26
        E-8C Joint Surveillance and Target Attack Radar System...    27
        EC-130 Compass Call cross deck...........................    27
        F-15C capability, capacity, and recapitalization.........    28
        F-16 radar modernization.................................    29
        F-22 increment 3.2B upgrade..............................    29
        F-35 Lightning II aircraft program.......................    30
        Implications of increased Army, Navy, and Marine Corps 
          force structure on Air Force airlift, air refueling 
          tanker, and Navy sealift force structure requirements..    32
        MQ-9 modernization and upgrades..........................    32
        Next generation ejection seat acquisition................    33
        RC-135S Cobra Ball.......................................    34
        Reporting on air traffic control avionics upgrades for 
          Air Force aircraft.....................................    34
        RQ-4 and universal payload adapter integration...........    35
        Wide-area motion imagery intelligence capability.........    35
    Procurement, Defense-Wide....................................    36
      Items of Special Interest..................................    36
        MC-12 modernization initiatives..........................    36
        Modernization of UH-60A/L aircraft bound for Afghanistan 
          Aviation Forces........................................    36
        Standard data link requirement for the Department of 
          Defense................................................    37
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................    38
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................    38
      Section 101--Authorization of Appropriations...............    38
    Subtitle B--Army Programs....................................    38
      Section 111--Report on Acceleration of Increment 2 of the 
        Warfighter Information Network-Tactical..................    38
    Subtitle C--Navy Programs....................................    38
      Section 121--Aircraft Carriers.............................    38
      Section 122--Procurement Authority for Icebreaker Vessels..    38
      Section 123--Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
        Procurement of Icebreaker Vessels........................    39
      Section 124--Multiyear Procurement Authority for Virginia 
        Class Submarine Program..................................    39
      Section 125--Multiyear Procurement Authority for Arleigh 
        Burke Class Destroyers and Associated Systems............    39
      Section 126--Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
        Arleigh Burke Class Destroyer............................    39
      Section 127--Extensions of Authorities Relating to 
        Construction of Certain Vessels..........................    40
      Section 128--Multiyear Procurement Authority for V-22 
        Osprey Aircraft..........................................    40
    Subtitle D--Air Force Programs...............................    40
      Section 131--Streamlining Acquisition of Intercontinental 
        Ballistic Missile Security Capability....................    40
      Section 132--Limitation on Selection of Single Contractor 
        for C-130H Avionics Modernization Program Increment 2....    40
      Section 133--Limitation on Availability of Funds for EC-
        130H Compass Call Recapitalization Program...............    41
      Section 134--Cost-Benefit Analysis of Upgrades to MQ-9 
        Reaper Aircraft..........................................    41
    Subtitle E--Defense-Wide, Joint, and Multiservice Matters....    41
      Section 141--Authority for Procurement of Economic Order 
        Quantities for the F-35 Aircraft Program.................    41
      Section 142--Limitation on Demilitarization of Certain 
        Cluster Munitions........................................    41
      Section 143--Reinstatement of Requirement to Preserve 
        Certain C-5 Aircraft.....................................    42
      Section 144--Requirement That Certain Aircraft and Unmanned 
        Aerial Vehicles Use Specified Standard Data Link.........    42
TITLE II--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION............    42
    Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army............    42
      Items of Special Interest..................................    42
        Acoustic threat detection technology.....................    42
        AN/VVR-4 Laser Detecting Set.............................    43
        Army counter-improvised explosive device technology......    43
        Army Network Integration Evaluations and Joint 
          Warfighting Assessments................................    43
        Army warfighter technology programs......................    44
        Civil Support Team Information Management System.........    44
        Cold Temperature and Arctic Protective System development    45
        Enhanced lightweight hard armor and combat helmet 
          research and development...............................    45
        Future Vertical Lift.....................................    46
        High Bandwidth Tethered Unmanned Air Systems Technology..    46
        High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle external fire 
          suppression systems....................................    46
        Improved Turbine Engine Program..........................    47
        Improved vehicle camouflage systems and next generation 
          signature management...................................    47
        Integrated Air and Missile Defense command and control 
          capabilities...........................................    48
        Land-Based Anti-Ship Missile hardware and software 
          integration and test capability........................    49
        Lightweight metal matrix composite technology for combat 
          and tactical vehicles..................................    49
        M4 Carbine Free Floating Rail Technology.................    49
        Material development, characterization, and computational 
          modeling...............................................    50
        Mobile protected firepower...............................    50
        Multi-function explosive material detection technology...    51
        Open Campus..............................................    51
        Rapid integration for emerging threats against missile 
          system networks........................................    51
        Remote weapon system development and integration for 
          tactical and ground combat vehicles....................    52
        Report on heavy and Stryker brigade combat team wireless 
          intercommunication systems.............................    52
        Short range air defense advanced development.............    53
        Software Based Mesh Network for Tactical Communications..    53
        Soldier Enhancement Program..............................    54
        Soldier Power development................................    54
        Testing and evaluation of supercavitating ammunition.....    54
        Underwater munitions disposal and waterjet technology 
          development............................................    55
    Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy............    55
      Items of Special Interest..................................    55
        Academic partnerships for undersea technology............    55
        Advanced capability for 81mm and 120mm mortar development    56
        Airborne anti-submarine warfare systems..................    56
        Amphibious Combat Vehicle engineering and manufacturing 
          development............................................    57
        Automated Testing Technologies...........................    57
        Barking Sands Tactical Underwater Range modernization....    58
        F/A-18 noise reduction research..........................    58
        Incremental development of Next Generation Jammer........    59
        Littoral Combat Ship immersive virtual ship environment..    59
        Marine and hydrokinetic technology.......................    59
        Marine Corps and Navy small unmanned aircraft system and 
          capability development.................................    60
        Marine Corps female body armor...........................    61
        Marine Corps Group 5 unmanned aircraft systems 
          experimentation initiative.............................    61
        Maritime Strike Tomahawk.................................    62
        Modification to independent review of F/A-18 
          physiological episodes and corrective actions as 
          required by section 237 of the National Defense 
          Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017.................    62
        MQ-25 Unmanned Air System................................    63
        Naval energetic materials roadmap........................    64
        Passive rocket propelled grenade armor protection 
          technology.............................................    64
        Scalable energy and chemical conversion system...........    64
        Torpedo defense..........................................    65
        Workforce management at Navy test ranges.................    66
    Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force.......    66
      Items of Special Interest..................................    66
        Adaptive engine transition program.......................    66
        Advanced laser technologies for coating removal, surface 
          restoration, and repair................................    66
        Advanced pilot training program..........................    67
        Air Force dual-mode missile testing and evaluation.......    68
        Air Force test and evaluation support....................    68
        Assessment of Air Force Test Center......................    69
        Battlefield airborne communications node program.........    69
        Educational Partnership Agreements.......................    69
        F135 aircraft engine component improvement program.......    70
        High-efficiency heat exchangers..........................    70
        High-speed, anti-radiation missile targeting system pod 
          block upgrade program..................................    70
        Hypoxia research collaboration...........................    71
        Joint Surveillance and Target Attack Radar System 
          Recapitalization program...............................    71
        Light Attack Aircraft Experiment Report..................    72
        Metals Affordability Initiative..........................    72
        Remote and stand-off detection of weapons of mass 
          destruction threats....................................    73
        Reusable hypersonic vehicle structure....................    73
        Robust electrical power system for aircraft..............    73
        Technology transition efforts............................    74
    Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-Wide....    74
      Items of Special Interest..................................    74
        Accumulation of section 219 funds........................    74
        Additive manufactured parts..............................    75
        Briefing on improving overseas security from UAS threats 
          and existing authorities to use countermeasures........    75
        Common Analytical Laboratory System......................    76
        Cyber Grand Challenge....................................    76
        Defense genomics research and training...................    76
        Department of Defense laboratories and engineering 
          centers................................................    77
        Deployable assured position, navigation, and timing 
          systems................................................    77
        Energy storage modules...................................    78
        Enhancement of test and evaluation through modeling and 
          simulation.............................................    78
        Explosive Ordnance Disposal equipment technology upgrades    78
        Historically black colleges and universities and minority 
          serving institutions...................................    79
        Joint Electronic Warfare wargaming.......................    79
        Joint U.S. Forces Korea Portal and Integrated Threat 
          Recognition program....................................    80
        Latent and delayed-onset effects of traumatic brain 
          injury.................................................    80
        Light field display technology...........................    80
        Low-power, long-endurance radar for force protection.....    81
        Machine learning.........................................    81
        Medical simulation research..............................    81
        Non-lethal directed energy technologies..................    82
        Overseas waste disposal technology development...........    82
        Pilot program on modernization and fielding of 
          electromagnetic spectrum warfare systems and electronic 
          warfare capabilities...................................    82
        Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics........    83
        Small turbine engines....................................    83
        Space-based debris remediation in Low Earth Orbit........    83
        Sterilization and inspection of medical instruments......    84
        Success metrics of the Defense Innovation Unit Experiment 
          (DIUx).................................................    84
        System for reviewing and monitoring industrial base 
          transactions...........................................    85
        Training ranges for electronic warfare experimentation...    85
        Trusted microelectronics supply..........................    86
        U.S. Special Operations Command SOFWERX initiative.......    87
        Weapons and munitions science and technology roadmap.....    87
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................    88
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................    88
      Section 201--Authorization of Appropriations...............    88
    Subtitle B--Program Requirements, Restrictions, and 
        Limitations..............................................    88
      Section 211--Cost Controls for Presidential Aircraft 
        Recapitalization Program.................................    88
      Section 212--Capital Investment Authority..................    88
      Section 213--Modification of Authority to Award Prizes for 
        Advanced Technology Achievements.........................    88
      Section 214--Critical Technologies for Columbia Class 
        Submarine................................................    89
      Section 215--Joint Hypersonics Transition Office...........    89
      Section 216--Hypersonic Airbreathing Weapons Capabilities..    89
      Section 217--Limitation on Availability of Funds for MQ-25 
        Unmanned Air System......................................    89
      Section 218--Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
        Contract Writing Systems.................................    89
TITLE III--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE.............................    90
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................    90
    Budget Request Adjustments...................................    90
      Advanced Adversarial Air Training..........................    90
      Civil Air Patrol...........................................    91
      Ship Repair in the Western Pacific.........................    91
    Energy Issues................................................    91
      Energy Resiliency for Mission Assurance....................    91
      Energy Resilience of Overseas Military Installations.......    92
    Logistics and Sustainment Issues.............................    92
      Army Contracting Command Reachback Functions...............    92
      Corrosion Control and Prevention Executives for the 
        Military Departments.....................................    93
      Improving Asset Tracking and In-Transit Visibility.........    93
      Inventory Management and Demand Planning Software Pilot 
        Program..................................................    94
      Joint Minimum Standards for Protective Covers..............    95
      Logistics Management Business Systems Modernization........    95
      Opportunities to Consolidate Printing Services.............    96
      Report on Operation of the Transportation Working Capital 
        Fund.....................................................    96
      Revising Depot Carryover Calculations......................    97
    Readiness Issues.............................................    98
      Advanced Adversarial Air Training Program..................    98
      Advanced Foreign Language Proficiency......................    98
      Alternative-Source F/A-18 Depot-Level Maintenance..........    99
      Counter-UAS Briefing.......................................    99
      Expediting the Security Clearance Process..................   100
      Explosive Ordnance Disposal Budget Display.................   101
      Explosive Ordnance Disposal Organization and Support to 
        Operational Plans........................................   101
      Joint Force Training and Exercises.........................   102
      Military Mission Line Moratorium...........................   102
      NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center F/A-18 Chase Aircraft   103
      Naval Shipyard Development Plans...........................   104
      Readiness of Coastal Riverine Forces.......................   106
      Remotely Piloted Aircraft Training Strategy................   107
      Report on Army Aviation Restructure Initiative.............   107
      Report on Military Training for Rotary-Wing Aviation.......   107
      Report on Multi-Domain Battle Concept......................   108
      Report on Unit-Level Training Costs to Build Full-Spectrum 
        Readiness................................................   109
      Small Arms Weapons Simulation Training.....................   110
      Training for Air Force Combined Air Operations Center 
        Personnel................................................   111
      Training Range Inventory, Capacity, and Configuration in 
        Europe...................................................   111
      Undergraduate Pilot Training...............................   112
    Other Matters................................................   113
      Combatant Command Policies on Open-Air Burn Pits...........   113
      Consideration of the Domestic Textile Industrial Base in 
        Contracting for Uniforms.................................   113
      Dioxin-Based Herbicides Review Related to Guam.............   113
      Ensuring Proper Fitting of Athletic Footwear...............   114
      Environmental Restoration..................................   114
      Fabric and Membrane Technology for Footwear................   115
      Flame-Resistant Military Uniform Postures..................   116
      Former Naval Weapons Industrial Plant Bethpage.............   116
      Guam Micronesian Kingfisher Recovery Habitat...............   117
      Personal Protection Equipment Awards Program...............   117
      Polyfluoroalkyl Substances.................................   117
      Recurrent Flooding and Sea Level Rise......................   119
      Standard-Issue Garments for Women..........................   119
      Water Quality Trading......................................   119
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   120
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................   120
      Section 301--Authorization of Appropriations...............   120
    Subtitle B--Energy and Environment...........................   120
      Section 311--Codification of and Improvements to Department 
        of Defense Clearinghouse to Coordinate Department Review 
        of Applications for Certain Projects That May Have 
        Adverse Impact on Military Operations and Readiness......   120
      Section 312--Energy Performance Goals and Master Plan......   120
      Section 313--Payment to Environmental Protection Agency of 
        Stipulated Penalty in Connection with Umatilla Chemical 
        Depot, Oregon............................................   121
      Section 314--Payment to Environmental Protection Agency of 
        Stipulated Penalty in Connection with Longhorn Army 
        Ammunition Plant, Texas..................................   121
      Section 315--Department of Defense Cleanup and Removal of 
        Petroleum, Oil, and Lubricant Associated with the Prinz 
        Eugen....................................................   121
    Subtitle C--Logistics and Sustainment........................   121
      Section 321--Reauthorization of Multi-Trades Demonstration 
        Project..................................................   121
      Section 322--Guidance Regarding Use of Organic Industrial 
        Base.....................................................   121
    Subtitle D--Reports..........................................   121
      Section 331--Quarterly Reports on Personnel and Unit 
        Readiness................................................   121
      Section 332--Biennial Report on Core Depot-Level 
        Maintenance and Repair Capability........................   122
      Section 333--Annual Report on Personnel, Training, and 
        Equipment Needs of Non-Federalized National Guard........   122
      Section 334--Annual Report on Military Working Dogs Used by 
        the Department of Defense................................   122
      Section 335--Annual Briefings on Army Explosive Ordnance 
        Disposal.................................................   122
      Section 336--Report on Effects of Climate Change on 
        Department of Defense....................................   122
    Subtitle E--Other Matters....................................   122
      Section 341--Explosive Safety Board........................   122
      Section 342--Department of Defense Support for Military 
        Service Memorials and Museums that Highlight the Role of 
        Women in the Armed Forces................................   122
      Section 343--Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
        Advanced Skills Management Software System of the Navy...   123
      Section 344--Cost-Benefit Analysis of Uniform 
        Specifications for Afghan Military or Security Forces....   123
TITLE IV--MILITARY PERSONNEL AUTHORIZATIONS......................   123
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   123
    Subtitle A--Active Forces....................................   123
      Section 401--End Strengths for Active Forces...............   123
      Section 402--Revisions in Permanent Active Duty End 
        Strength Minimum Levels..................................   124
    Subtitle B--Reserve Forces...................................   124
      Section 411--End Strengths for Selected Reserve............   124
      Section 412--End Strengths for Reserves on Active Duty in 
        Support of the Reserves..................................   124
      Section 413--End Strengths for Military Technicians (Dual 
        Status)..................................................   125
      Section 414--Fiscal Year 2018 Limitation on Number of Non-
        Dual Status Technicians..................................   125
      Section 415--Maximum Number of Reserve Personnel Authorized 
        To Be on Active Duty for Operational Support.............   125
    Subtitle C--Authorization of Appropriations..................   126
      Section 421--Military Personnel............................   126
TITLE V--MILITARY PERSONNEL POLICY...............................   126
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   126
      Bystander Intervention Training............................   126
      Comptroller General Report on Race Data in the Military 
        Justice System...........................................   126
      Digital Transformation of the Recruiting Process...........   127
      Female Propensity to Serve in the Armed Forces.............   127
      Gender Double Standards....................................   128
      Gender Integration of United States Marine Corps Basic 
        Recruit Training.........................................   128
      GI Bill Benefit Review.....................................   129
      Military Child Custody Protections.........................   129
      Military Officer Diversity.................................   129
      Military Service Academy Applications and Reserve Officer 
        Training Corps Scholarship Programs......................   130
      Pilot Shortage Assessment..................................   130
      Pre-Command Audit Training Course..........................   130
      Provision of Services at Department of Defense-Run Child 
        Development Centers (CDC)................................   131
      Report on the Feasibility of Establishing a Military Family 
        Service Corps............................................   131
      Review of Resourcing of Trial Defense Services.............   132
      Review of the Court Martial Appeals Process................   132
      Social Media Policy for Recruits...........................   132
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   133
    Subtitle A--Regular and Reserve Component Management.........   133
      Section 501--Modification of Requirements Relating to 
        Conversion of Certain Military Technician (Dual Status) 
        Positions to Civilian Positions..........................   133
      Section 502--Pilot Program on Use of Retired Senior 
        Enlisted Members of the Army National Guard as Army 
        National Guard Recruiters................................   133
      Section 503--Equal Treatment of Orders to Serve on Active 
        Duty under Section 12304a and 12304b of Title 10, United 
        States Code..............................................   134
      Section 504--Direct Employment Pilot Program for Members of 
        the National Guard and Reserve...........................   134
    Subtitle B--General Service Authorities and Correction of 
        Military Records.........................................   134
      Section 511--Consideration of Additional Medical Evidence 
        by Boards for the Correction of Military Records and 
        Liberal Consideration of Evidence Relating to Post-
        Traumatic Stress Disorder or Traumatic Brain Injury......   134
      Section 512--Public Availability of Information Related to 
        Disposition of Claims Regarding Discharge or Release of 
        Members of the Armed Forces when the Claims Involve 
        Sexual Assault...........................................   134
      Section 513--Pilot Program on Use of Video Teleconferencing 
        Technology by Boards for the Correction of Military 
        Records and Discharge Review Boards......................   134
      Section 514--Inclusion of Specific Email Address Block on 
        Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty (DD 
        Form 214)................................................   135
      Section 515--Provision of Information on Naturalization 
        Through Military Service.................................   135
    Subtitle C--Military Justice and Other Legal Issues..........   135
      Section 521--Clarifying Amendments Related to the Uniform 
        Code of Military Justice Reform by the Military Justice 
        Act of 2016..............................................   135
      Section 522--Minimum Confinement Period Required for 
        Conviction of Certain Sex-Related Offenses Committed by 
        Members of the Armed Forces..............................   135
      Section 523--Prohibition on Wrongful Broadcast or 
        Distribution of Intimate Visual Images...................   135
      Section 524--Information for the Special Victims' Counsel 
        or Victims' Legal Counsel................................   135
      Section 525--Special Victims' Counsel Training Regarding 
        the Unique Challenges Often Faced by Male Victims of 
        Sexual Assault...........................................   136
      Section 526--Garnishment to Satisfy Judgement Rendered for 
        Physically, Sexually, or Emotionally Abusing a Child.....   136
      Section 527--Inclusion of Information in Annual SAPRO 
        Reports regarding Military Sexual Harassment and 
        Incidents Involving Nonconsensual Distribution of Private 
        Sexual Images............................................   136
      Section 528--Inclusion of Information in Annual SAPRO 
        Reports regarding Sexual Assaults Committed by a Member 
        of the Armed Forces against the Member's Spouse or Other 
        Family Member............................................   136
      Section 529--Notification of Members of the Armed Forces 
        Undergoing Certain Administrative Separations of 
        Potential Eligibility for Veterans Benefits..............   136
      Section 530--Consistent Access to Special Victims' Counsel 
        for Former Dependents of Members of the Armed Forces.....   136
    Subtitle D--Member Education, Training, Resilience, and 
        Transition...............................................   137
      Section 541--Prohibition on Release of Military Service 
        Academy Graduates to Participate in Professional 
        Athletics................................................   137
      Section 542--ROTC Cyber Institutes at the Senior Military 
        Colleges.................................................   137
      Section 543--Lieutenant Henry Ossian Flipper Leadership 
        Scholarship Program......................................   137
    Subtitle E--Defense Dependents' Education and Military Family 
        Readiness Matters........................................   137
      Section 551--Continuation of Authority to Assist Local 
        Educational Agencies That Benefit Dependents of Members 
        of the Armed Forces and Department of Defense Civilian 
        Employees................................................   137
      Section 552--Education for Dependents of Certain Retired 
        Members of the Armed Forces..............................   137
      Section 553--Codification of Authority to Conduct Family 
        Support Programs for Immediate Family Members of Members 
        of the Armed Forces Assigned to Special Operations Forces   138
      Section 554--Reimbursement for State Licensure and 
        Certification Costs of a Spouse of a Member of the Armed 
        Forces Arising from Relocation to Another State..........   138
    Subtitle F--Decorations and Awards...........................   138
      Section 561--Replacement of Military Decorations at the 
        Request of Relatives of Deceased Members of the Armed 
        Forces...................................................   138
      Section 562--Congressional Defense Service Medal...........   138
      Section 563--Limitations on Authority to Revoke Certain 
        Military Decorations Awarded to Members of the Armed 
        Forces...................................................   138
    Subtitle G--Miscellaneous Reports and Other Matters..........   139
      Section 571--Expansion of United States Air Force Institute 
        of Technology Enrollment Authority to Include Civilian 
        Employees of the Homeland Security Industry..............   139
      Section 572--Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance..........   139
      Section 573--Voter Registration............................   139
      Section 574--Sense of Congress regarding Section 504 of 
        Title 10, United States Code, on Existing Authority of 
        the Department of Defense to Enlist Individuals, Not 
        Otherwise Eligible for Enlistment, Whose Enlistment Is 
        Vital to the National Interest...........................   139
TITLE VI--COMPENSATION AND OTHER PERSONNEL BENEFITS..............   139
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   139
      Local Purchasing Contracts for the Defense Commissary 
        Agency...................................................   139
      Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Assessment.................   140
      Reserve Component Benefits Parity Under 12304b Mobilization 
        Authority................................................   140
      Review of Department of Defense Debt Collection Practices..   141
      Service Member Financial Planning..........................   141
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   142
    Subtitle A--Pay and Allowances...............................   142
      Section 601--Annual Adjustment of Basic Monthly Pay........   142
      Section 602--Limitation on Basic Allowance for Housing 
        Modification Authority for Members of the Uniformed 
        Services Residing in Military Housing Privatization 
        Initiative Housing.......................................   142
      Section 603--Housing Treatment for Certain Members of the 
        Armed Forces, and Their Spouses and Other Dependents, 
        Undergoing a Permanent Change of Station Within the 
        United States............................................   142
      Section 604--Per Diem Allowance Policies...................   142
    Subtitle B--Bonuses and Special and Incentive Pays...........   143
      Section 611--One-Year Extension of Certain Bonus and 
        Special Pay Authorities for Reserve Forces...............   143
      Section 612--One-Year Extension of Certain Bonus and 
        Special Pay Authorities for Health Care Professionals....   143
      Section 613--One-Year Extension of Special Pay and Bonus 
        Authorities for Nuclear Officers.........................   143
      Section 614--One-Year Extension of Authorities Relating to 
        Title 37 Consolidated Special Pay, Incentive Pay, and 
        Bonus Authorities........................................   143
      Section 615--One-Year Extension of Authorities Relating to 
        Payment of Other Title 37 Bonuses and Special Pays.......   144
      Section 616--Reimbursement for State Licensure and 
        Certification Costs of a Member of the Armed Forces 
        Arising from Separation from the Armed Forces............   144
      Section 617--Increase in Maximum Amount of Aviation Bonus 
        for 12-Month Period of Obligated Service.................   144
      Section 618--Technical and Clerical Amendments Relating to 
        2008 Consolidation of Certain Special Pay Authorities....   144
    Subtitle C--Disability Pay, Retired Pay, and Survivor 
        Benefits.................................................   145
      Section 621--Findings and Sense of Congress regarding the 
        Special Survivor Indemnity Allowance.....................   145
    Subtitle D--Other Matters....................................   145
      Section 631--Land Conveyance Authority, Army and Air Force 
        Exchange Service Property, Dallas, Texas.................   145
      Section 632--Advisory Boards regarding Military 
        Commissaries and Exchanges...............................   145
TITLE VII--HEALTH CARE PROVISIONS................................   145
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   145
      Educational Opportunities for Certified Registered Nurse 
        Anesthetists.............................................   145
      Force of the Future Pilot Program on Cryopreservation of 
        Gametes..................................................   145
      Improving Access to Para Health Professional Extenders.....   146
      Medical Blood Volume Diagnostics...........................   146
      Medical Simulation and Training with First Responders......   146
      Military Caregivers........................................   147
      Military Family Wellness and Suicide Prevention............   147
      Motion Sickness Research...................................   147
      Opioid--Chronic Pain and Recruiting........................   148
      Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine..........................   148
      Personnel Policies regarding Members of the Armed Forces 
        Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV).........   148
      Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.............................   149
      Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury 
        Research Initiatives.....................................   150
      Promising Burn Therapies...................................   150
      TRICARE Pharmacy Pilot Program.............................   150
      Use of Data Analytics within the Defense Medical 
        Surveillance System for Complex Epidemiology and 
        Pathology Research.......................................   151
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   151
    Subtitle A--TRICARE and Other Health Care Benefits...........   151
      Section 701--Physical Examinations for Members of a Reserve 
        Component Who Are Separating from the Armed Forces.......   151
      Section 702--Mental Health Examinations Before Members 
        Separate from the Armed Forces...........................   151
      Section 703--Provision of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for 
        Certain Members of the Armed Forces......................   152
    Subtitle B--Health Care Administration.......................   152
      Section 711--Clarification of Roles of Commanders of 
        Military Medical Treatment Facilities and Surgeons 
        General..................................................   152
      Section 712--Maintenance of Inpatient Capabilities of 
        Military Medical Treatment Facilities Located Outside the 
        United States............................................   152
      Section 713--Regular Update of Prescription Drug Pricing 
        Standards Under TRICARE Retail Pharmacy Program..........   152
      Section 714--Residency Requirements for Podiatrists........   152
    Subtitle C--Other Matters....................................   152
      Section 721--One Year Extension of Pilot Program for 
        Prescription Drug Acquisition Cost Parity in the TRICARE 
        Pharmacy Benefits Program................................   152
      Section 722--Pilot Program on Health Care Assistance System   153
      Section 723--Research of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy..   153
      Section 724--Sense of Congress on Eligibility of Victims of 
        Acts of Terror for Evaluation and Treatment at Military 
        Treatment Facilities.....................................   153
TITLE VIII--ACQUISITION POLICY, ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT, AND 
    RELATED MATTERS..............................................   153
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   153
      Accuracy of Pricing in Responses to Letters of Request for 
        Pricing and Availability in Foreign Military Sales.......   153
      Best Value Criteria for Complex Acquisitions and 
        Information Technology...................................   153
      Collecting Historical Data on Rescinded Solicitations......   154
      Congressional Notification for Direct Commercial Sales.....   155
      Other Transaction Consortia................................   155
      Outcome-Based Services Contracts...........................   156
      Procurement Technical Assistance Centers...................   156
      Report on Commercial Acquisition Transparency..............   156
      Review of Implementation of Online Marketplace Procurement.   157
      Reviews of Acquisition Statute and the Federal Acquisition 
        Regulation...............................................   157
      Should-Cost Analysis Methodology and Transparency..........   158
      Soldier and Marine Equipment Requirements..................   158
      Technical Exchanges on Independent Research and Development 
        Projects.................................................   159
      Transparency in Department of Defense Contract Negotiations   160
      Vendor Vetting Process and Guidance........................   160
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   161
    Subtitle A--Defense Acquisition Streamlining and Transparency   161
     Part I--Acquisition System Streamlining.....................   161
      Section 801--Procurement through Online Marketplaces.......   161
      Section 802--Performance of Incurred Cost Audits...........   162
      Section 803--Modifications to Cost or Pricing Data and 
        Reporting Requirements...................................   163
     Part II--Early Investments in Acquisition Programs..........   164
      Section 811--Requirement to Emphasize Reliability and 
        Maintainability in Weapon System Design..................   164
      Section 812--Licensing of Appropriate Intellectual Property 
        to Support Major Weapon Systems..........................   164
      Section 813--Management of Intellectual Property Matters 
        within the Department of Defense.........................   165
      Section 814--Improvement of Planning for Acquisition of 
        Services.................................................   165
      Section 815--Improvements to Test and Evaluation Processes 
        and Tools................................................   166
     Part III--Acquisition Workforce Improvements................   167
      Section 821--Enhancements to the Civilian Program 
        Management Workforce.....................................   167
      Section 822--Improvements to the Hiring and Training of the 
        Acquisition Workforce....................................   167
      Section 823--Extension and Modifications to Acquisition 
        Demonstration Project....................................   168
      Section 824--Acquisition Positions in the Offices of the 
        Secretaries of the Military Departments..................   168
     Part IV--Transparency Improvements..........................   169
      Section 831--Transparency of Defense Business System Data..   169
      Section 832--Major Defense Acquisition Programs: Display of 
        Budget Information.......................................   169
      Section 833--Enhancements to Transparency in Test and 
        Evaluation Processes and Data............................   170
    Subtitle B--Streamlining of Defense Acquisition Statutes and 
        Regulations..............................................   170
      Section 841--Modifications to the Advisory Panel on 
        Streamlining and Codifying Acquisition Regulations.......   170
      Section 842--Extension of Maximum Duration of Fuel Storage 
        Contracts................................................   171
      Section 843--Exception for Business Operations from 
        Requirement to Accept $1 Coins...........................   171
      Section 844--Repeal of Expired Pilot Program...............   171
    Subtitle C--Amendments to General Contracting Authorities, 
        Procedures, and Limitations..............................   171
      Section 851--Limitation on Unilateral Definitization.......   171
      Section 852--Codification of Requirements Pertaining to 
        Assessment, Management, and Control of Operating and 
        Support Costs for Major Weapon Systems...................   172
      Section 853--Use of Program Income by Eligible Entities 
        That Carry Out Procurement Technical Assistance Programs.   172
      Section 854--Amendment to Sustainment Reviews..............   172
      Section 855--Clarification to Other Transaction Authority..   172
      Section 856--Clarifying the Use of Lowest Price Technically 
        Acceptable Source Selection Process......................   172
      Section 857--Amendment to Nontraditional and Small 
        Contractor Innovation Prototyping Program................   173
      Section 858--Modification to Annual Meeting Requirement of 
        Configuration Steering Boards............................   173
      Section 859--Change to Definition of Subcontract in Certain 
        Circumstances............................................   173
      Section 860--Amendment Relating to Applicability of 
        Inflation Adjustments....................................   173
    Subtitle D--Other Matters....................................   173
      Section 861--Exemption from Design-Build Selection 
        Procedures...............................................   173
      Section 862--Requirement That Certain Ship Components Be 
        Manufactured in the National Technology and Industrial 
        Base.....................................................   174
      Section 863--Procurement of Aviation Critical Safety Items.   174
      Section 864--Milestones and Timelines for Contracts for 
        Foreign Military Sales...................................   174
      Section 865--Notification Requirement for Certain Contracts 
        for Audit Services.......................................   174
      Section 866--Training in Acquisition of Commercial Items...   175
      Section 867--Notice of Cost-Free Federal Procurement 
        Technical Assistance in Connection with Registration of 
        Small Business Concerns on Procurement Websites of the 
        Department of Defense....................................   175
      Section 868--Comptroller General Report on Contractor 
        Business System Requirements.............................   175
      Section 869--Standard Guidelines for Evaluation of 
        Requirements for Services Contracts......................   175
      Section 870--Temporary Limitation on Aggregate Annual 
        Amount Available for Contract Services...................   175
TITLE IX--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT......   175
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   175
    Subtitle A--Organization and Management of the Department of 
        Defense Generally........................................   175
      Section 901--Responsibility of the Chief Information 
        Officer of the Department of Defense for Risk Management 
        Activities regarding Supply Chain for Information 
        Technology Systems.......................................   175
      Section 902--Repeal of Office of Corrosion Policy and 
        Oversight................................................   176
      Section 903--Designation of Corrosion Control and 
        Prevention Executives for the Military Departments.......   176
      Section 904--Maintaining Civilian Workforce Capabilities to 
        Sustain Readiness, the All Volunteer Force, and 
        Operational Effectiveness................................   176
    Subtitle B--Designation of the Navy and Marine Corps.........   176
      Section 911--Redesignation of the Department of the Navy as 
        the Department of the Navy and Marine Corps..............   176
      Section 912--Conforming Amendments to Title 10, United 
        States Code..............................................   176
      Section 913--Other Provisions of Law and Other References..   177
      Section 914--Effective Date................................   177
    Subtitle C--Other Matters....................................   177
      Section 921--Transition of the Office of the Secretary of 
        Defense to Reflect Establishment of Positions of Under 
        Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering, Under 
        Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, and 
        Chief Management Officer.................................   177
      Section 922--Extension of Deadlines for Reporting and 
        Briefing Requirements for Commission on the National 
        Defense Strategy for the United States...................   177
      Section 923--Briefing on Force Management Level Policy.....   178
TITLE X--GENERAL PROVISIONS......................................   178
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   178
    Counter-Drug Activities......................................   178
      Narcotics Flow to the United States from Central and South 
        America..................................................   178
      National Guard Counterdrug Schools.........................   178
      Peace in Colombia..........................................   179
      Venezuela Security and Stability...........................   179
    Other Matters................................................   180
      Assessment of Culture and Accountability in Special 
        Operations Forces........................................   180
      Botulinum Toxin Type A Countermeasures.....................   180
      Combat Helmets for Female Service Members..................   181
      Comptroller General Assessment of Emerging Threats of High 
        National Security Consequence............................   181
      Defense Department 501(c)3 Coordination and Strategy.......   182
      Department of Defense Overmatch Strategy...................   182
      Disposal of Excess Agriculture-Related Equipment...........   182
      High-Altitude Airborne Intelligence, Surveillance, and 
        Reconnaissance Capacity, Capability, and Force Structure.   182
      National Biodefense Strategy...............................   183
      National Guard CBRN Enterprise Report......................   183
      National Guard Use of Department of Defense Issued Unmanned 
        Aircraft Systems for Domestic Operations.................   184
      Navy Reserve F/A-18 Aircraft...............................   185
      Next Generation Immersive Cockpit Systems..................   185
      Overseas Posture and Permanently Stationed Forces..........   186
      Report on the National Security Implications of Ukraine's 
        Arbitration Proceedings against Russia under Annex VII of 
        the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea......   187
      Requirement for Notification of Modifications Made to 
        Presidential Policy Guidance for Direct Action Against 
        Terrorist Targets........................................   188
      Ring Wheel Drive...........................................   188
      Special Operations Forces Demand, Priorities, and Over-
        Reliance.................................................   188
      Strategy to Counter Unconventional and Hybrid Warfare 
        Threats..................................................   189
      U.S. Efforts to Train, Advise, Assist, and Equip the Iraqi 
        Counterterrorism Service and the Iraqi Special Operations 
        Forces...................................................   189
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   190
    Subtitle A--Financial Matters................................   190
      Section 1001--General Transfer Authority...................   190
      Section 1002--Preparation of Consolidated Corrective Action 
        Plan and Implementation of Centralized Reporting System..   190
      Section 1003--Additional Requirements Relating to 
        Department of Defense Audits.............................   190
    Subtitle B--Naval Vessels and Shipyards......................   190
      Section 1011--National Defense Sealift Fund................   190
      Section 1012--National Defense Sealift Fund: Construction 
        of National Icebreaker Vessels...........................   190
      Section 1013--Use of National Sea-Based Deterrence Fund for 
        Multiyear Procurement of Certain Critical Components.....   190
      Section 1014--Restrictions on the Overhaul and Repair of 
        Vessels in Foreign Shipyards.............................   191
      Section 1015--Availability of Funds for Retirement or 
        Inactivation of Ticonderoga-Class Cruisers or Dock 
        Landing Ships............................................   191
      Section 1016--Policy of the United States on Minimum Number 
        of Battle Force Ships....................................   191
    Subtitle C--Counterterrorism.................................   191
      Section 1021--Termination of Requirement to Submit Annual 
        Budget Justification Display for Department of Defense 
        Combating Terrorism Program..............................   191
      Section 1022--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Transfer or 
        Release of Individuals Detained at United States Naval 
        Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba to the United States.......   191
      Section 1023--Prohibition on Use of Funds to Construct or 
        Modify Facilities in the United States to House Detainees 
        Transferred from United States Naval Station, Guantanamo 
        Bay, Cuba................................................   191
      Section 1024--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Transfer or 
        Release of Individuals Detained at United States Naval 
        Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to Certain Countries......   192
      Section 1025--Biannual Report on Support of Special 
        Operations to Combat Terrorism...........................   192
    Subtitle D--Miscellaneous Authorities and Limitations........   192
      Section 1031--Limitation on Expenditure of Funds for 
        Emergency and Extraordinary Expenses for Intelligence and 
        Counter-Intelligence Activities and Representation 
        Allowances...............................................   192
      Section 1032--Modifications to Humanitarian Demining 
        Assistance Authorities...................................   192
      Section 1033--Prohibition on Charge of Certain Tariffs on 
        Aircraft Traveling through Channel Routes................   192
      Section 1034--Limitation on Divestment of U-2 or RQ-4 
        Aircraft.................................................   192
      Section 1035--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Retirement of 
        Legacy Maritime Mine Countermeasures Platforms...........   193
      Section 1036--Restriction on Use of Certain Funds Pending 
        Solicitation of Bids for Western Pacific Dry Dock........   193
      Section 1037--National Guard Flyovers of Public Events.....   193
      Section 1038--Transfer of Funds to World War I Centennial 
        Commission...............................................   193
      Section 1039--Rule of Construction Regarding Use of 
        Department of Defense Funding of a Border Wall...........   193
    Subtitle E--Studies and Reports..............................   193
      Section 1051--Elimination of Reporting Requirements 
        Terminated After November 25, 2017, Pursuant to Section 
        1080 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
        Year 2016................................................   193
      Section 1052--Report on Department of Defense Arctic 
        Capability and Resource Gaps.............................   194
      Section 1053--Review and Assessment of Department of 
        Defense Personnel Recovery and Nonconventional Assisted 
        Recovery Mechanisms......................................   194
      Section 1054--Mine Warfare Readiness Inspection Plan and 
        Report...................................................   194
      Section 1055--Report on Civilian Casualties from Department 
        of Defense Strikes.......................................   194
      Section 1056--Reports on Infrastructure and Capabilities of 
        Lajes Field, Portugal....................................   194
      Section 1057--Report on Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex 
        Modernization............................................   194
    Subtitle F--Other Matters....................................   194
      Section 1061--Technical, Conforming, and Clerical 
        Amendments...............................................   194
      Section 1062--Workforce Issues for Relocation of Marines to 
        Guam.....................................................   194
      Section 1063--Protection of Second Amendment Rights of 
        Military Families........................................   195
      Section 1064--Transfer of Surplus Firearms to Corporation 
        for the Promotion of Rifle Practice and Firearms Safety..   195
      Section 1065--National Guard Accessibility to Department of 
        Defense Issued Unmanned Aircraft.........................   195
      Section 1066--Sense of Congress Regarding Aircraft Carriers   195
      Section 1067--Notice to Congress of Terms of Department of 
        Defense Settlement Agreements............................   195
      Section 1068--Sense of Congress Recognizing the United 
        States Navy Seabees......................................   196
      Section 1069--Recognition of the United States Special 
        Operations Command.......................................   196
      Section 1070--Sense of Congress Regarding World War I......   196
      Section 1071--Findings and Sense of Congress Regarding the 
        National Guard Youth Challenge Program...................   196
      Section 1072--Sense of Congress Regarding National Purple 
        Heart Recognition Day....................................   196
TITLE XI--CIVILIAN PERSONNEL MATTERS.............................   196
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   196
      Accelerated Promotion Program..............................   196
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   197
      Section 1101--Extension of Direct Hire Authority for 
        Domestic Defense Industrial Base Facilities and Major 
        Range and Test Facilities Base...........................   197
      Section 1102--Extension of Authority to Provide Voluntary 
        Separation Incentive Pay for Civilian Employees of the 
        Department of Defense....................................   197
      Section 1103--Additional Department of Defense Science and 
        Technology Reinvention Laboratories......................   197
      Section 1104--One-Year Extension of Authority to Waive 
        Annual Limitation on Premium Pay and Aggregate Limitation 
        on Pay for Federal Civilian Employees Working Overseas...   197
      Section 1105--Appointment of Retired Members of the Armed 
        Forces to Positions In or Under the Department of Defense   197
      Section 1106--Direct Hire Authority for Financial 
        Management Experts in the Department of Defense Workforce   197
      Section 1107--Extension of Authority for Temporary 
        Personnel Flexibilities for Domestic Defense Industrial 
        Base Facilities and Major Range and Test Facilities Base 
        Civilian Personnel.......................................   198
      Section 1108--One-Year Extension of Temporary Authority to 
        Grant Allowances, Benefits, and Gratuities to Civilian 
        Personnel on Official Duty in a Combat Zone..............   198
TITLE XII--MATTERS RELATING TO FOREIGN NATIONS...................   198
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   198
      Assessment of Freedom of Navigation Operations in the South 
        China Sea................................................   198
      Attacks on U.S. Armed Forces Personnel by Partner Nation 
        Security Forces..........................................   198
      Briefing on the Role of the Russian Military in Influence 
        Operations Targeting Democratic Elections and Disruption 
        of Military Alliances and Partnerships...................   199
      Countering Russian Aggression..............................   200
      Counterterrorism Effectiveness Research....................   200
      Critical Shortfalls in the Indo-Asia-Pacific Region........   201
      Cultural Preservation in Armed Conflict....................   201
      Defense Support to the Global Engagement Center Mission....   202
      Department of Defense Briefing on Crisis Response in Africa   203
      DTRA International Countering WMD-Program..................   203
      Forward-Stationed Combat Aviation Brigade in South Korea...   203
      Global Engagement Center...................................   204
      Global Theater Security Cooperation Management Information 
        System...................................................   204
      Impact of Foreign Laws on U.S. Defense Contractors.........   205
      Implementation of Strategy to Prevent and Respond to 
        Gender-Based Violence....................................   205
      Improvements to Transparency in the Technology Release 
        Process in Foreign Military Sales........................   206
      Independent Security Cooperation Evaluation Office.........   206
      NATO Defense Weapon System Development Cooperation.........   206
      Non-lethal Weapons for European Theater Contingencies......   207
      Plan to Enhance Imagery Sharing with Allies in the Asia-
        Pacific Region...........................................   207
      Report on Impact of Outsourcing on the U.S. Defense 
        Industrial Base..........................................   208
      Security Cooperation Assessment, Monitoring, and Evaluation   208
      Security Cooperation Reform................................   209
      Support for Afghan Special Immigrant Visa Program..........   209
      Support for Other Departments and Agencies of the United 
        States Government that Advance Department of Defense 
        Security Cooperation Objectives..........................   209
      Timor Sea Maritime Developments............................   210
      U.S. Civilian Contractors in Iraq..........................   210
      U.S. National Security Threats in Africa...................   210
      Utilizing Unmanned Aircraft Systems for International 
        Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief..............   211
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   212
    Subtitle A--Assistance and Training..........................   212
      Section 1201--One-Year Extension of Logistical Support for 
        Coalition Forces Supporting Certain United States 
        Military Operations......................................   212
      Section 1202--Modification to Special Defense Acquisition 
        Fund.....................................................   212
      Section 1203--Modification to Ministry of Defense Advisor 
        Authority................................................   212
      Section 1204--Modification of Authority to Build Capacity 
        of Foreign Security Forces...............................   212
      Section 1205--Extension and Modification of Authority on 
        Training for Eastern European National Military Forces in 
        the Course of Multilateral Exercises.....................   213
      Section 1206--Extension of Participation in and Support of 
        the Inter-American Defense College.......................   213
    Subtitle B--Matters Relating to Afghanistan and Pakistan.....   213
      Section 1211--Extension of Authority to Transfer Defense 
        Articles and Provide Defense Services to the Military and 
        Security Forces of Afghanistan...........................   213
      Section 1212--Report on United States Strategy in 
        Afghanistan..............................................   213
      Section 1213--Extension and Modification of Authority for 
        Reimbursement of Certain Coalition Nations for Support 
        Provided to United States Military Operations............   213
    Subtitle C--Matters Relating to Syria, Iraq, and Iran........   214
      Section 1221--Report on United States Strategy in Syria....   214
      Section 1222--Extension and Modification of Authority to 
        Provide Assistance to Counter the Islamic State of Iraq 
        and the Levant...........................................   214
      Section 1223--Extension and Modification of Authority to 
        Support Operations and Activities of the Office of 
        Security Cooperation in Iraq.............................   215
      Section 1224--Sense of Congress on Threats Posed by the 
        Government of Iran.......................................   215
    Subtitle D--Matters Relating to the Russian Federation.......   216
      Section 1231--Extension of Limitation on Military 
        Cooperation between the United States and the Russian 
        Federation...............................................   216
      Section 1232--Prohibition on Availability of Funds Relating 
        to Sovereignty of the Russian Federation over Crimea.....   216
      Section 1233--Statement of Policy on the Russian Federation   216
      Section 1234--Modification and Extension of Ukraine 
        Security Assistance Initiative...........................   216
      Section 1235--Limitation on Availability of Funds Relating 
        to Implementation of the Open Skies Treaty...............   217
      Section 1236--Sense of Congress on Importance of Nuclear 
        Capabilities of NATO.....................................   217
      Section 1237--Sense of Congress on Support for Georgia.....   217
      Section 1238--Sense of Congress on Support for Estonia, 
        Latvia, and Lithuania....................................   217
    Subtitle E--Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty 
        Preservation Act of 2017.................................   218
      Section 1241--Short Title..................................   218
      Section 1242--Findings.....................................   218
      Section 1243--Compliance Enforcement regarding Russian 
        Violations of the INF Treaty.............................   218
      Section 1244--Development of INF Range Ground-Launched 
        Missile System...........................................   218
      Section 1245--Notification Requirement Related to Russian 
        Federation Development of Noncompliant Systems and United 
        States Actions Regarding Material Breach of INF Treaty by 
        the Russian Federation...................................   219
      Section 1246--Limitation on Availability of Funds to Extend 
        the Implementation of the New START Treaty...............   219
      Section 1247--Review of RS-26 Ballistic Missile............   219
      Section 1248--Definitions..................................   220
    Subtitle F--Fostering Unity Against Russian Aggression Act of 
        2017.....................................................   220
      Section 1251--Short Title..................................   220
      Section 1252--Findings and Sense of Congress...............   220
      Section 1253--Strategy to Counter Threats by the Russian 
        Federation...............................................   220
      Section 1254--Strategy to Increase Conventional Precision 
        Strike Weapon Stockpiles in the United States European 
        Command's Areas of Responsibility........................   220
      Section 1255--Plan to Counter the Military Capabilities of 
        the Russian Federation...................................   220
      Section 1256--Plan to Increase Cyber and Information 
        Operations, Deterrence, and Defense......................   221
      Section 1257--Sense of Congress on Enhancing Maritime 
        Capabilities.............................................   221
      Section 1258--Plan to Reduce the Risks of Miscalculation 
        and Unintended Consequences that Could Precipitate a 
        Nuclear War..............................................   221
      Section 1259--Definitions..................................   221
    Subtitle G--Matters Relating to the Indo-Asia-Pacific Region.   221
      Section 1261--Sense of Congress on the Indo-Asia-Pacific 
        Region...................................................   221
      Section 1262--Report on Strategy to Prioritize United 
        States Defense Interests in the Indo-Asia-Pacific Region.   221
      Section 1263--Assessment of United States Force Posture and 
        Basing Needs in the Indo-Asia-Pacific Region.............   222
      Section 1264--Extended Deterrence Commitment to the Asia-
        Pacific Region...........................................   222
      Section 1265--Authorization of Appropriations to Meet 
        United States Financial Obligations under Compact of Free 
        Association with Palau...................................   222
      Section 1266--Sense of Congress Reaffirming Security 
        Commitments to the Governments of Japan and South Korea 
        and Trilateral Cooperation between the United States, 
        Japan, and South Korea...................................   222
      Section 1267--Sense of Congress on Freedom of Navigation 
        Operations in the South China Sea........................   223
      Section 1268--Sense of Congress on Strengthening the 
        Defense of Taiwan........................................   223
      Section 1269--Sense of Congress on the Association on 
        Southeast Asian Nations..................................   223
      Section 1270--Sense of Congress on Reaffirming the 
        Importance of the United States-Australia Defense 
        Alliance.................................................   223
    Subtitle H--Other Matters....................................   223
      Section 1271--NATO Cooperative Cyber Defense Center of 
        Excellence...............................................   223
      Section 1272--NATO Strategic Communications Center of 
        Excellence...............................................   224
      Section 1273--Security and Stability Strategy for Somalia..   224
      Section 1274--Assessment of Global Theater Security 
        Cooperation Management Information System................   224
      Section 1275--Future Years Plan for the European Deterrence 
        Initiative...............................................   224
      Section 1276--Extension of Authority to Enter into 
        Agreements with Participating Countries in the American, 
        British, Canadian, and Australian Armies' Program........   225
      Section 1277--Security Strategy for Yemen..................   225
      Section 1278--Limitation on Transfer of Excess Defense 
        Articles That Are High Mobility Multi-Purpose Wheeled 
        Vehicles.................................................   225
      Section 1279--Department of Defense Program to Protect 
        United States Students Against Foreign Agents............   226
      Section 1280--Extension of United States-Israel Anti-Tunnel 
        Cooperation Authority....................................   226
      Section 1281--Anticorruption Strategy......................   226
TITLE XIII--COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION.........................   226
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   226
      Section 1301--Specification of Cooperative Threat Reduction 
        Funds....................................................   226
      Section 1302--Funding Allocations..........................   227
TITLE XIV--OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS..................................   227
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   227
      Assessment of the Realignment of the Joint Improvised-
        Threat Defeat Organization under the Defense Threat 
        Reduction Agency.........................................   227
      Beryllium Supply Chain.....................................   228
      Fiscal Stability of the National Defense Stockpile.........   228
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   229
    Subtitle A--Military Programs................................   229
      Section 1401--Working Capital Funds........................   229
      Section 1402--Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction, 
        Defense..................................................   229
      Section 1403--Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug 
        Activities, Defense-Wide.................................   229
      Section 1404--Defense Inspector General....................   229
      Section 1405--Defense Health Program.......................   229
      Section 1406--National Defense Sealift Fund................   229
    Subtitle B--Other Matters....................................   229
      Section 1411--Authority for Transfer of Funds to Joint 
        Department of Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs 
        Medical Facility Demonstration Fund for Captain James A. 
        Lovell Health Care Center, Illinois......................   229
      Section 1412--Authorization of Appropriations for Armed 
        Forces Retirement Home...................................   230
TITLE XV--AUTHORIZATION OF ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATIONS FOR OVERSEAS 
    CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS.......................................   230
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   230
      National Guard and Reserve Component Equipment Account.....   230
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   231
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................   231
      Section 1501--Purpose and Treatment of Certain 
        Authorizations of Appropriations.........................   231
      Section 1502--Procurement..................................   231
      Section 1503--Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation..   231
      Section 1504--Operation and Maintenance....................   231
      Section 1505--Military Personnel...........................   231
      Section 1506--Working Capital Funds........................   231
      Section 1507--Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug 
        Activities, Defense-Wide.................................   231
      Section 1508--Defense Inspector General....................   232
      Section 1509--Defense Health Program.......................   232
    Subtitle B--Financial Matters................................   232
      Section 1511--Treatment as Additional Authorizations.......   232
      Section 1512--Special Transfer Authority...................   232
    Subtitle C--Limitations, Reports, and Other Matters..........   232
      Section 1521--Afghanistan Security Forces Fund.............   232
      Section 1522--Joint Improvised-Threat Defeat Fund..........   232
TITLE XVI--STRATEGIC PROGRAMS, CYBER, AND INTELLIGENCE MATTERS...   233
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   233
    Space Activities.............................................   233
      Overview on National Security Space Organization...........   233
      Certification of Reusable Launch Vehicles for National 
        Security Space Missions..................................   235
      Commercial Geospatial Intelligence.........................   235
      Comptroller General Review of Hosted Payloads..............   236
      Global Positioning System..................................   236
      Multi-Band Satellite Communications Terminals..............   236
      Outer Space Cooperation with Japan.........................   237
      Reliance on Global Positioning System for Defense of the 
        Homeland.................................................   237
      Responsive Launch..........................................   238
      Small Satellite Technology Development.....................   238
      Space Commercial Antenna Service...........................   239
      Space Security.............................................   239
      Space Situational Awareness and Battle Management Command 
        and Control..............................................   240
      Use of Surplus Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Motors 
        for Commercial Space Launches............................   241
    Missile Defense Programs.....................................   241
      Hypersonic Defense.........................................   241
      Improving Ground Testing of the Ground-Based Midcourse 
        Defense System...........................................   241
      Low Cost Missile Defense Initiative........................   242
      National Missile Defense Policy Change and Adversary 
        Reactions................................................   242
      Plan to Assess the Acquisition of Missile Defense Targets..   243
      Sea-Based X-Band Radar.....................................   243
    Nuclear Forces...............................................   244
      Briefing on Commonality Related to the Ground-Based 
        Strategic Deterrent Program..............................   244
      Briefing on the 3+2 Strategy and Interoperable Warhead 1 
        (IW-1)...................................................   244
      Comptroller General Review of Nuclear Forces Readiness 
        During Recapitalization and Transition...................   245
      Continuation of Nuclear Command, Control and Communications 
        Acquisition Assessments by the Government Accountability 
        Office...................................................   246
      Countering Threats from Unmanned Aircraft Systems..........   246
      Future of Nuclear Deterrence and the Joint Strategic 
        Deterrence Review Process................................   247
      Nuclear Assurance and Deterrence Science, Technology, 
        Innovation, and Collaboration............................   247
      Nuclear Command, Control, and Communications Systems 
        Modernization............................................   248
      Nuclear Security Collaboration and Harmonization...........   248
      Office of the Secretary of Defense Oversight and 
        Organization for the Nuclear Deterrence Mission..........   249
      Remote Visual Assessment System at Minuteman III Launch 
        Facilities...............................................   249
      Report on Ground Based Strategic Deterrent and Minuteman 
        III......................................................   250
      Status of Infrastructure Supporting NATO Nuclear Deterrence 
        Mission..................................................   251
    Cyber-Related Matters........................................   252
      Assessment of Effectiveness of Cyber Reporting.............   252
      Assessment of Third-Party Cybersecurity Risk...............   252
      Cloud Computing............................................   253
      Comply-to-Connect Policy...................................   254
      Comptroller General Assessment of Cyber Training...........   254
      Cyber Hardening............................................   254
      Cyber Training and Talent Management.......................   255
      Cyber Vulnerability Disclosure Program.....................   256
      Data Protection............................................   256
      Evaluation of Commercial Cyber Threat Information Sources..   257
      Implementation of Recommendations by Defense Science Board 
        Task Force on Cyber Deterrence and Cyber Supply Chain....   257
      Persistent Training Environment............................   258
      Report on Army Network Security Consolidation..............   258
      Unified Platform...........................................   259
      Weapon System Cyber Vulnerabilities........................   259
    Intelligence Matters.........................................   260
      Defense Clandestine Service................................   260
      European Deterrence Initiative Intelligence, Surveillance, 
        and Reconnaissance.......................................   260
      Improving Analytic Automation..............................   260
      Intelligence Simulation Center.............................   261
      Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Capability 
        Imbalance................................................   261
      Joint Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance 
        Management...............................................   262
      Report on National Intelligence Program and Military 
        Intelligence Program Integration Against Hard Targets....   264
      Review by Comptroller General of the United States of the 
        General Defense Intelligence Program.....................   265
      Secure Compartmented Information Facility Standardization..   265
      Strengthening Intelligence Input to Milestone Decisions....   266
      Threat Awareness Programs..................................   266
      Underground Facility Targeting Capabilities................   267
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   267
    Subtitle A--Management and Organization of Space Programs....   267
      Section 1601--Establishment of Space Corps in the 
        Department of the Air Force..............................   267
      Section 1602--Establishment of Subordinate Unified Command 
        of the United States Strategic Command...................   268
    Subtitle B--Space Activities.................................   268
      Section 1611--Codification, Extension, and Modification of 
        Limitation on Construction on United States Territory of 
        Satellite Positioning Ground Monitoring Stations of 
        Foreign Governments......................................   268
      Section 1612--Foreign Commercial Satellite Services: 
        Cybersecurity Threats and Launches.......................   268
      Section 1613--Extension of Pilot Program on Commercial 
        Weather Data.............................................   269
      Section 1614--Conditional Transfer of Acquisition and 
        Funding Authority of Certain Weather Missions to National 
        Reconnaissance Office....................................   269
      Section 1615--Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle 
        Modernization and Sustainment of Assured Access to Space.   269
      Section 1616--Commercial Satellite Communications 
        Pathfinder Program.......................................   270
      Section 1617--Demonstration of Backup and Complementary 
        Positioning, Navigation, and Timing Capabilities of 
        Global Positioning System................................   270
      Section 1618--Enhancement of Positioning, Navigation, and 
        Timing Capacity..........................................   270
      Section 1619--Establishment of Space Flag Training Event...   271
      Section 1620--Report on Operational and Contingency Plans 
        for Loss or Degradation of Space Capabilities............   271
      Section 1621--Limitation on Availability of Funding for 
        Joint Space Operations Center Mission System.............   272
      Section 1622--Limitation on Availability of Funds Relating 
        to the Advanced Extremely High Frequency Program.........   272
    Subtitle C--Defense Intelligence and Intelligence-Related 
        Activities...............................................   272
      Section 1631--Security Clearances for Facilities of Certain 
        Contractors..............................................   272
      Section 1632--Extension of Authority to Engage in Certain 
        Commercial Activities....................................   272
      Section 1633--Submission of Audits of Commercial Activity 
        Funds....................................................   272
      Section 1634--Clarification of Annual Briefing on the 
        Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance 
        Requirements of the Combatant Commands...................   272
      Section 1635--Review of Support Provided by Defense 
        Intelligence Elements to Acquisition Activities of the 
        Department...............................................   273
      Section 1636--Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
        Certain Offensive Counterintelligence Activities.........   273
      Section 1637--Prohibition on Availability of Funds for 
        Certain Relocation Activities for NATO Intelligence 
        Fusion Center............................................   273
      Section 1638--Establishment of Chairman's Controlled 
        Activity within Joint Staff for Intelligence, 
        Surveillance, and Reconnaissance.........................   273
      Section 1639--Sense of Congress and Report on Geospatial 
        Commercial Activities for Basic and Applied Research and 
        Development..............................................   274
      Section 1640--Department of Defense Counterintelligence 
        Polygraph Program........................................   274
      Section 1641--Security Clearance for Dual-Nationals........   274
      Section 1642--Suspension or Revocation of Security 
        Clearances Based on Unlawful or Inappropriate Contacts 
        with Representatives of a Foreign Government.............   274
    Subtitle D--Cyberspace-Related Matters.......................   274
      Section 1651--Notification Requirements for Sensitive 
        Military Cyber Operations and Cyber Weapons..............   274
      Section 1652--Modification to Quarterly Cyber Operations 
        Briefings................................................   275
      Section 1653--Cyber Scholarship Program....................   275
      Section 1654--Plan to Increase Cyber and Information 
        Operations, Deterrence, and Defense......................   275
      Section 1655--Report on Termination of Dual-Hat Arrangement 
        for Commander of the United States Cyber Command.........   275
    Subtitle E--Nuclear Forces...................................   276
      Section 1661--Notifications Regarding Dual-Capable F-35A 
        Aircraft.................................................   276
      Section 1662--Oversight of Delayed Acquisition Programs by 
        Council on Oversight of the National Leadership Command, 
        Control, and Communications System.......................   276
      Section 1663--Establishment of Nuclear Command and Control 
        Intelligence Fusion Center...............................   276
      Section 1664--Security of Nuclear Command, Control, and 
        Communications System from Commercial Dependencies.......   277
      Section 1665--Oversight of Aerial-Layer Programs by Council 
        on Oversight of the National Leadership Command, Control, 
        and Communications System................................   277
      Section 1666--Security Classification Guide for Programs 
        Relating to Nuclear Command, Control, and Communications 
        and Nuclear Deterrence...................................   278
      Section 1667--Evaluation and Enhanced Security of Supply 
        Chain for Nuclear Command, Control, and Communications 
        and Continuity of Government Programs....................   278
      Section 1668--Limitation on Pursuit of Certain Command and 
        Control Concept..........................................   279
      Section 1669--Procurement Authority for Certain Parts of 
        Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Fuzes.................   279
      Section 1670--Sense of Congress on Importance of 
        Independent Nuclear Deterrent of United Kingdom..........   280
      Section 1671--Prohibition on Availability of Funds for 
        Mobile Variant of Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent 
        Missile..................................................   280
      Section 1672--Report on Impacts of Nuclear Proliferation...   280
    Subtitle F--Missile Defense Programs.........................   280
      Section 1681--Administration of Missile Defense and Defeat 
        Programs.................................................   280
      Section 1682--Preservation of the Ballistic Missile Defense 
        Capacity of the Army.....................................   281
      Section 1683--Modernization of Army Lower Tier Air and 
        Missile Defense Sensor...................................   281
      Section 1684--Enhancement of Operational Test and 
        Evaluation of Ballistic Missile Defense System...........   281
      Section 1685--Defense of Hawaii from North Korean Ballistic 
        Missile Attack...........................................   282
      Section 1686--Aegis Ashore Anti-Air Warfare Capability.....   283
      Section 1687--Iron Dome Short-Range Rocket Defense System, 
        Israeli Cooperative Missile Defense Program Codevelopment 
        and Coproduction, and Arrow 3 Testing....................   283
      Section 1688--Review of Proposed Ground-Based Midcourse 
        Defense System Contract..................................   284
      Section 1689--Sense of Congress and Plan for Development of 
        Space-Based Sensor Layer for Ballistic Missile Defense...   285
      Section 1690--Sense of Congress and Plan for Development of 
        Space-Based Ballistic Missile Intercept Layer............   285
      Section 1691--Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
        Ground-Based Midcourse Defense Element of the Ballistic 
        Missile Defense System...................................   285
      Section 1692--Conventional Prompt Global Strike Weapon 
        System...................................................   286
      Section 1693--Determination of Location of Continental 
        United States Interceptor Site...........................   286
    Subtitle G--Other Matters....................................   286
      Section 1695--Protection of Certain Facilities and Assets 
        from Unmanned Aircraft...................................   286
      Section 1696--Use of Commercial Items in Distributed Common 
        Ground Systems...........................................   286
      Section 1697--Independent Assessment of Costs Relating to 
        Ammonium Perchlorate.....................................   286
      Section 1698--Limitation and Business Case Analysis 
        Regarding Ammonium Perchlorate...........................   286
      Section 1699--Industrial Base for Large Solid Rocket Motors 
        and Related Technologies.................................   287
      Section 1699A--Pilot Program on Enhancing Information 
        Sharing for Security of Supply Chain.....................   287
      Section 1699B--Commission to Assess the Threat to the 
        United States from Electromagnetic Pulse Attacks and 
        Events...................................................   288
      Section 1699C--Pilot Program on Electromagnetic Spectrum 
        Mapping..................................................   288
TITLE XVII--MATTERS RELATING TO SMALL BUSINESS PROCUREMENT.......   288
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   288
    Subtitle A--Improving Transparency and Clarity for Small 
        Businesses...............................................   288
      Section 1701--Improving Reporting on Small Business Goals..   288
      Section 1702--Uniformity in Procurement Terminology........   289
      Section 1703--Responsibilities of Commercial Market 
        Representatives..........................................   289
      Section 1704--Responsibilities of Business Opportunity 
        Specialists..............................................   289
    Subtitle B--Women's Business Programs........................   289
      Section 1711--Office of Women's Business Ownership.........   289
      Section 1712--Women's Business Center Program..............   289
      Section 1713--Matching Requirements under Women's Business 
        Center Program...........................................   289
    Subtitle C--SCORE Program....................................   290
      Section 1721--SCORE Reauthorization........................   290
      Section 1722--SCORE Program................................   290
      Section 1723--Online Component.............................   290
      Section 1724--Study and Report on the Future Role of the 
        SCORE Program............................................   290
      Section 1725--Technical and Conforming Amendments..........   290
    Subtitle D--Small Business Development Centers Improvements..   290
      Section 1731--Use of Authorized Entrepreneurial Development 
        Programs.................................................   290
      Section 1732--Marketing of Services........................   291
      Section 1733--Data Collection..............................   291
      Section 1734--Fees from Private Partnerships and 
        Cosponsorships...........................................   291
      Section 1735--Equity for Small Business Development Centers   291
      Section 1736--Confidentiality Requirements.................   291
      Section 1737--Limitation on Award of Grants to Small 
        Business Development Centers.............................   291
    Subtitle E--Miscellaneous....................................   292
      Section 1741--Modification of Past Performance Pilot 
        Program to Include Consideration of Past Performance with 
        Allies of the United States..............................   292

DIVISION B--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION AUTHORIZATIONS.................   292
  PURPOSE........................................................   292
      MILITARY CONSTRUCTION AND FAMILY HOUSING OVERVIEW..........   292
      Section 2001--Short Title..................................   292
      Section 2002--Expiration of Authorizations and Amounts 
        Required To Be Specified by Law..........................   293
      Section 2003--Effective Date...............................   293
TITLE XXI--ARMY MILITARY CONSTRUCTION............................   293
  SUMMARY........................................................   293
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   293
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   293
      Army Power Projection Platforms............................   294
      Pohakuloa Training Area....................................   294
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   294
      Section 2101--Authorized Army Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   294
      Section 2102--Family Housing...............................   294
      Section 2103--Improvements to Military Family Housing Units   295
      Section 2104--Authorization of Appropriations, Army........   295
      Section 2105--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2014 Project.........................   295
      Section 2106--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2015 Project.........................   295
      Section 2107--Extension of Authorization of Certain Fiscal 
        Year 2014 Project........................................   295
      Section 2108--Extension of Authorizations of Certain Fiscal 
        Year 2015 Projects.......................................   295
      Section 2109--Additional Authority to Carry Out Certain 
        Fiscal Year 2000, 2005, 2006, and 2007 Projects..........   295
TITLE XXII--NAVY MILITARY CONSTRUCTION...........................   296
  SUMMARY........................................................   296
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   296
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   296
      Assessment of Department of Defense Equities for Operation 
        and Maintenance of the George P. Coleman Memorial Bridge, 
        Yorktown, VA.............................................   297
      Red Hill Bulk Underground Fuel Storage Facility............   297
      Requirements for Munitions and Explosives of Concern 
        Clearance on Guam........................................   298
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   299
      Section 2201--Authorized Navy Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   299
      Section 2202--Family Housing...............................   299
      Section 2203--Improvements to Military Family Housing Units   299
      Section 2204--Authorization of Appropriations, Navy........   299
      Section 2205--Extension of Authorizations for Certain 
        Fiscal Year 2014 Projects................................   299
      Section 2206--Extension of Authorizations of Certain Fiscal 
        Year 2015 Projects.......................................   300
TITLE XXIII--AIR FORCE MILITARY CONSTRUCTION.....................   300
  SUMMARY........................................................   300
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   300
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   300
      Air Force Dormitory Master Plan............................   302
      Lincoln Laboratory Recapitalization........................   303
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   303
      Section 2301--Authorized Air Force Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   303
      Section 2302--Family Housing...............................   303
      Section 2303--Improvements to Military Family Housing Units   303
      Section 2304--Authorization of Appropriations, Air Force...   303
      Section 2305--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2017 Projects........................   303
      Section 2306--Extension of Authorizations of Certain Fiscal 
        Year 2015 Projects.......................................   304
TITLE XXIV--DEFENSE AGENCIES MILITARY CONSTRUCTION...............   304
  SUMMARY........................................................   304
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   304
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   304
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   306
      Section 2401--Authorized Defense Agencies Construction and 
        Land Acquisition Projects................................   306
      Section 2402--Authorized Energy Resiliency and Conservation 
        Projects.................................................   306
      Section 2403--Authorization of Appropriations, Defense 
        Agencies.................................................   306
      Section 2404--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2017 Project.........................   306
      Section 2405--Extension of Authorizations of Certain Fiscal 
        Year 2014 Projects.......................................   306
      Section 2406--Extension of Authorizations of Certain Fiscal 
        Year 2015 Projects.......................................   307
TITLE XXV--INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS................................   307
  SUMMARY........................................................   307
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   307
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   307
      Infrastructure Capabilities, Capacity, and Investments.....   307
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   308
    Subtitle A--North Atlantic Treaty Organization Security 
        Investment Program.......................................   308
      Section 2501--Authorized NATO Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   308
      Section 2502--Authorization of Appropriations, NATO........   308
    Subtitle B--Host Country In-Kind Contributions...............   308
      Section 2511--Republic of Korea Funded Construction 
        Projects.................................................   308
      Section 2512--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2017 Projects........................   308
TITLE XXVI--GUARD AND RESERVE FORCES FACILITIES..................   308
  SUMMARY........................................................   308
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   308
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   308
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   310
    Subtitle A--Project Authorizations and Authorizations of 
        Appropriations...........................................   310
      Section 2601--Authorized Army National Guard Construction 
        and Land Acquisition Projects............................   310
      Section 2602--Authorized Army Reserve Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   310
      Section 2603--Authorized Navy Reserve and Marine Corps 
        Reserve Construction and Land Acquisition Projects.......   311
      Section 2604--Authorized Air National Guard Construction 
        and Land Acquisition Projects............................   311
      Section 2605--Authorized Air Force Reserve Construction and 
        Land Acquisition Projects................................   311
      Section 2606--Authorization of Appropriations, National 
        Guard and Reserve........................................   311
    Subtitle B--Other Matters....................................   311
      Section 2611--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2015 Project.........................   311
      Section 2612--Extension of Authorizations of Certain Fiscal 
        Year 2014 Projects.......................................   311
      Section 2613--Extension of Authorizations of Certain Fiscal 
        Year 2015 Projects.......................................   312
TITLE XXVII--BASE REALIGNMENT AND CLOSURE ACTIVITIES.............   312
  OVERVIEW.......................................................   312
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   312
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   312
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   312
      Section 2701--Authorization of Appropriations for Base 
        Realignment and Closure Activities Funded Through 
        Department of Defense Base Closure Account...............   312
      Section 2702--Prohibition on Conducting Additional Base 
        Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Round.....................   312
TITLE XXVIII--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION GENERAL PROVISIONS...........   313
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   313
      Air Training Ranges in the Department of Defense...........   313
      Aircraft Stationing, Basing, and Laydown Process...........   314
      Collaboration with Federal Aviation Administration on 
        Unmanned Aerial Systems..................................   315
      Efficient and Integrated Military Installations............   315
      Enhanced Use Leases........................................   316
      Financial Institutions on Military Installations...........   316
      Infrastructure Master Plan for Defense Laboratory and 
        Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation 
        Infrastructure...........................................   317
      Overseas Infrastructure and Facility Investments...........   317
      Railroads for National Defense.............................   318
      Sentinel Landscapes Partnership Program....................   318
      Sustainment and Recapitalization of Utilities..............   319
      Use of Federal Facilities by Contractors...................   319
      Veteran Apprenticeship Programs and Military Construction..   320
      Wastewater Treatment Infrastructure........................   320
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   321
    Subtitle A--Military Construction Program and Military Family 
        Housing..................................................   321
      Section 2801--Elimination of Written Notice Requirement for 
        Military Construction Activities and Reliance on 
        Electronic Submission of Notifications and Reports.......   321
      Section 2802--Modification of Thresholds Applicable to 
        Unspecified Minor Construction Projects..................   321
      Section 2803--Extension of Temporary, Limited Authority to 
        Use Operation and Maintenance Funds for Construction 
        Projects Outside the United States.......................   321
      Section 2804--Use of Operation and Maintenance Funds for 
        Military Construction Projects to Replace Facilities 
        Damaged or Destroyed by Natural Disasters or Terrorism 
        Incidents................................................   321
    Subtitle B--Real Property and Facilities Administration......   322
      Section 2811--Elimination of Written Notice Requirement for 
        Military Real Property Transactions and Reliance on 
        Electronic Submission of Notifications and Reports.......   322
      Section 2812--Clarification of Applicability of Fair Market 
        Value Consideration in Grants of Easements on Military 
        Lands for Rights-of-Way..................................   322
      Section 2813--Criteria for Exchanges of Property at 
        Military Installations...................................   322
      Section 2814--Prohibiting Use of Updated Assessment of 
        Public Schools on Department of Defense Installations to 
        Supersede Funding of Certain Projects....................   322
      Section 2815--Requirements for Window Fall Prevention 
        Devices in Military Family Housing.......................   322
      Section 2816--Authorizing Reimbursement of States for Costs 
        of Suppressing Wildfires Caused by Department of Defense 
        Activities on State Lands; Restoration of Lands of Other 
        Federal Agencies for Damage Caused by Department of 
        Defense Vehicle Mishaps..................................   323
      Section 2817--Prohibiting Collection of Additional Amounts 
        from Members Living in Units Under Military Housing 
        Privatization Initiative.................................   323
    Subtitle C--Land Conveyances.................................   323
      Section 2821--Land Exchange, Naval Industrial Reserve 
        Ordnance Plant, Sunnyvale, California....................   323
      Section 2822--Land Conveyance, Naval Ship Repair Facility, 
        Guam.....................................................   323
      Section 2823--Lease of Real Property to the United States 
        Naval Academy Alumni Association and Naval Academy 
        Foundation at United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, 
        Maryland.................................................   323
      Section 2824--Land Conveyance, Natick Soldier Systems 
        Center, Massachusetts....................................   324
      Section 2825--Imposition of Additional Conditions on Land 
        Conveyance, Castner Range, Fort Bliss, Texas.............   324
      Section 2826--Land Conveyance, Wasatch-Cache National 
        Forest, Rich County, Utah................................   324
      Section 2827--Land Conveyance, Former Missile Alert 
        Facility known as Quebec-01, Laramie County, Wyoming.....   324
    Subtitle D--Military Land Withdrawals........................   324
      Section 2831--Indefinite Duration of Certain Military Land 
        Withdrawals and Reservations and Improved Management of 
        Withdrawn and Reserved Lands.............................   324
      Section 2832--Temporary Segregation from Public Land Laws 
        of Property Subject to Proposed Military Land Withdrawal; 
        Temporary Use Permits and Transfers of Small Parcels of 
        Land between Departments of Interior and Military 
        Departments; More Efficient Surveying of Lands...........   325
    Subtitle E--Military Memorials, Monuments, and Museums.......   325
      Section 2841--Modification of Prohibition on Transfer of 
        Veterans Memorial Objects to Foreign Governments without 
        Specific Authorization in Law............................   325
      Section 2842--Recognition of the National Museum of World 
        War II Aviation..........................................   325
      Section 2843--Principal Office of Aviation Hall of Fame....   325
    Subtitle F--Shiloh National Military Park....................   325
      Section 2851--Short Title..................................   325
      Section 2852--Definitions..................................   325
      Section 2853--Areas to Be Added to Shiloh National Military 
        Park.....................................................   326
      Section 2854--Establishment of Affiliated Area.............   326
      Section 2855--Private Property Protection..................   326
    Subtitle G--Other Matters....................................   326
      Section 2861--Modification of Department of Defense 
        Guidance on Use of Airfield Pavement Markings............   326
      Section 2862--Authority of Chief Operating Officer of Armed 
        Forces Retirement Home to Acquire and Lease Property.....   326
TITLE XXIX--OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS MILITARY CONSTRUCTION   326
  SUMMARY........................................................   326
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   327
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   327
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   329
      Section 2901--Authorized Army Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   329
      Section 2902--Authorized Navy Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Project......................................   329
      Section 2903--Authorized Air Force Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   329
      Section 2904--Authorized Defense Agencies Construction and 
        Land Acquisition Project.................................   329
      Section 2905--Authorization of Appropriations..............   329
      Section 2906--Extension of Authorization of Certain Fiscal 
        Year 2015 Projects.......................................   329

DIVISION C--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY AUTHORIZATIONS 
  AND OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS.......................................   330
TITLE XXXI--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY PROGRAMS......   330
  OVERVIEW.......................................................   330
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   330
    National Nuclear Security Administration.....................   330
      Overview...................................................   330
      Weapons Activities.........................................   330
        Advanced simulation and computing........................   330
        Analysis of alternatives for unobligated enriched uranium   330
        Beryllium................................................   331
        Defense nuclear security.................................   331
        Nuclear Survivability....................................   332
        Secure transportation asset and mobile guardian 
          transporter............................................   333
        Single-point failures in the nuclear security enterprise.   333
      Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation...........................   334
        Nuclear counterterrorism and incident response program 
          and emergency preparedness.............................   334
        Nuclear detection and verification efforts...............   334
      Naval Reactors.............................................   335
        Naval Reactors program...................................   335
      Federal Salaries and Expenses..............................   335
        Comptroller General review of support service contracts..   335
    Environmental and Other Defense Activities...................   336
      Overview...................................................   336
      Defense Environmental Cleanup..............................   336
        Waste Isolation Pilot Plant..............................   336
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   337
    Subtitle A--National Security Programs Authorizations........   337
      Section 3101--National Nuclear Security Administration.....   337
      Section 3102--Defense Environmental Cleanup................   337
      Section 3103--Other Defense Activities.....................   337
      Section 3104--Nuclear Energy...............................   337
    Subtitle B--Program Authorizations, Restrictions, and 
        Limitations..............................................   337
      Section 3111--Nuclear Security Enterprise Infrastructure 
        Recapitalization and Repair..............................   337
      Section 3112--Incorporation of Integrated Surety 
        Architecture in Transportation...........................   338
      Section 3113--Cost Estimates for Life Extension Program and 
        Major Alteration Projects................................   339
      Section 3114--Budget Requests and Certification regarding 
        Nuclear Weapons Dismantlement............................   339
      Section 3115--Improved Information Relating to Defense 
        Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development Program   339
      Section 3116--Research and Development of Advanced Naval 
        Reactor Fuel Based on Low-Enriched Uranium...............   340
      Section 3117--Prohibition on Availability of Funds for 
        Programs in Russian Federation...........................   340
      Section 3118--National Nuclear Security Administration Pay 
        and Performance System...................................   341
      Section 3119--Disposition of Weapons-Usable Plutonium......   341
      Section 3120--Modification of Minor Construction Threshold 
        for Plant Projects.......................................   341
      Section 3121--Design Competition...........................   341
      Section 3122--Department of Energy Counterintelligence 
        Polygraph Program........................................   342
      Section 3123--Security Clearance for Dual-Nationals 
        Employed by National Nuclear Security Agency.............   342
    Subtitle C--Plans and Reports................................   342
      Section 3131--Modification of Certain Reporting 
        Requirements.............................................   342
      Section 3132--Assessment of Management and Operating 
        Contracts of National Security Laboratories..............   342
      Section 3133--Evaluation of Classification of Certain 
        Defense Nuclear Waste....................................   343
      Section 3134--Report on Critical Decision-1 on Material 
        Staging Facility Project.................................   343
      Section 3135--Modification to Stockpile Stewardship, 
        Management, and Responsiveness Plan......................   343
      Section 3136--Improved Reporting for Anti-Smuggling 
        Radiation Detection Systems..............................   343
      Section 3137--Annual Selected Acquisition Reports on 
        Certain Hardware Relating to Defense Nuclear 
        Nonproliferation.........................................   344
      Section 3138--Assessment of Design Trade Options of W80-4 
        Warhead..................................................   344
TITLE XXXII--DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD.............   344
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   344
      Section 3201--Authorization................................   344
TITLE XXXIV--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES............................   344
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   344
      Section 3401--Authorization of Appropriations..............   344
TITLE XXXV--MARITIME ADMINISTRATION..............................   344
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   344
        National Security Multi-Mission Vessel...................   344
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   345
      Section 3501--Authorization of the Maritime Administration.   345
      Section 3502--Merchant Ship Sales Act of 1946..............   345
      Section 3503--Maritime Security Fleet Program; Restriction 
        on Operation for New Entrants............................   345
      Section 3504--Codification of Sections Relating to 
        Acquisition, Charter, and Requisition of Vessels.........   345
      Section 3505--Assistance for Small Shipyards...............   345
      Section 3506--Report on Sexual Assault Victim Recovery in 
        the Coast Guard..........................................   345
      Section 3507--Centers of Excellence........................   346

DIVISION D--FUNDING TABLES.......................................   346
      Section 4001--Authorization of Amounts in Funding Tables...   346
      Summary of National Defense Authorizations for Fiscal Year 
        2018.....................................................   347
      National Defense Budget Authority Implication..............   352
TITLE XLI--PROCUREMENT...........................................   354
      Section 4101--Procurement..................................   354
      Section 4102--Procurement for Overseas Contingency 
        Operations...............................................   401
      Section 4103--Procurement for Overseas Contingency 
        Operations for Base Requirements.........................   419
TITLE XLII--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION..........   420
      Section 4201--Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation..   420
      Section 4202--Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation 
        for Overseas Contingency Operations......................   460
      Section 4203--Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation 
        for Overseas Contingency Operations for Base Requirements   461
TITLE XLIII--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE...........................   465
      Section 4301--Operation and Maintenance....................   465
      Section 4302--Operation and Maintenance for Overseas 
        Contingency Operations...................................   486
      Section 4303--Operation and Maintenance for Overseas 
        Contingency Operations for Base Requirements.............   497
TITLE XLIV--MILITARY PERSONNEL...................................   500
      Section 4401--Military Personnel...........................   501
      Section 4402--Military Personnel for Overseas Contingency 
        Operations...............................................   501
      Section 4403--Military Personnel for Overseas Contingency 
        Operations for Base Requirements.........................   501
TITLE XLV--OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS..................................   502
      Section 4501--Other Authorizations.........................   502
      Section 4502--Other Authorizations for Overseas Contingency 
        Operations...............................................   505
TITLE XLVI--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION................................   507
      Section 4601--Military Construction........................   507
      Section 4602--Military Construction for Overseas 
        Contingency Operations...................................   521
TITLE XLVII--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY PROGRAMS.....   523
      Section 4701--Department of Energy National Security 
        Programs.................................................   523

Department of Defense Authorization Request......................   536
Communications from Other Committees.............................   537
Congressional Budget Office Estimate.............................   550
Statement Required by the Congressional Budget Act...............   551
Committee Cost Estimate..........................................   551
Advisory of Earmarks.............................................   551
Oversight Findings...............................................   551
General Performance Goals and Objectives.........................   551
Statement of Federal Mandates....................................   553
Federal Advisory Committee Statement.............................   553
Applicability to the Legislative Branch..........................   553
Duplication of Federal Programs..................................   553
Disclosure of Directed Rule Makings..............................   553
Committee Votes..................................................   553
Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported............   563
Additional Views.................................................   566







115th Congress   }                                            {    Report
                          HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session     }                                            {   115-200

======================================================================



 
        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2018

                                _______
                                

  July 6, 2017.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

  Mr. Thornberry, from the Committee on Armed Services, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 2810]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Armed Services, to whom was referred the 
bill (H.R. 2810) to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 
2018 for military activities of the Department of Defense and 
for military construction, to prescribe military personnel 
strengths for such fiscal year, and for other purposes, having 
considered the same, report favorably thereon with amendments 
and recommend that the bill as amended do pass.
    The amendments are as follows:
    The amendment strikes all after the enacting clause of the 
bill and inserts a new text which appears in italic type in the 
reported bill.
    The title of the bill is amended to reflect the amendment 
to the text of the bill.

                       PURPOSE OF THE LEGISLATION

    The bill would: (1) authorize appropriations for fiscal 
year 2018 for procurement and for research, development, test, 
and evaluation (RDT&E;); (2) authorize appropriations for fiscal 
year 2018 for operation and maintenance (O&M;) and for working 
capital funds; (3) authorize for fiscal year 2018 the personnel 
strength for each Active Duty component of the military 
departments, and the personnel strength for the Selected 
Reserve for each Reserve Component of the Armed Forces; (4) 
modify various elements of compensation for military personnel 
and impose certain requirements and limitations on personnel 
actions in the defense establishment; (5) authorize 
appropriations for fiscal year 2018 for military construction 
and family housing; (6) authorize appropriations for Overseas 
Contingency Operations; (7) authorize appropriations for fiscal 
year 2018 for the Department of Energy national security 
programs; and (8) authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2018 
for the Maritime Administration.

                    RATIONALE FOR THE COMMITTEE BILL

    H.R. 2810, the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2018, is a key mechanism through which Congress 
fulfills one of its primary responsibilities as mandated in 
Article I, Section 8, of the Constitution of the United States, 
which grants Congress the power to provide for the common 
defense, to raise and support an Army, to provide and maintain 
a Navy, and to make rules for the government and regulation of 
the land and naval forces. Rule X of the House of 
Representatives provides the House Committee on Armed Services 
with jurisdiction over the Department of Defense generally and 
over the military application of nuclear energy. The committee 
bill includes the large majority of the findings and 
recommendations resulting from its oversight activities, 
conducted through hearings, briefings, and roundtable 
discussions with Department of Defense and Department of Energy 
civilian and military officials, intelligence analysts, outside 
experts, and industry representatives, and informed by the 
experience gained over the previous decades of the committee's 
existence.
    The committee believes that America's global military 
capabilities and commitments have undergirded peace, security, 
and economic prosperity, and underwritten an international 
world order and American interests. However, the committee also 
recognizes that others seek to threaten such security and 
prosperity. The committee further acknowledges that the U.S. 
Armed Forces have been under an unrelenting pace of operations. 
In fact, in testimony given to the committee on June 12, 2017, 
the Secretary of Defense described forces affecting the 
readiness of the military, noting ``The first force we must 
recognize is 16 years of war. This period represents the 
longest continuous stretch of armed conflict in our Nation's 
history. In more than a quarter century since the end of the 
Cold War, our country has deployed large-scale forces in active 
operations for more months than we have been at peace.''
    The provisions contained in the committee bill reinforce 
the committee's belief that America's military strength and its 
global posture and presence will continue to be necessary to 
deter aggression, to reassure U.S. allies and partners, and to 
exercise global influence. Further, the committee bill would 
make much needed and overdue investments in the men and women 
in uniform as well as their equipment and training, as they 
face an uncertain a global threat environment.

Reforming the Department of Defense

    The committee continues to believe that reform of the 
Department of Defense is needed to improve the military's 
agility and the speed at which it can address an increasingly 
complex security environment and unprecedented technological 
challenges. Reforms also ensure effective and efficient use of 
taxpayer dollars. The bill reflects three major reform 
initiatives undertaken by the committee in H.R. 2810: (1) 
acquisition reform, (2) data management reform, and (3) 
statutory streamlining.
    Furthermore, in the area of defense healthcare, the 
committee refines the reforms of the Military Health System 
initiated in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) by maintaining emphasis on the 
readiness of the force. To accomplish this goal, H.R. 2810 
builds on the importance of these efforts by focusing on a 
Military Health System that reduces costs, improves the 
delivery of health care services at military medical treatment 
facilities and enhances readiness of health professionals 
supporting the war fighter.
    In the area of military justice and sexual assault 
prevention and response, the committee recognizes the 
significant changes to the Uniform Code of Military Justice 
contained in last year's bill. Therefore, H.R. 2810 includes 
limited clarifying and technical amendments designed to refine 
last year's reforms. In addition, it includes a provision that 
would prohibit the nonconsensual sharing of intimate images, 
including cases in which the images were initially obtained 
with consent. The bill also contains improvements to sexual 
assault prevention and response, including a provision that 
would require special victims counsel to receive training on 
the unique challenges often faced by male sexual assault 
victims.

Readiness of the Force and Rebuilding the Military

    The committee recognizes that while the Department's 
missions and requirements have increased, its resources have 
decreased and readiness has suffered. The Vice Chief of Staff 
of the Army testified that, ``In total, only about two thirds 
of the Army's initial critical formations--the formations we 
would need at the outset of a major conflict--are at acceptable 
levels of readiness to conduct sustained ground combat in a 
full spectrum environment against a highly lethal hybrid threat 
or near-peer adversary. Stated more strategically, based on 
current readiness levels, the Army can only accomplish Defense 
Planning Guidance Requirements at high military risk.'' The 
Assistant Commandant of the MarineCorps testified, ``Current 
readiness shortfalls require additional operations and 
maintenance resources, and we have exhausted our internal 
options. Additional resources would facilitate exercises and 
training and correct repair parts shortfalls, while 
specifically addressing aviation specific operations and 
maintenance funding.'' The other military service chiefs have 
expressed similar sentiments. These undeniable readiness 
shortfalls in the military services led Secretary of Defense 
James N. Mattis to testify before the committee that, after 
returning to the Pentagon ``. . . I have been shocked by what 
I've seen with our readiness to fight.''
    To begin to address the decline in readiness and initiate 
the rebuilding of the military, the bill would include more 
than $2.9 billion in additional funds for ship and aircraft 
depot maintenance; aviation training and readiness; and long-
neglected facilities sustainment, restoration, and 
modernization accounts, all of which were identified as 
unfunded requirements by the military services. The bill would 
also fully resource U.S. Special Operations Command, provide 
additional resources for unfunded requirements to counter 
global terrorism threats, and provide resources to accelerate 
capabilities to support counterterrorism analytic tools.
    Procurement of modernized systems is key to addressing the 
readiness of the force. Many legacy systems can no longer be 
maintained and adversary systems are increasingly able to 
challenge such platforms. H.R. 2810 responds to numerous 
unfunded, yet critical, modernization requirements identified 
by the military services, including in the areas of air 
dominance, strike fighter capability gaps, rotorcraft for 
ground forces, Navy cruiser modernization, surface combatants, 
shortfalls in war reserves for critical munitions, and 
accelerating full spectrum capability within the Army's ground 
forces.
    The committee bill authorizes the total budget request 
funding level for the National Nuclear Security 
Administration's (NNSA) nuclear weapons activities and defense 
nuclear nonproliferation program, including critical efforts to 
modernize the nuclear weapons stockpile and to tackle the 
multibillion dollar backlog in deferred maintenance of NNSA 
facilities.
    The committee recognizes that the cyber domain of modern 
warfare continues to grow in scope and sophistication. 
Therefore, H.R. 2810 fully funds the budget request for cyber 
operations and prioritizes the readiness of the cyber mission 
forces. The committee increases funding to U.S. Cyber Command 
by 16 percent, and enhances the Department's defensive and 
offensive cyberspace capabilities. The bill also addresses 
military service unfunded requirements for cyber warfare by 
providing additional funding to close these critical gaps.
    The committee remains focused on assuring access to space, 
given the military's dependence on the capabilities provided 
from satellites. Thus, the bill would authorize funds for the 
development of a new American engine to replace the Russian-
made RD-180 by 2019; ensure the maintenance and modernization 
of existing national security space launch capabilities; and, 
ensure funding of national security space-related modifications 
of commercial launch vehicles, instead of funding the 
development of new space launch vehicles. In light of the 
criticality of space as a new warfighting domain, the bill 
would establish a space corps within the Air Force and elevate 
U.S. Space Command to a subunified command under U.S. Strategic 
Command.
    In the area of ballistic missile defense, the bill would 
authorize significant additional resources to meet combatant 
command shortfalls, and service unfunded requirements for 
missile defense interceptor inventories around the globe. The 
bill would also require the Director of the Missile Defense 
Agency (MDA) to begin the development of a space-based sensor 
layer for ballistic missile defense; give the U.S. Army a 
deadline to develop a modernization schedule that acceptably 
meets warfighter requirements for a replacement to the legacy 
Patriot air and missile defense radar system; require the 
Secretary of Defense to transfer acquisition authority for 
operational missile defense programs from the Director of MDA 
to a military service by the time the President's budget is 
submitted for fiscal year 2020; and prevent the Army from 
retiring GEM-T interceptors from its inventory until the 
Secretary of the Army submits an evaluation of the Army's 
ability to meet warfighter requirements and operational needs 
without such interceptors.
    The bill also includes provisions that would advance 
hypersonic weapons research, development, and transitional 
efforts within the Department, and require weapons and 
munitions science and technology roadmaps, including naval 
energetics, to ensure focused developmental efforts of critical 
weapon systems.

Resources for Warfighters and Families

    The committee believes that caring for the troops and their 
families is the essential foundation of readiness. H.R. 2810 
builds upon the bipartisan work of the Subcommittee on Military 
Personnel in providing the troops the benefits they need, 
deserve, and have earned. As always, the committee's approach 
is guided by a determination to maintain the viability and 
readiness of the All-Volunteer Force while ensuring that the 
Government does not break faith with U.S. service members, 
retirees, their family members, and survivors.
    H.R. 2810 would authorize a fully funded, by-law pay raise 
for all U.S. service members at 2.4 percent. The bill would 
also begin to grow military end strength, by increasing the 
active duty Army by 10,000 to 486,000, the Army National Guard 
by 4,000 to 347,000, the Army Reserve by 3,000 to 202,000 in 
fiscal year 2018.
    H.R. 2810 would grant permanency to family support programs 
within U.S. Special Operations Command. This important and 
proven pilot program now merits codification and permanency to 
ensure continued support and care for families of Special 
Operations Forces.
    The bill also contains important provisions that would 
provide further protection to former service members, including 
those who have been diagnosed with Post-Traumatic Stress 
Disorder or Traumatic Brain Injury as a result of combat or 
sexual assault in the military.

National Defense Strategy

    The committee remains concerned about the absence of a 
clear and cohesive strategy concerning national security 
priorities in places of conflict, including in the Syrian Arab 
Republic, the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, the Republic of 
Yemen, and the Federal Republic of Somalia, and the provisions 
contained in the committee bill would require the Department of 
Defense to provide additional details on efforts in those 
countries. At the same time, the committee notes the importance 
of disrupting and dismantling terrorist groups that threaten 
U.S. interests and provides funds necessary to train and equip 
partner forces, including the Iraqi Security Forces, which 
combat the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant and other 
terrorist groups across the Middle East, Africa, and Central 
Asia.
    The committee remains concerned about the Islamic Republic 
of Iran's malign military activities, and H.R. 2810 would 
express the committee's view that the United States should 
counter such activities, ensure that the U.S. military 
maintains a capable posture in the Arabian Gulf to deter and 
respond to Iranian aggression, strengthen ballistic missile 
defense capabilities, ensure freedom of navigation at the Bab 
al Mandab Strait and the Strait of Hormuz, and counter Iranian 
efforts to illicitly proliferate weapons.
    The committee has also focused on the Department's efforts 
to deter aggression by the Russian Federation against Ukraine 
and other allies and partners in Europe. The committee supports 
a significant increase in European Deterrence Initiative 
funding above the fiscal year 2017 request, including funding 
for heel-to-toe rotations of U.S. forces, pre-positioning of 
equipment in Europe, and building up necessary Air Force 
infrastructure. The bill would also provide $150.0 million for 
the Ukraine Security Assistance Initiative to enhance the 
defense of Ukraine and to deter further Russian aggression.
    The committee supports the Department of Defense in 
strengthening U.S. military posture and capabilities in the 
Indo-Asia-Pacific region. To aid in its oversight, H.R. 2810 
would require the Department of Defense to provide a strategy 
on United States defense objectives and priorities in the Indo-
Asia-Pacific region and an assessment of U.S. force posture and 
basing needs. Additionally, it would reaffirm U.S. extended 
deterrence commitments to Japan and the Republic of Korea and 
condemn any assertion that limits the right of freedom of 
navigation and overflight in the South China Sea. It would 
express a sense of Congress in strengthening security 
cooperation with allies and partners, including Japan, the 
Republic of Korea, Taiwan, Australia, and with regional 
institutions such as the Association of Southeast Asian 
Nations.
    The committee also supports the Department of Defense in 
countering instability and strengthening capabilities of U.S. 
partners in Africa. To aid in its oversight, H.R. 2810 would 
require the president to provide a strategy on United States 
objectives and priorities in the Federal Republic of Somalia.

                                HEARINGS

    Committee consideration of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 results from posture and 
budget-related hearings that began on February 1, 2017, and 
that were completed on June 12, 2017. The full committee 
conducted 8 hearing and the 6 subcommittees conducted a total 
of 31 sessions during this time period. Additionally, over the 
past year, the committee conducted numerous policy and program 
oversight hearings, including hearings in support of its reform 
initiatives, to inform its development of the legislative 
proposals contained in this Act.

                           COMMITTEE POSITION

    On June 28, 2017, the Committee on Armed Services held a 
markup session to consider H.R. 2810. The committee ordered the 
bill H.R. 2810, as amended, favorably reported to the House of 
Representatives by a recorded vote of 60-1, a quorum being 
present.

                EXPLANATION OF THE COMMITTEE AMENDMENTS

    The committee adopted an amendment in the nature of a 
substitute during the consideration of H.R. 2810. The title of 
the bill is amended to reflect the amendment to the text of the 
bill. The remainder of the report discusses the bill, as 
amended.

            RELATIONSHIP OF AUTHORIZATION TO APPROPRIATIONS

    The bill does not provide budget authority. This bill 
authorizes appropriations; subsequent appropriations acts will 
provide budget authority. However, the committee strives to 
adhere to the recommendations as issued by the Committee on the 
Budget as it relates to the jurisdiction of this committee.
    The bill addresses the following categories in the 
Department of Defense budget: procurement; research, 
development, test, and evaluation; operation and maintenance; 
military personnel; working capital funds; and military 
construction and family housing. The bill also addresses the 
Armed Forces Retirement Home, Department of Energy National 
Security Programs, the Naval Petroleum Reserve, and the 
Maritime Administration.
    Active Duty and Reserve personnel strengths authorized in 
this bill and legislation affecting compensation for military 
personnel determine the remaining appropriation requirements of 
the Department of Defense. However, this bill does not provide 
authorization of specific dollar amounts for military 
personnel.

          SUMMARY OF DISCRETIONARY AUTHORIZATIONS IN THE BILL

    The President requested discretionary budget authority of 
$659.8 billion for programs within the jurisdiction of the 
committee for fiscal year 2018. Of this amount, $574.6 billion 
was requested for ``base'' Department of Defense programs, 
$64.6 billion was requested for Overseas Contingency Operations 
requirements covering the entire fiscal year, $20.5 billion was 
requested for Department of Energy national security programs 
and the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, and $0.2 
billion was requested for defense-related activities associated 
with the Maritime Administration.
    The committee recommends an overall discretionary 
authorization of $688.3 billion in fiscal year 2018. The base 
committee authorization of $613.8 billion is a $70.4 billion 
increase above the levels provided for in the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328). 
The authorization provided in title XV totals $74.6 billion for 
Overseas Contingency Operations, of which $10.0 billion is 
authorized in support of base budget requirements.
    The table preceding the detailed program adjustments in 
division D of this report summarizes the committee's 
recommended discretionary authorizations by appropriation 
account for fiscal year 2018 and compares these amounts to the 
President's request.

                      BUDGET AUTHORITY IMPLICATION

    The President's total request for the national defense 
budget function (050) in fiscal year 2018 is $675.8 billion, as 
estimated by the Congressional Budget Office. In addition to 
funding for programs addressed in this bill, the total 050 
request includes discretionary funding for national defense 
programs not in the committee's jurisdiction, discretionary 
funding for programs that do not require additional 
authorization in fiscal year 2018, and mandatory programs.
    The table preceding the detailed program adjustments in 
division D of this report details changes to the budget request 
for all aspects of the national defense budget function.

            DIVISION A--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AUTHORIZATIONS

                          TITLE I--PROCUREMENT

                       Aircraft Procurement, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


Health and Usage Monitoring Systems

    In the committee report (H. Rept. 113-446) accompanying the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015, the 
committee directed the Secretary of the Army review the 
potential for integrating and demonstrating a Next Generation 
Health Monitoring System (NGHMS) for UH-72 light utility 
helicopters. The NGHMS could enable early warning for failing 
platform systems, reduce emergency maintenance demands, provide 
predictable platform maintenance schedules, reduce cost and 
should increase readiness.
    The committee notes the Army is currently evaluating NGHMS 
systems and most recently conducted a critical design review in 
February 2017. The committee understands that preliminary test 
and evaluation have demonstrated promising results. Given these 
encouraging results with light utility rotorcraft, the 
committee believes there could be potential for integrating 
NGHMS on ground combat vehicles, in particular the Stryker 
Combat Vehicle, to help with improving maintenance and 
readiness.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by September 15, 2017, that provides the status and available 
results of the UH-72 NGHMS testing; the Army's plan for 
procuring and integrating NGHMS into the UH-72 fleet to include 
any detailed description of the planned changes to the UH-72 
aircraft maintenance construct, expected efficiencies and 
estimated annual cost savings, as well as any potential for 
application on ground combat vehicles.

                       Missile Procurement, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


Lethal Miniature Aerial Missile Systems

    In the committee report (H. Rept. 114-102) accompanying the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016, the 
committee noted the effectiveness of the Lethal Miniature 
Aerial Missile System (LMAMS) currently fielded in the U.S. 
Central Command (CENTCOM) theater of operations, and supported 
the potential distribution of this capability across Army 
infantry units. The LMAMS is a single man-portable/operable, 
lightweight, beyond-line-of-sight, precision-guided, loitering 
aerial missile system capable of locating and engaging obscured 
and/or fleeting enemy targets who otherwise cannot be engaged 
by typical direct fire weapon systems.
    The committee notes the Army requested a total of $63.5 
million for 655 LMAMS as part of the fiscal year 2017 Overseas 
Contingency Operations request to address joint urgent 
operational needs in CENTCOM's area of operations. The 
committee understands the LMAMS Capability Development Document 
has completed initial Army staff review, is currently being 
revised by the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Maneuver 
Center of Excellence, and will then be considered by the Army 
Requirements Oversight Council for transition to a program of 
record. While the committee fully supports the Army's request 
from fiscal year 2017 and the budget request for fiscal year 
2018, the committee requires additional details regarding the 
Army's long-term acquisition strategy for LMAMS.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by November 1, 2017, on the Army's long-term plan for LMAMS, to 
include current analysis of LMAMS operational performance to 
date, current fielding strategy, as well as projected funding 
requests across the Future Years Defense Program.

        Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicles, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


Armored brigade combat team modernization

    The committee understands that Budget Control Act of 2011 
(Public Law 112-25) funding levels have reduced buying power, 
disrupted modernization plans, and reduced the Army's 
capability advantage over near-peer, high-end competitors. The 
committee notes that Army modernization funding declined 74 
percent from 2008-2015 as a result of the drawdown from two 
wars and the imposition of the budget caps by Public Law 112-
25. Perhaps most significant is that research and development 
(R&D;) funding has been reduced by 50 percent, and appears to be 
concentrated in the later stages of R&D; at the prototyping and 
system design and development stages, which are the precursors 
to fielding new capabilities. The Vice Chief of Staff of the 
Army stated, in testimony before the House Committee on Armed 
Services, that today's Army is ``out-ranged, outgunned, and 
outdated; and on our present course, the U.S. Army will not be 
sufficiently modern to deter and defeat potential enemies.'' 
The committee is concerned that the tactical overmatch that 
U.S. ground forces have enjoyed for decades is being 
diminished, or in some cases, no longer exists.
    The committee believes the consequences of reduced 
modernization funding are most dramatic with respect to ground 
combat vehicle modernization. While the Army has definitive 
plans in place for Army aviation modernization, and has worked 
to establish mature acquisition strategies using multiyear 
procurement contracts for aviation platforms, the same cannot 
be said for ground combat vehicle modernization. The committee 
believes there is an immediate need for a more accelerated 
ground combat vehicle modernization strategy that should 
include the development of a next generation infantry fighting 
vehicle and main battle tank, while also looking for ways to 
accelerate needed upgrades for legacy combat vehicles in the 
near term to address immediate threats.
    The committee understands the armored brigade combat team 
(ABCT), which is comprised of Abrams tanks, Bradley fighting 
vehicles, M109A7 Paladin self-propelled artillery, M113 Armored 
Personnel Carriers, Armored Multipurpose Vehicles, M88 Improved 
Recovery Vehicles, Joint Light Tactical Vehicles, and other 
systems is the only full-spectrum force in the Army's force 
structure. Over the past several National Defense Authorization 
Acts, the committee has noted concerns regarding the reduction 
of active ABCTs and the Army's ability to have sufficient 
numbers of fully ready active ABCTs to meet combatant commander 
steady-state and contingency plan requirements. The committee 
has also taken action to prevent further reductions in ABCT 
force structure, and prevent any production breaks in the 
combat vehicle industrial base. Given the return of armored 
units to the European theater, as well as the Army's plans to 
increase ABCT capacity, the committee believes that these 
actions have been validated.
    However, the committee remains concerned about the 
stability of ABCT modernization funding in fiscal year 2018 and 
beyond, and encourages the Army to fully modernize at least one 
ABCT per year. The committee directs the Secretary of the Army, 
in consultation with the Chief of Staff of the Army, to provide 
a report to the House Committee on Armed Services and the 
Senate Committee on Armed Services by April 5, 2018, on the 
Army's plan for executing its ground combat vehicle 
modernization strategy. Elements of the report should include: 
the Army's combat vehicle modernization priorities over the 
next 5 and 10 years; the extent to which those priorities can 
be supported at current funding levels within a relevant time 
period; the extent to which additional funds are required to 
support such priorities; detail how the Army is balancing and 
resourcing these priorities with efforts to rebuild and sustain 
readiness and increase force structure capacity over this same 
time period; and explain how the Army is balancing its near-
term modernization efforts with an accelerated long-term 
strategy for acquiring next generation combat vehicle 
capabilities.
    The committee also directs the Comptroller General of the 
United States to provide a briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services by May 1, 2018, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary assessment of the Army's report on the ground 
combat vehicle modernization strategy. The committee further 
directs the Comptroller General to provide a report on the 
Comptroller General's final assessment to the House Committee 
on Armed Services at a date to be determined at the time of the 
briefing. The Comptroller General's review should focus in 
particular on how the Army has developed its modernization 
priorities for the next 5 years, and examine how the Army is 
balancing and resourcing these priorities with efforts to 
rebuild and sustain readiness and increase force structure 
capacity over this time period. Additionally, the review should 
evaluate the extent to which the Army has balanced its near-
term modernization efforts with its long-term strategy for 
acquiring new capabilities.

M240B medium machine gun inventory assessment

    The committee has concerns regarding the Army's inventory 
of M240B medium machine guns due to the Army's lack of detailed 
information regarding the condition of the weapons within that 
inventory. The committee understands the Army has achieved the 
procurement objective for the M240 medium machine gun, and that 
current M240 acquisition and sustainment strategies rely on 
piecemeal replacement of individual parts instead of new 
production. The committee is concerned about the impact of this 
strategy on the industrial base, and the potential to eliminate 
a critical production line that would be difficult and costly 
to reestablish at a later date. The committee also notes that 
M240 requirements could potentially increase as a result of the 
Army increasing end-strength levels and growing additional 
armored brigade combat teams. The committee believes the Army 
needs to clearly demonstrate the operational viability of its 
M240B inventory.
    In light of these concerns, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Army to conduct an assessment of the health 
and operational viability of the Army's M240B inventory. The 
committee further directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
a briefing on the findings of this assessment to the Committees 
on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives by January 17, 2018. This briefing shall 
include, at a minimum: a detailed review of the Army's current 
M240B inventory, to include the number of systems that are 
operationally ready, the number of systems that require repair, 
and the number of systems that should be taken out of inventory 
and replaced; a description of the full cost to repair and 
refurbish an M240B machine gun, to include parts procurement, 
labor, logistics, and sustainment costs; a description of the 
current contracted cost to procure new production M240B machine 
guns; and a detailed comparison of the timelines associated 
with repair and refurbishment efforts, and those required to 
replace systems with new weapons.

Small arms magazine procurement

    The committee understands the Enhanced Performance Magazine 
(EPM) is the latest upgrade of the 30 round 5.56mm magazine 
used in Army and Marine Corps rifles and carbines that resulted 
from the introduction of the M855A1 Enhanced Performance Round 
(EPR). The EPR, while providing a number of significant 
performance enhancements over the original general purpose M855 
ammunition, to include improved lethality, contributed to a 
reduction in system level reliability under certain conditions. 
The committee understands the EPM mitigates the system 
reliability issues that resulted from using the EPR in Army 
weapons. However, the committee has been informed by the Marine 
Corps that in some Marine Corps unique weapons, such as the M27 
Infantry Automatic Rifles and M16A4 rifles, reliability 
concerns remain. The committee further understands that, as a 
result of these concerns, that the Marine Corps conducted 
further reliability testing on additional commercial polymer 
magazines, and that the Commandant of the Marine Corps has 
approved the decision to field a different magazine than the 
EPM. The committee understands that as of now the Army will 
replace all legacy magazines with the EPM, and the Marine Corps 
will replace all legacy magazines with their qualified polymer 
magazine.
    The committee has long supported small arms modernization, 
and notes that the Program Executive Office-Soldier through the 
Soldier Enhancement Program (SEP) is currently evaluating 
alternative magazines to the EPM, to include polymer magazines 
used by the Marine Corps. The committee expects the Army to 
leverage Marine Corps test and evaluation data and any other 
available Department of Defense data to the maximum extent 
possible to shorten the overall evaluation timeline which the 
committee understands could take up to 6-12 months. The 
committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by September 
29, 2017, with an update on the status of the Army's SEP 
evaluation.

Small arms production industrial base

    The committee notes that the Ike Skelton National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2011 (Public Law 111-383) 
repealed section 2473 of title 10, United States Code, which 
required the Department of Defense to only procure certain 
small arms repair parts and components from a limited number of 
industry sources that the Department had identified as 
comprising the small arms production industrial base (SAPIB).
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with senior military services acquisition 
executives, to provide a briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services by January 15, 2018, on the state of the small 
arms production industrial base. At a minimum, the briefing 
should identify critical small arms systems and items; describe 
the Department's strategy for preserving a stable SAPIB in the 
areas of development, production, maintenance, and competitive 
contracting; describe the results of increased use of small 
business set-asides, as well as organic depot activities on 
quality, delivery, competition, engineering, and research and 
development investments and capability.

Vehicle active protection systems

    The committee is encouraged by the Army's expedited Non-
Developmental Item (NDI) vehicle active protection systems 
(APS) risk reduction strategy, and notes the current program 
remains on cost and on schedule. In the committee report (H. 
Rept. 114-537) accompanying the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2017, the committee noted this strategy 
will allow the Army to better address the evolving threats 
posed by the growing proliferation of anti-tank guided missiles 
and rocket-propelled grenades. The committee is also aware of 
the importance of vehicle APS capabilities for forward-deployed 
units, specifically those units in the U.S. European Command 
area of operations. The committee understands this risk 
reduction effort installs and characterizes three different NDI 
APS solutions on Abrams main battle tanks, Bradley fighting 
vehicles, and Stryker combat vehicle platforms. The committee 
believes the outcomes of these characterization tests and 
evaluations will allow the Army to assess integration and 
performance risks, and should provide the necessary information 
to make an informed decision regarding the transition of these 
NDI solutions to a future program of record. The committee 
understands this characterization effort will be completed in 
calendar year 2017. Should the outcomes of these 
characterization tests prove favorable, the committee expects 
the Army to proceed forward with an accelerated procurement 
strategy for this critical capability that is consistent with 
acquisition reform principles and maximizes use of all 
available acquisition authorities.

                    Procurement of Ammunition, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


Ammunition production base support

    In the committee report (H. Rept. 114-537) accompanying the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017, the 
committee was concerned that despite a commitment by the Army 
to maintain steady-state funding of $250.0 million for 
ammunition industrial base upgrades, significant safety, 
environmental, and operational discrepancies exist among the 
Army ammunition plants (AAPs), in particular the four largest 
AAPs. This could require investments exceeding what is 
currently in the Army's long-term modernization plan for the 
ammunition industrial base. The committee remains concerned 
about this discrepancy between documented need and planned 
investment. These committee concerns are further amplified by 
the recent explosion that occurred at the Lake City AAP. The 
committee understands the explosion caused significant damage 
to the primer production area and that, as a result of the 
explosion, the Army was forced to stop all production of small 
caliber ammunition production for an indefinite amount of time 
until safety inspections can be completed.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by November 
1, 2017, on the Army's 2025 Ammunition Industrial Base 
strategic plan.

Clean disposal of conventional munitions

    The committee continues to support the use of technologies 
like those deployed at Camp Minden as a cleaner and safer 
alternative to the open burning of munitions. The committee 
directs the Secretary of the Army to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by January 31, 2018, on the 
use of cost-competitive technologies that minimize waste 
generation and air emissions to dispose of stockpiles of 
conventional munitions awaiting demilitarization, as directed 
by section 314 of the Fiscal Year 2017 National Defense 
Authorization.

                        Other Procurement, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


Army land mobile radio acquisition

    The committee is aware of the Army's effort to secure 
upgraded communications infrastructure on U.S. military 
installations, specifically land mobile radios (LMRs), and its 
progress towards meeting this requirement. However, the 
committee is concerned that delays in fielding enhanced secure 
infrastructure could lead to risks to force protection, as well 
as to public safety. The committee encourages the Army to 
consider an expedited timeline for LMR upgrades across U.S. 
military bases, if additional resources become available.

Army personal dosimeters

    The committee is aware that the Department of the Army is 
investing in the Joint Personnel Dosimeter-Individual, an 
advanced radiological dosimeter that will replace legacy 
dosimetry systems. Personal dosimeters are essential tools for 
tracking radiological exposure throughout a service member's 
career, and provide important diagnostic data as the service 
member seeks medical care during and after Active Duty service. 
To ensure service members are provided with the best possible 
tracking data for radiological exposure, the committee urges 
the Army to ensure production requirements and schedules are 
met to provide Active Duty and Reserve Components the ability 
to track radiological exposure.

Heavy Equipment Transport System modernization strategy

    The committee encourages the Army to continue development 
and procurement of a heavy equipment trailer solution to be 
used as part of the Heavy Equipment Transport System (HETS) for 
current and future combat vehicles. The committee notes the 
current heavy equipment transport (HET) trailer is rated for 70 
tons, but the most modernized M1A2 Abrams main battle tank 
configuration, the M1A2 SEPv3, will weigh in excess of 80 tons. 
The committee understands the current HET trailer will be 
unable to transport modernized M1A2 SEPv3 tanks, or future M1A2 
SEPv4 configurations. The committee believes the Army will 
require a more capable means of transport organic to the 
service. The committee encourages the Army to begin to plan and 
resource the modification of all 192 existing HET trailers, as 
well as develop ways to accelerate the new Enhanced HETS 
developmental program.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by December 
1, 2017, on the Army's strategy for upgrading current HETS and 
HET trailers.

Personnel and cargo parachute acquisition and management

    The committee is concerned that the military services 
appear to lack a comprehensive and resourced plan to upgrade 
military personnel parachutes, parachute support equipment, and 
guided cargo parachutes. The committee understands both the 
Army and Marine Corps are pursuing high glide parachutes that 
will allow a parachutist to cover a substantial horizontal 
distance. However, this capability is not currently fully 
operational because the Army and Marine Corps have not procured 
complete parachute systems. While the military has the 
parachute, it does not have oxygen equipment with sufficient 
capacity to allow the full use of the high glide canopy. 
Additionally, the committee understands that the Army and 
Marine Corps have not procured guided cargo parachutes with the 
same glide capability as the personnel parachute. Finally, the 
committee notes that the Army has assigned responsibility for 
the acquisition of guided cargo parachutes and personnel 
parachutes to different program executive offices. The 
committee is concerned that this organizational structure could 
fragment responsibility for integrating the capabilities of all 
systems involved in airborne missions.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 
2018, that examines (1) whether the Army and Marine Corps have 
a valid requirement for high glide canopies, and if so, whether 
each service has an integrated plan to procure all associated 
equipment required to use the high glide features; (2) whether 
the Army's decision to divide parachutes between two different 
program offices hinders or enhances integration of their 
capabilities; and (3) whether the Army and Marine Corps have a 
plan and contracts that will allow for the improvement of 
parachutes over the life cycle of the equipment.

Rough Terrain Container Handler recapitalization

    The committee is concerned that the budget request does not 
include funding for the Rough Terrain Container Handler (RTCH), 
a material handling equipment system considered vital and 
critical to Department of Defense expeditionary logistics. The 
committee understands the RTCH system, along with other 
material handling equipment logistic systems, provides 
strategic capability to set the theater, strategic agility to 
the joint force, and maintains freedom of movement and action 
during sustained and high tempo operations at the end of 
extended lines of communication in austere environments. The 
committee is concerned by the number of RTCH systems that are 
combat worn, and notes there is neither a formal reset and 
recapitalization program for these systems, nor a long-term 
strategy to modernize a fleet that entered service in 2001.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Army to develop plans to recapitalize and modernize RTCH 
systems and other material handling equipment systems in a 
timely manner, and encourages the Army to resource this effort 
across the Future Years Defense Program. The committee further 
directs the Secretary of the Army to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by September 1, 2017, on this 
recapitalization strategy.

Small unit support vehicle recapitalization strategy

    The committee understands the Army's family of small unit 
support vehicle (SUSV) fleet is used by Army units that train 
and operate in extreme cold weather conditions, and that this 
vehicle provides those units with unique capabilities not found 
elsewhere in the Army. In addition, while the committee is 
aware of the Army's effort to refurbish some of the fleet, the 
committee notes that legacy SUSVs are beyond their economic 
useful life and have become increasingly difficult to maintain. 
In the committee report (H. Rept. 114-537) accompanying the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017, the 
committee required a briefing on the potential requirement for 
a replacement to the SUSV fleet. The briefing indicated the 
Army National Guard has established an SUSV overhaul program; 
however, this overhaul does not provide any additional 
capability.
    The committee remains concerned regarding the capability 
and capacity of the Army's SUSV fleet, and therefore directs 
the Secretary of the Army to conduct a business case analysis 
(BCA) to determine whether the Army should develop or procure a 
replacement for the small unit support vehicle designated SUSV. 
The BCA should include the following elements:
    (1) an analysis of how the SUSV fleet will be affected if a 
replacement for the vehicle is not developed or procured;
    (2) an explanation of the costs associated with 
refurbishing the SUSV fleet;
    (3) a description of specific requirements for a new SUSV 
vehicle and whether there is a vehicle available that would 
meet such requirements;
    (4) an analysis that compares the costs and benefits of the 
procuring of a new SUSV to the costs and benefits of 
refurbishing the SUSV fleet; and
    (5) recommendations for the most cost-effective approach to 
addressing the needs of the SUSV fleet.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 
2018, on the results of the BCA.

Tactical network review

    The committee understands that the Army is evaluating all 
of the tactical network components to reduce vulnerabilities 
and focus on capability gaps to ensure that the Army's end-to-
end network is resilient, interoperable, and secure. The 
committee notes that this review will cover the lower and upper 
tactical internet that make up the Army's tactical network. The 
committee also notes that software-defined radios and various 
waveforms are among two of the components that comprise the 
lower tactical internet that support soldiers at the tactical 
level. The committee understands the Army's network review 
should allow for the rapid introduction of other new 
capabilities, including advances in satellite communications, 
cyber protection, and electronic warfare, as well as assured 
positioning, navigation, and timing technology and other 
technologies that enable assured communications. The committee 
directs the Secretary of the Army to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by September 29, 2017, that 
details the network study results and the Army's recommended 
way ahead.

Vehicle medical kits

    The committee understands there have been significant 
advances made in emergency medical treatment for combat 
casualties, and notes that during Operation Iraqi Freedom, the 
military services, as a result of a joint urgent operational 
need from U.S. Central Command, fielded a standardized vehicle 
medical kit called the warrior aid and litter kit (WALK), to 
complement the capabilities already provided as part of the 
improved first aid kit and the combat lifesaver bag. The 
committee notes there is no official program of record for the 
WALK, and it is unclear to the committee as to how the Army 
would provide standardized vehicle medical kits for future 
contingency operations.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 
2018, on the advisability and feasibility of providing a 
standardized vehicle medical kit for combat and tactical 
vehicles.

                       Aircraft Procurement, Navy


                       Items of Special Interest


EA-18G ALQ-99 tactical jamming system modernization

    The committee notes that the EA-18G is the Navy's primary 
tactical aircraft platform dedicated to the dominance of the 
radio frequency spectrum in support of contingency and training 
operations requiring electronic warfare support. The EA-18G 
currently accomplishes this mission with the ALQ-99 tactical 
jamming system, but certain legacy transmitters of this system 
have not been upgraded, resulting in unsatisfactory reliability 
and increased risk to fulfilling contingency operation 
requirements. The Navy's Next Generation Jammer program is 
planned to eventually replace legacy ALQ-99 equipment, and is 
currently scheduled to be fielded incrementally starting with 
initial operational capability being declared in 2021, and full 
operational capability projected for some time during the 2035 
timeframe.
    Therefore, the committee supports the continued sustainment 
of legacy ALQ-99 equipment, and expects the Navy to continue 
upgrading ALQ-99 transmitters, particularly bands 5 and 6 of 
the ALQ-99 legacy system that have not been upgraded, with 
solid state technologies in order to mitigate risk pertaining 
to low reliability and potential failures in flight.

Implications of a 355-ship Navy on Naval and Marine Corps Aviation 
        force structure requirements

    The committee notes that the Navy's most recent Force 
Structure Assessment indicates a need to increase Navy force 
structure to 355 ships, which includes a 12th aircraft carrier. 
The committee also notes that this greater fleet size may in 
turn impact Navy and Marine Corps Aviation force structure 
requirements.
    Consequently, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Navy to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services not later than September 30, 2018, or 12 months after 
the issuance of a new National Defense Strategy, whichever date 
is earlier. The briefing should provide estimates as to the 
number of Navy and Marine Corps aircraft by series and type 
needed to achieve the objectives of the National Defense 
Strategy and to complement the capability resident in a 355-
ship Navy with 12 aircraft carriers. The briefing shall also 
include the following elements: (1) a detailed explanation of 
the strategy and associated force sizing and shaping 
constructs, associated scenarios and assumptions used to 
conduct the analysis; and (2) quantification of risk using 
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff risk management 
classifications.

Maritime intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance capabilities 
        demonstration

    The budget request contained $15.2 million in PE 63782N for 
mine and expeditionary warfare advanced technology program, but 
contained no funding for the MS-177A maritime enhanced sensor 
demonstration program.
    The committee notes that the Navy has the opportunity to 
leverage a $300.0 million Air Force investment in the MS-177A 
sensor, which is meant to improve maritime target detection and 
long-range imaging and could significantly reduce procurement 
costs and expedite fielding. The committee is aware that PACOM 
identified the MS-177A in its classified fiscal year 2018 
integrated priority list for consideration in meeting mission 
gaps. The committee believes that having an organic Navy MS-
177A demonstration in the U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM) area of 
responsibility could help the Navy to assess the full range of 
anti-surface unit warfare and anti-submarine warfare 
capabilities, as well as gather needed intelligence against 
threats in the PACOM strategic environment. Specifically, this 
could allow the Navy to address, validate, and fill current 
PACOM maritime intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance 
mission gaps in a timely manner. The MS-117A could also improve 
the Navy organic capability to conduct standoff anti-surface 
unit warfare intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance and 
long-range positive identification of targets.
    The committee recommends $38.7 million, an increase of 
$23.5 million, in PE 63782N to procure one MS-177A sensor for 
the maritime enhanced sensor demonstration program.

MQ-4C Triton unmanned aircraft system

    The committee recognizes that the Navy's MQ-4C Triton will 
be a forward-deployed, land-based, remotely piloted aircraft 
system that provides persistent maritime intelligence, 
surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) capability using a 
mission payload that will eventually be able to collect 
information in the signals and imagery intelligence 
disciplines. Given the MQ-4C combination of long endurance and 
advanced sensors, it will provide robust ISR support in meeting 
combatant commanders' requirements in the maritime domain. 
Although the MQ-4C program has had its share of cost, schedule, 
and execution challenges over the years, the committee fully 
supports the program, and acknowledges that it will be a 
critical component and integral capability both for the Navy 
and the intelligence community as a whole.
    The MQ-4C is integral to recapitalization of the Navy's 
maritime patrol and reconnaissance force (P-3C and EP-3E), and 
will be complementary to the capability provided by the P-8A 
patrol aircraft. The committee understands that a fleet of 68 
MQ-4C aircraft is planned to support five separate lines of 
high-altitude airborne ISR capability to provide real-time ISR 
information to a variety of operational and tactical users. 
However, the committee is unclear as to how the Navy plans to 
support mission execution and subsequent tasking, collection, 
processing, exploitation, and dissemination (TCPED) processes 
of these ISR missions when ISR collection taskings may occur 
outside the traditional naval employment constructs of aircraft 
carrier strike group deployments and operations.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than November 15, 2017, on MQ-4C mission execution 
and TCPED processes. The briefing should include:
    (1) a framework description of the manning, equipping, and 
training requirements for the MQ-4C system;
    (2) a description of the baseline architecture of the 
mission support infrastructure required to support MQ-4C 
operations;
    (3) how the Navy plans to support and execute the TCPED 
processes;
    (4) how the Navy plans to support flying operations from 
either line-of-sight or beyond-line-of-sight locations;
    (5) how many aircraft the Navy plans to dedicate annually 
to the ISR Global Force Management Allocation Process of the 
Department of Defense; and (6) how many hours of collection the 
MQ-4C will be able to provide annually in each of the 
intelligence disciplines for combatant commanders.

MV-22 upgrades

    The committee notes that the Commandant of the Marine Corps 
included the Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force En-
route Command, Control, Communications, and Computer Urgent 
Universal Need (SPMAGTF En-route C4 UUN) in his unfunded 
priorities for fiscal year 2017. The SPMAGTF En-route C4 UUN 
provides a communications capability to maintain tactical 
situation awareness of events ongoing in a target area, while 
Marines are en route to the target destination in an MV-22 
aircraft. The committee further notes that in fiscal year 2017, 
the budget planned for fiscal year 2018 for the SPMAGTF En-
route C4 UUN included $3.3 million for research, development, 
test, and evaluation; $42.1 million in Procurement, Marine 
Corps; $14.4 million for Operations and Maintenance, Marine 
Corps; and $171.4 million for Aircraft Procurement, Navy. The 
committee supports the SPMAGTF En-route UUN, and expects that 
the Department of the Navy will execute the programmed funding 
for fiscal year 2018.
    The committee understands that the majority of maintenance 
man-hours (MMH) conducted on the MV-22 are for components and 
wiring internal to the nacelle, and that high vibration and 
external environmental factors such as sand, dust, and water, 
have led to significantly more maintenance required on the 
nacelle than expected. According to aviation officials in the 
Department of the Navy, nacelle wiring alone accounts for 35 
percent of MMH on the nacelles for MV-22. The committee also 
understands that recent aircraft incidents and failure to meet 
time on wing requirements for the engine have led to a need to 
improve the performance of the engine inlet system, and that 
high failure rates of infrared suppressor (IRS) components 
drive excessive MMH and contribute to low aircraft 
availability. Accordingly, the committee believes the 
Department of the Navy should pursue a common nacelle structure 
with options for changeable engine inlet systems, improved IRS, 
and optimized nacelle wiring. The committee believes that the 
Department of the Navy could develop the common nacelle with 
nacelle improvements by fiscal year 2019 and have testing 
complete by fiscal year 2020.

Naval aircraft physiological episodes

    In the committee report (H. Rept. 114-537) accompanying the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017, the 
committee noted its concern with the increasing rates of 
physiological episodes (PEs) experienced by F/A-18 pilots over 
the previous 5 years. At the committee's recommendation, the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public 
Law 114-328) included a provision that required the Secretary 
of the Navy to establish an independent review team to review 
the Navy's data on, and mitigation efforts related to, the 
increase in F/A-18 physiological episodes since January 1, 
2009, and to report to the congressional defense committees on 
its findings by December 1, 2017. The committee understands 
that the Department of the Navy has engaged personnel assigned 
to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to conduct 
this review, and expects that the Department of the Navy will 
submit the report on time.
    To continue its oversight of naval aircraft physiological 
episodes, the Subcommittee on Tactical Air and Land Forces held 
a hearing on Naval Strike Fighter Issues and Concerns on March 
28, 2017. At that hearing, Navy witnesses testified that the PE 
rate per 100,000 hours increased in the F/A-18A through D, F/A-
18E/F, and EA-18G each year from 2012 to 2016. Also at that 
hearing, the committee requested PE data for the T-45C, and 
Navy witnesses testified that the PE rate per 100,000 hours had 
also increased each year since 2012. Within a few days of the 
March 28, 2017, hearing, the committee notes that a high 
percentage of T-45C pilots at the three T-45C flying locations 
opted not to fly the T-45C due to safety concerns with the 
aircraft's oxygen system, and the Department of the Navy 
suspended student training due to these concerns. The committee 
views these events as a serious readiness issue if student 
training continues to be suspended, which will result in fewer 
of the aircraft carrier qualified pilots and naval flight 
officers necessary to conduct fighter, attack, and electronic 
combat missions. The committee notes that the Department of the 
Navy has established a physiological episode team to evaluate 
these events, and has undertaken actions to address these 
occurrences and mitigate their effects, while considering this 
issue as its highest aviation safety priority.
    The committee will continue to closely monitor PEs in naval 
aircraft, and expects the Department of the Navy to 
aggressively take actions to determine the root cause of these 
events, determine mitigation procedures, and to budget for the 
modifications for each aircraft necessary to lower the rate of 
PEs in naval aircraft.

            Procurement of Ammunition, Navy and Marine Corps


                       Items of Special Interest


Advanced Low Cost Munition Ordnance

    The committee continues to support development of the 
Advanced Low Cost Munition Ordnance (ALaMO), a guided 57 mm 
projectile, with fire-and-forget capability that requires no 
Littoral Combat Ship fire control system changes, to counter 
the growing threats posed by small boat swarms, unmanned aerial 
systems, and other emerging threats. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Navy to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by August 30, 2017, on 
achieving low rate of initial production in 2019. The briefing 
should also include, but not be limited to, an evaluation of 
the current funding profile of this program across the Future 
Years Defense Program, as well as potential courses of action 
to accelerate or streamline the current program strategy.

                   Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy


                       Items of Special Interest


America-class amphibious assault ships

    The committee is concerned that the Navy program of record 
for America-class amphibious assault ships (LHA-
9) would result in a break in production of 7 years following 
delivery of LHA-8, thereby accruing significant additional 
costs at both the shipyard and the supply chain. The committee 
believes the optimal schedule would be to begin construction of 
LHA-9 in 2020. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary 
of the Navy to provide a briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services by March 1, 2018, that provides an assessment of 
the cost savings and other benefits of accelerating LHA-9 to 
2020 compared to 2024, assuming LHA-9 is identical to LHA-8.

Columbia-class submarine program

    The committee continues to exercise specific oversight on 
the progress and challenges facing the Navy's Columbia-class acquisition program and the 
replacement to the Ohio-class ballistic missile 
submarines, which are scheduled to begin retirement in 2027. 
The committee notes the Department of Defense and the Navy 
consider the Columbia-class acquisition among the 
highest priorities in order to meet sea-based strategic 
deterrence requirements in the future threat environment 
through the 2080s. The magnitude of the program's estimated 
cost, expected to exceed $267.0 billion over its life cycle, as 
well as the aggressive schedule on which the Navy and its 
shipbuilders plan to complete the submarine's technology 
development and design, and start constructing the new class, 
among other issues, will be subjects of continued interest and 
concern to the committee.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to assess the Navy's Columbia-
class acquisition and submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees by March 1, 2018, that includes an analysis 
of the following:
    (1) technology development including activities in support 
of the submarine's nuclear propulsion system;
    (2) progress of shipbuilder design products;
    (3) program cost estimates;
    (4) approved acquisition strategy and use of expanded 
authorities including cross-program material procurement, early 
structural fabrication, and advance construction;
    (5) industrial base capacity to meet the Navy's plans and 
requirements; and
    (6) construction readiness and feasibility of achieving on-
time submarine delivery to meet Navy operational requirements.

Guided missile patrol boats

    The committee recognizes that as the Navy continues to 
refine its distributed lethality concept, one component could 
be the incorporation of patrol boats equipped with guided 
missiles. As described in the 2017 Surface Force Strategy, one 
distinguishing component of the distributed lethality concept 
is increasing lethality at the unit level in order to reduce 
the susceptibility of higher end warships. Another key 
characteristic is the employment of adaptive force packages 
that allow operational commanders the ability to scale force 
capabilities based on the threat. The low cost of fielding 
combined with the ability to quickly disperse them make patrol 
boats an ideal platform in achieving these two distinguishing 
characteristics. Patrol boat units equipped with a variety of 
offensive capabilities, including short- and long-range anti-
ship cruise missiles, would provide an operational commander 
the ability to inject increased levels of uncertainty and 
complexity into an adversary's planning. As the Navy concludes 
the planned production of the MK VI Patrol Boat and initiates 
the start of the PB(X) program, there are opportunities to 
leverage stable production lines that could rapidly field a 
patrol boat that is ideally suited to support the distributed 
lethality concept. Therefore, the committee strongly encourages 
the Navy to pursue an offensive capability, including guided 
missiles, which can be incorporated on patrol boats in support 
of surface warfare operations.

High-pressure Cold Spray repair

    The committee is aware that the Department of Defense is 
utilizing high-pressure Cold Spray repair, a solid-state metal 
deposition technology that is capable of reapplying metal to 
highly worn or corroded metal surfaces without damaging the 
base metal. The committee understands this technology would 
restore the strength and serviceability of parts that 
previously would require replacement. The committee notes this 
technology is capable of portable, hand-held, high-pressure 
operation and has been used by the Department of the Navy to 
achieve cost savings for the repair of critical components. 
Therefore, the committee encourages the Secretary of the Navy 
to expand the use of this technology for the development of new 
repair processes for additional Navy components.

Increased standardization and commonality for U.S. Navy shipbuilding 
        programs

    The committee recognizes the importance of maintaining a 
robust shipbuilding budget to support increasing demands and 
commitments being placed upon the U.S. Navy. The committee also 
recognizes that steps need to be taken to continually reduce 
the cost of shipbuilding so that the U.S. Navy can maximize the 
number of ships being built under the current and projected 
fiscal constraints. Since a large portion of the cost 
associated with shipbuilding resides in the subcontracted 
systems, subsystems, and components provided by the 
shipbuilding supplier industrial base, it is important to help 
this industrial base reduce the cost of its products that 
support these major shipbuilding programs.
    As many of these suppliers are small- to mid-sized 
companies, it is incumbent upon the U.S. Navy and the 
shipbuilding prime contractors to explore ways that help reduce 
the costs of these products without placing additional stress 
on this supplier base. The committee encourages the U.S. Navy 
to address alternate approaches to the shipbuilding process 
that would alleviate the more onerous and costly processes that 
increase the cost of these ships. The committee also encourages 
the U.S. Navy and major shipbuilding prime contractors to 
explore additional levels of standardization and commonality 
across shipbuilding programs and across major shipbuilding 
prime contractors to realize significant potential cost 
savings.

Littoral Combat Ships capability enhancements

    The committee believes that the Littoral Combat Ship and 
the Frigate will continue to play a critical role in the mix of 
warships necessary for Distributed Maritime Operations and 
believe the Navy should begin Frigate construction as soon as 
possible. To better expand Frigate capabilities, the committee 
notes that the Chief of Naval Operations initiated an 
Independent Review Team to assess Frigate requirements. The 
committee further notes that the Navy intends to leverage the 
proposed capabilities of the original Frigate program while 
adding: increased air warfare capability in both self-defense 
and escort roles; enhanced survivability; and increased 
electromagnetic maneuver warfare. The committee supports the 
Navy's intent to increase the lethality and survivability of 
the Frigate and further supports backfit options that will 
provide appropriate enhancements to the existing Littoral 
Combat Ships. In fiscal year 2019, the committee also believes 
that additional forward fit options for the fiscal year 2019 
Littoral Combat Ships should be pursued. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to prepare a report 
to the congressional defense committees by March 1, 2018 that 
details a transition plan to include forward fit options for 
the fiscal year 2019 Littoral Combat Ships and backfit options 
for the existing fleet. Specifically, this report should 
include an assessment of the following elements: deploying an 
over-the-horizon weapons system; expanding electronic warfare 
capabilities to include SEWIP Block II or SEWIP Lite; enhancing 
survivability attributes; and expanding use of unmanned aerial 
vehicles or unmanned underwater vehicles.

Propeller shafts

    The committee recognizes that title III of the Defense 
Production Act (Public Law 81-774) provides the Department of 
Defense with an important tool to ensure the timely creation 
and availability of domestic production capabilities for 
technologies that have the potential for wide-ranging impact on 
the operational capabilities and technological superiority of 
U.S. defense systems. The committee supports the Defense 
Production Act title III program and recognizes its importance 
to preserving key capabilities throughout the U.S. defense 
industrial base.
    The committee notes the importance of the segments of the 
defense industrial base where limited numbers of suppliers 
provide materiel that is critical to readiness of the force. 
The committee further notes that the industrial segment 
responsible for the manufacturing and refurbishment of 
propeller shafts for the Navy's surface and submarine fleet 
faces considerable strain from high demand from Naval Supply 
Systems Command and Naval Sea Systems Command. Accordingly, the 
committee supports the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition, Technology and Logistics, as manager for the 
Defense Production Act title III program, working with the 
Secretary of the Navy to ensure that this and other areas of 
the defense industrial base are maintained and enhanced.

Protection of Navy ships against High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse

    The committee notes that the High-Altitude Electromagnetic 
Pulse (HEMP) protection for military surface ships became an 
official Department of Defense interface standard when it was 
issued on January 25, 2016, as a result of the Department's 
interest in system survivability of warships to HEMP. MIL-STD-
4023 establishes performance metrics, test protocols, and 
hardness margin levels for protection of military surface ships 
that must function when subjected to the HEMP environment.
    The committee believes that the only reliable method to 
assure a ship will survive a HEMP event is to test the ship 
with physical, realistic simulations of the HEMP environment. 
Such assurance can be technically justified by evaluating the 
ship's resistance to a simulated, threat-representative HEMP 
environment and monitoring for any undesired effects. 
Incorporating guidance of MIL-STD-4023 combined with the active 
testing of ships using a threat level simulator can achieve a 
high-confidence, low-risk assurance that the Navy warships can 
survive the nuclear weapon-generated threat of HEMP 
environments.

                    Aircraft Procurement, Air Force


                       Items of Special Interest


A-10 to F-16 transition at Fort Wayne, Indiana

    The committee notes that section 134 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328) included a subsection that authorizes the Secretary of the 
Air Force to carry out the transition of the A-10 aircraft unit 
at Fort Wayne Air National Guard Base, Indiana, to an F-16 
aircraft unit, as described by the Secretary in the Force 
Structure Actions map submitted in support of the budget 
request for fiscal year 2017. The committee understands that 
the Secretary of the Air Force has not yet planned for or 
announced this transfer, and encourages the Secretary to 
execute this transfer as soon as possible. The committee 
remains concerned about the status of other A-10 and F-16 
basing decisions for the Active Duty Air Force, Air Force 
Reserve, and Air National Guard.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by September 1, 2017, on an update of A-10 and F-16 
basing decisions for the Active Duty Air Force, Air Force 
Reserve, and Air National Guard.

A-10 wing replacement program

    In the committee report (H. Rept. 114-537) accompanying the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017, the 
committee noted its belief that the Department of the Air Force 
continues to suffer from capacity shortfalls in its fighter 
aircraft fleets. The committee further believes that 
sustainment of the 283-aircraft A-10 fleet helps to meet the 
Department of the Air Force fighter aircraft capacity 
requirements, and notes that the A-10 aircraft has been 
recently deployed in support of both Operations Inherent 
Resolve and Atlantic Resolve. To sustain the A-10 fleet, the 
committee understands that all 283 A-10 aircraft require wing 
replacement, but the committee notes that the Department of the 
Air Force has procured wing replacement for only 173 A-10 
aircraft.
    Accordingly, the committee encourages the Department of the 
Air Force to program the necessary funds to accelerate wing 
replacement for the remaining 110 A-10 aircraft.

B-52 modernization

    The committee notes that the nation's ability to meet its 
long-range strike requirements may be placed at increased risk 
by the aging B-52 fleet, which averages more than 60 years old.
    The committee also notes that the B-21 is not expected to 
achieve initial operational capability until the mid-2020s and 
that the Air Force is considering plans to retire certain 
bomber fleets over the next few decades while keeping the B-52 
through 2040 and possibly longer. Consequently, there is a 
pressing need to upgrade the B-52 bomber fleet with new 
engines, ground mapping radar, and self-protection electronic 
warfare capabilities to meet future long-range strike 
requirements.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by February 6, 2018, on its modernization plan for the 
B-52 aircraft fleet. The briefing should include:
    (1) re-engine options, including utilizing authorities 
pursuant to section 2371b of title 10, United States Code, 
third-party financing, and traditional procurement;
    (2) plans to upgrade the ground mapping radar;
    (3) electronic self-defense options; and
    (4) an integration timeline that best takes advantage of 
scheduled depot throughput.

Bomber modernization

    The committee notes that the Air Force has not released its 
bomber vector. This document is expected to describe the future 
of the current bomber fleets. It is also expected to detail 
when the new B-21 long range strike bomber will transition with 
the existing bomber force and identify which aircraft will be 
retired. The committee is uncertain that the bomber 
modernization plan is informed by the bomber vector. The 
committee is concerned that modernization programs with 
procurement delivery dates in the early to mid-2020s are not 
properly coordinated, and as such, bomber investment strategies 
across the Future Years Defense Program appear to lack 
justification. The committee expects the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide the bomber vector to the committee upon its 
completion to better assist the committee with its oversight 
responsibilities for bomber programs.
    The committee recommends a general Air Force reduction of 
$195.9 million for bomber modernization programs.

C-130H Aircraft Modernization Program Increments 1 and 2

    The committee supports the C-130H Avionics Modernization 
Program (AMP) Increments 1 and 2 and encourages the Air Force 
to upgrade all 172 C-130H aircraft in the most expeditious and 
cost-effective way to meet military requirements. However, the 
committee is concerned that an over-reliance on military 
specification solutions could potentially delay completion of 
AMP Increments 1 and 2, despite the availability of commercial 
off-the-shelf (COTS) and non-developmental item (NDI) 
technologies, such as glass cockpit and autopilot systems 
available and in use on C-130 derivative aircraft today.
    The committee encourages the Air Force to maximize efforts 
to procure COTS and NDI solutions to the maximum extent 
possible, while meeting the requirements for AMP Increments 1 
and 2. The committee also encourages all efforts to meet the 
intent of section 2377 of title 10, United States Code, and the 
tenets of the Department of Defense Better Buying Power (BBP) 
3.0 policy.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by January 15, 2018, that outlines Air Force efforts 
to leverage COTS and NDI solutions for the C-130H AMP Increment 
1 and 2 programs. The briefing shall include the following 
elements:
    (1) a detailed explanation of how the Air Force considered 
section 2377 of title 10, United States Code, and Department of 
Defense BBP 3.0 during the definition of the technical 
requirements and acquisition strategies for AMP Increments 1 
and 2;
    (2) examples of incentives made to offerors for accelerated 
and cost-capped implementation for C-130 AMP Increment 1 and 2;
    (3) where military specification standards were selected 
for C-130 AMP Increment 1 and 2, a comparison of such standards 
and COTS standards; and
    (4) where military specification standards were selected 
for C-130 AMP Increment 1 and 2, a comparison of operation and 
support costs for such standards and COTS standards.

C-130H propulsion systems upgrades

    The budget request contained no funds for C-130H propulsion 
systems upgrades.
    The committee continues to support the upgrade of C-130H 
aircraft with the T56 3.5 engine enhancement, NP2000 8-bladed 
propeller and the inflight propeller balancing system. The 
committee notes that the Air National Guard (ANG) is currently 
testing the T56 3.5 engine enhancement and preliminary test 
results have exceeded expectations for fuel savings and 
performance gained. The committee understands the ANG expects 
to issue a full test report in the summer of 2018 to be 
followed with a business case analysis for upgrading the entire 
fleet of C-130H aircraft. The committee is aware that only 8 of 
172 C-130H aircraft are programmed to receive these upgrades 
across the Future Years Defense Program. The committee expects 
the Air Force to include the necessary funds to accelerate C-
130H upgrades in future base budgets.
    The committee recommends $146.6 million for the C-130H 
propulsion systems upgrade program.

E-8C Joint Surveillance and Target Attack Radar System

    The committee acknowledges that the E-8C Joint Surveillance 
Target Attack Radar System (JSTARS) is a proven Air Force 
Battle Management Command and Control platform enabled by 
leveraging its extremely capable active radar system that 
provides invaluable moving target indicator (MTI) intelligence, 
surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) targeting information to 
multiple users both on the ground and in airborne attack 
platforms. The demand for MTI capability within each geographic 
combatant commander's area of responsibility far exceeds what 
JSTARS can currently provide due to its limited fleet size and 
strained crew resources. The committee also notes that the 
current fleet of 16 E-8C aircraft has issues and challenges the 
Air Force must successfully navigate to maintain viability 
until the current fleet of E-8C aircraft is replaced by the 
JSTARS Recapitalization program beginning in the late 2020s. 
Despite these issues and challenges, the committee is confident 
that the Secretary of the Air Force can develop a successful 
legacy JSTARS to JSTARS Recapitalization transition plan that 
would not prematurely retire E-8C aircraft, reassign crews or 
maintenance personnel, or otherwise create an MTI ISR 
capability gap or capacity deficit greater than what existing 
levels of aircraft should be providing currently.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services not later than November 1, 2017, that describes, in 
detail, a strategy to sufficiently address manning, 
sustainment, modernization, and viability deficiencies that 
would resolve capability gaps, shortfalls, and deficiencies of 
the E-8C fleet of aircraft. The briefing should include a 
strategy that addresses right-sizing and balancing unit manning 
among the Total Force; maintaining proficient and current 
aircrews to meet operational requirements; resolving 
obsolescence and diminishing manufacturing sources of parts and 
supply; necessary mission system upgrades and operational 
enhancements across the E-8C fleet to keep the aircraft viable 
and relevant until the JSTARS Recapitalization aircraft is 
fielded; standardizing existing aircraft capabilities in areas 
such as imagery servers and the Automated Information System; a 
forward-deployed basing construct that would enable E-8C 
aircraft to operate simultaneously while deployed, if needed, 
from three forward-deployed locations while on temporary duty 
supporting a combatant commander's command and control or 
moving target indicator intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance requirements; and, the associated cost, budget, 
and timeline required to implement the strategy.
    Finally, the committee also directs the Secretary of the 
Air Force to provide a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than March 1, 2019, that explains in 
detail all aspects of how and when the Air Force will 
transition from legacy JSTARS aircraft capability to JSTARS 
Recapitalization aircraft capability.

EC-130 Compass Call cross deck

    Last year, the committee received a letter from the U.S. 
Air Force requesting a technical adjustment to the fiscal year 
2017 budget request and authorization for a new start program 
to re-host the EC-130H Compass Call mission equipment onto a 
new platform identified as the EC-37B. At the time, the U.S. 
Air Force stated that there was only one aircraft option that 
met requirements and did not require development and/or further 
certification work. This aircraft was identified as the 
Gulfstream G550 Conformal Airborne Early Warning airframe. 
Earlier this year, the committee was notified that the 
acquisition strategy had changed and the Air Force no longer 
planned to make the selection as to which aircraft would re-
host the mission equipment. In a letter dated February 1, 2017, 
the Air Force stated its intention to contract with a lead 
system integrator (LSI) and delegate the aircraft selection to 
the LSI. The letter claims that ``after extensive analysis, we 
have determined that the most efficient, expedient, and cost 
effective means to acquire Compass Call capability is through a 
lead systems integrator approach.''
    However, in testimony before the Subcommittee on Seapower 
and Projection Forces on May 25, 2017, Air Force officials 
stated that they yet again changed their acquisition strategy. 
The committee understands the Air Force now intends to contract 
with a systems integrator, not an LSI, in contravention to what 
was stated in letters from both the Acting Secretary of the Air 
Force and the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Air 
Force for Acquisition. While the committee supports the Air 
Force's need to accelerate fielding a replacement aircraft for 
the Compass Call mission that meets its requirement, it is not 
clear that the Air Force is pursuing a coherent acquisition 
strategy.
    Elsewhere in this Act, the committee includes a provision 
that would restrict the Secretary of the Air Force from 
obligating or expending funds until 30 days after the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics 
certifies that the acquisition strategy conforms to law, 
follows appropriate guidelines, and adheres to best practices.

F-15C capability, capacity, and recapitalization

    The committee notes that during the hearing on March 22, 
2017, titled ``The Current State of the U.S. Air Force,'' 
before the Subcommittee on Readiness of the House Committee on 
Armed Services, Air Force witnesses testified that the 
Department of the Air Force is likely to decide during fiscal 
year 2019 budget deliberations whether or not to proceed with 
an option of divesting F-15C aircraft from the Air Force 
inventory and replacing those aircraft with upgraded F-16 
aircraft.
    The committee notes that the Air Force is executing a 
service life extension program to upgrade the F-15C with an 
improved radar and missile warning system, as well as airframe 
structural enhancements. The committee strongly supports the 
Eagle Passive Active Warning and Survivability System (EPAWSS) 
modernization program for the F-15C fleet. The committee 
recalls that the Air Force has previously stated a requirement 
to extend the service life of the F-15C aircraft fleet to fill 
the air superiority mission capacity gap created by the 
truncation of the F-22 procurement program to only 187 
aircraft. Similarly, the committee also recalls that the Air 
Force planned to keep the F-15C viable until the Air Force's 
next-generation air dominance aircraft is fielded to avoid a 
capacity gap in the air superiority mission area. Additionally, 
the committee is unaware of any warfighting analysis within the 
Department of Defense that would validate replacing F-15C 
capability and capacity with upgraded F-16 aircraft to fulfill 
requirements of the air superiority mission area. The committee 
does not understand how the Air Force would grow to its desired 
number of 60 fighter squadrons by retiring a significant number 
of F-15C aircraft and replacing those with aircraft already in 
the Air Force inventory. As well, the committee is concerned 
such a decision would exacerbate the substantial personnel 
shortage that currently exists within the F-16 maintenance 
enterprise by having to retrain and qualify F-15C personnel to 
maintain F-16 aircraft.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services not later than February 28, 2018, that provides 
detailed information on the following: the Air Force's weapon 
system sustainment and service-life plan for the F-15C 
aircraft, to include EPAWSS integration; when and with which 
material option(s) the Air Force plans to recapitalize air 
superiority mission capability provided by modernized F-15C 
aircraft, without incurring a reduction in capacity, if the F-
15C is retired; how and when the Air Force plans to grow, and 
with which aircraft, to 60 fighter squadrons; any analysis 
completed by the Department of Defense that validates that the 
air superiority mission capability and capacity provided by a 
modernized F-15C can be supplanted with an upgraded F-16; and 
forecasted mission transition plans for locations and units 
that currently possess or support F-15C aircraft, personnel, 
operations, or maintenance activities if F-15C aircraft are 
retired.

F-16 radar modernization

    In the committee report (H. Rept. 114-102) accompanying the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016, the 
committee noted the joint operational urgent need (JOUN) that 
specifically required an active electronically scanned array 
(AESA) radar upgrade to the F-16 aircraft that perform the 
aerospace alert control mission, and the committee supported 
taking all appropriate steps to meet that JUON as soon as 
possible. For fiscal year 2017, the committee notes that the 
Department of the Air Force F-16 program includes $216.5 
million for 72 AESA radars and $15.0 million for F-16 AESA 
radar development. The committee further notes that the budget 
request includes $2.9 million for AESA radar procurement, $40.8 
million for AESA radar development, and the committee 
understands that the budget request also includes $14.4 million 
for procurement of six F-16 AESA radars as initial procurement 
spares.
    The committee continues to view the procurement and 
development of the AESA radar upgrade to the F-16 aircraft that 
perform the aerospace alert control mission as a national 
security priority, and expects the Department of the Air Force 
will fully execute its planned procurement and development for 
fiscal years 2017 and 2018.

F-22 increment 3.2B upgrade

    The committee notes that the Department of the Air Force 
plans to upgrade 143 F-22 aircraft with the increment 3.2B 
upgrade. The increment 3.2B upgrade provides the F-22 aircraft 
with the most advanced air superiority capabilities including 
the AIM-9X missile, AIM-120D missile, electronic protection, 
and in-flight data link enhancements. The committee understands 
that the Department of the Air Force F-22 inventory includes 34 
Block 20-configured F-22 aircraft which are used for training 
pilots upgrading to the F-22 aircraft, and believes those 34 F-
22 aircraft should also be configured with the increment 3.2B 
upgrade.
    Accordingly, the committee encourages the Department of the 
Air Force to program the necessary funds to configure the 34 
Block 20-configured F-22 aircraft with the increment 3.2B 
upgrade, and believes that such an upgrade will improve F-22 
pilot training, improve F-22 inventory capability, and 
standardize F-22 configurations for more efficient maintenance 
and parts replacement.

F-35 Lightning II aircraft program

    The committee continues to support the F-35 Lightning II 
program. The F-35 Lightning II aircraft is the Department of 
Defense's largest acquisition program, which will eventually 
deliver 2,443 F-35 aircraft to the Departments of the Navy and 
Air Force. The committee notes the Department of Defense has 
taken delivery of over 285 F-35 aircraft. The committee 
believes that the F-35 will form the backbone of U.S. air 
combat superiority for decades to come, replacing or 
complementing the legacy tactical fighter fleets of the Air 
Force, Navy, and Marine Corps with a dominant, multirole, 
fifth-generation aircraft capable of projecting U.S. power and 
deterring potential adversaries. The committee notes that, for 
the F-35 program's international partners and foreign military 
sales customers, the F-35 will become a cornerstone for future 
coalition operations and will enhance the strength of our 
security alliances.
    The committee understands the F-35 Lightning II program is 
approximately 90 percent through its system development and 
demonstration (SDD) phase, which is planned to be completed not 
later than the second quarter of fiscal year 2018 and will 
provide capabilities required by the Departments of the Navy 
and Air Force in a final software block known as block 3F. At a 
hearing held by the House Committee on Armed Services' 
Subcommittee on Tactical Air and Land Forces on February 16, 
2017, the F-35 program executive officer (PEO) testified that 
the F-35 program is making solid progress as it grows and 
accelerates. The committee notes that looking beyond completion 
of the SDD phase of the F-35 program, the follow-on effort, 
known as the follow-on modernization (FOM) or block 4 program, 
is moving forward and will be executed as a continuation of the 
F-35 program with full transparency and reporting on cost, 
schedule, and performance as if it were a new program. The 
committee fully supports development and delivery of a FOM 
software increment that will provide vitally important 
additional combat capabilities such as advanced electronic 
protection, nuclear weapon delivery, and additional air-to-
ground precision munitions. The committee believes that the FOM 
is critical to improve the F-35's warfighting capabilities to 
keep pace with rapidly maturing adversary threat aircraft and 
integrated air defense systems, and expects that the FOM 
engineering, manufacturing, and development contract award will 
take place as scheduled in late 2018.
    The committee is aware the budget request for SDD is $231.0 
million over the previous year's projection for SDD in fiscal 
year 2018, and that this additional amount is necessary due to 
delays in software development, the need to address problems 
found during testing, and funding reductions in prior years. 
The committee also notes that both the Director of Cost 
Assessment and Program Evaluation and the Government 
Accountability Office have estimated that significant 
additional funding beyond the amount requested may be necessary 
to finish the SDD phase of the program, and that the difference 
between their estimates and the F-35 joint program office 
estimates are due in large part to different assumptions about 
flight test efficiency and duration.
    The committee supports completion of the SDD phase and 
delivery of full block 3F software capability as soon as 
possible. However, the committee is concerned that, if 
remaining SDD activities do take longer and cost more than 
planned, the joint program office may recommend termination of 
the SDD phase, and transfer of unfinished or incomplete 
capabilities could be deferred into the FOM portion of the 
program. While the committee understands that deferral of some 
minor capabilities may be appropriate and low-risk, the 
committee does not support premature termination of the SDD 
phase if combat capabilities critical to the military services 
are not completed. Accordingly, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees, not later than January 30, 2018, that 
provides an updated estimate of the cost and time necessary to 
complete the SDD phase, a list of any block 3F capabilities 
planned for deferral to the FOM phase, and the impact of any 
such deferred capabilities on the FOM phase of the program.
    The committee continues to support increased F-35 aircraft 
production rates to address fighter aircraft capability and 
capacity shortfalls in both the Departments of the Navy and Air 
Force. The committee notes that at a hearing held by the 
Subcommittee on Tactical Air and Land Forces on July 13, 2016, 
entitled ``Future Air Dominance and the Role of Fifth 
Generation Fighters,'' the Commander of the Air Combat Command 
testified that, to address capability and capacity shortfalls 
in the Department of the Air Force, the desired F-35A 
production rate is 60 aircraft per year. The committee believes 
that full-rate production in fiscal year 2021 would require an 
annual procurement rate of 80 F-35As, 36 F-35Bs, and 30 F-35Cs. 
The committee expects the Department of Defense to invest in 
the tooling necessary to accelerate these future F-35 
production rates.
    The committee is also aware that the Department of Defense 
has recently reached a successful agreement with the F-35 prime 
contractor that achieves lower unit costs for low-rate initial 
production (LRIP) lot 10. Further, the committee notes the 
testimony of the F-35 PEO at the February 16, 2017, hearing 
informed the committee that the then President-elect had a 
conversation with the F-35 PEO, prior to the conclusion of the 
lot 10 negotiations, where the President-elect sought more 
information about the F-35 and its affordability. The F-35 PEO 
also noted that the conversation with the President-elect 
resulted in tasks to the F-35 Program Office to determine what 
actions are currently being taken to ensure the affordability 
of the F-35, and how the Department of Defense can be assured 
that F-35s are procured at the best value. The committee 
commends the actions taken by the administration and the F-35 
PEO to negotiate lower unit costs and continued cost savings 
for F-35 aircraft.
    To continue the trend of decreasing unit F-35 procurement 
costs, the committee notes that the Department of Defense 
submitted a request for authorization to enter into contracts 
for economic order quantities of material and equipment for use 
in F-35 procurement contracts, to be awarded during fiscal 
years 2019 and 2020, so that the Department of Defense can 
execute a block buy contracting strategy. The committee 
understands that such a block buy contracting strategy would 
generate cost savings of approximately $2.0 billion. 
Accordingly, elsewhere in this Act, the committee includes a 
provision that would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
enter into one or more contracts, beginning with the fiscal 
year 2018 program year, for the procurement of economic order 
quantities for material and equipment for the F-35 program, to 
be used in F-35 procurement contracts in fiscal years 2019 and 
2020.

Implications of increased Army, Navy, and Marine Corps force structure 
        on Air Force airlift, air refueling tanker, and Navy sealift 
        force structure requirements

    The committee notes that the administration intends to 
increase Army, Navy, and Marine Corps force structure and that 
the last mobility capability and requirements study was 
completed in 2013. With this greater force structure, the 
committee is concerned about the anticipated impact on Air 
Force airlift and air refueling tanker and Navy sealift force 
structure.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to carry out a mobility capability and requirements study and 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than September 30, 2018, or 12 months after the issue of 
a new National Defense Strategy, whichever date is earlier. The 
study should estimate the number of airlift aircraft, tanker 
aircraft, and sealift ships needed to meet the combatant 
commander requirements. The briefing shall include the 
following elements:
    (1) a detailed explanation of the strategy and associated 
force sizing and shaping constructs, associated scenarios, and 
assumptions used to conduct the analysis;
    (2) estimate of risk based on Chairman of the Joint Chiefs 
of Staff risk management classifications; and
    (3) implications of operations in contested areas with 
regard to the Civil Reserve Air Fleet.

MQ-9 modernization and upgrades

    The committee notes that the Air Force relies heavily upon 
its MQ-9 fleet of remotely piloted aircraft to support global 
combatant commander requirements for both steady-state and 
contingency operations. As a result of the extensive use of the 
MQ-9 platform for operations, many aircraft are reaching the 
end of their designed service life sooner than expected. The 
committee notes that in the fiscal year 2017 President's budget 
request, the Air Force proposed a new effort to retrofit and 
upgrade 166 MQ-9 aircraft to a Block 5 configuration. The 
committee also notes that while the Block 5 upgrade increases 
the mission capability of the aircraft by modernizing avionics 
and mission systems, the upgrade does not address structural or 
fatigue issues of the MQ-9 aircraft that could extend the 
designed service life of the aircraft. The committee 
understands that the Air Force could forgo the option of 
continued Block 5 upgrades to existing MQ-9 aircraft, and could 
pursue an option to participate in development and procurement 
of the MQ-9B aircraft. The committee also understands that the 
MQ-9B system plans to leverage both the current MQ-9 aircraft 
and the Advanced Cockpit Ground Control Station as points of 
departure for MQ-9B systems design, and that hardware, 
software, and structural upgrades will be included in MQ-9B 
aircraft to improve structural fatigue and damage tolerance 
over the current MQ-9 baseline aircraft. However, the committee 
currently lacks the required information to make an informed 
determination as to which effort the Air Force should pursue.
    Elsewhere in this title, the committee includes a provision 
that would require the Secretary of Defense, in consultation 
with the Secretary of the Air Force, to conduct a cost-benefit 
analysis (CBA) that compares upgrading MQ-9 Reaper aircraft to 
a Block 5 configuration versus proceeding with procurement of 
MQ-9B aircraft. The committee expects the CBA to explain in 
detail all assumptions that underpin the CBA, and to weigh and 
analyze factors in the CBA such as investment cost, schedule, 
risk, open-architecture design, capability, capacity, mission 
systems configuration within the MQ-9 enterprise, manpower 
requirements, sustainment, logistics, and life-cycle cost or 
cost-avoidance.

Next generation ejection seat acquisition

    The committee notes that section 146(b) of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014 (Public Law 113-
66) required a report by the Secretary of the Air Force on 
various aspects of the health and safety risks associated with 
ejection seats. That report confirmed that, with increased use 
of helmet-mounted devices, the risks of death or serious injury 
increases, and increases even more for lighter weight aircrew. 
The committee also notes that the Joint Explanatory Statement 
to Accompany the Carl Levin and Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 
(Committee Print No. 4) stated that the Air Force should 
establish a program for increasing the ejection safety and 
reliability of the Air Force's fighter and bomber aircraft. 
Subsequently the Air Force established the Next Generation 
Escape System (NGES) program of record, and is currently in the 
market research phase of its next acquisition endeavor to 
upgrade and modernize ejection seats for aircraft currently in 
the Air Force inventory. The committee also recognizes that 
there are a limited number of ejection seat manufacturers 
qualified to meet Department of Defense egress requirements for 
high-performance military aircraft.
    Concerning the acquisition of NGES, the committee expects 
the Secretary of the Air Force to design and execute an 
acquisition strategy that enables fair, open, equitable, and 
objective consideration of ejection seat technologies. The 
committee encourages the Air Force to also take into account 
industrial base considerations that will preserve sufficient 
access to ejection seat technology for future programs. The 
committee also expects that any ejection seat proposal assessed 
during source selection processes will be evaluated in 
accordance with established Department of Defense policies, 
regulations, and instructions governing the acquisition of 
egress systems for military aircraft.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force, and a representative from the office of the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and 
Logistics, to provide a briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services not later than September 1, 2017, that explains 
in detail the acquisition strategy for NGES and how the 
committee's aforementioned considerations related to the 
acquisition strategy will be implemented. Finally, the 
committee is dissatisfied with the slow pace the Air Force has 
given this issue since it was initially addressed by the 
committee over 3 years ago, and expects the Secretary of the 
Air Force to demonstrate more urgency in providing modernized 
and safer egress systems for Air Force aircrews.

RC-135S Cobra Ball

    The committee notes that the collection of information 
associated with foreign ballistic missile programs remains a 
priority for the Department of Defense. For many years, the RC-
135S Cobra Ball program has served a vital role by providing 
unique and highly responsive collection on numerous high-
priority missions. As one of the smallest aircraft inventories 
in the Department of the Air Force, the three aircraft of the 
RC-135S fleet struggle to balance routine and depot maintenance 
schedules against operations and training requirements. The 
committee remains concerned that the Department's ability to 
conduct responsive technical collection against high-priority 
items of interest is constrained by the small size of the RC-
135S enterprise which must compete fulfilling requirements for 
operations, training, and maintenance.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services not later than December 1, 2017, on modernization and 
upgrades to RC-135S aircraft and training facilities. 
Specifically, the briefing should include what actions the 
Secretary will take to complete the modernization and upgrade 
of the remaining two RC-135S aircraft to the newest baseline 
standard for mission systems and software, as well as what 
actions the Secretary will take to field an RC-135S ground-
based mission trainer to reduce reliance on mission aircraft 
and increase operational availability of RC-135S aircraft for 
world-wide deployments.

Reporting on air traffic control avionics upgrades for Air Force 
        aircraft

    The committee notes that the Air Force is upgrading the 
avionics of its entire fleet to make the tracking of military 
aircraft by air traffic control facilities more secure and to 
comply with Federal Aviation Administration Air Traffic 
Management Surveillance mandates which go into effect on 
January 1, 2020.
    The committee is aware that the Air Force is combining the 
acquisition of Identification, Friend or Foe Mode 5 and 
Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast-Out capable avionics 
and the supporting software in an effort to reduce overall 
costs. The committee is concerned that the Air Force will not 
fully meet the January 1, 2020, mandate, which could seriously 
impact operational capability of the force.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services not later than February 15, 2018, that addresses the 
following elements:
    (1) operational and training impacts of non-compliant 
aircraft;
    (2) mitigation efforts to minimize training and operational 
disruptions;
    (3) plans to bring aircraft into compliance by aircraft 
series and type;
    (4) challenges to bringing all aircraft into compliance; 
and
    (5) steps taken to ensure cost effectiveness of avionics 
upgrades.

RQ-4 and universal payload adapter integration

    The budget request contained $86.7 million for RQ-4 post-
production charges, but contained no funding for integration of 
the universal payload adapter.
    The committee notes that the RQ-4 Global Hawk is the 
Department of Defense's only remotely piloted, high-altitude, 
long-endurance, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance 
(ISR) system that provides complementary capability alongside 
the U-2. The RQ-4 system provides critical support to deployed 
forces around the world, including providing critical 
communications to forward-deployed ground forces and essential 
ISR information to the intelligence community. The RQ-4 also 
provides support to homeland defense and disaster response 
operations that could not be achieved using other medium-
altitude remotely piloted aircraft that are unable to operate 
in the high-altitude flight environment. The committee notes 
that integrating the universal payload adapter on the RQ-4 
fleet will ensure greater interoperability and flexibility 
alongside the U-2, as it would enable employment of an array of 
ISR sensors, including select U-2 sensors, in support of 
combatant commander high-altitude ISR requirements.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $105.0 million, an 
increase of $18.3 million, for RQ-4 post-production charges to 
support continued modifications to existing RQ-4 aircraft and 
integration of the universal payload adapter.

Wide-area motion imagery intelligence capability

    The budget request contained $4.5 million in PE 35206F for 
development of airborne reconnaissance systems, and $321.1 
million for MQ-9 unmanned aircraft system (UAS) modifications, 
but contained no funding for continued development or 
procurement of wide-area motion imagery (WAMI) beyond line-of 
sight (BLOS) capabilities.
    The committee notes that persistent, near real-time day and 
night WAMI capability is considered by operational commanders 
to be a critical beyond line-of-sight intelligence, 
surveillance, and reconnaissance capability for numerous combat 
units. WAMI capability has been deployed in support of combat 
operations in Afghanistan since 2010 and in Iraq since 2015; 
however, despite the invaluable capability that WAMI capability 
provides, the Air Force has only been able to provide four 
steady-state UAS lines of WAMI capability. The committee 
understands that last year, the Department of Defense validated 
a U.S. Central Command Joint Urgent Operational Need Statement 
that requires the further development and procurement of WAMI 
BLOS capabilities for forward-deployed operations.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends $17.3 million in PE 
35206F, an increase of $12.8 million, for development of WAMI 
BLOS processor upgrades to enable enhanced data management and 
integration of multi-intelligence WAMI technologies, automatic 
target recognition, correlation and tracking information, and 
near-vertical direction finding capabilities. The committee 
recommends $326.3 million for MQ-9 UAS modifications, an 
increase of $5.2 million, to complete the purchase of the 10th 
pod set for which partial funding was authorized by the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public 
Law 114-328).
    Additionally, the committee directs the Vice Chairman of 
the Joints Chief of Staff (VCJCS), utilizing the Joint 
Requirements Oversight Council process, to provide a report to 
the House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 2018, that 
determines the quantity of steady-state operational combat UAS 
lines that would be required to provide WAMI BLOS capabilities 
to meet airborne signals and imagery intelligence requirements 
for all of the geographic combatant commanders. The committee 
expects the VCJCS to seek input from all geographic combatant 
commanders, and to also provide an explanation of underpinning 
assumptions and risk analysis for the final derived 
requirement.
    Finally, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by March 1, 2018, that describes in detail the life-
cycle weapon system sustainment and modernization strategy for 
maintaining an enduring WAMI capability for the geographic 
combatant commanders.

                       PROCUREMENT, DEFENSE-WIDE


                       Items of Special Interest


MC-12 modernization initiatives

    The budget request contained $5.8 million in Aircraft 
Procurement, Air Force, for MC-12 aircraft modernization 
initiatives.
    The committee is aware of a capability and modernization 
gap with the MC-12W fleet of aircraft currently being flown by 
Air National Guard units when compared to those being flown by 
Active Components. The committee notes these critical 
capability gaps are found in tactical data links, signals 
intelligence, high definition optics, and antennas, all of 
which are critical for flight operations in contested 
environments.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $70.8 million, an 
increase of $65.0 million, in Aircraft Procurement, Air Force, 
for MC-12W aircraft upgrades utilized by the Air National 
Guard.

Modernization of UH-60A/L aircraft bound for Afghanistan Aviation 
        Forces

    The committee encourages the Office of the Secretary of 
Defense (OSD) to develop strategies to modernize analog flight 
and crew advisory instruments in the UH-60A/L aircraft bound 
for Afghanistan Aviation Forces. The committee understands the 
aging analog systems in the UH-60A/L are being phased out in 
favor of digital glass flight displays that provide increased 
situational awareness and avoid growing obsolescence and 
reduced readiness. The committee notes that the digital glass 
flight displays have the added benefit of more efficient 
delivery of information to the pilot and copilot, easier scan 
of flight parameters, and more intuitive use of this 
information in the control of safe flight operations.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Defense to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
December 1, 2017, on OSD's strategy to transition UH-60A/L 
aircraft bound for Afghanistan Aviation Forces.

Standard data link requirement for the Department of Defense

    The committee reminds the Department of Defense that the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (Public 
Law 112-239) included a provision, section 157, requiring 
tactical manned intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance 
(ISR) aircraft and unmanned aerial systems (UAS) to use a 
specified standard data link. The provision requires the use of 
encrypted waveforms to transmit and receive internet protocol 
communications, requires UAS use data formats that are 
consistent with North Atlantic Treaty Organization standards, 
and requires that acquisition solicitations conform to 
Department of Defense data link specification standards without 
requirements or evaluation criteria that mandate proprietary or 
undocumented waveforms, control interfaces, or data interfaces.
    The committee understands that the office of the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics 
(USD(AT&L;)) is currently developing a common data link (CDL) 
enterprise modernization policy intended to transition the 
Department of Defense to a Bandwidth Efficient CDL Revision B 
(BE CDL Rev B), implement an open system cryptographic 
modernization, and provide a vendor neutral terminal control 
interface. The committee also understands the CDL executive 
agent (the Department of the Air Force) is developing a BE CDL 
Rev B software upgrade that will allow the Department to port 
this compliant waveform into a number of widely fielded 
airborne and ground terminals. Further, the Department of 
Defense has informed the committee that preliminary transition 
is already beginning via the secure CDL ISR radio program which 
requires each vendor to implement BE CDL Rev B, Cryptographic 
Core Modernization (CCM) encryption, and the new terminal 
Common Control Interface (CCI), which are currently pending 
National Security Agency certification. The Department of 
Defense also informed the committee that the CDL enterprise 
modernization policy to be issued later this year will direct 
all new programs requiring CDL terminals (and existing programs 
replacing their terminals) to implement BE CDL Rev B, the CCI, 
and CCM modular encryption, and that the policy will retire the 
466ER, Vortex Native, Predator Tactical, and Frequency 
Modulation (FM) Analog ISR waveforms, not later than October, 
1, 2023.
    However, the committee is not entirely convinced that the 
Department of Defense is on a path to meet the requirements of 
section 157 without a need to exercise future waiver authority, 
because the committee understands that some programs of the 
Department of Defense may still seek to obtain waivers from 
USD(AT&L;). The committee believes that the Department of 
Defense's waiver authority should be used rarely and only in 
cases in which vital, unavoidable circumstances exist. 
Therefore, the committee will consider in the future repealing 
the waiver authority provided in section 157 if the committee 
observes that program offices of the Department of Defense are 
utilizing the waiver authority as a matter of convenience 
rather than outright necessity.
    Elsewhere in this title, the committee includes a provision 
that would amend section 157 to require the Secretary of 
Defense to provide the congressional defense committees 
notification of common data link solicitations containing 
certain waveforms, and modifies criteria related to the review 
and approval of waiver requests by program offices seeking to 
use legacy data link waveforms.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations


              Section 101--Authorization of Appropriations

    This section would authorize appropriations for procurement 
at the levels identified in section 4101 of division D of this 
Act.

                       Subtitle B--Army Programs


 Section 111--Report on Acceleration of Increment 2 of the Warfighter 
                      Information Network-Tactical

    This section would require the Secretary of the Army to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees by 
January 30, 2018, detailing potential options for the 
acceleration of procurement and fielding of the Warfighter 
Information Network-Tactical Increment 2 program.

                       Subtitle C--Navy Programs


                     Section 121--Aircraft Carriers

    This section would express the sense of Congress as to the 
necessity to obtain 12 aircraft carriers, the frequency of 
aircraft carrier construction, the requirement to provide shock 
trials on the USS John F. Kennedy (CVN 79), and the desire to 
continue the Ford-class carrier design for CVN 81. This section 
would also require the Secretary of the Navy to obtain 12 
aircraft carriers by September 2023, which is expected to occur 
with the delivery of the USS John F. Kennedy. Finally, this 
section would provide economic order quantity authority for the 
construction of two Ford-class aircraft carriers and 
incremental funding authority for the nuclear refueling and 
complex overhaul of four Nimitz-class aircraft carriers.

       Section 122--Procurement Authority for Icebreaker Vessels

    This section would authorize the Secretary of the Navy to 
act as a general agent for the Secretary of the Department in 
which the Coast Guard is operating and to enter into a contract 
for not more than three heavy icebreakers and three medium 
icebreakers.

  Section 123--Limitation on Availability of Funds for Procurement of 
                           Icebreaker Vessels

    This section would prohibit funds authorized to be 
appropriated by this Act or otherwise made available for the 
Department of Defense for fiscal year 2018 from being obligated 
or expended for the procurement of an icebreaker vessel.

    Section 124--Multiyear Procurement Authority for Virginia Class 
                           Submarine Program

    This section would authorize the Secretary of the Navy to 
enter into one or more multiyear contracts for Virginia class 
submarines beginning in fiscal year 2018, in accordance with 
section 2306b of title 10, United States Code.

 Section 125--Multiyear Procurement Authority for Arleigh Burke Class 
                   Destroyers and Associated Systems

    This section would authorize the Secretary of the Navy to 
enter into one or more multiyear contracts for Arleigh Burke 
class destroyers and associated systems beginning in fiscal 
year 2018, in accordance with section 2306b of title 10, United 
States Code.

  Section 126--Limitation on Availability of Funds for Arleigh Burke 
                            Class Destroyer

    This section would limit the obligation of certain funds to 
procure new air and missile defense radars for Arleigh Burke 
class destroyers unless the radars are AN/SPY-6(V) radar 
modular assembly (RMA) based. This section would authorize the 
Secretary of the Navy to a waive the limit if the Secretary 
determines that the cost or schedule risk associated with the 
integration of the AN/SPY-6(V) radar is unacceptable or 
incongruous with an appropriate business case.
    The committee recognizes that the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics, in his 
report to Congress required by the committee report (S. Rept. 
114-49) accompanying the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92), noted that the Navy's 
current radar program of record, AN/SPY-6(V) Air and Missile 
Defense Radar, was designed to be fully scalable and modular to 
support a variety of shipboard radar applications on a variety 
of platforms and that the radar modular assembly conforms to 
the Department of Defense's Better Buying Power initiative by 
leveraging open systems, common logistics, and software 
baselines, and by securing government data rights to both the 
hardware and software to affect affordability.
    The committee applauds the Navy's successful efforts to 
leverage RMA-based applications of AN/SPY-6(V) technologies as 
part of the Enterprise Air Surveillance Radar (EASR) program 
that provides critical capabilities for America-class 
amphibious assault ships, amphibious transport docks, and 
aircraft carrier-class combatants. The committee believes these 
efforts demonstrate the feasibility of integrating RMA-based 
solutions to existing ship designs.
    The committee believes that all future DDG-51 radar new 
construction procurements should remain consistent with the 
Navy's current destroyer modernization plan and leverage the 
AN/SPY-6(V) radar modular assembly architecture to minimize 
operation and sustainment costs, reduce training and logistical 
requirements, and maintain affordability through economies of 
scale with other programs like EASR.

  Section 127--Extensions of Authorities Relating to Construction of 
                            Certain Vessels

    This section would extend incremental funding authorities 
for Ford class aircraft carriers and LHA replacement ships.

 Section 128--Multiyear Procurement Authority for V-22 Osprey Aircraft

    This section would authorize the Secretary of the Navy, 
subject to section 2306b of title 10, United States Code, to 
enter into one or more multiyear contracts, beginning with the 
fiscal year 2018 program year, for the procurement of V-22 
Osprey aircraft and common configuration-readiness and 
modernization upgrades for the V-22 Osprey aircraft. 
Notwithstanding section 2306b(k) of title 10, United States 
Code, this section would also authorize the period covered by 
such contract entered into on a multiyear basis to exceed 5 
years, but not to exceed 7 years. Additionally, this section 
would require that any such multiyear contract provide that any 
obligation of the United States to make a payment under the 
contract for a fiscal year, after fiscal year 2018, be subject 
to the availability of appropriations or funds for that purpose 
for such later fiscal year.
    The committee encourages the Department of the Navy to 
execute a procurement profile for this multiyear in order to 
acquire the aircraft at economic order quantity levels that 
most efficiently acquire the aircraft and fully procures the 
programmed acquisition objective aircraft for the Department of 
the Navy.

                     Subtitle D--Air Force Programs


  Section 131--Streamlining Acquisition of Intercontinental Ballistic 
                      Missile Security Capability

    This section would list findings regarding the acquisition 
of an aircraft to provide intercontinental ballistic missile 
security as a replacement for the UH-1N helicopter, express the 
sense of Congress that the Secretary of Defense should have the 
authority to expedite procurement of a replacement aircraft for 
the UH-1N helicopter, and authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
waive any provision of law requiring the use of competitive 
procedures for the procurement of a UH-1N helicopter 
replacement and enter into a contract for the procurement on a 
sole-source basis. The Secretary's authority in this section 
would be subject to a 15-day wait period, a notice of the 
Secretary's intent to exercise such authority, and the 
Secretary's certification of certain events and determinations.

 Section 132--Limitation on Selection of Single Contractor for C-130H 
               Avionics Modernization Program Increment 2

    This section would prohibit the Department of the Air Force 
from selecting a single contractor for the C-130H avionics 
modernization program increment 2 until the Secretary of the 
Air Force certifies to the congressional defense committees 
that every opportunity will be taken to make use of commercial-
off-the-shelf technology solutions and nondevelopmental items 
and that excessively restrictive military specification 
standards were not used as criteria to restrict or eliminate 
fair and open competition.

 Section 133--Limitation on Availability of Funds for EC-130H Compass 
                     Call Recapitalization Program

    This section would restrict the Secretary of the Air Force 
from contracting with any entity for the purposes of the 
Compass Call re-host program until the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics submits a 
certification to the congressional defense committees that 
indicates the acquisition strategy has been reviewed and 
determined to meet applicable laws, guidelines, and best 
practices.

 Section 134--Cost-Benefit Analysis of Upgrades to MQ-9 Reaper Aircraft

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Secretary of the Air Force, to conduct a 
cost-benefit analysis that compares upgrading MQ-9 Reaper 
aircraft to a Block 5 configuration, or foregoing the Block 5 
upgrade to MQ-9 aircraft and proceeding with procurement of MQ-
9B aircraft instead. The provision also requires the Department 
of Defense to submit the analysis to the congressional defense 
committees not later than 180 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act.

       Subtitle E--Defense-Wide, Joint, and Multiservice Matters


Section 141--Authority for Procurement of Economic Order Quantities for 
                       the F-35 Aircraft Program

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
enter into one or more contracts, beginning with the fiscal 
year 2018 program year, for the procurement of economic order 
quantities for material and equipment that has completed formal 
hardware qualification testing for the F-35 program and is to 
be used in procurement contracts to be awarded under the F-35 
program in fiscal years 2019 and 2020. This section would also 
limit the amount of such contracts for fiscal year 2018, or any 
year thereafter, to not more than $661.0 million. Additionally, 
this section would limit the Secretary of Defense from entering 
into such contracts until a period of 15 days has elapsed 
following the date on which the Secretary submits to the 
congressional defense committees a written certification that 
the contract meets certain conditions.

    Section 142--Limitation on Demilitarization of Certain Cluster 
                               Munitions

    The section would prohibit the elimination of cluster 
munition stockpiles considered to be non-compliant after 
January 1, 2019, according to the Memorandum of the Secretary 
of Defense dated June 19, 2008, regarding the Department of 
Defense policy on cluster munitions and unintended harm to 
civilians. The prohibition remains in effect until the 
Secretary of Defense certifies that the Department retains 
sufficient inventory levels of operationally suitable cluster 
munitions that comply with the Department's current policy, and 
meets at least 75 percent of the U.S. combatant commands 
operational requirements across the full range of military 
operational environments.
    This section would allow the demilitarization of cluster 
munitions determined to be unserviceable due to a significant 
failure to meet performance or logistics requirements. Cluster 
munitions categorized as unserviceable solely due to current or 
amended Department of Defense policy related to cluster 
munitions would not meet this definition of unserviceable, and 
would be subject to the limitation in this provision.

   Section 143--Reinstatement of Requirement To Preserve Certain C-5 
                                Aircraft

    This section would amend section 132 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328) to reinstate the requirement for the Secretary of the Air 
Force to continue to preserve certain C-5 aircraft in a storage 
condition that would allow a recall of retired aircraft to 
future service in the Air Force Reserve, Air National Guard, or 
Active Force structure.

  Section 144--Requirement That Certain Aircraft and Unmanned Aerial 
               Vehicles Use Specified Standard Data Link

    This section would amend section 157 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (Public Law 112-
239) by: requiring the Secretary of Defense to notify the 
congressional defense committees not later than 15 days after a 
solicitation is issued for a Common Data Link-To Be Sunset 
(CDL-TBS) waveform; elevating waiver review and approval 
authority from the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, 
Technology, and Logistics to the Deputy Secretary of Defense; 
and, terminating the waiver authority that enables use of 
legacy data link waveforms on October 1, 2023.

         TITLE II--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION

           Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


Acoustic threat detection technology

    The committee is aware of efforts undertaken by the Army to 
develop and operationally test acoustic threat detection 
technology as a method of improving forward operating base 
protection. The committee is also aware that acoustic threat 
detection technology has been successfully integrated and 
tested from fixed, aerostat, and deployable containerized 
platforms. As such, the committee encourages continued 
operational testing, to include limited user evaluations. If 
warranted, the committee expects the Army to consider 
acceleration of the transition of this technology to a program 
of record through the utilization of acquisition reform 
principles.

AN/VVR-4 Laser Detecting Set

    The committee recognizes U.S. Army ground combat vehicles 
are increasingly susceptible to laser-aided threats. The 
committee believes ground combat vehicle crews require a 
reliable means to identify laser threats and to apply 
countermeasures or take evasive action against the growing 
reliance by adversaries on lasers to enhance ballistic 
solutions on weapons terminal guidance systems. The committee 
believes a key element to the detection of these threats is the 
AN/VVR-4 Laser Detecting Set, and is aware the AN/VVR-4 Laser 
Detecting Set was designed to meet or exceed all performance 
and environmental specifications defined by the U.S. Army. 
Therefore, the committee encourages the Secretary of the Army 
to pursue initial production and fielding of the AN/VVR-4 Laser 
Detecting Set and to begin initial integration on the M1A2 
Abrams tank.

Army counter-improvised explosive device technology

    The committee recognizes that over the last decade the 
military services have succeeded in developing, fielding, and 
deploying highly capable systems to address the threats from 
improvised explosive devices (IEDs), and that the Department of 
Defense is currently supportive of additional ongoing 
development efforts, including, but not limited to, the Army's 
Research, Development, and Engineering Command's activities in 
this area.
    However, the committee is concerned that despite progress 
in research and development, shortcomings may still exist in 
areas such as real-time and easily interpreted imaging, non-
metallic detection, false alert rates, and non-invasive sensor 
technologies. The committee is aware of currently available 
technologies, tested and endorsed by close allies and partners, 
such as the United Kingdom, capable of providing additional 
protection from these IEDs.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Commanding General of 
the U.S. Army Materiel Command to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by September 1, 2017, on such 
technologies. This briefing shall include a detailed assessment 
of the Army's ongoing efforts to improve capabilities to 
counter IEDs, the extent to which existing and innovative 
sensor technologies are and will be incorporated into relevant 
development efforts, and the applicability of those 
technologies by allies and partner nations, such as the United 
Kingdom, to Army development efforts.

Army Network Integration Evaluations and Joint Warfighting Assessments

    The committee acknowledges the importance of the Department 
of the Army's Network Integration Evaluation (NIE) exercises 
conducted at Fort Bliss, Texas, and White Sands Missile Range, 
New Mexico. The committee notes that, through this program, the 
Army has been able to test equipment in a realistic battlefield 
environment in the hands of soldiers so the Army can 
successfully integrate new technologies. The committee also 
acknowledges the importance of the Joint Warfighting 
Assessments (JWA). The committee recognizes NIE and JWA as 
critical cost saving measures since these exercises allow the 
Army to clarify program requirements and discontinue programs 
that do not meet Army needs. As a result, the Army has produced 
over $1.8 billion in savings and cost avoidance since 2011. The 
committee believes that these exercises help the Army to test 
emerging concepts, integrate new capabilities and technology, 
and promote interoperability between the military services and 
U.S. allies.
    The committee also acknowledges the investments made in the 
Joint Modernization Command, located at Fort Bliss, and 
encourages the Army to continue NIE and JWA exercises at Fort 
Bliss whenever possible to utilize those investments as well as 
the unique space, terrain, and freedom of movement available at 
Fort Bliss and White Sands Missile Range. The committee also 
acknowledges that NIE and JWA events should be brigade-level 
exercises when practical to ensure any systems tested will be 
fully capable of deployment at the brigade level.
    While the committee believes that the NIE and JWA should 
continue to be an integral part of the Army's modernization 
strategy, and encourages the Army to pursue both the NIE and 
JWA, the committee understands that the Army is assessing the 
most efficient way to test the integration of new concepts and 
technologies. The committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by March 1, 2018, on this assessment.

Army warfighter technology programs

    The budget request contained $39.6 million in PE 62786A for 
Warfighter Technology research and development programs.
    The committee is aware of the work being done by the 
Warfighter Technology Directorate in improving the protection, 
survivability, mobility, and combat effectiveness of soldiers. 
The committee understands the directorate is continuing 
research in the areas of advanced ballistic polymers for body 
armor, fibers to make more durable and breathable uniforms, 
fire resistant and lightweight infrastructures for advanced 
shelters, among other research programs that should provide 
tangible benefits to the individual soldier. The committee 
believes it is critical to ensure that the Army continues 
development of this technology and believes additional funding 
could help to accelerate its development.
    The committee recommends $44.6 million, an increase of $5.0 
million, in PE 62786A for Warfighter Technology research and 
development programs.

Civil Support Team Information Management System

    The committee is aware that the National Guard Bureau (NGB) 
Weapons of Mass Destruction-Civil Support Teams (CST) currently 
field a system called the ``CST Information Management System'' 
(CIMS) to provide a common operating picture, promote 
information-sharing and real-time collaboration in an emergency 
situation, and support the CST mission of assisting and 
advising first responders and facilitating communications with 
other Federal resources. The committee is aware that the NGB 
has developed a long-term strategy to expand that system to the 
rest of the Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear 
Response Enterprise, known as ``NG CIMS 2018+.'' The current 
plan for NG CIMS 2018+ would standardize the tactical common 
operational picture and information management systems for all 
elements of the CRE, and achieve full operational capability 
(FOC) by September 30, 2018. The committee is also aware that 
this system has been successfully demonstrated in recent real-
world operations and training events, including the 2017 
Presidential Inauguration.
    The committee encourages the National Guard to continue to 
develop and deploy NG CIMS 2018+ on the current timeline, and 
utilize the National Guard and Reserve Equipment appropriation, 
if necessary, to ensure resourcing to meet that FOC date.

Cold Temperature and Arctic Protective System development

    The committee is aware that the Army is developing an 
updated cold weather clothing system referred to as the ``Cold 
Temperature and Arctic Protective System'' (CTAPS). The 
committee supports efforts to ensure that soldiers are equipped 
with organizational clothing and individual equipment for all 
environments. The committee is aware the CTAPS system would 
include flame-resistant technology similar to that of the 
current flame-resistant environmental ensemble. The committee 
encourages the Army to consider commercial-off-the-shelf 
technologies, as well as technologies already proven in current 
Army cold and extreme weather clothing systems as part of the 
CTAPS development program.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by November 
15, 2017, that includes the development timeline and schedule 
for CTAPS, as well as addresses the cooperative efforts being 
taken by the Army, to include the industrial base into the 
overall design of the CTAPS system.

Enhanced lightweight hard armor and combat helmet research and 
        development

    The budget request contained $20.2 million in PE 63827A for 
soldier systems--advanced development, to include weight 
reduction and performance improvements for body armor and 
combat helmets.
    The committee has consistently highlighted the critical 
need for modernization of personal protective equipment (PPE), 
to include body armor and combat helmets. In previous 
legislation, the committee has expressed its concern regarding 
the Department of Defense's long-term strategy for PPE 
industrial base sustainment, and has encouraged the Department 
to pursue strategies that would allow for sustainment of this 
critical industrial base through modernization efforts. For 
example, section 141 and section 216 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (Public Law 111-84) 
established separate procurement line items and separate 
program elements required for the procurement and research and 
development (R&D;) of individual body armor and associated 
components. The committee continues to encourage and recommend 
a weapon system approach to PPE acquisition, in particular body 
armor and combat helmets. The committee believes this would 
provide for more efficient planning, programming, and budgeting 
for PPE, and would create a more stable environment for the 
industrial base to continue to invest in innovation and weight 
reduction technology.
    The committee notes the Army's Soldier Protection System 
and other service R&D; efforts have made significant progress in 
reducing the weight and improving the form, fit, and function 
of body armor. The committee is also aware of current R&D; 
projects in this PE to help advance improved performance. The 
committee understands that the Department of Defense 
Appropriations Act, 2017 (division C of Public Law 115-31) 
included an additional $25.0 million in PE 63827A to continue 
to improve the capability of hard and soft body armor and 
combat helmets. The committee supports this initiative and 
understands the industrial base is ready to start the efforts 
to address the Army's two key goals of reducing body armor 
weight by 20 percent or more, and improving combat helmet 
capability against projected threats.
    The committee recommends $45.2 million, an increase of 
$25.0 million, in PE 63827A to ensure continuity and sufficient 
resources are programmed for enhanced soft and hard body armor 
and combat helmet research and development. The committee also 
directs the Secretary of the Army to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by March 14, 2018, on the 
Army's plan to obligate these additional funds, and identify 
potential development projects that could be accelerated.

Future Vertical Lift

    The committee is aware that the Army is continuing 
execution of the Future Vertical Lift (FVL) analysis of 
alternatives (AOA) during fiscal year 2018, and the FVL 
initiative has been informed by concept definition efforts such 
as the Joint Multi-Role Technology Demonstration and the 
Vertical Lift Consortium. The committee recommends that the 
Army continue leveraging existing Other Transaction Authority 
efforts to execute concept definition studies for the purpose 
of informing acquisition approaches and advancing vertical lift 
technologies in support of future requirements. The committee 
encourages the Army to fully fund FVL efforts and to seek 
opportunities to accelerate the program based on performance 
and available resources.

High Bandwidth Tethered Unmanned Air Systems Technology

    The committee understands that there are new, commercial 
tethered unmanned air system solutions that could provide 
significant improvements in the following capability sets: 
communications, persistent surveillance, force protection, and 
counter-VAS. The committee believes these improved capabilities 
could benefit the forward deployed warfighter. As such, the 
committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide a 
briefing to the Committees on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives and the Committee on Armed Services of the 
Senate by September 30, 2017, on the advisability and 
feasibility of procuring new, tethered-based multi-rotor 
platforms as a potential solution to address critical 
operational capability gaps in communication, expeditionary 
cyber operations, and intelligence collection requirements as 
well as counter-unmanned aircraft systems applications.

High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle external fire suppression 
        systems

    The committee is aware that in 2008 the Army pursued Work 
Directive 379 in response to an operational needs statement, 
and that the purpose of the directive was to explore options 
for fluid-based fires in the fuel tank and engine compartment 
of Army High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWV). 
The committee is also aware that one of the recommendations 
resulting from this effort was to continue testing of fuel 
tank, engine, and tire improvements that could potentially 
reduce the risk of fluid-based fires. However, despite this 
recommendation, the Army chose not to pursue such improvements 
or validate a requirement for an external fire suppression 
system (EFSS) for Army HMMWVs.
    Given the evolution of fire suppression technology since 
this evaluation was conducted, the committee believes that the 
Army should reconsider the potential requirement for an EFSS 
for Army and Army National Guard HMMWVs. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of the Army, in coordination 
with the Chief, National Guard Bureau, to provide a briefing to 
the House Committee on Armed Services by September 1, 2017, on 
the advisability and feasibility of such a system being 
installed on Army and Army National Guard HMMWVs as part of 
HMMWV modernization and recapitalization programs.

Improved Turbine Engine Program

    The committee continues to support the Army research and 
development budget request for the Improved Turbine Engine 
Program (ITEP), as well as the acquisition strategy included in 
the request. ITEP is a competitive acquisition program that is 
designed to develop a more fuel-efficient and powerful engine 
for the current Black Hawk and Apache helicopter fleets. This 
new engine will increase operational capabilities in high/hot 
environments, while reducing operating and support costs. The 
committee acknowledges the benefits of improved fuel 
efficiencies through lower specific fuel consumption that ITEP 
will bring to the battlefield. In addition, the committee 
encourages the Army to prioritize maintenance and sustainment 
cost savings for ITEP to ensure the continued affordability of 
the program.
    In the committee report (H. Rept. 114-537) accompanying the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017, the 
committee required the Army to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services on potential options to accelerate 
the ITEP program. The committee notes that the Army provided 
the briefing and that the Army stated that there are two 
potential acceleration opportunities that will be informed by 
program knowledge points. The committee understands that 
performance and available resources will drive these two 
knowledge points. The committee encourages the Army to continue 
to fully fund this competitive program and to pursue 
acceleration opportunities based on program performance and 
available resources.

Improved vehicle camouflage systems and next generation signature 
        management

    The budget request contained $91.0 million in PE 64804A for 
Logistics and Engineer Equipment-Engine Development. Of this 
amount, $6.6 million was requested for next generation 
signature management systems.
    The committee remains encouraged by recent research and the 
approval of the updated requirements document for next 
generation signature management systems for combat and tactical 
vehicles. The committee continues to recognize the importance 
of this low-cost defensive capability against current and 
emerging threats, particularly in Europe, and encourages the 
Department of Defense to continue to accelerate development, 
procurement, and fielding of this advanced camouflage net 
system to meet warfighter requirements.
    Given the immediate increasing demand for next generation 
signature management systems by combatant commanders, the 
committee encourages the Army, to the maximum extent possible, 
to accelerate completion of the research and development of the 
woodland and arctic camouflage variants in order to set the 
conditions for a low-rate initial production decision in fiscal 
year 2018, 1 year earlier than planned.
    The committee recommends $93.0 million, an increase of $2.0 
million, in PE 64804A to address an unfunded requirement for 
next generation signature management systems.

Integrated Air and Missile Defense command and control capabilities

    The committee acknowledges that fielding of an Integrated 
Air and Missile Defense command and control set of capabilities 
remains the U.S. Army's Air Defense Artillery community's 
number one priority and believes that such capabilities are 
urgently required to meet warfighter needs.
    However, the committee is concerned about continued 
programmatic challenges that have delayed even incremental 
capability delivery. The committee notes the President's budget 
request for Fiscal Year 2018 formalizes a shift of initial 
operational capability for the Integrated Air and Missile 
Defense (IAMD) Battle Command System (IBCS) from September 2016 
to April of 2022 and that total program costs have grown from 
$1.73 billion to $2.68 billion as of the end of 2016.
    The committee is further concerned about recent IBCS 
performance observations by the Department of Defense's Office 
of Operational Test and Evaluation which, in its February 2017 
report, called the system's software ``neither mature nor 
stable . . .'' and by the Army Test and Evaluation Command 
which noted in report detailing a June 2016 limited user test 
that the system is ``Not suitable, Not survivable, Not 
reliable.''
    The committee recognizes that the Army IAMD architecture 
has changed significantly since IBCS requirements were 
validated in 2009 with the cancellation of the Joint Land 
Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor System 
(JLENS), the Medium Extended Air Defense System (MEADS), and 
the Surface Launched Advanced Medium Range Air to Air Missile 
(SLAMRAAM), and that emphasis has now shifted to integration of 
other Army systems.
    Therefore the committee directs the Secretary of Army, not 
later than September 30, 2017, to provide a briefing to the 
congressional defense committees on the status of the IBCS 
program. At a minimum, this briefing shall include:
    (1) Updated information on programmatic risks, total 
estimated costs, and a new testing and fielding schedule;
    (2) The program's plan to address emerging threats such as 
cyber and electronic attack; and
    (3) A plan for potential IBCS capability delivery 
acceleration, including options for how the Army could use 
Fiscal Year 2018 funding, prior year funding, or otherwise 
leverage other programs' investments to contribute or be 
incorporated into IBCS prior to the completion of fielding or 
investments that could alternatively meet program requirements.

Land-Based Anti-Ship Missile hardware and software integration and test 
        capability

    The committee understands the U.S. Army Aviation and 
Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center has 
initiated a science and technology program for the Land-Based 
Anti-Ship Missile effort. This effort includes adapting 
existing Army and Marine Corps High Mobility Artillery Rocket 
Systems (HIMARS) and Multiple Launch Rocket System (MLRS) 
missile systems for this land-based offensive surface warfare 
capability. The committee is aware that HIMARS and MLRS systems 
could be limited to only engagement of stationary area and 
point targets using global positioning system aided inertial 
navigation, while maritime targets would require the capability 
to engage mobile target sets. The committee notes that 
additional technology consisting of integrating multi-mode 
seekers and datalinks to existing HIMARS and MLRS systems could 
be required, and also notes that this would be a significant 
advancement in capability. The committee expects the Army to 
program the necessary resources required across the Future 
Years Defense Program to begin the integration work and testing 
of the capability to address maritime targets.

Lightweight metal matrix composite technology for combat and tactical 
        vehicles

    The committee recognizes the versatility and broad 
application that Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) technology may 
provide to the armed services through weight reduction of 
vehicle components by potentially 50 percent, and in turn could 
increase the service life of vehicles by three to four times 
that of vehicles manufactured with traditional steel and armor. 
The committee understands the U.S. Army Tank and Automotive 
Research, Development, and Engineering Command (TARDEC) is 
currently evaluating technologies that can reduce vehicle 
weight, reduce fuel consumption, increase payload capacity, and 
extend service life of combat and tactical vehicles, and that 
MMC technology is part of this ongoing evaluation.
    The committee directs the Commanding General of TARDEC to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
November 1, 2017, on the progress of development and 
implementation of Metal Matrix Composite component technology 
in order to reduce vehicle weight, reduce fuel consumption, 
increase payload capacity, and extend service life.

M4 Carbine Free Floating Rail Technology

    The committee has long supported small arms modernization 
and continues to encourage increased investment to improve 
small arms capability. The committee notes that the Army 
continues to use and field legacy rail systems for use on M4 
carbines. However, the committee understands that the U.S. 
Special Operations Command (SOCOM) and the Army Marksmanship 
Unit have begun to field free-float rail systems instead of 
using current legacy systems. The committee is also aware that 
free-float rail systems are considered to be the commercial 
industry standard and are readily available. The committee 
understands that the Program Executive Office-Soldier (PEO-
Soldier) through the Soldier Enhancement Program (SEP) is 
currently evaluating the SOCOM free-float rail system. The 
committee encourages the Army, subject to a favorable SEP 
evaluation, to consider the advisability and feasibility of 
developing an accelerated acquisition strategy for free-float 
rail systems.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army, in 
coordination with PEO Soldier, to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by December 1, 2017, on the 
results of the current SEP evaluation and the Army's plans for 
upgrading legacy rail systems.

Material development, characterization, and computational modeling

    The committee recognizes the importance of evaluation of 
materials and technologies, designs, and the development of 
methodologies and models to enable enhanced lethality and 
survivability. Methods such as computational research allow for 
the development of models that predict the mechanical 
properties of materials that are used in research and 
development at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL). These 
models and simulations provide a cost savings to the Department 
of Defense by simulating materials prior to testing them to 
ensure mechanical properties will work together. Additionally, 
these methodologies allow for the enhanced development of 
technologies, such as lightweight armors, protective 
structures, kinetic energy active protection, ballistic shock 
and mine blast protection, and helmet technologies to prevent 
traumatic brain injury, as well as numerous other uses. The 
committee encourages ARL to continue the utilization of 
computational modeling and simulations research to achieve 
greater cost savings.

Mobile protected firepower

    The committee understands that as part of the Army's 
modernization strategy, the Army is attempting to improve the 
tactical mobility and lethality of infantry brigade combat 
teams (IBCTs). The committee notes the mobile protected 
firepower (MPF) combat vehicle program would provide the Army's 
IBCTs with a mobile and survivable direct fire capability to 
defeat enemy armored vehicles, hardened fortifications, and 
dismounted personnel. The committee recognizes that the Army 
Chief of Staff has made MPF a high priority modernization 
program, and notes the Army is actively engaging with the 
industrial base to ensure clarity of requirements. The 
committee believes the Army is developing strategies to 
potentially accelerate the MPF schedule given that the current 
projected schedule has MPF fielding beginning in 2024.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by October 5, 2017, that outlines potential opportunities for 
MPF program acceleration. The briefing should include a review 
of testing requirements and potential areas for consolidation; 
funding required in fiscal year 2018 and beyond to accelerate 
the program; and any areas of legislative relief that would be 
required in order to accelerate the program.

Multi-function explosive material detection technology

    The committee notes that deployed U.S. military forces in 
the greater Middle East face a range of explosive threats from 
improvised explosive devices (IED), which vary based on 
geography, adversary technical expertise, and availability of 
different explosives. The committee is concerned that current 
explosive detection technology is limited to detecting a 
limited set of explosive materials. The committee is aware of 
research work conducted by the Joint Improvised Threat Defeat 
Organization and the Army in the area of multi-function 
detection technology between fiscal years 2012 and 2015 that 
had the potential of providing improved explosive material 
detection capability against certain threats. However, the 
committee was informed by the Army Armament Research, 
Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) that there was no 
funding planned in fiscal years 2017 or 2018 to further pursue 
this technology due to a lack of a specific requirement. The 
committee is concerned that this potentially useful 
technology's development may be hindered as a result. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Director of the U.S. Army 
Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center to 
provide a briefing not later than September 30, 2017, on the 
mix of explosive materials that could be used to target US 
forces with IEDs, the variety of explosive detection 
technologies available, the potential utility of multi-function 
explosive detection technology, and an estimate of the funding 
necessary to accelerate work on this technology to a level that 
would enable thorough testing in the future.

Open Campus

    The committee commends the Army Research Laboratory (ARL) 
for establishing its new Open Campus concept. The committee 
notes that the goal of Open Campus is to build a science and 
technology ecosystem that will encourage groundbreaking 
advances in basic and applied research areas of relevance to 
the Army through a unique arrangement that allows government, 
industry, and academia to work collaboratively on projects in 
common spaces. Such innovation initiated at the laboratory 
level reflects current practices in industry and academia, and 
can be a useful tool in maintaining the ability of ARL to 
maintain its technological competency, workforce, and 
facilities. The committee also encourages the Army to explore 
opportunities to provide stipends for temporary sabbaticals to 
allow academic experts to conduct research at ARL and to 
consider funding long-term joint assignments between academia 
and government. The committee recognizes that Open Campus might 
be a useful model for the other military service laboratories 
to examine to improve their collaboration as well as attract 
new researchers and foster new multidisciplinary teams.

Rapid integration for emerging threats against missile system networks

    The committee is aware that there are a number of rapidly 
emerging threats to the integrity and security of space and 
missile systems and their associated networks. The committee 
recognizes that the Program Executive Office for the Army 
Missile and Space Command is developing a capability to provide 
cyber-robust networked weapon systems the ability to assess and 
integrate rapid countermeasures to such threats. The committee 
understands this capability is accomplished through a unique 
approach to adapt to real-time threats, dramatically 
accelerating the timeline to employ resilience in networked 
weapon systems. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary 
of the Army to provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed 
Services of the House of Representatives by March 1, 2018, on 
the status of progress being made through this accelerated 
program.

Remote weapon system development and integration for tactical and 
        ground combat vehicles

    The budget request included $87.6 million in PE 64601A for 
infantry support weapons. Of this amount, $22.5 million is for 
the purchase of prototypes, design improvements, and test and 
evaluation for a remote weapon station (RWS) that integrates a 
medium-caliber weapon system with a 30mm auto-cannon and a 
Stinger surface-to-air missile. This effort will support 
upgraded lethality capabilities for Army and Marine Corps 
tactical vehicles, including the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle 
(JLTV).
    The committee understands these upgrades are necessary to 
fill emerging capability gaps identified by the Maneuver 
Support Center of Excellence (MSCoE) and identified in the 
Common Remotely Operated Weapon Stations (CROWS) Increment II 
Capability Development Document (CDD). The committee is aware 
the Army is considering upgrades to legacy remote weapon 
systems in order to accelerate fielding of this capability. The 
committee believes other alternative RWS platforms may be 
available that could address these capability gaps. The 
committee encourages the Army to consider a competitive 
acquisition strategy that would leverage advances made in this 
area by the industrial base that potentially generates better 
value for the warfighter, and address the capability gap 
without delaying fielding of this capability. However, the 
committee also recognizes that the Secretary of the Army can 
still exercise discretion in developing the appropriate 
acquisition strategy to meet urgent operational needs.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by August 31, 2017 that reviews the Army's current plan for 
acquisition and fielding of remote weapon stations for tactical 
and ground combat vehicles.

Report on heavy and Stryker brigade combat team wireless 
        intercommunication systems

    The committee understands the Army's Training and Doctrine 
Command conducted a requirement capability gap trace in March 
2016 on wireless intercommunication systems for heavy brigade 
combat teams and Stryker brigade combat teams, and subsequently 
identified and re-certified a capability gap and standing 
requirements. The committee is aware the Army is conducting a 
Combined Arms Futures Integrated Exercise (CAFIX) assessment at 
the Maneuver Center of Excellence (MCoE) to identify potential 
technology solutions. Additionally, the committee understands 
that the Program Executive Office Soldier (PEO Soldier) in 
coordination with the Army's Soldier Enhancement Program (SEP) 
is considering formal field user assessments of the wireless 
intercommunications systems evaluated by MCoE.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
a briefing to the House Armed Services Committee by March 29, 
2018, that describes the technologies evaluated by MCoE during 
the CAFIX assessment, as well as provides the results of the 
SEP field user assessments.

Short range air defense advanced development

    The committee believes there are significant capability and 
capacity shortfalls in the Army's short-range air defense 
artillery (SHORAD) force structure and posture. The committee 
notes the National Commission on the Future of the Army 
concluded that unacceptable modernization shortfalls can be 
found in SHORAD. Section 114 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) 
required an assessment of the ways and associated costs to 
reduce or eliminate capacity shortfalls in major capability 
areas, to include SHORAD. The committee has not received this 
assessment to date. However, the committee understands that the 
Army has conducted a Strategic Portfolio Analysis and Review 
(SPAR) to review 780 programs and evaluate their impact on 
warfighting, and that the SPAR identified SHORAD as a top 
priority. Given current and emerging threats, to include the 
proliferation of small, unmanned aircraft as well as near-peer 
and peer competitors' anti-access and area denial capability, 
the committee supports the SPAR's assessment. The committee 
also notes that U.S. forces can no longer assume air 
superiority or air dominance in future overseas contingency 
operations, which makes SHORAD that much more important.
    The committee understands the Army is pursuing a 
maneuverable, protected, SHORAD capability, as well as plans to 
modernize legacy SHORAD capability and capacity. The committee 
supports these efforts and would encourage the Army to develop 
ways to accelerate this capability.

Software Based Mesh Network for Tactical Communications

    The committee recognizes small dismounted teams require 
nodes of tactical communication that are operationally 
flexible, secure, reliable in austere and contested 
environments, and emit minimal electronic signature. 
Furthermore, the committee notes that satisfying these unique 
communications requirements often entails introduction of 
hardware infrastructure that degrades unit mobility, 
operational agility and stealth. The committee is aware of and 
encouraged by software-based alternatives that create secure 
mesh communications networks, are highly mission adaptable, 
hardware agnostic and scalable to larger maneuver units. As 
such, the committee directs the Department of the Army, in 
coordination with the U.S. Special Operations Command, to 
provide the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives and the Committee on Armed Services of the 
Senate a briefing, not later than 90 days after enactment of 
this act, to include results of a market survey of existing 
software mesh capabilities, on its plan for addressing 
capability gaps in its tactical communications requirements.

Soldier Enhancement Program

    The budget request contained $87.6 million in PE 64601A for 
Infantry Support Weapons. Of this amount, $3.3 million was 
requested for Soldier Enhancement Program (SEP) initiatives.
    The committee supports the work of the Soldier Enhancement 
Program operated by Program Executive Office Soldier. For 
several years, SEP has helped the Army rapidly evaluate and 
type classify commercial off-the-shelf individual equipment and 
organizational clothing to ensure soldiers in training and in 
the field have the best products available. The committee 
encourages the Army, through SEP, to continue evaluating 
additional equipment in order to ensure soldiers have the best 
and latest equipment possible, and believes additional funding 
will allow the program to expand the scope of its work.
    The committee recommends $90.6 million, an increase of $3.0 
million, in PE 64601A for Soldier Enhancement Program 
initiatives.

Soldier Power development

    The committee understands that the Soldier Power portfolio 
consists of the squad power manager (SPM) and integrated 
soldier power and data system-core (ISPDS-C) with conformal 
central power source (CCPS), universal battery charger (UBC), 
flexible solar blankets, and soldier power generation programs. 
The committee is aware that the SPM and ISPDS-C with CCPS 
Capability Production Document (CPD) received final approval 
from the Vice Chief of Staff of the Army on May 15, 2017. The 
committee understands the UBC program is currently completing 
low-rate initial production and is on track for full-rate 
production approval decision in July 2017. The committee notes 
these capabilities provide soldiers with expeditionary power 
and multiple power management alternatives all designed for 
combat operations in austere environments and can be tailored 
to any mission. The committee supports these critical programs 
and believes that they will help to reduce the soldier's combat 
carrying load. The committee encourages the Army to continue to 
work with the industrial base to improve and upgrade components 
in the Soldier Power portfolio to potentially reduce weight and 
cost, as well as to improve overall performance.

Testing and evaluation of supercavitating ammunition

    The committee understands the defense industry has been 
investing in research and development of full caliber 
supercavitating ammunition for use in small arms. The committee 
notes supercavitating ammunition can be used in various 
operational environments, including air-to-air, water-to-water, 
air-to-water and water-to-air, and that this technology could 
potentially address critical mission capability gaps for the 
warfighter.
    The committee is aware that the Government of Norway's 
Norwegian Defense Research Establishment has performed tests 
and evaluation of supercavitating ammunition and that initial 
assessments regarding these tests have demonstrated positive 
results. Given these positive results of the Norwegian 
government's assessments, the committee encourages the 
Secretary of the Army and the Secretary of the Navy to consider 
conducting similar tests and evaluations of this technology.
    Therefore, the committee directs the U.S. Army Program 
Executive Officer for Ammunition, in coordination with the Navy 
Surface Warfare Center-Crane, and any other relevant U.S. 
defense officials to provide a briefing to the House Committee 
on Armed Services by October 6, 2017, that addresses the 
advisability and feasibility of establishing a test and 
evaluation program that could provide for a full capabilities 
assessment.

Underwater munitions disposal and waterjet technology development

    The committee remains concerned that the military services 
have programmed insufficient resources and attention towards 
technology that could significantly improve capabilities 
required for underwater explosive ordnance disposal. The 
committee notes the Navy continues to be threatened by mines 
placed in the waters in which they operate, as well as the Army 
having a requirement to remotely demilitarize obsolete, 
discarded, and unstable munitions that have become embedded in 
the undersea habitat, including coral, without damaging the 
ocean environmental habitat. As such, the committee understands 
the Department of Defense has a requirement for a feasible 
technological approach to recover a munition's chemical and 
explosive ordnance without removing the munition from the ocean 
environment that would both render a munition safe by removing 
the fuse, recovering the explosive material while also leaving 
the munitions body in place. The committee believes additional 
targeted research is needed to demonstrate technology capable 
of both remotely defeating mines threatening U.S. Naval forces, 
as well as providing the capability to demilitarize underwater 
munitions without damaging critical ocean habitat.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army, 
in coordination with the Secretary of the Navy, to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by December 
1, 2017, on research and development efforts by the Army and 
the Navy to further develop a prototype for underwater munition 
explosive ordnance disposal for the purpose stated above.

           Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy


                       Items of Special Interest


Academic partnerships for undersea technology

    The budget request contained $57.8 million in PE 63680N for 
the manufacturing technology program.
    The Navy has been studying the capacity of U.S. shipyards 
to maintain higher production rates for the Virginia-class 
submarine, while at the same time designing and then beginning 
construction of the first Columbia-class ballistic missile 
submarine in 2021. Although this is a feasible option aligned 
with the administration's stated strategic objectives, this 
scenario may present numerous schedule and affordability 
issues.
    The committee is aware that opportunity may exist for the 
Navy to leverage existing relationships with higher education 
partners in the Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH) program to 
decrease the risk the proposed concurrency at the shipyards may 
pose for the cost and schedule of the programs. Specifically, 
the committee believes greater leverage of existing 
partnerships within MANTECH that are focused on undersea 
vehicle applications relating to several key fabrication and 
manufacturing processes technologies, including composites, 
metals, and electronics, may be beneficial.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $67.8 million, an 
increase of $10.0 million, in PE 63680N to develop increased 
manufacturing capability through academic and industrial 
partnerships to better support the needs of the submarine and 
undersea fleet.

Advanced capability for 81mm and 120mm mortar development

    The committee understands that the Marine Corps has a 
science and technology (S&T;) objective for a precision-guided, 
extended-range munition for the M252 81mm mortar system, and 
that the Office of Naval Research (ONR) is currently leading 
this effort. The committee is aware that ONR's goal is to 
demonstrate an affordable precision-guided round using a global 
positioning system or semi-active lasers with minimal size and 
weight growth that has an extended maximum range of 20 
kilometers or more. The committee notes that current testing 
conducted by ONR in 2015 and 2016 have shown promising results, 
and that additional testing is planned in 2017 to demonstrate 
engagements in stationary and moving targets by utilizing a 
semi-active laser. The committee also notes that a potential 
employment concept option exists for either an 81mm or 120mm 
mortar round to be dropped from an aircraft at medium altitude 
with the mortar round utilizing precision guided maneuvering to 
strike the intended target set.
    If either of these developmental and demonstration efforts 
are successful, the committee expects the Marine Corps to 
consider transitioning these validated employment concepts from 
S&T; to a warfighting capability, and to consider developing an 
accelerated acquisition strategy that would utilize all 
available authorities to accelerate the acquisition of 
production ready, or near-production ready, capabilities.

Airborne anti-submarine warfare systems

    The committee understands that the Secretary of the Navy 
continues to advocate for the advanced development and 
developmental testing of airborne anti-submarine warfare 
systems, including aircraft, equipment, and devices for use 
against all types of submarine targets. The committee notes 
that this includes sensors and components, processing, post-
processing, data recording and display capabilities to address 
regional threat scenarios against surfaced or submerged 
conventionally and nuclear-powered submarines. The committee 
continues to support the rapid development of these 
technologies that are considered mature and provide increased 
operational capability through the use of the Rapid Capability 
Insertion program.

Amphibious Combat Vehicle engineering and manufacturing development

    The budget request contained $179.0 million in PE 65611M 
for the Amphibious Combat Vehicle (ACV) program.
    In testimony before the committee, senior Marine Corps 
officials, to include the Commandant of the Marine Corps, have 
described the Amphibious Combat Vehicle program as the 
service's highest modernization priority for the ground combat 
element. The committee supports the President's budget request 
for the ACV program. The committee commends the Marine Corps on 
executing an accelerated acquisition strategy that incorporates 
lessons learned from previous amphibious vehicle and armored 
personnel carrier programs. By using an incremental acquisition 
approach, the Marine Corps will be able to field a next 
generation modernized ground combat vehicle to the warfighter 
in an efficient and timely manner.
    While the committee is encouraged by the progress of the 
ACV program to date, and the committee notes the program 
remains on cost and schedule with all engineering and 
manufacturing development prototype vehicles having been 
delivered, the committee will continue to exercise oversight on 
the ACV program. The committee will focus particular attention 
on the levels of concurrency, or overlap, that may exist 
between testing, and the low-rate production decision that is 
currently scheduled for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2018.
    The committee recommends $179.0, the full amount requested, 
in PE 65611M for the Amphibious Combat Vehicle program.

Automated Testing Technologies

    The committee is aware that the Navy's Automated Testing 
and Analysis (ATA) program was established to expand the use of 
automated test methods currently in use by the Navy, such as 
Automated Test and Re-Test, and adds new methods of testing, 
promotes the use of automated test technologies, and 
standardizes automated test practices, methods, and tools. In 
addition, funding supports the development of enterprise level 
strategies to apply ATA technology to a broad range of 
software-intensive acquisition programs.
    The committee applauds the Department's move to a more 
flexible and agile development approach for software intensive 
projects, but also recognizes that such activities must also be 
matched with the ability to do automated software assurance to 
improve security, and automated testing to improve software 
quality and effectiveness. While the Navy has struggled to 
develop an effective strategy for how to best utilize these 
technologies, the committee believes the other services and 
agencies are even more woefully underprepared to identify and 
adopt useful and effective automated testing technologies such 
as those demonstrated in the ATA program. The committee 
believes that automated tools like this could be beneficial to 
other service and agency test and evaluation activities for 
software intensive systems, and elsewhere in this bill has 
endorsed recommendations for how best to manage and centralize 
such tools to support widespread use across the services and 
agencies.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Director of the Test 
Resource Management Center (TRMC) to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services assessing the current state 
of the art in automated testing technologies available in the 
commercial marketplace by March 1, 2018. This briefing should 
assess the requirements for automated testing tools across each 
of the services and defense agencies developing software-
intensive systems, include a matrix with current commercial 
automated testing tools that could service those requirements, 
a rough order of magnitude assessment of the resources needed 
for those tools, recommendations for making such tools 
available on an enterprise basis, and recommendations for 
measuring the use of and effectiveness of such tools, such as 
through quantitative goals for the reduction of time and 
improvements in the quality of tested software across the 
enterprise.

Barking Sands Tactical Underwater Range modernization

    The budget request contained $66.5 million in PE 24571N for 
consolidated training systems. Of this amount, no funds were 
requested for research and development to upgrade the anti-
submarine warfare (ASW) underwater range instrumentation needs 
at the Barking Sands Tactical Underwater Range at the Pacific 
Missile Range Facility in Hawaii.
    The committee recognizes that the military's ability to 
conduct advanced ASW training is a critical aspect of our 
military technological superiority. The Barking Sands Tactical 
Underwater Range, which was designed, manufactured, and 
installed in 1994, is the largest underwater instrumented range 
in the world, and covers over 1,100 square nautical miles. 
However, the committee is concerned that the current system is 
beyond its 20-year design life, and rapidly becoming difficult 
to operate, repair, and maintain. Senior leaders within the 
Nation's submarine community have been on record since 2012 
calling for a range replacement to begin in order to maintain 
worldwide ASW fleet readiness and superiority.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $76.5 million, an 
increase of $10.0 million, in PE 24571N to support upgrading 
the ASW underwater range instrumentation needs at the Barking 
Sands Tactical Underwater Range.

F/A-18 noise reduction research

    The committee understands that Navy testing to date on F/A-
18E/F Super Hornet noise reduction concluded that engine 
chevron attachments achieved significant noise reduction in a 
limited area of the F/A-18's engine's power settings. However, 
the committee has also been informed by the Navy that further 
research is likely needed to determine if chevron attachment 
technology can be improved to cover a wider range of F/A-18 
engine power settings, and in particular the range of settings 
most relevant to high-noise flight operations near naval air 
stations.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than September 1, 2017, on the results of all noise 
reduction research complete as of the date of the briefing, its 
plans for continued testing of noise reduction technologies for 
the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet, and any possible funding needed to 
pursue such testing efforts in the future.

Incremental development of Next Generation Jammer

    The committee notes that the Navy's Next Generation Jammer 
(NGJ) program is an element of airborne electronic attack that 
is required to meet both current and emerging electronic 
warfare capability gaps and shortfalls. The committee 
understands that the Navy plans to field NGJ capabilities in 
three increments, with each increment designed as separate 
podded systems that will cover a different segment of the 
electromagnetic spectrum. NGJ increment one is designed for the 
mid-band threat range, while NGJ increment two will be designed 
to cover frequency ranges to counter emerging threats from low-
band radar systems.
    The committee expects that funding already invested to 
develop NGJ increment one capability likely resulted in product 
development lessons learned that could be applied to implement 
efficiencies and capabilities, which could reduce the overall 
development cost of NGJ increment two capability. Furthermore, 
the committee notes that the modular open-architecture design 
of NGJ increment one should offer the Navy a significant 
opportunity to benchmark capability that could be leveraged 
into the design of NGJ increment two capability.

Littoral Combat Ship immersive virtual ship environment

    The committee notes that the Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) 
training and certification capability is a key enabler of the 
reduced crew size. The Navy indicated that the LCS training is 
based on a virtual ship-centric concept, accomplished through a 
combination of classroom instruction, vendor training, shore-
based trainers, and sophisticated virtual reality training 
systems. The committee notes that the original LCS training 
design relied upon using an immersive, virtual ship environment 
(IVSE) to replicate key training objectives and protocols for 
both ship variants. The committee continues to support efforts 
to fully employ such sophisticated training, particularly live-
virtual-constructive training, for the LCS fleet with the 
objective of improving sailor performance through higher-
fidelity, effective training solutions.
    Despite the broad acknowledgement of the value of this 
approach to training, positive fleet feedback from the first 
immersive course, and the existence of a contract vehicle to 
support courseware development, the committee believes the Navy 
has been slow to leverage this capability to address readiness. 
The committee is concerned about the Navy's commitment to 
addressing the LCS training environment. In light of ongoing 
LCS operations and maintenance challenges, the committee 
encourages the Navy to more fully utilize IVSE courseware.

Marine and hydrokinetic technology

    The committee is aware of the U.S. Navy's vision in the 30-
year research and development plan for supporting energy 
harvesting, undersea sensor nets, and unmanned underwater 
vehicle operations. In order to conduct many of the development 
and research projects planned by the Navy, the committee 
recognizes the need to have sufficient infrastructure to not 
only test, but also to do a broader range of experimentation, 
prototyping, and development that will be necessary for future 
naval capabilities. The committee encourages the Navy, in 
coordination with its other Federal partners, to continue its 
support for the development of marine and hydrokinetic 
technologies, including research, testing, and demonstration of 
maritime security systems, at-sea persistent surveillance and 
communications systems, and unmanned undersea vehicle charging. 
The committee believes that support from existing facilities, 
such as the Navy's Wave Energy Test Site in Hawaii and other 
research facilities that are supporting marine and hydrokinetic 
energy systems technology development, will be critical to 
developing the naval force of the future.

Marine Corps and Navy small unmanned aircraft system and capability 
        development

    The committee supports the U.S. Marine Corps pursuit of 
nano-sized vertical takeoff and landing small unmanned aircraft 
systems at the squad level to help Marines in small units 
enhance situational awareness. The committee notes that this 
plan was further supported in the 2017 Marine Corps Land 
Systems Investment Plan. For squad-level missions, pocket-sized 
sensors provide soldiers with improved intelligence, 
situational awareness, and enhanced targeting capability. The 
committee understands that this technology has been 
successfully demonstrated by the Army and allied militaries 
during operations, and believes it holds promising potential 
for Marine Corps operations. The committee is further aware 
that the Marine Corps Requirements Oversight Council approved a 
nano-sized and vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) small 
unmanned aircraft system (SUAS) program.
    The committee also recognizes that the Navy and Marine 
Corps are taking advantage of and increasing reliance on the 
many capabilities that SUAS have to offer. The committee 
understands that computer vision and machine learning 
algorithms have been used by other agencies of the federal 
government for the past decade for various applications ranging 
from face recognition to three-dimensional surface modeling. 
Until recently, these algorithms have required significant 
computational resources, and therefore, power consumption. 
However, because of recent technological advancements, it is 
now possible to place an embedded processor on a SUAS and 
perform a number of computer vision tasks onboard. Technologies 
developed by Small Business Innovative Research in the 
specialty of object detection, tracking, and recognition have 
high potential for addressing Department of Defense 
intelligence community surveillance and reconnaissance 
challenges. Automated object detection and tracking (AODT) 
capability for SUAS platforms applied to airborne computer 
vision technology have the potential to provide seamless, 
secure, and scalable SUAS deployed systems in support our 
Nation's surveillance and reconnaissance efforts.
    The committee encourages the Navy and Marine Corps to 
advance development and implementation of nano-sized VTOL SUAS 
capability at the squad level, to include researching AODT 
integration opportunities. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Navy to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than December 15, 2017, 
providing the status of the nano-sized and VTOL SUAS programs, 
a detailed discussion of the technologies being reviewed, and 
the acquisition strategy for potentially implementing this 
capability into the Department of the Navy.

Marine Corps female body armor

    The committee commends the Marine Corps for updating its 
guidance for body armor sizes to better fit Marines at both 
ends of the size distribution scale. Whereas before the 
standard for body armor sizes was to cover Marines from the 5th 
to 95th percentile in size, the new guidance goes further to 
cover the 2nd to 98th percentile in order to provide better 
form, fit, and function to a greater range of male and female 
Marines. The committee also notes that the Marine Corps made 
other changes to its plate carrier system to improve the fit 
for both smaller and larger Marines. The committee understands 
that the Marine Corps believes that this new sizing approach is 
the best way to ensure female Marines have body armor that fits 
properly. The committee supports these efforts.
    In the committee report (H. Rept. 114-537) accompanying the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017, the 
committee directed the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the committee outlining plans to provide personal 
protective equipment (PPE) and organizational clothing and 
individual equipment developed specifically for female service 
members. The committee notes that this briefing was supposed to 
be presented by March 1, 2017; however, the Department of 
Defense requested additional time and now expects to deliver 
the briefing in late June 2017. As such, the committee remains 
concerned that the Marine Corps and the Army continue to take 
different approaches to the development of PPE, to include body 
armor, for female service members. Specifically, the committee 
notes that the Army has fielded female improved outer tactical 
vests, better designed female protective undergarments, 
ballistic combat shirts, as well as requiring female variants 
for the Torso and Extremity Protection System, as part of the 
overall Soldier Protection System. While the committee 
recognizes that both military services are trying to provide 
the best possible protection to their service members, the 
apparent disconnect on this issue is concerning. The committee 
expects the Marine Corps to fully coordinate with the Army 
regarding the Army's development of body armor and PPE to meet 
specific female needs.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Commanding General, 
Marine Corps Combat Development Command, in coordination with 
the Principal Military Deputy to the Assistant Secretary of the 
Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology, to participate 
in the briefing, as required by H. Rept. 114-537, to address 
the Marine Corps' views on the Army's female PPE efforts, as 
well as the Marine Corps' position on the appropriateness of 
adopting the Army's approach to PPE and body armor development 
for female service members. The committee further directs that 
the Secretary of Defense provide the briefing no later than 
September 1, 2017.

Marine Corps Group 5 unmanned aircraft systems experimentation 
        initiative

    The budget request included $8.0 million in PE 34240M for 
advanced tactical unmanned systems, of which $5.0 million is 
for development and capability requirements of the Marine Air 
Ground Task Force Unmanned Aircraft System Expeditionary with 
Vertical/Short Take-Off and Vertical Landing Group 5 UAS 
capability (MUX).
    The committee notes that these funds will allow for early 
trade studies, analysis, experimentation, and concept 
refinement for MUX capability, and that the MUX system's 
initial capabilities document was approved in October 2016. The 
committee is aware that the material development decision and 
analysis of alternatives is also planned to start in fiscal 
year 2018. The future MUX system concept is envisioned to be a 
multi-mission, weaponized, shipboard capable, expeditionary 
system that is runway independent for all weather, long-range, 
and persistence operations from the sea in a contested 
environment. The MUX effort will inform future program scope 
and phasing for development of a MUX capability that is planned 
to be part of a future program of record, supporting 
Expeditionary Force 21 Operating Concepts.
    The committee looks forward to engaging with the Marine 
Corps as the MUX capability becomes more refined in the future. 
The committee also encourages the Commandant of the Marine 
Corps to proactively keep the committee apprised of concept 
refinement and any developmental efforts regarding the MUX 
capability.
    The committee recommends $8.0 million, the amount of the 
request, in PE 34240M for advanced tactical unmanned systems.

Maritime Strike Tomahawk

    The budget request contained $133.6 million in PE 24229N 
for Tomahawk mission planning and development. Of this amount, 
$114.8 million was requested for the Maritime Strike Tomahawk 
program.
    The committee remains concerned about the Navy's ability to 
relieve the back-loading of development funding for the 
Maritime Strike Tomahawk (MST) effort. The vision of the Navy 
regarding the MST program implementation is to install the MST 
components in missiles concurrently with the Tomahawk missile 
recertification program. The committee supports this expanded 
research and development of the MST capability and the 
concurrent delivery of the MST effort with the Tomahawk 
recertification process.
    The committee recommends $123.8 million, an increase of 
$9.0 million, in PE 24229N for the Maritime Strike Tomahawk 
program.

Modification to independent review of F/A-18 physiological episodes and 
        corrective actions as required by section 237 of the National 
        Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017

    Section 237 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (PL 114-328) required an independent review of 
F/A-18 Physiological Episodes (PEs) and corrective actions. The 
findings of the Independent Review are to be sent to the 
congressional defense committees by December 1, 2017.
    The committee notes that in June 2017 the Navy issued a 
Comprehensive Review (CR) examining the facts, circumstances 
and processes surrounding the recent PEs involving T-45 and FA-
18 aircrew, including recommendations for how best to address 
this ongoing problem. The Committee notes with concern the CR's 
finding that at least four deaths have been related to 
incidents involving mishaps involving PEs over the past several 
years.
    Therefore, as part of the Independent Review required by 
Section 237 of PL 114-328, the committee directs the Secretary 
of the Navy to provide further information on the service's 
effort to address this problem in the immediate and long term. 
This information should include, but not be limited to, 
addressing the findings and recommendations provided in the 
June 2017 CR including the Navy's plans (including aircraft 
design changes) to address the following:
    (1) execution of a depot-level deep dive inspection of the 
entire F/A-18 environmental control system and onboard oxygen 
generation system, to include associated sub-components and 
piping;
    (2) replacement of the F/A-18 cockpit altimeter;
    (3) redesign of F/A-18 aircraft life support systems as 
required to meet onboard oxygen generation system input 
specifications;
    (4) development of comprehensive F/A-18 physiological event 
resolution instrumented data plans including multi-media in-
flight audio/video recording;
    (5) design of an F/A-18 automatic or semi-automatic 
initiation of emergency oxygen;
    (6) design of an F/A-18 automatic ground collision 
avoidance system;
    (7) designs for improved FA-18 physiological monitoring and 
alerting systems;
    (8) how all improvements to the F/A-18 aircraft will be 
included in future F/A-18 production.
    The information provided by the Secretary of the Navy 
should also include an assessment of whether the Navy and the 
Independent Review Team have the Resources necessary to carry 
out its mission. Should resources be found to be insufficient, 
the Secretary of the Navy shall include an estimate of what 
resources are necessary.

MQ-25 Unmanned Air System

    The committee notes that the MQ-25 Unmanned Air System 
program is programmed to provide an air refueling capability. 
The committee supports this unmanned air refueling capability 
and believes that it is critical that the Navy integrate an 
unmanned aerial vehicle into carrier aviation operations to 
increase the striking power of carrier air wings.
    However, the committee is concerned that while the MQ-25 
program continues to leverage Unmanned Carrier-Launched 
Airborne Surveillance and Strike (UCLASS) requirements 
justification, the most recent documentation that was sent to 
industry did not include precision strike capability as a 
requirement. The committee believes that the Navy may be 
unnecessarily excluding a critical capability and precluding 
future growth in a platform that will likely be integrated into 
the carrier air wing for the next 30 years.
    Finally, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees by March 1, 2018, on the Navy's carrier 
based unmanned aircraft acquisition program(s), with specific 
focus on the MQ-25 that takes into account the revised 
capability development document. At a minimum the report should 
include: (1) the extent to which the program(s) have 
established cost, schedule, and performance goals, including 
test, production, and fielding plans; and (2) an assessment of 
program progress toward meeting those goals.

Naval energetic materials roadmap

    The committee is aware that energetic materials, including 
both explosives and propellants, are critical components to 
Navy weapon systems and munitions. While the committee is aware 
that Navy laboratories and engineering centers have been 
involved in some research into energetic materials, the 
committee is concerned that these investments have not been 
strategic in scope or direction. Much of the ongoing work is 
devoted to sustaining legacy formulations for energetic 
materials, not investing in new or revolutionary propellants or 
explosives.
    Therefore, the committee believes that the Navy should 
pursue a renaissance of its energetic materials enterprise and 
directs the Secretary of the Navy to develop a long-term 
science and technology roadmap for the development of energetic 
materials, both explosives and propellants. In developing this 
roadmap, the committee believes that Navy should consider the 
identification of the long-term research opportunities for the 
Navy for energetic materials; an assessment of the current 
laboratory and engineering infrastructure to meet the needs of 
this roadmap; and a resourcing strategy. The committee further 
directs the Secretary of the Navy to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by March 2, 2018, on the 
plan.

Passive rocket propelled grenade armor protection technology

    The committee notes there have been significant 
improvements in passive rocket propelled grenade (RPG) armor 
protection over legacy RPG armor systems, which are heavy and 
cumbersome, as well as present form, fit, and function 
constraints, particularly for Marine Corps ground combat 
tactical vehicle fleets operating in expeditionary 
environments. The committee encourages the Secretary of the 
Navy to consider lightweight RPG armor solutions that provide 
protection against RPG attacks, while maintaining the ability 
to fold flat against the vehicle to allow for rapid deployment 
and transport from amphibious ships and aircraft.

Scalable energy and chemical conversion system

    The committee supports continued research by the Office of 
Naval Research into the development of a scalable energy and 
chemical conversion system. The goal of this research and 
development project is to convert small waste-energy sources, 
such as landfill gas, animal digester gas, sewage treatment 
plants, agricultural and forest product wastes, and wellhead 
flare gas, into useful fuels and chemicals. The committee is 
aware that a demonstration effort could take waste methane 
emissions from a solid-waste landfill, clean and desulfurize 
the methane, and then convert it catalytically into gasoline. 
Once fully piloted, it is anticipated that such plants would 
not only reduce or eliminate their fugitive methane emissions, 
but also the methane captured could be converted into a useful 
fuel with only a 2-year payback period before it becomes a 
positive cost contributor to the overall waste collection and 
disposal process. The committee encourages this research as a 
way to potentially reduce fuel cost for the military, and 
potentially address supply chain concerns in forward areas.

Torpedo defense

    In 2010, the Chief of Naval Operations issued an urgent 
operational need for a robust surface ship torpedo defense 
(SSTD) system to address a range of torpedo threats facing the 
Navy's high value units. In response, the Navy accelerated 
research and development efforts of torpedo detection and 
defense capabilities, resulting in the deployment of a towed 
array sensor system and passive sonar signal processing, 
automation, and tactical control system four years ahead of its 
original schedule. Today, five systems with more than 20,000 
operational hours are deployed on aircraft carriers, with 
active sonar upgrades to be delivered for all systems in 2017. 
In parallel, industry has continued to implement planned 
technology upgrades, with Department of Defense officials 
confirming that the most recent sea trial successfully 
identified system achievements and further development 
priorities.
    The committee notes that these improvements have occurred 
against the backdrop of increasing torpedo threats as other 
nations become more aggressive in the maritime domain. While 
the intended goal was to develop a full SSTD capability for a 
program of record while supporting deployed systems, the 
committee understands that accelerating the program in this 
manner impacted funding originally planned for the program of 
record development. The committee appreciates the Navy's plan 
to use the results of the 2017 Quick Reaction Assessment (QRA) 
to help inform and validate the size and scope of planned 
future investments in this critical technology. While the 
committee also supports the Navy's interim plan to fully fund 
necessary upgrades to ensure the highest operational 
availability and performance of currently deployed CVN systems, 
the committee notes that the FY2018 SSTD budget request does 
not provide full funding to achieve this goal, let alone enable 
appropriate program planning and adjustments that may result 
following a successful QRA. As such, the committee believes 
that this capability is essential to support the fleet and will 
continue to monitor this program.
    In addition, the committee notes that through the SSTD 
program, the Navy has expended significant resources to develop 
advanced Torpedo Warning System (TWS) software and algorithms 
for torpedo detection, classification and localization that 
could be used to enhance torpedo warning capabilities on 
surface ships, particularly combatants that carry a 
MultiFunction Towed Array (MFTA). This expanded utilization of 
the TWS capability aligns with the Navy's efforts to work 
across domains to leverage existing systems and programs to 
achieve efficiencies while addressing requirements effectively. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Navy to provide a briefing 
to the House Committee on Armed Services, no later than 
November 1, 2017, on the ability to integrate applicable 
surface ship torpedo defense technologies to support an 
expanded range of ships and the results of the QRA and related 
testing events. At a minimum, this briefing shall include an 
in-depth analysis of: the current and foreseeable torpedo 
threats facing surface combatants; requirements for a torpedo 
defense capability on surface combatants; the applicability of 
the Navy's existing test and operational data regarding the 
torpedo defense system to surface combatants; and cost savings 
that would be achieved by capitalizing on the integration of 
mature SSTD capabilities on a broader range of surface ships.

Workforce management at Navy test ranges

    The committee notes that Navy elements of the Major Range 
and Test Facility Base (MRTFB) operate under the Navy Working 
Capital Fund (WCF). As such, their workforce management should 
be dictated by section 2208 of title 10, United States Code, 
which allows for flexibility in decisions to expand the 
workforce driven by the funded work coming in from other Navy 
or government customers. However, other parts of the MRTFB, 
which in the other military services do not operate in a WCF, 
use a billeting system to manage the workforce. The committee 
notes that such conflicting workforce management methods can 
prove to be problematic when funding work across the MRTFB 
enterprise. The committee is concerned that this uncertainty 
may be posing challenges for planning at these Navy test 
ranges.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by October 2, 2017, on the workforce management policies at 
Navy MRTFBs, including any shortfalls in staffing, conflicts in 
guidance between WCF organizations and MRTFB organizations, and 
recommendations for improving hiring and talent management at 
these facilities.

         Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force


                       Items of Special Interest


Adaptive engine transition program

    The committee continues to support Department of the Air 
Force efforts to mature technology and reduce the risk for the 
adaptive cycle engine (ACE). The committee notes that the 
Department of the Air Force has given official engine 
designations to the two competing ACE concepts. The committee 
also understands that significant accomplishments validated by 
the Department of the Air Force include the designation of 
technology readiness level six for the adaptive fan technology, 
completion of a preliminary design for an ACE, and validation 
of third stream cooling air operation for aircraft and engine 
heat sink capacity. Accordingly, the committee believes that 
both legacy and future aircraft can benefit from this 
technology and capability.
    Therefore, the committee recommends the full amount 
requested in PE 64858F to continue the adaptive engine 
transition program, and further encourages the Department of 
the Air Force to continue to make the necessary investments in 
these critical technology demonstrations and engine 
developments to ensure achieving operational capability at the 
earliest opportunity.

Advanced laser technologies for coating removal, surface restoration, 
        and repair

    The committee recognizes the mission critical importance of 
using cutting-edge technologies in Air Force service depots. 
The committee notes that technologies such as advanced laser 
coating removal, repair, and additive restoration of aircraft 
skin made of metal and composite materials results in 
significant increases in warfighter system readiness, 
sustainability, better environmental outcomes, and cost 
savings. By improving and upgrading laser technologies and 
incorporating them into aircraft life cycle, depot, and field 
programs, the Air Force has estimated a significant annual cost 
savings across all airframes and other Air Force systems and 
ground support equipment. Additionally, the Air Force has 
estimated environmental hazards due to coating removal at 
depots to be reduced by 50 percent through the use of laser 
technologies. Therefore, the committee encourages the Product 
Support Engineering Division in the Air Force Life Cycle 
Management Center, in support of the Air Force depots, to 
qualify and incorporate advanced laser technologies for de-
painting, restoration, and repair of aircraft surfaces for both 
metal and composite surfaces.

Advanced pilot training program

    As the Department of the Air Force continues to 
recapitalize its combat aircraft with fifth generation fighters 
and bombers, the committee is becoming increasingly concerned 
with the T-38C's inability to safely and affordably train the 
Department of the Air Force's incoming pilots. In the committee 
report (H. Rept. 114-537) accompanying the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017, the committee noted 
that the average age of aircraft in the T-38C fleet is 50 
years, with an average of over 16,000 flight hours on each 
aircraft. As a result, the committee believes that the T-38 is 
reaching the end of a safe and viable service life, and is 
increasingly unable to provide the modern pilot training 
required by the Department of the Air Force. The committee 
notes that the APT program office is currently engaged in the 
in-source selection phase to evaluate proposals received by the 
submission deadline of March 30, 2017, and that contract award 
is anticipated to occur late in 2017. Upon contract award, the 
committee understands that the program will enter a limited 
development phase to finalize and verify system design prior to 
a production decision planned for fiscal year 2022. The 
committee also understands that the Air Force plans to make a 
full rate production decision and declare initial operating 
capability in 2024. Further, the Department of the Air Force 
plans to attain full operating capability of the APT system in 
2034. The committee notes that the costs of sustaining the T-
38C fleet are growing even as aircraft availability is 
decreasing, and that the T-38C was originally intended to 
undergo replacement in the mid-1990s. Accordingly, the 
committee continues to believe that any delay to the APT 
program will place the Department of the Air Force combat 
readiness at risk, and that maintaining or accelerating the 
current APT program schedule is required to ensure safe and 
effective training of Department of the Air Force combat 
pilots.
    Therefore, the committee recommends the full amount 
requested in PE 64233F to continue the T-X program. The 
committee also directs the Secretary of the Air Force to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than January 15, 2018, on potential options to accelerate 
the APT program, subsequent to contract award.

Air Force dual-mode missile testing and evaluation

    The committee understands the Department of the Air Force's 
plans to complete development and fielding of the GBU-53 Small 
Diameter Bomb II (SDB II) weapon, with initial operational 
capability on F-15E aircraft planned in fiscal year 2019. The 
committee notes that the SDB II has a three mode sensor that 
provides capability against many target sets in a variety of 
conditions. The committee also notes that, based on the 2016 
selected acquisition report to Congress, the average 
procurement unit cost for the GBU-53 is approximately $140,000 
per weapon. The committee supports continued development, 
production, and fielding of the GBU-53.
    However, the committee also encourages the Department of 
the Air Force to look at less expensive dual-mode missiles 
that, if proven effective and fielded in quantity, could help 
increase precision munition stocks. In particular, the 
committee is concerned that the Department of the Air Force may 
struggle to meet anti-armor precision weapon stock requirements 
in a U.S. European Command context. Therefore, the committee 
encourages the Department of the Air Force to conduct 
integration testing with any dual-mode, air-launched, anti-
armor missiles currently in production and available to the 
Department of the Air Force, including the Brimstone missile 
now in service with the United Kingdom of Great Britain and 
Northern Ireland and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, or other 
similar weapons.

Air Force test and evaluation support

    The budget request contained $678.3 million in PE 65807F 
for the Department of the Air Force. Of this amount, the budget 
request contained $640.8 million for Department of the Air 
Force test and evaluation support. The committee notes that 
test facilities capabilities and resources operated through 
this program include wind tunnels, rocket and jet engine test 
cells, armament test ranges, civilian payroll, and contractor 
services.
    Department of the Air Force officials have informed the 
committee that funding for test and evaluation support is about 
$30.0 million below its historical norm, and that this funding 
erosion has diminished the ability of the Air Force Test and 
Evaluation (T&E;) enterprise to support T&E; of next generation 
capabilities in the near-term. Therefore, the committee 
recommends an increase of $30.0 million for this purpose.
    Additionally, the committee understands that due to late 
resolution of a collective bargaining agreement for a test 
range operations and maintenance contract, the determination of 
required increases for pay and benefits did not occur in time 
to be addressed in the fiscal year 2018 budget request. The 
Department of the Air Force has informed the committee that the 
shortfall amount is $2.4 million, and without these funds, 
critical support to ongoing testing of weapons systems and 
support for operational training activities would be in 
jeopardy. To address this shortfall, the committee recommends 
an increase of $2.4 million.
    Finally, the committee understands that the Department of 
the Air Force does not have a validated requirement for joint 
threat emitters (JTEs) at all test ranges. However, the 
committee believes that the installation of JTEs on all test 
ranges would enhance tactical fighter pilot training, 
particularly for pilots flying fifth generation aircraft at 
nearby locations. Therefore, the committee encourages the 
Department of the Air Force to reconsider its requirement for 
JTEs at all test ranges.
    In total, the committee recommends $710.7 million, an 
increase of $32.4 million, in PE 65807F for Air Force test and 
evaluation support.

Assessment of Air Force Test Center

    The committee acknowledges the importance of the Air Force 
Test Center (AFTC) and the invaluable developmental test and 
evaluation (DT&E;) of air, space, and cyber systems conducted 
throughout the AFTC enterprise. The AFTC enterprise leverages 
its 31 locations across the U.S., 100-plus aircraft, and a 
workforce of 18,000 strong to carryout complex electronic 
warfare testing, airframe and avionics testing, propulsion 
testing, C4ISR testing, and weapons integration. The Committee 
notes that through the AFTC the Air Force has successfully 
tested equipment and aircraft in a realistic and cutting-edge 
environment, ensuring the U.S. maintenance of airpower 
superiority.
    While the Committee believes that the AFTC should continue 
to serve as the cornerstone of Air Force's test and evaluation 
enterprise, the Committee understands that the AFTC faces 
unique challenges in carrying out its mission. These challenges 
include funding for critical sustainment, restoration, and 
modernization of test capabilities; development and growth of 
hypersonic infrastructure and testing capabilities; and 
increasing workforce recruitment and retention. The committee 
directs the Secretary of the Air Force to submit a report on 
its assessment of these challenges and plans to address such 
challenges to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 
2018.

Battlefield airborne communications node program

    The committee notes that the battlefield airborne 
communications node (BACN) system was initially developed to 
meet an urgent warfighter need, and continues to provide 
critical communications and information sharing capability 
between disparate tactical data and voice networks in some of 
the most challenging and important environments around the 
world. The committee appreciates the Department of the Air 
Force's efforts to establish a program of record, and 
encourages continued progress towards this goal.
    In addition, the committee encourages the Secretary of the 
Air Force to continue the planning and establishment of a BACN 
program of record while continuing to meet ongoing warfighter 
requirements in theater. As part of the program's future, the 
committee encourages the Secretary to begin system 
modernization planning in support of anticipated future 
requirements across multiple theaters to ensure that BACN 
capability is maintained in the Department of the Air Force to 
support joint operational communications, 5th Generation 
communications, Combat Cloud, and data networking requirements.

Educational Partnership Agreements

    The committee is aware that the Air Force performs a wide 
range of advanced research and engineering in multi-
disciplinary design for unmanned air platforms. Further, the 
committee recognizes that advanced modeling and design, as well 
as quicker comparative analyses, are beneficial to this effort. 
The committee believes that academia is well-suited to partner 
with the Air Force on modeling, design, and comparative 
analysis through the use of Educational Partnership Agreements, 
which are mutually beneficial agreements that also may enhance 
the Air Force's effort to recruit a diverse and educated 
workforce. The committee encourages the Air Force to leverage 
Educational Partnership Agreements for advanced research and 
engineering for unmanned air platforms.

F135 aircraft engine component improvement program

    The budget requested contained $32.3 million in PE 27268F 
for the F135 aircraft engine component improvement program.
    The committee notes that the F135 component improvement 
program (CIP) provides the only source of critical sustaining 
engineering support for this in-service propulsion system. 
Engine CIP maintains flight safety, fixes in-service revealed 
deficiencies, and improves system operational readiness and 
reliability and maintainability (R&M;) to reduce propulsion 
system life-cycle cost and sustain the propulsion system 
throughout the service life of the aircraft. With most F135 
systems design and development funding ending in fiscal year 
2018, CIP funding will be a critical part of efforts to 
maintain single engine safety and support of the F-35 fleet.
    The committee notes further that in 2015 the F135 CIP 
successfully completed a full service life demonstration test, 
and that the program continued in 2016 with an engine assembled 
and delivered to test by the end of the year. In addition, the 
program is now positioned with multiple tasks for design and 
development which will contribute to the planned course of 
reliability specification requirements. The committee believes 
that continued funding of CIP will ensure that necessary 
improvements can be properly fielded following planned task 
design, development, and test validation.
    The committee recommends $32.3 million, the full amount 
requested, in PE 27268F for the F135 aircraft engine component 
improvement program.

High-efficiency heat exchangers

    High-efficiency heat exchangers are becoming increasingly 
necessary for engines and aircraft, such as the F-35, that 
generate more heat as more advanced capabilities, and thus 
increased weight, are added to the platform. The committee is 
aware that current thermal management systems (TMS) may be 
limited by traditional manufacturing processes, and that 
additive manufacturing is crucial to next-generation TMS. 
Therefore, the committee encourages the Air Force to make 
investments in additive manufactured TMS.

High-speed, anti-radiation missile targeting system pod block upgrade 
        program

    The budget request contained $15.1 million in PE 27136F for 
manned destructive suppression, but included no funds for a 
high-speed, anti-radiation missile targeting system (HTS) pod 
block upgrade program.
    The HTS pod is currently the only reactive suppression of 
enemy air defenses capability and enables the F-16 pilot to 
detect, identify, and locate hostile ground-based emitters. 
Additionally, the HTS pod provides the precise geo-location 
capability necessary to employ precision-guided munitions to 
destroy fixed and mobile enemy air defense systems.
    The committee understands that component obsolescence 
diminishes the availability of HTS pods, and that the 
Department of the Air Force is currently managing this issue by 
using a part-by-part replacement approach that will maintain 
pod inventory, but will not increase the capability of the 
system since any re-design efforts are limited to form-fit-
function constraints. The committee believes that this process 
may result in more advanced and agile threat systems outpacing 
the capability of the HTS pod. To address this issue, the 
committee believes that development of a block upgrade program 
would be a more efficient option to mitigate the impact of 
obsolescence in a single development cycle, and to provide the 
capability enhancements necessary to defeat future adversary 
threat systems.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $35.1 million, an 
increase of $20.0 million, in PE 27136F for manned destructive 
suppression to begin a block upgrade program for the HTS pod.

Hypoxia research collaboration

    The budget request contained $245.9 million in PE 63115DHA 
for medical technology development for promising candidate 
solutions for defense medical challenges.
    The committee recognizes the challenges posed to military 
pilots from hypoxia, and notes the recent significant hypoxia 
challenges with the Navy's F/A-18 Hornet and F/A-18 Super 
Hornet fleets, and the grounding of Navy T-45C Goshawk training 
aircraft. The committee believes that the Air Force should be 
maintaining a robust aerospace research program focused on 
hypoxia research to enhance human resiliency and performance 
within extreme and variable cognitive and physical 
environments. The committee also believes that deeper 
relationships with universities and non-profit research 
institutes can be a useful mechanism to deepen the bench of 
expertise focused on these challenges. Finally, the committee 
encourages the Air Force to work with the Navy as it designs 
its research plans to ensure that hypoxia research efforts are 
fully coordinated across the Department of Defense.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $250.9 million, an 
increase of $5.0 million, in PE 63115DHA to expand 
collaboration on hypoxia research for the Air Force.

Joint Surveillance and Target Attack Radar System Recapitalization 
        program

    The committee is aware of the progress to date being made 
by the Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System (JSTARS) 
Recapitalization program in the effort to replace the legacy E-
8C JSTARS platform. In accordance with the waiver authority 
provided in section 223 of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328), regarding the 
limitation on availability of funds for the JSTARS 
Recapitalization program, the committee notes that the 
Secretary of Defense waived the congressional requirement to 
have a firm-fixed-price contract structure for the engineering 
and manufacturing development phase of the program. The 
committee expects the Secretary of the Air Force to keep the 
committee informed regarding the radar risk reduction effort, 
eventual source-selection and contract award for the aircraft, 
progress towards achieving a milestone B award. The committee 
also expects to be informed regarding any efforts that could be 
implemented to enable program acceleration without 
inadvertently increasing program cost, schedule, or risk beyond 
that are already planned for the program. Finally, the 
committee supports the current acquisition strategy and 
discourages any alteration to the strategy that would rely upon 
the use of a private-sector lead systems integrator.

Light Attack Aircraft Experiment Report

    The committee is aware that the Air Force is conducting a 
Capability Assessment of Non-Developmental Light Attack 
Platforms run by the Air Force Strategic Development Planning 
and Experimentation Office with inexpensive, light attack 
aircraft to determine what missions such aircraft could 
perform, how well, and the efficacy of creating a `high/low' 
aircraft capability mix within the Service. The committee 
supports service-wide efforts to explore innovative solutions 
that lower costs. The possibilities afforded by highly capable, 
low-cost, and low cost-per-flying-hour aircraft include: 
dramatically reducing the use of existing legacy and 5th 
Generation aircraft in low-threat insurgency-type environments, 
reducing the Service's yearly operations and support costs, 
offering increased joint training opportunities with ground 
forces, improving international partnerships and capacities, 
and helping to solve pilot absorption issues by dramatically 
increasing the amount of fighter mission flying time trained 
pilots receive every month. The committee does not believe that 
light attack aircraft can replace the high-end capabilities of 
aircraft such as the A-10 or F-35. The committee notes that 
these lower cost aircraft can be operated as supplement to, and 
thereby maximizing the life of, these important aircraft for 
the near-peer fight, were that to be necessary.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force to 
submit a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
December 31, 2017, on the results of the OA-X experiment. If 
the Secretary has concluded that an OA-X program will 
effectively complement the existing force structure, reduce 
costs, and improve pilot training and proficiency, and that 
such a program should proceed expeditiously, the Secretary is 
encouraged to provide the Congress with a supplemental funding 
request and acquisition plan.

Metals Affordability Initiative

    The committee is pleased by the continuing work of the Air 
Force Research Laboratory to decrease costs and weight of high-
performance metals for use in airframes, engines, and other 
structures and devices through the Metals Affordability 
Initiative. Technologies produced through this program have 
aided many major weapons systems, including the F-35, C-130, 
and legacy aircraft such as the F-15 and F-16. The committee 
encourages the Air Force to continue the work of this 
innovative public-private partnership.

Remote and stand-off detection of weapons of mass destruction threats

    The budget request included $124.7 million in PE 62201F for 
Aerospace Vehicle Technologies, but contained no funding for 
technology development research for remote and stand-off 
detection of weapons of mass destruction using remotely piloted 
aircraft.
    The committee encourages the Department of Defense and the 
Air Force to leverage existing work to increase focus regarding 
the development of weapons of mass destruction sensor 
technology that could be potentially integrated on remotely 
piloted aircraft. The committee understands that analyzing and 
applying chemical plume tracking behavior could potentially 
lead to opportunities to address current requirements for 
improved detection and location of sources of chemical, 
biological, radiological and nuclear targets, and recovery of 
endangered personnel through the integration of this sensor 
technology on remotely piloted aircraft.
    The committee recommends $129.7 million, an increase of 
$5.0 million, in PE 62201F to accelerate technology development 
for remote and stand-off detection of weapons of mass 
destruction using remotely piloted aircraft.

Reusable hypersonic vehicle structure

    The committee is aware of the importance of hypersonic 
research to future defense needs. The committee notes that the 
Air Force has reinvigorated its work in this area, and in 
conjunction with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, 
has been exploring near-term weapons systems options. The Air 
Force has also recently announced a new initiative to explore a 
reusable hypersonic vehicle, which will require investments to 
better characterize the materials properties, flight dynamics 
properties, and vehicle and wing structure that might be 
necessary for such a vehicle. The committee supports the goals 
of the Air Force initiative, and encourages the use of a 
consortium, including research universities, non-profit 
research institutes, industry partners, and other government 
laboratories, to focus on areas of thermal and mechanical load 
predictions through the use of computational models validated 
with limited hypersonic wind tunnel testing.

Robust electrical power system for aircraft

    The budget request contained $104.5 million in PE 603216F 
for the development and demonstration of electrical power, 
thermal management, and distribution for aerospace 
applications.
    The committee recognizes the Air Force is highly focused on 
developing directed energy weapons systems, both for aircraft 
self-protection as well as to provide offensive capability for 
future aircraft. In order to meet those goals, the Air Force 
will not just need a lasing system and optics with the size and 
weight to be incorporated into aircraft-sized systems, but it 
will also need a power generation system that can meet all of 
these new power demands in addition to all of the other 
electrical and avionics subsystems on these aircraft. The 
committee encourages the Air Force to focus developmental work 
on the aerospace electrical power for lightweight and efficient 
power technologies needed for those future aircraft concepts.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $109.5 million, an 
increase of $5.0 million, in PE 603216F to enable the design, 
fabrication, and ability to test components in a ground 
demonstrator to support a robust electrical power system for 
future aircraft needs.

Technology transition efforts

    The budget request contained $840.7 million in PE 604858F 
for efforts to demonstrate technologies and concepts to 
accelerate the transition to acquisition programs of record and 
operational use.
    The committee recognizes the need to provide more 
opportunities to mature and demonstrate technology in order to 
improve acquisition outcomes and get new technology in the 
hands of the warfighter more rapidly. The committee also 
recognizes that without some dedicated funding to help bridge 
the ``valley of death'' between research efforts from the labs 
and acquisition programs of record, the warfighter will 
continue to be challenged with maintaining technological 
superiority and keeping a qualitative technological advantage 
over potential future adversaries. The committee encourages the 
Air Force to continue using this program element line to 
conduct large scale demonstrations, as well as to take greater 
advantage of cost-matching with its industry, academic, and 
other Government partners in order to support key technology 
areas, like system performance modeling and simulation, 
additive manufacturing, demonstrations, and rapid evaluation of 
systems-of-systems prototypes.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $850.7 million, an 
increase of $10.0 million, in PE 604858F for cost-matched 
technology transition efforts.

       Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-Wide


                       Items of Special Interest


Accumulation of section 219 funds

    The committee is aware that section 219 of the Duncan 
Hunter National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009 
(Public Law 110-417) provided new authorities to allow the 
Department of Defense laboratories to set aside funds for 
activities to improve the labs' ability to conduct defense 
missions. That authority included the use of these funds for 
some minor military construction projects that would help 
alleviate the backlog in modernization needed to keep the labs 
at the cutting edge of research. The provision was further 
modified by section 262 of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2014 (Public Law 113-66) to allow these 
funds to be accumulated for up to 5 years.
    However, the committee is aware that to date, no actions 
have been taken to implement the new authority allowing the 
accumulation of funds among any of the military services. While 
there has been some discussion about difficulty in establishing 
the accounting procedures to account for these funds, the 
committee is not aware of any formal determination or 
explanation of the reasons for not implementing this authority. 
The committee is concerned that the Department, despite the 
widespread support for these authorities among the Department 
of Defense laboratories, has not provided sufficient attention 
to this issue to work through any difficulties. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in coordination 
with the Secretaries of the military departments, to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by January 
15, 2018, on the status and challenges of implementing 
subsection (b)(3) of section 219 of Public Law 110-417, 
including recommendations for actions that might support 
implementation.

Additive manufactured parts

    The committee is aware of the significant possibilities 
that additive manufacturing, or 3-D printing, will provide to 
the Department of Defense, both in revolutionizing the 
industrial supply chain, as well as in providing radically new 
technological capabilities. The ability to utilize new 
materials in new ways, such as titanium or explosives, or to 
develop new manufacturing processes, has the potential to 
transform how the Department does business. The establishment 
of new Defense Manufacturing Innovation Institutes, as well as 
the growing prevalence of 3-D printers at tactical levels, 
indicates the Department sees that potential as well. Additive 
manufacturing could also greatly improve the organic industrial 
base's ability to respond to demands that original equipment 
manufacturers are unable to meet or to fabricate obsolete parts 
that are no-longer manufactured.
    The committee understands that an inhibitor to seeing the 
full potential of this technology will be the need to do 
quality assurance and validation of additive manufactured 
parts, especially for those in flight or safety-critical 
systems. Until the Department can develop the standards and 
processes for assuring quality, 3-D printing will be limited in 
its application. Also, substantial room remains across the 
force to add more capacity for this capability, both to repair 
out-of-date equipment and to speed repair in order to meet 
urgent operational requirements.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than December 1, 2017, on the Department's plans to 
develop and improve additive manufacturing. The briefing shall 
include the Department's plans to: develop military and quality 
assurance standards as quickly as possible; leverage current 
manufacturing institutes to conduct research in the validation 
of quality standards for additive manufactured parts; and 
further integrate additive manufacturing capabilities and 
capacity into the Department's organic depots, arsenals, and 
shipyards.

Briefing on improving overseas security from UAS threats and existing 
        authorities to use countermeasures

    The committee is aware that servicemembers and operational 
security are threatened by the global proliferation of unmanned 
aerial systems. Adversaries ranging from ISIS to North Korea 
have employed UAS of varying sophistication in capacities 
including offensive operations and reconnaissance. Because of 
the commercial availability of these systems, their relative 
affordability and ease of use, this trend is likely to continue 
into the future.
    The committee is also aware of developments in counter-UAS 
strategies which have the capability to reduce this threat. 
Options range from sophisticated EW jamming technologies to 
specially trained birds of prey, such as those used to protect 
the May meeting of NATO leaders. The committee believes a 
tiered approach to installation self-protection including 
multiple defensive measures is ideal. However, the committee 
notes the authorities employed to interdict UAS can vary 
greatly by host country. Therefore, the committee requests a 
briefing from the Secretary of Defense no later than September 
30, 2017, on emerging technologies and techniques for counter-
UAS installation security and force protection at locations 
with such requirements and any challenges to meeting 
requirements due to host nation law, rules, and regulations.

Common Analytical Laboratory System

    The Common Analytical Laboratory System (CALS) would 
provide the U.S. military with a common platform across all the 
military services for analyzing, diagnosing, and investigating 
chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) agents 
at home station or when forward deployed. Currently, each 
military service uses its own system requiring different 
training across each platform and differing sustainment 
resources and investments. The committee believes CALS will not 
only provide increased capability for analyzing, diagnosing, 
and investigating CBRN agents, but that commonality will also 
result in costs savings and other efficiencies. Therefore, the 
committee encourages the Department of Defense to continue its 
investment in CALS.

Cyber Grand Challenge

    The committee recognizes the value in researching, testing, 
developing, and wargaming autonomous systems, artificial 
intelligence, and cyber tools in order to enable the Department 
of Defense with advanced systems and platforms. The committee 
recognizes that the Cyber Grand Challenge conducted by the 
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is an excellent 
example of such an engagement, in which the construct was 
productive and the purpose was critical. It is imperative that 
lessons learned from the Cyber Grand Challenge and other such 
exercises are not forgotten and that the Department work to 
incorporate the technology, lessons learned, and process into 
future research, development, testing, and evaluation. The 
committee encourages the Department to harness these lessons 
and ensure increased collaboration with the operational cyber 
mission forces as a way to get those emerging technologies into 
the hands of the warfighter. The committee believes the 
Department should continue to develop the technological 
advances displayed at Cyber Grand Challenge, and to consider 
incorporating these lessons, ideas, and challenge opportunities 
into other exercises moving forward.

Defense genomics research and training

    Given recent advancements in genetic engineering, synthetic 
biology, and the genomic sciences, the committee is interested 
in advancing the genomics work performed by the U.S. Army 
Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) as 
a way to more effectively identify, monitor, and potentially 
counter emerging biological threats. The committee also notes 
that current research and development efforts underway in the 
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the Defense 
Threat Reduction Agency may offer collaborative opportunities 
when combined with USAMRIID's expertise and institutional 
knowledge. Therefore, the committee encourages a more robust 
and rapid collaborative effort between these organizations 
within the Department of Defense to more effectively deal with 
emerging biological threats.

Department of Defense laboratories and engineering centers

    The committee is aware that vital work is being conducted 
at Department of Defense laboratories and research and 
engineering centers, along with the laboratories of the 
military services. The committee has previously noted its 
concern about the state of research facilities, office space, 
and other infrastructure at some of the Nation's premier labs. 
That concern was reiterated in a January 2017 report from the 
Defense Science Board, titled ``Defense Research Enterprise 
Assessment.'' This report quantified the average age of 
facilities being between 45-50 years, and ``found examples of 
dysfunction regarding infrastructure planning and operation.''
    Modern buildings, equipment, and other resources are vital 
to ensuring that the military services stay at the cutting edge 
of technology and are recruiting and retaining the most 
talented scientific personnel, but are not adequately or 
comprehensively addressed by laboratory, science and 
technology, or military service leadership. Therefore, the 
committee encourages the Department and other services to 
prioritize recapitalizing, refurbishing, and otherwise 
modernizing facilities at military service research 
laboratories and research and engineering centers.

Deployable assured position, navigation, and timing systems

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense has 
several urgent research and development efforts underway to 
ensure that critical position, navigation, and timing (PNT) 
systems remain effective into the future as part of an assured 
PNT (A-PNT) program of record. The committee supports these 
efforts and believes that the threat to PNT capability is 
increasing and likely warrants an aggressive approach by the 
Department to stay ahead of the problem. The committee notes 
that the Army Rapid Capabilities Office is exploring a range of 
potential A-PNT alternatives in which existing technologies 
could efficiently meet near-term operational needs in the 
European theater. As the A-PNT program of record continues to 
progress, the committee expects that manufacturers of existing 
technologies will have the opportunity to bid on A-PNT 
contracts for the development of materiel solutions as part of 
the program of record.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by September 
1, 2017, that includes the following: a summary of the 
Department's current programs related to assured PNT; the 
current requirements for the programs in terms of size, weight, 
power, resilience against kinetic and non-kinetic effects, and 
other factors; the current schedule and cost estimates for such 
programs; and any opportunities for potential acceleration of 
these efforts.

Energy storage modules

    The committee supports continued research and development 
of directed energy weapons, including those capable of use on 
high-altitude aircraft. In order to make that goal achievable, 
the committee notes its concern surrounding the availability of 
energy and pulsed power source for airborne directed energy 
weapons. The committee is aware of significant advances in the 
capabilities, size, and weight of new energy sources, such as 
those that combine lithium-ion batteries with phase change 
materials and an active heat transfer loop. The committee 
believes that with further research, these activities could 
develop enhancements to current technology that might include 
reduced weight and volume; improved battery longevity; reduced 
procurement, operations and maintenance, and sustainment costs; 
significantly improved safety and survivability; increased 
recharge as well as discharge rates; and robust and well-damped 
thermal management process controls.

Enhancement of test and evaluation through modeling and simulation

    The committee believes that advanced modeling and 
simulation (M&S;) can moderate the rising costs associated with 
test and evaluation (T&E;) of complex weapon systems. However, 
the committee notes there is no indication that the Department 
of Defense's T&E; organizations are involved in any concentrated 
effort to reduce the cost of T&E; activities through a 
coordinated M&S; effort. The committee understands that 
significant investments have been made by program offices in 
M&S; for their particular weapon system, and that some M&S; is 
primarily for training uses and are proprietary or specifically 
designed for that weapon system. Therefore, these models cannot 
be easily integrated together in a complete war fighting 
fashion. The committee recommends that the Department 
aggressively pursue initiatives, like establishing a 
coordination group, to encourage the use of M&S; more 
effectively by the T&E; community in development and operational 
activities.

Explosive Ordnance Disposal equipment technology upgrades

    The committee notes that conventional Explosive Ordnance 
Disposal (EOD) units across the military services require 
upgraded equipment and technology enhancements, particularly 
for routine inspection and search activities. The committee 
believes that conventional Joint Service EOD units would 
benefit from rapid acquisition of EOD equipment, which have 
high-definition resolution and encrypted signals, among other 
upgraded capabilities. The committee understands that the 
Department of Defense cancelled the Explosive Ordnance 
Disposal/Low Intensity Conflict program element which formerly 
developed and delivered Joint Service EOD advanced 
capabilities. The committee understands the Combating Terrorism 
Technology Support (CTTS) program will absorb this mission area 
within the Improvised Defeat Device and Explosive 
Countermeasures subgroup activity. The committee encourages the 
Director of the CTTS program to prioritize funding toward 
delivering advanced capabilities for conventional Joint-Service 
EOD units.

Historically black colleges and universities and minority serving 
        institutions

    The budget request contained $25.9 million in PE 61228D8Z 
for research work with historically black colleges and 
universities and minority serving institutions (HBCU/MSI).
    The committee recognizes the important role this program 
plays in bolstering the research capabilities and capacities at 
HBCU/MSIs. Not only is such work important in meeting the 
defense research needs of the Department of Defense, but the 
committee also believes it provides an added benefit by 
diversifying the supply of scientists, engineers, and 
researchers working on defense problems. This diversity in 
people also provides diversity in thought and approach that can 
be immensely beneficial for research.
    Section 233 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92) required the Department of 
Defense to develop a strategy for improving engagement with 
HBCU/MSIs. Among other things, this strategy outlined four 
objectives, including:
    (1) increasing efforts to include HBCU/MSIs in ongoing 
research programs and activities for which institutions of 
higher learning, in general, are the eligible entities;
    (2) increasing the visibility of the Department of Defense 
programs and activities among HBCU/MSIs and their students;
    (3) re-emphasize the need to include HBCU/MSI faculty and 
students in Department of Defense research activities; and
    (4) ensuring HBCU/MSIs and their faculty and students are 
mentored.
    The committee applauds the Department for articulating a 
clear strategy, and encourages the Department to develop a 
scorecard for collecting and reporting metrics of success in 
achieving the components of this strategy.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $35.9 million, an 
increase of $10.0 million, in PE 61228D8Z for additional 
research between historically black colleges and universities 
and minority serving institutions, as well and increased 
teaming opportunities between these institutions and other 
research universities with experience supporting defense needs.

Joint electronic warfare wargaming

    The committee recognizes electronic warfare (EW) 
capabilities are a critical enabler of the U.S. military, and 
that the EW capabilities and countermeasures of our adversaries 
threaten our military's advantage on the battlefield. The 
committee believes effective and efficient management of joint 
EW capabilities are an essential element of addressing trans-
regional, multi-functional, and multi-domain security 
challenges across the spectrum of conflict, and supports the 
Department of Defense's establishment of the Electronic Warfare 
Executive Committee (EW EXCOM) in 2015, and the development of 
an EW Strategy to that end.
    However, the committee is concerned that the speed and 
scope of progress on the strategy and joint development of 
warfighting capabilities is not keeping pace with threats and 
opportunities. The committee believes wargaming may provide an 
opportunity to thoroughly understand the current preparedness 
of the joint force to operate in a EW contested environment, 
and such knowledge will contribute to the overall management of 
joint EW capabilities and development of a strategy. Therefore, 
the committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to conduct an 
EW wargame to model and evaluate the preparedness of the joint 
force to operate in a contested environment based on current EW 
capabilities modeled against a selection of approved war plans 
and current intelligence estimates. The committee further 
encourages the Department to consider focusing on the 
challenges potentially posed by the Russian Federation or the 
People's Republic of China as part of any wargaming scenario.

Joint U.S. Forces Korea Portal and Integrated Threat Recognition 
        program

    The committee notes the recent increase in political 
tensions on the Korean peninsula caused by the growing threat 
of the use of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) by the 
Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea), and 
recognizes the importance of the Joint U.S. Forces Korea Portal 
and Integrated Threat Recognition (JUPITR) Advanced Technology 
Demonstration (ATD). While threats posed by North Korea's 
nuclear weapon and ballistic missile programs remain paramount, 
deterrence and defense requires a comprehensive strategy 
against all WMD. JUPITR compliments this mission by providing 
essential detection and identification of biological threats.
    The committee recognizes the important role JUPITR plays in 
the protection of U.S. Forces Korea and the defense of the 
Republic of Korea. The committee encourages the Department of 
Defense to take actions to accelerate and enhance the JUPITR 
ATD and to establish an operational program of record for 
fielding and operating suitable equipment to protect U.S. 
Forces Korea from biological threats.

Latent and delayed-onset effects of traumatic brain injury

    The committee is aware that traumatic brain injury (TBI) 
disproportionately affects the warfighter and veterans, with 
symptoms including memory loss, an inability to manage 
emotions, impulsivity, and depression. However, due to the lack 
of overt symptoms for many who suffer mild TBI or concussions, 
service members may be left untreated or dismissed due to 
delayed effects that may only manifest over time. The committee 
commends the Department of Defense on its efforts to promote 
research aimed at addressing symptoms of TBI in the acute 
stages after injury and prevention of such injuries. However, a 
key challenge facing the military is understanding how TBI 
impacts the brain, both in the short-term and long-term, and 
how to improve the function of the brain regions that have 
escaped damage. Therefore, the committee encourages the 
Department to continue its efforts and collaborate with public 
and private partners to accelerate the development of 
treatments for the latent and delayed-onset effects of TBI.

Light field display technology

    The committee notes that the Defense Advanced Project 
Research Agency funded and developed a working prototype of a 
holographic display for real-time battle space visualization 
through a program called the ``Urban Photonic Sandtable 
Display.'' Subsequent efforts through Small Business Innovation 
Research grants by the Department of the Navy, the Department 
of the Army, and the Department of the Air Force have advanced 
this technology to support warfighter situational awareness 
requirements, including an enhanced glasses-free 3-Dimensional 
common operating picture. The committee supports accelerated 
development of this technology, including rapid transitions 
into military service programs of record.

Low-power, long-endurance radar for force protection

    The committee is aware that U.S. Special Operations Command 
has developed an ultra-low-power, rapidly deployable field 
radar to enhance force protection, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance missions for small teams operating in austere 
environments. This capability has also shown promise in 
traditionally difficult areas, including riverine environments, 
mountains terrain, and dense foliage. Therefore, the committee 
encourages the Department of Defense and U.S. Special 
Operations Command to continue to develop similar capabilities, 
and to transition mature technology into a program of record 
when appropriate.

Machine learning

    The committee applauds the Department of Defense's focus on 
machine learning in its Third Offset Strategy as a means of 
enhancing the safety of the warfighter, lowering costs and 
streamlining processes, and informing strategic decision 
making. The committee is aware that the exponential growth in 
data available globally, combined with evolving machine 
learning techniques and growing computational resources, are 
both an opportunity and a necessity. The committee recognizes 
that countries that make effective use of these data sets and 
tools will have strategic and tactical advantages over those 
who do not. As such, the committee urges the Department of 
Defense to continue to expand its exploration of commercial 
machine learning offerings, and in particular, to consider the 
promise of machine learning applied to non-traditional data 
sets, including financial markets, the Internet of Things, and 
global supply chains. These and other similar data sets 
encapsulate the actions and decisions of wide swaths of the 
world's population, and thus may provide enhanced situational 
awareness, as well as anticipatory signals on future events 
through crowd sourcing.

Medical simulation research

    The committee is aware that medical simulation systems can 
improve education, training, and skills development. While many 
of the current simulator manikins used for practical, hands-on 
training lack the tactile fidelity and accurate portrayal of 
multiple biological and organ systems, these systems hold 
greater promise in the future after further development and 
validation. However, recent advances in computational power, 
big data analytics, machine learning, and medical informatics 
also indicate promise for new forms of medical simulation that 
might be applied to other areas of clinical outcomes, including 
clinical decision support.
    The committee is encouraged by advances in both areas, and 
believes the Department of Defense could do more to leverage 
these technological advances to support medical training. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
January 19, 2018, on current investments in medical simulation 
technology and research and Department-wide efforts to 
incorporate simulated learning techniques in defense medical 
training.

Non-lethal directed energy technologies

    The committee supports the need to minimize collateral 
damage, take all available avenues to reduce civilian 
casualties, and prevent damage to infrastructure in engagements 
abroad. The utilization of radio-frequency and microwave-based 
non-lethal directed energy technologies provides many 
opportunities in this regard. These technologies have matured 
through the science and technology phase, and are already 
employed by military service and combatant commands in the 
operational environment across the globe, providing a 
complementary asset and additional flexibility to the 
warfighter and U.S. security forces. These technologies have 
the capacity to stop ground vehicles, small vessels, and 
unmanned aerial vehicles from infringing upon protected spaces, 
or to deny access to secured facilities. The effects of these 
technologies are entirely reversible. The committee, therefore, 
encourages the Department of Defense to make greater efforts to 
utilize these technologies where appropriate, and sustain these 
integrated non-lethal directed energy technologies in order to 
minimize risk to U.S. forces, noncombatants, and critical 
infrastructure.

Overseas waste disposal technology development

    Section 317 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2010 (Public Law 111-84) required the Secretary of 
Defense to submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and House of Representatives regarding the use of 
open-air burn pits. The report submitted by the Secretary 
stated that ``the introduction of incinerators, plus other 
thermal (to include waste-to-energy) and non-thermal waste 
disposal options, are intended to eventually displace the use 
of burn pits.'' The report concluded, ``The Department of 
Defense must continue to explore viable technical solutions for 
waste reduction and waste disposal in all categories--solid, 
medical, and hazardous--and then make such solutions available 
through easily acquired commercial or Department of Defense 
provided equipment.''
    The committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics to provide a briefing to 
the House Committee on Armed Services by November 15, 2017, 
that provides an update on the progress made toward achieving 
the goals stated in the report required by section 317 of 
Public Law 111-84, as well as an update regarding how the 
Department is implementing lessons learned regarding waste-
disposal technologies in overseas contingency operations.

Pilot program on modernization and fielding of electromagnetic spectrum 
        warfare systems and electronic warfare capabilities

    The committee notes that Section 234 of the Fiscal Year 
2017 NDAA established a pilot program on modernization of 
electromagnetic spectrum (EMS) warfare systems and electronic 
warfare (EW) systems. This program was written to provide the 
Secretary of Defense with flexibility in the use of 
appropriated funds, with the ultimate goal of developing and 
fielding more modern capabilities. As an example, some aircraft 
are currently operating with jammers and radar warning 
receivers developed in the 1980s which would be ideal 
candidates for inclusion in the pilot program. By using the 
authority granted in Section 234, the Department of Defense 
could then use appropriated sustainment funds to modernize 
these systems, delivering improved capability to the warfighter 
without additional appropriations. The committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to deliver a report to the House Armed 
Services Committee no later than December 31, 2017 on 
implementation of the Section 234 pilot program, to include 
which EMS warfare and EW systems have been selected and any 
challenges encountered in modernization of these systems.

Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics

    The committee acknowledges science, technology, 
engineering, and mathematics (STEM) educated personnel are 
required for a significant portion of the Department of Defense 
workforce. Personnel with STEM degrees are especially important 
to the viability of the science and technology workforce now 
and in the future, including at national labs. The committee 
believes it is important that the Department of Defense grow 
the next generation of scientists and researchers to contribute 
to national defense and technology through funding STEM 
education programs and collaboration with academia.

Small turbine engines

    The committee recognizes the importance of low cost turbine 
engines in powering munitions and unmanned aerial vehicles that 
support operations in the various combatant command areas of 
responsibility, and is aware that technology for high-
efficiency, low-cost systems may be available. Low-cost is 
driven by competition, as well as small business participation. 
Therefore, the committee encourages the Department of Defense 
to adequately resource efforts to identify low-cost, small 
engine technologies capable of powering missiles and unmanned 
aerial vehicles, and directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics to provide a briefing to 
the Senate Armed Services Committee and House Armed Services 
Committee by September 1, 2018, on current research and 
development efforts and the industrial base which supports this 
area.

Space-based debris remediation in Low Earth Orbit

    The committee is concerned about the increasing challenges 
of space debris and growing risk to defense and other 
satellites. The committee thereby directs the Director of the 
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to assess the 
viability of space-based debris remediation in Low Earth Orbit 
(LEO), and also whether such system could be used for 
additional purposes, including space situational awareness. The 
committee believes that remediation of debris smaller than what 
can currently be detected and tracked may help prevent 
catastrophic conjunctions and preserve orbital regimes for 
future operations.
    The committee directs DARPA to provide a briefing to the 
House and Senate Armed Services Committees no later than 
January 15, 2018 on the results of the assessment.

Sterilization and inspection of medical instruments

    The committee is aware that a new class of small diameter, 
near-field inspection scopes and infection control systems, 
designed to provide ready access to and imaging of the interior 
chambers and working channels of medical and surgical devices 
and endoscopes, have been developed, and are commercially 
available on a competitive basis. The detailed inspection and 
focused sterilization they provide may be the most efficient 
and effective way to ensure that medical devices are safe when 
used on patients and compliant with the Association for the 
Advancement of Medical Instrumentation and American National 
Standards Institutes standards for surgical instrumentation 
sterilization. The committee is aware such advancements in 
technology would be beneficial to Department of Defense medical 
facilities, especially in forward deployed surgery centers. 
Therefore, the committee encourages the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Health Affairs, in coordination with the Surgeon 
Generals of the military departments, to explore deployment of 
these modern infection control systems.

Success metrics of the Defense Innovation Unit Experiment (DIUx)

    The committee is aware of the Department of Defense's 
efforts to increase outreach to and collaboration with sources 
of commercial innovation throughout the United States. The 
committee is also aware that there is discussion about 
reorganizing the innovation organizations in the Office of the 
Secretary of Defense (OSD). The establishment of an Under 
Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering under Section 
901 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2017 (Public Law 114-328) would elevate the innovation function 
within the Department and provide a critical mass for all of 
the technology innovation functions within OSD, much like a 
Chief Innovation Office or a Chief Technology Officer would in 
a private sector organization. The committee recommends the 
Department look at the organization and functions of the 
Defense Innovation Unit Experiment (DIUx) as part of that 
holistic review, and encourages the Department to consider 
placing this organization under this new Under Secretary.
    Further, the committee appreciates the DIUx report, dated 
January 16, 2016, which was submitted in response to 
requirements in the FY17 NDAA. However, additional information 
is necessary in order to fully evaluate the effectiveness of 
DIUx under the listed metrics. Lack of reporting on the metrics 
impacts the committee's ability to fully evaluate and 
understand if the DIUx program is meeting its mission of 
accelerating innovation to the warfighter.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit to the congressional defense committees a report not 
later than March 1, 2018, on how DIUx activities will be 
sufficiently tied into the broader activities of the Department 
of Defense, including incorporating lessons learned to 
alleviate the systematic problems with technology access and 
timely contract execution. The report shall also contain 
results of DIUx's metrics of success, by year since DIUx 
establishment, that include complete data on the following:
    (1) number of innovations delivered into the hands of the 
warfighter;
    (2) return on investment for all DIUx projects, including 
both ``demonstration effect'' and incorporation of piloted 
technology if applicable;
    (3) whether DOD access to technology leaders has increased 
as a result of DIUx, with specific examples;
    (4) number of non-traditional companies doing business with 
DOD as a result of DIUx
    (5) whether other DOD components have elected to adopt DIUx 
practices, with specific examples.
    The report shall also include information on:
    (1) how the Department plans to integrate, field and 
sustain capabilities acquired through the private sector to 
ensure maximum utility and value to the department through a 
capability's lifecycle; and
    (2) how the Department is notifying its internal components 
about participation in DIUx.

System for reviewing and monitoring industrial base transactions

    The budget request contained $10.9 million in PE 67210D8Z 
for industrial base analysis and sustainment support.
    The committee is aware that the challenge of monitoring and 
analyzing foreign investments into the defense industrial base, 
including everything from mergers, acquisitions, joint 
ventures, strategic partnerships, and other transfers of 
intellectual property, is taxing the capabilities of the 
Department of Defense. Not only are the types of transactions 
becoming more opaque, but the use of tactics specifically to 
circumvent traditional regulatory mechanisms are making the 
situation increasingly difficult to identify and assess within 
a complex business environment. Recent reports in the news, as 
well as briefings to the committee, indicate a shortfall in our 
capabilities, especially for decision support systems to allow 
a limited number of highly trained analysts to be proactive and 
inform pending industrial base decisions before irreversible 
mergers or acquisitions are made. The committee believes that 
the Department should devote more resources to monitoring this 
complex business environment, utilizing both automated decision 
support systems, as well as use of more analysts to assess and 
make recommendations.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $15.9 million, an 
increase of $5.0 million, in PE 67210D8Z for the development of 
an information technology systems to support the review and 
monitoring of industrial base transactions, especially those 
involving foreign transactions, as well as for additional 
analytical support.

Training ranges for electronic warfare experimentation

    The committee is aware that electronic warfare is a field 
where the technology is undergoing rapid changes, based on both 
commercial pressures as well as tactical innovation on 
battlefields around the world. The resurgence of focus on this 
technical area is also a challenge to the Department of 
Defense, which must ensure that these new and quickly evolving 
capabilities can be adequately tested, trained with, and 
defended against. It also demands the capability to rapidly 
experiment with both new technologies and new concepts to 
deliver capabilities to the warfighter that are relevant and 
effective. In order to do that, the Department needs to ensure 
it has sufficient range capabilities and space to perform 
important training. Therefore, the committee encourages the 
Secretary of Defense to review the efficacy of existing ranges 
for experimentation and testing of advanced electronic warfare 
technology and capability, as well as whether there is a need 
to increase investment and develop new approaches to testing, 
training, and experimentation for electronic warfare systems.

Trusted microelectronics supply

    The committee recognizes that microelectronics technology 
provides critical capabilities in Department of Defense, other 
Government organizations' systems, and the commercial 
marketplace. The committee is also aware that that the U.S. 
microelectronics industrial base faces global competitive 
challenges, including from foreign competitors that receive 
substantial support from their government. A recent report from 
the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology 
(PCAST) titled, ``Report to the President Ensurin Long-Term 
U.S. Leadership in Semiconductors'' highlighted many of these 
challenges, including:
    (1) a concerted push by the People's Republic of China to 
reshape the semiconductor industry in its favor, using 
industrial policy backed by over $100.0 billion dollars in 
government-directed funds, that threatens the competitiveness 
of U.S. industry;
    (2) any presumption that existing market forces alone will 
yield optimal outcomes, particularly when faced with 
substantial industrial policies from other countries, is 
unwarranted;
    (3) policy can slow the diffusion of technology, but it 
cannot stop its spread. The only way to retain leadership is to 
outpace the competition; and
    (4) the United States should act in the short-term to 
reduce the market-distorting behavior of Chinese policy by 
increasing transparency on Chinese actions; working with allies 
to coordinate and strengthen inward investment security and 
export control, and to respond firmly and consistently to 
Chinese violations of international agreements.
    Further, the committee notes that the Department's current 
approach to ensure trusted microelectronics supply is 
characterized by a narrow definition for trust-only applicable 
to application-specific integrated circuits, but not to other 
classes of circuits like field programmable gate arrays. The 
committee supported the requirement in section 231 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public 
Law 114-328) for a strategy for assured access to 
microelectronics that would address this definition for trust, 
as well as ensure there is comprehensive thought on the 
acquisition and industrial base concerns related to 
microelectronics. As the Department develops and codifies that 
strategy, the committee encourages a thorough review all of the 
Department's related guidance and instructions, to include a 
more comprehensive definition of the items requiring a trust 
policy, as well as ensuring that appropriate language is 
included in relevant solicitations and contracts for applicable 
systems.

U.S. Special Operations Command SOFWERX initiative

    The committee notes that the SOFWERX initiative within U.S. 
Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) has taken on several 
innovative projects that encourage collaboration between the 
private sector, and other Government agencies and organizations 
such as the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, Defense 
Innovation Unit Experimental, and science and technology 
efforts within the military services.
    The committee encourages these practices, specifically the 
continuation of the 1208 Rapid Prototyping Event (RPE) with its 
potential for cost efficiencies. RPE verified that the 
technology exists to supplement the 1208 counterterrorism 
authority in section 127e of title 10, United States Code, by 
equipping partner forces with commercial equipment in a cost 
effective manner. In a similar fashion, the committee also 
encourages USSOCOM and SOFWERX to advance the application of 
disruptive emerging technologies, including nano-technology, 
additive manufacturing, quantum computing, artificial 
intelligence, robotics, and the convergence of each, in 
fulfilling immediate and emerging special operations forces' 
requirements. The committee also encourages the military 
services to continue to monitor developments within this 
framework to leverage work being done through SOFWERX.

Weapons and munitions science and technology roadmap

    The committee recognizes that Department of Defense 
investments in science and technology (S&T;) to counter emerging 
threats should be reflected in the science and technology 
portfolio and understands that the exigencies of ongoing 
operations required a focus on improving our systems for 
uncontested or asymmetrically contested environments. As a 
result, advances in weapons and munitions have received less 
attention in recent years. At the same time, potential 
adversaries have made advances in platforms, missiles, long-
range guns, new propellants, and explosive combinations that 
could threaten U.S. forces and frustrate U.S. efforts at 
forcible entry into contested areas. The committee believes the 
Department must concentrate on developing new generations of 
weapons and munitions to counter those threats.
    Therefore, the committee urges the Secretary of Defense to 
develop a focused weapons and munitions science and technology 
roadmap to comprehensively guide investment needs for this 
area. In developing this roadmap, the Secretary should address 
the following:
    (1) how have recent wargaming scenarios and exercises been 
used to identify key needs;
    (2) how have the integrated priorities lists of the 
combatant commands articulated their needs for new munitions 
types and delivery systems;
    (3) how are current S&T; efforts aligned with these needs; 
and
    (4) are there shortfalls in resources or capacity to 
address these needs.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations


              Section 201--Authorization of Appropriations

    This section would authorize appropriations for research, 
development, test, and evaluation at the levels identified in 
section 4201 of division D of this Act.

    Subtitle B--Program Requirements, Restrictions, and Limitations


 Section 211--Cost Controls for Presidential Aircraft Recapitalization 
                                Program

    This section would fix the requirements for Presidential 
Aircraft Replacement (PAR) Program aircraft to those identified 
by the systems requirements document (SRD) for the Presidential 
aircraft recapitalization program version 7.0 dated December 
14, 2016. This section would also limit changes to PAR 
requirements to only those approved by the Secretary of the Air 
Force following a written determination provided to the 
congressional defense committees that the change is necessary. 
This section would require that not less than 50 percent of the 
total amount of funds obligated or expended for contracts for 
engineering and manufacturing development (EMD) under the PAR 
Program shall be for fixed price type contracts. This section 
would authorize contracts other than fixed price type contracts 
for EMD only if such contract type is approved by the service 
acquisition executive. This section would also require the 
Secretary of the Air Force to provide quarterly briefings to 
the House Committee on Armed Services beginning no later than 
October 1, 2017 and continuing through October 1, 2022 on the 
efforts to control costs. The quarterly updates shall include 
the following:
    (1) schedule overview;
    (2) contract type and status;
    (3) development status;
    (4) modification status;
    (5) test status;
    (6) delivery status; and
    (7) sustainment status.

               Section 212--Capital Investment Authority

    This section would amend section 2208(k)(2) of title 10, 
United States Code, to raise the limit on capital purchases 
from defense working capital funds from $0.25 million to $0.5 
million.

  Section 213--Modification of Authority To Award Prizes for Advanced 
                        Technology Achievements

    This section would amend section 2374a of title 10, United 
States Code, to make permanent the Secretary of Defense's 
authority to award prizes for advanced technology achievements, 
to allow for the award of non-monetary awards, and to authorize 
the acceptance of non-monetary items from other parts of the 
Federal Government, from State government, and from non-
governmental sources.

    Section 214--Critical Technologies for Columbia Class Submarine

    This section would deem certain Columbia-class ballistic 
missile submarine components as critical technologies.

            Section 215--Joint Hypersonics Transition Office

    This section would re-designate the ``Joint Technology 
Office on Hypersonics''' as the ``Joint Hypersonics Transition 
Office,'' with the responsibility to coordinate and integrate 
programs, ensure coordination of current and future programs of 
the Department of Defense on hypersonics, and approve 
demonstrations.

       Section 216--Hypersonic Airbreathing Weapons Capabilities

    This section would allow the Secretary of Defense to 
transfer oversight and management of the Hypersonic 
Airbreathing Weapons Concept from the Defense Advanced Research 
Projects Agency to an entity of the Air Force.

Section 217--Limitation on Availability of Funds for MQ-25 Unmanned Air 
                                 System

    This section would allow only 75 percent of the funds 
authorized to be appropriated by this Act or otherwise made 
available for fiscal year 2018 for the MQ-25 unmanned air 
system to be obligated or expended until a period of 60 days 
has passed after the date on which the Secretary of the Navy 
certifies that the MQ-25 meets a validated capability gap; the 
Chief of Naval Operations has reviewed and approved the initial 
capabilities document (ICD) and the capability development 
document (CDD); and the ICD and CDD have been submitted to the 
congressional defense committees.
    This section would also require the Assistant Secretary of 
the Navy for Research, Development, and Acquisition to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees that includes 
key performance parameters, certification of performance 
parameters' achievement, as well as a description of 
requirements with respect to fuel transfer, equipment for 
intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance, electronic 
attack and electronic protection, communications equipment, 
weapons payload, range, mission endurance for unrefueled and 
aerial refueled operations, affordability, survivability, and 
interoperability.

 Section 218--Limitation on Availability of Funds for Contract Writing 
                                Systems

    This section would limit the amount of authorized funds 
available to be obligated or expended to not more than 75 
percent for specified contract writing systems until the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Secretaries of 
the military departments, provides an assessment of the common 
requirements and potential use of shared information technology 
(IT) services as a means to provide that capability in a 
common, interoperable, and more cost effective manner.
    The committee remains concerned that the Department of 
Defense continues to invest billions of dollars in systems that 
fail to provide integrated business solutions, timely and 
reliable information, and other important financial and 
business information for the daily operations of the military. 
In fiscal year 2015, the Defense Business Council approved 
certification requests totaling $6.9 billion for 1,182 business 
systems. Of these, more than 30 are service or component unique 
contracting, procurement, and solicitation management systems. 
While this ongoing redundancy diverts available funding from 
direct warfighting capability and decreases the Department's 
ability to manage its operations as an enterprise, the 
Department has made little progress in consolidating such 
business systems.
    Furthermore, the committee notes that the Government 
Accountability Office has repeatedly reported that the 
Department could achieve greater efficiency in defense business 
operations, including directing 49 related recommendations to 
the Department in 2011, 38 of which remain open and unresolved. 
The committee believes that more focus on implementing shared 
IT services may be helpful in overcoming the longstanding 
cultural barriers that continue to prevent more enterprise-wide 
management of defense business systems. It would also support 
the goal of the Secretary of Defense, as stated in his 
memorandum dated January 31, 2017, to achieve ``horizontal 
integration across DOD components to improve efficiency and 
take advantage of economies of scale.'' As an example of where 
such efficiencies could be taken, the committee notes with 
skepticism the existence of multiple service and agency unique 
contract writing systems. The committee recommends the 
inclusion of this section to better understand the risks 
associated with eliminating or consolidating such systems and 
will rely on the information provided in assessing future 
support for such systems.

                  TITLE III--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


                       Budget Request Adjustments


                   Advanced Adversarial Air Training

    The budget request included $516.8 million for advanced 
adversarial air training. The committee noted in section 350 of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 
(Public Law 114-328) its concern that advanced tactical air 
training and advanced adversarial air training has diminished 
significantly over the past 20 years, at a time when foreign 
air forces are growing in technical capability and their pilots 
are growing in proficiency. The committee has assessed that 
maintenance of combat aircraft will not, in and of itself, 
restore combat efficiency to U.S. flight crews or their 
squadrons. The committee notes that senior leaders in the 
military services understand this and have sought to increase 
advanced flight training and to restore adversarial air 
training as integral to combat pilot proficiency. The committee 
also understands that, due to the cost of operating frontline 
aircraft and the need to train pilots in their primary roles 
with these aircraft, it is most beneficial to use capable 
aircraft of older vintage to perform adversarial air training 
and to contract out the adversarial air mission to former 
flight instructors and combat pilots in order to save finite 
hours of life limits to frontline aircraft, costs of 
adversarial air training, and to help address the 40,000 hours-
per-year shortfall in adversary air training. The committee 
endorses the movement by the services to integrate these 
capabilities into their training regimens and recognizes the 1-
year budget programming lag resulting in insufficient funds 
being requested in the fiscal year 2018 budget request.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $527.0 million, an 
increase of $10.2 million, in Operation and Maintenance, Air 
Force, for contractor support for advanced adversarial air 
training.

                            Civil Air Patrol

    The budget request included $26.7 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Air Force, for the Civil Air Patrol (CAP) to 
execute support to Federal agencies and State and local 
communities. The committee recommends $29.8 million, an 
increase of $3.1 million, in Operation and Maintenance, Air 
Force, to allow the CAP to comply with the mandate by the 
Federal Aviation Administration to install the Automatic 
Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) system across the CAP 
aircraft fleet, replace non-repairable radios used for 
emergency response search-and-rescue and disaster-relief 
missions, and implement cyber security upgrades to critical 
mission systems.

                   Ship Repair in the Western Pacific

    The budget request included no funds for providing 
additional dry-docking capability in the western Pacific 
theater. A business-case analysis commissioned by the U.S. 
Pacific Fleet indicated a savings to the U.S. Navy by 
maintaining a dry dock on the Territory of Guam. The Asia-
Pacific rebalance has increased Navy forward deployment in the 
Western Pacific, including the deployment of a fourth attack 
submarine and a second submarine tender to Naval Base Guam. 
However, depot-level maintenance capabilities have not 
followed, and current Pacific U.S. dry-docking maintenance 
capabilities exist only in Hawaii and the west coast of the 
continental United States, requiring surface and subsurface 
vessels to be removed from the theater and from Pacific Fleet's 
strategic inventory for an additional 2-3 weeks. Further, the 
interport differentials, temporary duty costs, and impact on 
families are significant added costs to these repairs. The only 
other dry-docking options remain outside of the United States, 
requiring that U.S. naval vessels receive significant repairs 
using foreign labor and technology, potentially compromising 
the quality of work as well as national security interests. The 
committee, therefore, recommends an increase of $9.5 million in 
Operation and Maintenance, Navy, Ship Depot Maintenance, for 
the chartering of a dry dock to meet maintenance requirement 
for the western Pacific Fleet.

                             Energy Issues


                Energy Resiliency for Mission Assurance

    The committee continues to believe that the Department of 
Defense must have the ability to sustain mission-critical 
operations during utility disruptions at its installations. The 
committee notes that the Department has placed a large emphasis 
on energy infrastructure investments that may reduce energy 
demand and provide a financial return on investment. While the 
committee is supportive of these efforts, the committee is 
concerned that more emphasis is required on investments that 
reduce mission risk by increasing energy resiliency through on-
installation energy generation, transmission, distribution, and 
storage. To that end, section 2805 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) 
expanded the authority of the Energy Conservation Investment 
Program (ECIP) to include energy resiliency projects. The 
committee encourages the Department to take further action, 
both through ECIP and other energy initiatives pursued through 
other authorities, to fully integrate energy resiliency with 
military value into their energy investment programs.

          Energy Resilience of Overseas Military Installations

    As noted elsewhere in this report, the committee continues 
to assert that the Department of Defense must have the ability 
to sustain operations during energy supply disruptions, 
especially in the case of overseas military locations that rely 
on foreign-sourced energy. For example, the committee notes 
that a number of European countries that host permanent and 
rotational U.S. Armed Forces rely extensively on natural gas 
and oil from the Russian Federation. The committee believes 
that a policy of energy reliance through diversification is 
critical to maintaining a resilient U.S. overseas defense 
posture and presence.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by March 1, 2018, on potential vulnerabilities to energy supply 
disruptions at overseas locations that host permanent and 
rotational U.S. Armed Forces and on mitigation efforts aimed at 
protecting mission resiliency. The briefing must, at a minimum, 
assess the operational risk of energy supply disruptions, 
identify mitigation measures to sustain mission-critical 
operations, and assess the feasibility and cost and schedule 
impacts of including diversified energy solutions for future 
overseas military construction projects.

                    Logistics and Sustainment Issues


              Army Contracting Command Reachback Functions

    The committee understands the Army Contracting Command has 
a policy by which contracting elements at Army installations 
are required to forward all contracts governing awards valued 
at more than $750,000 to their regional service centers for 
resolution with the stated goals of improved continuity of 
workflow and the potential for more efficiencies. Despite this, 
the committee is aware of anecdotal evidence that it is not 
having the desired effect and is creating inefficiencies.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by October 2, 2017, on Army Contracting Command Reachback to 
include:
    (1) The number of contracting actions that have been sent 
to the various Reachback groups across the contracting 
enterprise since the start of the Reachback program;
    (2) The percentage of contracting actions that were awarded 
on time;
    (3) Detailed impacts to installations due to late award of 
contracts;
    (4) The amount of cost savings realized attributed to the 
Reachback program, specifically, administrative savings; and
    (5) The amount of personnel reductions at each local 
contracting unit.

     Corrosion Control and Prevention Executives for the Military 
                              Departments

    The committee continues to be concerned that the military 
departments have not adequately addressed corrosion control and 
prevention in the military departments' sustainment plans for 
weapon systems. The committee believes that corrosion control 
and prevention must be addressed early in system design. To 
facilitate education, awareness, and prioritization of 
corrosion control and prevention, section 903 of the Duncan 
Hunter National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009 
(Public Law 110-417) required each military department to 
identify a corrosion control prevention executive (CCPE). The 
committee has observed that the CCPEs are most effective when 
they have the time and seniority to manage corrosion control 
policy and resources across the military department, consistent 
with the requirements of section 903 of Public Law 110-417. The 
committee believes the Departments of the Navy and the Air 
Force have been most effective in corrosion control and 
prevention and notes they have assigned individuals whose 
primary responsibility is to perform the functions of the CCPE. 
The committee also notes that the Department of the Army has 
used a different model and implemented the requirements of 
section 903 of Public Law 110-417 by appointing a Deputy 
Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and 
Technology as the CCPE and having action-officer level 
individuals assist in those duties.
    The committee directs the Secretaries of the military 
departments to provide a briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services, not later than September 30, 2017, on the steps 
the military departments have taken to comply with section 903 
of Public Law 110-417. The briefing should describe the service 
corrosion executives' technical qualifications, duties, and 
responsibilities, including coordination with the Department of 
Defense Director of Corrosion Policy and Oversight and 
formulation of service-level guidance and policy regarding 
corrosion control and prevention as part of the development, 
procurement, and sustainment of the military services' weapon 
systems and infrastructure. Finally, the briefing should 
include the Secretaries' assessments as to the effectiveness of 
their corrosion control and prevention policies and the extent 
to which the CCPEs are taking steps to improve prioritization 
of this issue early in the planning of weapon systems.

           Improving Asset Tracking and In-Transit Visibility

    The committee is supportive of the Department of Defense's 
ongoing efforts to improve asset tracking and in-transit 
visibility. The committee supports the goal of enhancing asset 
visibility through item-unique identification (IUID) and 
automatic identification technology/automatic identification 
and data capture processes because this initiative can help 
improve readiness, reduce waste, and increase oversight. 
However, the committee remains concerned with the Department's 
compliance with its own IUID policy as issued in 2015 in 
Department of Defense Instruction 8320.04 and believes that 
writing requirements into contracts fosters compliance with the 
IUID policy. The committee is also concerned that a briefing 
requirement on this subject from the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 has not yet been 
delivered, and expects to receive this briefing in a timely 
manner. Additionally, the committee directs the Director of the 
Defense Contract Management Agency (DCMA) to brief the 
committee not later than December 1, 2017, on the DCMA's plan 
to foster the adoption, implementation, and verification of the 
revised IUID policy across the Department and the defense 
industrial base.

    Inventory Management and Demand Planning Software Pilot Program

    The committee is aware that the Army completed a small test 
program using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) software on 27 
various Army Black Hawk helicopter parts. This small-sample 
study showed significant cost savings and increased readiness 
when leveraging the Army's enterprise resource planning system, 
the Logistics Modernization Program (LMP), to manage inventory, 
particularly unserviceable assets. The committee remains 
interested in not only the cost savings and readiness increases 
found in the Army's Black Hawk inventory management, demand 
planning, and readiness-based sparing software application to 
LMP, but also cost savings and readiness increases if the Army 
were to apply this tool across Army Materiel Command's (AMC's) 
spare parts management portfolio.
    The committee also seeks information on Naval Sea Systems 
Command's (NAVSEA's) views regarding the benefits of COTS 
product lifecycle management software to help with its growing 
challenge in managing its critical databases across the NAVSEA 
enterprise. Currently, two NAVSEA databases, the Naval Ships 
Engineering Drawing Repository (NSEDR) and the Naval Logistics 
Technical Data (NAVLOGTD), are growing faster than the 
antiquated and expensive system that manages them can handle.
    The committee directs the commander of Army Materiel 
Command and the commander of Naval Sea Systems Command to 
provide briefings to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than February 7, 2018, on separate initial assessments of 
following:
    (1) the extent to which AMC explored the use of COTS 
software as an add-on to LMP to improve its spare parts and 
inventory control management;
    (2) the extent to which NAVSEA has explored the use of COTS 
product lifecycle management software to improve managing its 
NSEDR and NAVLOGTD databases; and
    (3) the extent to which AMC and NAVSEA have found cost 
savings and readiness improvements for their programs by using 
this software and believe these cost savings and readiness 
increases could be expanded.

             Joint Minimum Standards for Protective Covers

    The committee recognizes and supports the military 
departments and the Office of the Secretary of Defense's 
efforts to identify and address the adverse readiness impacts 
of exposing critical military equipment to corrosive 
environmental conditions. However, the committee is concerned 
that there is no minimum U.S. military standard for protective 
covers. Subsequently, a wide range of covers has been procured, 
many of which do not adequately protect against corrosion. The 
committee understands that there are commercial, off-the-shelf 
protective covers that can address corrosion and thus improve 
the life of covered equipment.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the congressional defense committees, 
not later than December 1, 2017, on the Department's efforts 
across the military services and within the Office of the 
Secretary of Defense to develop joint minimum standards for 
commercial, off-the-shelf protective covers. This briefing 
shall include a detailed description of plans and priorities 
for both the active and reserve components to use such covers 
to protect equipment, including but not limited to equipment 
returned from operational theaters, pre-deployed assets, and 
those items currently in storage within the United States and 
its territories. At a minimum, this briefing shall address 
requirements regarding the following: water, particulate, mold, 
and mildew intrusion; hydrophobic, oleo-phobic, and ultra-
violet resistance; flexure; and temperature.

          Logistics Management Business Systems Modernization

    The committee is aware of the military services' challenges 
in developing, acquiring, and fielding integrated supply, 
maintenance, logistics and financial resource planning systems 
that work across the enterprise. The committee notes that the 
Department of the Army has achieved a measureable level of 
success with the Logistics Modernization Program (LMP), a 
commercially developed enterprise resource planning system 
(ERP) used by the Army to integrate its Working Capital Fund 
missions. The committee encourages the Secretaries of the Navy 
and the Air Force to explore alternative resource planning 
systems associated with Working Capital Fund operations and 
consider future implementation of LMP. The committee directs 
the Secretary of the Navy and the Secretary of the Air Force to 
provide a briefing to the committee, no later than December 1, 
2017, on the following in regard to Navy, Marine Corps, and Air 
Force Working Capital Fund ERPs:
    (1) The ERP or other systems the military services are 
currently using to integrate their Working Capital Fund 
business systems across the services' logistics enterprises;
    (2) The annual cost of modernizing and maintaining their 
current Working Capital Fund business systems;
    (3) How the three military services' current ERPs are 
contributing to the national security of the United States or 
to the efficient management of the Department of Defense, 
including auditability compliance;
    (4) Options the military services have explored to find 
alternatives to their current systems which would provide equal 
or greater capability at a lower cost, including consideration 
of the Army LMP; and
    (5) Whether the existing acquisition management structure 
for the military services' current ERPs is adequate to manage 
and control program costs into the future.

             Opportunities To Consolidate Printing Services

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense 
requested funding for printing services that totaled more than 
$440.0 million in the fiscal year 2017 budget request. 
Department of Defense Instruction 5330.03 establishes the 
Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) Document Services as the 
preferred provider for document automation services to the 
Department, which includes printing services, scanning and 
conversion, office device support, and electronic content 
management. In addition, the Defense Business Board's February 
2015 report ``Transforming DOD's Core Business Processes for 
Revolutionary Change'' noted that actions such as moving to 
managed printing services and consolidating print management 
services could achieve significant savings in related 
activities. Furthermore, the committee has noted that the 
printing budgets for active service components are excessive 
and that portions of these budgets should be realigned to 
address unfunded readiness priorities of the Department and the 
military services.
    In light of the above, the committee directs the 
Comptroller General of the United States to assess the 
following:
    (1) what is the nature and scope of printing activities 
financed by Department components, including the military 
services and DLA;
    (2) how have estimated costs for printing activities 
compared to actual costs since fiscal year 2012;
    (3) what options, if any, has the Department considered in 
adjusting its approach to printing services to achieve greater 
efficiencies or reduced costs for related activities; and
    (4) any other issues the Comptroller General determines 
appropriate with respect to consolidation of printing services.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than December 1, 2017, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary findings and to submit a final report to the Senate 
Committee on Armed Services and House Committee on Armed 
Services on a date agreed to at the time of the briefing.

     Report on Operation of the Transportation Working Capital Fund

    The committee notes that the Airlift Readiness Account 
(ARA), which maintains military airlift capacity during 
peacetime to be prepared for the higher level of activity 
needed during contingency operations, has received varying 
levels of funding in past years. The committee is concerned 
about how the Transportation Working Capital Fund (TWCF) can 
effectively operate and set reasonable rates with such fiscal 
uncertainty. Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller 
General of the United States to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees by August 1, 2018, regarding 
allocation of the ARA in conjunction with the TWCF during 
fiscal years 2007 to 2016, inclusive. The report should 
include:
    (1) a review of the U.S. Transportation Command (TRANSCOM) 
oversight of the TWCF, including the command's adherence to 
statutory authorities related to the TWCF and ARA;
    (2) a review of the rate-setting procedure used by 
TRANSCOM, including procedures to lower the TWCF rate once 
fixed costs of the program are covered and how ARA funding is 
used to fund airlift capacity not being fully utilized during 
peacetime but required to support contingency operations;
    (3) how the Air Force pays its ARA bill during years in 
which ARA funding is not requested, authorized, or appropriated 
or years in which ARA funding is cut; and
    (4) what steps the Air Force has taken to ensure the Air 
Force Working Capital Fund receives the appropriate funding if 
a cash shortfall occurs because of a lack of fiscal year ARA 
funding.

                 Revising Depot Carryover Calculations

    Department of Defense regulations limit the amount of 
carryover allowable at the military depots at the end of a 
fiscal year. These regulations require that carryover be 
calculated in a way that routinely exceeds allowable carryover 
ceilings, resulting in decrements to the military services' 
appropriations. While the committee believes there should be 
limits on the amount of carryover workload held by a depot, the 
committee is concerned that the current calculation of 
allowable carryover has indirectly affected military readiness 
and the ability of the depots to sustain core workload as 
required by section 2464 of title 10, United States Code. As a 
result, the committee would like to understand the Department's 
calculation of allowable carryover.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in consultation with the Secretaries of the military 
departments, to submit a report to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by December 31, 2017, on workload carryover to 
include:
    (1) an explanation of how the carryover formula is 
currently calculated, and how each military service manages 
carryover;
    (2) what exclusions from carryover are currently in place 
and how they were determined;
    (3) how carryover has been affected by the late receipt of 
funds;
    (4) the level of carryover of parts and materiel needed to 
support depot maintenance programs compared to direct labor 
hours;
    (5) what portion of total carryover is for inter-service 
workload; and
    (6) recommendations to modify the existing carryover 
formula.
    The Secretary of Defense may also include other related 
matters as deemed appropriate in order to provide a 
comprehensive examination of carryover policies.
    The committee further directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than October 31, 2017, on preliminary findings of the 
Secretaries' evaluation.

                            Readiness Issues


               Advanced Adversarial Air Training Program

    The committee notes that the Air Force testified it is at 
its lowest state of full-spectrum readiness in its history, 
particularly when confronting near-peer adversaries. The Air 
Force has publicly stated its need for contracted adversarial 
air support. The committee is concerned about the disparity 
between the significance that senior Air Force leadership 
assigns to increased combat pilot training and the lack of 
budgetary and programmatic attention to addressing it. The 
fiscal year 2018 Air Force budget approach delays the entrance 
of new combat pilot training capabilities not currently 
available to the Air Force. Specifically, the current 
adversarial air training capability flies subsonic, single 
engine aircraft that address a portion of lower-end training 
requirements; it does not address supersonic training, which 
U.S. pilots will face when engaging near-peer adversaries.
    In the absence of commercially supplied supersonic 
adversarial air capability, the Air Force will continue to rely 
on front-line aircraft and pilots to meet this need, which the 
committee notes is expensive, reduces the life of the fleet, 
and takes pilots away from practicing their intended missions.
    The committee believes the Air Force should move 
aggressively to meet the adversarial air combat training 
requirements. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
the Air Force to brief the House Committee on Armed Services by 
September 1, 2017, on the status of near-peer training 
utilizing advanced adversarial air capabilities.

                 Advanced Foreign Language Proficiency

    The committee recognizes the importance of advanced foreign 
language and cultural proficiency for military readiness and 
national security. When proficient language speakers 
effectively communicate with non-English speakers, individually 
or via the broadcast media, they become a major force 
multiplier and key component of national defense. The committee 
is aware that, in partnership with universities across the 
country, the National Security Education Program provides 
critical training for service members and government officials 
in a number of languages and strategic cultures, including 
those of the Arab world, Afghanistan, China, Russia, and Iran. 
The committee understands that the Language Flagship Program 
has successfully recruited language-proficient students by 
utilizing partnerships with K-12 schools devoted to creating 
articulated pathways into the program. The committee is 
concerned that the Department of Defense has not sufficiently 
prioritized these language readiness programs.
    The committee is further concerned that the Department of 
Defense allowed access to authentic, copyrighted foreign 
language broadcast services media to lapse in 2015. Despite the 
continued need, the committee understands that a competitive 
request for proposal has not yet been released to begin the 
process of contracting for a suitable solution.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by December 1, 2017, that assesses:
    (a) Whether the National Security Education Program meets 
the current need for language and culture training so that 
warfighters and national security professionals can complete 
their missions effectively, whether current partnerships with 
K-12 schools are sufficient to provide language-proficient 
students to the Language Flagship Program, and whether the need 
would warrant an expansion of the language and cultural 
training programs; and
    (b) The status of whether access to authentic, copyrighted 
foreign language content should be restored for the joint 
force.

           Alternative-Source F/A-18 Depot-Level Maintenance

    The committee understands that the Department of the Navy 
awarded an alternative-source contract for F/A-18A/B/C/D depot-
level maintenance in February 2016. This award is another step 
toward addressing the backlog of F/A-18A/B/C/D depot-level 
maintenance requirements in a manner that leverages the range 
of relevant resources within the national technology and 
industrial base, and the committee encourages the Navy to 
induct aircraft to meet this contract's maximum authorization 
within each contract year. While the committee expects the 
Department of the Navy to workload its organic aviation depots 
to the maximum extent possible and in accordance with Federal 
law, the committee encourages the Navy to make maximum use of 
this contract to help eliminate the remaining backlog of F/A-
18A/B/C/D depot-level maintenance requirements. Additionally, 
to improve efficiency of the aircraft maintenance process under 
this contract, the committee encourages the Navy to provide 
authorizations for engineering disposition and alternate supply 
chain as appropriate, with accompanying contractual changes.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to submit a 
report to the House Committee on Armed Services not later than 
September 15, 2017, that includes, but is not limited to, plans 
to maximize the F/A-18A/B/C/D workload at its organic aviation 
depots; an evaluation of ongoing F/A-18A/B/C/D alternative-
source depot-level maintenance efforts; plans for maximizing 
the number of aircraft authorized under the existing contract 
by contract year; plans for establishing a follow-on multiple-
award contract for F/A-18A/B/C/D depot-level maintenance, as 
required to address the maintenance backlog; and confirmation 
that Navy officials are providing engineering disposition and 
other improvements to allow for optimal efficiency and 
throughput of aircraft.

                          Counter-UAS Briefing

    The committee believes that the importance of counter-
unmanned aerial systems (C-UAS) will continue to increase due 
to the proliferating threat of commercially available and 
homemade hostile unmanned aerial systems used for 
reconnaissance and as flying Improvised Explosive Devices.
    The committee is concerned that there is a shortage of C-
UAS range space in the United States. Currently, there is only 
one site where test and training activities can take place, 
which is at the Army's Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona. The 
committee notes it is important that training locations have 
sufficient contiguous and unimpeded ground and air space so 
that radio frequency jamming, directed energy, and kinetic 
capabilities can be utilized without concern for impact outside 
of the range.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than December 1, 2017, on the potential of using additional 
military installation ranges for C-UAS testing and training. To 
address this critical need, the committee encourages the 
Department of Defense to consider a number of additional sites 
that could be used for the testing and training of C-UAS 
capabilities.

               Expediting the Security Clearance Process

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense and the 
Office of Personnel Management have undertaken significant 
steps to improve the security clearance review process. While 
some progress has been made, the security clearance backlog 
continues to prevent the Federal Government and the national 
security industrial base from hiring otherwise qualified 
personnel. The committee believes more needs to be done to 
address this backlog, including reviewing current security 
clearance procedures. For example, the Questionnaire for Public 
Trust Positions Standard Form 85 requires nearly the same 
information as the Standard Form 86, Questionnaire for National 
Security Positions. The committee believes positions requiring 
access to classified information are inherently positions of 
public trust, and requiring an individual with a favorably 
adjudicated security clearance based on the Standard Form 86 to 
undergo an additional nearly identical background check based 
on the Standard Form 85 is redundant, and likely adds to the 
significant backlog of background investigations throughout the 
U.S. Government.
    The Department risks losing new hires, particularly 
qualified linguists, engineers, computer scientists, and cyber 
professionals, who find jobs elsewhere while their security 
clearance review takes months to complete. However, the 
committee does note that the Federal Government already has 
options to expedite the security clearance process to bring in 
personnel that have linguistic and cultural competencies that 
are critical to the warfighter. Authority under title 5, United 
States Code, allows the government, in certain circumstances, 
to expedite hiring persons with specialized skills.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the Office of Personnel Management, to 
provide a briefing to the Senate Committee on Armed Services 
and the House Committee on Armed Services by December 1, 2017, 
on efforts to shorten the security clearance review process. 
The briefing shall address potential time-savers such as using 
Standard Form 86 in lieu of Standard Form 85, allowing industry 
to provide certified initial background materials, reducing the 
number of contractors who require a clearance, returning to 
interim secret clearances for low-risk hires, standardizing the 
process to allow civilians and contractors to move to new jobs 
within an agency without a lengthy wait for an additional 
security review, and standardizing adjudication measures. The 
briefing provided should also include information about how the 
Federal Government uses other authorities to hire linguists and 
cultural experts where there are workforce gaps.

               Explosive Ordnance Disposal Budget Display

    The committee received a briefing in accordance with a 
directive in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) that included budget data for 
all explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) activities throughout the 
Department of Defense. The committee notes that this 
information, collected from all of the services' budgets and 
including operation and maintenance, procurement, and research, 
development, test and evaluation accounts, was not easily found 
yet was useful in identifying where EOD funding originated. 
Given the increasing importance of EOD units and congressional 
interest in EOD activities, the committee expects that in all 
future Department and service budget justification documents 
EOD activities will be clearly marked and identified.

  Explosive Ordnance Disposal Organization and Support to Operational 
                                 Plans

    Improvised explosive devices (IEDs) have been the enemy's 
weapon of choice in the Republic of Iraq, the Syrian Arab 
Republic, and the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan and, 
according to the Department of Defense, will probably be a 
mainstay in any future conflict, given their low cost to 
develop coupled with their potential for strategic impact. 
Since 2003, under the aegis first of the U.S. Army's Improvised 
Explosive Device Task Force, then of the Joint Improvised 
Explosive Device Defeat Organization, and now of the Joint 
Improvised-Threat Defeat Organization, the Department of 
Defense has sought to counter IED threats to U.S. forces. 
Integral to this effort, among other things, are explosive 
ordnance disposal (EOD) units which, despite a spike in growth 
since 2002, remain in high demand relative to the limited 
number of units throughout the Department. Moreover, the 
committee is concerned about the degree to which EOD 
requirements and capabilities have been integrated into 
standing operational plans. In light of the above, the 
committee directs the Comptroller General of the United States 
to assess the following:
    (1) the extent to which EOD requirements and capabilities 
are integrated into operational plans, including those for 
potential support of civil authorities;
    (2) the extent to which the Department's EOD capabilities, 
including manning and equipment, are sufficient to meet 
combatant commander requirements;
    (3) what, if any, steps are being taken to identify and 
mitigate any EOD capability gaps in operational plans;
    (4) the extent to which the Department conducts oversight 
of Department-wide EOD functions; and
    (5) any other issues the Comptroller General determines 
appropriate with respect to EOD capability support to 
operational plans.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than December 1, 2017, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary findings and to submit a final report to the 
congressional defense committees on a date agreed to at the 
time of the briefing. The committee also directs the Secretary 
of Defense, the Secretaries of the military departments, and 
the combatant commanders, to share any pertinent information 
about EOD units, requirements, and capabilities, including EOD 
units required to support operational plans, with designated 
representatives of the Government Accountability Office 
assigned to this review commensurate with applicable 
classification guidance.

                   Joint Force Training and Exercises

    The budget request contained $583.6 million in Operation 
and Maintenance, Defense-Wide, for the Combatant Commanders 
Exercise Engagement and Training Transformation (CE2T2) 
program.
    The committee understands that the CE2T2 program supports 
combatant command and service joint training, from individual 
specialized skills to large-scale joint exercises, and is a 
critical enabler to improving joint readiness and warfighting 
capabilities. However, since 2011, the CE2T2 program has been 
reduced by 38 percent.
    The committee recognizes that the 2016 National Military 
Strategy emphasizes the four-plus-one security challenges of 
the Russian Federation, the People's Republic of China, the 
Democratic People's Republic of Korea, the Islamic Republic of 
Iran, and violent extremism. The committee remains concerned 
about the readiness of the joint force to address the full 
spectrum of security challenges. The committee believes that 
greater resources for joint force training and exercises that 
span the combatant commands and allow for experimentation with 
new concepts of operations are essential to improving the 
effectiveness and readiness of the joint force, and for 
maintaining an appropriate balance within the joint force.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $603.6 million, an 
increase of $20.0 million, in Operation and Maintenance, 
Defense-Wide, for the Combatant Commanders Exercise Engagement 
and Training Transformation program to enhance joint training 
and exercises that span combatant commands and address the 
four-plus-one challenges identified in the 2016 National 
Military Strategy.

                    Military Mission Line Moratorium

    The committee notes that the military departments utilize 
ranges and operating areas in the Gulf of Mexico for a variety 
of testing and training missions. These include high altitude, 
supersonic air combat training, air-to-air missile testing, 
electronic warfare, drone targeting, naval sub-surface, air-to-
surface, and surface-to-surface testing, including mine and 
counter-mine operations. These ranges and operating areas east 
of the Military Mission Line in the Gulf of Mexico provide 
approximately 120,000 square miles of ranges and operating 
areas that are essential to maintaining the maritime and 
airborne readiness of the military services. Furthermore, the 
ranges and operating areas east of the Military Mission Line in 
the Gulf of Mexico provide the military departments with 
critical airspace essential to 5th generation capabilities and 
provides for hypersonic weapons testing and space launch.
    The Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act (GOMESA) of 2006 
(Public Law 119-432) established a moratorium on oil and gas 
leasing, pre-leasing, or any related activity in the ranges and 
operating areas east of the Military Mission Line in the Gulf 
of Mexico. This moratorium expires on June 30, 2022. With no 
comparable test and training area within the United States, the 
committee is concerned that the expiration of this moratorium 
may adversely impact the Department of Defense's ability to 
meet its military testing and training missions. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to deliver a report 
to the House Committee on Armed Services and the House 
Committee on Natural Resources not later than March 1, 2018. At 
a minimum the report shall address the following:
    (1) The scope of military test and training events 
conducted in the area east of the Military Mission Line in the 
Gulf of Mexico;
    (2) Comparable testing and training areas within the United 
States and its territories that can replicate the capabilities 
of the ranges and operating areas east of the Military Mission 
Line in the Gulf of Mexico;
    (3) Comparable testing and training areas outside the 
United States which are available for United States military 
testing and training activities that can replicate the 
capabilities of the ranges and operating areas east of the 
Military Mission Line in the Gulf of Mexico;
    (4) The number of test events, exercises, and military 
operations conducted annually in the ranges and operating areas 
east of the Military Mission Line in the Gulf of Mexico from 
2006 to time of report;
    (5) The extent to which the services will be unable to meet 
training and test requirements necessary to be prepared to 
support Operational Plans should the moratorium on oil and gas 
leasing, pre-leasing, or any related activity east of the 
Military Mission Line in the Gulf of Mexico not be extended.

      NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center F/A-18 Chase Aircraft

    The committee is concerned about the availability of chase 
aircraft at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, which 
provides total flight safety during developmental and 
operational tests. The committee notes the NASA Armstrong 
Flight Research Center's proximity to Edwards Air Force Base, 
China Lake Naval Weapons Station, Marine Corps Air Station 29 
Palms, and other associated desert and offshore test ranges, 
which makes the Center a regular provider of test missions for 
the Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps. The committee believes 
these missions are critical to helping the U.S. military 
maintain its technological superiority.
    The committee notes that chase aircraft maintain constant 
radio contact with research pilots, serve as an extra set of 
eyes during test flights, and provide a camera platform for 
research missions that must be photographed or videotaped. The 
committee understands that F/A-18F have the ideal high-speed 
test bed capacity and mold lines, can maintain safe, long-term, 
high-speed test operations, and do not confront the same 
maintenance issues as the current Armstrong Flight Research 
Center chase aircraft. The committee believes that Department 
of Defense-wide test missions are adversely impacted by the 
current aircraft availability at the Center, and that the 
Department should consider replacing current NASA chase 
aircraft to support an aggressive future test schedule as the 
Department modernizes its overall aircraft fleet.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Navy to submit a report to the House Committee on Armed 
Services, not later than 90 days after the enactment of this 
Act, on its plans to consider the transfer of aircraft and the 
timeline associated with such plans. The report should include:
    (1) The number of aircraft planned for transfer;
    (2) The minimum number of remaining flight hours of each 
aircraft to be transferred; and
    (3) The radar capabilities, centerline and wing station 
stores management system, and advanced targeting forward 
looking infrared equipment of such aircraft.

                    Naval Shipyard Development Plans

    The Department of the Navy operates and maintains four 
public shipyards in the United States: Norfolk Naval Shipyard, 
Virginia; Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Maine; Puget Sound Naval 
Shipyard, Washington; and Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard, Hawaii. 
The committee recognizes the vital role these shipyards play in 
generating readiness, supporting the Navy's surface and 
submarine fleet by performing depot- and intermediate-level 
maintenance, modernization, emergent repairs, and 
inactivations. However, the committee notes that the 
infrastructure at these shipyards has not been properly 
sustained, modernized, or configured to efficiently and 
effectively support the Navy's future force structure and 
shipyard workload. The committee believes that long-term 
underfunding of the Navy's infrastructure investment accounts 
has created capability gaps in shipyard infrastructure that 
will result in the public shipyards being unable to properly 
complete assigned and projected work. In fact, disturbing 
delays in ship overhaul work have already occurred.
    The committee also notes that the public shipyards are 
supported by more than 34,000 employees and the Navy is 
planning to expand the workforce by another 2,000 employees by 
2020 to accommodate anticipated workload. The committee notes 
that almost half of the entire public shipyard workforce has 
less than 5 years of experience and lacks the journeyman skills 
associated with a more experienced workforce. The Navy has 
testified that the manpower shortfall and inexperience in the 
public shipyard workforce may result in extended maintenance 
availabilities, thus affecting operational availability of 
combat-ready ships. This comes at a time when existing 
maintenance backlogs have expanded due to the increased 
operational tempo of the fleet, and continuing delays in 
receipt of appropriations have further affected the public 
shipyards' ability to execute work on time.
    The shortage of journeyman-level experience and the 
insufficient industrial capacity have led to severe throughput 
issues at the public shipyards, highlighted by six nuclear 
attack submarines languishing in the shipyards for years beyond 
their scheduled completion date. As a result, some crews have 
spent their entire submarine assignment rotation pier-side, 
which degrades military personnel readiness and operational 
effectiveness. Further, insufficient capacity has led the Navy 
to decertify the USS Boise (SSN 764) for diving operations 
until this submarine can be inducted for its engineered 
overhaul. Other attack submarines are likely to experience 
similar operational limitations until sufficient public-sector 
throughput can be provided. The committee is disappointed by 
the Navy's failure to respond in a timely and effective manner 
to growing backlogs and to implement corrective actions. The 
committee believes that significant workforce, workload 
planning, and infrastructure management changes should occur to 
enable more efficient planning and execution of maintenance 
availabilities.
    While the public sector is expanding to accommodate the 
growing maintenance requirements, the committee also notes that 
private-sector shipyards currently have infrastructure and 
workforce capacity to help mitigate the shortfalls in nuclear 
maintenance availabilities. The committee believes that the 
Naval Sea Systems Command has moved away from the ``One Naval 
Shipyard'' concept that it had previously embraced at a time 
when it should be fully leveraging the entire industrial base. 
Furthermore, the committee notes that a significant private-
sector workload expansion is programmed in conjunction with the 
start of the Columbia-class program. To reduce risk associated 
with the delivery of the Columbia-class ballistic missile 
submarine, the committee believes that the Navy should analyze 
the feasibility of moving additional workload to the private 
sector until the public sector can establish a higher workload 
throughput baseline. At the same time, the Navy must not divert 
funding from or delay the public shipyards' modernization and 
workforce expansion that are necessary to meet future Navy 
requirements. This will allow the private sector to build up 
its workforce gradually prior to commencing work on the first 
Columbia-class submarine rather than rapidly expanding its 
workforce in 2021. The committee further believes that this 
temporary move may lead to a more efficient private-sector 
workforce and eventually lower program costs associated with 
the Columbia-class program, which, at a cost of $100.2 billion, 
is the second largest acquisition program in the Department of 
Defense. Naval Sea Systems Command should examine ways to 
eliminate the barriers between the public- and private-sector 
nuclear shipyards and consider innovative ways to share 
resources and infrastructure across the enterprise while the 
public yards recapitalize.
    Finally, the committee notes that the deficiencies within 
the public shipyard enterprise will be further exacerbated by 
the Navy's goal to expand ship force structure. The committee 
believes that the growth in the public shipyard enterprise 
should be paced by the anticipated growth in the Navy force 
structure, as detailed by the administration's 30-year 
shipbuilding plan, required annually pursuant to section 231 of 
title 10, United States Code.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to provide a report to the congressional defense committees, by 
March 1, 2018, on a comprehensive plan to address shortfalls in 
the public shipyard enterprise. Specifically, this plan shall 
address the following elements:
    (1) Personnel Roadmap: Prepare an employment development 
plan by shipyard that estimates resourcing shortfalls and full-
time equivalent allotments, including overtime and contracting 
support, workforce hiring targets, and the numbers and types of 
employees needed. To the degree possible include the number of 
apprentices by trade skill, the number of engineers, and the 
number of overhead disciplines; and the training initiatives 
and time needed to meet the emerging workload requirements for 
fiscal year 2019 and beyond.
    (2) Infrastructure Development Plan: Identify current 
infrastructure deficiencies at U.S. naval shipyards and prepare 
a detailed master plan for each shipyard that includes a list 
of specific infrastructure projects, scope of work, cost 
estimates, and schedule associated with the current and 30-year 
force structure projections.
    (3) Metrics Assessment Plan: Develop holistic workload 
metrics to better assess the efficiency of the entire shipyard 
versus a narrow review by maintenance availability.
    (4) Workload Management Plan: Using the limitation 
currently imposed by the shortfall of personnel and the 
existing material condition of the public shipyards, prepare a 
5-year workload management plan to include the entirety of the 
nuclear maintenance enterprise, both public- and private-sector 
capacities, that limits lost operational days.
    (5) Funding and Authority Plan: Each plan shall identify 
the additional funding and any legislative authority needed to 
achieve an end state, as quickly as practicable, of elimination 
of all ship maintenance backlogs and a return to predictable, 
sustainable, and affordable ship maintenance availabilities, 
including for the anticipated growth in Navy force structure.

                  Readiness of Coastal Riverine Forces

    Following an incident involving the temporary detention of 
10 U.S. Navy sailors aboard two riverine patrol boats by Iran's 
Revolutionary Guard in January 2016, the Comptroller General of 
the United States conducted a comprehensive review of the 
readiness of the Navy's Coastal Riverine Force, whose 
operational responsibilities range from defending high-value 
assets and critical maritime infrastructure to conducting 
offensive combat operations. The Comptroller General's report 
on the readiness of the Coastal Riverine Force highlights 
manning, training, and equipping challenges the force faces in 
maintaining its warfighting readiness. However, the committee 
notes that the Navy's response to the report failed to describe 
the steps the Navy will take to address the challenges 
identified. The committee is concerned that the challenges 
outlined in the Comptroller General's report will continue to 
worsen without correction, particularly the manning challenges 
facing the force. Accordingly, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Navy to:
    (1) develop manning strategies tailored to the Coastal 
Riverine Force's unique needs to address gaps in critical 
skills and competencies;
    (2) evaluate what human capital flexibilities the Navy 
could implement to support strategies to address Coastal 
Riverine Force's manning shortfalls; and
    (3) develop a strategic human capital plan that addresses 
Coastal Riverine Force manning shortfalls.
    Further, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services and 
the Senate Committee on Armed Services not later than January 
12, 2018, on the results of these efforts.

              Remotely Piloted Aircraft Training Strategy

    The committee notes with concern that the Air Force's 
Active and Reserve Component MQ-1 and MQ-9 aircrews within the 
Air Force's remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) enterprise have 
limited access to unit training resources such as proficiency 
simulators and continuation training sorties because they are 
stretched to meet the operational demands of combatant 
commanders supporting deployed forces. The committee also notes 
that RPA aircrews are able to meet some training and 
proficiency requirements during the conduct of operational 
missions, but believes that this practice should be exercised 
only when absolutely necessary.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to brief the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than September 28, 2017, on the service's approach to RPA 
aircrew training, with a particular focus on how the Air Force 
plans to field simulator capability and training capacity among 
Active and Reserve Component units supporting RPA operations.

             Report on Army Aviation Restructure Initiative

    The committee is concerned about the status of Army attack 
aviation following the decision to execute the Aviation 
Restructure Initiative in 2013. The committee is aware that the 
decision to reduce attack and reconnaissance aviation 
battalions by 37 percent and realign most attack helicopters 
from the Army National Guard to the active component was made 
to meet the demands of strategic planning at the time. However, 
the committee notes there is a shortfall of both warrant 
officer and commissioned officer pilots in the active 
component. Meanwhile, there is a cadre of experienced and 
qualified Guard pilots that can help bridge this gap. The 
committee is concerned that this cadre may not remain a viable 
option, as the nation is facing a pilot shortage crisis and 
commercial airlines are now specifically targeting helicopter 
pilots. This mismatch of resources has created a situation 
where aircraft are assigned to bases with no pilots to fly 
them. The committee believes this scenario could negatively 
affect the ability of the Army to support combatant commanders' 
future needs. Furthermore, the committee needs to gain a better 
understanding of the overall operational impacts for National 
Guard Apache battalions given the current plan to retain 18 
aircraft per unit in the National Guard instead of the 24 that 
their active-duty counterparts will have.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Army, in coordination with the Director of the National Guard 
Bureau, to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services, not later than December 31, 2017, on the status of 
Army attack aviation readiness. The briefing should also 
provide updates on new factors that affect the Army's ability 
to maintain a robust attack aviation capability over the next 3 
years, including a plan to recruit and retain the required 
number of qualified attack helicopter pilots.

          Report on Military Training for Rotary-Wing Aviation

    Ongoing readiness challenges with rotary-wing aviation in 
the U.S. Armed Forces have raised a number of questions around 
the maintenance, training, manpower, safety, and deployability 
of these aircraft. For example, both the Army and Marine Corps 
have cited a lack of funding for training and maintenance, 
including spare parts, as a critical concern for their rotary-
wing aviation communities. Further, the military services have 
cited pilot shortages and the lengthy duration of new pilot 
training as issues affecting rotary-wing aviation readiness. 
These issues have been further exacerbated by increased 
civilian hiring competition for experienced rotary-wing pilots. 
The committee has expressed concern about the effect these 
readiness challenges have had on the frequency of accident 
mishaps in rotary-wing aviation over the past 5 years and has 
urged the military services to prioritize funding for rotary-
wing aviation in order to ensure that the United States 
maintains this crucial capability into the future.
    Given these concerns, the committee directs the Comptroller 
General of the United States to assess the following:
    (1) to what extent have the military services met annual 
training requirements for rotary-wing aircraft, and identified 
any factors that have limited this training;
    (2) what is known about the relationship between the amount 
and type of training completed on rotary-wing aircraft and the 
number of accident mishaps;
    (3) to what extent have the military services utilized 
virtual training devices to meet training requirements for 
rotary-wing aircraft; and
    (4) any other issues the Comptroller General determines 
appropriate with respect to rotary-wing aviation training.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than February 1, 2018, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary findings and to submit a final report to the Senate 
Committee on Armed Services and the House Committee on Armed 
Services on a date agreed to at the time of the briefing.

                 Report on Multi-Domain Battle Concept

    Over the past decade, the Russian Federation, the People's 
Republic of China, and other potential adversaries have 
developed sophisticated intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance; air defense; artillery; information operations; 
and other capabilities that pose significant challenges to U.S. 
ground forces entering the theater and, once in place, would 
leave them exposed to counterattack. In February 2017, the Army 
and Marine Corps published a concept paper describing an 
approach for ground combat operations in the face of such 
challenges. This approach, named ``multi-domain battle,'' would 
synthesize ground maneuver, fires, and information operations 
capabilities to project power from the land and into the air, 
maritime, and cyber domains. In doing so, land forces would be 
able to consolidate gains, deny the adversary freedom of 
movement, and create temporary windows that the joint force 
could then exploit for decisive operations.
    The committee appreciates the Army and Marine Corps 
publication of the multi-domain battle concept and is 
encouraged by the Army's forward thinking on the next steps to 
bring multi-domain battle to the warfighter. The committee is 
aware of additional, planned Army concept development, 
experimentation, and potential force structure changes that are 
intended to translate the concept into a warfighting 
capability. However, significant work remains. Importantly, the 
committee notes that multi-domain battle has implications for 
the Navy and Air Force, whose involvement will be instrumental 
in the concept's warfighting success. Bringing the multi-domain 
battle concept to fruition will require changes in warfighting 
doctrine, organization of new warfighting formations at 
multiple echelons, investment in key technologies, leader 
education, force training, and readiness evaluation.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to review the Army's progress and plans in 
developing the concept. As part of the review, the Comptroller 
General should examine the extent to which the Army and Marine 
Corps have engaged with each other and with the other services 
to develop multi-domain battle concepts and doctrine, and set 
priorities for organizing, training, and equipping the force in 
the concept. Additionally, the review should assess:
    (1) the services' priorities and plans for fielding new 
multi-domain battle capabilities over the next 2 to 5 years;
    (2) the implications for the Army's near-term and long-term 
modernization plans;
    (3) plans for educating, training, and evaluating the 
readiness of Army formations to execute multi-domain battle 
operations; and
    (4) any other matters related to multi-domain battle the 
Comptroller General determines are appropriate.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
July 1, 2018, on preliminary findings of the review and to 
submit a final report to the Senate Committee on Armed Services 
and the House Committee on Armed Services by a date agreed to 
at the time of the briefing.

  Report on Unit-Level Training Costs to Build Full-Spectrum Readiness

    The Department of Defense uses operation and maintenance 
(O&M;) funding to train U.S. military forces in order to build 
combat readiness, among other purposes. However, in recent 
years, the military services have raised concerns about the 
level of O&M; funding available to support unit-level training 
programs. For example, in 2016 the Assistant Commandant of the 
Marine Corps stated that given available resource levels, the 
Marine Corps was accepting prolonged readiness risks and 
focusing the training of some units to their more limited 
rotational missions versus full-spectrum training. The Vice 
Chief of Staff of the Army also stated that the Army took 
actions to enable the effective and efficient use of training 
resources in order to mitigate the risk posed by the fact that 
less than one-third of Army units were at acceptable levels of 
readiness.
    The military service chiefs have identified rebuilding the 
readiness of the armed forces to prevail across a full range of 
potential contingencies as a top priority and, in recent budget 
requests, have recommended funding for training that had been 
cut due to budget constraints. The committee is aware that the 
military services use various approaches and models to 
determine funding requirements for training as part of the 
Department's planning, programming, budgeting, and execution 
processes. The committee is further aware that the Department's 
annual budget requests include some information about the 
military services' O&M; funding estimates for training. However, 
this information is not sufficiently detailed to determine unit 
training costs and the amount of readiness that is expected to 
be generated by annual O&M; expenses. Therefore, it is difficult 
to determine the benefits that would be gained from additional 
O&M; funding for unit-level training.
    To better understand the military services' budgeting 
processes to build unit-level training readiness, and to 
achieve greater transparency over the military services' O&M; 
funding requests, the committee directs the Comptroller General 
of the United States to assess the following:
    (1) how the military services determine annual O&M; budget 
estimates for unit-level training;
    (2) the extent to which the Department of Defense and the 
military services established mechanisms to monitor the amount 
of O&M; obligations for unit-level training and used data on 
actual O&M; costs to develop future funding requests; and
    (3) the extent to which the military services established 
processes and metrics to systematically evaluate unit training 
costs and the amount of readiness that is generated from O&M; 
training expenditures.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than February 1, 2018, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary findings and to submit a final report to the 
congressional defense committees on a date agreed to at the 
time of the briefing.

                 Small Arms Weapons Simulation Training

    The committee recognizes the benefits gained from the use 
of simulation and synthetic training systems to maximize 
military training and readiness requirements. As the use of 
such systems increases to supplement live training exercises 
and to meet critical warfighter readiness requirements, the 
committee is concerned that the Department of Defense has not 
implemented clear performance evaluation metrics, data 
collection requirements, and validation standards to accurately 
assess and document whether each command's chosen training 
system is transferring required skills proficiency to live fire 
and real-world combat scenarios.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by December 1, 2017, that includes, at a minimum: a detailed 
description of the evaluation metrics that each service plans 
to use to ensure all new small arms simulation training systems 
and programs of instructions are tested to demonstrate clear 
and repeated live fire transfer proficiency and combat 
readiness prior to system acquisition; an assessment of the 
live fire performance results of existing simulation and 
synthetic small arms training systems being utilized; a plan to 
ensure future systems are capable of data collection that gives 
commands the ability to maintain and track individual and 
squad-level training records, provide trend analysis and 
forecast models to reduce training time and accurately 
determine live fire transfer readiness, and train to multiple 
proficiency levels and threat evolutions; and, examples of 
current simulation and synthetic small arms training systems 
that are documenting cost savings in ammunition, travel, 
training time, and expedited and improved qualification and 
remediation rates.

    Training for Air Force Combined Air Operations Center Personnel

    The committee recognizes that a top priority for the Air 
Force Chief of Staff is to qualify personnel to serve in joint 
task forces and combined air operations centers (CAOCs). This 
qualification relies in part on the opportunity for Air Force 
personnel to train in command and control procedures within the 
physical environment of a CAOC. Most Air Force CAOC training 
occurs during occasional large-force training and mission-
rehearsal exercises, where the primary focus of the exercise is 
not the training of CAOC personnel. The committee believes that 
adequate command and control training of CAOC staffs is 
essential to safe, secure, and effective air operations in 
theaters and contingency environments around the world.
    Additionally, the committee is aware that regional CAOC 
training centers provide effective training with reduced costs. 
The Air Combat Command (ACC) Crisis Action Center, where ACC 
staff plans and commands ACC forces responding to a national 
crisis, and the CAOC Exercise (CAOC-X), designed to support 
planning and execution of joint forces when ACC is the air 
component commander supporting an engaged combatant commander 
or a joint task force commander leading a crisis response, are 
two such regional centers. In those cases, the CAOC provides 
actual current intelligence and targeting and produces the 
daily air tasking order. The committee strongly encourages the 
Chief of Staff of the Air Force to ensure that CAOC-X and other 
regional CAOCs are resourced, manned, and fully utilized to 
serve as a training venue for the planning, execution, and 
command and control of joint forces taking part in major 
regional joint exercises.

    Training Range Inventory, Capacity, and Configuration in Europe

    As the committee asserts elsewhere in this report, the 
committee believes there is operational and strategic value in 
maintaining forward presence of United States military forces 
by providing rapid response capabilities to geographic 
combatant commanders, serving as a deterrent to potential 
adversaries, assuring partners and allies, and facilitating 
cooperative efforts to build and develop partner-nation 
security capabilities. The committee notes that permanently 
stationed U.S. forces presently are located primarily at 
legacy, enduring locations in Western Europe, while rotational 
U.S. forces have primarily been deployed to support exercises 
and assurance activities in the Baltic countries, as well as 
Central and Eastern Europe. With these rotational forces 
exercising in new locations, the committee is concerned that 
training requirements to build and sustain readiness may not be 
adequately met by current training range capabilities in the 
region.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in coordination with the Commander, U.S. European Command, to 
provide a report to the congressional defense committees by 
April 1, 2018, on the location, capabilities, and capacities of 
air and ground ranges, range complexes, military training 
routes, and special-use areas in the European Command's area of 
responsibility. At a minimum, the report should address the 
following:
    (1) an inventory of current air and ground ranges, range 
complexes, military training routes, and special-use areas the 
U.S. Armed Forces currently utilize or have access to in the 
U.S. European Command's area of responsibility;
    (2) an overview of the current capabilities and capacity of 
these training areas to support permanent and rotational 
forward presence of U.S. military forces;
    (3) an assessment of any capability gaps at these training 
areas that limit the ability to meet training requirements to 
U.S. standards; and
    (4) details of current or planned investments in training 
infrastructure to mitigate identified capability gaps, help 
meet U.S. training requirements, or required to support 
additional permanent or rotational forces in Europe, funded 
either by the United States, NATO, or foreign partners.

                      Undergraduate Pilot Training

    The committee supports the Air Force's efforts to increase 
pilot production as a critical enabler to rebuilding readiness. 
Given current and future training demands, existing 
undergraduate pilot training (UPT) facilities are reaching 
maximum throughput capacity. The Air Force currently utilizes 
nearby civilian airfields to meet operational flight 
requirements. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
the Air Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services by October 27, 2017, on the following:
    (1) A business case analysis to identify efficient ways to 
maximize current UPT activities including use of proximate 
civilian airfields;
    (2) Efforts to maximize current UPT activities;
    (3) Efforts to optimize the pilot instructor training force 
including use of retired-to-reserve, Air Force Reserve, Air 
National Guard, and civilian contract instructors;
    (4) An assessment of availability of civilian aviation 
facilities proximate to current UPT installations including 
runway capacity, ramp space, access to military operating 
areas, hangars, other aviation operation infrastructure, 
facilities for administrative and support functions, and 
availability of instructors, maintainers, and other support 
personnel;
    (5) A summary of currently shared operations and activities 
between each Air Force UPT installation and proximate civilian 
aviation facilities, and a list of other proximate civilian 
aviation facilities with potential utilization capabilities; 
and
    (6) An evaluation of the feasibility and efficiency of 
increasing the use of proximate civilian aviation facilities to 
expand UPT capacity to meet throughput requirements and create 
additional surge capacity, including expanding operations at 
currently utilized civilian aviation facilities and increasing 
utilization of additional proximate civilian aviation 
facilities.

                             Other Matters


            Combatant Command Policies on Open-Air Burn Pits

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense has in 
place Department of Defense Instruction (DODI) 4715.19 that 
establishes policies, responsibilities, and procedures 
regarding the use of open-air burn pits in contingency 
environments. The committee notes that U.S. Central Command is 
currently the only geographic combatant command that has issued 
implementation policies and procedures for waste management. In 
September 2016, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) 
recommended that the commanders of U.S. Africa Command, U.S. 
European Command, U.S. Pacific Command, and U.S. Southern 
Command also issue implementation policies and procedures for 
waste management. The committee notes that the Department 
concurred with this recommendation and understands that the 
Department is currently in the process of revising DODI 
4715.19. As the Department revises DODI 4715.19, the committee 
encourages the Department to incorporate the above GAO 
recommendation.

 Consideration of the Domestic Textile Industrial Base in Contracting 
                              for Uniforms

    The committee is aware of an August 2016 Department of the 
Navy directive altering mandatory seabag requirements, 
including elimination of the wool peacoat and the all-weather 
coat. The committee is concerned this decision was made without 
considering upgrades or alternatives to the traditional peacoat 
or the impact to the nation's domestic textile industrial base. 
As the Department of the Navy works to streamline military 
uniforms, the committee notes the importance of a stable 
domestic textile industrial base to produce garments such as 
these and encourages the Department to take into consideration, 
when making decisions about uniform changes, such an impact 
upon the domestic textile industrial base, including the small 
businesses that provide critical contributions.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than October 1, 2017, that addresses the following:
    (1) an explanation of why the Navy removed the peacoat from 
the mandatory seabag requirements;
    (2) what consideration of alternatives was given to 
upgrades or improvements to the peacoat;
    (3) any evaluation of the costs of the cold-weather parka 
compared to both the peacoat and the all-weather coat; and
    (4) an assessment of the impact to the domestic textile 
industrial base of these changes.

             Dioxin-Based Herbicides Review Related to Guam

    Agent Orange, a dioxin-based herbicide now known as a 
carcinogen, was used by the United States during the Vietnam 
war to defoliate trees and shrubs that provided cover for 
opposition forces. The committee is concerned that additional 
exposures to Agent Orange may have occurred in the U.S. 
Territory of Guam, where persistent questions have been raised 
about the use of locations on Guam as a transshipment point for 
Agent Orange intended for use in Vietnam. The committee 
therefore directs the Comptroller General of the United States 
to conduct a review of the Federal Government's handling of 
Agent Orange on Guam and submit a report of the findings to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by March 22, 2018. The 
Comptroller General's study should address the following:
    (1) what is known about where the Federal Government 
stored, transferred, and used Agent Orange or its components on 
Guam, and what is known about related contamination at these 
locations, including what is known about the storage or 
transfer of Agent Orange on Guam;
    (2) the number of known and suspected environmental ``hot 
spots'' from dioxin contamination associated with Agent Orange 
that are on Guam;
    (3) what is known about the current dioxin levels and 
threats to human health and the environment at these sites;
    (4) the plans that are in place to remediate these sites, 
and the status of these plans; and
    (5) the sum of money the Department of Defense spent to 
date to clean up these sites and the projected remaining costs 
associated with these cleanup efforts.

              Ensuring Proper Fitting of Athletic Footwear

    The committee is aware of the Department of the Navy's use 
of specific foot imaging technology to properly gauge the 
individual foot type (overpronated, neutral, or underpronated) 
and appropriate shoe type (motion control, stability, or 
cushioned/neutral) for recruits entering basic training. The 
committee notes a Department of the Navy study demonstrating 
the effectiveness of its Recruit Training Command's 
standardized physical training program including injury 
prevention initiatives, such as matching individuals with 
appropriate shoe types, in lowering the rate of recruit injury 
by nearly 70 percent. The committee supports the Department of 
the Army and the Department of the Air Force's efforts to fit 
recruits with appropriate athletic footwear to reduce injury 
and encourages both departments to ensure that all recruit 
training facilities are equipped with foot imaging technology 
to prevent injury.

                       Environmental Restoration

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense has 
responsibility for more than 34,000 sites under the 
installation restoration program at active installations, 
Formerly Utilized Defense Sites, and BRAC locations. The 
Department has set a goal of achieving response complete at 90% 
of these sites by the end of fiscal year 2018 and 95% of these 
sites by the end of fiscal year 2021. The committee understands 
that the Department is currently on track to achieve these 
goals. However, the committee notes that even after the 
Department meets these goals, more than 1,700 sites will still 
not have achieved response complete status. Based on current 
estimates, many of these locations will require significant 
time and resources to achieve response complete.
    The committee is concerned that current funding may be 
insufficient and result in inefficient remediation efforts, 
delays and overall higher costs. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the 
secretaries of the military departments, to provide a report to 
the House Committee on Armed Services no later than December 
31, 2017, on efforts to reach 100% response complete for sites 
under the installation restoration program. At minimum, the 
report should provide a list of sites that have not yet 
achieved response complete, a total estimated cost for 
achieving response complete at these sites, the number of years 
that it will take at current annual funding levels to achieve 
response complete at these sites, and current efforts the 
Department is taking to ensure the installation restoration 
program is resourced to maximize efficiency and minimize the 
total time required to reach response complete at these sites 
including the feasibility of public-private partnerships to 
expedite clean up.

              Fabric and Membrane Technology for Footwear

    The committee expresses its ongoing support for Department 
of Defense research and testing of cutting-edge fabric and 
membrane technologies to improve service members' comfort, 
effectiveness, and mission readiness. The report (S. Rept. 114-
49) accompanying the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 included a requirement for the Secretary of 
Defense to submit a report to the Senate Committee on Armed 
Services on fabric-based respiratory protective equipment, 
including evaluations of emerging technologies to minimize 
service member exposure to inhalation of particulates and 
pollutants. Additionally, in the report (S. Rept. 114-255) 
accompanying the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2017, the Senate Committee on Armed Services directed the 
Secretary of the Army to report similarly on footwear 
technologies that incorporate new polytetrafluoroethylene 
(ePTFE) and other membrane technologies. In light of these 
directives, the committee understands that the Army is 
currently evaluating the referenced technologies and that the 
evaluations are yielding positive results.
    Recognizing the importance of these technologies to 
warfighter readiness, the committee directs the Secretary of 
the Army to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services not later December 15, 2017, on the suitability of the 
aforementioned technologies to military applications. 
Specifically, the briefing shall provide an evaluation of the 
fabric-based filter protective equipment technologies reviewed 
under the reporting requirement in S. Rept. 114-49, 
identification of specific applications for integration of the 
technology, and a plan for transitioning the technology into 
such applications and programs. In line with the Army's review 
of footwear technologies as required in S. Rept. 114-255, the 
briefing shall provide a detailed evaluation of new ePTFE 
membranes, laminates, and other membrane technologies. 
Additionally, the briefing shall include suggested revisions to 
current requirements and product descriptions that could be 
implemented to expand access to these membrane technology 
advancements. Finally, the briefing shall address a plan for 
transitioning membrane technologies into military applications, 
including Army boot modernization programs such as the jungle 
combat boot program, the cold-weather and extreme cold-weather 
boot programs, and future cold-weather clothing systems.

               Flame-Resistant Military Uniform Postures

    In the committee report (H. Rept. 114-537) accompanying the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017, the 
committee directed the military services to provide a joint 
briefing to the committee that outlined the plan and process, 
including costs, for providing flame-resistant (FR) uniform 
protection postures for all military personnel. The committee 
encouraged all military services to consider implementing FR 
uniform protective postures based on an assessment of the 
threat and the operating environment. In light of this report, 
the committee encourages the services to continue to update 
military requirements and implementation of FR protective 
postures based on the threat and the operating environment.

             Former Naval Weapons Industrial Plant Bethpage

    The committee notes that from 1942 until 1996, the Naval 
Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant (NWIRP) at Bethpage, New York, 
was a government-owned, contractor-operated facility. Since its 
inception, the plant's primary mission supported the research, 
prototyping, testing, design, engineering, fabrication, and 
primary assembly of military aircraft. The committee is aware 
of the environmental concerns related to soil and groundwater 
contamination in the vicinity of NWIRP Bethpage. There are 
other responsible parties and non-Navy sources that have 
contributed to regional groundwater contamination, including 
the contractor which operated the NWIRP and owned and operated 
adjacent facilities.
    To guide remediation actions associated with the historic 
operations, the committee notes that the Navy has signed three 
separate records of decision (ROD) for the NWIRP Bethpage dated 
1995, 2003, and 2015. To date, the U.S. Government has spent 
approximately $94 million to implement and comply with the 
RODs. The U.S. Government currently estimates that it will 
spend approximately $2.5 million to $10.0 million per year over 
the next 30 years. This funding supports a range of response 
actions including extensive off-property groundwater 
monitoring, construction, operation, maintenance and monitoring 
of public water supply treatment systems and hot spot mass 
removal systems. Funding is also being used to remove 
contaminated soil, construct and operate soil vapor extraction 
systems to treat contamination in solid and control vapor 
intrusion, and to conduct community and regulatory outreach 
through restoration advisory board and quarterly technical 
meetings. The committee is aware that the Navy intends to 
continue efforts to remediate soil and groundwater 
contamination while also putting in place land use controls to 
prevent human exposure to contaminated soil and groundwater.
    The committee is supportive of the Navy's remediation 
efforts as outlined in the RODs and believes it is important 
for the Navy to continue to dedicate adequate resources to 
ensure timely and effective remediation of the former NWIRP 
Bethpage site. The committee also believes working with State 
and local governments to timely and efficiently execute the 
Navy's responsibilities under its RODs may help reduce the 
financial burden stemming from remediation efforts. As 
additional resources or new technologies are made available, 
the committee encourages the Navy to seek opportunities to 
expedite the current remediation schedule.

              Guam Micronesian Kingfisher Recovery Habitat

    The committee is aware that the Department of the Navy and 
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service signed a Memorandum of 
Agreement (MOA) on June 11, 2015 regarding the conservation of 
the Guam Micronesian kingfisher. The committee notes that this 
MOA was put in place to support the relocation of U.S. Marines 
to Guam as well as to ensure a sufficient amount of suitable 
survival recovery habitat is conserved and managed for the 
reintroduction and recovery of the Guam Micronesian kingfisher. 
Under the MOA, 5,234 acres of land under the control of the 
Department of Defense was identified and designated for 
enhanced management activity to ensure the continued 
suitability of the recovery habitat until such time as the 
species can be reintroduced on Guam. The committee notes that 
this MOA was signed by the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the 
Navy, as the Department of the Navy serves as the executive 
agent for installation management for Joint Region Marianas. 
However, the committee is concerned about the potential impacts 
this MOA may have on current and future military infrastructure 
development, training, and operational requirements on Guam as 
well as the limitations unrelated to the Department of Defense 
that affect the feasibility of reintroduction of the species. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy and 
the Secretary of the Air Force to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services not later than September 30, 
2017, regarding the near- and long-term operational impacts of 
the MOA. At minimum, the briefing should address land use needs 
at Andersen Air Force Base, impacts on the operations master 
plan for future mission growth, any identified property deemed 
potentially in conflict with current land designations, and any 
other relevant information.

              Personal Protection Equipment Awards Program

    The Army's Personal Protection Equipment Awards program 
recognizes soldiers whose lives were saved by their personal 
protective equipment. The award consists of a demilitarized 
piece of protective equipment that the soldier was wearing when 
injured, mounted on a wooden plaque or mount. The committee 
understands that the Secretary of the Army chose to limit 
eligibility for these awards to only those soldiers under the 
jurisdiction of the Secretary of Defense at the time of the 
award. The committee believes that the program is important to 
both soldiers and former soldiers and, when feasible, should be 
available to both groups. The committee supports the Army's 
Personal Protection Awards program for all recipients, 
including former soldiers who have earned the award.

                       Polyfluoroalkyl Substances

    The committee notes that perfluorooctanesulfonic acid 
(PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) are part of a class of 
man-made chemicals that are used in many industrial and 
consumer products to make the products resist heat, stains, 
water, and grease. In the 1970s, the Department of Defense and 
commercial airports began using aqueous film forming foam 
(AFFF), which contained these chemical compounds, to extinguish 
petroleum fires. The committee notes that on May 19, 2016, the 
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued new Lifetime 
Health Advisories (LHAs) under the Safe Drinking Water Act for 
combined PFOS and PFOA concentrations at 70 parts per trillion. 
Since EPA issued these new LHAs, the Department of Defense has 
completed testing of the 480 drinking water systems at 
locations where the Department supplies drinking water. In 
addition, the Department is currently working through The 
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and 
Liability Act (42 U.S.C. 9601) (CERCLA) process to conduct 
preliminary assessments and site inspections to identify sites 
where PFOS and PFOA may have been released by the Department of 
Defense. This activity includes performing tests of privately 
owned drinking water wells near military installations where 
warranted. These efforts will be used to inform future cleanup 
actions, and the Department incorporates LHA information when 
assessing risk to human health under CERCLA.
    The committee understands that the Department of Defense 
spent approximately $200.0 million through December 31, 2016, 
in response to PFOS and PFOA. This funding has been used to 
conduct preliminary assessments and site inspections, test 
drinking water systems, and provide mitigations such as bottled 
water or drinking water filtration systems where water systems 
tests indicate PFOS/PFOA above the LHA levels. The committee 
notes that the Department was unable to program funds 
specifically for these actions in the fiscal year 2016 or 
fiscal year 2017 budget requests and have been funding their 
response to PFOS/PFOA using existing funds originally 
programmed for other response actions. The committee is 
supportive of the Department's near-term efforts to respond to 
PFOS and PFOA and believes it is critical for the Department to 
continue its outreach and engagement with local communities 
with drinking water systems that have PFOS/PFOA detected above 
the LHAs and may have been impacted by the Department's 
activities. Furthermore, the committee believes it is important 
for the Department to fully plan, program, and budget for 
actions related to PFOS and PFOA in order to meet its 
responsibilities under the CERCLA, the Safe Drinking Water Act 
(42 U.S.C. 300f), and other applicable Federal statutes, rules, 
and regulations.
    Finally, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than September 30, 2017, on the Department's response to 
PFOS/PFOA. The briefing should provide the following:
    (1) the locations on or in proximity to current and former 
military installations where the Department has conducted 
testing of military, public, and private drinking water systems 
and a summary of the results of those tests where PFOS/PFOA 
levels were detected in excess of the LHA levels;
    (2) the locations on or in proximity to current and former 
military installations where the Department has conducted 
groundwater testing where PFOS/PFOA may have been released and 
a summary of the results of those tests where PFOS/PFOA levels 
were detected in excess of the LHA levels;
    (3) short-term mitigations that have been funded and 
provided by the Department, both on military installations and 
in the surrounding communities, where PFOS/PFOA levels were 
detected in excess of the LHA levels;
    (4) the process and timeline for identifying and resourcing 
long-term remediation on military installations or in the 
surrounding communities where PFOS/PFOA levels were detected in 
excess of the LHA levels; and
    (5) research conducted in pursuit of less environmentally 
harmful AFFF blends containing less or no PFOS/PFOA.

                 Recurrent Flooding and Sea Level Rise

    The committee is aware that several Department of Defense 
installations and facilities are experiencing recurrent 
flooding events and encroachment from sea level rise. These 
events have the potential to adversely impact military 
operations, training, and readiness. The committee is aware 
that the Department of Defense and the military departments 
have initiated several studies and collaborations with 
academic, research, and intergovernmental institutions to model 
recurrent flooding and sea level rise and examine options for 
enhancing mission resiliency at impacted military 
installations. The committee supports these collaborations and 
encourages the Department of Defense to continue and expand 
these research efforts.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Secretaries of the military departments, 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than March 1, 2018, on recurrent flooding and sea 
level rise impacting military installations. At a minimum, the 
briefing should address the findings and recommendations of the 
research collaborations that have been undertaken to date, a 
discussion of areas where the Department of Defense believes 
additional research is needed, and ongoing and planned 
mitigations to ensure the continued operational viability and 
mission resilience of affected military installations.

                   Standard-Issue Garments for Women

    In the committee report (H. Rept. 114-537) accompanying the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017, the 
committee directed the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the committee outlining plans to provide personal 
protective equipment (PPE) and organizational clothing and 
individual equipment (OCIE) developed specifically for female 
service members. The committee notes that it has not yet 
received this briefing. The committee further directs the 
Secretary of the Army to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than September 30, 2017, 
on efforts to ensure that standard-issue garments, such as the 
Army Combat Shirt, are meeting the unique body types of female 
service members. This briefing should include a discussion of 
how the Army is seeking to leverage advancements in flame-
resistant technology and integrate them into standard garments.

                         Water Quality Trading

    The Committee recognizes that the Department of Defense 
must comply with post-construction water quality requirements 
under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (Clean Water Act) 
when conducting construction activities on military 
installations. Water quality requirements may include, but are 
not limited to, those associated with the control and reduction 
of storm water runoff, total maximum daily loads, water quality 
standards and criteria, National Pollution Discharge 
Elimination System permits, or similar state or local permits. 
The committee is aware that some states are developing Water 
Quality Trading Program, where the purchase of water quality 
credits, generated by third parties and certified by the 
appropriate federal, state, or local agency, may help reduce 
costs while meeting water quality compliance requirements in a 
transparent and accountable manner. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the 
secretaries of the military departments, to provide a briefing 
to the House Committee on Armed Services not later than March 
1, 2018, on the potential use of water quality credits to 
comply with applicable federal and state laws and regulations. 
At minimum, the briefing should address the Department's policy 
with respect to purchasing water quality credits, examples of 
where such credits have been used by the Department of Defense, 
as well as the financial costs, benefits, and challenges 
associated with such credits.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations


              Section 301--Authorization of Appropriations

    This section would authorize appropriations for operation 
and maintenance activities at the levels identified in section 
4301 of division D of this Act.

                   Subtitle B--Energy and Environment


Section 311--Codification of and Improvements to Department of Defense 
   Clearinghouse to Coordinate Department Review of Applications for 
 Certain Projects That May Have Adverse Impact on Military Operations 
                             and Readiness

    This section would amend chapter 7 of title 10, United 
States Code, by inserting a new section that would update the 
authorities of the Department of Defense Clearinghouse 
established by section 358 of the Ike Skelton National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2011 (Public Law 111-383).
    This section would also change the name of the 
Clearinghouse to the ``Military Aviation, Range, and 
Installation Assurance Program Office'' would repeal section 
358 of Public Law 111-383 upon enactment.

         Section 312--Energy Performance Goals and Master Plan

    This section would amend section 2911 of title 10, United 
States Code, to add future energy demand, energy resiliency, 
and opportunities to leverage third-party financing to the 
special considerations the Secretary of Defense must consider 
when developing and implementing the energy performance goals 
and energy performance master plan.

 Section 313--Payment to Environmental Protection Agency of Stipulated 
       Penalty in Connection With Umatilla Chemical Depot, Oregon

    This section would authorize the Secretary of the Army to 
transfer a specified amount to the Hazardous Substance 
Superfund to satisfy a stipulated penalty assessed by the 
Environmental Protection Agency against the Umatilla Chemical 
Depot, Oregon, under a Federal Facility Agreement entered into 
by the Army and the Environmental Protection Agency in 1989.

 Section 314--Payment to Environmental Protection Agency of Stipulated 
    Penalty in Connection With Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant, Texas

    This section would authorize the Secretary of the Army to 
transfer a specified amount to the Hazardous Substance 
Superfund to satisfy a stipulated penalty assessed by the 
Environmental Protection Agency against Longhorn Army 
Ammunition Plant, Texas, under a Federal Facility Agreement 
entered into by the Army and the Environmental Protection 
Agency in 1991.

 Section 315--Department of Defense Cleanup and Removal of Petroleum, 
           Oil, and Lubricant Associated With the Prinz Eugen

    This section would authorize removal and cleanup of 
petroleum, oil and lubricants from the heavy cruiser Prinz 
Eugen, which was transferred from the United States to the 
Republic of the Marshall Islands in 1986.

                 Subtitle C--Logistics and Sustainment


   Section 321--Reauthorization of Multi-Trades Demonstration Project

    This section would amend section 338 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2004 (Public Law 108-
136) to extend the multi-trades demonstration project through 
2024.

     Section 322--Guidance Regarding Use of Organic Industrial Base

    This section would direct the Secretary of the Army to 
maintain the arsenals with sufficient workloads to ensure 
affordability and technical competence in all critical 
capability areas.

                          Subtitle D--Reports


     Section 331--Quarterly Reports on Personnel and Unit Readiness

    This section would amend section 482 of title 10, United 
States Code, to change the matters reported in the Quarterly 
Readiness Reports to Congress (QRRC). Reports for the first and 
third quarters of a fiscal year would contain information on 
Department of Defense and military service readiness status 
while those for the second and fourth quarters of a fiscal year 
would contain Department of Defense mitigation plans for 
readiness deficiencies identified in the previous quarter's 
QRRC.

Section 332--Biennial Report on Core Depot-Level Maintenance and Repair 
                               Capability

    This section would amend section 2464 of title 10, United 
States Code, to improve existing biennial reporting 
requirements on core depot-level maintenance and repair 
capabilities by clarifying what specific data should be 
included in such reports.

Section 333--Annual Report on Personnel, Training, and Equipment Needs 
                   of Non-Federalized National Guard

    This section would amend section 10504 of title 10, United 
States Code, to require an annual report on the personnel, 
training, and equipment needs of the non-federalized National 
Guard.

    Section 334--Annual Report on Military Working Dogs Used by the 
                         Department of Defense

    This section would establish an annual reporting 
requirement on Military Working Dogs used by the Department of 
Defense.

   Section 335--Annual Briefings on Army Explosive Ordnance Disposal

    This section would require an annual briefing to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and House of 
Representatives on the Army's explosive ordnance disposal 
program.

   Section 336--Report on Effects of Climate Change on Department of 
                                Defense

    This section would state findings related to climate 
change, express the sense of Congress regarding climate change 
and national security, and would require the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a report on vulnerabilities to military 
installations and combatant commands from climate change 
related effects.

                       Subtitle E--Other Matters


                  Section 341--Explosive Safety Board

    This section would amend section 172 of title 10, United 
States Code, to change the name of the Ammunition Storage Board 
to the Explosive Safety Board while also changing the 
membership requirements of that board.

    Section 342--Department of Defense Support for Military Service 
  Memorials and Museums That Highlight the Role of Women in the Armed 
                                 Forces

    This section would allow the Secretary of Defense to 
provide financial support for the acquisition, installation, 
and maintenance of exhibits, facilities, historical displays, 
and programs at military service memorials and museums that 
highlight the role of women in the Armed Forces.
    The budget request included $5.0 million for financial 
support for the acquisition, installation, and maintenance of 
exhibits, facilities, historical displays, and programs at 
military service memorials and museums that highlight the role 
of women in the military in accordance with section 2833 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public 
Law 114-328). As noted in the justification materials 
accompanying the budget request, the committee expects these 
funds and the authority provided by this section to enable the 
memorial to address program shortfalls and chart a path to 
financial independence by end of year fiscal year 2018.

 Section 343--Limitation on Availability of Funds for Advanced Skills 
                 Management Software System of the Navy

    This section would require the Secretary of the Navy to 
brief the committee on needed enhancements to the Advanced 
Skills Management software system. This section would also 
withhold funding for this software system until 60 days after 
the Secretary of the Navy has provided the committee with the 
results of a formal request for information that considers 
commercial-off-the-shelf solutions.

Section 344--Cost-Benefit Analysis of Uniform Specifications for Afghan 
                      Military or Security Forces

    This section would require a cost-benefit analysis of 
uniform specifications as a condition of the contract whenever 
the Secretary of Defense enters into a contract for the 
provision of uniforms for Afghan military or security forces.

              TITLE IV--MILITARY PERSONNEL AUTHORIZATIONS

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                       Subtitle A--Active Forces


              Section 401--End Strengths for Active Forces

    This section would authorize the following end strengths 
for Active Duty personnel of the Armed Forces as of September 
30, 2018:

Sec. 401.


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       FY 2018                 Change from
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                    Service                        FY 2017                  Committee
                                                  Authorized    Request       Recom-      FY 2018      FY 2017
                                                                            mendation     Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army...........................................      476,000      476,000      486,000       10,000       10,000
Navy...........................................      323,900      327,900      327,900            0        4,000
USMC...........................................      185,000      185,000      185,000            0            0
Air Force......................................      321,000      325,100      325,100            0        4,100
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total....................................    1,305,900    1,314,000    1,324,000       10,000       18,100
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Section 402--Revisions in Permanent Active Duty End Strength Minimum 
                                 Levels

    This section would establish new minimum Active Duty end 
strengths for the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force as of 
September 30, 2018. The committee recommends 486,000 as the 
minimum Active Duty end strength for the Army, 327,900 as the 
minimum Active Duty end strength for the Navy, 185,000 as the 
minimum Active Duty end strength for the Marine Corps, and 
325,100 as the minimum Active Duty end strength for the Air 
Force.

                       Subtitle B--Reserve Forces


            Section 411--End Strengths for Selected Reserve

    This section would authorize the following end strengths 
for Selected Reserve personnel, including the end strength for 
Reserves on Active Duty in support of the Reserves, as of 
September 30, 2018:

Sec. 411.


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       FY 2018                 Change from
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                    Service                        FY 2017                  Committee
                                                  Authorized    Request       Recom-      FY 2018      FY 2017
                                                                            mendation     Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard............................      343,000      343,000      347,000        4,000        4,000
Army Reserve...................................      199,000      199,000      202,000        3,000        3,000
Navy Reserve...................................       58,000       59,000       59,000            0        1,000
Marine Corps Reserve...........................       38,500       38,500       38,500            0            0
Air National Guard.............................      105,700      106,600      106,600            0          900
Air Force Reserve..............................       69,000       69,800       69,800            0          800
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total....................................      813,200      815,900      822,900        7,000        9,700
Coast Guard Reserve............................        7,000        7,000        7,000            0            0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Section 412--End Strengths for Reserves on Active Duty in Support of 
                              the Reserves

    This section would authorize the following end strengths 
for Reserves on Active Duty in support of the Reserves as of 
September 30, 2018:

Sec. 412.


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       FY 2018                 Change from
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                    Service                        FY 2017                  Committee
                                                  Authorized    Request       Recom-      FY 2018      FY 2017
                                                                            mendation     Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard............................       30,155       30,155       30,155            0            0
Army Reserve...................................       16,261       16,261       16,261            0            0
Navy Reserve...................................        9,955       10,101       10,101            0          146
Marine Corps Reserve...........................        2,261        2,261        2,261            0            0
Air National Guard.............................       14,764       16,260       16,260            0        1,496
Air Force Reserve..............................        2,955        3,588        3,588            0          633
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total....................................       76,351       78,626       78,626            0        2,275
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

   Section 413--End Strengths for Military Technicians (Dual Status)

    This section would authorize the following end strengths 
for military technicians (dual status) as of September 30, 
2018:

Sec. 413.


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       FY 2018                 Change from
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                    Service                        FY 2017                  Committee
                                                  Authorized    Request       Recom-      FY 2018      FY 2017
                                                                            mendation     Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard............................       25,507       25,507       25,507            0            0
Army Reserve...................................        7,570        7,427        7,427            0         -143
Air National Guard.............................       22,103       21,893       21,893            0         -210
Air Force Reserve..............................       10,061       10,160       10,160            0           99
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total....................................       65,241       64,987       64,987            0         -254
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Section 414--Fiscal Year 2018 Limitation on Number of Non-Dual Status 
                              Technicians

    This section would establish the maximum end strengths for 
the Reserve Components of the Army and Air Force for non-dual 
status technicians as of September 30, 2018:

Sec. 414.


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       FY 2018                 Change from
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                    Service                        FY 2017                  Committee
                                                  Authorized    Request       Recom-      FY 2018      FY 2017
                                                                            mendation     Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard............................        1,600        1,600        1,600            0            0
Air National Guard.............................          350          350          350            0            0
Army Reserve...................................          420          420          420            0            0
Air Force Reserve..............................           90           90           90            0            0
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total....................................        2,460        2,460        2,460            0            0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Section 415--Maximum Number of Reserve Personnel Authorized To Be on 
                  Active Duty for Operational Support

    This section would authorize, as required by section 115(b) 
of title 10, United States Code, the maximum number of Reserve 
Component personnel who may be on Active Duty or full-time 
National Guard duty during fiscal year 2018 to provide 
operational support. The personnel authorized here do not count 
against the end strengths authorized by section 401 or section 
412 of this Act unless the duration on Active Duty exceeds the 
limitations in section 115(b)(2) of title 10, United States 
Code.

Sec. 415.


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       FY 2018                 Change from
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                    Service                        FY 2017                  Committee
                                                  Authorized    Request       Recom-      FY 2018      FY 2017
                                                                            mendation     Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard............................       17,000       17,000       17,000            0            0
Army Reserve...................................       13,000       13,000       13,000            0            0
Navy Reserve...................................        6,200        6,200        6,200            0            0
Marine Corps Reserve...........................        3,000        3,000        3,000            0            0
Air National Guard.............................       16,000       16,000       16,000            0            0
Air Force Reserve..............................       14,000       14,000       14,000            0            0
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total....................................       69,200       69,200       69,200            0            0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

              Subtitle C--Authorization of Appropriations


                    Section 421--Military Personnel

    This section would authorize appropriations for military 
personnel at the levels identified in the funding table in 
section 4401 of division D of this Act.

                   TITLE V--MILITARY PERSONNEL POLICY

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


                    Bystander Intervention Training

    The committee notes that research in the use of evidence-
based bystander intervention training and education has yielded 
promising results in helping to decrease the number of sexual 
assaults. The committee encourages the Department of Defense to 
continue to employ evidence-based training and education 
methods and to leverage civilian research centers in developing 
new and effective ways to reduce sexual assaults in the 
military.

 Comptroller General Report on Race Data in the Military Justice System

    The committee is aware of a recent report that concluded 
that racial disparities may exist in the military justice 
system. The committee notes that the report relies on 
incomplete information because of differences in the way in 
which the military services collect and maintain data on this 
subject. Therefore, not later than January 30, 2019, the 
committee directs the Comptroller General of the United States 
to submit a report to the Armed Services Committee of the House 
of Representatives containing the following components: (1) how 
the military services record and maintain the race and gender 
of service members convicted of violations of the Uniform Code 
of Military Justice; (2) the reason for any differences in 
collection and maintenance of this data among the military 
services; (3) recommendations to improve the collection of this 
data; (4) data and analysis to assist the committee in 
determining whether there is a racial disparity in the 
prosecution of cases under the Uniform Code of Military 
Justice; and (5) any other matters the Comptroller General 
believes are relevant to this issue.

            Digital Transformation of the Recruiting Process

    The committee understands that the Department of Defense 
and the military departments are working to improve and 
modernize the military recruiting process. However, the 
committee is aware that additional modernization is required to 
optimize recruiting and entrance processing. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in consultation 
with the military services, to provide a briefing to the 
Committee on Armed Services of the House of Representatives no 
later than April 1, 2018, on the plan to modernize military 
recruiting and entrance processing. The briefing shall include:
    (1) how the enlistment and commissioning workflow process 
can be modernized to improve workflow by minimizing paperwork 
and maximizing paperless transactions;
    (2) how the military services measure effectiveness and 
return on investment for recruiting and advertising; and
    (3) how the military services are using data analytics to 
improve recruiting.

             Female Propensity To Serve in the Armed Forces

    The committee recognizes that a broad talent pool is 
critical to attaining qualified recruits with the requisite 
skill sets in demand by the armed services. An analysis of 
Joint Advertising Market Research and Studies data conducted 
for the Defense Advisory Committee on Women in the Services 
estimated that only 29% of youth ages 17 to 24 meet eligibility 
criteria for military service. Over half of that population is 
comprised of women; however, women account for less than 15% of 
today's active duty force. Increasing the propensity of women 
to serve is an important step to achieving meaningful access to 
that eligible population and vital to meeting long-term 
readiness requirements. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to brief the House Armed Services 
Committee by January 31st, 2018 on the following:
    (1) female propensity to serve in each of the Armed 
Services, including historical trends in propensity from 9/11 
through the opening of remaining combat arms MOSs and units to 
women;
    (2) a review of proactive measures the services have taken 
to increase the propensity of women to serve;
    (3) an assessment of programs, policies, or incentives that 
could help increase the propensity of women to serve including 
an evaluation of how successful previous efforts been in this 
regard;
    (4) service efforts to recruit women applicants, including 
measures of success weighted against the varying propensity of 
men and women to serve, funding directed towards gender 
diversity initiatives, and statistics related to female-
targeted advertising and outreach to female athletes and high 
school students as a percentage of overall recruiting efforts 
in these areas; and
    (5) an assessment of the impact of service culture on the 
propensity of women to serve, including departmental and 
service efforts to build environments of respect and inclusion 
and counter negative impressions of military service stemming 
from recent social media scandals.

                        Gender Double Standards

    The committee embraces the service of all qualified service 
members and believes that a single standard should apply to all 
service men and women to the degree practicable. While the 
committee supports the continuance of gender and age specific 
physical fitness evaluations, the committee is concerned that 
female service members are sometimes perceived to be held to 
different standards than their male service members. The 
committee is particularly concerned with the differences in 
basic training, such as the differing haircut standards for men 
and women in all services' initial entry training. The 
committee also believes that gender neutral physical standards 
should be adopted through the services for each occupation. 
Such standards would ease the gender neutral assignment 
policies to all duty positions, which should be the norm.
    To begin the process of eliminating the perception of 
double standards as much as possible, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with service secretaries 
and the chiefs of the armed services, to review instances where 
men and women are held to different standards across the 
services and brief the House Committee on Armed Services by 
February 1, 2018 on any such differences the Secretary 
recommends retaining. Such a briefing should include discussion 
on appearance standards; a gender neutral assignment policy; 
gender neutral training and occupational standards, and any 
separate gender training.

Gender Integration of United States Marine Corps Basic Recruit Training

    The committee notes that on January 24, 2013 the Secretary 
of Defense rescinded the 1994 Direct Ground Combat Definition 
and Assignment Rule and directed the service to open all 
occupations and units to women as expeditiously as possible, 
but no later the 1 January 2016. The committee also recognizes 
that the military services have transitioned to gender-neutral 
occupational standards, but the military has retained different 
standards for men and women for the service's physical fitness 
test and encourages the services to continue to explore options 
for gender-neutral standards in this regard. The committee also 
notes that the United States Marine Corps is the only military 
service that has not integrated men and women at basic recruit 
training. Therefore, the committee directs the Commandant of 
the Marine Corps, not later than one year after enactment, to 
report to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives on the required changes and cost 
the Marine Corps would require to execute a fully integrated 
basic recruit training, to include the construction or 
renovation of barracks.

                         GI Bill Benefit Review

    The committee recognizes the substantial benefit the Post 
9-11 GI Bill provides service members to further their or their 
dependent's education. Due to the length of service 
requirements to earn the benefit or transfer the benefit to a 
dependent, many service members have experienced difficulty 
understanding how much of the benefit they have earned. The 
committee is aware that service members, both Active Duty and 
in the Reserve Components, have had to reimburse the government 
for unauthorized use of the benefit due to not meeting the 
length of service requirements. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by November 30, 2017, on 
whether providing service members information on their 
remaining entitlement upon discharge from service would be 
feasible and appropriate. The committee believes relevant 
information would include the amount of the Post 9-11 GI Bill 
benefit each service member has earned prior to separation, 
retirement or release from military service, including whether 
or not they have completed any additional service obligation 
for transferring the benefit to a dependent.

                   Military Child Custody Protections

    The committee remains concerned that service members are 
not receiving necessary information related to State child 
custody laws governing their dependents. While the Secretaries 
of the military departments are currently required to provide 
notice of child custody protections under the Servicemembers 
Civil Relief Act, the military departments do not have uniform 
requirements to provide information on State child custody 
laws. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense, in consultation with the Secretaries of the military 
departments, to provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed 
Services of the House of Representatives not later than March 
1, 2018, on the information and resources currently provided to 
service members regarding State child custody laws. The 
briefing shall include an analysis of how best to standardize 
the dissemination of this information to all affected service 
members, as well as an analysis of when, and how often, the 
information should be provided to these service members.

                       Military Officer Diversity

    The Committee is concerned with the lack of diversity 
within commissioned officers and believes a new evaluation of 
military service academy attendees is necessary to obtain data 
in order to evaluate future policy. Therefore, the Committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to evaluate the recruiting, 
retention, and persistence rates of military service academy 
candidates, current cadets/midshipmen, and graduates. The 
Secretary of Defense shall provide the results of the 
evaluation in a briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of 
the House of Representatives no later than December 1, 2018.

  Military Service Academy Applications and Reserve Officer Training 
                       Corps Scholarship Programs

    The committee recognizes that the selection opportunity for 
a position at a military service academy is a very selective 
process and the number of applications vastly outnumbers the 
available military service academy positions. Due to an 
abundance of well-qualified applicants for military service 
academies and their potential interest and qualification for a 
Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) scholarship, the 
committee highly encourages the Secretaries of the military 
departments to forward all military service academy non-select 
applications to their respective ROTC commands for 
consideration for an ROTC scholarship. In so doing, the 
Secretaries should also inform the applicant of the full range 
of options for which he or she may be qualified.

                       Pilot Shortage Assessment

    The committee recognizes that the services are having 
difficulty addressing shortfalls in critical career fields that 
are vital for the readiness of our Armed Forces, specifically 
in the pilot career field. The committee is concerned about the 
Air Force's retention and recruitment issues within the fighter 
pilot community. The committee notes that the Air Force 
provided written testimony to the committee on February 7, 
2017, stating that the Air Force was short 723 fighter pilots 
below requirement and 1,555 pilots short across all mission 
areas.
    Therefore, the committee encourages the Secretary of the 
Air Force to evaluate all options for improving the recruitment 
and retention of Air Force pilots. As part of such an 
assessment, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed Services 
of the House of Representatives by December 1, 2017, on the 
extent to which moving pilot or other aviation billets to the 
Active Guard and Reserve Components would address these 
shortages.

                   Pre-Command Audit Training Course

    The committee believes that good financial management and 
auditability are important responsibilities of military leaders 
at all levels and is concerned that responsible officers 
receive inadequate training on these matters in the course of 
their careers. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary 
of Defense to submit a report to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives by 
March 1, 2018, on the current programs of education used to 
train those officers assuming a command billet or a billet 
directly responsible for financial management on their 
responsibilities regarding financial management and 
auditability.
    Additionally, the committee directs the Comptroller General 
of the United States to submit a report to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives 
by June 1, 2018, that provides an assessment of the programs 
identified in the Secretary's report. The report of the 
Comptroller General shall also include an overview of current 
law and the Department of Defense's financial management and 
audit efforts to be in compliance with statutory guidance, as 
well as general financial management training requirements for 
command billets or billets requiring management of Department 
of Defense funds.

 Provision of Services at Department of Defense-Run Child Development 
                             Centers (CDC)

    The committee is concerned about staffing shortages at 
childcare centers on military installations. These facilities 
provide important services to the families of our men and women 
in uniform and allow the military to tap the potential of 
important demographics of society that otherwise might not be 
able to contribute to our national defense. On-base childcare 
is also an important workplace benefit that servicemembers and 
their families depend on as part of their total military 
compensation. The committee is further concerned that the 
civilian hiring freeze issued by the Administration in January 
2017 has furthered these shortages. Therefore the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to brief the House Armed 
Services Committee by December 1, 2017 on:
    (1) current staffing deficiencies at service-run child 
development centers (CDCs), to include part-time and preschool 
programs;
    (2) whether the hiring freeze created any collateral 
effects on the services' ability to fill child-care positions 
(e.g. reduced administrative staff at personnel offices, etc.);
    (3) how long the hiring process takes for filling 
individual child-care positions including information on what 
kinds of background checks are involved;
    (4) an assessment of whether streamlined hiring authorities 
help fill vacancies faster;
    (5) a discussion of the kinds of incentives that would help 
recruit child-care workers in areas where filling these 
positions is a challenge;
    (6) how child care fee assistance programs could be 
improved to fill any gaps in availability; and
    (7) how the Department intends to ensure that non-
installation Child Development Centers address the unique 
developmental needs of servicemember families should military 
families have to seek outside care.

  Report on the Feasibility of Establishing a Military Family Service 
                                 Corps

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives by February 1, 2018, on the 
feasibility of the U.S. Department of Defense entering into an 
agreement with the Corporation for National and Community 
Service to establish a Military Family Service Corps as an 
AmeriCorps Affiliate.
    Participants in such a Corps would focus on service in a 
military community in activities selected by the installation 
commander from a list of options drawn from a survey of need in 
the military community. Potential activities could include the 
following: military spouse career support, transition support 
for members departing military service; integration of new 
military families into the military community and installation; 
development and implementation of morale and recreation 
activities for the installation; service as a liaison with 
local schools for military children; support for military 
families with children of special needs, wounded warrior 
transition support, and any additional activities the Secretary 
deems appropriate.

             Review of Resourcing of Trial Defense Services

    The committee is aware of the integral role that an 
independent and adequately resourced military trial defense 
service plays in the military justice system. Accordingly, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in coordination 
with the Secretaries of the military departments, to conduct a 
review of the trial defense services resourcing, and to provide 
a briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives not later than April 1, 2018. The review will 
include:
    (1) whether military defense counsel require independent 
investigators in order to adequately defend their clients, and 
the costs associated with providing such investigators;
    (2) whether trial defense offices are adequately resourced 
with personnel and equipment;
    (3) the feasibility and advisability of providing 
independent funding and approval authority to trial defense 
services for expert witnesses; and
    (4) the programs in place to ensure that lead defense 
counsel in complex cases, such as murder and sexual assault, 
have the appropriate experience and training required to 
effectively defend their clients.

              Review of the Court Martial Appeals Process

    The committee recognizes the significant efforts made to 
modernize the Uniform Code of Military Justice in order to 
maintain good order and discipline in the armed forces while 
providing service members due process protections. However, the 
committee is aware that certain service members are unable to 
appeal their court-martial cases to the United States Supreme 
Court. Under existing law, the Supreme Court lacks jurisdiction 
to hear appeals in which the Court of Appeals for the Armed 
Forces (CAAF): declined review; denied extraordinary relief; 
or, in some cases, denied interlocutory appeals. In these 
cases, service members have less access to Supreme Court review 
than civilians operating in the civilian court system. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
review restrictions on service member appeals to the United 
States Supreme Court and whether these restrictions should be 
eliminated and provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed 
Services of the House of Representatives no later than April 
30, 2018.

                    Social Media Policy for Recruits

    The committee notes that DOD Instruction 1304.26, March 23, 
2015, ENCLOSURE 3 contains a section, ``Character/Conduct,'' 
that reads as follows: ``The underlying purpose of these 
enlistment, appointment, and induction standards is to minimize 
entrance of persons who are likely to become disciplinary 
cases, security risks, or who are likely to disrupt good order, 
morale, and discipline. The Military Services are responsible 
for the defense of the Nation and should not be viewed as a 
source of rehabilitation for those who have not subscribed to 
the legal and moral standards of society at-large.'' The 
committee understands that DD FORM 4/1, OCT 2007, ENLISTMENT/
REENLISTMENT DOCUMENT ARMED FORCES OF THE UNITED STATES, 
states, ``If my behavior fails to meet acceptable military 
standards, I may be discharged and given a certificate for less 
than honorable service, which may hurt my future job 
opportunities and my claim for veteran's benefits.''
    The committee is troubled by recent high-profile cases 
involving the nonconsensual sharing of intimate images. In 
addition, the committee is concerned that the military 
departments continue to have varying policies outlining 
appropriate social media conduct. The committee believes that 
all service members must be explicitly notified, upon 
enlistment or reenlistment, that online harassment, bullying, 
or hazing, including sexual harassment, bullying, or hazing, 
will not be tolerated and, if verified, may lead to a less than 
honorable discharge.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by January 31, 2018, on the best method to ensure uniform high 
standards across the military services for social media use by 
service members, and to require notification and acknowledgment 
by all enlistees of the existence of these policies and the 
potential consequences for violations of these standards.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


          Subtitle A--Regular and Reserve Component Management


  Section 501--Modification of Requirements Relating to Conversion of 
    Certain Military Technician (Dual Status) Positions to Civilian 
                               Positions

    This section would amend section 1053 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92), as amended by section 1084 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328), to 
reduce the clerical and administrative dual status technician 
conversions to title 5, United States Code, civilians required 
by those sections from 20 percent to 10 percent and would 
extend the date of completion of those conversions for 1 year 
until October 1, 2018. Additionally, this section would require 
the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the Committees 
on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives not later than March 1, 2018, containing 
recommendations for revisions to section 709 of title 32, 
United States Code.

Section 502--Pilot Program on Use of Retired Senior Enlisted Members of 
       the Army National Guard as Army National Guard Recruiters

    This section would authorize the Secretary of the Army to 
carry out a pilot program under which retired senior enlisted 
members of the Army National Guard would serve as contract 
recruiters for the Army National Guard.

 Section 503--Equal Treatment of Orders To Serve on Active Duty under 
       Section 12304a and 12304b of Title 10, United States Code

    This section would amend sections 1074(d)(2) and 1145(a) of 
title 10, United States Code, to authorize Reserve Component 
members activated under the authority provided by either 
section 12304a or 12304b of title 10, United States Code, to 
receive pre-mobilization and transitional TRICARE health care.

    Section 504--Direct Employment Pilot Program for Members of the 
                       National Guard and Reserve

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
conduct a pilot program to provide job placement assistance to 
members of the National Guard and Reserves. This section would 
also require the Secretary to provide a report to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives by January 31, 2022 describing the results of 
the pilot. The authority to conduct the program would expire on 
September 30, 2020. The Secretary would be further authorized 
to extend the pilot program for not more than 2 fiscal years.

  Subtitle B--General Service Authorities and Correction of Military 
                                Records


Section 511--Consideration of Additional Medical Evidence by Boards for 
    the Correction of Military Records and Liberal Consideration of 
Evidence Relating to Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder or Traumatic Brain 
                                 Injury

    This section would amend section 1552 of title 10, United 
States Code, to require Boards for the Correction of Military 
Records to review medical evidence of the Secretary of Veterans 
Affairs and civilian healthcare providers in cases in which the 
application is based on matters relating to post-traumatic 
stress disorder (PTSD) or traumatic brain injury (TBI). In 
addition, it would require the boards to review the case with 
liberal consideration to the former member that PTSD or TBI 
potentially contributed to the discharge or dismissal, or 
discharge characterization.

Section 512--Public Availability of Information Related to Disposition 
of Claims Regarding Discharge or Release of Members of the Armed Forces 
                 When the Claims Involve Sexual Assault

    This section would amend sections 1552(h) and 1553(f) of 
title 10, United States Code, to add a requirement to publicly 
disclose statistics related to applications to the Boards for 
the Correction for Military Records and Discharge Review Boards 
in which sexual assault is alleged to have contributed to the 
original characterization of the discharge or release of the 
claimant.

Section 513--Pilot Program on Use of Video Teleconferencing Technology 
 by Boards for the Correction of Military Records and Discharge Review 
                                 Boards

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
conduct a pilot program on the use of video teleconferencing 
technology by boards for the correction of military records and 
discharge review boards so that, when authorized, applicants 
may appear before the board without being physically present.

 Section 514--Inclusion of Specific Email Address Block on Certificate 
         of Release or Discharge From Active Duty (DD Form 214)

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
modify the Certificate of Release or Discharge from Active Duty 
(DD Form 214) to include a specific block for the service 
member's email address.

    Section 515--Provision of Information on Naturalization Through 
                            Military Service

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
ensure certain service members are informed of the availability 
of naturalization through military service under section 328 of 
the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 143).

          Subtitle C--Military Justice and Other Legal Issues


   Section 521--Clarifying Amendments Related to the Uniform Code of 
      Military Justice Reform by the Military Justice Act of 2016

    This section would make clarifying amendments to the 
Uniform Code of Military Justice, including clarifying that 
petitions for writs of mandamus by victims have priority in 
both the Court of Criminal Appeals and the Court of Appeals for 
the Armed Forces; expanding the pre-referral matters that a 
military judge may consider to include appointment of a certain 
individual to assume the rights of certain victims and pre-
referral matters related to a petition for a writ of mandamus 
by a victim; clarifying that the President may establish the 
types of sentences that require automatic reduction in enlisted 
rank; and extending the due date of the Military Justice Review 
Panel's assessment on sentencing data from 2020 to 2021.

  Section 522--Minimum Confinement Period Required for Conviction of 
 Certain Sex-Related Offenses Committed by Members of the Armed Forces

    This section would amend section 856(b)(1) of title 10, 
United States Code (article 56(b)(1) of the Uniform Code of 
Military Justice) to include a two-year mandatory minimum 
period of confinement for service members convicted of certain 
sex-related offenses.

   Section 523--Prohibition on Wrongful Broadcast or Distribution of 
                         Intimate Visual Images

    This section would amend the Uniform Code of Military 
Justice to insert a new section (article) prohibiting wrongful 
broadcast or distribution of intimate visual images.

 Section 524--Information for the Special Victims' Counsel or Victims' 
                             Legal Counsel

    This section would amend section 1044e(b)(6) of title 10, 
United States Code, to require that, if there is a prosecution 
of an alleged sex-related offense, the special victims' counsel 
or victims' legal counsel representing the victim shall receive 
a copy of all case information in the possession of the trial 
counsel, unless the information is privileged.

  Section 525--Special Victims' Counsel Training Regarding the Unique 
        Challenges Often Faced by Male Victims of Sexual Assault

    This section would require that baseline Special Victims' 
Counsel training include training on how to recognize and deal 
with the unique challenges often faced by male victims of 
sexual assault.

Section 526--Garnishment To Satisfy Judgement Rendered for Physically, 
                Sexually, or Emotionally Abusing a Child

    This section would amend section 1408 of title 10, United 
States Code, to authorize the garnishment of service member 
retired pay to satisfy a judgement rendered for physically, 
sexually, or emotionally abusing a child.

Section 527--Inclusion of Information in Annual SAPRO Reports Regarding 
   Military Sexual Harassment and Incidents Involving Nonconsensual 
                 Distribution of Private Sexual Images

    This section would amend section 1631(b) of the Ike Skelton 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2011 (Public 
Law 111-383) to require inclusion of information on reports of 
sexual harassment and incidents involving nonconsensual 
distribution of private sexual images involving members of the 
Armed Forces in the annual Department of Defense Sexual Assault 
Prevention and Response Office Report.

Section 528--Inclusion of Information in Annual SAPRO Reports regarding 
 Sexual Assaults Committed by a Member of the Armed Forces against the 
                 Member's Spouse or Other Family Member

    This section would require inclusion of information 
regarding sexual assaults committed by service members against 
their spouse, intimate partner, or other dependent in an annual 
report required by section 1631 the Ike Skelton National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2011 (Public Law 111-
383), which is issued on or after March 1, 2018.

  Section 529--Notification of Members of the Armed Forces Undergoing 
    Certain Administrative Separations of Potential Eligibility for 
                           Veterans Benefits

    This section would require that service members being 
separated from the military with an other than honorable 
discharge be informed, in writing, that they may petition the 
Veterans Benefits Administration of the Department of Veterans 
Affairs for certain benefits despite their characterization of 
service.

 Section 530--Consistent Access to Special Victims' Counsel for Former 
               Dependents of Members of the Armed Forces

    This section would direct the Secretary of the Navy to 
revise the Navy Victims' Legal Counsel policy to allow certain 
former dependents of service members to receive Victims' Legal 
Counsel representation.

   Subtitle D--Member Education, Training, Resilience, and Transition


    Section 541--Prohibition on Release of Military Service Academy 
           Graduates To Participate in Professional Athletics

    This section would amend sections 4348(a), 6959(a), and 
9348(a) of title 10, United States Code, to require that any 
graduate from a military service academy program must fulfill 
their military service commitments without exception before 
being released to participate in professional sports.

   Section 542--ROTC Cyber Institutes at the Senior Military Colleges

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
carry out a program to establish a Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps Cyber Institute at each of the senior military colleges.

  Section 543--Lieutenant Henry Ossian Flipper Leadership Scholarship 
                                Program

    This section would require the Secretary of the Army to 
establish the Lieutenant Henry Ossian Flipper Leadership 
Scholarship Program. The scholarship program would provide 
financial assistance to an individual pursuing a recognized 
post-secondary credential at a minority-serving institution, 
who enters into an agreement for active duty service with the 
Army. This section would also require the Secretary to report 
to the congressional defense committees within one year 
following the date of enactment of this Act on the progress of 
the program.

Subtitle E--Defense Dependents' Education and Military Family Readiness 
                                Matters


  Section 551--Continuation of Authority to Assist Local Educational 
  Agencies That Benefit Dependents of Members of the Armed Forces and 
                Department of Defense Civilian Employees

    This section would authorize $30.0 million for the 
continuation of Department of Defense assistance in fiscal year 
2018 to local educational agencies that are impacted by the 
enrollment of dependent children of military members and 
Department of Defense civilian employees. Elsewhere in this 
Act, the funding table in Division D would authorize an 
additional $20.0 million, for a total of $50.0 million, for 
such purposes.

Section 552--Education for Dependents of Certain Retired Members of the 
                              Armed Forces

    This section would amend section 2164 of title 10, United 
States Code, to allow dependents of retired members of the 
Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps residing on military 
installations in the United States to attend Department of 
Defense schools on those bases.

   Section 553--Codification of Authority to Conduct Family Support 
 Programs for Immediate Family Members of Members of the Armed Forces 
                 Assigned to Special Operations Forces

    This section would make permanent the authority provided by 
section 554 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2014 (Public Law 113-66), as modified by section 
574(a) of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92) by adding a new section to 
chapter 88 of title 10, United States Code. The section would 
provide the Commander, U.S. Special Operations Command the 
authority to conduct programs for immediate family members of 
members of the Armed Forces assigned to special operations 
forces.

Section 554--Reimbursement for State Licensure and Certification Costs 
of a Spouse of a Member of the Armed Forces Arising from Relocation to 
                             Another State

    This section would amend section 476 of title 37, United 
States Code, to permit the Secretary of a military department 
or the Secretary of Homeland Security to reimburse a member of 
the Armed Forces up to $500 for a spouse's expenses related to 
obtaining licensing or certification in another State incident 
to a permanent change of station. This section would also 
require the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of Homeland 
Security to work with States to improve the portability of 
licenses and certifications between States.

                   Subtitle F--Decorations and Awards


  Section 561--Replacement of Military Decorations at the Request of 
           Relatives of Deceased Members of the Armed Forces

    This section would amend section 1135 of title 10, United 
States Code, to require the Secretary of Defense to replace the 
military decorations of a deceased recipient to certain 
relatives at no cost to the Department of Defense.

            Section 562--Congressional Defense Service Medal

    This section would amend chapter 57 of title 10, United 
States Code, to establish the Congressional Defense Service 
Medal. The medal would be awarded by the Secretary of Defense 
on the behest and behalf of Congress to groups or other 
entities that have distinguished themselves by exemplary 
service or achievement advancing the defense or national 
security of the United States. The committee believes that 
Congress will direct the Secretary to bestow these awards by 
passage of a law or concurrent resolution and that all awards 
will be approved on a bipartisan basis.

   Section 563--Limitations on Authority to Revoke Certain Military 
           Decorations Awarded to Members of the Armed Forces

    This section would amend chapters 357, 567, and 857 of 
title 10, United States Code, to limit the authority of the 
President or Secretary of a military department to revoke 
certain military decorations after the presentation of the 
award to the service member.

          Subtitle G--Miscellaneous Reports and Other Matters


    Section 571--Expansion of United States Air Force Institute of 
 Technology Enrollment Authority to Include Civilian Employees of the 
                       Homeland Security Industry

    The section would amend section 9314a of title 10, United 
States Code, to allow homeland security industry employees 
employed by a private firm in one of the critical 
infrastructure sectors identified in Presidential Policy 
Directive 21 to attend the United States Air Force Institute of 
Technology.

           Section 572--Servicemembers' Group Life Insurance

    This section would amend section 1967(f)(4) of title 38, 
United States Code, by striking the second sentence of such 
paragraph, regarding the failure to notify a member's spouse in 
a timely manner of certain elections and beneficiary 
designations.

                    Section 573--Voter Registration

    This section would amend section 705 of the Servicemembers 
Civil Relief Act (50 U.S.C. 4025), to allow service members 
stationed in a State pursuant to military orders to vote in 
Federal, State and local elections in that State instead of 
their State of permanent residence.

   Section 574--Sense of Congress regarding Section 504 of Title 10, 
United States Code, on Existing Authority of the Department of Defense 
  To Enlist Individuals, Not Otherwise Eligible for Enlistment, Whose 
              Enlistment is Vital to the National Interest

    This section would express a sense of Congress that there 
is currently a statute, specifically paragraph (2) of 
subsection (b) of section 504 of title 10, United States Code, 
that allows the Secretary concerned to authorize the enlistment 
of certain non-citizens if the Secretary determines that such 
enlistment is vital to the national interest.

          TITLE VI--COMPENSATION AND OTHER PERSONNEL BENEFITS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


      Local Purchasing Contracts for the Defense Commissary Agency

    The committee is aware that significant savings in Second 
Destination Travel costs may be realized by the Defense 
Commissary Agency (DeCA) by pursuing contracts with local 
distributors and vendors in the Pacific region. The Department 
of Defense Inspector General has recently verified that DeCA 
can maintain quality, selection and cost savings by exercising 
local purchase with Fresh Fruits and Vegetable. The committee 
believes that DeCA should explore every opportunity available 
to reduce second destination transportation cost and that 
utilizing existing contracts could provide commissary customers 
with greater variety while providing significant transportation 
savings to the Department of Defense. Additionally, an 
expansion of local products and distributor contracts will 
strengthen local economic partnerships with DeCA. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the committee not later than January 1, 2018, on 
the following:
    (1) The current percentage of goods that are provided by 
local vendors, to include commodity category and dollar value 
of sales, and an analysis of historical data for the past five 
years.
    (2) The cost of Second Destination Transportation to 
provide commissary goods to the Commissaries on Guam.
    (3) The feasibility of whether using local distributors for 
items other than Fresh Fruits and Vegetables will reduce the 
cost of Second Destination Transportation while maintaining 
savings to beneficiaries.
    (4) Initiatives undertaken or explored that seek to 
encourage and promote local vendor and distributor access to 
commissaries on Guam.

               Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Assessment

    The committee recognizes that the continued support for 
service members and families is vital to their quality of life 
as operational requirements and budgetary pressures continue 
unabated. The committee is concerned that the military services 
have not complied with established Department of Defense policy 
to ensure appropriate financial support of family, welfare, and 
recreational programs for the past several years, particularly 
for programs within Category B, which relies on both 
appropriated and nonappropriated funding.
    The committee recognizes that all programs, including 
Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) programs, need to be 
constantly reviewed to ensure that they are necessary, 
effective, and cost efficient. Therefore, the committee directs 
the Comptroller General of the United States to conduct a 
review of the Department of Defense's MWR programs by category 
to assess the Department's current Category A, B, and C 
appropriated and nonappropriated funding policies and 
priorities. The review should include a baseline assessment of 
the programs; the budgeting, funding, and accounting processes 
used by the services; an analysis and assessment of the review 
process by which services ensure that programs continue to be 
effective and cost-effective; and whether the organizational 
structure of the services are adequate to provide the 
appropriate oversight of these important programs. The 
committee further directs the Comptroller General to submit a 
report to the House Committee on Armed Services not later than 
April 1, 2018, on the results of the assessment.

 Reserve Component Benefits Parity Under 12304b Mobilization Authority

    The committee recognizes that Reserve Component units 
ordered to Active Duty should receive the same benefits for the 
same duty as their Active Duty counterparts. The committee 
understands that Reserve Component units involuntarily ordered 
to Active Duty under the authority provided by section 12304b 
of title 10, United States Code, are not entitled to several 
benefits that other deployed service members are provided, 
including the Post 9/11 GI Bill, pre-mobilization TRICARE 
health care, reduced age for retirement, Federal civilian 
differential pay and high deployment allowance. Even though 
this mobilization authority was established by Congress at the 
Department of Defense's request to support non-contingency 
operations, the committee believes that these benefits should 
be made available to the Reserve Component units that are 
ordered to Active Duty under any authority. Section 515 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public 
Law 114-92) required the Secretary of Defense to assess the 
viability of consolidating the number of authorities to order 
members of the Reserve Components to perform duty. Once the 
recommendation from the Secretary of Defense is received, the 
committee expects that the benefits disparity will be 
corrected.

       Review of Department of Defense Debt Collection Practices

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense operates 
a debt collection process to recoup erroneous payments. While 
debt collection is sometimes necessary, the committee is 
concerned that some Department of Defense debt collection 
practices may place an undue burden on service members and 
their families. The committee therefore directs the Comptroller 
General of the United States to submit a report to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives not later than June 1, 2018, on debt collection 
procedures of the Department of Defense. The report shall 
include an analysis of the following:
    (1) policies of the Department that govern such 
overpayments and debt collection actions, including the extent 
to which such policies ensure uniform enforcement and due 
process for members of the Armed Forces;
    (2) the extent to which the Department has processes or 
controls in place to ensure compliance with applicable laws 
related to debt collection;
    (3) means by which the Department may be flexible in the 
enforcement of debt collection practices regarding members of 
the Armed Forces, including the ability to grant debt 
forgiveness or provide other forms of debt relief;
    (4) how the Department reports such overpayments and 
related debt collection actions to credit rating agencies, 
including whether and how such agencies distinguish between 
types of delinquency; and
    (5) policies and procedures of the Department that allow 
members of the Armed Forces to challenge alleged overpayments 
or debt collection actions by the Department before the 
Department reports such overpayments or actions to credit 
rating agencies.

                   Service Member Financial Planning

    The Committee is concerned with the ensuring the Department 
of Defense provides sufficient assistance to service members 
retiring under the new Blended Retirement System beginning in 
January 2018. Specifically, current service members will have 
the option to opt into the Blended Retirement System and will 
be authorized to elect to take a lump sum disbursement of their 
retirement pay. The Committee remains concerned about ensuring 
service members are fully aware of their options and able to 
make the best choice for themselves and their families. 
Therefore, the Secretary of Defense will provide a briefing to 
the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives, no later than March 1, 2018, on the number of 
financial planners the Department has available to service 
members and how service members are informed or advised 
concerning professional financial planning and the availability 
of professional financial planners.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                     Subtitle A--Pay and Allowances


          Section 601--Annual Adjustment of Basic Monthly Pay

    This section would direct that the rates of basic pay under 
section 203(a) of title 37, United States Code, be increased in 
accordance with section 1009 of title 37, United States Code, 
notwithstanding a determination made by the President under 
subsection (e) of section 1009.

  Section 602--Limitation on Basic Allowance for Housing Modification 
 Authority for Members of the Uniformed Services Residing in Military 
                Housing Privatization Initiative Housing

    This section would amend section 403(b) of title 37, United 
States Code, to temporarily prohibit the Secretary of Defense 
from further reducing the basic allowance for housing (BAH) 
below the current level for service members residing in 
Military Housing Privatization Initiative (MHPI) housing until 
2019. The committee remains concerned about the reduction in 
BAH and its effect on the recapitalization of these housing 
units. The committee believes that military families must be 
provided with on-base housing that is safe and periodically 
modernized. Therefore, this section would also require the 
Comptroller General of the United States to submit a report to 
the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives not later than March 1, 2018, on the Department 
of Defense's management of MHPI, and plans and alternatives 
considered for ensuring the continued viability of MHPI 
projects for the life of the housing project.

Section 603--Housing Treatment for Certain Members of the Armed Forces, 
 and Their Spouses and Other Dependents, Undergoing a Permanent Change 
                  of Station Within the United States

    This section would amend chapter 7 of title 37, United 
States Code, to allow a member of the Armed Forces undergoing a 
permanent change of station within the United States to request 
that their spouse or other dependents continue to reside at the 
current duty station or move ahead of them to the new duty 
station if it is advantageous to the member and their family 
due to spousal employment, dependent schooling needs, dependent 
special medical needs or immediate family long term care needs.

                Section 604--Per Diem Allowance Policies

    This section would prohibit a Secretary of a military 
departments from implementing a flat rate per diem policy for 
long term temporary duty described in a certain policy 
memorandum. This section would also prohibit a Secretary of a 
military department from implementing a new per diem allowance 
policy under section 474 of title 10, United States Code, until 
a report is issued by the Secretary of Defense to the 
congressional defense committees and the Committee on Homeland 
Security and Governmental Affairs of the Senate and the 
Committee on Oversight and Government Reform of the House of 
Representatives and until a period of 30 days has elapsed after 
notifying such congressional committees regarding any new 
policy.

           Subtitle B--Bonuses and Special and Incentive Pays


   Section 611--One-Year Extension of Certain Bonus and Special Pay 
                     Authorities for Reserve Forces

    This section would extend the authority, through December 
31, 2018, for the Selected Reserve reenlistment bonus, the 
Selected Reserve affiliation or enlistment bonus, special pay 
for enlisted members assigned to certain high-priority units, 
the Ready Reserve enlistment bonus for persons without prior 
service, the Ready Reserve enlistment and reenlistment bonus 
for persons with prior service, the Selected Reserve enlistment 
and reenlistment bonus for persons with prior service, the 
authority to reimburse travel expenses for inactive duty 
training outside of normal commuting distance, and income 
replacement payments for Reserve Component members experiencing 
extended and frequent mobilization for Active Duty service.

   Section 612--One-Year Extension of Certain Bonus and Special Pay 
               Authorities for Health Care Professionals

    This section would extend the authority for the nurse 
officer candidate accession program, repayment of educational 
loans for certain health professionals who serve in the 
Selected Reserve, the accession and retention bonuses for 
psychologists, the accession bonus for registered nurses, the 
incentive special pay for nurse anesthetists, the special pay 
for Selected Reserve health care professionals in critically 
short wartime specialties, the accession bonus for dental 
officers, the accession bonus for pharmacy officers, the 
accession bonus for medical officers in critically short 
wartime specialties, and the accession bonus for dental 
specialist officers in critically short wartime specialties, 
until December 31, 2018.

 Section 613--One-Year Extension of Special Pay and Bonus Authorities 
                          for Nuclear Officers

    This section would extend the authority for the special pay 
for nuclear-qualified officers extending a period of active 
service, the nuclear career accession bonus, and the nuclear 
career annual incentive bonus until December 31, 2018.

  Section 614--One-Year Extension of Authorities Relating to Title 37 
     Consolidated Special Pay, Incentive Pay, and Bonus Authorities

    This section would extend the general bonus authority for 
enlisted members, the general bonus authority for officers, the 
special bonus and incentive pay authority for nuclear officers, 
special aviation incentive pay and bonus authorities, the 
special health professions incentive pay and bonus authorities, 
contracting bonus for Senior Reserve Officers' Training Corps 
cadets and midshipmen, hazardous duty pay, assignment pay or 
special duty pay, skill incentive pay or proficiency bonus, and 
the retention bonus for members with critical military skills 
or assigned to high-priority units, until December 31, 2018.

 Section 615--One-Year Extension of Authorities Relating to Payment of 
                Other Title 37 Bonuses and Special Pays

    This section would extend the authority for the aviation 
officer retention bonus, assignment incentive pay, the 
reenlistment bonus for active members, the enlistment bonus for 
active members, the incentive pay for members of 
precommissioning programs pursuing foreign language 
proficiency, the accession bonus for new officers in critical 
skills, the incentive bonus for conversion to military 
occupational specialty to ease personnel shortage, the 
incentive bonus for transfer between Armed Forces, and the 
accession bonus for officer candidates, until December 31, 
2018.

Section 616--Reimbursement for State Licensure and Certification Costs 
of a Member of the Armed Forces Arising from Separation from the Armed 
                                 Forces

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense and 
the Secretary of Homeland Security to reimburse a service 
member up to $500 for relicensing costs incurred upon 
separation from the Armed Services. The section would also 
require the Secretaries to work with States on improving 
portability of licenses between States and to report 
recommendations on this matter to appropriate congressional 
committees and the States.

Section 617--Increase in Maximum Amount of Aviation Bonus for 12-Month 
                      Period of Obligated Service

    This section would amend section 334(c)(1)(B) of title 37, 
United States Code, to increase the statutory limits for the 
aviation retention bonus to $50,000 and allow the Secretary 
concerned the flexibility to increase the aviation incentive 
pay limit set forth in regulations issued by the Secretary of 
Defense under section 374 of title 37, United States Code. The 
Secretary of Defense should revise applicable regulations as 
required.

    Section 618--Technical and Clerical Amendments Relating to 2008 
            Consolidation of Certain Special Pay Authorities

    This section would make technical and clerical corrections 
to titles 10, 14, 37, and 42, United States Code, as part of 
the Department of Defense's transition to the consolidated 
authorities described in section 661 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008 (Public Law 110-181), 
which provided eight consolidated statutory special and 
incentive pay authorities to replace those currently in use.

     Subtitle C--Disability Pay, Retired Pay, and Survivor Benefits


   Section 621--Findings and Sense of Congress regarding the Special 
                      Survivor Indemnity Allowance

    This section would express the sense of Congress that the 
Special Survivor Indemnity Allowance was created as a stop gap 
measure to assist widowed spouses by reducing the Survivor 
Benefit Plan/Dependency Indemnity Compensation offset required 
by law. This section would also state that the dollar-for-
dollar reduction in payment to surviving spouses should be 
fully repealed at the first opportunity.

                       Subtitle D--Other Matters


  Section 631--Land Conveyance Authority, Army and Air Force Exchange 
                    Service Property, Dallas, Texas

    This section would allow the Secretary of Defense to 
authorize the Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES) to 
divest itself of real property owned by AAFES at 8901 Autobahn 
Drive, Dallas, Texas, as part of its consolidation into one 
headquarters building in Dallas, Texas. Additionally, this 
section would authorize AAFES to retain the nonappropriated 
funds derived from the divestiture since AAFES acquired the 
property with nonappropriated funds.

   Section 632--Advisory Boards regarding Military Commissaries and 
                               Exchanges

    The section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
direct installation commanders to establish an advisory board 
regarding the interests of patrons and beneficiaries of 
military commissaries and exchanges.

                   TITLE VII--HEALTH CARE PROVISIONS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


 Educational Opportunities for Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists

    The committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to 
establish educational opportunities for Certified Registered 
Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) to attend accredited CRNA post 
graduate pain management fellowships.

    Force of the Future Pilot Program on Cryopreservation of Gametes

    The committee is aware that nearly 2,000 servicemembers 
suffered injuries to the genitourinary tract while deployed to 
Iraq and Afghanistan. These injuries and other blast injuries 
to the spine and brain can have a profound impact on 
servicemembers' reproductive health.
    In order to preserve the ability to start a family, some 
servicemembers have elected to freeze reproductive material 
pre-deployment, paying for the cost out of pocket. Recognizing 
this demand, the Department of Defense proposed a pilot program 
to allow individuals to cryopreserve gametes, but has not moved 
forward with this initiative. The committee is supportive of 
this pilot program because it preserves deploying 
servicemembers' options for the future in the event of a 
catastrophic injury, and provides deploying servicemembers with 
important peace of mind. Therefore the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense, not later than January 31, 2018, to brief 
the House Armed Services Committee on the program and the 
status of implementation.

         Improving Access to Para Health Professional Extenders

    The committee notes the Department of Defense continues to 
seek ways to improve health care delivery and facilitate access 
to health care services for military beneficiaries and lower 
the total cost of care. The committee is aware that certain 
para health professionals may be used as physician and health 
professional extenders within the Military Health System if 
they meet and comply with specific professional qualification 
and licensing criteria. However the Committee is concerned that 
the Department does not have a common standard for hiring or 
reimbursing para health professionals. The Committee is also 
concerned with the delineated process that reviews the 
feasibility of using certain para health professionals or 
adding them to the list of individual professional providers of 
medical care who are authorized to provide services to TRICARE 
beneficiaries on an annual basis. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report not later 
than 1 April 2018 to the House Committee on Armed Services, 
outlining the process used by the Department to include para 
health professionals as healthcare providers within the 
Military Health System. The review shall also determine the 
feasibility of incorporating physical therapist assistants, 
occupational health therapy and mental health counselors, and 
other para health professionals determined by the Secretary 
into the Military Health System to improve beneficiary access 
to health care services, while ensuring quality and outcome 
standards are maintained, supervision by appropriate health 
professionals, and reasonable reimbursement for services 
provided.

                    Medical Blood Volume Diagnostics

    The committee is aware that medical research has shown 
improved patient outcomes when providers can access more 
accurate and faster direct blood-volume measurements. Recent 
breakthroughs in direct blood-volume analysis and management 
can improve care for congestive heart failure, sepsis, burns, 
trauma, and other life-threatening conditions by informing 
critical lifesaving medical decisions needing speedy 
resolution. The committee encourages the Secretary of Defense 
to fully leverage new direct blood-volume analysis to improve 
patient outcomes.

         Medical Simulation and Training with First Responders

    The committee notes the efforts of the Navy bioskills 
simulation training centers to provide state-of-the-art 
simulation based medical training and the continued need to 
maintain critical trauma care skills. The centers provided a 
unique and realistic environment for training medical personnel 
who treat critical battlefield injuries. In particular, the 
committee recognizes training center partnerships with local 
first responders and the local medical community to enhance 
training realism and provide train-the-trainer opportunities 
leveraging and sharing valuable real world experience. The 
committee encourages the Department of Defense to continue 
investing in this crucial capability and expanding local 
partnerships.

                          Military Caregivers

    The committee is aware that the Military Caregiver Heart of 
Recovery (MCHR) program provides much needed support to 
military caregivers, who are tireless in their support of their 
loved ones in uniform. The committee appreciates the value of 
military caregiver service and believes the MCHR is helping to 
lessen their burden. The committee has learned of several 
challenges facing the MCHR program as it develops, including 
ensuring a warm handoff to the Department of Veterans Affairs, 
approval of a critical caregiver survey, and stable funding and 
placement within the Department of Defense. The committee urges 
the Secretary of Defense to resolve these issues as quickly as 
possible.

            Military Family Wellness and Suicide Prevention

    The Committee is concerned with the behavioral health and 
wellness of service members to include suicide risk factors and 
believes that an evaluation must be done on ways to inform the 
dependents' of service members of the suicide risk factors. The 
Committee seeks a report on the methods and resources in order 
to train and educate dependents on suicide risk factors and 
ways to support their service member, promote healthy 
environments, and reduce the overall risk factors for suicide. 
Emphasis should be placed on dependents living with service 
members that have been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress 
disorder (PTSD). Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary 
of Defense to evaluate the resources, methods, and approaches 
for such training and education of dependents. The Secretary of 
Defense shall provide the results of the evaluation in a 
briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives no later than December 1, 2018.

                        Motion Sickness Research

    The committee believes that motion sickness is a pervasive 
problem spanning a variety of mission sets across the services, 
and poses a real safety and readiness threat to aviation, 
seaborne, and ground combat missions, as well as simulator and 
remote vehicle operations. An estimated 11.5 percent of 
aviation training attrition is due to motion sickness. As the 
military moves towards smaller, leaner crews operating in 
complex, technological environments, the impacts of motion 
sickness are amplified as the loss of even a single crew member 
could cease operations or cause a human factors catastrophe.
    The committee is encouraged by the Navy's efforts in 
developing and testing intranasal scopolamine (INSCOP) for use 
in operational environments in which cognitive and human 
performance must be maintained at high levels. INSCOP shows 
promise as a rapid-acting, safe, and effective treatment, and 
meets requirements for a medication that is easy for personnel 
to self-administer, has no special storage requirements, and 
has a long stable shelf life.
    The committee encourages the Navy to accelerate the next 
stage of advanced INSCOP testing and development.

                  Opioid--Chronic Pain and Recruiting

    The committee notes with concern the growing number of 
servicemembers with chronic pain and musculoskeletal disorders 
caused in part by the physical stress of heavy kits, body armor 
and strain associated with training and deployment-related 
activities. Chronic pain is particularly pronounced among 
younger veterans returning from deployments to the Middle East 
and older generations of veterans. The Committee is also 
concerned that growing rates of addiction among young 
Americans, especially those in rural communities, can impact 
current and future recruitment, threatening the overall 
readiness and operational effectiveness of our military. The 
Committee has previously expressed its concern about the 
growing opioid epidemic at the national level and has asked the 
Department of Defense to submit a report to the House Committee 
on Armed Services that describes DOD's efforts to prevent, 
educate and treat prescription drug abuse by military 
servicemembers (House Report 114-537).
    The committee is aware that the Secretary of Defense is 
designing a gap-driven musculoskeletal and pain research 
portfolio which includes a diverse collection of studies 
examining improved management of pain from the point of injury 
to chronic pain management. The committee is also concerned 
with the potential challenges that opioid abuse may be having 
on recruitment. Therefore, the Committee directs Secretary of 
Defense to brief the House Armed Services Committee by December 
31, 2017 on efforts underway to provide opioid-alternative 
treatments and therapies to manage chronic pain and to address 
the adverse side effects and consequences of classic opioid use 
and/or abuse. The briefing shall also address the emerging and 
ongoing challenges to recruitment by prescription opioid use 
and include any information regarding departmental 
collaboration with schools, law enforcement, and health care 
professionals.

                   Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine

    The committee is aware of research regarding the 
effectiveness of Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine (OMM) in 
reducing recovery time for injured athletes and as an adjunct 
therapy for pain management. OMM is a non-invasive, drug free 
treatment that can improve readiness and reduce the need for 
opioid pain medication in the armed services. While the 
committee understands that OMM has been used to limited degree 
in the Military Health System, the committee encourages the 
Department of Defense to further explore OMM as an adjunct to 
manage pain and expedite recovery for warfighters.

Personnel Policies Regarding Members of the Armed Forces Infected With 
                   Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

    On September 22, 2014, the Department of Defense (DOD) 
submitted a report to Congress in response to section 572 of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014 
(Public Law 113-66) on personnel policies regarding members of 
the Armed Forces infected with human immunodeficiency virus 
(HIV) and hepatitis B (HBV). The Committee notes that while the 
report received did outline the current DOD policies, it failed 
to include how current policies reflect the evidence base and 
medical advances in the fields of HIV. The report also fell 
short in describing the criteria for which these policies are 
implemented throughout different branches and among commanding 
officers. Therefore, not later than March 1, 2018, the 
Secretary of Defense shall submit to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives a 
report on Department of Defense personnel policies regarding 
members of the Armed Forces infected with human 
immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The report shall include the 
following:
    (1) A description of policies addressing the enlistment or 
commissioning of individuals with these conditions and 
retention policies, deployment policies, discharge policies, 
and disciplinary policies regarding individuals with these 
conditions.
    (2) An update on the status of the Department of Army's HIV 
policy, which was under review during the issuance of the 2014 
report.
    (3) An assessment of these policies, with reference to 
medical experts and literature, which includes how the policies 
reflect an evidence-based, medically accurate understanding of 
how this condition is contracted; how this condition can be 
transmitted to other individuals; the risk of transmission; and 
treatment regimens available.
    (4) The feasibility of allowing an individual who is 
currently serving as an enlisted member of the Armed Forces to 
become a commissioned officer of the Armed Forces and what 
restrictions are different for an officer.

                     Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    The committee acknowledges the efforts of the Department of 
Defense and the military services to diagnose and treat 
military members suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder 
(PTSD). Despite the progress that has been made, the committee 
believes that more needs to be done to ensure service members 
seek and receive the treatment they deserve. The committee 
continues to believe PTSD is underreported and underdiagnosed, 
leading to unnecessary suffering and some service members 
receiving other than honorable discharges that are unwarranted. 
The committee wishes to stay informed of the Department's 
progress in addressing these concerns and directs the Secretary 
of Defense to provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed 
Services of the House of Representatives not later than 
December 1, 2017, on the extent to which service members are 
seeking PTSD treatment; steps the military services are taking 
to eliminate the stigma sometimes associated with seeking 
treatment; and efforts by the military services to ensure 
commanders carefully weigh a diagnosis of PTSD when 
adjudicating involuntary separations.

  Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury Research 
                              Initiatives

    The committee notes that the Defense Centers of Excellence 
for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury collaborate 
with a wide variety of research institutions, both military and 
civilian, to better understand the impacts and improve 
treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and 
traumatic brain injury (TBI). The committee encourages the 
Secretary of Defense to continue to explore complementary and 
integrative PTSD therapies that benefit patients, such as art 
or music therapy, and to pursue research into appropriate 
therapy drugs that are under development. With regard to TBI, 
the committee is heartened by the creation of the Center for 
Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine Brain Tissue Repository 
that will allow service members to donate their brain for 
research after death, but is concerned by the Department's slow 
pace in publicizing the effort and the process involved. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the 
House of Representatives by June 1, 2018, on his plan for 
informing service members about the Brain Tissue Repository, 
donor qualifications, and the donation process.

                        Promising Burn Therapies

    The committee notes that deployed service members are at 
risk of suffering burn and smoke inhalation injuries in remote 
locations and are not yet benefiting from promising new burn 
treatment therapies using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MSCs, 
which can come from a variety of sources, offer improved 
efficiency for wound healing and reduce long-term scarring, 
particularly with early application, and help treat multiple 
injuries simultaneously. The committee is heartened to learn 
that the Army and Defense Health Program recognize the value of 
MSCs and are conducting research into several potential 
applications. The committee urges the Secretary of Defense and 
the Secretary of the Army to develop and deploy these therapies 
to theaters of operation as soon as possible.

                     TRICARE Pharmacy Pilot Program

    The committee notes that section 743 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328) authorizes the Secretary of Defense to conduct a pilot 
program to evaluate whether extending additional discounts for 
prescription drugs filled at retail pharmacies will maintain or 
reduce cost for the Department of Defense. This pilot gives the 
Secretary of Defense the authority to implement a pilot program 
that would test prescription drug acquisition cost parity in 
the TRICARE pharmacy program. The committee believes there is 
merit in executing the pilot program in order to determine if 
TRICARE pharmacy costs to the Department can be reduced through 
decreased acquisition costs, lower administrative fees, and 
competition, while restoring beneficiary access to brand-name 
maintenance prescription drugs at all dispensing retail 
pharmacies. Therefore, the committee encourages the Secretary 
to promptly utilize the authority granted under section 743 and 
implement the pilot program. In the event the Secretary 
declines to conduct the pilot, the committee directs the 
Secretary to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by September 15, 2017, on the analytical basis for 
that decision.

 Use of Data Analytics Within the Defense Medical Surveillance System 
            for Complex Epidemiology and Pathology Research

    The Committee notes the persisting concerns of many 
veterans and current service members regarding possible 
linkages between their service and medically unexplained 
illnesses and/or diagnosed diseases with difficult to identify 
causes such as many forms of cancer. The committee supports the 
efforts of the Department to maximize data collection within 
the Defense Medical Surveillance System, as well as the use of 
this data by the Epidemiology and Analysis Section of the Armed 
Forces Health Surveillance Branch to improve our understanding 
of service member epidemiology.
    Given recent advances in data processing and analytics, the 
Committee is hopeful that continued collection and improved 
analysis of the dataset within the Defense Medical Surveillance 
System will help confirm or disprove the statistical 
significance of a veteran's service as a causal factor in 
contracting certain diseases. However, the Committee also 
recognizes that the immense scale of the data contained within 
the Defense Medical Surveillance System would likely require 
significant processing power and advanced modeling systems to 
fully understand the patterns contained within its records.
    Therefore, the Committee directs the Director of the 
Defense Health Agency to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by December 31, 2017, on:
    (1) the data processing systems currently employed to 
analyze records within the Defense Medical Surveillance System;
    (2) any research completed or currently in progress using 
the Defense Medical Surveillance System to identify linkages 
between veterans' service and medically unexplained illnesses, 
and;
    (3) current limitations or restrictions on research due to 
insufficient data processing capability.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


           Subtitle A--Tricare and Other Health Care Benefits


 Section 701--Physical Examinations for Members of a Reserve Component 
                Who Are Separating From the Armed Forces

    This section would amend section 1145 of title 10, United 
States Code, to require the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
physical examination upon request to a member of a Reserve 
Component upon separation from service, provided that the 
member had deployed for more than 30 days within the last 2 
years prior to the service member's separation date.

 Section 702--Mental Health Examinations Before Members Separate From 
                            the Armed Forces

    This section would amend section 1145 of title 10, United 
States Code, to require that service members receive a mental 
health examination, as well as a physical examination, before 
separation from active duty.

Section 703--Provision of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Certain Members 
                          of the Armed Forces

    This section would amend chapter 55 of title 10, United 
States Code, to authorize the Secretary of Defense to furnish 
hyperbaric oxygen therapy at a military medical treatment 
facility to a covered member if such therapy is prescribed by a 
physician to treat post-traumatic stress disorder or traumatic 
brain injury.

                 Subtitle B--Health Care Administration


 Section 711--Clarification of Roles of Commanders of Military Medical 
               Treatment Facilities and Surgeons General

    This section would amend section 1073c of title 10, United 
States Code, to clarify that the commanders of military medical 
treatment facilities are responsible for the operation of the 
military medical treatment facility they supervise. This 
section would also amend sections 3036, 5137, and 8036 of title 
10, United States Code, to clarify that the surgeons general 
are responsible for the medical readiness provided by the 
military medical treatment facilities and maintaining a ready 
medical force within their respective military departments.

Section 712--Maintenance of Inpatient Capabilities of Military Medical 
         Treatment Facilities Located Outside the United States

    This section would prohibit the Secretary of Defense from 
reducing inpatient capacity at military medical facilities 
located outside the United States. The committee understands 
that reductions are being considered and believes further 
review is required before such reductions may proceed.

  Section 713--Regular Update of Prescription Drug Pricing Standards 
                 Under TRICARE Retail Pharmacy Program

    This section would amend section 1074g of title 10, United 
States Code, to require that contracts with a TRICARE pharmacy 
program contractor include requirements to ensure regular 
updates to the provision of information regarding the pricing 
standard for prescription drugs.

          Section 714--Residency Requirements for Podiatrists

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
ensure podiatrists in the Armed Forces have successfully 
completed a three year podiatric medicine and surgical 
residency.

                       Subtitle C--Other Matters


Section 721--One Year Extension of Pilot Program for Prescription Drug 
    Acquisition Cost Parity in the TRICARE Pharmacy Benefits Program

    This section would amend section 743 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328) to extend the authority of the Secretary of Defense to 
conduct a pilot program for prescription drug acquisition cost 
parity in the TRICARE pharmacy program until September 30, 
2019.

      Section 722--Pilot Program on Health Care Assistance System

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
carry out a pilot program for health care assistance services 
for certain TRICARE beneficiaries and that the Secretary 
provide the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
House of Representatives an evaluation of the success of the 
pilot by January 1, 2021.

       Section 723--Research of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    This section would authorize not more than $25.0 million in 
funds for the Defense Health Program to be appropriated for 
advanced development for research, development, test, and 
evaluation for early detection of chronic traumatic 
encephalopathy, as reflected in Division D of this Act.

  Section 724--Sense of Congress on Eligibility of Victims of Acts of 
  Terror for Evaluation and Treatment at Military Treatment Facilities

    This section would amend section 717 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328) to express the sense of Congress that civilians covered by 
this section would include United States victims of domestic 
and international terrorism.

  TITLE VIII--ACQUISITION POLICY, ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT, AND RELATED 
                                MATTERS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


Accuracy of Pricing in Responses to Letters of Request for Pricing and 
                 Availability in Foreign Military Sales

    The committee is concerned about the pricing and 
availability (P&A;) process for foreign military sales. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than November 1, 2017, on P&A; responses. The briefing 
should address the process for contractors to provide input, 
feedback, and adjudication of any differences regarding the 
appropriateness of governmental P&A; estimates prior to delivery 
to potential foreign customers of formal responses to letters 
of request for P&A; as required by section 1297(b) of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public 
Law 114-328), as well as the methodology used to determine 
pricing for P&A; responses.

Best Value Criteria for Complex Acquisitions and Information Technology

    Lowest price technically acceptable (LPTA) source selection 
criteria are legitimate and useful in acquisitions with well-
defined and non-complex requirements that are not expected to 
evolve over the life of a contract. However, the committee 
remains concerned that the Department of Defense continues to 
use LPTA criteria for other acquisitions, including those for 
innovative professional services and high-performance 
technologies. Maintaining our military's technological edge 
requires technical superiority rather than mere acceptability. 
As the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, 
and Logistics noted in a memorandum on ``Appropriate Use of 
Lowest Priced, Technically Acceptable Source Selection Process 
and Associated Contract Type'' dated March 4, 2015, ``If not 
applied appropriately, however, the Department can miss an 
opportunity to secure an innovative, cost effective solution to 
meet warfighter needs to help maintain our technological 
edge.'' Therefore, the committee encourages the Secretary of 
Defense to ensure that the Department's acquisition policies 
clearly specify that best value source selection criteria 
should be used in acquisitions for complex services, complex 
electronics, and advanced innovative technologies. The 
committee also encourages the Secretary to carefully consider 
whether lowest price technically acceptable source selection 
processes are appropriate for the award of contracts related to 
major defense acquisition programs, given the technological 
complexity of the weapon systems being acquired.

         Collecting Historical Data on Rescinded Solicitations

    The committee is aware that the Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) released a report in June 2016 titled ``Defense 
Contracting: Complete Historical Data Not Available on Canceled 
DOD Solicitations'', in response to a provision in the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016. In this 
provision, the committee specifically directed the Comptroller 
General to determine: (1) the number of solicitations that were 
canceled after bids were received, (2) whether these 
cancellations are increasing or decreasing and their 
distribution by Agency or military service and contracting 
command, (3) the bid and proposal incurred costs by the 
companies and the government resources committed to these 
solicitations, (4) the extent to which, if any, the bid and 
proposal costs for these solicitations have reduced the funding 
available for independent research and development, and (5) the 
reasons for the cancellation of the solicitations.
    However, the committee is concerned that complete 
historical data are not available to assess patterns in the 
Department's cancellation of solicitations. The committee 
continues to be concerned with the significant cost of canceled 
solicitations to industry and government. Furthermore, the 
committee is concerned that the bid protest process is often an 
insufficient mechanism for contractors to contest circumstances 
of canceled solicitations. The GAO report noted that the 
federal business opportunities (FBO) webpage is the ``best 
potential source for information on canceled solicitations''; 
however, ``the FAR does not require contracting officials to 
publicize notices of canceled solicitations'', and ``the 
information from FBO is not available in a format that would 
allow for a reliable trend analysis of DOD's canceled 
solicitations''.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Administrator, General 
Services Administration, in coordination with the 
Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and 
Logistics, to provide a briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services not later than December 1, 2017 regarding how 
this data could be collected via the FBO web page.

         Congressional Notification for Direct Commercial Sales

    The committee notes that as part of the U.S. Export Control 
Reform initiative, the House Committee on Armed Services 
supports the review of Categories I-III of the U.S. Munitions 
List (USML) of International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) 
to describe more precisely the firearms and related articles 
controlled by the USML. Category I of the USML currently covers 
firearms with a caliber up to .50 inches (other than non-combat 
shotguns with barrel length of 18 inches or longer), combat 
shotguns, close assault weapons systems, and related parts, 
components, and accessories. The committee understands that 
draft regulations to revise this category were developed more 
than two years ago, but final interagency approval has not 
occurred and thus a draft rule has never been published. Under 
the Export Control Reform Initiative, only firearms that are 
designed, manufactured, and exported for military end-use and 
otherwise warrant control on the USML or, if it is a type 
common to non-military firearms applications, possess 
parameters or characteristics that provide a critical military 
or intelligence advantage to the United States should continue 
to be subject to ITAR controls. Those items not warranting USML 
control would shift to the more flexible licensing authorities 
of the Department of Commerce. Likewise, the committee supports 
review by the committee of jurisdiction of the current $1 
million Congressional notification threshold for exports of 
USML-controlled firearms. The committee directs the Secretary 
of Defense, the Secretary of Commerce, and Secretary of State 
to provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the 
House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Affairs 
of the House of Representatives by September 30, 2017, 
detailing how current export controls on firearms and 
ammunition, to include the processing of licenses for direct 
commercial sales, may impact U.S. businesses, U.S. national 
security and foreign policy interests, and provide for 
effective monitoring of the end-uses of USML-controlled 
firearms.

                      Other Transaction Consortia

    The committee remains committed to providing the Department 
of Defense needed flexibility to acquire advanced capabilities 
through streamlined and expedited processes. Toward that end, 
the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than November 1, 2017, on ways to improve the use of other 
transactions (OT) authorized in section 2371 of title 10, 
United States Code. The briefing should address the value and 
successes of OT, including development of OT consortia of 
willing companies, non-profit organizations, and academic 
institutions; potential areas where OT consortia may enable 
more effective, flexible, and agile acquisitions; opportunities 
for OT consortia to be used for emerging research and 
prototyping to develop better modeling, simulation, and 
training tools; and recommendations the Secretary may have for 
improving OT authorities.

                    Outcome-Based Services Contracts

    The committee is aware that the Department of Defense 
awards input-oriented services contracts that require, for 
example, the number of personnel to be contracted, as well as 
the education and experience levels, skill sets, and work 
locations of the contracted personnel. An alternative approach 
to services contracting is to require the outcomes that must be 
achieved in a specified time, along with associated milestones 
and standards by which success will be measured. This outcome-
based approach could allow contractors the flexibility to 
deliver services in the most cost-effective manner using 
advancements in business processes, including innovations in 
automation and other technology. The committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to evaluate the use of outcome-based 
services contracts within the Department and provide a briefing 
to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 2018, on 
the results. The evaluation and briefing should include a 
comparison of the Department's use of outcome-based services 
contracts versus input-based services contracts, the 
limitations of outcome-based services contracts, a description 
of the obstacles to the use of outcome-based requirements in 
lieu of specified personnel requirements, and an analysis of 
the cost implications of both approaches.

                Procurement Technical Assistance Centers

    The committee is concerned about reports that for-profit 
companies are selling services to assist other businesses in 
registering in the System for Award Management of the General 
Services Administration (GSA), a service that Procurement 
Technical Assistance Centers (PTACs) offer for free. The 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than September 1, 2017, on ways to best inform businesses about 
free services available from PTACs. In developing the briefing, 
the Secretary should coordinate with the Administrator of GSA 
and the Administrator of the Small Business Administration.

             Report on Commercial Acquisition Transparency

    The committee is concerned that some contractors of the 
Department of Defense may be disguising their identities and 
cost structures from procurement officers, in effect acting as 
hidden monopolists with unreasonable prices or establishing 
anonymous or opaque ownership structures for other benefits 
that are contrary to the government's interests. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Comptroller General of the United States 
to conduct a study of Department of Defense processes to 
determine the identities and cost structures of contractors, 
how anonymous or opaque ownership structures can circumvent 
these processes, potential abuses by companies with anonymous 
or opaque ownership structures, and means of improving such 
processes to enhance transparency and prevent such abuses. The 
committee further directs the Comptroller General to provide a 
briefing to the congressional defense committees by February 1, 
2018, with a report to follow, on the results of the study.

       Review of Implementation of Online Marketplace Procurement

    Elsewhere in this title, the committee includes a provision 
that would require the General Services Administration (GSA) to 
contract with multiple commercial online marketplaces for the 
procurement of certain commercial-off-the-shelf products. The 
committee anticipates that opportunities to purchase additional 
products through online marketplaces may arise as GSA gains 
familiarity with the use of online marketplaces. Toward that 
end, the committee directs the Administrator of GSA to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services and the 
House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, not later 
than 6 months after the first contract with a marketplace is 
awarded, on the results of online marketplace purchasing. The 
briefing should address the dollar value of purchases through 
each marketplace, lessons learned from implementation, any 
limitations on product purchases that were established in 
implementation guidance, potential means of addressing or 
overcoming such limitations, and potential means of procuring 
through marketplaces products referenced in section 2410n of 
title 10, United States Code.

 Reviews of Acquisition Statute and the Federal Acquisition Regulation

    The committee strongly supports efforts to thoroughly 
review the defense acquisition process by the Section 809 Panel 
on Streamlining and Codifying Acquisition Regulations, which 
was established in the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92). The Panel produced an 
interim report in May, 2017, that recommended several revisions 
to acquisition statutes and regulations. Elsewhere in this Act, 
the committee includes provisions related to the recommended 
statutory changes. The committee directs the Administrator of 
the Office of Federal Procurement Policy to review the 
recommended changes to the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) 
and provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
and the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform not 
later than December 1, 2017, on the findings of the review. The 
briefing should include recommendations for modifying the FAR 
consistent with the Panel recommendations or reasons that the 
Panel's recommendations cannot be adopted.
    In addition to the Panel's recommendations, the committee 
is concerned that process requirements have built up in 
acquisition statutes over time and may now impair effective 
procurement practices and decision making. The committee 
recognizes that each individual process requirement was 
intended to effect a specific change in acquisition outcomes. 
However, the amalgamation of processes may contribute to a 
culture of compliance within the defense acquisition system and 
hinder agile acquisitions that provide better capabilities to 
warfighters more quickly.
    For example, section 2377 of title 10, United States Code, 
establishes a preference for acquisition of commercial items. 
However, it also stipulates processes for how requirements must 
be stated; how market research is to be conducted by government 
personnel and prime contractors; and required training. Section 
2384a of title 10, United States Code, requires agencies to 
procure supplies in economically efficient quantities. However, 
it also requires solicitations to invite contractors to submit 
alternative quantities that may be economically efficient, 
which may increase proposal costs and acquisition decision 
timelines.
    The committee encourages the Panel to review such process 
requirements during its deliberations. It also directs the 
Secretary of Defense to conduct a review of process 
requirements in the acquisition sections of title 10, United 
States Code, and submit a report to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives not 
later than April 1, 2018, on the findings of the review. The 
review should:
    (1) identify process requirements in acquisition statutes 
that hinder agile acquisitions;
    (2) identify any obsolete statute (elsewhere in this Act, 
the committee includes an example provision to repeal an 
expired pilot program); and
    (3) recommend any related statutory changes that should be 
considered to simplify or improve the agility of the defense 
acquisition system.

           Should-Cost Analysis Methodology and Transparency

    Since 2010, the Department of Defense has promoted 
``should-cost'' management to identify process efficiencies and 
technical trade-offs that can reduce acquisition costs without 
compromising performance requirements. The committee is 
concerned, however, that the Department may not be sufficiently 
transparent with should cost-cost analyses, thereby reducing 
associated benefits to the Department. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by September 30, 2017, on 
should-cost processes. At a minimum, the briefing shall address 
the following issues:
    (1) a description of the features distinguishing should-
cost reviews from analyses of program direct and indirect 
costs;
    (2) the process for communicating with the contractor the 
elements of a proposed should-cost review;
    (3) the method for ensuring that every identified should-
cost savings opportunity is based on accurate, complete, and 
current information and is tied to a specific engineering or 
business change that can be quantified and tracked;
    (4) a description of the training, skills, and experience, 
including cross-functional experience, that Department and 
contractor officials carrying out a should-cost review should 
possess;
    (5) the method for ensuring appropriate collaboration with 
the contractor throughout the review process; and
    (6) a description of review process requirements that 
provide for sufficient analysis and minimize any impact on 
program schedule.

               Soldier and Marine Equipment Requirements

    Ensuring that military service members receive the best 
available organizational clothing, individual equipment (OCIE), 
and personal protective equipment (PPE) without unnecessary 
delays has been a long-standing high priority for the 
committee. The committee believes that any OCIE and PPE 
solution must meet validated capability requirements and be 
certified through first article testing before being fielded to 
the warfighter. The committee commends the Army for actively 
pursuing process efficiencies and acquisition reform for PPE 
and OCIE where feasible. The committee encourages the Army to 
continue taking necessary actions to help streamline the 
requirements development and acquisition process. The committee 
encourages the Army to routinely solicit the industrial base, 
and when appropriate leverage commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) 
and modified COTS that could potentially meet OCIE and PPE 
validated capability requirements.

  Technical Exchanges on Independent Research and Development Projects

    The committee supports efforts to increase mutually 
beneficial communications between government and industry and 
ensure the vital flow of information on technology needs and 
areas of research. The committee is aware that exchanges of 
information on independent research and development (IR&D;) 
projects currently occur in many areas. Contractors often seek 
out information about the technology needs of the Department of 
Defense and inform the Department about IR&D; projects in order 
to enhance their competitiveness.
    The committee is concerned, however, that a recent Defense 
Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) rule links 
the technical exchange of information on IR&D; projects to the 
determination of allowable costs for those projects. While 
having greater visibility of IR&D; projects early in the process 
can be beneficial to the Department, the committee questions 
the necessity of creating a direct linkage between technical 
exchanges and the determination of allowable costs. Further, 
the committee believes this linkage results in practical 
difficulties in implementation for both the Department and 
industry that could potentially disrupt ongoing research and 
development efforts that are vital to improving our 
warfighters' technological edge.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by October 1, 2017, on technical exchanges for IR&D; projects. 
The briefing should include:
    (1) the extent to which technical exchanges occur presently 
with contractors, including contractor IR&D; reviews, and how 
the Department uses the information received through these 
reviews;
    (2) the extent to which IR&D; information submitted to the 
Defense Technical Information Center database in accordance 
with the DFARS rule is used by the Department;
    (3) a description of the additional information that is 
expected to be obtained through the technical exchanges 
required by the DFARS rule and how this information would be 
used by the Department;
    (4) the rationale for linking the determination of cost 
allowability to technical exchanges and the advantages and 
disadvantages of such linkage; and
    (5) a detailed plan for how the Department would implement 
the DFARS rule, including staffing, IT infrastructure, the 
implementation timeline, and required funding.
    The committee expects the Secretary will consider 
suspending implementation of the DFARS rule until this 
implementation plan and briefing is completed.

      Transparency in Department of Defense Contract Negotiations

    The Federal Government requires defense contractors to 
submit substantial cost and pricing data in proposals for major 
defense acquisition programs. Contractors are also required to 
submit substantial amounts of information for business case 
analyses that support Government decision making. The committee 
is concerned that the Department of Defense may not be, in 
turn, providing appropriate transparency for industry to 
understand, evaluate, and respond to departmental counteroffers 
and requests for additional information. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than September 30, 2017, on efforts to improve transparency 
during contract negotiations and business case analyses.

                  Vendor Vetting Process and Guidance

    The committee continues to believe that a comprehensive 
vendor vetting process is essential to prevent the Department 
of Defense from awarding contracts to companies having ties to 
violent extremist organizations or other inappropriate 
entities. The committee is encouraged by the fact that two 
combatant commands, U.S. Central Command and U.S. 
Transportation Command, have established vendor vetting cells 
to determine whether potential vendors actively support any 
terrorist, criminal, or other sanctioned organization, but is 
concerned about the extent to which the Department has 
developed an approach to institutionalize vendor vetting across 
the Department and geographic combatant commands, including 
guidance and the information systems involved in vendor 
vetting. For example, the committee notes that the U.S. 
Government Accountability Office reported in December 2015 that 
the Department lacks guidance specifying conditions under which 
combatant commands should have a vendor vetting process or cell 
in place, and has identified other deficiencies in the vendor 
vetting process (GAO-16-105).
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to assess the Department's efforts to 
institutionalize vendor vetting across the Department and 
geographic combatant commands. At a minimum, the review shall 
address:
    (1) the extent to which the Department and its geographic 
combatant commands have developed guidance on vendor vetting;
    (2) the extent to which the Department and its geographic 
combatant commands have established and are implementing vendor 
vetting processes, including information systems involved in 
vendor vetting;
    (3) the sufficiency of the internal controls the Department 
has in place to ensure that the information used to make 
determinations of vendor risk is complete, accurate, and 
timely, including appeals processes, if any, available to 
vendors; and
    (4) the challenges, if any, the Department faces with 
regard to vendor vetting.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than January 31, 2018, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary findings and to submit a final report to the 
congressional defense committees on a date agreed to at the 
time of the briefing.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


     Subtitle A--Defense Acquisition Streamlining and Transparency


                Part I--Acquisition System Streamlining


          Section 801--Procurement through Online Marketplaces

    This section would require the General Services 
Administration (GSA) to contract with multiple commercial 
online marketplaces for the procurement of certain commercial-
off-the-shelf (COTS) products. Marketplaces would be limited to 
those that are commonly used in the private sector; provide a 
dynamic selection of products and prices from numerous 
suppliers; provide procurement oversight controls, such as two-
person approval for purchases; and can screen suppliers and 
products to ensure compliance with suspension and debarment, 
domestic sourcing, and other similar statutes. Online 
marketplaces primarily provide streamlined and automated access 
to various suppliers; suppliers therefore would be considered 
prime vendors for purposes of the Small Business Act. This 
section would require the Comptroller General to provide a 
report to the relevant congressional committees on small 
business participation in the marketplaces not later than 3 
years after a contract with an online marketplace provider is 
awarded.
    The committee expects that by contracting with numerous 
marketplaces, there will be competition between marketplaces 
for procurement of COTS products, and government personnel will 
have streamlined access to suppliers, products, and prices from 
varying marketplaces. The section therefore would not require 
GSA to use competitive procedures to contract with each 
marketplace. This section would require marketplaces to provide 
electronic access to information about products that are 
purchased, including the date of each purchase, the price paid, 
the person or entity within the department or agency that made 
the purchase, the delivery address, and the number of sellers 
that offered the same or similar product at the same time. The 
committee believes that such information would provide much 
better transparency into the Federal Government's purchasing 
and thereby enable more thorough oversight and accountability. 
This section would require each contract with a marketplace to 
prohibit the sale or other use of such purchase information to 
a third party in a manner that identifies the Federal 
Government, or any of its departments or agencies, as the 
purchaser.
    The committee believes that online marketplaces provide a 
substantial opportunity to greatly streamline procurement of 
COTS products. Namely, marketplaces generally ensure 
competition and price reasonableness, and therefore would 
obviate many of the time-consuming government-unique 
procurement processes GSA and the Department of Defense perform 
today. Additionally, departments and agencies would be required 
to accept the standard terms and conditions related to 
purchases on each marketplace. The committee understands, 
however, that it may be prudent to procure some commercial 
products through traditional acquisition processes. Therefore, 
this section would require the Department of Defense to 
purchase COTS products from the marketplaces only in 
appropriate circumstances. The committee expects the Secretary 
of Defense to issue implementation guidance that may limit the 
products that the Department of Defense may purchase on 
marketplaces. The committee expects, however, that 
opportunities to purchase additional products through 
marketplaces may arise as GSA gains familiarity with the use of 
online marketplaces. Elsewhere in this report, the committee 
includes an item directing the Administrator of GSA to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services and the 
House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform on the 
results of online marketplace purchasing.

            Section 802--Performance of Incurred Cost Audits

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
adhere to commercial standards for risk and materiality when 
auditing costs incurred under flexibly priced contracts. The 
committee is concerned that current incurred cost auditing 
processes in the Department of Defense are too slow, impede 
effective contract management, and may not provide good value 
to the taxpayer. The committee also understands that commercial 
auditors used by other Federal agencies may cost less and 
complete incurred cost audits sooner.
    The section would authorize contract management personnel 
in the Department to choose either the Defense Contract Audit 
Agency (DCAA) or a qualified private auditor (QPA) to audit 
incurred costs, subject to guidelines of an audit planning 
committee. The section would require the Department to enter 
into an indefinite delivery-indefinite quantity task order 
contract with QPAs, and that QPAs audit at least 25 percent of 
incurred costs on flexibly priced contracts after September 1, 
2020. The section would prohibit DCAA from further auditing 
audits performed by QPAs and would require the Secretary to 
treat DCAA and QPA audits equally. The section also would 
require DCAA to pass a peer review by a commercial auditor, 
which is consistent with commercial practice, to continue to 
issue unqualified audit findings after September 1, 2022. The 
section would require the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives not later than September 1, 2019, on the 
progress on finding a commercial auditor to perform the peer 
review.
    This section also would specify a materiality standard for 
incurred cost audits effective September 1, 2020, based on 
private sector norms, for both DCAA and QPAs. The Comptroller 
General of the United States would be required to provide a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
March 1, 2019, describing private sector and government 
standards for risk and materiality and providing 
recommendations as necessary to adjust the materiality 
standards in this section. On September 1, 2019, and every 5 
years thereafter, the Department would be required to review 
private sector materiality standards and propose changes to the 
materiality standards in this section, as necessary.
    The section would require incurred cost audits to be 
completed within 1 year after receipt of qualified cost 
submissions, or the submissions would be accepted in their 
entirety, unless the Department could demonstrate that the 
contractor withheld information necessary to perform the audit. 
The committee intends for the Department to redefine its 
incurred cost backlog to include all audits that are not 
completed within 1 year of receipt of qualified incurred cost 
submissions. The committee further intends the Department to 
allocate DCAA and QPA audit resources to the highest risk 
audits consistent with completing incurred cost audits within 1 
year.
    Toward that end, the section would direct the Comptroller 
General of the United States to provide a report to the 
congressional defense committees by April 1, 2025, that 
evaluates the relative timeliness, costs, and quality of 
incurred cost audits performed by DCAA and QPAs; relative 
contractor costs of incurred cost audits performed by DCAA and 
QPAs; any effects on other types of audits; and the capability 
and capacity of commercial auditors to perform incurred cost 
audits for the Department.

   Section 803--Modifications to Cost or Pricing Data and Reporting 
                              Requirements

    This section would amend section 2306a of title 10, United 
States Code, and section 3502 of title 41, United States Code, 
to raise contract dollar thresholds that require submission of 
certified cost and pricing data. The threshold for non-
competitive prime contracts, modifications of such contracts, 
subcontracts, and modifications of subcontracts would increase 
from $500,000 to $2.5 million, while the threshold for 
modifications to legacy contracts would increase from $100,000 
to $750,000. Raising certified cost and pricing data thresholds 
would reduce administrative burdens, improve process timelines 
for smaller contracts, and make thresholds approximately 
consistent with standard auditing thresholds. The section would 
further amend section 2306a of title 10, United States Code, to 
require offerors to submit other than certified cost or pricing 
data sufficient to determine price reasonableness when 
certified cost or pricing data is not required.
    This section would also require the Comptroller General of 
the United States to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees not later than March 1, 2022, on the 
implementation and effect of these modifications to cost or 
pricing data submission requirements.
    This section also would amend section 2313a of title 10, 
United States Code, to revise reporting requirements of the 
Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA) to provide more clarity on 
the cost effectiveness of different types of audits. It would 
require DCAA to report separately for incurred cost, forward 
pricing, and other audits with regard to the number and dollar 
value of audits completed and pending, sustained questioned 
costs, the costs of performing audits, and the return on 
investment of conducting audits. This section also would change 
the inflation calculation for the thresholds for certified cost 
and pricing data, as well as covered contracts related to 
allowable costs, to be consistent with the inflation 
methodology in section 1908 of title 41, United States Code.

           Part II--Early Investments in Acquisition Programs


 Section 811--Requirement to Emphasize Reliability and Maintainability 
                        in Weapon System Design

    This section would emphasize reliability and 
maintainability (R&M;) in the system design of a major defense 
acquisition program (MDAP). First, the section would require 
the Secretary of Defense to include R&M; as attributes of the 
existing key performance parameter on sustainment during the 
requirements development process. Second, when contracting for 
engineering and manufacturing development (EMD) or production 
of an MDAP, the program manager would be required to include 
clearly defined and measurable requirements for engineering 
activities and design specifications for R&M; in the contract 
solicitation and contract terms unless he or she determines R&M; 
should not be a contract requirement. Third, the section would 
require the Secretary to encourage the use of objective R&M; 
criteria in the source selection process. Fourth, the section 
would authorize the use of incentive fees and would require the 
use of recovery options when practicable to encourage 
contractor performance in R&M; for EMD and production contracts. 
The Department would be able to exercise incentive fees and 
recovery options until the date of acceptance of the last item 
under the contract. Finally, the section would establish a 
program through which program managers would compete for 
additional funding to invest in R&M; during the EMD or 
production of an MDAP to reduce future operating and support 
(O&S;) costs.
    The committee notes that the design of a major weapon 
system directly affects its life-cycle sustainment activities 
and consequently drives its O&S; costs. Elements of sustainment 
that are highly dependent on the system design, namely R&M;, are 
easier and less costly to address during the development of an 
MDAP than after a weapon system is fielded. Therefore, the 
committee believes the Department should emphasize R&M; in early 
engineering decisions.

Section 812--Licensing of Appropriate Intellectual Property to Support 
                          Major Weapon Systems

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
work with contractors to determine prices for technical data 
the Department plans to acquire or license before selecting a 
contractor for the engineering and manufacturing development 
phase or the production phase of a major weapon system. 
Obtaining prices for technical data while competition exists 
among contractors encourages the Department to plan early for 
the technical data it needs to maintain a weapon system and 
affords the Department more competitive prices than it might 
pay later during the sustainment phase. Additionally, this 
section would encourage program managers to negotiate with 
industry to obtain the custom set of technical data necessary 
to support each major defense acquisition program rather than, 
as a default approach, seeking greater rights to more 
extensive, detailed technical data than is necessary.
    The committee believes that acquiring broad rights to most 
or all of the technical data in a weapon system can be cost-
prohibitive and deter contractors from bidding on defense 
programs. Not acquiring enough technical data, however, can 
reduce subsequent competition and increase sustainment costs. 
Therefore, the committee urges program managers when seeking 
technical data to consider the particular data that is 
required, the level of detail necessary, the purpose for which 
it will be used, with whom the government needs to share it, 
and for how long the government needs it. Program managers 
should also consider the unique characteristics of the weapon 
system and its components, the product support strategy for the 
weapon system, the organic industrial base strategy of the 
military department, and the commercial market.

  Section 813--Management of Intellectual Property Matters within the 
                         Department of Defense

    This section would create a small cadre of experts in 
intellectual property (IP) that would advise, assist, and 
provide resources to program offices as they develop their IP 
strategies and negotiate with industry. The section would also 
establish a centralized Office of Intellectual Property within 
the Department of Defense to standardize the Department's 
approach toward obtaining technical data, promulgate policy on 
IP, oversee the cadre of IP experts, and serve as a single 
point of contact for industry on IP matters. Finally, this 
section would add IP positions to the acquisition workforce and 
would revise the training provided to the acquisition workforce 
on IP matters.
    The committee has observed within the Department divergent 
philosophies toward acquiring technical data and varying 
knowledge of IP matters, including laws, regulations, and best 
practices. The committee is concerned that this inconsistency 
and lack of coordination disadvantages the Department. 
Additionally, because a provision elsewhere in this title would 
establish a preference for ``specially negotiated licenses'' to 
obtain the appropriate technical data customized to each weapon 
system, the committee believes the Department requires tools to 
improve its ability to negotiate with industry. A centralized 
Office of Intellectual Property and cadre of IP experts are 
warranted to address these issues. The committee intends that 
the office and cadre would provide advice and assistance to 
facilitate acquisitions. This section would not require the 
office or cadre to approve IP strategies, contracting actions, 
or other program office activities.
    The committee also intends for the Office of Intellectual 
Property to maintain Department of Defense policy on Small 
Business Innovation Research (SBIR) data rights, particularly 
as it pertains to the transition from Phase I and II awards to 
Phase III awards, and to serve as a liaison between the 
Department of Defense and SBIR companies when IP issues arise 
related to SBIR.

    Section 814--Improvement of Planning for Acquisition of Services

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
ensure that the appropriate information is available and that 
the right factors are considered to enable the most effective 
business decisions regarding the procurement of services. This 
section would require the Secretaries of the Department of 
Defense and of the military departments to analyze spending 
patterns and projected future requirements for contracted 
services and use this analysis to inform future decisions on 
services acquisition. Additionally, the section would require 
the Secretary of Defense to submit to Congress with the annual 
budget clear and detailed information on the amounts requested 
for contracted services organized according to the common 
enterprise data structure required elsewhere in this Act.
    This section also would require the Services Requirements 
Review Boards (SRRBs) that the Department of Defense 
established last year to focus primarily on evaluating the need 
for contracted services, rather than the contracting action. 
The SRRBs would be required to critically examine requirements 
in light of total force management, available resources, 
analysis of past spending, and contracting best practices.
    Finally, this section would require the entities that need 
contracted services to plan appropriately, whenever possible, 
to receive validation of the requirement, secure the needed 
funding, and complete the contracting action before the service 
is needed. A requirements owner that does not adequately plan 
for contracted services and consequently relies on a bridge 
contract would be required to provide an update and explanation 
to a relevant senior official. Upon the second use of a bridge 
contract for the same service, the senior official would be 
required to notify senior leadership within the relevant 
military department, Defense Agency, Department of Defense 
Field Activity, or combatant command.
    The committee believes that greater data and analytics 
would enable the Department of Defense to make more enterprise-
oriented, strategic decisions about its acquisition of 
services. The committee also believes that if departmental 
organizations were encouraged to identify their known or 
enduring requirements earlier in the process, it would enable 
more thorough examination of the requirements, better and 
timelier alignment of resources, and opportunities to use 
contracting best practices. Additionally, improved planning 
processes would empower local installations and commands to 
better manage individual contracts and their associated 
funding. The committee notes that this legislation would 
improve headquarters analysis and management of the acquisition 
of services but would retain the decentralized nature of 
procuring services at local installations.

  Section 815--Improvements to Test and Evaluation Processes and Tools

    This section would amend sections 2366b and 2366c of title 
10, United States Code, to require an assessment of the 
sufficiency of the developmental test plan and resources for 
each major defense acquisition program (MDAP) be included in 
the ``acquisition scorecards'' that were created in section 808 
of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 
(Public Law 114-328). The committee believes that developmental 
testing is critical to reducing acquisition program risk by 
providing valuable information to support sound decision 
making. However, the committee is concerned that some MDAPs do 
not conduct enough developmental testing, so too many problems 
are first identified during operational testing, when they are 
expensive and time-consuming to fix. This section also would 
require the Secretary of Defense to evaluate the Department of 
Defense's strategy for developing and expanding the use of 
tools that facilitate cost-effective developmental testing, 
including automated test methods and tools, modeling and 
simulation tools, and big data analytics technologies. The 
Secretary of Defense would be required to provide a briefing to 
the House Committee on Armed Services,not later than 1 year 
after the date of the enactment of this Act, on the Secretary's 
evaluation. The committee believes that emerging technologies 
and tools, such as Automated Test and Retest and modeling and 
simulation, can reduce program risk by facilitating rigorous 
system testing early in the life of a program.

              Part III--Acquisition Workforce Improvements


 Section 821--Enhancements to the Civilian Program Management Workforce

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
implement a new career development program for highly 
qualified, competitively selected civilian employees to 
increase the pool of experienced civilian employees qualified 
to serve as program managers for major defense acquisition 
programs (MDAPs). The committee believes that a focus on career 
development and incentive structures for program managers would 
increase the number of personnel ready and willing to 
successfully manage MDAPs, thereby increasing the 
professionalization and tenure of personnel in these critical 
positions. The new career development program would include 
selection criteria for personnel in the program, necessary 
human capital flexibilities, and structured training and career 
paths. The Secretary would be required to provide a design for 
the program to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate 
and the House of Representatives within 1 year after the date 
of the enactment of this Act. This section would also require 
an independent study of personnel policies and incentives 
needed to attract, retain, and hold accountable civilian and 
military program managers for the largest and most complex 
acquisition programs in the Department. The study would be 
required to be completed within 9 months after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, and the Secretary would be required to 
provide the study to the congressional defense committees 
within 30 days thereafter.

Section 822--Improvements to the Hiring and Training of the Acquisition 
                               Workforce

    This section would amend section 1705 of title 10, United 
States Code, to authorize the use of the Defense Acquisition 
Workforce Development Fund to pay salaries of personnel to 
manage the Fund. The committee expects that this authorization 
would improve the Department of Defense's ability to 
effectively sustain its acquisition workforce.
    The section also would require the Comptroller General of 
the United States to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees by June 30, 2019, on the effectiveness of 
existing hiring flexibilities for the acquisition workforce, as 
well as the need for acquisition training for personnel who 
work in acquisition programs but are not formally considered 
part of the acquisition workforce.
    The section would require the Department to evaluate gaps 
in knowledge of industry operations, industry motivation, and 
business acumen in the acquisition workforce, and would require 
the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment 
to submit a report on this evaluation to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives 
by December 31, 2018.
    Lastly, the section would require the Director of the 
Defense Contract Audit Agency to provide a briefing to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives, not later than 180 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, on strategies to enhance the 
professionalization of the Agency's workforce.
    The committee believes that the hiring, training, and 
retention of highly qualified civilian personnel for the 
defense acquisition workforce is vital to maintaining military 
readiness, increasing the Department's buying power, and 
achieving substantial long-term savings through systems 
engineering and contracting. Therefore, the committee urges 
that planning for any workforce reduction that would affect the 
civilian acquisition workforce takes into consideration 
potential long-term effects of those reductions on cost, 
technical baseline, and warfighting capability.

 Section 823--Extension and Modifications to Acquisition Demonstration 
                                Project

    This section would amend section 1762 of title 10, United 
States Code, to extend, through December 2023, the Acquisition 
Demonstration (AcqDemo) personnel demonstration project that 
was established in section 4308 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1996 (Public Law 104-106). 
AcqDemo allows the Department of Defense flexibility in setting 
compensation for recruiting and retaining high-performing 
acquisition personnel. The section also would require the 
Secretary of Defense to develop an implementation strategy to 
address potential AcqDemo improvements that were identified in 
a recent RAND assessment, and to provide a briefing to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives and the Committee on Oversight and Government 
Reform of the House of Representatives on the implementation 
strategy within 1 year after the date of the enactment of this 
Act.

Section 824--Acquisition Positions in the Offices of the Secretaries of 
                        the Military Departments

    This section would help to retain qualified acquisition 
personnel within the Department of Defense by amending sections 
3014, 5014, and 8014 of title 10, United States Code, to 
authorize the Secretaries of the military departments to exceed 
statutory personnel caps for civilian employees when hiring 
acquisition oversight personnel from the Office of the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics 
or requirements personnel from the Joint Staff that supported 
the Joint Requirements Oversight Council. For the caps to be 
exceeded, a determination would be required that a position was 
no longer needed due to restructuring required by the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328) and that the position would not be refilled by the Office 
of the Secretary of Defense or the Joint Staff.

                   Part IV--Transparency Improvements


       Section 831--Transparency of Defense Business System Data

    This section would amend section 2222 of title 10, United 
States Code, to require that all data within Department of 
Defense business systems be considered owned by the Department 
and be readily available to the Office of the Secretary of 
Defense, the Joint Staff, and the military departments. To 
facilitate the management and analysis of data from across the 
military departments and defense agencies, the section would 
require the creation and maintenance of common enterprise data 
structures (CEDS) into which business system data could be 
mapped to populate common data sets. The section would assign 
responsibility to the Deputy Chief Management Officer for 
creation of CEDS and would amend section 139a of title 10, 
United States Code, to require that the Director of Cost 
Assessment and Program Evaluation maintain the CEDS and 
establish and maintain access to all related data. The section 
would also require the Deputy Chief Management Officer, with 
the concurrence of the Director, Cost Assessment and Program 
Evaluation, to develop a plan to implement the data 
transparency requirements in this section and to submit the 
plan to the congressional defense committees not later than 6 
months after the date of the enactment of this Act.
    The committee is concerned that the Department lags well 
behind the private sector in effectively incorporating 
enterprise-wide data analyses into decision making and 
oversight. The committee therefore believes that a statutory 
requirement that the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the 
Joint Staff, and the military departments be given access to 
business system data is necessary to overcome institutional and 
cultural barriers to information sharing. The committee further 
believes that to bring about this significant culture change, 
it is necessary to assign responsibility at the highest levels 
of the Department for creating and maintaining CEDS.
    The committee recommends $25.0 million in funding for the 
implementation of the data transparency requirements in this 
section.

  Section 832--Major Defense Acquisition Programs: Display of Budget 
                              Information

    This section would require greater transparency in the 
budget requests for major defense acquisition programs (MDAPs). 
Budget justification documents for MDAPs would be required to 
separately depict funding for developmental and operational 
testing and evaluation, the purchase of cost data from 
contractors, and the purchase or license of technical data. The 
committee believes that testing and evaluation, cost data, and 
intellectual property are necessary investments made early in a 
program. However, the committee is concerned that associated 
funding is often decremented when cost, schedule, or 
performance risks materialize. Improving transparency of 
funding for these items would improve the ability of the 
committee to conduct oversight.

   Section 833--Enhancements to Transparency in Test and Evaluation 
                           Processes and Data

    This section would require several improvements to the 
transparency of test and evaluation (T&E;) processes and data. 
It would amend section 139 of title 10, United States Code, to 
require the Director of Operational Test and Evaluation (OT&E;) 
to document specific circumstances that require the addition of 
smaller programs to the OT&E; oversight list and to summarize 
those circumstances in the annual OT&E; report. The section also 
would amend section 2399 of title 10, United States Code, to 
require the Director of OT&E; to provide data in test reports on 
how the capabilities of new systems being tested compare to 
those of legacy systems.
    The committee recognizes the value of an independent 
operational testing office in identifying potential 
vulnerabilities of weapon systems before such systems are 
purchased in significant quantity or deployed operationally. 
The committee believes that this information is critical to 
facilitate risk-based fielding decisions by senior Department 
of Defense leadership. However, the committee is concerned 
that, in recent years, operational test reports have provided 
evaluations of effectiveness and suitability but have not 
provided sufficient information to Congress on the performance 
improvements a system may provide when compared to legacy 
systems. The committee believes that more information on such 
comparisons, where appropriate and available, would provide 
useful context for evaluating a system's overall performance in 
operational testing.
    This section also would amend section 139 of title 10, 
United States Code, to enhance the opportunity of the military 
departments to comment on the annual OT&E; report to ensure that 
OT&E; information is complete, accurate, and timely. The section 
also would require improved transparency of T&E; cost data to 
enable oversight entities to better evaluate the adequacy of a 
program's T&E; plans and resources. It would require the 
Department of Defense to develop an enterprise approach to T&E; 
knowledge management to leverage T&E; data across programs. The 
Director of the Test Resource Management Center and the senior 
Department official responsible for developmental testing would 
be required to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees, within 1 year after the date of the enactment of 
this Act, on the Department's enterprise approach.

     Subtitle B--Streamlining of Defense Acquisition Statutes and 
                              Regulations


 Section 841--Modifications to the Advisory Panel on Streamlining and 
                   Codifying Acquisition Regulations

    This section would amend section 809 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92) to require the Advisory Panel on Streamlining and Codifying 
Acquisition Regulations to transmit its final report on January 
15, 2019, rather than 2 years after the panel was established. 
It also would require the panel to transmit its final report 
simultaneously to the Secretary of Defense and the 
congressional defense committees. The section would extend the 
period of time for the Secretary to submit comments on the 
final report from 30 to 60 days, and would establish a 
termination date for the panel 180 days after transmittal of 
the final report.

  Section 842--Extension of Maximum Duration of Fuel Storage Contracts

    This section would extend from 20 to 30 years the maximum 
total period of Department of Defense contracts for storage, 
handling, or distribution of liquid fuels and natural gas. This 
provision was recommended by the Section 809 Panel on 
Streamlining and Codifying Acquisition Regulations, which was 
established in the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92), as an example of updating 
acquisition regulations to be consistent with modern technology 
and business practices.

  Section 843--Exception for Business Operations From Requirement to 
                            Accept $1 Coins

    This section would exempt government contractors from the 
requirement of section 5112(p) of title 31, United States Code, 
that business operations performed on Federal Government 
premises provide for accepting and dispensing of existing and 
proposed dollar coins. This provision was recommended by the 
Section 809 Panel on Streamlining and Codifying Acquisition 
Regulations, which was established in the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92), as 
an example of an unnecessary contract clause.

              Section 844--Repeal of Expired Pilot Program

    This section would repeal an expired pilot program in 
section 2401a of title 10, United States Code, related to 
leasing utility cargo vehicles.

Subtitle C--Amendments to General Contracting Authorities, Procedures, 
                            and Limitations


          Section 851--Limitation on Unilateral Definitization

    This section would amend section 2326 of title 10, United 
States Code, to require the approval of the agency head before 
a Department of Defense contracting officer can unilaterally 
definitize the specifications, terms, or price of undefinitized 
contractual actions (UCAs) valued greater than $1.0 billion. 
Currently, departmental regulations allow contracting officers 
to unilaterally determine reasonable prices and applicable 
clauses governing definitized contracts, with approval from the 
head of contracting activity. The committee believes that this 
level of scrutiny is sufficient for low dollar value UCAs. 
However, for high dollar value UCAs, particularly those 
involving the development or production of major defense 
acquisition programs, the committee believes that greater 
oversight is warranted. This section would also require that 
the unilateral definitization not take effect until 30 calendar 
days after the approval by the agency head. The committee 
believes that a 30-day waiting period would result in the 
contractor and the government having additional time and 
incentive to reach agreement on the contract and avoid the 
negative consequences of unilateral definitization.

  Section 852--Codification of Requirements Pertaining to Assessment, 
Management, and Control of Operating and Support Costs for Major Weapon 
                                Systems

    This section would codify section 832 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 (Public Law 112-
81; 10 U.S.C. 2430 note) on assessing and controlling operating 
and support costs for major weapons systems.

Section 853--Use of Program Income by Eligible Entities That Carry Out 
               Procurement Technical Assistance Programs

    This section would amend section 2414 of title 10, United 
States Code, to give Procurement Technical Assistance Centers 
limited authority to carry over program income into the next 
fiscal year to further program objectives.

             Section 854--Amendment to Sustainment Reviews

    This section would amend section 2441 of title 10, United 
States Code, pertaining to sustainment reviews of major weapon 
systems. It would require the Secretaries of the military 
departments to make the results of sustainment reviews and 
supporting documentation available to the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment. The committee believes 
that data collected as part of sustainment reviews should be a 
Department of Defense-wide asset that is available for analysis 
and used to inform the Department's policies on sustainment of 
major weapon systems.

       Section 855--Clarification to Other Transaction Authority

    This section would modify section 2371b of title 10, United 
States Code, related to other transactions authority (OTA) to 
ensure consistency across the language and improve clarity for 
how the Department of Defense makes determinations when higher 
level authority is needed to sign off on a specific OTA award. 
The committee believes such changes will improve the speed and 
efficiency of issuing these awards by reducing the numbers of 
determinations requiring higher level signature. Due to the 
changes that have been made to this authority in recent years, 
the committee encourages the Department to revise and, if 
necessary, reissue guidance on using OTA.

Section 856--Clarifying the Use of Lowest Price Technically Acceptable 
                        Source Selection Process

    This section would amend section 813 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328) to require the Secretary of Defense to amend the Defense 
Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement to require that 
lowest price technically acceptable source selection criteria 
are only used in situations in which the Department would 
realize no or minimal additional innovation or future 
technological advantage, and, with respect to a contract for 
procurement of goods, the goods procured are predominantly 
expendable in nature, nontechnical, or have a short life 
expectancy. The section would also require the avoidance of the 
use of lowest price technically acceptable source selection 
criteria when procuring certain types of electronic test and 
measurement equipment.

     Section 857--Amendment to Nontraditional and Small Contractor 
                     Innovation Prototyping Program

    This section would amend section 844(d) of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328) pertaining to the nontraditional and small contractor 
innovation prototyping program. It would add unmanned ground 
logistics and unmanned air logistics to the list of 
capabilities to be included in the program.

      Section 858--Modification to Annual Meeting Requirement of 
                     Configuration Steering Boards

    This section would amend section 814 of the Duncan Hunter 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009 (Public 
Law 110-417) to remove the requirement for a configuration 
steering board to meet annually to review an acquisition 
program if the senior acquisition executive determines in 
writing that there were no changes to the requirements of the 
acquisition program during the preceding year.

      Section 859--Change to Definition of Subcontract in Certain 
                             Circumstances

    This section would amend section 1906(c)(1) of title 41, 
United States Code, to make the definition of subcontract in 
that section consistent with the definition in section 2375 of 
title 10, United States Code.

     Section 860--Amendment Relating to Applicability of Inflation 
                              Adjustments

    This section would modify section 1908(d) of title 41, 
United States Code, to ensure 5-year inflation adjustments 
apply consistently to all subcontractors. Currently, inflation 
adjustments impact only prime contractors, so that 
subcontractors must maintain a compliance requirement for some 
contracts but not others. The committee believes that 
standardization will reduce regulatory and compliance 
challenges for both prime and subcontractors.

                       Subtitle D--Other Matters


     Section 861--Exemption from Design-Build Selection Procedures

    This section would amend section 2305a of title 10, United 
States Code, to exempt solicitations issued pursuant to an 
indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity contract from the 
statutory limitation on the number of offerors that may proceed 
to step-two of the procurement selection process.

 Section 862--Requirement That Certain Ship Components Be Manufactured 
             in the National Technology and Industrial Base

    This section would amend section 2534 of title 10, United 
States Code, and would require certain auxiliary ship 
components to be procured from a manufacturer in the national 
technology and industrial base.

       Section 863--Procurement of Aviation Critical Safety Items

    This section would amend section 814 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328) to include the procurement of aviation critical safety 
items.
    The committee is concerned the military services may be 
interpreting the definition of personal protective equipment 
too narrowly and are not considering aviation critical safety 
items, such as military parachutes. This change ensures that to 
the maximum extent practicable, the source selection criteria 
used in the procurement of aviation critical safety items, such 
as parachutes, would be best-value based, rather than reverse 
auction or lowest price technically acceptable contracting 
methods.

    Section 864--Milestones and Timelines for Contracts for Foreign 
                             Military Sales

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
develop standard timeline milestones for the foreign military 
sales (FMS) process, including related contracting activities. 
Timeline milestones would vary by the complexity of the FMS 
case. The Secretary would report quarterly to the congressional 
defense committees, the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the 
House of Representatives, and the Committee on Foreign 
Relations of the Senate any FMS cases that require 
congressional notification pursuant to section 36 of the Arms 
Export Control Act that do not meet timeline milestones. The 
Secretary would also report annually to the congressional 
defense committees, the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the 
House of Representatives, and the Committee on Foreign 
Relations of the Senate the number of FMS cases that did meet 
timeline milestones during the preceding fiscal year, and the 
number of FMS cases that failed to meet the timeline 
milestones, categorized by milestone and reason for the delay.

 Section 865--Notification Requirement for Certain Contracts for Audit 
                                Services

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
notify the congressional defense committees when there is a 
protest of a contract for auditing services that contribute to 
the Department of Defense achieving auditable financial 
statements and the Department decides not to use existing 
authorities to continue performance of the contract while the 
protest is pending. The committee remains committed to the 
Department achieving auditable financial statements, and is 
concerned that a delay in any one annual auditing contract 
impairs the ability of the entire Department to achieve 
consolidated audited financial statements.

        Section 866--Training in Acquisition of Commercial Items

    This section would require the President of the Defense 
Acquisition University to establish a training program on part 
12 of the Federal Acquisition Regulation pertaining to the 
procurement of commercial items.

    Section 867--Notice of Cost-Free Federal Procurement Technical 
 Assistance in Connection With Registration of Small Business Concerns 
          on Procurement Websites of the Department of Defense

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
establish procedures to include information about cost-free 
services provided by a Federal procurement technical assistance 
program in notices or direct communications regarding the 
registration of a small business on a Department of Defense 
procurement website.

 Section 868--Comptroller General Report on Contractor Business System 
                              Requirements

    This section would require the Comptroller General of the 
United States to issue a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of 
this Act on the feasibility and effect of revising the 
applicability of contractor business system rules contained in 
section 893 of the Ike Skelton National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2011 (Public Law 111-383).

  Section 869--Standard Guidelines for Evaluation of Requirements for 
                           Services Contracts

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
encourage standardization of guidelines for the evaluation of 
requirements for services contracts.

Section 870--Temporary Limitation on Aggregate Annual Amount Available 
                         for Contract Services

    This section would extend the cap on spending for services 
contracts by the Department of Defense through fiscal year 
2018.

      TITLE IX--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


 Subtitle A--Organization and Management of the Department of Defense 
                               Generally


  Section 901--Responsibility of the Chief Information Officer of the 
 Department of Defense for Risk Management Activities Regarding Supply 
                Chain for Information Technology Systems

    This section would amend section 142(b)(1) of title 10, 
United States Code, by making the Department of Defense Chief 
Information Officer responsible for policy, oversight, 
guidance, and coordination for supply chain risk management 
activities for the Department's information technology (IT) 
systems.
    The committee remains concerned that the Department of 
Defense is not adequately postured or resourced to conduct the 
necessary planning, analysis, and assessment for supply chain 
risk management of Department of Defense information technology 
systems. This problem is exacerbated by the globalized nature 
of both the hardware and software supply chains for IT, and by 
the reliance of the Department on primarily commercial systems 
that are the products of the globalized management and supply 
chain. While the committee is aware that much progress has been 
made in developing policies and guidance, as well as creating 
the core of an analytic capability, the committee believes 
there is more to be done. In addition to rethinking how to 
address this problem with less manpower, the committee also 
believes the Department should do more to invest in automated 
information feeds, including from business and commercial 
intelligence providers, to fuse with classified information 
when needed, but also to provide stand-alone products more 
easily shareable with industry, interagency, and international 
partners.

    Section 902--Repeal of Office of Corrosion Policy and Oversight

    This section would repeal section 2228 of title 10, United 
States Code, requiring that there be an Office of Corrosion 
Policy and Oversight within the Office of the Under Secretary 
of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics.

Section 903--Designation of Corrosion Control and Prevention Executives 
                      for the Military Departments

    This section would designate corrosion control and 
prevention executives for the military departments.

  Section 904--Maintaining Civilian Workforce Capabilities to Sustain 
   Readiness, the All Volunteer Force, and Operational Effectiveness

    This section would amend section 912 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328) to add civilian workforce matters to the report required 
by that section.

          Subtitle B--Designation of the Navy and Marine Corps


    Section 911--Redesignation of the Department of the Navy as the 
                Department of the Navy and Marine Corps

    This section would re-designate the Department of the Navy 
as the Department of the Navy and Marine Corps. Further, this 
section would re-designate the Secretary of the Navy as the 
Secretary of the Navy and Marine Corps.

   Section 912--Conforming Amendments to Title 10, United States Code

    This section would make conforming amendments to Title 10, 
United States Code, consistent with designating the Department 
of the Navy as the Department of the Navy and Marine Corps.

       Section 913--Other Provisions of Law and Other References

    This section would amend other references in the United 
States Code consistent with the designation of the Department 
of the Navy as the Department of the Navy and Marine Corps.

                      Section 914--Effective Date

    This section would make this subtitle effective on the 
first day of the first month beginning more than 60 days after 
the enactment of this Act.

                       Subtitle C--Other Matters


 Section 921--Transition of the Office of the Secretary of Defense To 
 Reflect Establishment of Positions of Under Secretary of Defense for 
 Research and Engineering, Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition 
             and Sustainment, and Chief Management Officer

    This section would allow the incumbent Principal Deputy 
Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and 
Logistics to become the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment, and would allow the incumbent 
Deputy Chief Management Officer to continue to serve as the 
Chief Management Officer, once both positions come into effect 
on February 1, 2018, consistent with section 901 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public 
Law 114-328.) Additionally, this section would clarify that any 
statutory references to the positions established in the 
aforementioned section 901 also take effect on February 1, 
2018.
    In the conference report (H. Rept. 114-840) accompanying 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017, 
the conferees encouraged the President to move expeditiously on 
nominations for the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering, the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and 
Sustainment, and the Chief Management Officer. However, the 
committee recognizes the difficulty of recruiting talented, 
experienced individuals to the incumbent leadership positions 
if the tenure of such positions is short and the individuals 
are not retained for the newly established positions. 
Therefore, the committee recommends that the individuals 
appointed by and with the advice and consent of the Senate to 
the relevant incumbent positions be allowed to transition to 
the newly established positions.

    Section 922--Extension of Deadlines for Reporting and Briefing 
 Requirements for Commission on the National Defense Strategy for the 
                             United States

    This section would amend section 942 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328), which establishes a Commission on the National Defense 
Strategy for the United States, to extend the deadlines for the 
final report and interim briefing.
    The committee recognizes that the commissioners had not yet 
been appointed to the commission as of May 2017. To allow the 
commission sufficient time to conduct the review and assessment 
as required, the committee recommends revising the deadlines 
for the final report and interim briefing.

         Section 923--Briefing on Force Management Level Policy

    This section would express the sense of Congress that the 
Department of Defense should discourage the practice of 
substituting contractor personnel for available members of the 
Armed Forces when a unit deploys overseas. This section would 
also require the Secretary of Defense to brief the 
congressional defense committees on steps the Secretary is 
taking to revise deployment guidelines to ensure readiness, 
unit cohesion, and maintenance are prioritized as well as a 
plan to establish a policy to avoid costly contractor practices 
when practicable in the future.

                      TITLE X--GENERAL PROVISIONS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


                        Counter-Drug Activities


   Narcotics Flow to the United States From Central and South America

    Congress continues to be concerned regarding the flow 
illegal narcotics trafficking into the U.S. from in Central and 
South America. Congress notes the United States has a national 
security interest in the narcotics trafficking of transnational 
criminal organizations taking place in the Western Hemisphere 
risking widening insecurity and instability. The continuing 
efforts by U.S. Southern Command have been instrumental in 
combating the threats posed by the transnational criminal 
organizations. However, U.S. Southern Command could utilize 
additional requisite manpower, assets, and resources to assist 
the Office of National Drug Control Policy's mandated goal of 
forty percent reduction of narcotics entering through U.S. 
borders. The committee encourages the Department of Defense to 
continue to prioritize manpower, assets and resources to meet 
the mission of U.S. Southern Command to increase stability and 
security throughout the region. Therefore, the committee 
requires the Secretary of Defense, to provide a briefing, to 
the House Committee on Armed Services, no later than November 
1, 2017 on the future manpower and resourcing needs in the U.S. 
Southern Command area of responsibility and the Department's 
plan to contribute to the interagency effort to reduce the 
amount of illicit narcotics entering the United States.

                   National Guard Counterdrug Schools

    The committee acknowledges the continued contributions of 
the National Guard Counterdrug Schools as part of domestic 
counterdrug initiatives. The National Guard, working with law 
enforcement agencies and community-based organizations, 
operates five regional counterdrug training centers across the 
country to provide education and training to local, State, and 
Federal law enforcement in counterdrug and global threat 
reduction efforts.
    The committee notes the importance of each school's 
curriculum in addressing the counterdrug threat. Each course 
provides students with training and skill set development to 
better combat transnational criminal organizations, develop 
intelligence gathering skills, and develop investigation 
skills. The committee believes that the Department of Defense 
should perform a thorough review process, to include feedback 
from schools' leadership and instructors, of the effectiveness 
of courses and overall curriculum strategy. The committee 
encourages the Department, as it annually reviews the curricula 
of each school, to evaluate the holistic approach each school 
implements to train, educate, and assist its students.

                           Peace in Colombia

    The committee lauds the Government of the Republic of 
Colombia on the signing of the peace accords with the 
Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia in September 2016. The 
committee further congratulates the Government on its 
implementation of the peace accords, beginning in November 
2016. These accords lay the foundation for the peaceful 
transition of a country dealing with internal war and terrorism 
for 50 years to a country of stability.
    The committee remains supportive of the U.S. mission in 
Colombia and of the strides made through the U.S.-Colombian 
partnership. Since 2000, the poverty rate in Colombia has 
dropped by 44 percent and the Gross Domestic Product has grown 
by 142 percent, while homicides have decreased by 53 percent. 
There have also been setbacks, including increased coca 
production and increased paramilitary attacks, as well as the 
possible resurgence of the National Liberation Army, and a rise 
in national violence and homicides. While an increase in coca 
production has hindered some of the progress of the Colombian 
Government over the past decade, the U.S. partnership with 
Colombia to address this and other challenges remains vital. 
The peace process is a generational transition with no easy 
victories.
    The committee encourages the Government of Colombia to 
continue its efforts to promote and export stability, security, 
and transparency. The committee further encourages the 
Department of Defense and the Government of Colombia to 
continue their enduring partnership. The committee recognizes 
Colombia's work in Central America to train and assist 
countries with rampant violence and instability, leveraging 
lessons it has learned from 50 years of conflict, and to 
emphasize the professionalization of the military. The 
committee believes that, as Colombia evolves through its 
peaceful transition, a stronger and more stable hemisphere will 
emerge.

                    Venezuela Security and Stability

    The committee is concerned about the growing economic and 
political unrest occurring in the Bolivarian Republic of 
Venezuela under President Nicolas Maduro. With reports of 
famine, political uncertainty and corruption, a disintegrating 
economy, and undue violent government action against its 
citizens, the committee is concerned that instability in 
Venezuela could lead to a government collapse and failed state. 
In addition, this instability could result in portions of the 
Venezuelan population migrating to neighboring countries, 
including the Republic of Colombia, the Cooperative Republic of 
Guyana, the Republic of Peru, and the Federative Republic of 
Brazil, seeking humanitarian relief. The effects of a large 
scale humanitarian crisis in the region could be catastrophic.
    The committee is concerned about U.S. Government 
contingency planning if a collapse of the Venezuelan Government 
and economy occurs. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with other Federal 
Government agencies and departments that the Secretary deems 
appropriate, to provide a briefing, which may be classified, to 
the House Committee on Armed Services not later than September 
30, 2017, on U.S. Government contingency plans for a potential 
humanitarian and migration crisis in Venezuela if its 
Government and economy collapse, to include the Department of 
Defense's roles and responsibilities and assets that would 
contribute to such plans.

                             Other Matters


 Assessment of Culture and Accountability in Special Operations Forces

    The committee is aware of the integral role that Special 
Operations Forces play in the defense of our Nation. Special 
Operations Forces enjoy a stellar reputation as brave, 
competent and quiet professionals. The committee is concerned, 
however, that recent allegations of personal misconduct by a 
limited number of service members may be detracting from the 
honorable service of the vast majority of Special Operations 
Forces. These allegations of misconduct include reports of 
sexual assault and other sexual misconduct, as well as drug 
use. Additional concerns have been raised about increased 
public exposure of Special Operations Forces activities and 
operations via unauthorized books and media.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Special Operations/Low-Intensity Conflict and the 
Commander, U.S. Special Operations Command, to provide a 
briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives not later than January 1, 2018, on the 
Department's assessment of the culture and accountability 
within Special Operations Forces.

                 Botulinum Toxin Type A Countermeasures

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense is 
managing efforts to develop a vaccine to counter botulinum 
toxin types A and B. There is evidence and discussion in the 
scientific community stating that the use of the botulinum 
neurotoxin (BoNT) type A vaccine, which the department is 
pursuing, can limit future medical treatments for military 
personnel in that it would prevent immunized warfighters and 
veterans from receiving the benefit of the rapidly growing 
number of important medical uses of botulinum toxin type A. 
Several of these medical uses are critically important to the 
military veteran population, including treatments for PTSD-
associated migraine and amputation pain. Furthermore, the 
committee notes that advances in synthetic biology enhance both 
the potential threat and potential treatments of biological 
agents.
    Therefore, the committee directs Secretary of Defense to 
brief the House Committee on Armed Services within 90 days of 
enactment of this act on the Department of Defense's research 
and development plans to counter botulinum toxin type A, the 
impact and/or potential drawbacks in using the BoNT/A vaccine, 
and the potential future benefits and complications introduced 
through the advances of synthetic biology for the treatment and 
threat of biological agents.

               Combat Helmets for Female Service Members

    The committee encourages the Army and the Marine Corps to 
continue its efforts to reduce the weight of combat helmets 
issued to service members, while maintaining or enhancing 
ballistic protection. The committee also recognizes the need 
for the Department of Defense to ensure that the military 
services are procuring properly fitting helmets for all 
military servicemen and women. Specifically, the committee is 
aware of the Army's efforts to develop and field improved 
helmet fit and retention systems to account for female service 
member needs.
    Therefore, in finalizing the contracts for current and 
future combat helmet production, the committee encourages the 
Army and the Marine Corps to take into account the helmet needs 
of all military service members when determining the number, 
size variety, and fitting system designs, with the goal of 
ensuring that the entirety of the male and female military 
population have the appropriate size helmets.

  Comptroller General Assessment of Emerging Threats of High National 
                          Security Consequence

    Within the next ten years, the committee believes that 
several challenges could present emerging threats of high 
national security consequence, such as: the proliferation of 
disruptive and exponentially deployed technologies; the 
introduction of novel asymmetric weapons; second and third-
order effects of environmental and climate-related issues; 
global pandemic and public health issues; shifting demographics 
and urbanization effects; and unanticipated state and non-state 
acts of aggression.
    Since the committee believes the Department of Defense must 
be prepared to counter these threats, the committee directs the 
Comptroller General of the United States to identify and assess 
these and other emerging threats that could affect the national 
security of the United States. Such an assessment should 
provide a snapshot of critical emerging threats based on the 
views of the intelligence community, combatant commands, and 
other Department of Defense organizations, such as the Defense 
Advanced Research Projects Agency and the Defense Threat 
Reduction Agency. The assessment should identify:
    (1) the emerging threats within each geographic combatant 
commander's area of responsibility;
    (2) the extent to which the threats are highlighted in 
current national security defense strategies; and
    (3) the Department's component(s), if any, tasked to 
monitor and mitigate these threats.
    The committee directs the Comptroller General to provide a 
briefing to the congressional defense committees by February 1, 
2018, on preliminary findings, with a report to follow.

          Defense Department 501(c)3 Coordination and Strategy

    The committee is aware that non-profit 501(c)3 entities may 
provide a valuable utility when operating in concert with 
Department of Defense and other U.S. government agencies and 
plans, but that guidance for utilizing such entities is 
inconsistent throughout the Department and Combatant Commands.
    The committee therefore directs the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report by November 1, 2018, to the House Committee on 
Armed Services on the utility of 501(c)3 organizations to 
further the international goals and interests of the Department 
of Defense in concert with other U.S. government agencies and 
encourages the Department to issue standard guidance and 
standard operating procedures for working with such non-federal 
entities overseas.

                Department of Defense Overmatch Strategy

    The committee remains concerned that U.S. superiority in 
some key warfare domains may be at risk with the advances in 
technology being made by other nations that are designed to 
counter U.S. overmatch. While the committee appreciates the 
assessments conducted by the Department of Defense, including 
the Office of Net Assessment, to characterize trends in 
competitive capabilities, the committee also seeks to 
understand the Department's efforts to address these 
challenges.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than September 30, 2017, on the Department's strategy 
to maintain overmatch, including the organizations, activities, 
and resources involved in the development and implementation of 
such strategy.

            Disposal of Excess Agriculture-Related Equipment

    The committee is aware that the Department of Defense has a 
disposal process for its excess or unused equipment. The 
committee believes that veteran-owned farming operations could 
benefit from greater awareness of equipment availability. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Director of the Defense 
Logistics Agency to provide a briefing, not later than December 
31, 2017, to the House Committee on Armed Services on all 
agriculture-related equipment disposals for the past five 
years. The briefing shall include an itemized list of each item 
disposed, a brief description of each farming-related item, and 
whether the item was transferred to another government entity 
or a private company or citizen.

 High-Altitude Airborne Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance 
               Capacity, Capability, and Force Structure

    The committee recognizes that both the piloted U-2 Dragon 
Lady and the remotely piloted RQ-4 Global Hawk fleets of 
aircraft provide essential and extremely sought after high-
altitude airborne intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance (ISR) capabilities for geographic combatant 
commanders. Due to varying circumstances, both aircraft have 
been viewed as competitors for resources with various 
stakeholders trying to decide which should remain within the 
Air Force inventory for the long-term. However, the committee 
emphasizes that while both aircraft are highly capable and have 
differing attributes that may make one aircraft preferable at 
times over the other aircraft, the combination together 
provides critical, complementary capabilities within the 
Department's portfolio of high-altitude ISR capabilities. 
Furthermore, retiring either aircraft would create a 
significant capability gap and further exacerbate an existing 
and significant capacity shortfall in meeting combatant 
commanders' requirements.
    Therefore, elsewhere in this Act, the committee includes a 
provision that would prohibit the Secretary of the Air Force 
from retiring either the U-2 or RQ-4 aircraft until at least 
the beginning of fiscal year 2024. Additionally, the committee 
also supports and expects the Secretary of the Air Force to 
robustly continue current and future modernization efforts and 
capability upgrades underway for the U-2 and RQ-4 to increase 
capability, generate synergy, and foster commonality within the 
high-altitude airborne ISR portfolio. Finally, the committee 
discourages the Secretary of the Air Force or the Chief of 
Staff of the Air Force from planning in the future or proposing 
to Congress any aircraft retirement that would create a 
capability deficit or capacity shortfall from existing levels 
until a sufficient replacement capability declares full 
operational capability.

                      National Biodefense Strategy

    Section 1086 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) directed the Secretary of 
Defense, the Secretary of Health and Human Services, the 
Secretary of Homeland Security, and the Secretary of 
Agriculture to jointly develop a national biodefense strategy 
and associated implementation plan. The strategy is also to 
include a review and assessment of biodefense policies, 
practices, programs, and initiatives, and is to be reviewed and 
revised biennially. The committee is pleased with the 
interagency coordination that has taken place thus far, 
including periodic update briefs to all congressional oversight 
committees and urges the continuation of these updates. The 
committee looks forward to receiving the completed strategy as 
required by section 1086, not later than its due date, 
September 25, 2017, including the subsequent review by the 
Comptroller General of the United States.

                 National Guard CBRN Enterprise Report

    The committee is aware that since the 1998 report on 
National Guard and WMD response, there has not been an updated 
study on the readiness, roles and tasks of the National Guard 
in both Title 10 and Title 32 as it relates to the Chemical 
Biological and Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) threats has not 
been conducted to mirror evolving threats and technology 
including increased asymmetric threats, new chemical and 
biological threats, UAV and drone technology, and cyber warfare 
or maturing federal and state homeland defense architecture and 
policies.
    This Committee believes it is appropriate to re-examine our 
National Guard CBRN enterprise and recommends that the Chief of 
the National Guard Bureau conduct a comprehensive study of its 
current federal, state and local Chemical, Biological, 
Radiological and Nuclear operations, equipment and training 
requirements in light of today's threats. The report should 
highlight strengths as well as gaps and seams in the 
interagency planning and execution process.
    The committee directs the Chief of the National Guard 
Bureau, working in close coordination with other state and 
federal agencies and stakeholders across multiple levels of 
government, to provide a report detailing the following, no 
later than September 30, 2019:
    (1) define and clarify the roles and missions, structure, 
capabilities and training of the National Guard, as well as 
identifying emerging gaps and shortfalls in light of current 
CBRN threats to our country,
    (2) by State and territory, comment on the resources each 
state has (Title 32 and Title 10) that are available to respond 
to a CBRN attack, proposing adaptions and updated response 
plans to combat current threats,
    (3) the readiness and resourcing status of forces listed in 
(2),
    (4) current strengths and areas of improvement in working 
with State and Federal interagency partners,
    (5) current assessments that are in place that address both 
readiness and resourcing of Title 32 and Title 10 forces 
postured to respond to CBRN incidents.

 National Guard Use of Department of Defense Issued Unmanned Aircraft 
                    Systems for Domestic Operations

    The committee notes that the Deputy Secretary of Defense 
issued policy memorandum (15-002) for the Department of Defense 
on February 17, 2015, to provide guidance for the domestic use 
of Department of Defense unmanned aircraft systems (UAS). The 
policy's purpose is to ensure that Department UAS platforms are 
used in accordance with U.S. law and Department policy, and to 
ensure the appropriate use of Department UAS assets in domestic 
operations, training, exercises, and testing within the 
Department. The policy also covers use of Department UAS 
platforms issued to the National Guard, in accordance with 
subsection 710 of title 32, United States Code, which provides 
accountability for property issued to the National Guard.
    The committee supports the purpose and substantive issues 
that are addressed by the UAS policy memorandum, but the 
committee also believes that some of the coordination processes 
and governance structure stipulated by the policy may not be 
optimal and provides unclear guidance in support of certain 
State and National Guard operations and missions. For example, 
the policy states that Department UAS platforms may not be used 
for Federal, State, or local immediate response, yet the policy 
allows for State governors to consider Department UAS 
employment in their planning for disaster response activities, 
but only after a governor's response plan factors in the 
procedures and time required for Federal Aviation 
Administration consultation for access to the necessary 
airspace, and to obtain Secretary of Defense authorization 
through a formal request in writing. On the contrary, the 
committee notes that Secretary of Defense approval is not 
needed for Department UAS domestic operations for designated 
search and rescue missions involving distress and potential 
loss-of-life circumstances. However, the committee believes 
that most disaster response activities that a governor would 
undertake would likely involve distress and potential loss-of-
life circumstances in which immediate response may be 
necessary. The committee is uncertain as to why Secretary of 
Defense approval is necessary for a governor to use a 
Department UAS related to disaster response activities, but 
approval authority is delegated below the Secretary of Defense 
for search and rescue missions involving distress and potential 
loss-of-life.
    Therefore, elsewhere in this title, the committee includes 
a provision that would require the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Chief of the National Guard Bureau, the 
Commander, U.S. Northern Command, and the Commander, U.S. 
Pacific Command, to perform a review of the Department policy 
memorandum governing the domestic use of Department UAS 
platforms not later than 1 year after the date of the enactment 
of this Act, with a particular focus on efficiently and 
effectively supporting State and National Guard operations and 
missions.

                      Navy Reserve F/A-18 Aircraft

    The committee remains concerned over the health and 
readiness of the Navy Reserve combat air fleet. The committee 
is aware that the Navy Reserve tactical aviation squadrons 
provide critical adversary support and strike fighter weapons 
training to Active Duty forces, and must maintain a high 
mobilization readiness level as the sole strategic reserve 
available to the U.S. Navy. The committee understands the Navy 
Reserve currently operates 33 legacy F/A-18A+ aircraft that are 
currently shared between 2 squadrons. The committee notes that 
with an average airframe age of 30 years and onboard systems 
that are no longer compatible with today's Carrier Air Wing, 
these aircraft are increasingly less capable than the F/A-18E/F 
Super Hornets. The committee believes this could impact the 
ability of these two Navy Reserve squadrons in meeting 
requirements for advanced strike employment, as well as 
simulating current advanced threat aircraft. The committee also 
believes these legacy F/A-18A+ aircraft need to be 
recapitalized with next generation capability in order to 
provide realistic threat-representative training for naval 
aviators and to maintain operational readiness that provides a 
relevant and deployable backstop to the Active Duty air wings.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Navy, in coordination with the Chief of the Navy Reserve, to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, 
not later than December 1, 2017, on its plans to recapitalize 
the Navy Reserve combat air fleet.

               Next Generation Immersive Cockpit Systems

    The committee is aware of next-generation immersive 
aircraft operator cockpit technologies, including advanced crew 
stations, that may reduce aircraft operator risk, while 
enabling new aircraft to be designed that achieve higher 
performance at reduced costs when compared to conventional 
cockpit technology. The committee encourages the Department of 
Defense to pursue evaluation of such technologies if they are 
deemed to be beneficial in meeting performance and cost 
requirements for advanced next-generation aircraft.

           Overseas Posture and Permanently Stationed Forces

    The committee asserts that there is operational and 
strategic value in maintaining forward presence of U.S. 
military forces in both the U.S. European Command and U.S. 
Pacific Command's areas of responsibilities. Forward-positioned 
forces reduce time and space limitations by providing rapid 
response capabilities to geographic combatant commanders, serve 
as a deterrent to potential adversaries while assuring partners 
and allies, and facilitate cooperative efforts to build and 
develop partner-nation security capabilities. However, the 
committee notes that several geographic combatant commands have 
relied on rotational forces to meet requirements due to 
reductions in the number of permanently stationed forces. While 
rotational forces can maintain required force levels and help 
exercise certain skill sets, the committee is concerned that an 
over-reliance on rotational forces may come at a greater 
financial cost and with limitations on meeting requirements for 
our strategic and operational aims when compared to permanently 
stationed forces.
    For example, the use of rotational forces encumbers at 
least three units to support the one rotation: the unit 
currently performing the rotational mission, the unit training 
to assume the rotational mission, and the unit undergoing reset 
after completing the rotational mission. The committee is 
concerned that this may have an adverse impact on the readiness 
and availability of units. Unlike permanently stationed forces, 
rotational forces are also not assigned to a geographic area 
long enough to develop and sustain expertise on the terrain, 
supporting infrastructure, sustainable lines of communication, 
and regional security forces. This may adversely affect the 
ability of rotational and partner-nation forces to effectively 
coordinate responses to contingencies. The committee is also 
concerned that partner nations may question the United States' 
commitment, and partner forces may experience fatigue due to 
the higher operational training tempo associated with 
rotational forces. Finally, the committee is aware that the 
financial costs of supporting ``heel-to-toe'' rotational units 
over several years may be greater than correlating costs for 
permanently forward-stationed units.
    Due to these limitations, the committee asserts that it 
better serves the United States' operational and strategic 
interests to maintain additional permanently stationed forces 
where the geographic combatant commanders have requirements for 
persistent force presence to: provide rapid response 
capabilities; deter potential adversaries; assure partners and 
allies; or facilitate cooperative efforts to build and develop 
partner-nation security capabilities. The committee is 
concerned that the United States' posture may be out of balance 
and lack sufficient emphasis on permanent forward-stationed 
forces.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in consultation with the service secretaries, to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
April 1, 2018, on the Department's strategy for balancing the 
force structure of the U.S. Armed Forces as part of any planned 
growth in end strength and force structure. The report shall be 
unclassified, but may include a classified annex. At a minimum, 
the report should address the following issues with respect to 
U.S. European Command and U.S. Pacific Command's areas of 
responsibility:
    (1) an assessment of the additional permanently stationed 
forces at overseas locations required to meet U.S. strategic 
requirements and the operational requirements of the geographic 
combatant commanders;
    (2) an assessment of the infrastructure capacity of 
existing overseas locations and their ability to accommodate 
additional forces;
    (3) an overview of new locations that might be considered 
for permanently stationed forces and the estimated cost and 
scope of infrastructure investments, to include improvements to 
training areas, which would be required at those locations to 
support permanently stationed forces. This should include an 
assessment of what infrastructure investments might be provided 
by the host-nation as well as new construction or modernization 
of existing facilities that would be funded by the United 
States;
    (4) a detailed list of investments in equipment, supplies, 
logistics, storage, and maintenance, at current and new 
overseas locations, required to support additional permanently 
stationed forces;
    (5) an assessment of the readiness benefits and 
disadvantages associated with stationing additional permanent 
forces at overseas locations; and
    (6) a discussion of potential challenges with stationing 
additional permanent forces or developing new locations for 
permanently stationed forces as a result of treaty obligations, 
international agreements, or other legally binding instruments.

 Report on the National Security Implications of Ukraine's Arbitration 
   Proceedings against Russia under Annex VII of the United Nations 
                    Convention on the Law of the Sea

    The Committee notes the September 14, 2016 announcement by 
Ukraine that it had initiated arbitration proceedings against 
Russia under Annex VII of the United Nations Convention on the 
Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). In bringing this suit, Ukraine is 
seeking validation of its maritime rights in the vicinity of 
Crimea in the Black Sea, the Sea of Azov, and the Kerch Strait. 
The Ukrainian Ministry of Foreign Affairs stated that ``Ukraine 
has asked the arbitral tribunal to enforce its maritime rights 
by ordering the Russian Federation to cease its internationally 
wrongful actions in the relevant waters, to provide Ukraine 
with appropriate guarantees that it will respect Ukraine's 
rights under UNCLOS, and to make full reparation to Ukraine for 
the injuries the Russian Federation has caused.''
    Additionally, the committee notes that the United States 
was denied observer status to the tribunal's proceedings 
between the Philippines and the Republic of China, which also 
carried major national security implications. In its ruling on 
that case, the tribunal determined that ```only interested 
States parties to the United Nations Convention on the Law of 
the Sea will be admitted as observers' and thus could not 
accede to the U.S. request.''
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in consultation with the Secretary of State, to submit a report 
to the congressional defense committees by December 31, 2017 
on:
    (1) the national security implications of the arbitration 
proceedings brought by Ukraine against Russia under UNCLOS;
    (2) actions the U.S. can take to support the arbitration 
proceedings brought by Ukraine;
    (3) limitations to the U.S. position in this case given its 
failure to ratify UNCLOS, and;
    (4) a recommendation on whether the U.S. should ratify the 
UNCLOS.

  Requirement for Notification of Modifications Made to Presidential 
      Policy Guidance for Direct Action Against Terrorist Targets

    When necessary, U.S. Armed Forces use lethal force abroad 
to protect the American people, consistent with American values 
and all applicable law, including the international laws of 
armed conflict. In 2013, the Administration issued Presidential 
Policy Guidance (PPG) establishing standard operating 
procedures for direct action, which refers to lethal and non-
lethal uses of force, including capture operations against 
terrorist targets in areas of active hostilities outside of the 
United States. The committee is aware that the current 
Administration has directed the Department of Defense and the 
interagency to review the procedures for direct action against 
terrorist targets established by the 2013 PPG, and that the 
results of this review are forthcoming.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
within 30 days of any change made to procedures for direct 
action against terrorist targets conducted under title 10, 
United States Code, authorities, including any deviation, 
variation, change, or termination of procedure outlined within 
the 2013 PPG. Additionally, the committee expects the Secretary 
of Defense to continue to comply with standing requirements to 
notify the congressional defense committees of non-combatant 
causalities associated with direct action activities conducted 
under the auspices of the PPG, and all other title 10 
operations, to include a year-end compilation by country.

                            Ring Wheel Drive

    The committee is interested in advancements in power- and 
drivetrain systems and whether these systems could offer 
mechanical and electromechanical benefits to Department of 
Defense procurements. This includes new ``hub-less''' or 
``spoke-less''' technology that has been described as a ring 
wheel drive. The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the military services, to brief the 
congressional defense committees by March 1, 2018, on current 
commercial and government efforts to develop and deploy ring 
wheel drive technology. In addition, the briefing should 
include an assessment of the applicability of ring wheel drive 
for military platforms, including the broad range of wheeled 
vehicles and rotorcraft where ring wheel drive technology might 
improve the efficiency of current power and drivetrain systems.

    Special Operations Forces Demand, Priorities, and Over-Reliance

    The committee recognizes the unique capabilities U.S. 
Special Operations Forces (SOF) offer to combatant commanders 
to achieve objectives in their assigned area of operations. The 
committee acknowledges the value of SOF in carrying out 
missions which the general purpose forces are not trained or 
equipped to meet.
    The committee understands that all military operational 
units are pressed to meet current demand and maintain 
readiness, but believes SOF should be preserved for SOF 
specific missions as an elite, highly specialized, and small 
force available for high priority operations. However, the 
committee notes that SOF are increasingly assigned to missions 
more appropriate for general purpose forces, and the committee 
is concerned that the use of SOF for non-SOF specific missions 
may degrade SOF readiness for core missions.
    Therefore, the committee urges the Secretary of Defense to 
review the joint force allocation process in conjunction with 
an assessment of SOF structure, and to recalibrate the 
allocation of forces process as necessary to preserve essential 
readiness of SOF.

     Strategy To Counter Unconventional and Hybrid Warfare Threats

    The committee is concerned by the Department of Defense's 
failure to respond to the requirements of section 1097 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public 
Law 114-92). The committee continues to hear in open testimony 
from outside experts and combatant commanders on the need for a 
whole of government strategy to counter unconventional and 
hybrid threats. For several years, the committee has expressed 
concern over the growing sophistication of unconventional and 
hybrid state-sponsored threats by the Russian Federation, the 
People's Republic of China, and the Islamic Republic of Iran, 
and that these adversaries continue to advance and integrate 
conventional warfare, economic warfare, cyber and information 
operations, intelligence operations, and other activities to 
undermine U.S. national security objectives as well as the 
objectives of U.S. allies.
    Therefore, the committee urges the Secretary of Defense to 
complete the strategy required by section 1097 of Public Law 
114-92 as soon as possible.

      U.S. Efforts to Train, Advise, Assist, and Equip the Iraqi 
    Counterterrorism Service and the Iraqi Special Operations Forces

    The committee has received from the Inspector General of 
the Department of Defense the report entitled, ``An Assessment 
of U.S. and Coalition Plans and Efforts to Train, Advise, 
Assist, and Equip the Iraqi Counterterrorism Service and the 
Iraqi Special Operations Forces'' (DODIG-2017-074). Although 
the report found no statutory anomalies with the implementation 
of Iraqi train and equip efforts, the committee is concerned 
that several findings indicated a lack of accountability with 
materiel and equipment, training standards, and training 
metrics specifically for the Iraqi Counterterrorism Service and 
the Iraqi Special Operations Forces. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by September 1, 2017, on his 
plan to implement the recommendations made in DODIG-2017-074 
concerning efforts to train, advise, assist, and equip the 
Iraqi Counterterrorism Service and the Iraqi Special Operations 
Forces.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                     Subtitle A--Financial Matters


                Section 1001--General Transfer Authority

    This section would allow the Secretary of Defense, with 
certain limitations, to make transfers between amounts 
authorized for fiscal year 2018 in division A of this Act. This 
section would limit the total amount transferred under this 
authority to $5.00 billion. This section would also require 
prompt notification to Congress of each transfer made.

 Section 1002--Preparation of Consolidated Corrective Action Plan and 
             Implementation of Centralized Reporting System

    This section would direct the Under Secretary of Defense 
(Comptroller) to execute two recommendations identified in the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) report, ``DOD Financial 
Management: Significant Efforts Still Needed for Remediating 
Audit Readiness Deficiencies'' (GAO-17-85).

Section 1003--Additional Requirements Relating to Department of Defense 
                                 Audits

    This section changes Section 1003(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (Public 
Law 111-84; 10 U.S.C. 2222 note) regarding audits of the 
Department of Defense.

                Subtitle B--Naval Vessels and Shipyards


              Section 1011--National Defense Sealift Fund

    This section would amend section 2218 of title 10, United 
States Code, and strike the use of the fund for research and 
development related to national defense sealift. Additionally, 
this section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
purchase up to five used vessels, regardless of where 
constructed, for the Ready Reserve Force component on a one-
for-one basis with new vessels authorized by the National 
Defense Sealift Fund. Finally, prior to the purchase of a 
vessel not constructed in the United States, the section would 
require the Secretary to certify that there are no United 
States constructed vessels available for purchase at a 
reasonable price that are suitable for national defense or 
military purposes.

 Section 1012--National Defense Sealift Fund: Construction of National 
                           Icebreaker Vessels

    This section would amend section 2218 of title 10, United 
States Code, and would authorize the obligation and expenditure 
of funds associated with the National Defense Sealift Fund for 
the construction, alteration, and conversion of national 
icebreaker vessels.

 Section 1013--Use of National Sea-Based Deterrence Fund for Multiyear 
               Procurement of Certain Critical Components

    This section would expand the authority of the Secretary of 
the Navy to enter into a multiyear contract for certain 
nuclear-powered vessel components to include missile tubes, 
torpedo tubes, and propulsors.

  Section 1014--Restrictions on the Overhaul and Repair of Vessels in 
                           Foreign Shipyards

    This section would amend section 7310(b)(1) of title 10, 
United States Code, to prohibit the Department of the Navy from 
performing any overhaul, repair, or maintenance work that takes 
longer than 6 months in foreign shipyards.

 Section 1015--Availability of Funds for Retirement or Inactivation of 
            Ticonderoga-Class Cruisers or Dock Landing Ships

    This section would prohibit the Secretary of the Navy from 
using funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act to retire 
a cruiser or dock landing ship or to place in a modernization 
status more than six cruisers and one dock landing ship.

 Section 1016--Policy of the United States on Minimum Number of Battle 
                              Force Ships

    This section would establish the policy of the United 
States to have available, as soon as practicable, not fewer 
than 355 battle force ships.

                      Subtitle C--Counterterrorism


   Section 1021--Termination of Requirement to Submit Annual Budget 
  Justification Display for Department of Defense Combating Terrorism 
                                Program

    This section would terminate the requirement to submit an 
annual budget justification display for Department of Defense 
combating terrorism programs under section 229 of title 10, 
United States Code, by December 31, 2020.

 Section 1022--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Transfer or Release of 
 Individuals Detained at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, 
                       Cuba to the United States

    This section would prohibit the use of any amounts 
authorized to be appropriated or otherwise made available for 
the Department of Defense to be used during the period 
beginning on the date of the enactment of this Act and ending 
on December 31, 2018, to transfer or release detainees at U.S. 
Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to or within the United 
States, its territories, or possessions.

   Section 1023--Prohibition on Use of Funds to Construct or Modify 
  Facilities in the United States to House Detainees Transferred from 
           United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

    This section would prohibit the use of any amounts 
authorized to be appropriated or otherwise made available for 
the Department of Defense to be used during the period 
beginning on the date of the enactment of this Act and ending 
on December 31, 2018, to construct or modify any facility in 
the United States, its territories, or possessions to house any 
detainee transferred from United States Naval Station, 
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for the purposes of detention or 
imprisonment in the custody or under the effective control of 
the Department of Defense.

 Section 1024--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Transfer or Release of 
 Individuals Detained at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, 
                       Cuba, to Certain Countries

    This section would prohibit the use of any amounts 
authorized to be appropriated or otherwise made available for 
the Department of Defense to be used during the period 
beginning on the date of the enactment of this Act and ending 
on December 31, 2018, to transfer, release, or assist in the 
transfer or release of any individual detained at U.S. Naval 
Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to Libya, the Federal Republic 
of Somalia, the Syrian Arab Republic, or the Republic of Yemen.

   Section 1025--Biannual Report on Support of Special Operations to 
                            Combat Terrorism

    This section would modify the biannual reporting 
requirements located in section 127e(g) of title 10, United 
States Code.

         Subtitle D--Miscellaneous Authorities and Limitations


  Section 1031--Limitation on Expenditure of Funds for Emergency and 
   Extraordinary Expenses for Intelligence and Counter-Intelligence 
                Activities and Representation Allowances

    This section would modify section 127 of title 10, United 
States Code, to include an additional notification requirement 
for intelligence and counter-intelligence activities.

    Section 1032--Modifications to Humanitarian Demining Assistance 
                              Authorities

    This section would modify section 407, of title 10, United 
States Code, to remove ``stockpiled conventional munitions'' 
from the limitations of training opportunities with partner 
nations. This section would also modify the definitions of 
``humanitarian demining assistance'' and ``stockpiled 
conventional munitions assistance.''

  Section 1033--Prohibition on Charge of Certain Tariffs on Aircraft 
                    Traveling through Channel Routes

    This section would prohibit U.S. Transportation Command 
from charging a tariff when a military service uses their 
aircraft on a route that is designated by U.S. Transportation 
Command as a channel route.

     Section 1034--Limitation on Divestment of U-2 or RQ-4 Aircraft

    This section would repeal section 133 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 (Public Law 112-
81), regarding limitation on retirement of U-2 aircraft, and 
would prohibit the Department of Defense from retiring either 
U-2 or RQ-4 aircraft until at least fiscal year 2024.

  Section 1035--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Retirement of Legacy 
                Maritime Mine Countermeasures Platforms

    This section would prohibit the Secretary of the Navy from 
obligating or expending funds to deactivate, decommission, or 
place in reduced operating status any mine countermeasures 
ships or Sea Dragon (MH-53) helicopters. The limitation in this 
section may be waived if the Secretary of the Navy certifies 
that the replacement mine countermeasures capabilities are 
available in sufficient quantity and capacity to meet the 
combatant commander requirements that are currently fulfilled 
by legacy mine countermeasures platforms.

Section 1036--Restriction on Use of Certain Funds Pending Solicitation 
                  of Bids for Western Pacific Dry Dock

    This section would withhold funding for the Office of 
Secretary of the Navy until a request for proposal for a dry 
dock in the Western Pacific has been issued.

         Section 1037--National Guard Flyovers of Public Events

    This section would require that National Guard flyovers of 
public events be flown only as part of an approved training 
mission and would make the Adjutant General the approval 
authority for all Air National Guard and Army National Guard 
flyovers in a state or territory.

  Section 1038--Transfer of Funds to World War I Centennial Commission

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
transfer funding to the World War I Centennial Commission to 
assist the Commission in carrying out activities in support of 
the World War I Centennial Commission Act.

   Section 1039--Rule of Construction Regarding Use of Department of 
                    Defense Funding of a Border Wall

    This section would prohibit funds authorized to be 
appropriated or otherwise made available for fiscal year 2018 
for the Department of Defense to be used to plan, develop, or 
construct any barriers, including walls or fences along the 
international border of the United States.

                    Subtitle E--Studies and Reports


 Section 1051--Elimination of Reporting Requirements Terminated After 
  November 25, 2017, Pursuant to Section 1080 of the National Defense 
                 Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016

    This section makes technical and conforming edits to 
reflect the termination of certain Department of Defense 
reporting requirements pursuant to section 1080 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92), as amended by section 1061 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328).

  Section 1052--Report on Department of Defense Arctic Capability and 
                             Resource Gaps

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a report, not later than 90 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, to the congressional defense committees 
detailing the Department of Defense's efforts to resolve arctic 
security capability and resource gaps.

Section 1053--Review and Assessment of Department of Defense Personnel 
       Recovery and Nonconventional Assisted Recovery Mechanisms

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
submit to the congressional defense committees a review and 
assessment of personnel recovery and nonconventional assisted 
recovery programs, authorities, and policies not later than 
March 1, 2018.

    Section 1054--Mine Warfare Readiness Inspection Plan and Report

    This section would require the Navy to submit a plan for a 
readiness inspection of naval mine warfare units and report to 
Congress on the results after the first inspection has been 
completed. This section also repeals section 1090 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public 
Law 114-92).

Section 1055--Report on Civilian Casualties from Department of Defense 
                                Strikes

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit to the congressional defense committees a report on 
strikes carried out by the Department of Defense against 
terrorist targets.

   Section 1056--Reports on Infrastructure and Capabilities of Lajes 
                            Field, Portugal

    This section requires the Department of Defense to submit 
to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House 
of Representatives reports relating to Lajes Field, Portugal.

      Section 1057--Report on Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex 
                             Modernization

    This section would require the Secretary of the Air Force 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees 
regarding proposed improvements to the Joint Pacific Alaska 
Range Complex within 120 days after the date of enactment of 
this Act.

                       Subtitle F--Other Matters


      Section 1061--Technical, Conforming, and Clerical Amendments

    This section would make a number of technical and clerical 
amendments of a non-substantive nature to existing law.

    Section 1062--Workforce Issues for Relocation of Marines to Guam

    This section would amend section 1806 of title 48, United 
States Code, to permit the Director, U.S. Citizenship and 
Immigration Services, to approve H-2B visa applications and 
renewals through October 1, 2020, for contractors performing 
work on the Territory of Guam for the construction program 
supporting the realignment of U.S. Marines to Guam.

    Section 1063--Protection of Second Amendment Rights of Military 
                                Families

    This section would require for the purposes of federal 
firearms laws that the residency of members of the armed forces 
and their spouses be determined in the same manner.

   Section 1064--Transfer of Surplus Firearms to Corporation for the 
            Promotion of Rifle Practice and Firearms Safety

    This section would require the Secretary of the Army to 
transfer surplus firearms to the Corporation for the Promotion 
of Rifle Practice and Firearms Safety. This section also would 
terminate the pilot program established in section 1087 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public 
Law 113-66).

  Section 1065--National Guard Accessibility to Department of Defense 
                        Issued Unmanned Aircraft

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Chief of the National Guard Bureau, the 
Commander, U.S. Northern Command, and the Commander, U.S. 
Pacific Command, to complete an efficiency and effectiveness 
review of the governance structure, coordination processes, 
documentation, and timing requirements stipulated in Department 
of Defense policy memorandum 15-002, titled ``Guidance for the 
Domestic Use of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS).'' This section 
would require the review to be completed not later than 1 year 
after the date of the enactment of this Act and the Secretary 
of Defense to submit the review to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives not 
later than 30 days after its completion. This section also 
would require the aforementioned officials to consider 
information and data points from State governors and State 
adjutant generals related to their assessment of the efficiency 
and effectiveness of accessing Department of Defense UASes for 
State and National Guard operations.

      Section 1066--Sense of Congress Regarding Aircraft Carriers

    This section would express the sense of Congress that U.S. 
aircraft carriers are the preeminent power projection platform 
and have served the Nation's interests in times of war and in 
times of peace, adapting to the immediate and ever-changing 
nature of the world for over 90 years.

  Section 1067--Notice to Congress of Terms of Department of Defense 
                         Settlement Agreements

    This section would require that, upon the request of the 
chairman of a specified committee, the Secretary of Defense 
shall make available to that chairman a settlement agreement in 
a civil action involving the Department of Defense, a military 
department, or a Defense Agency, if, in the opinion of the 
Secretary, in consultation with the Attorney General, the terms 
of such settlement agreement could affect the congressional 
authorization or appropriations process with respect to the 
Department of Defense.

  Section 1068--Sense of Congress Recognizing the United States Navy 
                                Seabees

    This section would establish a sense of congress that 
recognizes the Navy Seabees and Navy personnel who comprise the 
construction force for the Navy and Marine Corps as critical 
elements in deterring conflict, overcoming aggression, and 
rebuilding democratic institutions.

   Section 1069--Recognition of the United States Special Operations 
                                Command

    This section recognizes contributions made by the U.S. 
Special Operations Command.

         Section 1070--Sense of Congress Regarding World War I

    This section would provide a sense of Congress to honor 
those members of the United States Armed Forces who served in 
the First World War.

  Section 1071--Findings and Sense of Congress Regarding the National 
                     Guard Youth Challenge Program

    This section would express findings and a sense of Congress 
regarding the National Guard Youth Challenge Program and its 
critical role in preparing qualified youth for military 
service.

    Section 1072--Sense of Congress Regarding National Purple Heart 
                            Recognition Day

    The section would express the sense of Congress that the 
citizens of the United States should learn about the history of 
the Purple Heart medal and conduct programs to support Purple 
Heart medal recipients.

                  TITLE XI--CIVILIAN PERSONNEL MATTERS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


                     Accelerated Promotion Program

    The committee is aware that the U.S. Office of Personnel 
Management (OPM) formally approved the Navy's request to 
establish a Naval Shipyards Engineer Accelerated Promotion 
Program in December 2016, about 11 months after the Navy Office 
of Civilian Human Resources directed naval shipyards to cease 
accelerated promotions. The program is intended to help the 
shipyards address geographically unique circumstances, such as 
major in-state competitors or a single in-state university with 
an engineering program from which to recruit. Given the 
criticality of engineers to the shipyards' effective planning 
and efficient and timely completion of ship maintenance 
availabilities, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to brief the House Committee on Armed Services on the history 
of the Accelerated Promotion Program and what consideration was 
given to making accelerated promotions retroactive for shipyard 
engineers hired between January 2016 and December 2016, 
including any statutory or regulatory impediments to 
implementation.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


 Section 1101--Extension of Direct Hire Authority for Domestic Defense 
  Industrial Base Facilities and Major Range and Test Facilities Base

    This section would extend the temporary direct hiring 
authority granted in section 1125 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) 
until September 30, 2021.

 Section 1102--Extension of Authority to Provide Voluntary Separation 
   Incentive Pay for Civilian Employees of the Department of Defense

    This section would extend the temporary increase in 
Voluntary Separation Incentive Pay granted in section 1107 of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 
(Public Law 114-328) until September 30, 2021.

 Section 1103--Additional Department of Defense Science and Technology 
                        Reinvention Laboratories

    This section would revise and update the list of 
laboratories designated as Science and Technology Reinvention 
Laboratories, to include the Naval Medical Research Center and 
the Joint Warfighting Analysis Center.

     Section 1104--One-Year Extension of Authority to Waive Annual 
 Limitation on Premium Pay and Aggregate Limitation on Pay for Federal 
                  Civilian Employees Working Overseas

    This section would amend section 1101 of the Duncan Hunter 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009 (Public 
Law 110-417) to extend the authority to waive the annual 
limitation on premium pay and aggregate limitation on pay for 
Federal civilian employees working overseas until September 30, 
2018.

  Section 1105--Appointment of Retired Members of the Armed Forces to 
            Positions In or Under the Department of Defense

    This section would amend section 3326 of title 5, United 
States Code, to allow the Secretary of Defense to appoint 
recently retired members of the Armed Forces to fill emergency 
needs.

Section 1106--Direct Hire Authority for Financial Management Experts in 
                  the Department of Defense Workforce

    This section would amend section 1110 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328) to expand the number of Department of Defense components 
that may hire financial management experts using direct hire 
authority.

     Section 1107--Extension of Authority for Temporary Personnel 
Flexibilities for Domestic Defense Industrial Base Facilities and Major 
           Range and Test Facilities Base Civilian Personnel

    This section would amend subsection (a) of section 1132 of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 
(Public Law 114-328) to extend authority for temporary civilian 
personnel flexibilities for domestic defense industrial base 
facilities and Major Range and Test Facilities through fiscal 
year 2021.

   Section 1108--One-Year Extension of Temporary Authority to Grant 
Allowances, Benefits, and Gratuities to Civilian Personnel on Official 
                         Duty in a Combat Zone

    This section would amend section 1133 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328) to extend temporary authority to grant allowances, 
benefits, and gratuities to civilian personnel on official duty 
in a combat zone through fiscal year 2019.

             TITLE XII--MATTERS RELATING TO FOREIGN NATIONS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


 Assessment of Freedom of Navigation Operations in the South China Sea

    The committee supports recent Freedom of Navigation 
Operations (FONOP) in the South China Sea that challenge 
arbitrary limitations that are in contravention of the United 
Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in consultation 
with the Secretary of State, to provide a report to the 
congressional defense committees, the Committee on Foreign 
Affairs of the House of Representatives, and the Committee on 
Foreign Relations of the Senate, not later than November 30, 
2017, that outlines U.S. policy and strategy regarding freedom 
of navigation in the global commons and a plan for conducting 
FONOPs in the South China Sea with regularity and frequency. 
The report shall be submitted in unclassified form but may 
contain a classified annex.

   Attacks on U.S. Armed Forces Personnel by Partner Nation Security 
                                 Forces

    U.S. military operations to train, advise, and assist 
missions conducted by our partner nation security forces are a 
core element of U.S. efforts to enhance security. Nevertheless, 
the committee is concerned by the incidence of attacks on U.S. 
military personnel by individuals affiliated with partner 
nation security forces, so-called ``insider'' or ``green-on-
blue'' attacks.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and House of Representatives by March 1, 2018 on the 
Department's efforts to mitigate the risk of attacks on U.S. 
military personnel working with partner nation security forces. 
The report should include:
    (1) A description of each insider attack on U.S. Armed 
Forces since September 2001, to include the date, location, 
U.S. and partner nation security forces involved, associated 
casualties (both U.S. and partner forces), and a description of 
the circumstances surrounding each incident.
    (2) A description of any training received or procedures 
implemented by U.S. Armed Forces to mitigate the risk of 
insider attacks (to include cultural awareness training).
    (3) A description of any vetting procedures undertaken by 
U.S. and partner nation security forces to identify possible 
insider threats.
    (4) Any recommendations the Secretary may have to further 
counter insider threats.

 Briefing on the Role of the Russian Military in Influence Operations 
Targeting Democratic Elections and Disruption of Military Alliances and 
                              Partnerships

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Secretary of State and the Director of 
National Intelligence, to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than October 1, 2017 on 
the role of the Russian military in influence operations and 
campaigns conducted by the Russian Federation targeting 
democratic elections and disruption of military alliances and 
partnerships of which the United States is a member. At a 
minimum, the briefing should include;
    (a) An assessment of the Russian Federation's objectives in 
influence campaigns targeting democratic elections and 
disruption of military alliances and partnerships of which the 
United States is a member and how they relate to the Russian 
Federation's broader strategic objectives;
    (b) The role of the Russian military in influence 
operations supporting such campaigns;
    (c) Identification of the Russian military's tactics, 
techniques, and procedures used in influence operations 
supporting such campaigns;
    (d) Identification of foreign countries with democratic 
elections systems that may be targeted in future influence 
operations and campaigns by the Russian Federation, an 
assessment of the likelihood each such foreign country will be 
targeted, and an analysis of the potential strategic advantage 
gained by the Russian Federation by targeting those foreign 
countries;
    (e) Identification of the Russian military's tactics, 
techniques, and procedures used in influence operations that 
are likely to be applied in future influence campaigns 
targeting democratic elections and disruption of military 
alliances and partnerships of which the United States is a 
member;
    (f) An assessment of the Russian Federation's perception 
and understanding of the security objectives of military 
alliances and partnerships of which the United States is a 
member and how that perception or understanding shapes the 
Russian Federation's intelligence collection and influence 
operations and campaigns; and
    (g) Identification of any gaps in intelligence and warnings 
and recommendations to address such gaps.

                     Countering Russian Aggression

    The committee remains concerned about a resurgent, 
revanchist Russian Federation. Over the past decade and more 
acutely in the past 3 years, Russia has intervened in the 
Syrian Arab Republic, illegally occupied and attempted to annex 
Crimea, fomented conflict in eastern Ukraine through the 
direction of combined Russian-separatist forces, interfered in 
democratic elections in the United States and Europe, conducted 
propaganda campaigns to undermine the legitimacy of democratic 
governments, and aggressively sought to expand its global 
influence and undermine international norms and organizations.
    The committee remains committed to reassuring our European 
partners and allies through the development, implementation, 
and sustainment of an effective, credible deterrent to Russian 
aggression, as well as measures to proactively address the 
danger Russia poses to international principles and 
institutions. The committee encourages the Department of 
Defense and other executive agencies to focus their manpower, 
resources, and capabilities toward the development a cohesive 
strategy.

                Counterterrorism Effectiveness Research

    The committee recognizes that broad basic research into the 
effectiveness of counterterrorism policies and strategy is 
critical to informing and shaping future strategies. The 
committee believes that there is currently a wide range of 
social science research in these areas that should be 
leveraged, including better use of and integration with 
existing research by organizations maintaining databases of 
terrorism incidents globally.
    For example, the National Consortium for the Study of 
Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START) is a university-
based research and education center. The center is comprised of 
an international network of scholars committed to the 
scientific study of the causes and human consequences of 
terrorism in the United States and around the world. START 
supports the research efforts of leading social scientists at 
more than 50 academic and research institutions across the 
country and the globe and is headquartered at the University of 
Maryland with partner institutions around the United States, 
including the University of Nebraska.
    The committee is aware the START program supports more than 
14 terrorism and counterterrorism related datasets that are 
used across civilian and defense agencies including the 
Departments of Homeland Security and Department of Defense to 
directly inform international, federal, state and local 
training and educational programs. However, the budget request 
for fiscal year 2018 for the Department of Homeland Security 
does not include funding for this effort.
    Therefore, the committee urges the Department of Defense to 
foster academically rigorous studies of terrorism, like the 
START initiative, to provide a foundational understanding for 
how to assess the effectiveness of specific counterterrorism 
program of the Department of Defense, and best practices to 
inform the Department of Defense's counterterrorism policies.

          Critical Shortfalls in the Indo-Asia-Pacific Region

    The committee remains concerned about existing shortfalls 
in critical preferred munitions inventories and the potential 
impacts this could have on the ability of the Armed Forces to 
perform required missions. The committee notes that all the 
military services have expressed concerns about having 
insufficient preferred munition stockpiles to meet global 
combatant command contingency requirements, and the committee 
believes this situation to be amplified for missions in the 
Indo-Asia-Pacific region. The committee recognizes that 
improvements in munition stockpiles and munition capacity will 
require sustained long-term investment, and notes the budget 
request does provide funding that will increase production 
capacity for certain high-priority munitions like Joint Direct 
Attack Munitions and Small Diameter Bombs. The committee 
expects the Department of Defense to continue to prioritize 
investment for critical munition capabilities such as long-
range anti-ship weapons, advanced air-to-air munitions, theater 
ballistic missile defense, and torpedoes. The committee also 
expects the Department to plan and program for improvements in 
munition prepositioning arrangements, infrastructure for 
munitions storage and security, and logistical requirements for 
critical munitions, specifically in the Indo-Asia-Pacific 
region.

                Cultural Preservation in Armed Conflict

    The committee recognizes Department of Defense policy, 
including the Department Directive 2311.01E, ``Department of 
Defense Law of War Program,'' which states it is Department 
policy to comply with the law of war during all armed conflicts 
and in all other military operations, including treaties and 
international agreements to which the United States is a party, 
such as the 1954 Hague Convention for the Protection of 
Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict. The committee 
is encouraged by actions the Department has taken to protect 
cultural property, including its training, education, and 
cataloging efforts as discussed in the Department's 2015 report 
relating to the protection of cultural property in the event of 
armed conflict, required by section 1273 of the Carl Levin and 
Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-291). However the 
committee remains concerned that the development, application, 
and oversight of policy and principles for cultural 
preservation in armed conflict remains inconsistent.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
September 29, 2017, that identifies:
    (1) the specific Assistant Secretary of Defense or Deputy 
Assistant Secretary of Defense responsible for managing and 
evaluating compliance with the 1954 Hague Convention and other 
relevant law of war requirements;
    (2) the offices and agencies within the Department that 
have responsibility for obtaining information related to 
safeguarding cultural heritage sites during armed conflict and 
other military operations;
    (3) the funding mechanisms that the Department uses, or 
would plan to use, to obtain relevant cultural heritage 
information; and
    (4) any other information the Secretary deems relevant.

        Defense Support to the Global Engagement Center Mission

    The committee recognizes that operating in the information 
environment will be an increasingly important task for the 
Department of Defense in dealing with future conflicts and 
national security contingencies. The Department of Defense 
Strategy for Operations in the Information Environment, dated 
June 2016, provided a rudimentary framework for trying to 
prepare for these kinds of operations. The key tenets of this 
strategy remain relevant, including the importance of 
information operations in all phases of future operations; the 
need for policies and procedures that can manage information 
activities appropriately across the spectrum of conflict; the 
need for intelligence support to conduct effective information 
operations; the need for increased resources and informed 
resource prioritization to provide key capabilities, personnel 
and approaches; and coordination of influence activities with 
the interagency and international partners.
    In order to meet those goals, and many of the specific 
tasks needed to develop the ways to conduct operations in the 
information environment, the Department will need to place 
increased attention and resources to build the workforce, 
technological capabilities and operational concepts, as well as 
coordinate with technology companies. The Department is already 
renewing its emphasis on traditional information operations 
programs, but the committee also believes that the Department 
should also actively explore how to, deconflict, contribute to, 
as well as reap the benefits from, interagency and technology 
companies activities in this space. For example, the committee 
is aware that the Global Engagement Center (GEC) within the 
Department of State is tasked with countering violent extremist 
groups, as well as addressing threats posed by state-sponsored 
and state-directed propaganda and misinformation activities. As 
noted elsewhere in this report, the committee supports the 
activities of the GEC, including through the development of a 
strategy for fulfilling its roles and responsibilities. The 
committee also believes that the Department should find 
opportunities to increase support for, cooperation with, and 
integration of efforts with the GEC. Increased cooperation 
would help with integrating military and non-military efforts, 
but also develop other pathways for career opportunity and 
advancement that don't currently exist. Additionally, such 
actions might also help ameliorate many of the challenges 
described in testimony before the committee, such as ``lack of 
accountability and oversight, bureaucracy resulting in 
insufficient levels of resourcing, and the inability to absorb 
cutting edge information and analytic tools, and access to 
highly skilled personnel.''
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Armed Services Committee by 
February 15, 2018 assessing the opportunities for support of 
and integration with the Global Engagement Center to address 
similar missions. This briefing should include identification 
of personnel or technology that has been or is being shared 
with the GEC, any requests for personnel or resources to the 
Department from the GEC, identification of training or exercise 
opportunities that might be beneficial for integrating GEC 
participation, and assessment of requirements being generated 
by the GEC for personnel or capabilities needs for future 
years. Further, the report shall include coordination with 
technology companies, specifically on understanding their 
efforts to make platforms hostile to propaganda and violent 
extremism.

      Department of Defense Briefing on Crisis Response in Africa

    The committee is concerned about the ability of the 
Department of Defense to provide rapid response to crises in 
Africa. The committee is aware that with current force posture 
and resources, the United States may be accepting a high level 
of risk in fulfilling crisis response support for U.S. posts 
that have been determined to be ``high risk, high threat'' as 
part of the ``New Normal'' requirements, as well as in 
responding to other emergent threats. Moreover, the committee 
is concerned that U.S. Africa Command may not have sufficient 
forces, enablers, and other resources to meet the ``New 
Normal'' requirements, particularly with the reduction in the 
force structure of the Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task 
Force-Crisis Response-Africa, while also meeting other 
requirements.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than October 31, 2017, on the Department's assessment 
of its ability to respond to ``New Normal'' and other crisis 
response requirements in Africa, and courses of action to 
reduce risk.

               DTRA International Countering WMD-Program

    The committee notes with approval that the Defense Threat 
Reduction Agency (DTRA) conducts programs to improve the 
ability of partner nations to respond to the spread of 
infectious disease, whether naturally occurring or the product 
of biological attack. In support of this work, Section 1241 of 
the Fiscal Year 2017 National Defense Authorization Act 
expanded DTRA authority to conduct these programs by 
authorizing the Secretary of Defense to support programs that 
build the capacity of foreign military forces to conduct 
several types of operations, including counter-WMD and border 
security. By working with partners in Africa and Asia, these 
DTRA programs contribute to the national strategy for 
countering weapons of mass destruction, including biological 
attack and pandemic because stopping the spread of disease 
early in an outbreak protects national security and saves 
lives. Therefore, the committee directs the Director of the 
DTRA, to brief the House Armed Services Committee not later 
than September 30, 2017, on the agency's planned activities to 
promote the ability of partner nations to respond to WMD, 
including infectious disease.

        Forward-Stationed Combat Aviation Brigade in South Korea

    The committee supports the Army's decision to retain a 
combat aviation brigade in the Republic of Korea. The committee 
was earlier concerned that the Army's plan to begin rotational 
sourcing in 2019 to meet the combat aviation brigade 
requirement in South Korea would present a significant risk in 
capabilities required for major contingencies, given terrain 
and aviation mission complexities in South Korea.

                        Global Engagement Center

    The committee remains concerned by the increasing 
prevalence of propaganda, disinformation, and influence 
activities aimed at undermining the decision-making of the 
Department of Defense and confidence in its actions. For 
several years, the committee has supported increasing the 
Department of Defense's focus and attention on these matters. 
To that end, the committee has directed actions to develop a 
strategy for operating in the information environment, pressed 
for technology development efforts to support this mission set, 
and issued clear guidance to help direct military information 
support operations.
    The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 
(Public Law 114-328) included a provision to authorize and 
expand the mission of the Global Engagement Center (GEC) within 
the Department of State beyond countering violent extremist 
groups to also address state-sponsored and state-directed 
propaganda and misinformation activities. Recent news of 
Russian efforts to influence elections in the United States and 
Europe, as well as its continued support of state-run media and 
proxy groups, highlights the need to focus attention and 
resources on state-sponsored challenges to our national 
security. The committee continues to support the efforts by the 
GEC to address messaging of violent extremist groups, but 
believes that the methodologies, tools, and expertise developed 
in that fight can be adapted to address state-sponsored 
misinformation campaigns.
    The committee believes that the GEC should exert greater 
leadership to better coordinate, synchronize, and leverage 
interagency capabilities in order to lead and coordinate this 
mission area across the Federal Government. In taking a long-
term view, the committee believes the GEC should begin to 
develop a strategy for fulfilling its roles and 
responsibilities for the recently expanded mission. The 
strategy should include identification of additional required 
resources, personnel, authorities, and capabilities. The 
strategy should also include milestones for continually 
evaluating and assessing the effectiveness of efforts and 
available resources, and ensure transparency through regular 
updates to key stakeholders. The strategy should also evaluate 
how the GEC should leverage commercially available technology 
to enhance its mission's capability. Further, the committee 
encourages the Department of Defense to be involved with this 
strategy in order to find ways to leverage the authorities, 
people, and funding for mutual benefit.

   Global Theater Security Cooperation Management Information System

    The committee is concerned that the functionality and 
effectiveness of the Global Theater Security Cooperation 
Management Information System (G-TSCMIS) are hindered by the 
lack of timely and regular input of high-quality security 
cooperation event information. The value and functionality of 
G-TSCMIS for all users is directly related to the input of 
information by those responsible across the Department of 
Defense. Inconsistent and late information creates an 
inaccurate global operating picture of security cooperation 
activities, thus hampering data analysis, planning, monitoring, 
and resource allocation decisions. Further, the committee 
believes that G-TSCMIS should be considered as a means to 
capture and disseminate security cooperation assessment, 
monitoring, and evaluation information, including lessons 
learned.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Policy, in coordination with the Deputy Chief 
Management Officer, to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than October 1, 2017, on:
    (1) measures the Department can take to improve data entry 
in G-TSCMIS, including recommendations for G-TSCMIS business 
process reengineering to streamline processes;
    (2) other steps to improve the functionality, utility, and 
effectiveness of G-TSCMIS; and
    (3) the potential for incorporation of Assessment, 
Monitoring, and Evaluation functionality in future releases of 
G-TSCMIS, including an assessment of other technical means or 
collaboration opportunities to increase functionality that the 
Department of Defense may be pursuing.
    Elsewhere in this Act, the committee includes a provision 
that would require the Secretary of Defense to submit an 
assessment to the congressional defense committees on the 
effectiveness of measures taken to improve the functionality of 
G-TSCMIS.

           Impact of Foreign Laws on U.S. Defense Contractors

    Partners and allies of the United States are vital to the 
national security of the United States and the world. These 
partnerships and alliances are the bedrock of global stability 
and democratic principles. However, the committee is concerned 
with legislative action by certain U.S. partners and allies to 
prevent citizens and private groups to invest in the U.S. 
defense industrial base. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to brief the House Committee on Armed 
Services, the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, the House 
Committee on Ways and Means, and the House Committee on 
Financial Services, no later than October 1, 2017, on whether 
any U.S. partners and allies have enacted domestic laws which 
have created any adverse consequences for any U.S. defense 
contractors, and, if so, the impact of said laws on such 
contractors, and any policy recommendations the Secretary may 
have to address such laws.

   Implementation of Strategy to Prevent and Respond to Gender-Based 
                                Violence

    The committee is aware of efforts by the Department of 
Defense to implement the ``United States Strategy to Prevent 
and Respond to Gender-Based Violence Globally,'' and 
appreciates the Department's efforts to keep the committee 
apprised of its implementation activities. However, the 
committee remains concerned about the metrics used to assess, 
monitor, and evaluate the activities, programs, and investments 
employed to implement the strategy.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Deputy Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for Stability and Humanitarian Affairs to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than October 2, 2017, on the Department's efforts to 
effectively assess, monitor, and evaluate activities, programs, 
and investments, to include the methodology used in the 
formulation of metrics, related to the ``United States Strategy 
to Prevent and Respond to Gender-Based Violence Globally.''

   Improvements to Transparency in the Technology Release Process in 
                         Foreign Military Sales

    The committee is encouraged by Department of Defense 
initiatives to improve internal Department processes in Foreign 
Military Sales (FMS) and urges the Department to continue to 
seek improvements. The committee is aware that the Deputy 
Secretary of Defense established a Defense Senior Steering 
Group on Arms Transfers and Technology Release in August 2008 
to review and improve the Department's decision-making on arms 
transfers and release of sensitive technology. In July 2010, 
the Deputy Secretary issued a memorandum to revise the 
Department's Technology Security and Foreign Disclosure 
processes, pursuant to the Steering Group's recommendations and 
Presidential Study Directive 8, issued in December 2009. The 
committee is aware that the Defense Security Cooperation Agency 
and the Defense Technology Security Administration engage with 
stakeholders through a variety of means; however, the committee 
remains concerned about the extent to which these organizations 
communicate with industry stakeholders regarding the technology 
release processes. Therefore, the committee directs the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Policy to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services and the House Committee on 
Foreign Affairs not later than October 31, 2017, on 
communication with industry stakeholders on relevant processes 
for considering the release of sensitive technology and steps 
to improve that communication.

           Independent Security Cooperation Evaluation Office

    The committee commends the Department of Defense for 
issuing its policy, Department of Defense Instruction (DODI) 
5132.14, requiring the assessment, monitoring, and evaluation 
of security cooperation programs. High-quality, independent 
evaluations of these programs can reveal important lessons for 
improving the effectiveness of security cooperation programs. 
The committee notes that DODI 5132.14 directs the establishment 
of an independent evaluation office, consistent with 
international best practices. Further, the committee believes 
the establishment of such an office to be an important 
prerequisite to effective implementation of the broader policy. 
To ensure that evaluations are both useful and utilized for 
decision-making, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Policy to provide a briefing to the House Committee 
on Armed Services by October 1, 2017, on its progress toward 
establishing an independent evaluation office.

           NATO Defense Weapon System Development Cooperation

    The committee recognizes the role that NATO defense 
industries have played in weapon systems programs through 
partnerships and supply chain activities. Joint weapon system 
development with NATO defense industries can help maintain 
stability and interoperability with partner defense forces. The 
committee encourages the Department to continue seeking avenues 
to provide the best weapon systems at the best cost for our 
Nation's defense, and when appropriate, leverage NATO defense 
industries to maximize joint force integration and 
interoperability. The committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a briefing on joint weapon system 
development and coordination and interoperability efforts with 
NATO members and defense industries by February 1, 2018.

         Non-Lethal Weapons for European Theater Contingencies

    The committee reaffirms its longstanding support for the 
accelerated development, fielding, and deployment of non-lethal 
technologies. Non-lethal systems are useful for both force 
application and force protection missions, especially in 
ambiguous environments where conflicts simmer below the 
threshold of declared hostilities. The committee notes that 
their employment is consistent with U.S. military strategy and 
helps minimize damage to property and inadvertent civilian 
casualties in the kinds of operational contingencies, including 
irregular warfare and humanitarian crises, in which U.S. forces 
are likely to be engaged. Their use provides commanders with 
additional decision time and space before resorting to lethal 
force, helps mitigate the negative consequences of unintended 
non-combatant injuries and fatalities, and enhances the overall 
prospects of mission success.
    With the challenges posed by grey zone conflicts, irregular 
warfare scenarios that co-mingle military and civilian militia 
forces, and the continuing growth of megacities and other 
expansive urban zones, the committee is concerned that 
insufficient planning, preparation or doctrinal development has 
been focused on the use of and integration of non-lethal 
systems in some of these scenarios. In light of the continuing 
importance of the European Deterrence Initiative (EDI) to 
preventing and deterring hostile actions with Russia, the 
committee believes that increased focus should be placed on how 
best to integrate non-lethal weapons into the strategic 
planning for regional scenarios, as well as the training and 
equipping of regional partner forces.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Chairman of the 
Joint Chiefs of Staff to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by February 1, 2018, on the 
integration of non-lethal weapons planning and training as part 
of EDI. This briefing should examine current contingency 
planning within European Command, and with North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization partners, to determine if the level of 
investment estimated across the Future Years Defense Program is 
sufficient to support those plans, identification of training 
or exercise opportunities for integrating non-lethal weapons 
training and doctrinal development, as well as recommendations 
for ways improving partner nation access to non-lethal systems 
for military, border guard units, or other government 
affiliated units.

 Plan to Enhance Imagery Sharing with Allies in the Asia-Pacific Region

    The committee supports enhancing imagery sharing with 
allies in the Asia-Pacific region to improve joint non-
proliferation, counterproliferation, and ballistic missile 
detection and defense capabilities. The committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the Director of 
National Intelligence, to develop and implement a plan for 
enhancing the sharing of commercial imagery and national 
technical means with the Governments of the Republic of Korea 
and Japan, consistent with the national security of the United 
States and with the protection of sources and methods. The 
committee further directs the Secretary to provide a briefing 
to the House Committee on Armed Services and the House 
Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence on this plan and its 
implementation not later than November 30, 2017.

  Report on Impact of Outsourcing on the U.S. Defense Industrial Base

    The committee has long been concerned with the vitality of 
the U.S. defense industrial base. The committee notes the 
domestic manufacturing sector has been particularly affected by 
the compounding deleterious effects of current market practices 
and business trends regarding outsourcing. The committee 
believes that large-scale outsourcing of U.S. manufacturing 
requirements to receptive foreign countries, such as the 
People's Republic of China, is having a damaging effect on the 
U.S. defense industrial base and could endanger national 
security.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to submit a report to the Committee on Armed 
Services of the House of Representatives by November 1, 2018, 
on the national security implications of private companies that 
outsource their industrial and manufacturing capacities to 
locations outside of the United States. The report shall 
include the following elements:
    (1) an assessment of the material effects of such 
outsourcing on the U.S. defense industrial base;
    (2) an assessment of the national security risks to the 
U.S. defense industrial base of such outsourcing, including the 
integrity of the Department of Defense acquisition system, 
logistics network, or supply chains;
    (3) an assessment of the risks posed by such outsourcing to 
the readiness of U.S. military forces to field a full spectrum 
of military capabilities; and
    (4) the risks posed by such outsourcing and its effects on 
the U.S. defense industrial base to the capacity of the United 
States to sustain a protracted conflict against a near-peer 
adversary.

      Security Cooperation Assessment, Monitoring, and Evaluation

    The committee notes the critical importance of assessment, 
monitoring, and evaluation of security cooperation initiatives. 
Section 1205 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) expressed the sense of 
Congress that the Secretary of Defense should implement an 
assessment, monitoring, and evaluation framework consistent 
with interagency approaches and existing best practices, and 
that it should be sufficiently resourced, and appropriately 
organized and staffed to inform security cooperation planning, 
policies, and resource decisions as well as ensure the 
effectiveness and efficiency of security cooperation efforts. 
The committee expects the Department of Defense will invest 
sufficient resources to ensure that best practices and lessons 
learned are incorporated into security cooperation policy, 
plans, programs, program management, resources, and the 
security cooperation workforce to ensure the best return on 
investment for the Department's security cooperation 
initiatives.

                      Security Cooperation Reform

    The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 
(Public Law 114-328) contained significant and extensive reform 
of security cooperation authorities, programs, and funding of 
the Department of Defense. The security cooperation reforms in 
Public Law 114-328 sought to provide greater clarity and 
consistency about the nature and scope of the Department's 
security cooperation programs and activities to those who plan, 
manage, implement, and conduct oversight of these programs. The 
committee is aware of the Department's initial progress toward 
implementing these reforms.
    Of note, Public Law 114-328 consolidated multiple, similar 
``train and equip'' authorities into a single authority to 
build partner capacity to conduct specific missions identified 
under section 333 of title 10, United States Code. Section 333 
was crafted to synchronize and replace the so-called 
``patchwork of authorities'' that previously existed for 
``train and equip'' and to alleviate inefficiencies in design, 
funding, management, and implementation of such programs. The 
committee urges the Department to overcome bureaucratic 
obstacles that hinder continued progress in aggressively 
implementing the security cooperation reforms in Public Law 
114-328.

           Support for Afghan Special Immigrant Visa Program

    The Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives recognizes the importance of the Afghan Special 
Immigrant Visa (SIV) program and the critical role these 
partners play in assisting the United States mission in 
Afghanistan. The Committee is concerned by reports that the 
United States Embassy in Kabul is close to exhausting available 
visas currently authorized to the program. Failing to authorize 
additional visas would leave threatened local partners in 
serious danger for many additional months beyond current 
processing times sometimes exceeding one year. This exposes 
these individuals and their families to attack, kidnapping, and 
death. The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the Secretary of State, to brief the 
committee on the importance of continuing the SIV program by 
September 30, 2017.

    Support for Other Departments and Agencies of the United States 
  Government that Advance Department of Defense Security Cooperation 
                               Objectives

    Section 385 of title 10, United States Code, authorizes the 
Secretary of Defense to transfer up to $75 million to other 
agencies in the United States Government for foreign assistance 
programs and activities that ``(1) are necessary for the 
effectiveness of one or more programs of the Department of 
Defense relating to security cooperation conducted pursuant to 
an authority in this chapter; and (2) cannot be carried out by 
the Department.'' For example, programs within the United 
States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the 
Department of State to counter violent extremism and terrorism 
may be an appropriate use of funds, if they are identified as a 
requirement by the Department and meet all of the conditions of 
section 385.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than February 1, 2018 on the status of any funds transferred to 
other departments and agencies.

                    Timor Sea Maritime Developments

    The committee recognizes the strategic importance of the 
Indo-Asia-Pacific region and has a strong interest in ensuring 
processes to resolve territorial and maritime disputes are done 
fairly and peacefully in accordance with international law. 
Given the growing and complex regional maritime security issues 
in the Pacific, the committee believes that negotiations 
between Australia and Timor-Leste to establish permanent 
maritime boundaries sends a positive signal to other states in 
the region regarding adherence to a rules-based international 
order. A mutually agreed upon resolution could serve as an 
example for resolving other disputes peacefully and have 
benefits to cooperative maritime efforts in the region. The 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in coordination 
with the Secretary of State, to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services, not later than September 30, 2017, 
on the potential security benefits that may result from the 
Australia-Timor Leste conciliation process and how a peaceful 
resolution to the dispute might affect overall U.S. defense and 
security interests in the region.

                   U.S. Civilian Contractors in Iraq

    The committee notes that U.S. civilian contractors 
supporting the U.S. military in the Republic of Iraq are 
performing services absent a diplomatic agreement that provides 
them with legal and financial safeguards. The committee is 
concerned that U.S. civilian contractors may be subject to visa 
denials, tax collection efforts, and other actions which may 
hinder support to U.S. forces and coalition partners, including 
their ability to provide U.S. forces and coalition partners 
with timely access to critical supplies.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in coordination with the Secretary of State, to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services and the House 
Committee on Foreign Affairs not later than July 31, 2017, on: 
tax collection, visa denials, and other issues that are 
affecting U.S. civilian contractors in Iraq; the impact of such 
issues; and, if necessary, any plans to mitigate such issues.

                U.S. National Security Threats in Africa

    The committee remains concerned about the ability of the 
Department of Defense to address the broad range of current and 
evolving threats to U.S. national security in Africa. Numerous 
security threats challenge the United States and its partners, 
such as stability in Libya, the Federal Republic of Somalia, 
and the Republic of Mali; various terrorist organizations such 
as Al Shabaab, Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, the Islamic 
State of Iraq and the Levant, and Boko Haram; and many others.
    Given the massive size of the continent, the array of 
security challenges, partners that may be unable or unwilling 
to address security challenges, and a constant shortage of 
resources, the Department of Defense and U.S. Africa Command 
must find innovative, effective, and efficient solutions to the 
security challenges they face. Over the previous several years, 
the committee has provided the Department with multiple new or 
revised authorities, as well as significant funding, to address 
these challenges. A comprehensive strategy for achieving the 
Department of Defense's objectives on the continent will better 
enable the Department to address and plan for these challenges, 
as well as assist the committee in its oversight role. The 
committee looks forward to receiving the strategy for U.S. 
defense interests in Africa, as required by section 1273 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public 
Law 114-328), not later than its due date of December 23, 2017.

  Utilizing Unmanned Aircraft Systems for International Humanitarian 
                     Assistance and Disaster Relief

    The Committee understands that over the last decade, 
unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) have increased in both number 
and capability in order to enhance warfighting operations. UAS 
have proven vital to enhancing situational awareness, improving 
mission performance, and minimizing risk to both civilian and 
military personnel within the U.S. Armed Forces.
    The Committee notes that effective use of these 
technologies may also have the potential to improve military 
operations such as Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic 
Aid missions in support of humanitarian crises and disaster 
relief. The Committee is also aware that UAS are being 
increasingly accepted and utilized for international 
humanitarian assistance and disaster relief (HA/DR).
    The Committee believes that while unmanned aircraft systems 
provide the United States' Armed Forces strategic ISR and 
combat capabilities, these systems have additional potential to 
enhance the speed and quality of localized needs assessments, 
and to strengthen and revolutionize humanitarian assistance and 
disaster relief efforts abroad, particularly when it comes to 
mapping, lightweight essential item delivery, damage assessment 
support, and increased situational awareness.
    The Committee therefore directs the Secretary of Defense to 
brief the House Committee on Armed Services and House Committee 
on Foreign Affairs on potential ways in which the Department of 
Defense can support increased utilization of unmanned aircraft 
systems in support of humanitarian assistance and disaster 
relief missions abroad understanding that such platforms are a 
limited, high demand resource. This brief should include the 
viability of UAS in support of these desired operations; 
address the feasibility of information sharing between civil 
authorities and multinational organizations for a common 
humanitarian purpose; determine payload delivery effectiveness 
or limitations; and identify any international regulations or 
jurisdictional constraints, as well as any other topics the 
Secretary deems appropriate, and should be delivered to the 
Committee by October 1, 2017.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS

                  Subtitle A--Assistance and Training


 Section 1201--One-Year Extension of Logistical Support for Coalition 
      Forces Supporting Certain United States Military Operations

    This section would amend section 1234 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008 (Public Law 110-
181), as most recently amended by section 1201 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328), by authorizing the Secretary of Defense to provide 
supplies, services, transportation, and other logistical 
support to coalition forces supporting U.S. operations in the 
Republic of Iraq and the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan during 
fiscal year 2018.

     Section 1202--Modification to Special Defense Acquisition Fund

    This section would amend section 114(c) of title 10, United 
States Code, to clarify the use of funds for the procurement of 
precision guided munitions with the Special Defense Acquisition 
Fund (SDAF).
    Section 1202 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) increased the size of the 
SDAF from $1.07 billion to $2.50 billion. Section 1202(b)(2) 
further required that $500.0 million of the SDAF may only be 
used to procure and stock precision guided munitions that may 
be required by partner and allied forces to enhance the 
effectiveness of their contribution to overseas contingency 
operations conducted or supported by the United States. The 
intent of section 1202(b)(2) was to ensure that once SDAF funds 
were used to purchase $2.00 billion of defense articles or 
services in a fiscal year, the remaining $500.0 million was to 
be used only for the purchase of precision guided munitions. 
Prior to reaching the threshold of $2.00 billion of purchases 
in any fiscal year, SDAF funds may be used to purchase 
precision guided munitions, but are not required to be used to 
purchase precision guided munitions.

  Section 1203--Modification to Ministry of Defense Advisor Authority

    This section would modify section 332 of title 10, United 
States Code, to authorize the Secretary of Defense to assign 
military personnel as advisors or trainers under the Ministry 
of Defense Advisor program to ensure that advisors or trainers 
with the appropriate expertise and skills are assigned to 
improve the institutional capacity of partner nations.

 Section 1204--Modification of Authority to Build Capacity of Foreign 
                            Security Forces

    This section would amend section 333(c) of title 10, United 
States Code, to modify the required elements associated with 
the authority to build partner capacity by allowing human 
rights training conducted by the Department of State to satisfy 
the human rights training requirement, and clarifying the 
requirement regarding respect for civilian control of the 
military and institutional capacity building to ensure that 
both are promoted as part of the capacity building programs of 
the Department of Defense.

 Section 1205--Extension and Modification of Authority on Training for 
Eastern European National Military Forces in the Course of Multilateral 
                               Exercises

    This section would extend the authority provided the 
Secretary of Defense by section 1251 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92), as 
amended by section 1233 of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328), to train eastern 
European national security forces until December 31, 2019. This 
section would also modify the authority to address the payment 
of incremental expenses of partner nations.

 Section 1206--Extension of Participation in and Support of the Inter-
                        American Defense College

    This section would extend for 1 year the authority in 
section 1243(c) of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) with respect to 
participation in and support of the Inter-American Defense 
College.

        Subtitle B--Matters Relating to Afghanistan and Pakistan


 Section 1211--Extension of Authority to Transfer Defense Articles and 
    Provide Defense Services to the Military and Security Forces of 
                              Afghanistan

    This section would extend through December 31, 2018, the 
authority under section 1222 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (Public Law 112-239), as 
amended, to transfer defense articles and provide defense 
services to the military and security forces of the Islamic 
Republic of Afghanistan.

     Section 1212--Report on United States Strategy in Afghanistan

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the Secretary of State, to submit a report to 
the appropriate congressional committees not later than 
February 15, 2018, that describes the strategy of the United 
States in the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. The committee is 
concerned that the Department of Defense does not have a long-
term strategy for U.S. involvement in Afghanistan to complement 
operational planning. A comprehensive strategy should look 
beyond the next five years and should connect current lines of 
effort to a steady state for U.S. involvement in Afghanistan 
that meets U.S. objectives.

Section 1213--Extension and Modification of Authority for Reimbursement 
  of Certain Coalition Nations for Support Provided to United States 
                          Military Operations

    This section would amend section 1233 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008 (Public Law 110-
181), as most recently amended by section 1218 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328), by extending the authority for reimbursement of coalition 
nations for support provided to the United States for military 
operations in the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan through 
December 31, 2018.
    This section would also extend, through December 31, 2018, 
the requirement for the Secretary of Defense to notify the 
appropriate congressional committees prior to making any 
reimbursement to the Government of the Islamic Republic of 
Pakistan for any logistical, military or other support that 
Pakistan provides to the United States.
    Further, this section would extend the requirement for the 
Secretary of Defense to certify, prior to making any 
reimbursement to Pakistan, that Pakistan is maintaining 
security along the Ground Lines of Communication through 
Pakistan, taking demonstrable steps to support counterterrorism 
operations, disrupting cross border attacks, and countering the 
threat of improvised explosive devices.
    This section would specify that, of the total amount of 
reimbursement and support authorized for Pakistan during the 
period beginning on October 1, 2017, and ending on December 31, 
2018, $400.0 million would not be eligible for a national 
security waiver unless the Secretary of Defense certifies that 
Pakistan continues to conduct military operations against the 
Haqqani Network in North Waziristan, is demonstrating 
commitment to preventing the Haqqani network from using North 
Waziristan as a safe haven, and is actively coordinating with 
the Government of Afghanistan to restrict the movement of 
militants, including the Haqqani Network, along the Pakistan-
Afghanistan border.

         Subtitle C--Matters Relating to Syria, Iraq, and Iran


        Section 1221--Report on United States Strategy in Syria

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Secretary of State, to submit a report to 
the appropriate congressional committees not later than 
February 1, 2018, on the U.S. strategy in the Syrian Arab 
Republic. This report would require the Secretary to describe 
and prioritize interests, assess the ambitions of state actors 
in Syria, including the Islamic Republic of Iran, assess the 
threat to U.S. interests posed by Al Qaeda, the Islamic State 
of Iraq and the Levant, and Hezbollah, assess the resources and 
timeline required to achieve U.S. objectives, describe the 
transition from military operations to stabilization 
programming, and evaluate the risk to U.S. forces.
    The committee understands that the political and military 
situation in Syria is unpredictable and that the nature of U.S. 
involvement may change as the result of such volatility. The 
committee, however, believes it important to articulate the 
United States' strategic objectives and describe a realistic 
process for achieving such objectives.

   Section 1222--Extension and Modification of Authority to Provide 
     Assistance to Counter the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant

    This section would extend section 1236 of the Carl Levin 
and Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-291), as most recently 
amended by section 1222 of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328), which authorizes 
the Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of 
State, to provide $1.3 billion in assistance in fiscal year 
2018 to the military and other security forces of, or 
associated with, the Government of the Republic of Iraq, 
including Kurdish and Sunni tribal security forces or other 
local security forces with a national security mission, through 
December 31, 2019. This section would also require a quarterly 
progress report that would detail the security in liberated 
areas in Iraq, the preparedness of the Iraqi Security Forces to 
conduct stabilization operations, and a description of the 
forces providing security in liberated areas.
    The committee notes that an inclusive and representative 
Iraq is critical to achieving U.S. counterterrorism objectives 
and that Iraq must take meaningful steps to ensure that 
minorities' interests are represented by the central 
Government. The committee encourages the Government of Iraq to 
pursue efforts to include and promote ethnic and sectarian 
minorities in the Iraqi Security Forces, and to ensure that 
defense equipment and materiel are getting to Sunni, Kurdish, 
and Christian groups, including the minority groups of the 
Nineveh Plain that have a national security mission. To that 
end, this section would express the sense of congress that the 
United States should provide arms, training, and appropriate 
equipment to vetted elements of the Nineveh Plain Council.
    The committee notes that funding provided to the Kurdish 
Regional Government (KRG) is to enhance Government of Iraq-KRG 
cooperation and support a unified effort to counter the Islamic 
State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). Such funding should be 
contingent upon KRG participation in the government of a 
unified Iraq and on their continued good faith cooperation in 
the anti-ISIL campaign.

   Section 1223--Extension and Modification of Authority to Support 
Operations and Activities of the Office of Security Cooperation in Iraq

    This section would amend section 1215 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 (Public Law 112-
81), as most recently amended by section 1223 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328), by extending the authority for the Office of Security 
Cooperation in the Republic of Iraq (OSC-I) for 1 year through 
fiscal year 2018.

 Section 1224--Sense of Congress on Threats Posed by the Government of 
                                  Iran

    This section would express the sense of Congress that the 
United States should counter the Islamic Republic of Iran's 
malign activities in the Middle East; maintain a capable 
military presence in the Arabian Gulf region to deter, and, if 
necessary, respond to Iranian aggression; strengthen ballistic 
missile defense capabilities; ensure freedom of navigation 
through the Bab al Mandab and the Strait of Hormuz; and, renew 
focus on countering Iranian efforts to illicitly proliferate 
weapons in the region.

         Subtitle D--Matters Relating to the Russian Federation


 Section 1231--Extension of Limitation on Military Cooperation between 
              the United States and the Russian Federation

    This section would extend, by 1 year, section 1232 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public 
Law 114-328). This section would limit the use of fiscal year 
2018 funds for bilateral military-to-military cooperation 
between the Governments of the United States and the Russian 
Federation until the Secretary of Defense, in coordination with 
the Secretary of State, provides a certification to the 
appropriate congressional committees relating to certain 
actions by Russia. This section would also allow the Secretary 
of Defense to waive the limitation under certain conditions.

    Section 1232--Prohibition on Availability of Funds Relating to 
           Sovereignty of the Russian Federation over Crimea

    This section would extend by 1 year the prohibition imposed 
by section 1245 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-270), as amended by section 
1234 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2017 (Public Law 114-328). This section would prohibit the use 
of fiscal year 2018 funds to implement any activity that 
recognizes the sovereignty of the Russian Federation over 
Crimea. This section would allow the Secretary of Defense, in 
concurrence with the Secretary of State, to waive the 
prohibition if the Secretary determines that doing so would be 
in the national security interest of the United States and 
submits a notification to the Committees on Armed Services of 
the Senate and the House of Representatives, the Committee on 
Foreign Relations of the Senate, and the Committee on Foreign 
Affairs of the House of Representatives.

      Section 1233--Statement of Policy on the Russian Federation

    This section would state that it is the policy of the 
United States to sustain credible deterrence against aggression 
by the Government of the Russian Federation in order to enhance 
regional and global security and stability. The section would 
also include a series of findings highlighting continued 
aggression and intimidation by the Russian Federation against 
U.S. allies and partners in Europe.

Section 1234--Modification and Extension of Ukraine Security Assistance 
                               Initiative

    This section would extend by 1 year section 1250 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public 
Law 114-92), as amended by section 1237 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328), to 
authorize the Secretary of Defense to provide security 
assistance and intelligence support to the Government of 
Ukraine.
    Elsewhere in this Act, the committee includes a provision 
that would authorize $150.0 million to carry out this authority 
in fiscal year 2018.
    As reflected in the past three National Defense 
Authorization Acts, Congress has authorized and encouraged the 
Department of Defense to provide defensive lethal assistance to 
the Government of Ukraine. The committee urges the Department 
to provide defensive lethal assistance to the Government of 
Ukraine to support its efforts to protect and defend its 
territorial integrity.

     Section 1235--Limitation on Availability of Funds Relating to 
                Implementation of the Open Skies Treaty

    This section would prohibit the use of funds authorized to 
be appropriated by this Act, or otherwise made available for 
fiscal year 2018, or any subsequent fiscal year, for Department 
of Defense operations and maintenance, Defense-wide, or 
operations and maintenance, Air Force, to conduct any flight 
for the purposes of implementing the Open Skies Treaty until 
the President submits a plan with respect to such fiscal year 
to the appropriate congressional committees and 7 days have 
elapsed. Such a plan would be required to be developed by the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of 
State, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the 
Director of National Intelligence, and would contain a 
description of the objectives for each Open Skies Treaty flight 
in the upcoming fiscal year. These requirements would terminate 
5 years after the date of enactment of this Act.
    This section would also prohibit the use of funds 
authorized to be appropriated by this Act, or otherwise made 
available for fiscal year 2018, for the digital visual imaging 
system to carry out any activities to modify any U.S. aircraft 
for purposes of implementing the Open Skies Treaty.

 Section 1236--Sense of Congress on Importance of Nuclear Capabilities 
                                of NATO

    This section would make a series of findings and express 
the sense of Congress regarding the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization's nuclear deterrence capability.

         Section 1237--Sense of Congress on Support for Georgia

    This section would express the sense of Congress regarding 
the United States' support for Georgia's sovereignty and 
territorial integrity as well as support for continued 
cooperation between the United States and Georgia.

  Section 1238--Sense of Congress on Support for Estonia, Latvia, and 
                               Lithuania

    This section would express the sense of Congress on U.S. 
support for the Republic of Estonia, the Republic of Latvia, 
and the Republic of Lithuania, including support for their 
sovereignty, concern over aggressive military actions of the 
Russian Federation against these nations, and encouragement for 
further defense cooperation between the United States and these 
nations.

Subtitle E--Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty Preservation 
                              Act of 2017


                       Section 1241--Short Title

    This section would cite this subtitle as the 
``Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty Preservation 
Act of 2017.''

                         Section 1242--Findings

    This section would make a series of findings by Congress 
related to the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty and the 
Russian Federation's violations of that treaty.

 Section 1243--Compliance Enforcement regarding Russian Violations of 
                             the INF Treaty

    This section would make a statement of U.S. policy 
regarding Russian Federation compliance to the Intermediate-
Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty. It would state:
    (1) it is the policy of the United States that the actions 
undertaken by Russia in violation of the INF Treaty constitute 
a material breach of the treaty;
    (2) in light of such a material breach, the United States 
is legally entitled to suspend the operation of the INF Treaty 
in whole or in part for so long as Russia continues to be in 
material breach; and
    (3) for so long as Russia remains in noncompliance with the 
INF Treaty, the United States should take actions to encourage 
a return to compliance, including by providing additional funds 
for certain capabilities identified in section 1243(d) of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public 
Law 114-92) and by seeking additional missile defense assets in 
the European theater to protect United States and North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization forces from missile systems of 
Russia that are in noncompliance with the INF Treaty.
    This section would also make available $50.0 million of the 
funds authorized by this Act for fiscal year 2018, as specified 
in the funding table in division D of this Act, for the 
development of active defenses to counter ground-launched 
missile systems with ranges between 500 and 5,500 kilometers; 
counterforce capabilities to prevent attacks from such 
missiles; and, countervailing strike capabilities identified in 
section 1243(d) of Public Law 114-92.
    Lastly, this section would authorize $25.0 million of the 
funds authorized by this section to be used for activities 
undertaken to carry out research and development activities 
contained elsewhere in this Act.

 Section 1244--Development of INF Range Ground-Launched Missile System

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
establish a program of record to develop a conventional road-
mobile ground-launched cruise missile system with a range of 
between 500 to 5,500 kilometers. This section would further 
require the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees, Committee on Foreign Affairs 
of the House of Representatives, and Committee on Foreign 
Relations of the Senate within 120 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act on the cost, schedule, and feasibility to 
modify existing and planned systems for ground launch with a 
range of between 500 and 5,500 kilometers in order to meet the 
capabilities specified.

 Section 1245--Notification Requirement Related to Russian Federation 
Development of Noncompliant Systems and United States Actions Regarding 
        Material Breach of INF Treaty by the Russian Federation

    This section would state that Congress declares the Russian 
Federation to be in material breach of the Intermediate-Range 
Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty. This section would also require 
the Director of National Intelligence to notify the appropriate 
congressional committees of any development, deployment, or 
test of a system by Russia that the Director determines is 
inconsistent with the INF Treaty within 15 days of the Director 
making such determination. This section would further direct 
the President to submit a report within 15 months after the 
date of the enactment of this Act to the appropriate 
congressional committees that contains a determination by the 
President whether Russia engaged in activity that would be 
considered noncompliant with the INF Treaty during each of the 
3 consecutive 120-day periods following the date of the 
enactment of this Act.
    If the determination is made by the President that Russia 
has engaged in activities considered noncompliant with the INF 
Treaty, this section would provide that the United States, as a 
matter of law, would no longer be bound by the prohibitions set 
forth in Article VI of the INF Treaty.

    Section 1246--Limitation on Availability of Funds to Extend the 
                 Implementation of the New START Treaty

    This section would prohibit any funds authorized to be 
appropriated or otherwise made available for fiscal year 2018 
for the Department of Defense to be obligated or expended to 
extend the implementation of the New Strategic Arms Reduction 
Treaty, unless the President certifies to the appropriate 
congressional committees that the Russian Federation has 
verifiably eliminated all missiles that are in violation of or 
may be inconsistent with the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces 
Treaty.

            Section 1247--Review of RS-26 Ballistic Missile

    This section would direct the President, in consultation 
with the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Defense, the 
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Director of 
National Intelligence to conduct a review of the RS-26 
ballistic missile of the Russian Federation and submit a report 
to the appropriate congressional committees not later than 90 
days after the date of the enactment of this Act.
    Such a report would include a determination of whether the 
RS-26 ballistic missile is covered under the New Strategic Arms 
Reduction Treaty (NST) or would be a violation of the 
Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty because Russia 
has conducted flight tests to ranges prohibited by the INF 
Treaty in more than one warhead configuration. If the President 
determines that the RS-26 ballistic missile is covered under 
the NST, the report would further include a determination 
whether the Russian Federation has agreed that such a system is 
limited under the NST central limits and has agreed to an 
exhibition of such a system.
    If the determination is made that the RS-26 ballistic 
missile is covered under the NST and that Russia has not agreed 
that such a system is limited under the NST or to an exhibition 
under the treaty of the system, the U.S. Government would 
consider such a system to be a violation of the INF Treaty for 
purposes of all policies and decisions.

                       Section 1248--Definitions

    This section would define the terms ``appropriate 
congressional committees'', ``INF Treaty'', ``intelligence 
community'', ``New START Treaty'', and ``Open Skies Treaty'', 
among other terms in this subtitle.

   Subtitle F--Fostering Unity Against Russian Aggression Act of 2017


                       Section 1251--Short Title

    This section would cite this subtitle as the ``Fostering 
Unity Against Russian Aggression Act of 2017''.

              Section 1252--Findings and Sense of Congress

    This section would express the sense of Congress on the 
Russian Federation's ``escalate to de-escalate'' doctrine, 
subversive and destabilizing activities of the Russian 
Federation, the European Deterrence Initiative as a long-term 
investment, and cooperation with North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization (NATO) allies.

  Section 1253--Strategy To Counter Threats by the Russian Federation

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Secretary of State, to submit a strategy 
to the appropriate congressional committees not later than 180 
days after the date of enactment of this Act containing a 
comprehensive strategy to counter threats by the Russian 
Federation.

Section 1254--Strategy To Increase Conventional Precision Strike Weapon 
      Stockpiles in the United States European Command's Areas of 
                             Responsibility

    This section would also require the Secretary of Defense, 
in coordination with the Secretary of State, to submit a 
strategy to the appropriate congressional committees not later 
than April 1, 2018, to increase conventional precision strike 
weapon stockpiles in the United States European Command's Area 
of Responsibility.

Section 1255--Plan To Counter the Military Capabilities of the Russian 
                               Federation

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
develop and implement a plan to counter the military 
capabilities of the Russian Federation and submit the plan to 
the appropriate congressional committees not later than April 
1, 2018.

   Section 1256--Plan To Increase Cyber and Information Operations, 
                        Deterrence, and Defense

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense and the 
Secretary of State to jointly develop and submit a plan to 
increase cyber and information operations deterrence and 
defense to the appropriate committees not later than 180 days 
after the date of enactment of this Act.

   Section 1257--Sense of Congress on Enhancing Maritime Capabilities

    This section would express the sense of Congress on 
enhancing maritime capabilities.

Section 1258--Plan To Reduce the Risks of Miscalculation and Unintended 
           Consequences That Could Precipitate a Nuclear War

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a plan not later than March 1, 2018, to the 
congressional defense committees that includes options to 
reduce the risk of miscalculation and unintended consequences 
that could precipitate a nuclear war.

                       Section 1259--Definitions

    This section would define the terms ``appropriate 
congressional committees''', and ``NATO''.

      Subtitle G--Matters Relating to the Indo-Asia-Pacific Region


    Section 1261--Sense of Congress on the Indo-Asia-Pacific Region

    This section would express the sense of Congress that the 
United States has a national interest in maintaining the 
stability and security of the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. It 
expresses that the United States should maintain a military 
capability to deter acts of aggression and respond to regional 
threats. It expresses that continuing efforts to realign 
forces, commit additional assets, and increase investments in 
the region are necessary to maintain a robust U.S. commitment 
to the region. The committee believes the United States should 
continue to strengthen alliances and partnerships and support 
regional institutions and bodies.

 Section 1262--Report on Strategy To Prioritize United States Defense 
               Interests in the Indo-Asia-Pacific Region

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
develop a strategic plan that would prioritize the Department 
of Defense's efforts in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region and to 
submit a report on this plan to the appropriate congressional 
committees by February 1, 2018. In preparing the report, the 
Secretary should consider the strategy required by section 1261 
of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 
(Public Law 114-92). This section would also repeal section 
1251 of the Carl Levin and Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-
291), even though the committee is disappointed that the 
Secretary failed to submit the report required by that section.

  Section 1263--Assessment of United States Force Posture and Basing 
                 Needs in the Indo-Asia-Pacific Region

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
assess U.S. Pacific posture, deployment plans, and realignment 
and basing needs to accomplish U.S. defense priorities and 
respond to complex crises and contingencies. This section would 
also require the Secretary to report the results of this 
assessment to the congressional defense committees not later 
than March 1, 2018. The required report should align with the 
Department of Defense strategy to prioritize U.S. defense 
interests in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region that would be 
required elsewhere in this subtitle.

Section 1264--Extended Deterrence Commitment to the Asia-Pacific Region

    This section would express the sense of Congress that the 
United States is committed to providing extended deterrence to 
allies in the Asia-Pacific, including Japan and the Republic of 
Korea. This section would also assert that the United States 
must maintain robust nuclear capabilities, including nuclear-
capable aircraft, to assure that the full spectrum of military 
options associated with the extended deterrence commitments of 
the United States remains credible and executable.

  Section 1265--Authorization of Appropriations To Meet United States 
   Financial Obligations Under Compact of Free Association With Palau

    This section would authorize the Secretary of the Interior 
to meet the financial obligations of the United States under an 
agreement with the Government of the Republic of Palau.

Section 1266--Sense of Congress Reaffirming Security Commitments to the 
Governments of Japan and South Korea and Trilateral Cooperation Between 
               the United States, Japan, and South Korea

    This section would express the sense of Congress that the 
United States values its alliances with the Governments of 
Japan and the Republic of Korea and that the United States 
should continue further defense cooperation. Additionally, the 
sense of Congress would convey the importance that the United 
States places on strengthening bilateral cooperation between 
Japan and South Korea and on trilateral cooperation among the 
United States, Japan, and South Korea. This section would seek 
to promote continued and strengthened bilateral and trilateral 
cooperation on a full range of issues related to the Democratic 
People's Republic of Korea and to other security challenges in 
the Asia-Pacific region.

Section 1267--Sense of Congress on Freedom of Navigation Operations in 
                          the South China Sea

    This section would express the sense of Congress that the 
United States should regularly and routinely conduct freedom of 
navigation operations in the South China Sea.

 Section 1268--Sense of Congress on Strengthening the Defense of Taiwan

    This section would express the sense of Congress that the 
United States should strengthen and enhance its long-standing 
partnership and strategic cooperation with Taiwan, and that 
Taiwan should take steps to optimize its self-defense. This 
section would recommend that the United States should consider 
opportunities to expand exchanges and encourage more frequent 
provisioning of defense articles and services to Taiwan.

 Section 1269--Sense of Congress on the Association on Southeast Asian 
                                Nations

    This section would provide the sense of Congress in support 
of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) on the 
50th anniversary of its formation. It would recognize ASEAN 
efforts to promote peace, stability and prosperity in the 
region, including the steps taken to highlight the importance 
of peaceful dispute resolution and the need for adherence to 
international rules and standards. Finally, the section would 
state that ASEAN and the ASEAN Defense Ministers Meeting Plus 
should continue to be forums to discuss shared challenges in 
the maritime domain and for greater information sharing.

 Section 1270--Sense of Congress on Reaffirming the Importance of the 
                United States-Australia Defense Alliance

    This section would provide the sense of Congress on the 
strength of United States-Australia relations. It recognizes 
that the United States and the Commonwealth of Australia 
maintain a critical strategic relationship underpinned by 
shared democratic values, common interests, and close defense 
ties. The committee recognizes that 2017 marks the 75th 
anniversary of the Battles of the Coral Sea, Midway, and 
Guadalcanal, and Australia has been a loyal ally, particularly 
with respect to international efforts in the Islamic Republic 
of Afghanistan and against the Islamic State of Iraq and the 
Levant. The committee also recognizes that the Force Posture 
Agreement between the Government of Australia and the 
Government of the United States, signed in 2014, strengthened 
the relationship between the two countries, a relationship that 
is an anchor for peace and security both in the Asia-Pacific 
region and worldwide.

                       Subtitle H--Other Matters


   Section 1271--NATO Cooperative Cyber Defense Center of Excellence

    This section would authorize up to $5.0 million for fiscal 
year 2018 for the purposes of establishing the NATO Cooperative 
Cyber Center of Excellence, and would direct the Secretary of 
Defense to assign executive agent responsibilities to an 
appropriate organization within the Department of Defense.

    Section 1272--NATO Strategic Communications Center of Excellence

    This section would authorize up to $5.0 million for fiscal 
year 2018 for the purposes of establishing the NATO Strategic 
Communications Center of Excellence, and would direct the 
Secretary of Defense to assign executive agent responsibilities 
to an appropriate organization within the Department of 
Defense.

       Section 1273--Security and Stability Strategy for Somalia

    This section would require the President to submit a report 
to the appropriate congressional committees not later than 120 
days after the date of enactment of this Act containing a 
comprehensive strategy to achieve long-term security and 
stability in the Federal Republic of Somalia.

    Section 1274--Assessment of Global Theater Security Cooperation 
                     Management Information System

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
enter into an agreement with a federally funded research and 
development center to conduct an assessment of the 
effectiveness of measures taken to improve the functionality of 
the Global Theater Security Cooperation Management Information 
System (G-TSCMIS). The committee is aware of a July 2016 study 
prepared for the Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) 
that recommended that DSCA should ascertain the extent to which 
security cooperation organizations are fully and accurately 
entering information into G-TSCMIS. The study further concluded 
that, if accurate and complete, data drawn from G-TSCMIS could 
be a tremendous asset in the evaluation of security cooperation 
impacts. This section would also require the Secretary of 
Defense to submit the assessment to the congressional defense 
committees not later than six months after the date of the 
enactment of this Act.

 Section 1275--Future Years Plan for the European Deterrence Initiative

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
develop and submit a plan to the congressional defense 
committees not later than 120 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, for the U.S. military's role in the 
European theater. This plan would include the allocation of 
resources in Europe through the continuation of the European 
Deterrence Initiative for fiscal year 2018 and four successive 
fiscal years. The plan would also include the Department's 
assessment of what would be required to fully resource U.S. 
force posture and capabilities in the European theater, as well 
as a plan to station additional permanent U.S. troops in 
Europe, along with the necessary infrastructure and enablers.
    This section would also require the Secretary of Defense to 
pause divestment of any remaining sites under the European 
Infrastructure Consolidation (EIC) until the required plan is 
submitted to Congress. Since the EIC was enacted into law in 
2015, the strategic landscape of Europe has evolved with the 
resurgence of aggression by the Russian Federation. The 
committee notes that in a changing strategic environment, a re-
evaluation of the sites the Department is planning to divest is 
necessary for long-term strategic planning.
    The committee believes this section would provide the 
Department a tool to further develop its transition of European 
resources from reassurance to resources that develop, 
implement, and sustain a credible deterrent against a resurgent 
Russia.

  Section 1276--Extension of Authority To Enter into Agreements With 
    Participating Countries in the American, British, Canadian, and 
                       Australian Armies' Program

    This section would extend by 5 years the authority in 
section 1274(g) of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2013 (Public Law 112-239) to enter into agreements 
with participating countries in the American, British, 
Canadian, and Australian Armies Program.

               Section 1277--Security Strategy for Yemen

    This section would require the President to develop a 
security strategy for the Republic of Yemen and to submit a 
report on the required strategy to certain congressional 
committees within 120 days of the date of the enactment of this 
Act. The report required would include: discussion of the 
strategy's compliance with applicable legal authorities; a 
detailed description of the security environment; the threats 
posed by Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula and the Islamic 
State in Iraq and the Levant--Yemen; a detailed description of 
the threat posed to maritime vessels at the Bab al Mandab 
Strait; the role of the U.S. Armed Forces in implementing the 
strategy; a discussion of the ends, ways, and means inherent to 
the strategy and the strategy's objectives regarding 
counterterrorism and long-term stability in Yemen; and a plan 
to coordinate the U.S. resources necessary to implement the 
strategy.

 Section 1278--Limitation on Transfer of Excess Defense Articles That 
            Are High Mobility Multi-Purpose Wheeled Vehicles

    This section would prohibit the Secretary of Defense from 
transferring any excess defense articles (EDA) that are high 
mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicles (HMMWVs) until 30 days 
after the Comptroller General of the United States submits a 
report to the congressional defense committees, the Committee 
on Foreign Relations of the Senate, and the Committee on 
Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives that assesses 
the Department of Defense's efforts to evaluate the potential 
impact of HMMWV EDA transfers on the U.S. industrial base 
pursuant to section 2321j(b)(1)(E) of title 22, United States 
Code, for fiscal years 2012 through 2016. The assessment shall 
also review the timing, rigor, and procedures used by the 
Department in conducting the industrial base analysis as 
required by current statute and any other related matters the 
Comptroller General considers appropriate.
    The committee is concerned that the existing requirements 
to determine the potential impact of EDA transfers on the U.S. 
industrial base as required under section 2321j(b)(1)(E) of 
title 22, United States Code, are not being enforced by the 
Department of Defense, and as such there could be adverse 
impacts to the U.S. industrial base or its workforce. The 
committee is particularly concerned about the potential adverse 
impacts of EDA transfers to the light tactical vehicle 
industrial base.
    The committee expects the Secretary of Defense to actively 
engage the industrial base in a timely manner regarding any 
potential EDA transfers to assist in the determination of 
whether the transfer of such articles will have an adverse 
impact on the national technology and industrial base, or 
reduce the opportunities of entities in the national technology 
and industrial base to sell new or used equipment to the 
countries to which such articles are transferred. The committee 
also expects the Secretary of Defense to engage the industrial 
base in providing refurbishment and sustainment of EDA 
equipment, to include supplies and parts, to the fullest extent 
possible.

 Section 1279--Department of Defense Program To Protect United States 
                    Students Against Foreign Agents

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
develop and implement a program to prepare U.S. students 
studying abroad through Department of Defense National Security 
Education Programs to recognize and protect themselves against 
recruitment efforts by foreign intelligence agents. This 
section would also require the Secretary of Defense to provide 
a briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the Committee on Armed Services of the House of Representatives 
on the plan to develop and implement the program.

Section 1280--Extension of United States-Israel Anti-Tunnel Cooperation 
                               Authority

    This section would amend section 1279(f) of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92) to extend the United States-Israel Anti-Tunnel Cooperation 
Authority to December 31, 2020.

                 Section 1281--Anticorruption Strategy

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, the 
Secretary of State, and the Administrator of the United States 
Agency for International Development, in consultation with the 
heads of other relevant Federal agencies, to develop a strategy 
to prevent corruption in reconstruction efforts and submit it 
to the congressional defense committees, the Committee on 
Foreign Relations of the Senate, and the Committee on Foreign 
Affairs of the House of Representatives.

                TITLE XIII--COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


   Section 1301--Specification of Cooperative Threat Reduction Funds

    This section would specify that funds authorized to be 
appropriated to the Department of Defense for the Cooperative 
Threat Reduction Program established under the Department of 
Defense Cooperative Threat Reduction Act (50 U.S.C. 3711) would 
be available for obligation in fiscal years 2018, 2019, and 
2020.
    The committee also notes that section 1303 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328) mandated the expenditure or obligation of semiannual 
installments of funds available for Cooperative Threat 
Reduction Activities in the People's Republic of China, and 
that such semiannual installments should be made in accordance 
with all applicable laws, to include chapter 39 of title 31, 
United States Code, also known as the ``Prompt Payment Act.''

                   Section 1302--Funding Allocations

    This section would allocate specific funding amounts for 
each program under the Department of Defense Cooperative Threat 
Reduction (CTR) Program from within the overall $324.6 million 
that the committee would authorize for the CTR Program. The 
allocation under this section reflects the amount of the budget 
request for fiscal year 2018.

                    TITLE XIV--OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


  Assessment of the Realignment of the Joint Improvised-Threat Defeat 
         Organization under the Defense Threat Reduction Agency

    The committee supports the transition of the Joint 
Improvised-Threat Defeat Agency (JIDA) to the Defense Threat 
Reduction Agency (DTRA) as the Joint Improvised-Threat Defeat 
Organization (JIDO) under DTRA. The committee also appreciates 
actions taken to achieve efficiencies and synergies while not 
compromising the mission of either JIDO or DTRA and without 
interruption of support to the warfighter. However, the 
committee believes there may be opportunities for additional 
efficiencies and collaboration that can be achieved as a result 
of this transition.
    For example, the committee is aware JIDO has taken on a 
greater role in countering unmanned aerial systems (UAS). The 
committee recognizes the nexus between UAS and improvised 
explosive devices (IEDs). However, the committee is concerned 
about mission creep to countering weapon systems and platforms 
that may diminish focus on the mission of countering IEDs 
employed in all forms. Additionally, the JIDO director remains 
a two-star billet sourced by the Army. The committee is 
concerned about whether this level of seniority for JIDO is 
necessary given the leadership and oversight structures in 
place at DTRA.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to assess the transition of JIDA as JIDO to 
DTRA, to include an assessment of additional efficiencies that 
may be achieved and recommendations for progress to that end in 
the near-term, as well as an assessment of JIDA's primary 
mission of countering current and future IED threats. The 
Comptroller General shall provide a briefing to the 
congressional defense committees, not later than March 1, 2018, 
on the results of the assessment with a report to follow on a 
date agreed to at the time of the briefing.

                         Beryllium Supply Chain

    The committee notes the continuing importance of the 
strategic and critical material beryllium to national security. 
The committee understands that, starting in 2004, the 
Department of Defense took affirmative steps to invest in a 
domestic beryllium manufacturing facility in order to maintain 
security of supply, as well as the affordability of beryllium 
for defense systems. These interventions have not only provided 
security of supply, they have also stabilized the price for 
beryllium metal in recent years, and the committee is 
encouraged that the Department of Defense is considering 
additional measures that would stabilize prices at the U.S. 
beryllium metal facility.
    However, the committee is concerned that individual program 
managers within the Department of Defense are considering the 
use of foreign-owned competitors. The committee believes there 
is no security of supply with foreign beryllium, and there is 
no realistic estimate for a supplier mine to be opened in the 
foreseeable future. As a result, the Department of Defense 
should exercise care when contractors or subcontractors seek to 
supply national security needs through use of these foreign 
manufacturers.
    The committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics to submit a report to 
the House Committee on Armed Services by November 30, 2017, on 
the supply chains for beryllium metal used by the Department of 
Defense. Such a study shall include: (1) an analysis of the 
economic viability and long-term supply potential of all 
current beryllium metal suppliers; and (2) an analysis of when 
foreign supplies of beryllium are expected to be exhausted.

           Fiscal Stability of the National Defense Stockpile

    The committee notes that the funds within the National 
Defense Stockpile (NDS) Transaction Fund have been 
significantly depleted due to the lack of excess materials 
available for disposal. The fund was designed to allow for the 
sale of excess materials, from which the funds in turn could be 
used to acquire emergent strategic and critical materials for 
national defense requirements. While this process has been 
ongoing since just after World War II, the value of the 
available inventory designated as ``excess''' is no longer 
sufficient to acquire the strategic and critical material 
requirements identified by the President. The committee 
believes the current manager of the NDS, the Defense Logistics 
Agency Office for Strategic Materials (DLA-SM), is hampered in 
its acquisition strategy due to the lack of funds available for 
the procurement of materials. The committee has observed that 
the DLA-SM must determine which materials are most critical for 
acquisition, leaving other material requirements unfunded. The 
committee notes that the fund will become insolvent within the 
next three to seven years, despite the careful management of 
expenditures.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense, in coordination with the NDS manager, to provide a 
briefing to the congressional defense committees not later than 
January 31, 2018, on the plan to develop and implement a 
funding strategy for sustaining a robust national defense 
stockpile inventory when current funds in the transaction fund 
are depleted. This strategy should include the incorporation of 
acquisition requirements for strategic and critical materials 
though the discretionary appropriations process.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                     Subtitle A--Military Programs


                  Section 1401--Working Capital Funds

    This section would authorize appropriations for Defense 
Working Capital Funds at the levels identified in section 4501 
of division D of this Act.

    Section 1402--Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction, Defense

    This section would authorize appropriations for Chemical 
Agents and Munitions Destruction, Defense at the levels 
identified in section 4501 of division D of this Act.

 Section 1403--Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense-
                                  Wide

    This section would authorize appropriations for Drug 
Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense-Wide at the 
levels identified in section 4501 of division D of this Act.

                Section 1404--Defense Inspector General

    This section would authorize appropriations for the Office 
of the Inspector General at the levels identified in section 
4501 of division D of this Act.

                  Section 1405--Defense Health Program

    This section would authorize appropriations for the Defense 
Health Program at the levels identified in section 4501 of 
division D of this Act.

              Section 1406--National Defense Sealift Fund

    This section would authorize appropriations for the 
National Defense Sealift Fund at the levels identified in 
section 4501 of division D of this Act.

                       Subtitle B--Other Matters


 Section 1411--Authority for Transfer of Funds to Joint Department of 
 Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Facility Demonstration 
     Fund for Captain James A. Lovell Health Care Center, Illinois

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
transfer funds from the Defense Health Program to the Joint 
Department of Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs Medical 
Facility Demonstration Fund created by section 1704 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (Public 
Law 111-84).

    Section 1412--Authorization of Appropriations for Armed Forces 
                            Retirement Home

    This section would authorize $64.3 million to be 
appropriated for the operation of the Armed Forces Retirement 
Home during fiscal year 2018.

   TITLE XV--AUTHORIZATION OF ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATIONS FOR OVERSEAS 
                         CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


         National Guard and Reserve Component Equipment Account

    The budget request for Overseas Contingency Operations 
contained no funding for a National Guard and Reserve Component 
equipment account. Elsewhere as reflected in division D of this 
Act, the committee notes that the base budget request contained 
$1.5 billion for procurement of National Guard and Reserve 
Component equipment.
    Given the uncertainty of the current and projected fiscal 
environment, the committee remains concerned about the 
availability of equipment needed to sustain and modernize the 
National Guard and Reserve Components as an operational reserve 
and for their domestic support missions. The committee 
recognizes the National Guard and Reserve Components continue 
to report significant shortages in modernized equipment and 
challenges associated with efficiently fulfilling combat 
readiness training requirements. For example, the committee 
notes there are significant modernization, capability, and 
training challenges associated with the current Air National 
Guard aircraft assigned to the Aerospace Control Alert mission, 
and those aircraft crews maintaining proficiency and readiness 
in other mission areas critical to full-spectrum combat 
readiness. The committee also notes the Army National Guard 
continues to experience modernization shortfalls in utility 
rotorcraft and heavy-lift rotorcraft.
    The committee believes additional funds would help 
eliminate identified critical dual-use equipment shortfalls. 
The committee expects these funds to be used for the purposes 
of, but not limited to, the procurement of rotorcraft, avionic 
and radar upgrades for legacy strike fighter aircraft to 
include Navy Reserve F-18 strike fighters, wheeled and tracked 
combat vehicles, tactical wheeled vehicles, ammunition, small 
arms, tactical radios (to include single channel ground and 
airborne radio systems), non-system training devices, logistics 
automation systems, sense and avoid system upgrades for 
unmanned aerial systems, civil support communication systems, 
hail and warning escalation of force systems, out of band 
infrared pointer and illumination systems, near infrared aiming 
and illumination systems, crashworthy and ballistically 
tolerant auxiliary fuel systems, Engagement Skills Trainer II 
systems, F-16 distributed-operations mission training centers, 
mobile ad hoc network emergency communications equipment, 
commercial Wi-Fi upgrades for operational support aircraft, and 
other critical dual-use, unfunded procurement items for the 
National Guard and Reserve Components.
    The committee recommends additional funding for a National 
Guard and Reserve Component equipment account within the 
Overseas Contingency Operations budget request. The committee 
also recommends $1.5 billion, the full amount of the base 
budget request, for National Guard and Reserve equipment.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations


   Section 1501--Purpose and Treatment of Certain Authorizations of 
                             Appropriations

    This section would establish the purpose of this title and 
make authorization of appropriations available upon enactment 
of this Act for the Department of Defense, in addition to 
amounts otherwise authorized in this Act, to provide for 
additional costs due to Overseas Contingency Operations and 
other additional funding requirements.

                       Section 1502--Procurement

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
Procurement at the levels identified in section 4102 of 
division D of this Act.

       Section 1503--Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation at the levels 
identified in section 4202 of division D of this Act.

                Section 1504--Operation and Maintenance

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
operation and maintenance programs at the levels identified in 
section 4302 of division D of this Act.

                    Section 1505--Military Personnel

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
military personnel at the levels identified in section 4402 of 
division D of this Act.

                  Section 1506--Working Capital Funds

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
Defense Working Capital Funds at the levels identified in 
section 4502 of division D of this Act.

 Section 1507--Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense-
                                  Wide

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense-Wide, at 
the levels identified in section 4502 of division D of this 
Act.

                Section 1508--Defense Inspector General

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
the Office of the Inspector General at the levels identified in 
section 4502 of division D of this Act.

                  Section 1509--Defense Health Program

    This section would authorize additional appropriations for 
the Defense Health Program at the levels identified in section 
4502 of division D of this Act.

                     Subtitle B--Financial Matters


          Section 1511--Treatment as Additional Authorizations

    This section would state that amounts authorized to be 
appropriated by this title are in addition to amounts otherwise 
authorized to be appropriated by this Act.

                Section 1512--Special Transfer Authority

    This section would authorize the transfer of up to $2.50 
billion of additional war-related funding authorizations in 
this title among the accounts in this title.

          Subtitle C--Limitations, Reports, and Other Matters


             Section 1521--Afghanistan Security Forces Fund

    This section would continue through December 31, 2018, the 
existing limitation on the use of funds in the Afghanistan 
Security Forces Fund, subject to certain conditions of section 
1513 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2008 (Public Law 110-181), as amended by section 1531(b) of the 
Ike Skelton National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2011 (Public Law 111-383).
    This section would also require the Secretary of Defense, 
in consultation with the Secretary of State, to conduct a 
progress assessment on the efforts of the Afghan National 
Defense and Security Forces. The assessment would focus on 
accountability and anti-corruption efforts, the capability and 
capacity of the security forces, the success of the security 
forces in holding and defending territory, and the appropriate 
distribution of equipment. Taking into account the results of 
such an assessment, the Secretary of Defense may withhold 
funding from the Afghan Security Forces Fund. The Secretaries 
are required to notify the appropriate congressional committees 
within 30 days of the decision to withhold such funds.

           Section 1522--Joint Improvised-Threat Defeat Fund

    This section would amend subsections (b) and (c) of section 
1514 of the John Warner National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2009 (Public Law 109-364) to extend the use and 
transfer authority for the Joint Improvised-Threat Defeat Fund 
through fiscal year 2018. This section would also extend the 
authority for interdiction of improvised explosive device 
precursor chemicals to December 31, 2018.

     TITLE XVI--STRATEGIC PROGRAMS, CYBER, AND INTELLIGENCE MATTERS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


                            Space Activities


            Overview on National Security Space Organization

    The committee believes that, without significant 
reorganization of the national security space enterprise, the 
United States is at serious risk of losing the competitive 
advantage it has maintained as a result of its use of space for 
national security.
    As noted by the Secretary of the Air Force, and other Air 
Force leaders, in a joint testimony to Congress on May 17, 
2017, ``space is now a warfighting domain, similar to the more 
familiar air, land, and maritime domains our men and women are 
fighting in today.'' The committee agrees with this statement 
and recognizes the gravity of this fundamental shift.
    The committee is concerned that our posture to address this 
shift is inadequate. As noted by the Commander of U.S. 
Strategic Command, ``[t]he space enterprise is not resilient 
enough to successfully prosecute--or even survive--a high-end 
conflict which extends to space,'' and that without space ``you 
go back to industrial age warfare,'' which was fraught with 
levels of casualties in military and civilian populations that 
are simply unacceptable today.
    The national security space enterprise is not sufficiently 
structured to facilitate the evolution of the space domain into 
a warfighting domain. And, the committee is concerned that the 
current organization and management construct of the national 
security space enterprise jeopardizes the sustainment of U.S. 
dominance in space.
    The committee notes that numerous studies and reports have 
cited systemic flaws in the organization and management 
structure of the national security space enterprise. 
Specifically, these reports consistently point to a 
fragmentation of leadership and authorities across the 
enterprise, which result in insufficient focus and priority on 
space and ineffective decision making.
    The first major report, the ``Commission to Assess United 
States National Security Space Management and Organization,'' 
also known as the Rumsfeld Commission, was mandated by section 
1623 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2000 (Public Law 106-65). The executive summary of the report 
states, ``[t]he Commission has unanimously concluded that 
organizational and management changes are needed . . . the 
Commission concluded that a number of disparate space 
activities should promptly be merged, chains of command 
adjusted, lines of communication opened and policies modified 
to achieve greater responsibility and accountability.''
    Subsequent reports on national security space management, 
oversight, and acquisition by the Institute for Defense 
Analyses in 2008 and the Government Accountability Office (GAO) 
in 2016, reaffirmed the issues raised by the 2001 Rumsfeld 
Commission. In July of 2016, the GAO published a report titled, 
``DOD Space Acquisition Management and Oversight,'' required by 
a provision in the committee report (S. Rept. 114-49) 
accompanying the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2016, which ``identified approximately 60 stakeholder 
organizations involved in space acquisitions.'' This report 
stated that ``[i]n general DOD has not made any significant 
changes to space leadership over the last two decades.''
    The committee further notes the conclusions made by these 
reports are consistent with the testimony from former national 
security space leaders during hearings the committee has held 
on the space enterprise.
    In September 2016, the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces 
held a hearing titled, ``National Security Space: 21st Century 
Challenges, 20th Century Organization'' with several retired 
space experts. During the hearing, each witness was asked if he 
believed, ``we are adequately postured to address the serious 
challenges faced in space'' to which all three witnesses 
responded unequivocally, ``[n]o.''
    In March 2017, the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces held a 
joint hearing with the House Committee on Homeland Security 
Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and 
Communications where several former national security leaders 
testified on the severity of threats facing U.S. space systems, 
the consequences of their loss, and an assessment of what has 
been done to address such threats. During his testimony, the 
former commander of Air Force Space Command summed up what has 
been done to improve U.S. posture in space since the 2007 
Chinese antisatellite weapon test, stating, ``10 years of 
innumerable studies and policy debates have not produced 
tangible improvements in our space protection posture.''
    In May 2017, the Director of the National Reconnaissance 
Office testified to the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces, 
stating, ``staying ahead of the adversaries who threaten our 
space capabilities is a challenge. Those adversaries are making 
space a priority. The U.S. has not been keeping pace. I believe 
we have not made the investment that would indicate space is a 
priority or fundamental to the U.S. Our requirements, budget, 
and acquisition processes are disconnected, and none of them 
moves quickly.''
    The committee believes several guiding principles must be 
addressed to solve these longstanding organization and 
management issues. First, bureaucracy should be reduced, roles 
and responsibilities clarified, and a person should be 
empowered with the proper authorities to lead the national 
security space enterprise. Second, space needs to be 
prioritized equally with the land, air, and maritime domains of 
conflict. Third, there needs to be a clearly identified cadre 
of space professionals who are trained, promoted, and sustained 
as space experts. Lastly, there needs to be an integrated 
national security space program.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a legislative 
reorganization of the Department of Defense national security 
space structure that would:
    (1) create a Space Corps within the United States Air Force 
to posture and properly focus the preponderance of our military 
services to protect U.S. interests in space; deter aggression 
in, from, and through space; and provide combat-ready space 
forces that enable combatant commanders to fight and win wars;
    (2) elevate national security space operations within the 
combatant command structure by creating a subunified combatant 
command for space within U.S. Strategic Command and strengthen 
operational leadership of space in the Department; and
    (3) eliminate unnecessary bureaucracy by terminating the 
Principal Department of Defense Space Advisor office and 
function, as well as the Defense Space Council construct.

 Certification of Reusable Launch Vehicles for National Security Space 
                                Missions

    The committee is aware of the recent successful re-launch 
of an Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle-class launch vehicle 
that had previously been used to deliver a payload to orbit. 
The potential to reuse launch vehicles for orbital space launch 
has the potential to significantly reduce the cost of space 
launch in the commercial sector and for national security space 
launches.
    The committee believes that the Air Force should move 
rapidly to evaluate how to leverage this commercial technology 
in order to meet national security space requirements. 
Reusability offers the potential to enable the Department of 
Defense to further lower the price of national security space 
launch.
    The committee believes that the government should move 
rapidly to evaluate the use of reusable space launch vehicles. 
Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
brief the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives not later than March 1, 2018 on the 
Department's plan to evaluate the risks, benefits, costs and 
potential cost-savings of the use of reusable launch vehicles 
for use in national security space missions.

                   Commercial Geospatial Intelligence

    The committee supports the National Geospatial-Intelligence 
Agency's (NGA's) leadership in acquiring new and non-
traditional sources for geospatial intelligence, including 
commercial geospatial intelligence data and services as part of 
its combat support mission. Commercial geospatial intelligence 
provides significant benefit to the Department of Defense, 
particularly in terms of increasing capability, providing cost-
savings, and enhancing opportunities for sharing unclassified 
products with multinational coalition partners. Additionally, 
approximately 90 percent of NGA's foundational geospatial 
intelligence, to include mapping, navigation, and aeronautical 
charts, is derived from commercial imagery sources. Along with 
evolving current commercial capabilities, there are new 
commercial endeavors of space and ground exploitation which 
will likely offer opportunities from which the Department can 
benefit. For instance, there are commercial companies that are 
utilizing machine learning techniques and capabilities to 
automate and extract additional information from commercial 
imagery, which will enhance and maximize analytical 
capabilities. The committee encourages the NGA Director to 
continue to lead the Department in current and new sources of 
geospatial intelligence collection and exploitation, and to 
keep the committee informed of its progress.

             Comptroller General Review of Hosted Payloads

    The committee is aware that the Air Force is working to 
strengthen processes to ensure greater consideration of hosted 
payloads in space-related analysis of alternatives and 
architecture studies. Of note, the Air Force has undertaken 
some efforts to study, contract for, and use hosted payloads 
for technology development, but it appears the Air Force has 
done little to operationally use hosted payloads. The committee 
is concerned that the acquisition process may not fully 
consider the use of hosted payloads. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Comptroller General of the United States to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by February 
1, 2018, on the following:
    (1) the Department of Defense's use of hosted payload 
arrangements to date;
    (2) the extent to which the Department has the knowledge it 
needs, from the perspectives of cost, capability, and 
resilience, to determine whether to expand its use of hosted 
payloads;
    (3) the extent that hosted payloads are appropriately 
considered throughout the acquisition process, including how 
acquisition requirements are written and how they impact the 
option to use hosted payloads; and
    (4) barriers or challenges the Department faces for 
increasing its use of hosted payloads.

                       Global Positioning System

    The committee is aware that the Air Force is developing an 
acquisition strategy for Global Positioning System (GPS) block 
III space vehicles 11 and beyond. The Air Force is anticipating 
a full and open competition for up to 22 space vehicles, with 
production starting in fiscal year 2019. The committee supports 
the GPS III program, and recommends the Air Force leverage the 
existing nonrecurring investment and technical risk reduction 
when developing an acquisition plan for future space vehicles. 
The committee continues to support evolutionary acquisition for 
space vehicles with technology insertion plans to meet 
warfighter requirements.

             Multi-Band Satellite Communications Terminals

    The committee is aware that satellite communications 
provide significant capabilities to deployed forces to 
communicate around the globe. The Department of Defense uses 
various satellite communication frequency ranges, each with 
advantages and drawbacks, to meet its mission. The committee 
also recognizes that potential adversaries are developing 
counter-space capabilities, to include but not limited to, 
systems which are designed to interfere with satellite 
communications. The committee therefore believes that 
warfighters may benefit from flexible user terminals which can 
communicate with a variety of government and