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115th Congress   }                                     {       Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session     }                                     {      115-238

======================================================================



 
     DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, ENVIRONMENT, AND RELATED AGENCIES 
                       APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2018

                                _______
                                

 July 21, 2017.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

   Mr. Calvert, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                            DISSENTING VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 3354]

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report in explanation of the accompanying bill making 
appropriations for the Department of the Interior, the 
Environmental A25JY0.Protection Agency, and Related Agencies 
for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2018. The bill 
provides regular annual appropriations for the Department of 
the Interior (except the Bureau of Reclamation and the Central 
Utah Project), the Environmental Protection Agency, and for 
other related agencies, including the Forest Service, the 
Indian Health Service, the Smithsonian Institution, and the 
National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities.

                                CONTENTS

_______________________________________________________________________


                                                            Page number

                                                            Bill Report
Title I--Department of the Interior:
        Bureau of Land Management..........................     2
                                                                      7
        United States Fish and Wildlife Service............     8
                                                                     11
        National Park Service..............................    15
                                                                     24
        United States Geological Survey....................    20
                                                                     34
        Bureau of Ocean Energy Management..................    23
                                                                     37
        Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement.....    24
                                                                     39
        Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and 
            Enforcement....................................    26
                                                                     39
        Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian 
            Education......................................    29
                                                                     41
        Office of the Secretary............................    38
                                                                     48
        Insular Affairs....................................    40
                                                                     49
        Office of the Solicitor............................    43
                                                                     50
        Office of Inspector General........................    43
                                                                     50
        Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians.    43
                                                                     50
        Department-wide Programs:
        Wildland Fire Management, Interior Department......    46
                                                                     51
        FLAME Wildfire Suppression Reserve Fund, Interior 
            Department.....................................   N/A
                                                                     52
        Central Hazardous Materials Fund...................    49
                                                                     52
        Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration.    49
                                                                     52
        Working Capital Fund...............................    50
                                                                     52
        Office of Natural Resources Revenue................    51
                                                                     53
        Payments in Lieu of Taxes (PILT)...................    52
                                                                     53
        General Provisions, Department of the Interior.....    52
                                                                     53
Title II--Environmental Protection Agency:
        Science and Technology.............................    62
                                                                     55
        Environmental Programs and Management..............    63
                                                                     58
        Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest System Fund....    64
                                                                     62
        Office of Inspector General........................    65
                                                                     62
        Buildings and Facilities...........................    65
                                                                     63
        Hazardous Substance Superfund......................    65
                                                                     63
        Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund Program    66
                                                                     64
        Inland Oil Spill Programs..........................    67
                                                                     65
        State and Tribal Assistance Grants.................    67
                                                                     66
        Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Program 
            Account........................................    75
                                                                     68
        Administrative Provisions..........................    76
                                                                     68
Title III--Related Agencies:
        Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.....    79
                                                                     69
        Office of the Under Secretary for Natural Resources 
            and Environment................................    79
                                                                     69
        Wildland Fire Management, Forest Service...........    85
                                                                     78
        FLAME Wildfire Suppression Reserve Fund, Forest 
            Service........................................   N/A
                                                                     79
        Indian Health Service, U.S. Department of Health 
            and Human Services.............................    95
                                                                     80
        National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences   104
                                                                     84
        Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry...   104
                                                                     84
        Other Related Agencies:
        Council on Environmental Quality and Office of 
            Environmental Quality..........................   105
                                                                     85
        Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board.....   106
                                                                     86
        Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation........   107
                                                                     86
        Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native 
            Culture and Arts Development...................   108
                                                                     87
        Smithsonian Institution............................   108
                                                                     87
        National Gallery of Art............................   110
                                                                     89
        John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.....   111
                                                                     90
        Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars...   112
                                                                     91
        National Endowment for the Arts....................   112
                                                                     91
        National Endowment for the Humanities..............   113
                                                                     92
        Commission of Fine Arts............................   114
                                                                     93
        National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs.........   115
                                                                     94
        Advisory Council on Historic Preservation..........   115
                                                                     94
        National Capital Planning Commission...............   115
                                                                     94
        United States Holocaust Memorial Museum............   116
                                                                     95
        Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission...........   116
                                                                     95
        Women's Suffrage Centennial Commission.............   117
                                                                     96
        World War I Centennial Commission..................   117
                                                                     96
Title IV--General Provisions:..............................   117
                                                                     97

                              INTRODUCTION

    The Department of the Interior, Environment, and Related 
Agencies Appropriations bill for fiscal year 2018 totals 
$31,456,000,000. This amount is $824,000,000 below the fiscal 
year 2017 enacted level and $4,256,911,000 above the budget 
request.
    The amounts in the accompanying bill are reflected by title 
in the table below.


                                  BUDGET AUTHORITY RECOMMENDED IN BILL BY TITLE
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                 Committee bill
                        Activity                         Budget estimates,   Committee bill,     compared with
                                                          fiscal year 2018   fiscal year 2018   budget estimates
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Title I, Department of the Interior: New budget            $10,554,207,000    $11,887,470,000    +$1,333,263,000
 authority.............................................
Title II, Environmental Protection Agency: New budget        5,655,000,000      7,524,087,000     +1,869,087,000
 authority.............................................
Title III, Related Agencies: New budget authority......     10,989,882,000     12,038,443,000     +1,048,561,000
Title IV, General Provisions: New budget authority.....                  0          6,000,000         +6,000,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
    Grand total, New budget authority..................     27,199,089,000    531,456,000,000     +4,256,911,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

             BUDGET AUTHORITY RECOMMENDED IN BILL BY TITLE


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                 Committee bill
                        Activity                         Budget estimates,   Committee bill,     compared with
                                                          fiscal year 2018   fiscal year 2018   budget estimates
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Title I, Department of the Interior:
    New budget authority...............................    $10,554,207,000    $11,887,470,000    +$1,333,263,000
Title II, Environmental Protection Agency:
    New budget authority...............................      5,655,000,000      7,530,087,000     +1,875,087,000
Title III, Related Agencies:
    New budget authority...............................     10,989,882,000     12,038,443,000     +1,048,561,000
Title IV, General Provisions:
    New budget authority...............................                  0                  0                  0
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Grand total, New budget authority..............     27,199,089,000     31,456,000,000     +4,256,911,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                          Committee Oversight


    Members of Congress have provided considerable input in 
fashioning this bill. In total, 351 Members submitted nearly 
5,200 programmatic requests relating to multiple agencies and 
programs.
    The Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies 
Subcommittee conducted 10 budget hearings and briefings this 
year (including four hearings involving American Indians and 
Alaska Natives) to carefully review the programs and budgets 
under its jurisdiction. The Subcommittee held the following 
oversight hearings:
    Members' Day hearing--February 28, 2017
    American Indian/Alaska Native Public Witnesses--May 16, 
2017 (morning)
    American Indian/Alaska Native Public Witnesses--May 16, 
2017 (afternoon)
    American Indian/Alaska Native Public Witnesses--May 17, 
2017 (morning)
    American Indian/Alaska Native Public Witnesses--May 17, 
2017 (afternoon)
    Indian Health Service FY18 budget oversight hearing--May 
24, 2017
    High Risk American Indian/Alaska Native Programs--May 24, 
2017
    U.S. Forest Service FY18 budget oversight hearing--May 25, 
2017
    Department of the Interior FY18 budget oversight hearing--
June 8, 2017
    Environmental Protection Agency FY18 budget oversight 
hearing--June 15, 2017
    In total, 110 individuals representing the Executive 
Branch, Congress, State, Tribal, and local governments, and the 
general public testified before the Subcommittee. In addition 
to those who testified in person, another 125 Members of 
Congress, organizations, or coalitions provided written 
testimony for the hearing record which is publicly available 
online.

                         COST OF WILDLAND FIRE

    In six of the last ten years, the Forest Service and the 
Department of the Interior have exceeded their wildland fire 
suppression budgets despite being fully funded at the ten-year 
suppression average for such costs. Fire seasons have grown 
longer and more destructive, putting people, communities, and 
ecosystems at greater risk. Fire borrowing has now become 
routine rather than extraordinary. Borrowing from non-fire 
accounts to pay suppression costs results in the Forest Service 
and Department of the Interior having fewer resources available 
for forest management activities to improve overall forest 
health and reduce the risk of catastrophic wildland fires.
    The Committee continues to believe the most catastrophic 
wildland fires should be addressed in a fashion similar to 
other major natural disasters such as floods and hurricanes, 
and funded through the disaster cap adjustment established by 
the Budget Control Act of 2011 (P.L. 112-25). This common sense 
reform would allow for a more responsible and stable way to 
budget for wildland fire suppression costs.
    While the budget request does not include a specific 
proposal, the Committee notes that the Administration has 
indicated its interest in working with Congress to find a 
solution, potentially like legislation that has been developed 
in the House (H.R. 2862) which has the support of every member 
of the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies 
Subcommittee. As the issue of the disaster cap adjustment falls 
outside of the Committee's jurisdiction, the Committee's 
recommendation does not include the request for suppression 
funding through the disaster cap adjustment.
    As Congress continues to debate the best approach for fire 
budgeting, the Committee has provided robust wildland fire 
funding in its fiscal year 2018 bill. The bill includes a total 
of $3,442,207,000 in wildland fire funding for the Department 
of the Interior and the Forest Service. Fire suppression 
accounts are fully funded at the ten-year average level. 
Hazardous fuels reduction program funding, a critical component 
of an effective overall fire strategy, is funded at 
$575,000,000, which is $5,000,000 above the fiscal year 2017 
enacted level.

                    PAYMENTS IN LIEU OF TAXES (PILT)

    The Payments in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) program provides 
compensation to local governments for the loss of tax revenue 
resulting from the presence of Federal land in their county or 
State. In 2017, 49 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, the 
Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands 
received PILT payments. The Committee includes bill language 
providing $465,000,000 in PILT funding for fiscal year 2018.

                        RECREATION FEE AUTHORITY

    Enacted in 2004, the Federal Land Recreation Enhancement 
Act (FLREA) authorized five agencies to collect and expend 
recreation fees on land they manage: the Department of the 
Interior's Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Bureau of 
Reclamation (BOR), National Park Service (NPS), and U.S. Fish 
and Wildlife Service (FWS), and the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture's Forest Service (USFS). These fees, which leverage 
other funding sources and complement appropriated dollars, fund 
projects that directly benefit the visitor experience.
    The authority for FLREA is scheduled to sunset at the end 
of the current fiscal year. This expiration would impact the 
Department of the Interior's estimated annual collection of 
$290 million, of which the National Park Service collects 
nearly $264 million. In 2016, the recreation fee program 
collected nearly $376 million from the Forest Service and the 
Department of the Interior combined. An extension of recreation 
fee authority is necessary for land managers to plan for 
upcoming seasons including selling annual passes, hiring 
seasonal employees, planning projects, organizing volunteers, 
and accepting reservations. The Committee has included within 
Title IV General Provisions a one-year extension of the current 
recreation fee authority as requested.

                           COST OF LITIGATION

    The Committee remains concerned that many of the legitimate 
goals of the Forest Service, the Department of the Interior, 
and other agencies under the Committee's jurisdiction--as well 
as the work of this Committee--are undermined by litigation 
filed in an effort to shift land management decisions from the 
agencies to the courts, regardless of merit.
    Litigation is a huge unbudgeted cost for land management 
agencies. The Committee is concerned that, as budgets shrink, 
agencies are forced to settle lawsuits quickly because they 
don't have funds available to complete court-imposed work. In 
addition, the courts are not concerned whether agencies have 
funding necessary to meet court mandates. As a result, the 
courts are playing an increasing role in determining how and 
where agencies use their funding.
    Given ongoing concerns, the Department of the Interior, 
EPA, and the Forest Service are directed to provide to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations, and to make 
publicly available no later than 60 days after enactment of 
this Act, detailed Equal Access to Justice Act (EAJA) fee 
information as specified in House Report 112-151.

                          STATE WILDLIFE DATA

    The Department of the Interior and U.S. Forest Service are 
expected to prioritize continued coordination with other 
Federal agencies and State fish and wildlife agencies to 
recognize and fully utilize State fish and wildlife data and 
analyses as a primary source to inform land use, planning, and 
related natural resource decisions. Federal agencies should not 
unnecessarily duplicate raw data, but when appropriate, 
evaluate existing analysis of data prepared by the States, and 
reciprocally share data with State wildlife managers, to ensure 
that the most complete data set is available for decision 
support systems.

                            PAPER REDUCTION

    The Committee urges each agency funded by this Act to work 
with the Office of Management and Budget to reduce printing and 
reproduction costs and directs each agency to report to the 
Committee within 90 days of enactment of this Act on what steps 
have been taken to achieve this goal. The report should 
specifically identify how much money each agency expects to 
save by implementing these measures.

                   EDUCATIONAL AND OUTREACH PROGRAMS

    The Committee strongly supports academic internships, 
partnerships, and educational and outreach programs of the 
agencies funded through the Interior, Environment, and Related 
Agencies appropriations bill and encourages them to ensure that 
their efforts reach the widest possible audience, including but 
not limited to, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, Historically 
Black Colleges and Universities, and Tribal Colleges and 
Universities, as appropriate.

                    LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND

    The Committee recognizes that investments in the Land and 
Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) support public land conservation 
and ensure access to the outdoors for all Americans. The 
recommendation balances bipartisan support for many LWCF 
programs with the need to address deferred maintenance backlogs 
at land management agencies, and to do both within the 
constraints of the budget and other priorities within the bill. 
Accordingly, the Committee recommends $275,000,000 for LWCF 
programs.
    The recommendation includes $50,000,000 for projects 
expected to be submitted to the Committee for Congressional 
consideration in accordance with the direction provided in the 
explanatory statement accompanying Public Law 115-31. 
Consistent with the process used in previous fiscal years, the 
Committee will review and recommend levels of funding based on 
Congressional priorities including, but not limited to, strong 
State and local support for the project, leveraging of existing 
lands, increased access to recreational opportunities, and 
project-readiness.
    Additionally, the recommendation includes no less than $10 
million for projects that open or improve access to public 
lands for hunting, fishing, and other recreational activities 
and no less than $11 million for projects that consolidate 
inholdings or alleviate hardships for private landowners. Prior 
to proceeding with recreation access funding, the agencies 
should submit a list of the projects to be funded, along with a 
description of how the projects meet the recreation access 
criteria as defined by each agency.

                   COTTONWOOD V. U.S. FOREST SERVICE

    The Committee has significant concerns about the effect the 
Ninth Circuit Court's 2015 decision in Cottonwood Environmental 
Law Center v. United States Forest Service could have on the 
ability of the Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management 
to manage public lands as required by law. The decision has the 
potential to curtail forest health activities, recreational 
opportunities, and conservation practices and appears to have 
exposed the Service and Bureau to the possibility of extensive 
litigation that will not benefit endangered species or improve 
the condition of public lands. The Committee strongly 
encourages the Departments of Agriculture and Interior to work 
with the Administration and Congress on this issue.

                         PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES

    The Committee recognizes that maintaining the professional 
competencies of the Federal workforce is necessary to assure 
sound scientific management principles are applied to resource 
management. Professional societies, such as the Society of 
American Foresters, the Society for Range Management, The 
Wildlife Society, American Fisheries Society, and others 
provide opportunities for employees to maintain professional 
competencies through continuing education, scientific journals, 
and interaction with other professionals. The Committee 
encourages the Federal agencies funded in this bill to support 
the participation of employees in such professional societies 
in accordance with guidance issued by the Office of Government 
Ethics through 5 CFR Part 2640.203, Official Participation in 
Nonprofit Organizations.

                        REPROGRAMMING GUIDELINES

    The Committee retains the reprogramming guidelines 
contained in the joint explanatory statement accompanying 
Public Law 114-113.

                  TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR


                       Bureau of Land Management


                   MANAGEMENT OF LANDS AND RESOURCES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................    $1,095,375,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................       963,163,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................     1,074,503,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       -20,872,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................      +111,340,000
 

    The Committee recommends $1,074,503,000 for Management of 
Lands and Resources, $20,872,000 below the fiscal year 2017 
enacted level and $111,340,000 above the budget request. A 
detailed table of funding recommendations below the account 
level is provided at the end of this report.
    The Bureau is encouraged to promote and expand the use of 
agreements with Indian Tribes to protect Indian trust resources 
from catastrophic wildfire, insect and disease infestation or 
other threats from adjacent Federal lands, as authorized by 
law.
    Soil, Water, and Air Management.--The Committee recommends 
$42,497,000 for soil, water, and air management, $1,112,000 
below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and $15,463,000 above 
the budget request.
    The Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Program is funded 
at $1,500,000. The Committee requests that the Bureau provide a 
detailed report, which should be made public, on the funds made 
available to the program and the accomplishments and results 
related to them, for the past five fiscal years.
    The Committee supports the Bureau's work with the State of 
Utah to develop water resources to benefit the public, 
wildlife, endangered species, permittees, and other users and 
encourages the Bureau to continue to work with the State and 
other interested entities to identify and pursue the highest 
priority projects.
    The Committee encourages the Bureau to continue to work 
with the State of Idaho to provide appropriate access to 
Federal lands for the purposes of aquifer recharge projects.
    Rangeland Management.--The Committee recommends $76,981,000 
for rangeland management, $2,019,000 below the fiscal year 2017 
enacted level and $9,228,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee directs the agency to focus on reducing the 
grazing permit backlog and carrying out a systematic program of 
range monitoring, land health assessments, development and 
implementation of allotment management plans, and adaptive 
management.
    Forestry Management.--The Committee recommends $9,819,000 
for forestry management, $257,000 below the fiscal year 2017 
enacted level and $316,000 below the budget request.
    Riparian Management.--The Committee recommends $20,777,000 
for riparian management, $544,000 below the fiscal year 2017 
enacted level and $555,000 above the budget request.
    Cultural Resources Management.--The Committee recommends 
$15,719,000 for cultural resources management, $412,000 below 
the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and $646,000 below the 
budget request.
    Wild Horse and Burro Management.--The Committee recommends 
$80,555,000 to implement Public Law 92-195 (16 U.S.C. 1331 et 
seq.) requiring the protection, management, and control of 
free-roaming horses and burros on public lands, equal to the 
fiscal year 2017 enacted level and $9,836,000 above the budget 
request.
    The Committee reminds the Bureau of the directive included 
in the joint explanatory statement accompanying the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2017, to provide a 
comprehensive plan to Congress to address the excess numbers of 
wild horses and burros and the unsustainable, rising costs of 
the Wild Horse and Burro program. The Committee encourages the 
Bureau to include in the plan: increased adoptions; additional 
research on equine contraceptives; opportunities for private 
citizens and organizations to support wild horses and burros; 
rangeland restoration; reductions in herd sizes on the range; 
and options for reducing the number of animals in long-term 
holding facilities.
    The bill continues a prohibition on funds to implement 
Section 1333(b)(2)(C) of Title 16, United States Code, 
requiring the humane destruction of excess animals that are not 
adopted. The bill continues two general provisions within Title 
I allowing the Bureau to enter into long-term contracts and 
agreements for holding facilities off the range and for the 
humane transfer of excess animals for work purposes.
    Wildlife and Fisheries.--The Committee recommends 
$115,491,000 for wildlife and fisheries, $320,000 below the 
fiscal year 2017 enacted level and $28,572,000 above the budget 
request. Within the total provided, the Committee provides 
$60,900,000 for sage-grouse conservation efforts, equal to the 
fiscal year 2017 enacted level. The Committee recommends 
$12,210,000 for fisheries management.
    The Committee continues to support the Bureau's plant 
conservation program and the National Seed Strategy and 
encourages the Bureau to focus on increasing the availability 
of appropriate seed to address high-priority restoration needs 
and to collaboratively work with other Federal agencies, 
States, researchers, and private partners to implement the 
strategy.
    Recreation Management.--The Committee recommends 
$69,900,000 for recreation management, $1,829,000 below the 
fiscal year 2017 enacted level and $7,151,000 above the budget 
request. The bill includes a general provision in Title IV 
prohibiting the use of funds to close areas open to 
recreational hunting and shooting as of January 1, 2013.
    The Committee appreciates the work of the California State 
Office in establishing an independent monitoring pilot program 
for certain off-highway vehicle events and directs the Bureau 
to continue to work with the off-highway vehicle community to 
refine, develop, and implement the pilot program on a broader 
scale. The Committee encourages the California State Office to 
conduct additional independent monitoring pilot projects at 
off-highway vehicle events in 2017 and to report to the 
Committee on its findings.
    Energy and Minerals.--The Committee recommends $168,439,000 
for energy and minerals, $4,407,000 below the fiscal year 2017 
enacted level and $8,960,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee directs the Bureau to collaboratively work 
with industry, other Federal agencies, States, and interested 
entities on methane emission issues, as well as to 
expeditiously approve pending permitting requests.
    Resource Protection and Maintenance.--The Committee 
recommends $114,335,000 for resource protection and 
maintenance, $95,000 above the fiscal year 2017 enacted level 
and $30,348,000 above the budget request.
    Resource Management Planning.--The Committee recommends 
$52,125,000 for resource management planning, equal to the 
fiscal year 2017 enacted level and $13,688,000 above the budget 
request. Within the total, the Committee recommends $8,000,000 
for planning requirements related to greater sage-grouse 
conservation efforts.
    The Committee continues to be concerned about the 
transportation routes identified in the Draft Resource 
Management Plan for the Red Cliffs National Conservation Area 
and lack of resolution of this matter. As such, the Committee 
directs the Bureau to work with the Fish and Wildlife Service; 
the State of Utah; Washington County, Utah; the city of St. 
George, Utah; and other cooperating entities to identify a 
northern transportation route as directed by the Omnibus Public 
Land Management Act of 2009, P.L. 111-11.
    The Bakersfield Field Office's 2014 Resources Management 
Plan (RMP) identifies approximately 1,480 acres of private 
property as part of an Area of Critical Environmental Concern 
(ACEC). While the Committee understands that under current law 
the RMP only applies to Federal land in a designated ACEC, it 
is concerned that the RMP does not clearly draw such a 
distinction. As such, the Committee encourages the Bureau to 
work with affected landowners to address concerns about the 
ACEC designation.
    Law Enforcement.--The Committee recommends $27,616,000 for 
law enforcement, $1,000,000 above the fiscal year 2017 enacted 
level and $1,908,000 above the budget request. The additional 
funds are provided to fill vacant ranger positions.
    National Landscape Conservation System.--The Committee 
recommends $35,800,000 for the national landscape conservation 
system, $1,019,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and 
$8,105,000 above the budget request.
    From the amounts provided for Management of Lands and 
Resources, at the discretion of the Director, the Bureau may 
make available up to $2,000,000 for critical conservation 
activities, pursuant to 16 U.S.C. 3701 et seq., subject to the 
terms and conditions outlined in Title I of Division G of P.L. 
115-31.

                            LAND ACQUISITION

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $31,416,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................         3,609,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        12,800,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       -18,616,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        +9,191,000
 

    The Committee recommends $12,800,000 for land acquisition, 
and a $1,769,000 rescission of unobligated balances from prior 
appropriations. Prior to implementation, the Bureau is directed 
to submit the proposed allocation of the rescission for 
Committee approval. A detailed table of funding recommendations 
below the account level is provided at the end of this report.
    The Committee does not have sufficient information to 
recommend specific Federal acquisition projects at this time, 
but will review and recommend levels of funding for projects 
submitted to the Committee in accordance with the direction 
provided in the explanatory statement accompanying Public Law 
115-31.

                   OREGON AND CALIFORNIA GRANT LANDS

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $106,985,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        89,800,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       104,256,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................        -2,729,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................       +14,456,000
 

    The Committee recommends $104,256,000 for the Oregon and 
California (O&C;) grant lands, $2,729,000 below the fiscal year 
2017 enacted level and $14,456,000 above the budget request. A 
detailed table of funding recommendations below the account 
level is provided at the end of this report.
    The Committee remains concerned with the Bureau's failure 
to comply with the principles of sustained yield timber 
harvests under the Oregon and California Revested Lands Act of 
1937. Within the funds appropriated for the Oregon and 
California Grant lands, the Bureau is directed to prioritize 
funding for timber production to achieve at least the 278 
million board feet Allowable Sale Quantity promised in the new 
Resource Management Plan for Western Oregon. Further, the 
Committee is troubled by the disparity in timber targets 
compared with timber awarded and harvested on some districts. 
The Bureau is directed to prioritize response to administrative 
protests on timber sales in a timely manner and to report 
timber sale accomplishments in volume of timber sold and 
awarded, rather than merely the volume offered for sale.

                           RANGE IMPROVEMENTS

    The Committee recommends an indefinite appropriation of not 
less than $10,000,000 to be derived from public lands receipts 
and Bankhead-Jones Farm Tenant Act lands grazing receipts, as 
requested.

               SERVICE CHARGES, DEPOSITS, AND FORFEITURES

    The Committee recommends an indefinite appropriation 
estimated to be $24,595,000 for Service Charges, Deposits, and 
Forfeitures, as requested.

                       MISCELLANEOUS TRUST FUNDS

    The Committee recommends an indefinite appropriation 
estimated to be $24,000,000, as requested.

          ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS, BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT

    The Committee recommendation includes Administrative 
Provisions.

                United States Fish and Wildlife Service

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the principal Federal 
agency responsible for conserving, protecting and enhancing 
fish, wildlife and plants and their habitats. The Service 
manages more than 150 million acres in the National Wildlife 
Refuge System, which encompasses 566 national wildlife refuges, 
thousands of small wetlands and other special management areas, 
and Marine National Monuments. It also operates 72 national 
fish hatcheries, 65 fish and wildlife management offices, and 
80 ecological services field stations. The agency enforces 
Federal wildlife laws, administers the Endangered Species Act, 
manages migratory bird populations, restores nationally 
significant fisheries, conserves and restores wildlife habitat 
such as wetlands, and helps foreign governments with their 
conservation efforts. It also oversees the Federal Assistance 
program, which distributes hundreds of millions of dollars in 
excise taxes on fishing and hunting equipment to State fish and 
wildlife agencies.

                          RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................    $1,258,761,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................     1,151,129,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................     1,247,109,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       -11,652,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................       +95,980,000
 

    The Committee recommends $1,247,109,000 for Resource 
Management. The Service is expected to execute its budget in 
accordance with the justification submitted to the Congress, 
except as otherwise directed below or summarized in the table 
at the end of this report.
    Endangered Species Act (ESA).--The Committee recognizes and 
supports recent bipartisan, State-led efforts to improve 
implementation of the ESA, and expects the Service to fully 
engage in these efforts.
    The ESA is premised on partnership with the States. Section 
6(a) of the ESA says, ``In carrying out the program authorized 
by the Act, the Secretary shall cooperate to the maximum extent 
practicable with the States.'' Congress included this mandate 
in recognition that States have always had primary management 
responsibility of fish and wildlife within their borders, and 
in recognition that the management of any federally listed 
species will return to the States once recovery criteria are 
met.
    Much of the controversy surrounding the ESA can be traced 
back to failures to cooperate with the States during the 
listing and recovery processes. Simply put, the Service needs 
to do a better job of cooperating. Although final decisions 
ultimately rest with the Secretary, nothing in law prohibits 
States from being involved in those decisions.
    To that end, the Service should make full use of its 
authority to cooperate with States to the point that any State 
affected by a federally listed species has opportunity to 
involve itself in all administrative actions, and all judicial 
actions not initiated by that State, concerning any provisions 
of the ESA except for international trade.
    Moreover, the Service needs to do a better job of letting 
States and other partners lead. Section 4(f)(2) of the ESA 
says, ``The Secretary, in developing and implementing recovery 
plans, may procure the services of appropriate public and 
private agencies and institutions, and other qualified persons. 
Recovery teams appointed pursuant to this subsection shall not 
be subject to the Federal Advisory Committee Act.'' By 
including this authority and recognizing that saving species 
from extinction is a responsibility shared by all, Congress 
relieved the Secretary from shouldering much of the burden. 
States and non-governmental partners can and should lead 
recovery plan development and implementation--not the Service.
    The Service should focus instead on backlogged and 
inherently Federal ESA actions that cannot be done by States 
and other partners, including: providing technical assistance 
when requested; permitting and consultation; publishing 
documents in the Federal Register; and reporting to Congress. 
Everything else done by the Service for candidate and listed 
species should be cost-shared as much as possible through its 
other existing programs and authorities.
    Listing.--The recommendation includes $17,122,000 as 
requested for Endangered Species Act listings, status 
assessments, critical habitat determinations, and related 
activities. Bill language is continued as requested, placing 
restrictions on the use of funds in order to enable the Service 
to manage its workload in response to numerous petitions and 
lawsuits.
    The Service is directed to exclude flood control reservoirs 
from critical habitat determinations, such as for the western 
distinct population segment of the yellow-billed cuckoo as 
described in detail in House Report 114-170.
    The Committee is concerned about reports from States--
regarding the Utah prairie dog, as discussed below, the black-
footed ferret, and the lesser prairie chicken--that there 
remains no certainty that the Service will consider or 
appropriately include non-regulatory but highly valuable 
conservation actions on private lands in species status 
assessments or 12-month findings. Nothing in the Endangered 
Species Act prioritizes lands held in the public trust or kept 
in any other sort of ``protected'' status, as opposed to lands 
that are privately owned and responsibly managed, and nothing 
in the Act implies that habitat on such private lands is any 
more or less threatened with destruction, modification, or 
curtailment. The Service is further reminded that threatened 
and endangered species mostly inhabit private lands, and that 
the Service cannot accomplish its mission without fully 
embracing non-regulatory and voluntary cooperative conservation 
efforts with private landowners. The Committee expects the 
Service to work with the States to develop a more reasonable 
policy whereby the Service's regulatory assurance criteria 
include responsible land management commitments by private 
landowners.
    Planning and Consultation.--The recommendation includes 
$104,783,000 for timely evaluations and permitting of 
development projects that contribute to economic growth and job 
creation, $6,028,000 above the budget request. The amount above 
the budget request should be apportioned in accordance with 
workload needs measured across the Service, rather than by 
region.
    The following programs are supported at not less than the 
levels requested by the Service: Bay Delta Ecosystem 
Restoration, $2,854,000; environmental contaminants, 
$2,767,000; Gulf Coast Restoration, $998,000; energy, 
$10,334,000; and pesticide consultations, $998,000.
    The Committee supports the continuation of collaborative 
efforts in the Pacific Northwest with the National Marine 
Fisheries Service, the Washington Department of Fish and 
Wildlife, and affected Tribes that will result in the 
completion of all Puget Sound hatchery program consultations by 
the fall of 2018.
    The Committee recognizes the important role of Habitat 
Conservation Plans (HCPs) in both recovery of species and in 
providing economic certainty and growth to municipalities 
affected by listed species. The Service is encouraged to place 
a priority on providing technical assistance to partners making 
good faith efforts to develop and implement responsible HCPs.
    Any projects funded by disaster settlements and required by 
law to have technical assistance, consultation, or permits from 
the Service should have such costs built into the projects. The 
Service is directed to establish a reimbursement program 
consistent with similar programs across the Department.
    Conservation and Restoration.--The recommendation includes 
$29,791,000 for Conservation and Restoration, of which: 
$12,698,000 is for Candidate Conservation and includes 
$3,250,000 for the sagebrush steppe ecosystem; $5,460,000 is to 
implement the Marine Mammal Protection Act; $6,772,000 is for 
environmental contaminants work in support of the Natural 
Resources Damage Assessment and Restoration program; $3,471,000 
is for the National Wetlands Inventory in support of the 
decadal report to Congress; and $1,390,000 is to implement the 
Coastal Barrier Resources Act (CBRA).
    Based on feedback provided by the States, the Service is 
commended for its efforts in the Southeast to work with States 
and others to preclude the need to list many of the hundreds of 
species recently petitioned for listing. The effort 
demonstrated that the ESA can work when the Federal government 
treats States as equal partners and makes full use of 
flexibilities already inherent in the ESA to minimize 
regulatory burdens. The Service is expected to expand this 
model nationwide.
    The Service is expected to focus Candidate Conservation 
funding on two primary activities: (1) preparing and publishing 
the annual Candidate Notice of Review as required by the ESA; 
and (2) providing the technical assistance to facilitate 
voluntary conservation efforts by others and to develop 
agreements that provide regulatory certainty to landowners in 
case a candidate species has to be listed. The Service should 
look to its other programs and its partners to fund and 
implement conservation activities on-the-ground.
    Recovery.--The recommendation includes $85,570,000 for 
Endangered Species Act recovery activities. Except where noted 
below, the Service is expected to focus on recovery plan 
oversight, five-year reviews, and status changes. The Service 
is commended for striving to fully utilize employee skills 
regardless of where employees are physically located, in order 
to more efficiently address the Service's highest priority 
needs including preparation and publication of documents 
required by the ESA.
    As noted above, the Service is expected to defer to the 
States and other governmental and non-governmental partners to 
lead recovery plan development and implementation. To that end, 
funding for States and localities through the Cooperative 
Endangered Species Conservation Fund is restored to the fiscal 
year 2017 enacted level, $34,192,000 above the request. In 
addition, $5,000,000 is provided in Recovery to enhance and 
increase partnerships with agencies and organizations 
implementing genetically-sound breeding, rearing, and 
reintroduction programs as prescribed in recovery plans, such 
as for northern aplomado falcon and California condor. The 
Service is encouraged to propose including this program within 
the Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund in the 
fiscal year 2019 budget request.
    The Service is directed to report to Congress on any 
species for which the Secretary and the relevant States find 
that a recovery plan will not promote the conservation of the 
species, including the justification.
    The Service is directed to complete all five-year reviews 
within the period required by law, and, for any determination 
on the basis of such review whether a species should be 
delisted, downlisted, or uplisted, promulgate an associated 
regulation prior to initiating the next status review for such 
species. Not less than $3,000,000 is provided to continue to 
reduce the backlog of downlistings and delistings.
    The Committee is aware the Fish and Wildlife Service 
obtained a favorable decision in its appeal regarding the Utah 
prairie dog. However, the Committee remains concerned that the 
Fish and Wildlife Service has not been proactive in evaluating 
the effectiveness of its own recovery plan and conservation 
strategies regarding the Utah prairie dog. There is concern the 
current recovery plan sets recovery criteria that are 
unachievable and unnecessary to ensure the species' viability 
into the foreseeable future. The Committee urges the Fish and 
Wildlife Service to re-evaluate the threats currently 
contributing to the Utah prairie dog's threatened status, to 
focus conservation efforts on those threats, and to recognize 
population status regardless of land ownership. The Committee 
recognizes the value of voluntary conservation mechanisms, 
incentive based programs, and hydrological limitations in 
evaluating and addressing habitat threats to Utah prairie dogs 
on private lands. Lastly, the Committee recognizes the 
importance of the Fish and Wildlife Service coordinating with 
the State of Utah on developing a new recovery plan or 
conservation strategy that closely aligns with the Utah 
management plan that has shown to be successful in conserving 
the species and addressing landowner and community needs. The 
coordinated plan or strategy should chart a clear path for the 
expeditious recovery of the species and delisting.
    The Wolf-Livestock Loss Demonstration Program is restored 
to the fiscal year 2017 enacted level of $1,000,000 but is 
transferred to the Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program. 
Funding to address white-nose syndrome in bats is transferred 
to Science Support.
    The bill includes language directing the Secretary to 
reissue the final rule delisting recovered gray wolves in 
Wyoming and the Western Great Lakes, consistent with 
congressional action on recovered gray wolves in Idaho and 
Montana in the fiscal year 2011 appropriation. The bill also 
includes language prohibiting the use of funds to treat gray 
wolves range-wide as endangered or threatened. The Committee is 
compelled to act when egregious lawsuits waste limited 
resources and threaten the integrity of the Endangered Species 
Act, which guarantees that the Federal government will return 
management authority to the States once recovery plan goals are 
met and scientifically sound State management plans are in 
place.
    The service is directed to, within 60 days of enactment of 
this Act, review and determine whether Mexican gray wolf (Canis 
lupus Baileyi) is a genetically valid subspecies designation 
and whether the red wolf (Canis rufus) is a genetically valid 
species designation. The Service shall complete its work and 
publish a report to Congress not later than one year from the 
date of enactment of this Act.
    Partners for Fish and Wildlife.--The recommendation 
includes $53,476,000 for voluntary, non-regulatory partnerships 
with private landowners authorized by the Partners for Fish and 
Wildlife Act. Included in this amount is $1,000,000 to 
implement the Wolf-Livestock Loss Demonstration Project. States 
with de-listed wolf populations shall continue to be eligible 
for funding, provided that those States continue to meet the 
eligibility criteria contained in Public Law 111-11.
    The recommendation includes not less than $1,800,000 to 
continue the multi-State Chesapeake Bay Nutria Eradication 
Project, including not less than $75,000 provided under the 
National Wildlife Refuge System activity. The Service is 
expected to complete the verification phase of the eradication 
process by the end of fiscal year 2020.
    Coastal Programs.--The recommendation includes $13,375,000 
for voluntary, non-regulatory coastal habitat restoration 
partnerships, equal to the fiscal year 2017 enacted level.
    National Wildlife Refuge System.--The recommendation 
includes $483,927,000 for the National Wildlife Refuge System, 
equal to the total provided in fiscal year 2017.
    Wildlife and Habitat Management is maintained at 
$231,843,000, of which: $196,089,000 is for general program 
activities; $2,830,000 is for subsistence management as 
requested; $22,924,000 is for inventory and monitoring; and 
$10,000,000 is for invasive species.
    The explanatory statement accompanying Division G of P.L. 
115-31 noted the support of the Committees for the directive in 
House Report 114-632 instituting signage on any individual 
refuge where trapping occurs and establishing guidance to be 
included in the refuge manual. The House report also directed 
the Service to post information on the National Wildlife Refuge 
System website and the websites of individual refuges where 
trapping occurs. To date, the Service has not complied with 
that directive. The Service has recently informed the Committee 
that they have set benchmarks of August 15, 2017, to post on 
its website a list of refuges where trapping occurs, and to 
issue a Director's Memo directing that no later than December 
31, 2017, Regions must post signs at each refuge where trapping 
occurs. Additionally, by October 15, 2017, the Service plans to 
include trapping signage in the Refuge System Sign Handbook and 
ensure individual refuge websites include trapping information 
for all refuges where trapping occurs. Until the Committee has 
been informed the Service has fully complied with this 
directive, $2,000,000 of the funding provided for Wildlife and 
Habitat Management is not available for obligation.
    Visitor Services is maintained at $73,319,000, of which 
$68,727,000 is for general program activities, $2,500,000 is 
for urban refuge programs, and $2,092,000 is for volunteer 
coordination.
    Conservation Planning is restored to the fiscal year 2017 
enacted level of $2,523,000. The Service is reminded of its 
backlog and statutory obligation to complete and update 
comprehensive conservation plans at every national wildlife 
refuge. Future funding of the National Wildlife Refuge System 
is contingent upon reducing this backlog. The Service is 
commended for its efforts to develop plans that are strongly 
supported by the surrounding communities.
    The 2013 Hopper Mountain, Bitter Creek, and Blue Ridge 
National Wildlife Refuges Comprehensive Conservation Plan and 
Environmental Assessment (CCP/EA) identifies approximately 
5,728 acres of private property for potential future 
acquisition to expand the Bitter Creek National Wildlife 
Refuge. The Committee notes that, under current law, national 
wildlife refuge regulations do not apply to private property 
included in an approved acquisition boundary, and that the 
Service only acquires private property from willing sellers. As 
such, the Committee encourages the Service to work with 
affected landowners to address concerns about the acquisition 
boundary.
    Refuge Maintenance is restored to the fiscal year 2017 
enacted level of $138,188,000, of which $42,297,000 is to 
continue to reduce the deferred maintenance backlog.
    The Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge and 
Conservation Area was created to protect one of the last 
remaining grassland and longleaf pine savanna landscapes in 
eastern North America while securing water resources for seven 
million people in south Florida. The Committee supports 
collaborative efforts to protect, restore, and conserve 
habitats for one of the greatest ecological treasures of the 
United States.
    The Committee is concerned that there could be future 
delays in Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) 
implementation caused by ecosystem-level restoration goals that 
are in conflict with the specific needs of one endangered 
species, the Cape Sable seaside sparrow. Such delays should be 
unnecessary given that restoration activities will likely 
produce net benefits for the species at the system level. The 
Committee urges the Service to work with the State of Florida, 
the National Park Service, the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. 
Army Corps of Engineers, and local stakeholders to implement 
the Memorandum of Understanding as quickly as possible, and to 
consider developing a conservation plan for the endangered 
sparrow. The Service is directed to update the Committee on its 
progress within 180 days of enactment of this Act.
    Migratory Bird Management.--The recommendation includes 
$48,157,000 for migratory bird management, of which: 
$31,039,000 is for conservation and monitoring, including 
$350,000 for bird-livestock conflicts; $3,424,000 is for permit 
processing; and $13,139,000 is for waterfowl management and the 
joint venture program. The Service is commended for its efforts 
to work with landowners to reduce black vulture predation on 
livestock.
    Law Enforcement.--The recommendation includes $75,053,000 
for law enforcement, equal to the fiscal year 2017 enacted 
level. The Service is directed to enforce illegal logging 
violations pursuant to the Lacey Act.
    Wildlife trafficking is funded at $7,500,000. Lawful 
importers and exporters should not shoulder the cost burden of 
a Service workload that has increased as global markets have 
expanded and wildlife trafficking has become more 
sophisticated. Service inspectors not only examine legal 
declared packages but now must also undertake efforts to 
interdict illegal shipments of wildlife and wildlife products. 
Funds appropriated specifically to combat wildlife trafficking 
may be used to supplement inspections.
    The Committee supports efforts to streamline government 
data collection for international trade transactions and 
encourages the Service to expedite the re-engineering of the 
FWS Message Set in the U.S. Customs and Border Protection's 
Automated Commercial Environment, which is part of the 
International Trade Data System. Continued collaboration will 
advance this interface, allow pilot testing to be initiated as 
soon as is feasible, and ultimately process cargo more 
expeditiously while protecting against prohibited shipments.
    The Service is directed to language in House Report 114-632 
and Senate Report 114-281 regarding inspections of imported and 
exported seafood. In coordination with the Secretary of 
Commerce and the seafood industry, the Secretary is urged to 
reevaluate Federal regulations for seafood inspections in order 
to ensure that regulations are fair, that agency actions are 
not duplicative, and that inspections are conducted 
expeditiously to avoid economic hardship and loss to business 
while protecting species from overfishing and illegal trade. 
Outcomes of this reevaluation and a justification for any 
continued or new regulations should be included in existing 
industry outreach programs. Open communication between the 
Service and inspected businesses is paramount to the success of 
any inspection program.
    International Affairs.--The recommendation includes 
$15,816,000 for international affairs. Wildlife trafficking 
programs are maintained at fiscal year 2017 enacted levels.
    The Committee is concerned about illegal trade in 
rhinoceros horn, elephant ivory, and harvested timber; the 
large sums of money that these products command on the black 
market; and the significant source of financing these 
activities provide for armed insurgencies and groups with links 
to transnational organized crime and terrorism. These 
activities threaten the stability and development of African 
countries and pose a threat to U.S. security interests. The 
Committee supports Service programs in particular that focus 
on: (1) site-based law enforcement protection in Africa for the 
most at-risk populations of forest and savanna elephants; (2) 
development and implementation of regional wildlife law 
enforcement networks in Africa and Asia; and (3) training local 
park guards and other wildlife law enforcement officers. These 
programs should be carried out in coordination with other U.S. 
agencies, local governments, and international conservation 
partners. The Committee encourages coordination between the 
Service and the Department of Homeland Security at U.S. ports 
of entry.
    The Service is encouraged to continue working with 
stakeholders affected by recent actions taken by the Parties to 
the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of 
Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES) regarding international trade in 
wood and wood products whose listing in Appendix II became 
effective January 2, 2017. The Service should review what is 
necessary to develop a domestic electronic permitting system 
with the ultimate goal of working with other countries on a 
universal electronic system which would expedite processing of 
licit imports and exports of products made with these 
materials. The Service should work with the Office of 
Management and Budget on approval of an electronic form for 
data collection and report back to the Committee on any 
resources required for technology upgrades and workload 
efficiencies.
    The Committee recognizes the Service's work with Honduras, 
El Salvador, Guatemala, and Mexico to conserve priority species 
and ecosystems, and urges the continuation of these 
international partnerships in fiscal year 2018.
    The Committee directs the Fish and Wildlife Service to 
conduct an internal review of its current CITES permitting 
process for live plants, in an effort to identify ways to 
create efficiencies in the permitting process. Within 150 days 
of enactment of this Act, the Committee directs the Service to 
provide a report of its findings to the Committee. The Service 
is urged to consider efforts to streamline or otherwise create 
efficiencies in the CITES permitting process for live plants 
that would ameliorate any delays and to include these 
suggestions in its report to the Committee.
    Fish and Aquatic Conservation.--The recommendation includes 
$159,714,000 for Fish and Aquatic Conservation. The Service is 
directed to continue its tradition of improving freshwater 
subsistence, commercial, and recreational fishing since 1871.
    The recommendation includes $55,818,000 for National Fish 
Hatchery System Operations, of which $1,200,000 is for Aquatic 
Animal Drug Approval Partnership implementation and $51,167,000 
is for general program activities. The Service is encouraged to 
consider economic return-on-investment in the allocation of 
funds.
    The following programs are supported at not less than the 
levels requested by the Service: Great Lakes Consent Decree, 
$549,000; mass marking salmon in the Pacific Northwest, 
$1,475,000; and wild fish health surveys, $1,427,000.
    None of the funds may be used to terminate operations or to 
close any facility of the National Fish Hatchery System. None 
of the production programs listed in the March, 2013, National 
Fish Hatchery System Strategic Hatchery and Workforce Planning 
Report may be reduced or terminated without advance, informal 
consultation with affected States and Tribes. The Service is 
directed not to enter into reimbursable agreements for 
mitigation hatchery production unless the Service is reimbursed 
for production costs as well as proportional facilities and 
administrative costs.
    The Service is commended for recommitting to the National 
Fishery Artifacts and Records Center and the Collection 
Management Facility in South Dakota, and for sharing the costs 
nationwide. Vacant positions should be filled and located at 
the facility.
    The recommendation includes $22,920,000 for Maintenance and 
Equipment, of which: $8,065,000 is for annual maintenance; 
$13,249,000 is for deferred maintenance; $1,088,000 is for 
equipment replacement; and $518,000 is for fish and wildlife 
conservation offices. The Service is commended for its efforts 
to allocate deferred maintenance funds to facilities with the 
most severe health and safety deficiencies across the System as 
a whole, rather than by region. All other funds should continue 
to be allocated as in prior years.
    The recommendation includes $31,555,000 for Habitat 
Assessment and Restoration. The following programs are funded 
at the requested levels: Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement, 
$1,610,000; National Fish Habitat Action Plan, $5,652,000; and 
the Chehalis Fisheries Restoration Program, $268,000. The 
National Fish Passage Program is restored to the fiscal year 
2017 enacted level of $13,998,000. In addition, the 
recommendation includes $5,000,000 to begin implementing the 
Delaware River Basin Conservation Act; the Service is strongly 
encouraged to enter into an agreement with an outside party for 
grant management services.
    The recommendation includes $28,392,000 for Population 
Assessment and Cooperative Management. The following programs 
are funded at the requested levels: Alaska fisheries 
subsistence, $9,536,000; Atlantic salmon restoration, $532,000; 
Great Lakes Consent Decree, $557,000; Great Lakes Fish and 
Wildlife Restoration Act, $457,000; National Wild Fish Health 
Survey, $36,000; Penobscot River restoration, $457,000; 
Regional Mark Processing Center, $225,000; and Yukon River 
Salmon Treaty, $2,687,000.
    The recommendation includes $21,029,000 for Aquatic 
Invasive Species. The Committee strongly supports efforts 
coordinated by the Service and the States to prevent the spread 
of aquatic nuisance species and to minimize their impacts on 
human health and safety, recreation and transportation, water 
infrastructure, and ecosystem health.
    Of the amounts recommended: $799,000 is for control and 
management; $1,321,000 is for prevention; $145,000 is for 
restoration of the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem, as requested; 
$1,000,000 is for the implementation of State and interstate 
plans as authorized by the National Invasive Species Act 
(NISA); $1,566,000 is for NISA administration and coordination; 
$2,000,000 is for control and prevention of the spread of 
quagga and zebra mussels; $710,000 is for sea lamprey control 
administrative costs, as requested; $3,088,000 is to implement 
subsection (d)(2) of Section 5, of Public Law 106-506, as 
amended; and $10,400,000 is for controlling Asian carp in the 
Mississippi and Ohio River Basins, and preventing them from 
entering the Great Lakes.
    Of the amount recommended for Asian carp control and 
prevention, $2,000,000 is to supplement funding provided 
through the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative for intensive 
control efforts via contract fishing pursuant to individual 
State laws and regulations and as called for in management 
plans. Contract fishing has proven to be an extremely effective 
method of control, and the intent of the additional $2,000,000 
is to expand and perfect those efforts. This is a management 
tool that is not meant to develop a sustainable commercial 
fishery. The Service shall continue to work with its State 
partners to gather data to analyze the impacts of contract 
fishing to control abundance and movement of Asian carp.
    Of the amount recommended for quagga mussel and zebra 
mussel control and prevention, $1,000,000 should continue to be 
allocated to implementation of quagga and zebra mussel control 
and prevention as called for in State and interstate plans as 
authorized by NISA, so that the total amount recommended in 
this bill for State and interstate plans is not less than 
$2,000,000.
    Cooperative Landscape Conservation.--The recommendation 
includes $12,988,000 for landscape conservation cooperatives 
(LCCs). The Committee continues to be concerned about a lack of 
State and Tribal support for LCCs in certain parts of the 
country. The Service should focus on areas where LCC 
partnerships are strongest.
    Consistent with a recent Inspector General report, the 
Service is directed to develop internal controls for the LCC 
grant award process to mitigate duplication in research. Rather 
than relying on informal and ad hoc coordination, the LCCs 
should implement written, formal guidance (based on GAO 
standards) for the award process. Such guidance should require: 
the consistent use of a peer review process; technology that 
easily identifies duplicative projects; notification from 
applicants if they submit identical proposals to different 
agencies; controls for checking information on current and past 
projects; and certification that proposals have been examined 
for duplication of research. LCCs should also store past, 
current, and future project information in a single database so 
that other LCCs, agencies, and the public may easily access 
this catalog of information and research on the Internet.
    Science Support.--The recommendation includes $16,985,000 
for Science Support, of which: $8,517,000 is for Adaptive 
Science general program activities; $3,968,000 is for Service 
Science general program activities; and $4,500,000 is to 
continue the search for a cure for white-nose syndrome in bats 
and includes $2,000,000 transferred from Recovery. The Service 
is expected to partner with Cooperative Research Units whenever 
possible.
    General Operations.--The recommendation includes 
$130,352,000 for General Operations, as requested.
    Everglades.--The recommendation includes $11,006,000 across 
multiple programs for Everglades restoration, as requested, 
including $2,631,000 to implement the Comprehensive Everglades 
Restoration Plan (CERP).
    Technical assistance for the promotion of hunting and 
recreational shooting.--The Committee encourages the Secretary 
to explore the benefits of allowing States to use a portion of 
funds allocated to them by the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife 
Restoration Act for any project or activity, including public 
relations, designed to recruit or retain hunters and 
recreational shooters.

                              CONSTRUCTION

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $18,615,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        15,800,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        16,540,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................        -2,075,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................          +740,000
 

    The Committee recommends $16,540,000 for Construction, 
$740,000 above the request. The recommendation restores Dam, 
Bridge, and Seismic Safety to the fiscal year 2017 enacted 
level. A detailed table of funding recommendations below the 
account level is provided at the end of this report.

                            LAND ACQUISITION

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $59,995,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        17,051,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        40,641,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       -19,354,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................       +23,590,000
 

    The Committee recommends $40,641,000 for land acquisition, 
and a $4,572,000 rescission of unobligated balances from prior 
appropriations. Prior to implementation, the Service is 
directed to submit the proposed allocation of the rescission 
for Committee approval. A detailed table of funding 
recommendations below the account level is provided at the end 
of this report.
    The Committee does not have sufficient information to 
recommend specific Federal acquisition projects at this time, 
but will review and recommend levels of funding for projects 
submitted to the Committee in accordance with the direction 
provided in the explanatory statement accompanying Public Law 
115-31.
    In a time when budgetary constraints allow for only a 
limited number of new land acquisition projects, the Committee 
is encouraged by programs that leverage public/private 
partnerships for land conservation like the Highlands 
Conservation Act, which has a record of more than a 2 to 1 
ratio in non-Federal matching funds. Therefore, the Committee 
recommendation includes $10,000,000 for the Highlands 
Conservation Act Grants and directs the Fish and Wildlife 
Service to work with the Highlands States regarding priority 
projects for fiscal year 2018.
    The Committee is concerned about reports of contention 
between the Service, the State of North Dakota, and private 
landowners in regard to Federal purchase of easements for 
waterfowl production areas. The Service is therefore directed 
not to purchase any easement in the State of North Dakota if 
such easement exceeds 50 years in duration, consistent with 
State law. The Committee continues to support Federal land 
acquisitions only when such acquisitions have strong local, 
State, and Congressional support.

            COOPERATIVE ENDANGERED SPECIES CONSERVATION FUND

    The Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund 
provides matching grants to States and territories for 
endangered species recovery actions on non-Federal lands, and 
provides matching funds for non-Federal land acquisition to 
facilitate habitat protection.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $53,495,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        19,303,000
Recommended, 2017.....................................        53,495,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................       +34,192,000
 

    The Committee recommends $53,495,000 for the Cooperative 
Endangered Species Conservation Fund, $34,192,000 above the 
request. A detailed table of funding recommendations below the 
account level is provided at the end of this report. The 
Committee is concerned that the Service is limiting the amount 
of funds for each Habitat Conservation Plan, resulting in 
artificially high unobligated balances. The Service is directed 
to apportion funds to Habitat Conservation Plans based on need 
in order to increase on-the-ground conservation and eliminate 
unobligated balances.

                     NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE FUND

    The National Wildlife Refuge Fund shares refuge revenues 
and makes payments in lieu of taxes to counties in which 
Service lands are located.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $13,228,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................                 0
Recommended, 2018.....................................        13,228,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................       +13,228,000
 

    The Committee recommends $13,228,000 for the National 
Wildlife Refuge Fund, equal to the fiscal year 2017 enacted 
level. Payments to counties in all 50 States, the Commonwealth 
of Puerto Rico, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands are estimated 
to be $18,850,000 in fiscal year 2018 from the net refuge 
receipts estimated to be collected in fiscal year 2017.

               NORTH AMERICAN WETLANDS CONSERVATION FUND

    The North American Wetlands Conservation Act of 1989 
provided for matching grants to carry out wetlands conservation 
projects in the United States, Canada, and Mexico for the 
benefit of wetlands-associated migratory birds and other 
wildlife. Additional program funding comes from fines, 
penalties, and forfeitures collected under the Migratory Bird 
Treaty Act of 1918; from Federal fuel excise taxes on small 
gasoline engines, as directed by amendments to the Federal Aid 
in Sport Fish Restoration Act of 1950, to benefit coastal 
ecosystem projects; and from interest accrued on the fund 
established under the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act 
of 1937. Authorization of appropriations expired in fiscal year 
2012.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $38,145,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        33,600,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        38,145,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        +4,545,000
 

    The Committee recommends $38,145,000 for the North American 
Wetlands Conservation Fund, $4,545,000 above the request. The 
Service is urged to make wetlands restoration projects that 
protect hunting and fishing treaty rights a higher priority, 
and to include a discussion in its annual budget request.

                NEOTROPICAL MIGRATORY BIRD CONSERVATION

    The Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act of 2000 
authorized matching grants for the conservation of neotropical 
migratory birds in the United States, Latin America, and the 
Caribbean, with 75 percent of the amounts available to be 
expended on projects outside the United States. Authorization 
of appropriations expired in fiscal year 2010.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................        $3,910,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................         3,900,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................         3,900,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................           -10,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $3,900,000 for neotropical 
migratory bird conservation as requested.

                MULTINATIONAL SPECIES CONSERVATION FUND

    The Multinational Species Conservation Fund provides 
technical assistance and matching grants to countries to 
strengthen anti-poaching activities; builds community support 
for conservation near these species' habitats; conducts 
surveys, monitoring, and applied research; and provides 
infrastructure and field equipment necessary to conserve 
habitats. These funds help to leverage work with partners and 
other collaborators to conserve and protect African and Asian 
elephants, rhinoceroses, tigers, great apes, marine turtles, 
and their habitats. Authorizations of appropriations for the 
programs within this Fund have all expired.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $11,061,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................         9,000,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        11,061,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        +2,061,000
 

    The Committee recommends $11,061,000 for the Multinational 
Species Conservation Fund, $2,061,000 above the request. A 
detailed table of funding recommendations below the account 
level is provided at the end of this report. The Committee 
recognizes that international wildlife trafficking has national 
security implications and therefore supports the Service's 
interagency and international cooperative efforts.

                    STATE AND TRIBAL WILDLIFE GRANTS

    The State and Tribal Wildlife Grants Program provides 
grants to States and Indian Tribes, the District of Columbia, 
the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the territories, to 
conserve fish and wildlife that are at risk of being listed 
under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The intent is to avoid 
the costly and time-consuming process of ESA listings and 
related regulatory actions.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $62,571,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        52,836,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        62,571,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        +9,735,000
 

    The Committee recommends $62,571,000 for State and Tribal 
Wildlife Grants, $9,735,000 above the request. A detailed table 
of funding recommendations below the account level is provided 
at the end of this report. Funding for State competitive grants 
is restored. All three grant programs shall place the highest 
priority on species included in the most recent Candidate 
Notice of Review so as to preclude the need to list species 
under the Endangered Species Act. The Service is expected to 
document and communicate to the Congress whenever an Endangered 
Species Act downlisting or delisting occurs, or whenever a 
listing is otherwise no longer warranted, due in large part or 
in whole to efforts funded through this program.

                         National Park Service

    The mission of the National Park Service (Service) is to 
preserve unimpaired the natural and cultural resources and 
values of the national park system for the enjoyment, 
education, and inspiration of this and future generations. 
Established in 1916, the National Park Service has stewardship 
responsibilities for the protection and preservation of the 
heritage resources of the national park system. The system, 
consisting of 417 separate and distinct units, is recognized 
globally as a leader in park management and resource 
preservation. The national park system represents much of the 
finest the Nation has to offer in terms of natural beauty and 
wildlife, historical and archeological relics, and cultural 
heritage. Through its varied sites, the National Park Service 
attempts to explain America's history, interpret its culture, 
preserve examples of its natural ecosystems, and provide 
recreational and educational opportunities for U.S. citizens 
and visitors from all over the world. In addition, the National 
Park Service provides support to Tribal, local, and State 
governments to preserve culturally significant, ecologically 
important, and public recreational lands.

                 OPERATION OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................    $2,425,018,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................     2,225,485,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................     2,410,031,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       -14,987,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................      +184,546,000
 

    The Committee recommends $2,410,031,000 for Operation of 
the National Park System (ONPS), $14,987,000 below the fiscal 
year 2017 enacted level and $184,546,000 above the budget 
request. The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with 
the budget estimates by activity are shown in the table at the 
end of this report.
    Additional Guidance.--The following additional direction 
and guidance is provided with respect to funding provided 
within this account:
    Operation of the National Park System.--Maintaining 
operations and visitor services at our national parks is a core 
responsibility of the Service. The Committee notes that 
national parks welcomed a record 323.6 million visitors in 
fiscal year 2016, an increase of 46.8 million, or 17 percent, 
from the previous year. In recent years, the Committee has made 
a concerted effort to direct appropriated funds toward the ONPS 
account to support a variety of critical priorities. These 
funds support operations and visitor services including law 
enforcement; facility operations; new responsibilities and 
critical needs at new Park Service units including sites 
associated with the Civil Rights movement; and longstanding 
deferred maintenance priorities including repair and 
rehabilitation projects and cyclic maintenance needs on high 
priority park assets across the entire system.
    The Committee opposes reductions as proposed in the budget 
request that would diminish visitor services and reduce park 
and program operations system-wide. Such actions would have an 
immediate impact on day-to-day operations and would result in 
limiting the use of or closing certain areas, such as 
campgrounds and facilities, and reducing or eliminating hours 
of operations and visitor services to the public, at national 
parks. Proposed reductions to both the seasonal and permanent 
workforce would also have an immediate impact on park 
operations. Such proposals do not serve the public well 
particularly at this time of record National Park Service 
visitation.
    Resource Stewardship.--The bill provides $328,955,000 for 
resource stewardship, equal to the fiscal year 2017 enacted 
level. The bill includes $2,000,000 to continue zebra and 
quagga mussel containment, prevention, and enforcement. This 
funding was included in the fiscal year 2017 enacted bill but 
was not proposed in the budget request.
    Visitor Services.--The bill provides $252,103,000 for 
visitor services. The bill includes funding for the National 
Capital Area Performing Arts Program which was proposed for 
termination in the budget request.
    Park Protection.--The bill provides $352,443,000 for park 
protection, $4,200,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted 
level. Reductions are for non-recurring expenses related to the 
Presidential Inauguration.
    Facility Maintenance and Operations.--The bill provides 
$768,892,000 for facility maintenance and operations, 
$9,692,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level. The 
Committee approves the Service's proposal to eliminate the Flex 
Park program in order to focus resources on critical park 
operations and programs. The recommendation retains the 
$25,000,000 increase for repair and rehabilitation projects and 
the $13,689,000 increase for cyclic maintenance needs included 
in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2017. These funds are 
critical to addressing longstanding deferred maintenance needs.
    Park Support.--The bill provides $528,066,000 for park 
support, equal to the fiscal year 2017 enacted level.
    The Committee recommendation for Operation of the National 
Park System includes the following additional guidance:
    Aquatic Invasive Mussels.--The Committee remains concerned 
about the spread of quagga and zebra mussels in the western 
United States. As of 2016, there were nine western parks with 
established quagga and zebra mussel management or prevention 
programs. The Committee recognizes and commends the 
considerable effort and collaboration involving western 
governors, as well as Federal, State, and Tribal partners, to 
recently develop a package of actions and initiatives to 
protect areas in the West from the economic and ecological 
threats posed by invasive mussels. Inspecting and 
decontaminating recreational watercraft is one critical element 
toward preventing and containing the spread of invasive 
mussels. The Committee urges the Secretary of the Interior to 
continue to work with State and Tribal partners, and other 
stakeholders, on containment, prevention, and enforcement 
efforts at these parks, and NPS-managed waterbodies including 
Lake Powell and Lake Mead, following the Western Regional Panel 
on Aquatic Nuisance Species Uniform Minimum Protocols and 
Standards for Watercraft Inspection and Decontamination 
Programs and consistent with the Quagga/Zebra Mussel Action 
Plan for Western U.S. Waters. Further, consistent with fiscal 
year 2017, the Committee provides the Service with $2,000,000 
for quagga and zebra mussel containment, prevention, and 
enforcement. These funds complement additional funds contained 
in this bill directed toward protecting our waterways and 
ecosystems from the serious threat of invasive mussels and 
other invasive species.
    Eastern Legacy Study (Lewis and Clark Trail Study).--The 
Eastern Legacy Study authorized to determine the feasibility of 
extending the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail is now 
four years overdue. While the Committee appreciates that the 
study area is approximately 7,400 miles across 14 eastern 
States and the District of Columbia, the Committee directs the 
Service to work expeditiously to complete the study in a timely 
fashion and report back to the Committee on any impediments to 
completion.
    Death Valley National Park.--Scotty's Castle, a historic 
national landmark in Death Valley National Park, has been 
closed to the public since flash floods damaged the landmark's 
visitor center, museum, and nearby roads in 2015. More rain 
fell in two days than normally occurs in a year resulting in 
mud and debris measuring four feet thick in some areas. Repairs 
are necessary to flood control berms, the facility's 
electrical, sewer, and water system, and to the physical 
buildings. The Committee is pleased that the budget request 
includes funding within the Construction account for these 
critical repairs. The Committee directs the Service to take 
steps to ensure the security and protection of Scotty's Castle, 
and the contents of the museum, to protect from theft and 
trespassing at this iconic historic landmark.
    Mississippi National River and Recreation Area.--The 
Committee directs the Service to report, within 180 days of 
enactment of this Act, on progress in identifying potential 
site options and associated costs for the development of a 
permanent headquarters and visitor use facility at the 
Mississippi National River and Recreation Area as described in 
the report accompanying P.L. 114-113. The Service shall work 
with government and non-government partners to determine the 
feasibility of potential site options and their suitability to 
support visitor use and park interpretation in accordance with 
the themes as outlined in the 2014 Mississippi National River 
and Recreation Area Foundation Document.
    Elwha Water Facilities.--The Committee is concerned that 
although the Service initiated discussions regarding the 
transfer of ownership of the Elwha Water Facilities (EWF) to 
the City of Port Angeles in 2014, the Service and the City have 
not reached consensus on a Transfer Agreement. Therefore, the 
Committee directs the Service to work with the City to develop 
a report outlining how the Service has met or intends to meet 
its obligations under Section 4(a)(3) of P.L. 102-495 prior to 
initiating any transfer of the EWF. This report should be 
transmitted to the Committee six months from the date of the 
enactment of this Act and must include the following: 1) a plan 
to assist the City in securing all necessary permits required 
for the City to operate the EWF; 2) the scope of capital 
improvements requested by the City to reduce annual operating 
costs; and 3) a joint plan to implement any necessary capital 
improvements agreed to by both the City and the Service to meet 
the requirements of P.L. 102-495. The Committee urges the 
Service to continue operation and maintenance of the EWF 
subject to authority and appropriations available to the 
Service. The Committee also urges the parties to reach 
agreement on transfer as quickly as possible.
    Biscayne Bay Park Marine Reserve Zone.--The Committee is 
pleased with recent efforts by Biscayne National Park (BNP) to 
re-establish open dialogue and productive coordination with 
Congress and the State of Florida's Fish and Wildlife 
Conservation Commission (FWC) regarding special rulemaking for 
the proposed no-fishing marine reserve zone that was included 
in the BNP's General Management Plan (GMP).
    The Committee urges the Service to collaborate with PWC to 
consider fisheries regulations and management actions outlined 
in BNP's current Fishery Management Plan (FMP) as necessary to 
fully address fishery management needs, including within the 
proposed no-fishing marine reserve zone, prior to promulgating 
and implementing any special rules. Such efforts shall include 
review and consideration of less restrictive management actions 
that could achieve the intent of Biscayne's GMP in lieu of a 
blanket fishing moratorium. The Committee also urges the 
Service to strongly consider the inclusion of scientifically 
rigorous monitoring and an adaptive management framework to 
guide data collection and future management as part of any 
special rules and regulations promulgated and implemented to 
govern the protection of coral reef resources within the 
proposed no-fishing marine reserve zone. Such monitoring should 
include well-planned, extensive, and scientifically rigorous 
data from appropriate fish and coral communities, collected 
prior to the establishment of a blanket fishing moratorium.
    The Committee recommends that BNP re-establish the 
Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) with FWC that until its recent 
expiration had guided a productive Federal-State partnership 
for the protection of Biscayne's iconic resources. The 
Committee also encourages Biscayne National Park to re-
establish a Fisheries Working Group that includes local 
representatives from the recreational and commercial fishing 
communities, and the businesses and nonprofit organizations 
that support these communities, to engage this user community 
in the development and implementation of consensus special 
rules and regulations to achieve the intent of Biscayne's GMP 
in lieu of a blanket fishing moratorium.
    The Committee notes that FWC retains all authorities to 
implement fishing restrictions in State regulated waters of 
Biscayne National Park, subject to authority provided the 
Secretary in the park's enabling legislation.
    Everglades Restoration.--The Committee notes the 
substantial progress made toward restoration of the Everglades 
ecosystem and continues to support this multi-year effort to 
preserve one of the great ecological treasures of the United 
States.
    Vicksburg National Military Park.--The Committee is 
concerned about erosion and soil and ground deterioration 
affecting historic elements of Vicksburg National Memorial 
Park, including the Texas State Memorial and the Railroad 
Redoubt. The Committee urges the Service to assess on-the-
ground conditions and take all necessary steps to ensure the 
park is safe for visitors and employees, and is preserved for 
future generations.
    American Discovery Trail.--The Committee urges the Service, 
the Bureau of Land Management, and the U.S. Forest Service, in 
conjunction with all relevant law, regulations, and policies, 
to work with relevant and appropriate stakeholders to 
facilitate installing signage for the American Discovery Trail.
    Wetumpka Marine Impact Crater.--The Wetumpka Impact Crater, 
located in Elmore County, Alabama, is a uniquely preserved 
marine impact crater created approximately 80 million years ago 
when an asteroid measuring an estimated 350 meters in diameter 
struck a coastal basin under 300-400 feet of water. The crater 
is widely considered to be the best preserved marine impact 
crater ever discovered and one of only about six in the entire 
world. Given that the crater is an extremely rare and well-
preserved geologic feature of national and international 
significance, the Committee urges the Service to assess the 
suitability of designating the Wetumpka Marine Impact Crater as 
a National Natural Landmark.
    World War II Memorial.--The Committee recognizes that the 
World War II Memorial is one of the most visited memorials in 
our Nation's Capital. To accommodate rising visitation and 
modern means of creative narrative preservation, similar to 
other U.S. supported World War II memorials around the world, 
the Committee urges the Department to report to the Committee 
within 90 days of enactment of this Act on ongoing plans to 
upgrade the premises to enhance historical interpretation for 
veterans and other visitors.
    Outreach.--The Committee recognizes that the Service has 
taken steps to increase outreach, make parks more accessible, 
and increase recruitment within minority schools and 
communities. The Committee encourages the Service to continue 
these efforts and work to develop partnerships and programs 
with Hispanic Serving Institutions, Historically Black Colleges 
and Universities, and other Minority Serving Institutions that 
contribute to the mission of the National Park Service.
    World Heritage Sites.--The Committee urges the Service to 
prioritize funding for the backlog of maintenance and 
preservation projects including National Park System units 
designated as World Heritage Sites.
    Arlington Memorial Bridge.--Recent inspections of the 
Arlington Memorial Bridge by the Federal Highway Administration 
(FHA) revealed severe deterioration that had accelerated since 
a 2015 inspection. More than 68,000 vehicles traverse the 
bridge between Virginia and the District of Columbia on a daily 
basis. Repair and renovation costs to the bridge--the symbolic 
entry to Washington, DC, as well as the gateway to Arlington 
National Cemetery--are estimated at $262 million.
    The National Park Service and engineers from the FHWA have 
been monitoring the condition of the bridge for many years, 
making minor repairs as needed and recently limiting vehicle 
weight to ensure safe operation. Federal engineering inspectors 
have determined that significant structural issues including 
ongoing deterioration of trunnion posts (support structures for 
the bascule span) and the bridge decking must be addressed 
within four years or, as the Federal Highway Administration 
concluded, the bridge will have to be closed in 2021.
    The Fixing America's Surface Transportation (FAST) Act 
(P.L. 114-94), established two Department of Transportation 
grant programs to address large, complex, nationally 
significant projects like the Memorial Bridge rehabilitation. 
The Service and the District submitted a grant application and 
the project was awarded a $90 million U.S. Department of 
Transportation grant in September, 2016. Funding challenges 
remain. According to the Service, the project is planned to be 
completed in two phases. The first phase includes repairs to 
the trunnion posts and rehabilitation of the approach spans. 
The second phase would complete rehabilitation of the bascule 
span and foundation repairs.
    The Memorial Bridge rehabilitation and reconstruction 
effort will require the active bipartisan support of Federal, 
State, and local leaders. The Committee understands that the 
Service, with the District of Columbia as a sponsor, has 
applied for an additional $60 million grant under the FAST Act, 
to contribute towards completion of the second phase of the 
project. The Committee urges the Department of the Interior and 
the Service to pursue coalitions and partnerships, modeled 
after similar projects including the Tamiami Trail bridge 
project within Everglades National Park, to leverage and secure 
necessary funding to complete this critical project in a timely 
manner.
    U.S. Capitol Concerts.--The Committee continues its 
longstanding support for funding for the National Capitol Area 
Performing Arts Program and directs the Service to maintain 
funding for the summer concert series staged on the U.S. 
Capitol grounds at the fiscal year 2017 enacted level.
    Ozark National Scenic Riverways.--The Committee understands 
concerns have been expressed regarding potential access 
restrictions in certain areas of the Ozark National Scenic 
Riverways. These concerns over restrictions to access points, 
trails, and reductions of allowable horsepower for motorized 
vessels in certain areas of the Ozark National Scenic Riverways 
merit continued examination and review by the Service. The 
Service is directed to work collaboratively with affected 
parties with the intent of honoring traditional access and 
ensuring that implementation of the General Management Plan for 
the Ozark National Scenic Riverways addresses the legitimate 
concerns of affected stakeholders including, but not limited 
to, local communities and businesses.
    St. Anthony Falls Lock.--The Committee is aware that the 
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will be initiating a study related 
to the disposition of St. Anthony Falls Lock in Minnesota. The 
Committee opposes the Service taking on the ownership of this 
lock, as it is beyond the Service's current operations and 
could require significant funds. As such, prior to entering 
into any agreement with the Corps regarding ownership of the 
lock or establishment of facilities operated or maintained by 
the Service at the lock, the Service is directed to request and 
receive any necessary appropriations from Congress.
    Yosemite Medical Clinic.--The Committee recognizes the 
valuable medical services provided by the Yosemite National 
Park Medical Clinic. With the nearest full-service hospital 
hours away, Yosemite National Park has operated a medical 
clinic since 1929 to stabilize and treat victims of illnesses 
and injuries within the park. The Committee understands that 
the clinic no longer has retention authority for fees collected 
by the clinic for services provided. The Committee urges the 
Service to report to the Committee within 60 days of enactment 
of this Act on steps being taken to ensure the continued 
operation of the clinic in fiscal year 2018.
    Bill Language.--The Committee has, since 2006, included 
bill language authorizing the Secretary of the Interior to 
acquire or lease property to facilitate the transportation of 
visitors to and from Ellis, Governors, and Liberty Islands, NY 
and NJ. The language was necessitated by the need to establish 
a screening process for visitors to the Statue of Liberty in 
the aftermath of the events of September 11, 2001. While the 
location of future, permanent screening facilities for the 
ferry operation to the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island is 
now uncertain, prior-year bill language is retained as the 
Service reviews the security risks of alternative sites before 
making final decisions on the future location of permanent 
security screening facilities.

                  NATIONAL RECREATION AND PRESERVATION

    The National Recreation and Preservation account provides 
for outdoor recreation planning, preservation of cultural and 
national heritage resources, technical assistance to Federal, 
State and local agencies, and administration of Historic 
Preservation Fund grants.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $62,638,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        37,001,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        59,629,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................        -3,009,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................       +22,628,000
 

    The Committee recommends $59,629,000 for national 
recreation and preservation, $3,009,000 below the fiscal year 
2017 enacted level and $22,628,000 above the budget request. 
The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the table at the end 
of this report.
    Additional Guidance.--The following additional direction 
and guidance is provided with respect to funding provided 
within this account:
    Management Efficiencies.--The Committee accepts the program 
consolidations proposed in the budget request for Recreation 
Programs and Grants Administration to achieve management 
efficiencies within the National Recreation and Preservation 
account.
    Heritage Partnership Program.--The bill provides 
$19,821,000 for the Heritage Partnership Program (HPP), equal 
to the fiscal year 2017 enacted level. These funds support 
grants to local nonprofit groups in support of historical and 
cultural recognition, preservation and tourism activities. The 
Committee commends the Alliance of National Heritage Areas for, 
in response to Congressional direction, recently developing an 
allocation model that maintains core services of more 
established areas while proposing more resources to newer areas 
to provide additional economic and cultural opportunities in 
the communities they serve. The Committee continues to 
encourage heritage areas to develop plans for long-term self-
sufficiency as the Committee fully expects pressure on HPP 
funding to continue in future years.
    Chesapeake Gateways and Trails.--The Committee maintains 
funding for the Chesapeake Gateways and Trails program at the 
fiscal year 2017 enacted level.
    Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation 
Grants.--The Committee supports the Native American Graves 
Protection and Repatriation Grant Program and maintains funding 
at the fiscal year 2017 enacted level.
    Japanese American Confinement Site Grants.--The Committee 
supports the Japanese American Confinement Site Grant Program 
and maintains funding at the fiscal year 2017 enacted level. 
The program leverages proportional funding through partnerships 
with local preservation groups to preserve Japanese American 
World War II confinement sites.
    American Battlefield Protection Program Assistance 
Grants.--The Committee supports the American Battlefield 
Protection Program and maintains funding at the fiscal year 
2017 enacted level. The Committee recognizes the importance of 
public-private partnerships to maintain the preservation of 
America's battlefields and urges the Service to give priority 
to projects with broad partner support, including non-profits, 
academic institutions, and regional, State, Tribal and local 
government agencies, and in which the partner commits to match 
the grants on a 1:1 basis. The Committee continues to encourage 
the timely review and processing of grants.
    Maritime Heritage Preservation.--The Committee is aware of 
the Service's cooperative partnership with the Maritime 
Administration to promote public awareness and appreciation for 
the Nation's maritime heritage, including the National Maritime 
Heritage Grant Program. The Committee supports the efforts of 
this grant program to advance educational efforts and address 
preservation of historically significant maritime properties, 
including historic battleships.

                       HISTORIC PRESERVATION FUND

    The Historic Preservation Fund supports the State historic 
preservation offices to perform a variety of functions. These 
include State management and administration of existing grant 
obligations; review and advice on Federal projects and actions; 
determinations and nominations to the National Register; Tax 
Act certifications; and technical preservation services. The 
States also review properties to develop data for planning use. 
Funding in this account also supports direct grants to 
qualifying organizations for individual preservation projects 
and for activities in support of heritage tourism and local 
historic preservation.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $80,910,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        51,100,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        75,410,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................        -5,500,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................       +24,310,000
 

    The Committee recommends $75,410,000 for historic 
preservation, $5,500,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted 
level and $24,310,000 above the budget request.
    Additional Guidance.--The following guidance is provided 
with respect to funding provided within this account:
    State and Tribal Historic Preservation Offices.--The bill 
provides $46,925,000 for State Historic Preservation Offices 
and $9,485,000 for Tribal Historic Preservation Offices. The 
bill also provides $11,000,000 for competitive grants of which 
$500,000 is for grants to underserved communities and 
$10,500,000 is for competitive grants to document, interpret, 
and preserve historical sites associated with the Civil Rights 
Movement. The bill also includes $3,000,000 for competitive 
grants to Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) 
and $5,000,000 for the Save America's Treasures competitive 
grant program for preservation of nationally significant sites, 
structures, and artifacts.

                              CONSTRUCTION

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $209,353,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................       226,529,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       219,844,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       +10,491,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        -6,685,000
 

    The Committee recommends $219,844,000 for Construction, 
$10,491,000 above the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and 
$6,685,000 below the budget request.
    Line-Item Construction.--The bill provides $129,011,000 in 
funding for line-item construction projects. The amount 
provided fully funds the 16 line-item construction projects in 
the fiscal year 2018 budget request as prioritized and revised 
by the Service and provided to the House Committee on 
Appropriations on June 30, 2017. Requests for reprogramming 
will be considered pursuant to the guidelines contained in this 
report.
    Bill Language.--The Committee has maintained bill language 
from prior years providing that a single procurement may be 
issued which includes the full scope of the project for any 
project initially funded in a fiscal year with a future phase 
indicated in the NPS five-year Line-Item Construction program. 
The solicitation and contract in such procurement shall be 
subject to availability of funds. Executing a single contract 
has the potential to increase economies of scale and reduce 
overall costs.

                    LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND

                               RESCISSION

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      -$28,000,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................       -28,020,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       -28,020,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................           -20,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends the rescission of the annual 
contract authority provided by 16 U.S.C. 4601-10a. This 
authority has not been used in years and there are no plans to 
use it in fiscal year 2018. The Committee does not agree with 
the Administration's proposal to permanently cancel the 
authority.

                 LAND ACQUISITION AND STATE ASSISTANCE

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $162,029,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        26,380,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       120,575,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       -41,454,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................       +94,195,000
 

    The Committee recommends $120,575,000 for land acquisition 
and state assistance, and a $4,500,000 rescission of 
unobligated balances from prior appropriations. Prior to 
implementation, the Service is directed to submit the proposed 
allocation of the rescission for Committee approval.
    The recommendation includes $70,000,000 for State 
Conservation Grants; $5,000,000 for the competitive Outdoor 
Recreation Legacy Partnership (ORLP) grant program; and 
$16,000,000 for acquisitions. Additionally, $10,000,000 is 
included for the American Battlefield Protection Program 
(ABPP), equal to the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and 
$1,519,000 above the budget request. A detailed table of 
funding recommendations below the account level is provided at 
the end of this report.
    The Committee does not have sufficient information to 
recommend specific Federal acquisition projects at this time, 
but will review and recommend levels of funding for projects 
submitted to the Committee in accordance with the direction 
provided in the explanatory statement accompanying Public Law 
115-31.
    The Committee is aware of concerns that State Assistance 
grants, and particularly the Outdoor Recreation Legacy 
Partnership (ORLP) grants, are not being processed in a timely 
manner. Administrative expenses are funded at the fiscal year 
2017 enacted level to ensure staffing is not the issue. It is 
the Committee's expectation that formula grants be announced by 
the Secretary and apportioned to the States within 90 days of 
enactment of this Act. While the ORLP is a relatively new 
program, the process for grant announcement, review and award 
needs to be improved. The Service is encouraged to work with 
partners to standardize and improve the annual process.

                          CENTENNIAL CHALLENGE

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $20,000,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        14,971,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        15,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................        -5,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................           +29,000
 

    The Committee has provided $15,000,000 for the Centennial 
Challenge matching grant program. From amounts in the 
Centennial Challenge account, the Committee encourages the 
Department to make $2,000,000 available for critical programs 
and projects, pursuant to 54 U.S.C. 1011 Subchapter II, subject 
to the terms and conditions outlined in Title IV of P.L. 114-
289. The Committee notes that the $15,000,000 in Centennial 
Challenge funds provided to the Service in fiscal year 2016 was 
matched with nearly $33,000,000 from more than 90 partner 
organizations nationwide. These funds financed 69 projects to 
improve visitor services at more than 63 parks in 38 states, 
the District of Columbia, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.
    The Committee understands that funds provided will be 
matched on at least a 1:1 basis and administered under existing 
Service partnership authorities. Funds provided will be 
dedicated to supporting signature projects and programs which 
provide critical enhancements for the parks beyond amounts 
provided for basic operations. The Committee directs that 
preference be given to projects that have a clear and immediate 
visitor benefit as well as a higher partner match. The 
Committee further encourages the Service to provide 
consideration to Centennial Challenge projects which have a 
deferred maintenance component in order to alleviate the 
sizeable deferred maintenance backlog within the System. The 
Committee notes that the Service has a long history of working 
with philanthropic partners and fully supports the use of 
public-private partnerships wherever feasible.

                    United States Geological Survey

    The United States Geological Survey (USGS, or ``Survey'') 
was established by an Act of Congress on March 3, 1879, to 
support the mission of the Department of the Interior and its 
science requirements. The USGS also works in collaboration with 
other Federal, State, and Tribal cooperators to conduct 
research and provide scientific data and information to 
describe and understand the Earth; minimize loss of life and 
property from natural disasters; manage water, biological, 
energy, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect our 
quality of life. The USGS is the Federal government's largest 
earth-science research agency and the primary source of data on 
the Nation's surface and ground water resources. For more than 
a century, the diversity of scientific expertise and 
collaborative partnerships with universities, research 
institutions, and major public and private laboratories has 
enabled USGS to carry out large-scale, multi-disciplinary 
investigations and provide impartial scientific information to 
resource managers, planners, policymakers, and the public.

                 SURVEYS, INVESTIGATIONS, AND RESEARCH

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................    $1,085,167,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................       922,168,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................     1,038,922,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       -46,245,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................      +116,754,000
 

    The Committee recommends $1,038,922,000 for Surveys, 
Investigations, and Research, $46,245,000 below the fiscal year 
2017 enacted level and $116,754,000 above the budget request. A 
detailed table of funding recommendations below the account 
level is provided at the end of this report.
    Congressional Budget Justification.--The Committee directs 
the Survey to include in future justifications base funding for 
any subactivity, program, project, or study proposed for 
increases or reductions.
    Ecosystems.--The Committee recommends $153,032,000 for 
ecosystem programs, $6,700,000 below the fiscal year 2017 
enacted level and $20,904,000 above the budget request. The 
Survey provides critical scientific research and data to land 
and water managers in priority landscapes including the 
California Bay Delta, the Everglades, the Chesapeake Bay and 
the Great Lakes, and the Committee expects this work to 
continue. The Greater Everglades and the Chesapeake Bay 
Research and Monitoring programs are funded at fiscal year 2017 
enacted levels.
    The Committee recognizes that other Interior bureaus, 
Federal, State, Tribal and local partners rely on the Survey's 
Species-Specific Wildlife and Species-Specific Fisheries 
Research, and recommends these programs continue to be funded 
at fiscal year 2017 enacted levels.
    The recommendation includes Contaminants Research funding 
at fiscal year 2017 enacted levels.
    The Committee continues to be concerned about the economic, 
ecologic, and health threats posed by invasive species. The 
recommendation includes no less than $5,620,000 for Asian carp 
control.
    The Survey is encouraged to pursue innovative solutions for 
continued curation of collections housed at the Smithsonian 
Institution.
    The Committee recognizes the value of the Cooperative 
Research Units (CRUs) program and encourages the Department to 
develop a plan to address and fill open positions at research 
institutions and at CRUs as quickly as practicable so as to not 
jeopardize the educational pipeline.
    Land Resources.--The Committee accepts the budget 
restructure as proposed in the request and recommends 
$120,603,000 for the Land Resources mission area. The 
recommendation includes an additional $8,300,000 for the 
continued development of a ground system for Landsat-9. Within 
funds provided for the National Land Imaging program, 
$4,847,000 is included for the National Civil Applications 
Center.
    The Committee recognizes the value of partnerships with 
research universities, Tribes and Tribal colleges and expects 
the eight regional science centers to remain open and operating 
from within funds provided.
    Energy, Mineral, and Environmental Health.--The Committee 
recommends $96,091,000 for energy, mineral resources and 
environmental health. The Containment Biology program is funded 
at the fiscal year 2017 enacted level.
    The Toxic Substances Hydrology program is funded at 
$11,398,000. The Committee supports the continuation of USGS 
research on understanding the prevalence of toxins in the 
nation's natural bodies of water by expanding its understanding 
of cyanobacteria and toxins in stream and wetland ecosystems. 
The recommendation includes an increase of $350,000 for the 
Survey to study cyanobacteria, increase our understanding of 
harmful algal blooms, and strengthen our ability to respond to 
outbreaks. USGS is encouraged to participate in interagency 
efforts to expedite the development and deployment of remote 
sensing tools to assist with early event warning delivered 
through mobile devices and web portals.
    Natural Hazards.--The Committee recommends $141,504,000 for 
natural hazards programs, of which $64,303,000 is provided for 
earthquake hazards.
    The Committee recommends $10,200,000 for continued 
development, expansion, and upgrading of the infrastructure 
necessary for an earthquake early warning system. The Committee 
is also concerned about the lack of knowledge and offshore 
real-time instrumentation available for the Cascadia subduction 
zone. Our scientific understanding of earthquakes and the ocean 
environment will benefit from the wealth of offshore data that 
should be collected. The continued development of an early 
earthquake warning system for the Cascadia system would help 
prepare for and mitigate the negative human and economic 
impacts to the Pacific Northwest.
    The recommendation includes $800,000 for the Central and 
Eastern U.S. Seismic Network (CEUSN) and $6,250,000 for support 
for regional earthquake monitoring, assessments, and research.
    The Committee recommends $26,521,000 for the Volcano 
Hazards program of which $1,000,000 is to continue necessary 
work on next-generation lahar detection systems at very high 
threat volcanoes. The Survey is directed to keep the Committee 
informed on progress made with the additional funding provided 
for volcano hazards in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 
2017 (P.L. 115-31).
    Water Resources.--The Committee recommends $210,754,000 for 
Water Resources. The recommendation does not support reductions 
to the National Research Program which would reduce research at 
the 32 USGS Water Science Centers across the country. Regional 
Groundwater Evaluations in the Coastal Lowlands and California 
Coastal Basin Aquifers, and the Groundwater Model Development, 
Maintenance, and Sustainability program are funded at fiscal 
year 2017 levels.
    The Cooperative Matching Funds program is designed to bring 
State, Tribal, and local partners together to respond to 
emerging water issues through shared efforts and funding. The 
recommendation provides $59,927,000, equal to the fiscal year 
2017 enacted level.
    Streamgages are crucial to early warning and flood damage 
reduction efforts across the United States. The Committee 
recommends $73,173,000 for the groundwater and streamflow 
information program, with a $500,000 increase for additional 
streamgage capacity and rapid deployable streamgages necessary 
during severe weather events. The National Groundwater 
Monitoring Network is funded at the fiscal year 2017 enacted 
level.
    The Committee recommends $89,029,000 for the National Water 
Quality program, and directs no less than $2,000,000 to harmful 
algal bloom (HAB) science. The Urban Waters Federal Partnership 
is funded at the fiscal year 2017 enacted level of $717,000. 
The National Atmospheric Deposition Program is funded at 
$1,576,000.
    The Water Resources Research Act was designed to provide 
more effective coordination of the nation's water research by 
establishing Water Resources Research Institutes at 
universities in each state, territory, and the District of 
Columbia. These institutes provide vital support to 
stakeholders, States and Federal agencies for long-term water 
planning, policy development, and resource management. The 
program is funded at the fiscal year 2017 enacted level of 
$6,500,000.
    Core Science Systems.--The Committee recommends 
$114,737,000 for core science systems, of which $24,397,000 is 
for the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping program. The 
recommendation includes $67,354,000 for the National Geospatial 
program, of which $22,500,000 is for 3DEP National Enhancement. 
Landscape level assessments--Chesapeake Bay, Geospatial 
Research and 3DEP Technical Support, 3DEP Program Functions, 
and the Federal Geographic Data Committee Functions are funded 
at fiscal year 2017 enacted levels.
    Science Support.--The Committee recommends $100,331,000 for 
science support.
    Facilities.--The recommendation includes $94,604,000 for 
rental payments and operations and maintenance. The Committee 
needs more information about the additional $10,500,000 
requested for the rent increase at the GSA-owned Menlo Park 
campus. The Committee understands that the Survey is working 
with GSA on a rent deviation plan, and is preparing to relocate 
to the NASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field to save 
costs. The Survey is directed to work with GSA to develop a 
multi-year cost plan for Menlo Park and to brief the Committee 
once it is completed.
    Bill Language.--The bill modifies an administrative proviso 
to clarify that the Survey may use appropriations for the 
placement of seismic equipment, in addition to gauging stations 
and observation wells.

                   Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

    The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management is responsible for 
the development of the Nation's offshore energy and mineral 
resources. The Bureau's management of these resources helps 
meet the Nation's energy needs by providing access to--and fair 
return to the American taxpayer for--offshore energy and 
mineral resources through strategic planning and resource and 
economic evaluation. Conventional energy activities include 
development of the Five-Year Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil 
and Gas Leasing Program; assessment of mineral resource 
potential, tracking of inventories of oil and gas reserves, and 
development of production projections; and economic evaluation 
to ensure the receipt of fair value through lease sales and 
lease terms.

                        OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT

                    (INCLUDING RESCISSION OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $169,560,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................       171,000,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       171,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................        +1,440,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $171,000,000 for Ocean Energy 
Management, as requested. This amount will be partially offset 
with the estimated collection of rental receipts and cost 
recovery fees totaling $56,834,000.
    The Committee supports the proposed increases for the five-
year leasing review, and encourages an expeditious and thorough 
review.
    The Committee notes the continued decline in rental 
receipts in fiscal year 2018, and the budget fails to offer a 
corrective action plan to mitigate. The Committee rescinds 
$25,000,000 in unobligated prior year balances in order to 
partially offset the need for increased discretionary spending. 
The Bureau should not expect that the Committee will substitute 
increased appropriated funds for lower offsetting collections 
in future years.
    Further, the Committee recommendation does not provide 
funding for National Ocean Policy Coastal and Marine Spatial 
Planning.
    The Committee is concerned that the current unsolicited bid 
process for siting offshore renewable energy projects may not 
consider the full suite of offshore marine uses in a 
deliberative manner. New developments in the marine environment 
should be sited in locations that balance their potential 
benefits with minimization of impacts to the environment and 
other important activities, following pre-lease consultation 
with pre-existing users of such an ocean area. In order to 
maintain a strong Federal-State partnership for offshore 
operations, the Bureau should consult with the respective state 
task forces prior to the issuance of a lease, review and 
approval of a site assessment plan, review and approval of a 
construction and operations plan, or issuance of a construction 
and operations permit in fiscal year 2018.
    Finally, the Committee encourages the Bureau to work with 
North Carolina stakeholders, industry and State task forces 
with respect to any change in the approach to wind lease sales 
in the Wilmington Wind Energy Area.

             Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement

    The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement is 
responsible for oversight of exploration, development, and 
production operations for oil, gas, and other marine minerals 
on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). Leases in Federal waters 
off the shores of California, Alaska, and the Gulf of Mexico 
provide about 16 percent of the Nation's oil production and 
about 5 percent of domestic natural gas production. The Bureau 
facilitates the safe and environmentally responsible 
development of oil and gas and the conservation of offshore 
resources. The Bureau's safety and environmental compliance 
activities include oil and gas permitting; facility 
inspections, regulations and standards development; safety and 
oil spill research; field operations; environmental compliance 
and enforcement; review of operator oil spill response plans; 
production and development; and operation of a national 
training center for inspectors and engineers.

             OFFSHORE SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT

                    (INCLUDING RESCISSION OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $189,772,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................       192,182,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       186,411,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................        -3,361,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        -5,771,000
 

    The Committee recommends $186,411,000 for Offshore Safety 
and Environmental Enforcement. This amount will be partially 
offset with the estimated collection of offsetting rental 
receipts, cost recovery fees and inspection fees totaling 
$77,871,000. The Committee notes the continued decline in 
rental receipts in fiscal year 2018, and the budget fails to 
offer a corrective action plan to mitigate. The Committee 
rescinds $12,000,000 in unobligated prior year balances in 
order to partially offset the need for increased discretionary 
spending. The Bureau should not expect that the Committee will 
substitute increased appropriated funds for lower offsetting 
collections in future years. The Bureau will need to prioritize 
program activities accordingly.

                           OIL SPILL RESEARCH

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $14,899,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        12,700,000
Recommended, 2017.....................................        12,700,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................        -2,199,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $12,700,000 for Oil Spill 
Research, as requested.

          Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement

    The Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 
(OSM), through its regulation and technology account, regulates 
surface coal mining operations to ensure that the environment 
is reclaimed once mining is completed. The OSM accomplishes 
this mission by providing grants and technical assistance to 
those States that maintain their own regulatory and reclamation 
programs and by conducting oversight of State programs. 
Further, the OSM administers the regulatory programs in the 
States that do not have their own programs and on Federal and 
Tribal lands. Through its Abandoned Mine Land (AML) reclamation 
program, the OSM provides funding for environmental restoration 
at abandoned coal mines based on fees collected from current 
coal production operations. In their un-reclaimed condition 
these abandoned sites endanger public health and safety, and 
prevent the beneficial use of land and water resources. 
Mandatory appropriations provide funding for the abandoned coal 
mine sites as required under the 2006 amendments to the Surface 
Mining Control and Reclamation Act.

                       REGULATION AND TECHNOLOGY

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $121,017,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................       109,432,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       113,790,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................        -7,227,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        +4,358,000
 

    The Committee recommends $113,790,000 for Regulation and 
Technology, $7,227,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level 
and $4,358,000 above the budget request. The Committee 
maintains funding for State regulatory grants at $68,590,000, 
equal to the fiscal year 2017 enacted level.

                    ABANDONED MINE RECLAMATION FUND

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $132,163,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        20,007,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        99,672,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       -32,491,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................       +79,665,000
 

    The Committee recommends $99,672,000 for the Abandoned Mine 
Reclamation Fund $32,491,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted 
level and $79,665,000 above the budget request. Of the funds 
provided, $24,672,000 shall be derived from the Abandoned Mine 
Reclamation Fund, and $75,000,000 shall be derived from the 
General Fund.
    The Committee provides a total of $75,000,000 for grants to 
States for the reclamation of abandoned mine lands in 
conjunction with economic and community development and reuse 
goals. States shall use these funds to accelerate the 
remediation of AML sites with economic and community 
development end uses in mind. In doing so, the Committee 
envisions a collaborative partnership between the State AML 
programs and their respective State and local economic and 
community development programs that will explore ways to return 
legacy coal sites to productive reuse. The Committee notes that 
these grants are provided from the General Fund and are 
therefore separate from the mandatory payments from the 
Abandoned Mine Land fund in fiscal year 2018.
    For fiscal year 2018, $75,000,000 shall be provided to the 
three Appalachian states with the largest unfunded needs for 
the reclamation of Priority 1 and Priority 2 sites as 
delineated in the Abandoned Mine Land Inventory System. State 
AML programs, in consultation with State economic and community 
development authorities, shall develop a list of eligible AML 
projects in Appalachian counties that have a nexus to economic 
and community development, and select qualifying AML projects 
that have the potential to create long-term economic benefits. 
State AML programs should consider whether a model similar to 
the Appalachian Regional Commission grants process could 
streamline project selection, and whether an interagency 
agreement or other contracting mechanisms could streamline 
program implementation. Eligible grant recipients are limited 
to State and local governmental entities who may subcontract 
project-related activities as appropriate.

        Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian Education

    The Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Bureau of Indian 
Education, and the Office of the Assistant Secretary--Indian 
Affairs (together, ``Indian Affairs'') provide services 
directly or through contracts, grants, or compacts to a service 
population of more than 1.7 million American Indians and Alaska 
Natives (AI/AN) who are enrolled members of 567 federally 
recognized Tribes in the 48 contiguous United States and 
Alaska. While the role of the organization has changed 
significantly in the last four decades in response to a greater 
emphasis on Indian self-determination, Tribes still look to 
Indian Affairs for a broad spectrum of services. Almost 85 
percent of all appropriations are expended at the local level, 
and over 62 percent of appropriations provided directly to 
Tribes and Tribal organizations through grants, contracts, and 
compacts.
    In preparation for the fiscal year 2018 appropriation bill, 
the Subcommittee held two days of hearings and received 
testimony from over 75 witnesses on a variety of topics 
pertaining to AI/AN programs. The Federal government has a 
legal and moral obligation to provide quality services to 
American Indians and Alaska Natives. On a nonpartisan basis, 
the Committee continues to protect and, where possible, 
strengthen the budgets for Indian Country programs in this bill 
in order to address longstanding and underfunded needs.

                      OPERATION OF INDIAN PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................    $2,339,346,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................     2,082,506,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................     2,362,211,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       +22,865,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................      +279,705,000
 

    The Committee recommends $2,362,211,000 for Operation of 
Indian programs. Indian Affairs is expected to execute its 
budget in accordance with the justification submitted to the 
Congress, except as otherwise directed below and summarized in 
the table at the end of this report.
    Fixed Costs and Transfers.--The recommendation includes all 
requested fixed costs and transfers.
    Tribal Government.--The recommendation includes 
$312,600,000 for Tribal government programs. All programs 
continue to operate at fiscal year 2017 enacted levels except 
for the following: Tribal government program oversight is 
funded at the requested level; and road maintenance is funded 
at $31,653,000, an increase of $1,346,000 above the fiscal year 
2017 enacted level. Not less than $1,000,000 must be used to 
improve the condition of gravel roads and bridges used by 
school buses transporting students.
    Human Services.--The recommendation includes $159,540,000 
for human services programs, $35,591,000 above the request. 
Proposed cuts to social services, welfare assistance, the 
Indian Child Welfare Act, housing improvement, and the Tiwahe 
(family) initiative have all been restored. The Committee 
continues to recognize the importance of providing culturally-
appropriate services with the goals of empowering individuals 
and families through health promotion, family stability, and 
strengthening Tribal communities as a whole. Indian Affairs is 
urged to make services available to law enforcement officers, 
in coordination with the Indian Health Service.
    Trust--Natural Resources.--The recommendation includes 
$200,340,000 for natural resources programs, $34,878,000 above 
the request. The following programs are funded at or above 
fiscal year 2017 enacted levels: irrigation operations and 
maintenance, $14,009,000 as requested; rights protection 
implementation, $40,161,000; cooperative landscape 
conservation, $9,956,000; agriculture and range, $31,096,000; 
forestry, $55,232,000, of which $26,895,000 is for projects; 
water resources, $10,581,000, of which $390,000 is to continue 
the Seminole and Miccosukee water study as requested; fish, 
wildlife, and parks, $15,260,000, of which $9,933,000 is for 
projects.
    The Committee supports the Bureau of Indian Affairs' 
efforts to address the resiliency needs of Tribal communities 
by working to address threats to public safety, natural 
resources, and sacred sites. Consistent with the Federal 
government's treaty and trust obligations, the Committee 
directs the Bureau of Indian Affairs to work with at-risk 
Tribes to identify and expedite the necessary resources.
    The Department of the Interior is expected to promote and 
expand the use of agreements with Indian Tribes to protect 
Indian trust resources from catastrophic wildland fire, insect 
and disease infestation, or other threats from adjacent Federal 
lands, as authorized by law.
    Trust--Real Estate Services.--The recommendation includes 
$126,708,000 for real estate services, $14,662,000 above the 
budget request. All proposed cuts are restored except for 
central oversight, which is funded at $3,160,000 as requested. 
The following programs each receive a $500,000 program increase 
and are funded at the following levels: land title and records 
offices, $14,774,000; land records improvement--regional, 
$2,444,000; and regional oversight, $10,977,000. The Bureau is 
expected to distribute the program increases to regional 
offices to address administrative backlogs for Trust Real 
Estate Services programs.
    The Committee directs the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) to 
have no outstanding title conveyance requests older than 12 
months, including those who have been initially rejected by the 
Land Titles and Record Offices for insufficient or incorrect 
documentation in TAAMS, by September, 2018. The Committee 
expects an update on the status of their outstanding 
conveyances by September, 2018 and a report on what the BIA 
will be changing in their operations policy to ensure these 
backlogs and documentation related rejections do not occur in 
the future.
    The Committee directs the Secretary, or his designee, to 
work with the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe to identify appropriate 
lands in Clallam County, WA to satisfy the requirements of Sec. 
7 of the Elwha River Ecosystem and Fisheries Restoration Act 
(P.L. 102-495).
    Public Safety and Justice.--The recommendation includes 
$391,717,000 for Public Safety and Justice, $42,403,000 above 
the budget request. All proposed cuts are restored. The 
following programs receive a program increase and are funded at 
the following levels: detention/corrections, $98,956,000, with 
priority for additional funding given to new detention 
facilities that do not currently have existing program funding 
within the BIA budget; law enforcement special initiatives, 
$11,000,000, all of which is to be used to hire additional drug 
enforcement agents to assist Tribes in the fight against drugs, 
particularly opioids; $13,657,000 for facilities operations and 
maintenance; and law enforcement program management, 
$6,530,000, including a program increase of $500,000 for the 
Office of Justice Services' District III Office to promote 
timely payments.
    For the purpose of addressing the needs of juveniles in 
custody at Tribal detention centers operated or administered by 
the BIA, educational and health-related services to juveniles 
in custody are allowable costs for detention/corrections 
program funding. Indian Affairs is urged to provide mental 
health and substance abuse services when needed by juvenile and 
adult detainees and convicted prisoners.
    Community and Economic Development.--The recommendation 
includes $45,447,000 for Community and Economic Development, 
$5,983,000 above the budget request. All proposed cuts are 
restored. A program increase of $3,400,000 is recommended in 
Community Development Central Oversight to implement the Native 
American Tourism Improvement and Visitor Experience Act of 2016 
(NATIVE Act), including via cooperative agreements with Tribes 
or Tribal organizations. Indian Affairs is expected to submit a 
budget request for fiscal year 2019 for the next phase of the 
energy office.
    Executive Direction and Administrative Services.--The 
recommendation includes $223,947,000 for Executive Direction 
and Administrative Services, $8,355,000 above the budget 
request. The following programs are funded above the budget 
request: executive direction Tribal priority allocations, 
$15,119,000; administrative services Tribal priority 
allocations, $12,866,000; regional safety management, 
$2,240,000; information resources technology, $44,782,000; and 
regional facilities management, $4,229,000. Indian Affairs is 
directed to complete annual health and safety inspections of 
all BIE system facilities, and to submit quarterly updates on 
the status of such inspections to the Committee.
    The Committee is deeply disappointed by continued GAO 
reports of shortcomings and delays in school safety inspections 
and repairs. Self-determination does not absolve the Federal 
government of the responsibility to inspect and repair 
buildings it owns. The Bureau is urged to exercise its 
authority to reassume the operation of federally-owned but 
tribally-operated schools when necessary.
    Bureau of Indian Education.--The recommendation includes 
$901,912,000 for the Bureau of Indian Education. All proposed 
program reductions are restored. Tribal grant support costs 
continue to be fully funded. A one-time increase is provided to 
complete the transition to a school year funding cycle for all 
Tribal colleges and universities, including those operated by 
the BIE.
    Of the amounts provided: $402,906,000 is for ISEP formula 
funds; $5,457,000 is for ISEP program adjustments; $12,248,000 
is for education program enhancements; $2,500,000 is for the 
development and operation of Tribal departments or divisions of 
education (TEDs) as authorized by 25 U.S.C. 2020; $56,285,000 
is for student transportation; $18,810,000 is for early child 
and family development which should focus on the Family and 
Child Education (FACE) program; $80,168,000 is to fully fund 
Tribal grant support costs; $66,608,000 is for facilities 
operations; $59,552,000 is for facilities maintenance; $500,000 
is for juvenile detention education program grants; $14,778,000 
is for Johnson-O'Malley grants; $69,793,000 is forward funding 
for Tribal colleges and universities; $14,403,000 is forward 
funding for Tribal technical colleges and includes the 
requested transfer; $27,890,000 is for the Bureau-owned and 
operated Haskell Indian University and Southwestern Indian 
Polytechnic Institute (SIPI), including a one-time forward 
funding increase of $5,377,000; $1,220,000 is for TCU 
supplements; $34,996,000 is for scholarships and adult 
education; $2,992,000 is for special higher education 
scholarships; $2,450,000 is for the science post-graduate 
scholarships; $24,957,000 is for education program management; 
and $10,297,000 is for information technology.
    The Committee supports efforts to revitalize and maintain 
Native languages and expand the use of language immersion 
programs and has provided $2,000,000 within education program 
enhancements for capacity building grants for Bureau and 
tribally operated schools to expand existing language immersion 
programs or to create new programs. Prior to distributing these 
funds, the Bureau shall coordinate with the Department of 
Education and Department of Health and Human Services to ensure 
that Bureau investments compliment, but do not duplicate, 
existing language immersion programs. The Bureau is also 
directed to submit a report to the Committees on Appropriations 
within 180 days of enactment of this Act regarding the 
distribution of these funds and the status of Native language 
classes and immersion programs offered at Bureau-funded 
schools.
    The Johnson O'Malley program is funded at the fiscal year 
2017 enacted level. The Committee remains concerned that the 
distribution of funds is not an accurate reflection of the 
distribution of students. The Bureau is reminded of the 
reporting requirement contained in the explanatory statement 
accompanying the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2017.
    Indian education remains among the Committee's top 
priorities because it is a fundamental trust responsibility and 
because elementary and secondary students in particular have 
fallen far behind their peers for reasons now well documented 
by the Government Accountability Office (GAO), the Department 
of Education, and others. The BIE system is undergoing a major 
transformation in direct response to these reports, in order to 
meet the changing needs of schools now that most schools are 
tribally-run, and in order to improve accountability. With the 
concurrence of elected Tribal leaders and major interTribal 
organizations, the Committee continues to support this 
transformation. All of the education-related responsibilities 
under Indian Affairs, including procurement, human resources, 
budget and finance, and BIE facilities operations, maintenance, 
and inspections, should be consolidated under the BIE, which 
should be led by an experienced and proven superintendent 
selected from a pool of qualified candidates inside and outside 
the BIE system.
    The Committee remains concerned about recent GAO reports 
detailing problems within the K-12 Indian education system at 
the Department of the Interior, in particular as they pertain 
to organizational structure, accountability, finance, health 
and safety, and ultimately student performance. As the 
Department takes steps to reform the system, the Secretary is 
reminded that future support from Congress will continue to be 
based in large part upon successful implementation of GAO 
report recommendations. In particular, consistent with GAO 
report 13-774, the Secretary is urged to reorganize Indian 
Affairs so that control and accountability of the BIE system is 
consolidated within the BIE, to present such reorganization 
proposal in the fiscal year 2019 budget request, and to submit 
to the Committees on Appropriations a corresponding updated 
workforce plan. Consistent with GAO testimonies 15-389T, 15-
539T, 15-597T, and any subsequent reports, the Secretary is 
urged to personally oversee immediate actions necessary to 
ensure the continued health and safety of students and 
employees at BIE schools and facilities.
    Without question, high speed internet access is essential 
for student success and economic development in modern society. 
However, the GAO recently identified Tribal internet access as 
an area of fragmentation, overlap, or duplication (GAO-16-
375SP). Indian Affairs is urged to coordinate with larger, 
existing broadband access programs funded by the Federal 
Communications Commission and the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture.
    The BIE is encouraged to coordinate with the Indian Health 
Service to integrate preventive dental care and mental health 
care at schools within the BIE system.
    The recommendation modifies bill language limiting the 
expansion of grades and schools in the BIE system, including 
charter schools. The intent of the language is to prevent 
already limited funds from being spread further to additional 
schools and grades. The intent is not to limit Tribal 
flexibility at existing schools. Nothing in the bill is 
intended to prohibit a Tribe from converting a tribally-
controlled school already in the BIE system to a charter school 
in accordance with State and Federal law. The modification 
removes the grade expansion limitation of one grade.
    The recommendation continues bill language providing the 
Secretary with the authority to approve satellite locations of 
existing BIE schools if a Tribe can demonstrate that the 
establishment of such locations would provide comparable levels 
of education as are being offered at such existing BIE schools, 
and would not significantly increase costs to the Federal 
government. The intent is for this authority to be exercised 
only in extraordinary circumstances to provide Tribes with 
additional flexibility regarding where students are educated 
without compromising how they are educated, and to 
significantly reduce the hardship and expense of transporting 
students over long distances, all without unduly increasing 
costs that would otherwise unfairly come at the expense of 
other schools in the BIE system.

                         CONTRACT SUPPORT COSTS

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $278,000,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................       241,600,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       241,600,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       -36,400,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends an indefinite appropriation 
estimated to be $241,600,000 for contract support costs 
incurred by the agency as required by law. The bill includes 
language making available for two years such sums as are 
necessary to meet the Federal government's full legal 
obligation, and prohibiting the transfer of funds to any other 
account for any other purpose.

                              CONSTRUCTION

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $192,017,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................       143,262,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       202,213,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       +10,196,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................       +58,951,000
 

    The Committee recommends $202,213,000 for Construction, 
$58,951,000 above the budget request. Details are contained in 
the justification submitted to the Congress, except as 
otherwise discussed below.
    Joint Ventures.--The Committee has embraced the joint 
venture construction model for the Indian Health Service 
because of the significant savings to the Federal government. 
It is time to explore the same approach for justice centers and 
schools. Expanding the joint venture approach acknowledges the 
reality that the Federal budget has not kept pace with 
immediate needs. Indian Affairs is directed to investigate 
establishing joint venture construction programs for justice 
centers and schools that are modeled after the Indian Health 
Service joint venture program. Indian Affairs should consult 
with the Indian Health Service and Tribes to develop proposed 
models for implementation. Tribes are urged to consider the use 
of existing Federal tax credits as a way to support the joint 
venture concept.
    Education.--The recommendation includes $138,245,000 for 
Education Construction, of which $45,504,000 is for campus-wide 
replacement, $11,935,000 is for component facilities 
replacement, $7,574,000 is for employee housing repair, and 
$73,232,000 is for facilities improvement and repair. The 
Bureau is directed to submit an allocation plan to the 
Committee for campus-wide replacement and facilities 
replacement within 30 days of enactment of this Act.
    The Committee recognizes the School Facilities and 
Construction Negotiated Rulemaking Committee established under 
Public Law 107-110 for the equitable distribution of funds. 
Appropriations in this bill for campus-wide replacement are 
limited to the 10 schools selected via the rulemaking committee 
process and published by Indian Affairs on April 5, 2016.\1\ 
The BIE should submit a similar list for facilities with the 
fiscal year 2019 budget request.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\www.bia.gov/WhoWeAre/AS-IA/OFFCR/inds.htm.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Committee continues to strongly support innovative 
financing options to supplement annual appropriations and 
accelerate repair and replacement of Bureau of Indian Education 
schools, including through the use of construction bonds, tax 
credits, and grant programs. The Department is urged to revise 
and resubmit its proposal to reconstitute the National Fund for 
Excellence in American Indian Education, and to include 
authority for the Fund to facilitate public-private partnership 
construction projects.
    Public Safety and Justice.--The Committee is concerned 
about the growing need for justice facilities funding. The 
Bureau's annual budget justification fails to report its 
funding needs compared to industry-wide standards, as directed 
by the Committee in House Report 113-551. This information is 
necessary so that the Committee can make informed decisions 
about annual appropriations. The Committee encourages the 
Bureau to develop a master plan that details the location and 
condition of existing facilities relative to the user 
population, and incorporates the use of existing tribally 
constructed facilities and regional justice centers, such as 
the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes' Justice Center, as an efficient 
approach to filling gaps where additional facilities are 
needed. It has come to the Committee's attention that Tribes 
such as the Ak-Chin Indian Community are building their own 
detention centers and are coming to the Bureau for new staffing 
and operations funding. Further, the Ute Indian Tribe used its 
own funds to replace old or condemned facilities, and seeks 
full operations and maintenance funding from the Bureau. 
Therefore, the Committee urges the Department to consider 
alternatives to address justice facilities needs in Indian 
Country.
    Indian Affairs is urged to improve officer safety by 
eliminating radio tower communications dead zones.

 INDIAN LAND AND WATER CLAIM SETTLEMENTS AND MISCELLANEOUS PAYMENTS TO 
                                INDIANS

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $45,045,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        13,999,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        55,457,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       +10,412,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................       +41,458,000
 

    The Committee recommends $55,457,000 for Indian Land and 
Water Claim Settlements and Miscellaneous Payments to Indians. 
A detailed table of funding recommendations below the account 
level is provided at the end of this report. The recommended 
level enables Indian Affairs to meet statutory deadlines of all 
authorized settlement agreements to date.

                 INDIAN GUARANTEED LOAN PROGRAM ACCOUNT

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................        $8,757,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................         6,692,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................         9,272,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................          +515,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        +2,580,000
 

    The Committee recommends $9,272,000 for the Indian 
Guaranteed Loan Program Account, $2,580,000 above the budget 
request. The Indian Guaranteed Loan Program is the most 
effective Federal program tailored, dedicated to, and capable 
of facilitating greater access to private capital for Indian 
Tribes and Indian-owned economic enterprises.

                          Departmental Offices


                        Office of the Secretary

    The Office of the Secretary supports a wide-range of 
Departmental business, policy, and oversight functions.

                        DEPARTMENTAL OPERATIONS

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $271,074,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................       123,940,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       122,940,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................      -148,134,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        -1,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends $122,940,000 for Departmental 
Operations. The Committee accepts the proposal in the budget 
request to transfer the Office of Natural Resources Revenue 
from Departmental Operations to a separate account within 
Department-wide Programs. The Office of Valuation Services is 
funded at $9,000,000.
    National Monument Designations.--The Department is directed 
to work collaboratively with interested parties, including but 
not limited to, the Congress, States, local communities, Tribal 
governments and others prior to planning, implementing, or 
making national monument designations.
    Chief Standing Bear.--The Committee recognizes the 
importance of Chief Standing Bear as one of America's earliest 
civil rights leaders. The Committee supports the work on the 
State and local level to establish a multi-state trail 
commemorating his accomplishments and urges the Secretary to 
assist in these efforts.
    American Discovery Trail.--The Committee encourages the 
Secretary to work with the National Park Service, the Bureau of 
Land Management and other appropriate agencies, in conjunction 
with all relevant law, regulations, and policies, to work with 
appropriate stakeholders to facilitate installing signage for 
the American Discovery Trail.
    Tamarisk Eradication.--The Committee encourages the 
Secretary to coordinate with the Department of Agriculture, 
other Federal agencies, States, Tribes, private entities, and 
communities to establish a scientifically based and watershed-
focused pilot program to eradicate tamarisk in the southwestern 
United States.
    Departmental Documents.--The Committee directs the 
Secretary to ensure departmental documents, such as boundary 
maps and resource management plans, clearly delineate Federal, 
State, and private land; state that Federal land management 
documents apply only to Federal lands; do not include private 
land, unless authorized by law and approved by landowner; and 
to adjust such documents as necessary.

                            Insular Affairs


                       ASSISTANCE TO TERRITORIES

    The Office of Insular Affairs (OIA) was established on 
August 4, 1995, through Secretarial Order No. 3191, which also 
abolished the former Office of Territorial and International 
Affairs. The OIA has important responsibilities to help the 
United States government fulfill its responsibilities to the 
four U.S. territories of Guam, American Samoa (AS), U.S. Virgin 
Islands (USVI) and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana 
Islands (CNMI) and also the three freely associated States: the 
Federated States of Micronesia (FSM), the Republic of the 
Marshall Islands (RMI) and the Republic of Palau. The permanent 
and trust fund payments to the territories and the compact 
nations provide substantial financial resources to these 
governments. During fiscal year 2004, financial arrangements 
for the Compacts of Free Association with the FSM and the RMI 
were implemented. These also included mandatory payments for 
certain activities previously provided in discretionary 
appropriations as well as Compact impact payments of 
$30,000,000 per year split among Guam, CNMI, AS, and Hawaii.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $91,925,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        80,967,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        90,930,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................          -995,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        +9,963,000
 

    The Committee recommends $90,930,000 for Assistance to 
Territories, $995,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level 
and $9,963,000 above the budget request. A detailed table of 
funding recommendations below the account level is provided at 
the end of this report.
    Coral Reef Initiative.-- The Coral Reef Initiative is 
funded at $1,218,000. Within the Coral Reef Initiative program, 
$250,000 is provided for the Office of Insular affairs to 
continue work on the 2015 strategic plan developed in 
coordination with Federal and local partners to help prevent, 
manage, and control invasive species in the United States 
Pacific region. The Committee directs the Office to include in 
future budget justifications a summary of the Department's role 
in the development and implementation activities of the plan. 
The annual report should include a table of prior fiscal year 
activities, upcoming fiscal year activities, and, if 
applicable, estimates of funding to be used or needed for 
planned activities.
    American Samoa Operations Grants.--The recommendation 
includes $23,002,222 for American Samoa Operations grants, 
$250,000 above the fiscal year 2017 enacted level. The increase 
is provided to assist grantees in complying with Federal 
mandates.

                      COMPACT OF FREE ASSOCIATION

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $16,465,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................         3,286,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................         3,300,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       -13,165,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................           +14,000
 

    The Committee recommends $3,300,000 for Compact of Free 
Association, $13,165,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted 
level and $14,000 above the budget request. A detailed table of 
funding recommendations below the account level is provided at 
the end of this report.

                        Office of the Solicitor


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $65,769,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        65,675,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        65,675,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................           -94,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $65,675,000 for salaries and 
expenses of the Office of the Solicitor, as requested.

                      Office of Inspector General


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $50,047,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        49,952,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        49,952,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................           -95,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $49,952,000 for salaries and 
expenses of the Office of Inspector General, as requested.

           Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians


                         FEDERAL TRUST PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    Congress has designated the Secretary of the Interior as 
the trustee delegate with responsibility for approximately 55 
million surface acres of land, 57 million acres of subsurface 
mineral interests, and nearly $4.4 billion that is held in 
trust by the Federal government on behalf of American Indians, 
Alaska Natives, and federally recognized Indian Tribes. The 
Office of the Special Trustee's trust management of these 
assets includes conserving, maintaining, accounting, investing, 
disbursing, and reporting to individual Indians and federally 
recognized Tribes and Tribal organizations on asset 
transactions generated from sales, leasing and other commercial 
activities on these lands.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $139,029,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................       119,400,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       119,400,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       -19,629,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $119,400,000 for Federal trust 
programs, as requested. A detailed table of funding 
recommendations below the account level is provided at the end 
of this report.

                        Department-Wide Programs


                             Wildland Fire

    The Department's Wildland Fire Management account supports 
fire activities for the Bureau of Land Management, the National 
Park Service, the Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Bureau of 
Indian Affairs. The Committee recommends a total of 
$935,850,000 for the Department's wildland fire accounts. This 
fully funds the fire accounts at the 10-year average of 
expenditures. The Committee accepts the proposal to provide all 
funding for wildland fire suppression costs in the Wildland 
Fire Management account.

                        Wildland Fire Management


 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $942,671,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................       873,518,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       935,850,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................        -6,821,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................       +62,332,000
 

    The Committee recommends $935,850,000 for Wildland Fire 
Management at the Department of the Interior. The detailed 
allocation of funding for these accounts is included in the 
table at the end of this report.
    Wildland Fire Preparedness.--The Committee recommends 
$332,784,000 for Wildland Fire Preparedness, equal to the 
fiscal year 2017 enacted level and $10,605,000 above the budget 
request. The Department should immediately notify the 
Committees on Appropriations if it appears that funding 
shortfalls may limit needed firefighting capacity.
    Wildland Fire Suppression.--The Committee recommends 
$389,406,000, for Wildland Fire Suppression, $5,594,000 below 
the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and equal to the budget 
request.
    Fuels Management.--The Committee recommends $182,500,000 
for the Fuels Management program, $2,500,000 above the fiscal 
year 2017 enacted level and $33,034,000 above the budget 
request.
    Burned Area Rehabilitation.--The Committee recommends 
$19,948,000 for the Burned Area Rehabilitation program, 
$522,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and 
$10,481,000 above the budget request. The Committee notes that 
funding for Burned Area Rehabilitation is meant to supplement 
emergency stabilization funding provided under suppression, not 
replace it.
    The Committee encourages the Department to investigate new 
approaches to fire science, such as techniques for analyzing 
fire data to improve forecasts and treatments to reduce 
accumulated fuel loads, as well as to continue its efforts to 
incorporate Unmanned Aircraft Systems into its fire-fighting 
strategy.

                FLAME Wildfire Suppression Reserve Fund


 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $65,000,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................                 0
Recommended, 2018.....................................                 0
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       -65,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $0 for the FLAME Wildfire 
Suppression Reserve Fund, $65,000,000 below the fiscal year 
2017 enacted level and equal to the budget request. As 
discussed above, the Committee accepts the proposal to provide 
all funding for wildland fire suppression costs in the Wildland 
Fire Management account.

                    Central Hazardous Materials Fund


 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $10,010,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................         2,000,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        10,010,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        +8,010,000
 

    The Committee recommends $10,010,000 for the Central 
Hazardous Materials Fund, equal to the fiscal year 2017 enacted 
level and $8,010,000 above the budget request.

           Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration


                NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENT FUND

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................        $7,767,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................         4,600,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................         7,568,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................          -199,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        +2,968,000
 

    The Committee recommends $7,568,000 for the Natural 
Resource Damage Assessment Fund, $199,000 below the fiscal year 
2017 enacted level and $2,968,000 above the budget request. A 
detailed table of funding recommendations below the account 
level is provided at the end of this report.

                          Working Capital Fund


 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $67,100,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        59,472,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        65,388,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................        -1,712,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        +5,916,000
 

    The Committee recommends $65,388,000 for the Working 
Capital Fund, $1,712,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted 
level and $5,916,000 above the budget request.

                  Office of Natural Resources Revenue


                       NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................                $0
Budget estimate, 2018.................................       137,757,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       137,757,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................      +137,757,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The Committee provides $137,757,000 for the Office of 
Natural Resources Revenue, as requested, and accepts the 
Department's proposal to create a separate account for the 
Office of Natural Resources Revenue to improve transparency.

                    PAYMENTS IN LIEU OF TAXES (PILT)

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $465,000,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................       396,880,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       465,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................       +68,120,000
 

    The bill includes $465,000,000 for Payments in Lieu of 
Taxes (PILT), equal to the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and 
$68,120,000 above the budget request. The projected full-year 
cost estimate for PILT for fiscal year 2018 is not yet 
available and will be considered by the Committee at such time 
as the Department conveys this information to the Committee 
prior to the enactment of this Act.

             General Provisions, Department of the Interior


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    Section 101 continues a provision providing for emergency 
transfer authority (intra-bureau) with the approval of the 
Secretary.
    Section 102 continues a provision providing for emergency 
transfer authority (Department-wide) with the approval of the 
Secretary.
    Section 103 continues a provision providing for the use of 
appropriations for certain services.
    Section 104 continues a provision permitting the transfer 
of funds between the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of 
Indian Education, and the Office of the Special Trustee for 
American Indians.
    Section 105 continues a provision permitting the 
redistribution of Tribal priority allocation and Tribal base 
funds to alleviate funding inequities.
    Section 106 continues a provision authorizing the 
acquisition of lands for the purpose of operating and 
maintaining facilities that support visitors to Ellis, 
Governors, and Liberty Islands, NJ and NY.
    Section 107 continues a provision allowing Outer 
Continental Shelf inspection fees to be collected by the 
Secretary of the Interior.
    Section 108 continues a provision allowing for the 
reorganization of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, 
Regulation and Enforcement only in conformance with Committee 
reprogramming guidelines.
    Section 109 continues a provision allowing the Bureau of 
Land Management (BLM) to enter into long-term cooperative 
agreements for long-term care and maintenance of excess wild 
horses and burros on private land.
    Section 110 continues a provision dealing with the U.S. 
Fish and Wildlife Service's responsibilities for mass marking 
of salmonid stocks.
    Section 111 modifies a provision addressing BLM actions 
regarding grazing on public lands.
    Section 112 continues a provision allowing the Bureau of 
Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian Education to more 
efficiently and effectively perform reimbursable work.
    Section 113 prohibits the use of funds to change the status 
of sage-grouse as a threatened or endangered species.
    Section 114 permits the humane transfer of excess wild 
horses and burros for work purposes.
    Section 115 prohibits the use of funds to list in the 
National Register of Historic Places property deemed crucial to 
national security and military training.
    Section 116 directs the Secretary to reissue two final 
rules removing recovered wolves in Wyoming and the Great Lakes 
from the endangered species list.
    Section 117 prohibits the treatment of gray wolves range-
wide as an endangered or threatened species.

               TITLE II--ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was created by 
Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1970, which consolidated nine 
programs from five different agencies and departments. Major 
EPA programs include air and water quality, drinking water, 
hazardous waste, research, pesticides, radiation, toxic 
substances, enforcement and compliance assurance, pollution 
prevention, Inland oil spill, Superfund, Brownfields, and the 
Leaking Underground Storage Tank program. In addition, EPA 
provides Federal assistance for wastewater treatment, sewer 
overflow control, drinking water facilities, other water 
infrastructure projects, and diesel emission reduction 
projects. The Agency is responsible for conducting research and 
development, establishing environmental standards through the 
use of risk assessment and cost-benefit, monitoring pollution 
conditions, seeking compliance through enforcement actions, 
managing audits and investigations, and providing technical 
assistance and grant support to States and Tribes, which are 
delegated authority for much of the program implementation. 
Under existing statutory authority, the Agency contributes to 
specific homeland security efforts and may participate in 
international environmental activities.
    Among the statutes for which the Environmental Protection 
Agency has sole or significant oversight responsibilities are:
    National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended.
    Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act, as 
amended.
    Toxic Substances Control Act, as amended.
    Clean Water Act [Federal Water Pollution Control Act], as 
amended.
    Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, as amended.
    Ocean Dumping Act [Marine Protection, Research, and 
Sanctuaries Act of 1972], as amended.
    Oil Pollution Act of 1990.
    Safe Drinking Water Act [Public Health Service Act (Title 
XIV)], as amended.
    Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource 
Conservation and Recovery Act.
    Clean Air Act, as amended.
    Great Lakes Legacy Act of 2002.
    Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002.
    Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and 
Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended.
    Small Business Liability Relief and Brownfields 
Revitalization Act of 2002 (amending CERCLA).
    Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986.
    Pollution Prevention Act of 1990.
    Pollution Prosecution Act of 1990.
    Pesticide Registration Improvement Act of 2003.
    Energy Policy Act of 2005.
    Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.

    For fiscal year 2018, the Committee recommends 
$7,524,087,000 for the Environmental Protection Agency, 
$534,401,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and 
$1,869,087,000 above the budget request. Comparisons to the 
budget request and 2017 enacted levels are shown by account in 
the table at the end of this report.
    Reprogramming.--The Agency is held to the reprogramming 
limitation of $1,000,000. This limitation will be applied to 
each program area in every account at the levels provided in 
the table at the end of this report. This will allow the Agency 
the flexibility to reprogram funds within a set program area. 
However, where the Committee has cited funding levels for 
certain program projects or activities within a program area, 
the reprogramming limitation continues to apply to those 
funding levels. Further, the Agency may not use any amount of 
de-obligated funds to initiate a new program, office, or 
initiative without the prior approval of the Committee.
    Congressional Budget Justification.--The Committee directs 
the Agency to include in future justifications the following 
items: (1) a comprehensive index of programs and activities 
within the program projects; (2) the requested bill language, 
with changes from the enacted language highlighted, at the 
beginning of each account section; (3) a justification for 
every program/project, including those proposed for 
elimination; (4) a comprehensive, detailed explanation of all 
changes within a program project; (5) a table showing 
consolidations, realignments or other transfers of resources 
and personnel from one program project to another such that the 
outgoing and receiving program projects offset and clearly 
illustrate a transfer of resources; and, (6) a table listing 
the budgets and FTE by major office within each National 
Program Management area with pay/non-pay breakouts. Further, if 
EPA is proposing to change State allocation formulas for the 
distribution of appropriated funds, then EPA should include 
such proposals in the Congressional justification.

                         Science and Technology

    The Science and Technology (S&T;) account funds all 
Environmental Protection Agency research (including Superfund 
research activities paid with funds moved into this account 
from the Hazardous Substance Superfund account). This account 
includes programs carried out through grants, contracts, and 
cooperative agreements, cooperative research and development 
agreements, and interagency agreements, with other Federal 
agencies, States, universities, nonprofit organizations, and 
private business, as well as in-house research. It also funds 
personnel compensation and benefits, travel, supplies and 
operating expenses, including rent, utilities and security, for 
all Agency research. Research addresses a wide range of 
environmental and health concerns across all environmental 
media and encompasses both long-term basic and near-term 
applied research to provide the scientific knowledge and 
technologies necessary for preventing, regulating, and abating 
pollution, and to anticipate emerging environmental issues.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $706,473,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................       450,812,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       602,238,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................      -104,235,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................      +151,426,000
 

    The bill provides $602,238,000 for Science and Technology, 
$104,235,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and 
$151,426,000 above the budget request. The Committee recommends 
that $15,496,000 be paid to this account from the Hazardous 
Substance Superfund account for ongoing research activities. A 
detailed table of funding recommendations below the account 
level is provided at the end of this report, and the Committee 
provides the following additional detail by program area:
    Indoor Air and Radiation.--The recommendation includes 
$5,097,000. The Committee recommendation maintains the radon 
program at the fiscal year 2017 enacted level.
    Operations and Administration.--The recommendation includes 
$79,334,000, as requested. The bill concurs with the Agency's 
proposed allocation of resources for workforce reshaping 
through buyouts and voluntary separation agreements offered to 
employees.
    Research: Chemical Safety and Sustainability.--The 
Committee recommends $107,891,000 and funds the computational 
toxicology and endocrine disruptor programs at the fiscal year 
2017 enacted levels. The Committee supports EPA's computational 
toxicology research activities to advance the next generation 
of risk assessment methods to enable integration of tiered 
toxicity evaluation strategies, advanced high throughput 
molecular biological assays and computational methods with 
exposure information to support risk-based decisions for 
prioritization and screening.
    Research: National Priorities.--The bill provides 
$4,100,000 which shall be used for extramural research grants, 
independent of the Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grant 
program, to fund high-priority water quality and availability 
research by not-for-profit organizations who often partner with 
the Agency. Because these grants are independent of the STAR 
grant program, the Agency should strive to award grants in as 
large an amount as is possible to achieve the most 
scientifically significant research. Funds shall be awarded 
competitively with priority given to partners proposing 
research of national scope and who provide a 25 percent match. 
The Agency is directed to allocate funds to grantees within 180 
days of enactment of this Act.
    Research: Safe and Sustainable Water Resources.--The 
Committee recommends $90,318,000. Further, augmenting drinking 
water supplies through artificial or enhanced recharge into 
aquifers, represents a cost-effective way of increasing the 
availability of water. Enhanced Aquifer Recharge (EAR) also 
represents a key practice for the management and restoration of 
ecosystems. Therefore, the Committee directs EPA to coordinate 
with other Federal research efforts in this area.
    Additional Guidance.--The Committee has included the 
following additional guidance with respect to funding provided 
under this account:
    Alternatives Testing.--The Committee commends EPA for 
developing new scientific methods, removing barriers, and 
fostering cooperation in implementing the toxicity testing 
agenda included in the 2007 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) 
report, ``Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century.'' The Committee 
is also aware that the Agency is incorporating an alternative 
scientific approach to screen chemicals within its Endocrine 
Disruptor Screening Program as called for in fiscal year 2015 
(House Report 113-551). The Committee is interested in how the 
Agency is implementing the same approach in all of its programs 
that involve toxicity testing and recommends that the Agency 
submit to the Committee a report that outlines (1) progress to 
date to research, develop, validate and translate innovative 
non-animal chemical testing methods that characterize toxicity 
pathways, (2) efforts to coordinate this across Federal 
agencies, and (3) future plans to continue to implement the 
toxicity testing vision outlined in the January 2017 NAS 
report, ``Using 21st Century Science to Improve Risk-Related 
Evaluations'' on all Agency programs that involve toxicity 
testing.
    Innovative Research Partnerships.--Interest continues to 
grow to identify innovative, technologically feasible solutions 
that will lead to air and water quality improvements and better 
environmental outcomes. The Committee has consistently 
supported partnerships with respect to research areas of 
national importance, and the Committee encourages EPA to 
identify partnerships with institutes, foundations and 
universities that would leverage scientific expertise and 
funding. EPA is encouraged to present the Committee with 
options for new or expanded partnerships within the context of 
the fiscal year 2019 budget. Such topics could include but are 
not limited to innovative approaches to fill key gaps in 
assessing exposure, enhanced aquifer recharge, toxicity testing 
without the use of animals, accurate measurement and capture of 
methane or other fugitive emissions, assessment and cleaning of 
produced water and other activities from oil and gas 
operations, rural community water treatment, and efficiencies 
to improve manufacturing operations. To help inform this 
effort, the Committee encourages EPA to solicit input from all 
interested parties.
    Water Security Test Bed.--For both fiscal year 2019 and 
future budget requests, the Committee recommends that EPA 
include adequate funding for advancing full scale applied 
research and testing capabilities to address threats to 
drinking water and drinking water infrastructure.

                 Environmental Programs and Management

    The Environmental Programs and Management account 
encompasses a broad range of abatement, prevention, 
enforcement, and compliance activities, and personnel 
compensation, benefits, travel, and expenses for all programs 
of the Agency except Science and Technology, Hazardous 
Substance Superfund, Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust 
Fund, Inland Oil Spill Programs, and the Office of Inspector 
General.
    Abatement, prevention, and compliance activities include 
setting environmental standards, issuing permits, monitoring 
emissions and ambient conditions and providing technical and 
legal assistance toward enforcement, compliance, and oversight. 
In most cases, the States are directly responsible for actual 
operation of the various environmental programs, and the 
Agency's activities include oversight and assistance.
    In addition to program costs, this account funds 
administrative costs associated with the operating programs of 
the Agency, including support for executive direction, policy 
oversight, resources management, general office and building 
services for program operations, and direct implementation of 
Agency environmental programs for headquarters, the ten EPA 
regional offices, and all non-research field operations.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................    $2,597,999,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................     1,717,484,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................     2,357,840,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................      -240,159,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................      +640,356,000
 

    The bill provides $2,357,840,000 for Environmental Programs 
and Management, $240,159,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted 
level and $640,356,000 above the budget request. A detailed 
table of funding recommendations below the account level is 
provided at the end of this report, and the Committee provides 
the following additional detail by program area:
    Clean Air.--The Committee recommends $227,142,000. Within 
this amount, the Committee includes $3,000,000 to enhance the 
efficiency and effectiveness of both preconstruction and 
operating permitting programs. In addition, the Committee 
continues to support the EnergySTAR program and does not 
terminate the program as proposed. However, program adjustments 
or reforms may be warranted. In 2009, EPA and the Department of 
Energy signed a Memorandum of Understanding that reallocated 
roles and responsibilities between the Department and the 
Agency. The Committee believes those responsibilities should be 
reviewed. In addition, EPA appropriately took action to 
restructure the program in 2011 following questions about 
program integrity. The Agency established third party 
certification requirements that directed many product review 
responsibilities to outside vendors. As such, the Committee 
finds that historical funding levels exceed the needs for 
internal product reviews leading to the recommended level of 
$31,000,000 for fiscal year 2018. Further, the Committee does 
not support the termination of voluntary programs such as 
Natural GasSTAR, AgSTAR, and other partnership programs where 
EPA works collaboratively with non-governmental entities to 
identify beneficial methods to reduce emissions, pollution, and 
increase efficiency.
    Compliance.--The Committee recommends $96,665,000. Tracking 
the import and export of hazardous waste shipment remains a key 
priority for the Committee.
    Environmental Protection: National Priorities.--The bill 
provides $12,700,000 for a competitive grant program to provide 
technical assistance for improved water quality or safe 
drinking water, adequate waste water to small systems or 
individual private well owners. The Agency shall provide 
$10,000,000 for Grassroots Rural and Small Community Water 
Systems Assistance Act, for activities specified under Section 
1442(e) of the Safe Drinking Water Act (42 U.S.C. 300j-
1(e)(8)). The Agency is also directed to provide $1,700,000 for 
grants to qualified not-for-profit organizations for technical 
assistance for individual private well owners, with priority 
given to organizations that currently provide technical and 
educational assistance to individual private well owners. The 
Agency is directed to provide on a national and multi-State 
regional basis, $1,000,000 for grants to qualified 
organizations excluding institutions of higher education, for 
the sole purpose of providing on-site training and technical 
assistance for wastewater systems. The Agency shall require 
each grantee to provide a minimum 10 percent match, including 
in kind contributions. The Agency is directed to allocate funds 
to grantees within 180 days of enactment of this Act.
    Geographic Programs.--The bill provides $402,000,000. The 
Committee has provided funding for programs that support 
restoration and protection of our Nation's most important water 
bodies, as protection of these resources continues to be a 
priority. From within the amount provided, the Committee 
directs the following:
    Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.--The Committee 
recommends $300,000,000 for the Great Lakes Restoration 
Initiative (GLRI), equal to the fiscal year 2017 enacted level 
and $300,000,000 above the budget request. The Agency shall 
continue to follow the direction as provided in House Report 
112-589. The Committee supports ongoing work to reduce the 
growth of harmful algal blooms and encourages continued 
targeting of watersheds that could pose a threat to human 
health in drinking water.
    Chesapeake Bay.--The Committee recommends $60,000,000 for 
the Chesapeake Bay program, $13,000,000 below the fiscal year 
2017 enacted level and $60,000,000 above the budget request. 
From within the amount provided, $5,000,000 is for nutrient and 
sediment removal grants and $5,000,000 is for small watershed 
grants to control polluted runoff from urban, suburban and 
agricultural lands.
    Puget Sound.--The Committee recommends $28,000,000 for 
Puget Sound, equal to the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and 
$28,000,000 above the budget request. Funds shall be allocated 
in the same manner as directed in House Report 112-331. The 
Committee directs EPA to expeditiously obligate funds, in a 
manner consistent with the authority and responsibilities under 
Section 320 and the National Estuary Program.
    Indoor Air and Radiation.--The Committee recommends 
$25,637,000, and the Agency should continue to operate the 
program following the priorities and direction under this 
heading in House Report 114-632 to implement the National Radon 
Action Plan.
    Operations and Administration.--The recommendation includes 
$496,483,000, as requested. The bill concurs with the Agency's 
proposed allocation of resources for workforce reshaping 
through buyouts and voluntary separation agreements offered to 
employees.
    Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).--The 
Committee recommends $100,877,000, $4,000,000 below the fiscal 
year 2017 enacted level and $27,784,000 above the budget 
request. Of the funds provided, not less than $2,000,000 should 
be allocated toward implementation of the provisions under 
section 2301 of the WIIN Act (P.L. 114-322) for the expeditious 
development of guidance for State and Federal plans to address 
the management of coal combustion residuals, and for EPA to 
implement a permit program in non-participating states. The 
Committee anticipates that additional State grants will be 
necessary to implement a permitting program as authorized under 
the WIIN Act. Since States are still waiting on guidance from 
EPA on how to best establish those programs, the Committee will 
continue to monitor progress and intends to revisit the 
question of additional State grant resources, as well as funds 
necessary for EPA to implement permit programs in non-
participating States, in a final fiscal year 2018 
appropriations bill. This is a key priority for the Committee. 
Further, the Committee does not support the proposed 
modification of cleanups under the RCRA Waste Management 
program nor the proposed elimination of the RCRA Waste 
Minimization and Recycling program.
    Toxics risk review and prevention.--The Committee 
recommends $92,521,000, equal to the fiscal year 2017 enacted 
level. The budget proposes an aggressive schedule for 
developing the new TSCA fee rule, and for the transition of FTE 
to be covered by new fee collections. The Committee is 
concerned the proposed schedule may be too aggressive. The 
recommended level provides for a more gradual transition to fee 
funded FTE for fiscal year 2018 so as to avoid a funding lapse 
that could impact implementation. Further, the Committee does 
not support the elimination of the Pollution Prevention 
program.
    Water: Ecosystems.--The Committee recommends $47,788,000, 
equal to the fiscal year 2017 enacted level. From within the 
amount provided, the recommendation includes $16,800,000 to 
provide $600,000 to each National Estuary Program (NEP) funded 
under Section 320 of the Clean Water Act. Further, in the 
Administrative Provisions section, the Committee directs that 
$1,500,000 in competitive grants be made available for 
additional projects, and encourages EPA to work in consultation 
with the NEP directors to identify worthy projects and 
activities.
    Water Quality Protection.--The Committee recommends 
$178,855,000 and rejects the proposed elimination of the 
WaterSENSE program. The recommendation does not support the 
propose termination of the Urban Waters program. The Committee 
supports ongoing activities related to integrated planning, 
which will be increasingly necessary as States and communities 
evaluate wastewater systems for lead contamination issues and 
pipe replacement. Further, the Committee is aware that more 
than one quarter of the U.S. population relies on onsite-
decentralized systems to treat wastewater. The Committee urges 
the Agency to designate additional technical assistance, 
resources and expertise toward onsite wastewater recycling 
issues within the Decentralized Wastewater Program.
    Additional Guidance.--The Committee has included the 
following additional guidance with respect to funding provided 
under this account:
    Administrator Priorities.--EPA is directed to submit a 
report within 90 days of enactment of this Act that identifies 
how any fiscal year 2016 and 2017 funding was used, by account, 
program area, and program project. Each activity funded should 
include a justification for the effort and any anticipated 
results.
    Antimicrobial Solutions for Citrus Disease.--The Committee 
recognizes the importance of antimicrobial crop protection 
tools in combating citrus greening and continues to support 
EPA's cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's 
Multi-Agency Coordination Group.
    Coal Combustion Residuals.--Section 2301 of the WIIN Act 
(P.L. 114-322) amended the Solid Waste Disposal Act to 
authorize the Agency to review and approve, as appropriate, 
State programs for permits or other systems of prior approval 
and conditions under State law for the regulation of coal 
combustion residuals. To expedite the process for reviewing and 
approving such State programs, the Agency should establish, as 
expeditiously as is practicable, streamlined procedures for 
prompt approval of those State programs.
    Exempt Aquifers.--For fiscal year 2018, the Committee 
anticipates that EPA will continue to receive exempt aquifer 
applications from the State of California for processing and 
approval. The Committee continues to support protecting 
underground sources of drinking water and promoting robust 
economic development. Accordingly, EPA is urged to work 
expeditiously to process exempt aquifer applications and use 
the existing regulatory framework to process these applications 
as provided in House Report 114-170 and House Report 114-632.
    Glider Kits.--The Committee notes that the Phase 2 rule for 
Medium and Heavy-Duty Engines and Vehicles is generally 
supported by the trucking industry. However, under the Phase 2 
rule, the Agency defined a glider kit as a new motor vehicle 
for the purposes of regulation. The Committee recognizes that 
glider kits typically do not incorporate new engines; 
therefore, classifying a glider kit as a new motor vehicle 
raises a number of valid concerns. The Committee also 
understands the intent of the provisions in the Phase 2 rule is 
to promote the removal of older, dirtier engines from the 
vehicle fleet in order to make air quality improvements. This 
is a policy that the Committee has strongly supported over a 
number of years albeit in a non-regulatory manner through the 
use of grants to encourage engine retrofits. The Committee 
urges EPA to study the emissions impact of remanufactured 
engines used in glider kits, compared to new engines, and issue 
a report to the Committee when available.
    Restrictions on Certain Communications.--In 2015, the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) concluded that EPA 
violated prohibitions against publicity or propaganda and 
grassroots lobbying contained in appropriations Acts. The 
Committee is also aware that grant funds were used to support 
billboards, websites and other advocacy efforts in the Pacific 
Northwest. The Committee reminds EPA that funding may not be 
used in a manner contrary to Section 401 of this bill.
    Science Advisory Board.--The Agency is directed to develop 
updated policy statements in order to fulfill previous 
Congressional directives.
    Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) Program.--The 
Committee reiterates the direction contained within the 
explanatory statement associated with the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2017 to consider harmonizing the status of 
any previously approved refrigerant or foam-blowing agent with 
other domestic and international programs for refrigeration and 
commercial air conditioning applications, and corresponding 
deadlines for military, space- and aeronautics-related 
applications.
    TSCA Risk Evaluations and Risk Management.--The Committee 
directs EPA to implement the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical 
Safety for the 21st Century Act in a manner that reflects the 
best available science as now required under TSCA sections 6 
and 26. In December 2016 and January 2017, EPA proposed rules 
under section 6(a) to prohibit certain chemical uses that rely 
on risk assessments completed by the Agency in 2014 that may 
not comply with TSCA section 26(l)(4). Rather than continuing 
with those rulemakings, the Committee encourages EPA to 
consider those chemical uses as part of the risk evaluation 
process for the ten priority compounds recently designated by 
EPA under TSCA section 6(b)(2)(A), which include the chemicals 
in question. Further, in order to support the ongoing and 
upcoming TSCA risk evaluation workload, the Committee would 
support the realignment and consolidation of risk assessment 
resources if proposed in future budget requests.
    Worker Protection Standards.--The Committee directs the 
Agency to engage the U.S. Department of Agriculture, farmers, 
farm workers, industry and other interested organizations as it 
implements its standards.

            Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest System Fund

    This account supports all activities necessary for the 
development of the system established by the Hazardous Waste 
Electronic Manifest Establishment Act (P.L. 112-195).

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................        $3,178,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................         3,674,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................         3,674,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................          +496,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The bill provides $3,674,000 which is expected to be fully 
offset by fees for a net appropriation of $0. The Committee 
continues to support the expeditious development of a system 
that would allow for the electronic tracking of hazardous waste 
shipments pursuant to P.L. 112-195.

                      Office of Inspector General

    The Office of Inspector General (OIG) provides audit, 
evaluation, and investigation products and advisory services to 
improve the performance and integrity of EPA programs and 
operations. The Inspector General (IG) will continue to perform 
the function of IG for the Chemical Safety and Hazard 
Investigation Board. This account funds personnel compensation 
and benefits, travel, and expenses (excluding rent, utilities, 
and security costs) for the Office of Inspector General. In 
addition to the funds provided under this heading, this account 
receives funds from the Hazardous Substance Superfund account.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $41,489,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        37,475,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        40,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................        -1,489,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        +2,525,000
 

    The bill provides $40,000,000, which is $1,489,000 below 
the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and $2,525,000 above the 
budget request. In addition, the Committee recommends 
$7,778,000 as a payment to this account from the Hazardous 
Substance Superfund account. The Inspector General is directed 
to prioritize funds to projects that prevent and detect fraud, 
waste and abuse at the Environmental Protection Agency.

                        Buildings and Facilities

    The Buildings and Facilities account provides for the 
design and construction of EPA-owned facilities as well as for 
the repair, extension, alteration, and improvement of 
facilities used by the Agency. The funds are used to correct 
unsafe conditions, protect health and safety of employees and 
Agency visitors, and prevent deterioration of structures and 
equipment.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $34,467,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        39,553,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        39,553,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................        +5,086,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The bill provides $39,553,000 as requested, and $5,086,000 
above the fiscal year 2017 enacted level. The Committee 
supports proposed projects that will reduce Agency operational 
and rent costs. EPA should prioritize projects based on 
anticipated cost savings and allocate funds accordingly.

                     Hazardous Substance Superfund

    The Hazardous Substance Superfund (Superfund) program was 
established in 1980 by the Comprehensive Environmental 
Response, Compensation, and Liability Act to clean up emergency 
hazardous materials, spills, and dangerous, uncontrolled, and/
or abandoned hazardous waste sites. The Superfund Amendments 
and Reauthorization Act (SARA) expanded the program 
substantially in 1986, authorizing approximately $8,500,000,000 
in revenues over five years. In 1990, the Omnibus Budget 
Reconciliation Act extended the program's authorization through 
1994 for $5,100,000,000 with taxing authority through calendar 
year 1995.
    The Superfund program is operated by EPA subject to annual 
appropriations from a dedicated trust fund and from general 
revenues. Enforcement activities are used to identify and 
induce parties responsible for hazardous waste problems to 
undertake cleanup actions and pay for EPA oversight of those 
actions. In addition, responsible parties have been required to 
cover the cost of fund-financed removal and remedial actions 
undertaken at spills and waste sites by Federal and State 
agencies. Funds are paid from this account to the Office of 
Inspector General and Science and Technology accounts for 
Superfund related activities.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................    $1,088,769,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................       762,063,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................     1,116,374,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       +27,605,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................      +354,311,000
 

    The bill provides $1,116,374,000 for the Hazardous 
Substance Superfund program, which is $27,605,000 above the 
fiscal year 2017 enacted level and $354,311,000 above the 
budget request. Unless otherwise stated herein or in the table 
at the end of this report, the recommendation continues funding 
for all Superfund programs, activities, and subactivities at 
the fiscal year 2017 enacted level.
    Operations and Administration.--The recommendation includes 
$123,105,000, which is $5,000,000 below the fiscal year 2017 
enacted level based upon estimates for rent, facility, and 
security savings. The recommendation does not concur with the 
Agency's proposed allocation of resources for workforce 
reshaping.
    Superfund Cleanup.--The Committee recommends $766,167,000, 
which is $47,605,000 above the fiscal year 2017 enacted level. 
The Committee appreciates the Administration's commitment to 
streamline and improve the program, and concurs with the 
designation of the program as a national infrastructure 
priority. The Committee expects the recommended resources will 
accelerate remediation at highly contaminated, orphan sites. 
Further, the Committee expects the additional funding will also 
support pipeline activities such as remedial investigations, 
feasibility studies, and remedial designs which are critical 
steps prior to construction.
    Additional Guidance.--The Committee has included the 
following additional guidance with respect to funding provided 
under this account:
    Financial Assurance.--The Committee is aware of concerns 
raised by States, stakeholders, and the Small Business 
Administration's Office of Advocacy regarding the Agency's 
proposed rule on financial assurance for hardrock mining. Those 
comments indicate the rule as proposed in January 2017 was 
duplicative of other financial assurance programs and 
unworkable. Accordingly the Committee has included bill 
language to prevent the proposed rule from being finalized in 
its current form.

          Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund Program

    Subtitle I of the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by 
the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act, authorized 
the establishment of a response program for cleanup of releases 
from leaking underground storage tanks. Owners and operators of 
facilities with underground tanks must demonstrate financial 
responsibility and bear initial responsibility for cleanup. The 
Federal trust fund is funded through the imposition of a motor 
fuel tax of one-tenth of a cent per gallon.
    In addition to State resources, the Leaking Underground 
Storage Tank (LUST) Trust Fund provides funding to clean up 
sites, enforces necessary corrective actions, and recovers 
costs expended from the Fund for cleanup activities. The 
underground storage tank response program is designed to 
operate primarily through cooperative agreements with States. 
Funds are also used for grants to non-State entities, including 
Indian Tribes, under Section 8001 of the Resource Conservation 
and Recovery Act. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 expanded the 
authorized activities of the Fund to include the underground 
storage tank program. In 2006, Congress amended section 9508 of 
the Internal Revenue Code to authorize expenditures from the 
trust fund for prevention and inspection activities.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $91,941,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        47,429,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        91,874,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................           -67,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................       +44,445,000
 

    The bill provides $91,874,000 for the Leaking Underground 
Storage Tank (LUST) Trust Fund Program, $67,000 below the 
fiscal year 2017 enacted level and $44,445,000 above the budget 
request.

                       Inland Oil Spill Programs

    This appropriation, authorized by the Federal Water 
Pollution Control Act, as amended by the Oil Pollution Act of 
1990, provides funds to prepare for and prevent releases of oil 
and other petroleum products in navigable waterways. In 
addition, EPA is reimbursed for incident specific response 
costs through the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund managed by the 
United States Coast Guard.
    EPA is responsible for directing all cleanup and removal 
activities posing a threat to public health and the 
environment; conducting site inspections; providing a means to 
achieve cleanup activities by private parties; reviewing 
containment plans at facilities; reviewing area contingency 
plans; pursuing cost recovery of fund-financed cleanups; and 
conducting research of oil cleanup techniques. Funds for this 
appropriation are provided through the Oil Spill Liability 
Trust Fund which is composed of fees and collections made 
through provisions of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, the 
Comprehensive Oil Pollution Liability and Compensation Act, the 
Deepwater Port Act of 1974, the Outer Continental Shelf Lands 
Act Amendments of 1978, and the Federal Water Pollution Control 
Act, as amended. Pursuant to law, the Trust Fund is managed by 
the United States Coast Guard.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $18,209,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        15,717,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        18,047,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................          -162,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        +2,330,000
 

    The bill provides $18,047,000 for the Inland Oil Spill 
program, $162,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and 
$2,330,000 above the budget request.

                   State and Tribal Assistance Grants

    The State and Tribal Assistance Grants (STAG) account 
provides grant funds for programs operated primarily by State, 
local, Tribal and other governmental partners. The account 
includes two broad types of funds: (1) Infrastructure 
Assistance, which is used primarily by local governments for 
projects supporting environmental protection; and (2) 
Categorical Grants, which assist State and Tribal governments 
and other environmental partners with the operation of 
environmental programs. The account also includes specific 
program grants such as competitive Brownfields grants and 
diesel emissions reduction grants.
    In the STAG account, EPA provides funding for 
infrastructure projects through two State Revolving Funds 
(Clean Water and Drinking Water), geographic specific projects 
in Alaskan Native Villages and on the United States-Mexico 
Border, Brownfields revitalization projects, diesel emission 
reduction grants, and other targeted infrastructure projects.
    The State Revolving Funds (SRFs) provide Federal financial 
assistance to protect the Nation's water resources. The Clean 
Water SRF helps eliminate municipal discharge of untreated or 
inadequately treated pollutants and thereby helps maintain or 
restore the country's water to a swimmable and/or fishable 
quality. The Clean Water SRF provides resources for municipal, 
inter-municipal, State, and interstate agencies and Tribal 
governments to plan, design, and construct wastewater 
facilities and other projects, including non-point source, 
estuary, stormwater, and sewer overflow projects. The Safe 
Drinking Water SRF finances improvements to community water 
systems so that they can achieve compliance with the mandates 
of the Safe Drinking Water Act and continue to protect public 
health.
    Many of the major Federal environmental statutes include 
provisions that allow the Federal government, through EPA, to 
delegate to the States and Tribes the day-to-day management of 
environmental programs or to approve State and Tribal 
environmental programs. The Federal statutes were designed to 
recognize the States as partners and co-regulators, allowing 
the States to issue and enforce permits, carry out inspections 
and monitoring, and collect data. To assist the States in this 
task, the statutes also authorized EPA to provide grants to the 
States and Tribes. These grants, which cover every major aspect 
of environmental protection, include those programs authorized 
by sections 319 and 106 of the Clean Water Act (Federal Water 
Pollution Control Act, as amended) (for non-point source 
pollution and the water quality permits programs), sections 105 
and 103 of the Clean Air Act (for State and Local air quality 
management programs), section 128 of CERCLA (for State and 
Tribal response programs), section 1443(a) of the Safe Drinking 
Water Act (for public water system supervision), and section 
3011 of RCRA (for the implementation of State hazardous waste 
programs).

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................    $3,527,161,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................     2,933,467,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................     3,288,161,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................      -239,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................      +354,694,000
 

    The bill provides $3,288,161,000 for the State and Tribal 
Assistance Grants account, $239,000,000 below the fiscal year 
2017 enacted level and $354,694,000 above the budget request. 
The Committee provides the following additional detail by 
program area:
    Infrastructure Assistance.--The Committee notes that more 
than $6 billion is currently revolving in the system and 
available for drinking water and wastewater infrastructure 
loans. The Committee believes that EPA and the States must 
aggressively allocate existing funds to projects in order to 
address the pressing infrastructure needs facing the country. 
In addition, the Committee continues to encourage EPA and water 
infrastructure stakeholders to promote alternate financing 
mechanisms for water infrastructure at local, State and Federal 
levels as it is widely accepted that Federal financing through 
the State Revolving Funds remains an important yet insufficient 
tool to address the Nation's water needs.
    Public-private partnerships, greater access to financing 
from private activity bonds, and improved asset management are 
just a few of the mechanisms that the Committee believes could 
serve to increase investment in a complementary way to Federal 
appropriations and reduce costs.
    In addition, the Committee continues bill language to allow 
EPA and the States to provide additional forms of subsidy to 
those communities which cannot afford the below market rates 
provided by an SRF loan.
    The Committee has a history of including a provision 
affording a procurement preference for iron and steel products 
produced in the United States in projects receiving funds from 
the State Revolving Funds or, now, the Water Infrastructure 
Finance and Innovation Act.
    Brownfields Program.--The bill provides $90,000,000 for 
brownfields grants and directs that at least 10 percent of such 
grants be provided to areas in which at least 20 percent of the 
population has lived under the poverty level over the past 30 
years as determined by censuses and the most recent Small Area 
Income and Poverty Estimates.
    Diesel Emissions Reductions Grants (DERA).--The bill 
provides $75,000,000 for DERA grants. More than 10 million 
older, heavily polluting diesel engines remain in use that have 
yet to be retrofitted, repowered, or replaced, and over one 
million are expected to remain in use in 2030. For fiscal year 
2018, the Committee directs EPA to continue to make at least 70 
percent of DERA grants available to improve air quality in non-
attainment areas.
    Targeted Airshed Grants.--The bill provides $40,000,000 for 
targeted airshed grants to reduce air pollution in non-
attainment areas. These grants shall be distributed on a 
competitive basis to non-attainment areas that EPA determines 
are ranked as the top five most polluted areas relative to 
annual ozone or particulate matter 2.5 standards as well as the 
top five areas based on the 24-hour particulate matter 2.5 
standard where the design values exceed the 35  /m3 standard. 
To determine these areas, the Agency shall use the most recent 
design values calculated from validated air quality data. The 
Committee notes that these funds are available for emission 
reduction activities deemed necessary for compliance with 
national ambient air quality standards and included in a State 
Implementation Plan submitted to EPA. Not later than the end of 
fiscal year 2017, EPA should provide a report to the Committees 
on Appropriations that includes a table showing how fiscal year 
2016 and 2017 funds were allocated. The table should also 
include grant recipients and metrics for anticipated or actual 
results.
    Categorical Grants.--For categorical grants to States and 
other environmental partners for the implementation of 
delegated programs, the bill provides $1,066,041,000.
    Radon.--The Committee continues to support state radon 
program efforts that raise awareness about the associated risks 
of radon exposure as ongoing, unmitigated exposures result in 
over 21,000 radon-induced lung cancer deaths per year. The 
Committee provides $8,051,000, equal to the fiscal year 2017 
enacted level, and the Agency shall allocate radon grants in 
fiscal year 2018 following the direction in House Report 114-
632.

          Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Program


 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................        10,000,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        20,000,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        30,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       +20,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................       +10,000,000
 

    The bill provides $30,000,000 for the Water Infrastructure 
Finance and Innovation Act (WIFIA) Program. This level is equal 
to the fiscal year 2017 level when compared to funding provided 
from both the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2017 (P.L. 115-
31) and the Further Continuing and Security Assistance 
Appropriations Act (P.L. 114-254). From within the amount 
provided, the Committee directs $5,000,000 to assist with the 
administrative expenses for the WIFIA program.
    Greater investment in the replacement of aging 
infrastructure will help mitigate nationwide issues the 
Committee is tracking related to contaminants such as lead and 
arsenic, help address Combined Sewer Overflows and Sanitary 
Sewer Overflows, and allow systems to improve water delivery 
for residents. Of the recommended amount, $25,000,000 is 
provided for direct loan subsidization which may translate into 
a potential loan capacity in excess of $3 billion to eligible 
entities for water infrastructure projects. The Committee 
expects that EPA will issue loans for the first time in fiscal 
year 2018 and the Committee intends to closely monitor 
implementation.

                       Administrative Provisions


             (INCLUDING TRANSFERS AND RESCISSION OF FUNDS)

    The Committee continues the language, carried in prior 
years, concerning Tribal Cooperative Authority, the collection 
and obligation of pesticides fees, and transfer authorities for 
the purposes of implementing the Great Lakes Restoration 
Initiative.
    The bill includes language expanding the eligible 
activities that pesticide fees may cover.
    The bill authorizes the collection and obligation of TSCA 
user fees.
    The bill continues language authorizing up to $150,000 to 
be spent for facility repairs at any one time.
    The bill authorizes certain uses for Section 319 non-point 
source grants.
    The bill rescinds $60,000,000 of unobligated balances from 
the State and Tribal Assistance Grants account.
    The bill directs the availability of not less than 
$1,500,000 of funds for the National Estuary program as 
competitive grants.

                      TITLE III--RELATED AGENCIES


                       DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


                             Forest Service

    The U.S. Forest Service manages 193 million acres of 
National Forests, Grasslands, and a Tallgrass Prairie, 
including lands in 44 States and the Commonwealth of Puerto 
Rico, and cooperates with States, other Federal agencies, 
Tribes and private landowners to sustain the Nation's forests 
and grasslands. The Forest Service administers a wide variety 
of programs, including forest and rangeland research, State and 
private forestry assistance, cooperative forest health 
programs, an international program, National Forest System, and 
wildland fire management. The National Forest System (NFS) 
includes 155 national forests, 20 national grasslands, 20 
national recreation areas, a national Tallgrass prairie, six 
national monuments, and six land utilization projects. The NFS 
is managed for multiple uses, beginning with wood, water and 
forage, and expanded under the Multiple Use Sustained Yield Act 
to include recreation, grazing, fish and wildlife habitat 
management.
    Challenges of the National Forests.--The national forests 
are facing some of the greatest challenges in their history. 
These include invasive species, regional drought and watershed 
degradation, fuel buildups and severe wildland fires, habitat 
fragmentation, and devastating outbreaks of insects and 
disease. For example, the southern pine beetle is the most 
destructive insect killer of pine trees in the southeastern 
United States. The last major outbreak in 2011 affected nearly 
one million acres across eight States and caused an estimated 
$1,500,000,000 in damage. Today there are more than 100 million 
dead and dying trees, the result of a severe four-year drought 
and insect and disease infestation, in California. Many of 
these acres are at risk for catastrophic wildland fire. As 
such, the Service is directed to aggressively work to improve 
the health of the national forests in California and around the 
Nation, using all available authorities and strategies. The 
Service also is directed to increase its collaboration with 
States and partners to address the forest health crisis before 
it worsens, putting lives and property at risk of catastrophic 
wildland fire.

  Office of the Under Secretary for Natural Resources and Environment


 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................                $0
Budget estimate, 2018.................................                 0
Recommended, 2018.....................................           875,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................          +875,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................          +875,000
 

    The Committee recommends $875,000 for the Office of the 
Under Secretary for Natural Resources and Environment.
    The Committee is funding the Office of the Under Secretary 
for Natural Resources and Environment in the Interior, 
Environment, and Related Agencies bill instead of the 
Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, 
and Related Agencies bill.
    Forest Service Accounting, Budgeting, and Management.--The 
Committee appreciates the Service's efforts to improve its 
accounting, budgeting, and management systems and practices but 
believes additional steps are necessary to ensure the Service 
is fully accountable and transparent with taxpayer dollars. The 
Committee has included bill language and directives relating to 
the administrative control of funds, budgeting practices and 
cost pools, and the Integrated Resource Restoration (IRR) pilot 
program. The Committee requests that the Secretary of 
Agriculture fully engage on these issues and designate a senior 
staff member with budgeting and management expertise to assist 
the Service on these matters.
    The Committee has learned the Service has outdated, 
unofficial policy and guidance documents directing the 
administrative control of funds; that in some cases control 
practices have been developed in an ad hoc manner; and that the 
practices vary across regions, forests, and districts. This is 
contrary to current law (31 U.S.C. 1514) and Office of 
Management and Budget requirements (OMB Circular No. A-11). 
Without internal controls, accountability and transparency are 
impossible to achieve. The Committee includes bill language to 
require the Service to develop an administration control of 
funds system, as required by 31 U.S.C. 1514). The Committee 
expects the system will apply consistently across the Service. 
The Committee also requests the Service to provide a report to 
the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations, as soon as 
practicable, on the estimated cost, staffing, and time 
requirements for developing and implementing this system.
    The Committee would like to assist the Service in its 
efforts to improve its accounting and budgeting processes. As 
such, the Committee requests a report by December 31, 2017, on 
the feasibility of restructuring the Service's budget request. 
The Committee envisions a request that allocates funding for 
the Service's major programs between salaries and expenses and 
project funds. This would allow for the elimination of cost 
pools, which the Committee believes complicate the Service's 
accounting and budgeting processes, and increase confidence 
that funds are used for the purposes Congress intended. The 
Committee looks forward to working with the Service on this 
request.
    The Committee discontinues the set asides for the IRR 
pilot. The goal of IRR was to improve the integration and 
prioritization of the forest restoration program, increase the 
flexibility of the regions in the pilot to focus on high-
priority projects, and to create budgetary and implementation 
efficiencies. In some cases, the flexibility provided by the 
pilot allowed regions to better integrate budgeting and project 
planning. However, budgetary and implementation efficiencies 
were not realized. The Committee believes that providing 
national forests the flexibility to identify and focus on high-
priority projects will ultimately improve forest health. As 
such, the Committee directs the Service to identify the 
positive results of the IRR pilot, such as improved priority-
setting and greater cooperation between forests and regions, 
and to apply them uniformly across the Service.
    Fiscal Year 2019 Budget Request.--The Committee appreciates 
the Service's work to provide project statements showing total 
available funding, including mandatory and discretionary funds; 
justifications of increases and decreases; and classifications 
of objects for each account in its fiscal year 2018 budget 
request, and directs the Service to provide the same 
information in greater detail in the fiscal year 2019 budget 
request. The Committee encourages the Service to work with the 
Office of Budget and Program Analysis to conform its budget 
requests to those of other Department of Agriculture agencies 
and offices.
    Indian Trust Lands.--The Service is encouraged to promote 
and expand the use of agreements with Indian Tribes to protect 
Indian trust resources from catastrophic wildfire, insect and 
disease infestation or other threats from adjacent Federal 
lands, as authorized by law.
    Knutsen-Vandenberg Program.--The Committee is concerned 
that the Service is not fully utilizing the Knutson-Vandenberg 
fund as authorized by 16 U.S.C. 576b, including the amendments 
made by this Committee in P.L. 109-54, to accomplish important 
restoration activities with funds generated from timber sales. 
The Service is directed to fully utilize this authority and 
limit the deduction of any agency overhead cost pools to fund 
personnel of the responsible Ranger District for the planning 
and implementation of activities authorized and funded under 
the Act.
    American Discovery Trail.--The Committee encourages the 
Service to work with interested parties to facilitate the 
installation of signage for the American Discovery Trail, in 
accordance with current law and regulation.
    Superior National Forest.--The Committee encourages the 
Service to coordinate with the Bureau of Land Management to 
complete a thorough environmental impact statement evaluating 
the proposal to withdraw nearly 235,000 acres of National 
Forest System lands in the Rainy River Watershed from mineral 
leasing for a period of 20 years, considering the economic, 
environmental, public health, and other related issues raised 
during the scoping process.

                     FOREST AND RANGELAND RESEARCH

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $288,514,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................       259,000,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       278,368,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       -10,146,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................       +19,368,000
 

    The Committee recommends $278,368,000 for Forest and 
Rangeland Research, $10,146,000 below the fiscal year 2017 
enacted level and $19,368,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee recommends $75,037,000 for the FIA program 
and does not accept the proposed reduction for invasive species 
research.
    Forest Products Laboratory.--The Committee recommends 
$23,900,000, as requested, for the Forest Products Lab.
    Wood Products Research.--The Committee supports continued 
research to improve the environmental performance, resiliency, 
and affordability of mass timber and other wood products and 
directs the Service to engage public safety, regulatory 
agencies, and any other interested parties to ensure public 
safety issues are appropriately addressed.
    Bighorn Sheep Research.--The Service is urged to 
collaborate with the Bureau of Land Management and the 
Agricultural Research Service on research involving the risk of 
disease transmission between domestic and bighorn sheep.
    Forest Carbon Research.--The Committee encourages the 
Service to work with other U.S. Department of Agriculture 
agencies and offices to establish the methods and tools needed 
to quantify forest carbon as a resource.
    Water, Air, and Soil Research.--The Committee notes that 
the Service's research program has the potential to improve air 
quality monitoring technologies and air quality data and 
encourages the Service to collaborate with other Federal 
agencies and research partners in this field.
    Forest Health and Fire Research.--The Committee recognizes 
the valuable research contributions that other Federal agencies 
and State and private colleges and universities make on forest 
health and fire issues and encourages the Service to expand 
these partnerships where feasible.
    Previously Requested Reports.--The Committee reminds the 
Service of the Post-fire Treatment Report and Technical Report 
Update required by House report 114-632 and encourages their 
expeditious completion.
    Research Program Report.--The Committee appreciates the 
information provided on the Service's research program in the 
fiscal year 2018 budget request and directs the Service to 
continue to provide this information in the fiscal year 2019 
request.

                       STATE AND PRIVATE FORESTRY

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $216,921,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................       118,010,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       198,710,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       -18,211,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................       +80,700,000
 

    The Committee recommends $198,710,000 for State and Private 
Forestry, $18,211,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level 
and $80,700,000 above the budget request.
    Landscape Scale Restoration.--The Committee recommends 
$13,643,000 for Landscape Scale Restoration, $357,000 below the 
fiscal year 2017 level and $13,643,000 above the budget 
request.
    Forest Health Management.--The Committee recommends 
$92,084,000 for Forest Health Management, $2,416,000 below the 
fiscal year 2017 enacted level and $1,694,000 above the budget 
request.
    Forest Stewardship Program.--The Committee recommends 
$19,525,000 for the Forest Stewardship Program, $511,000 below 
the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and $975,000 below the 
budget request.
    Forest Legacy.--The recommendation includes $36,184,000 for 
Forest Legacy. Not later than the start of the fiscal year, the 
Service is directed to submit to the Committee the list of 
fiscal year 2018 projects that have been prioritized in 
accordance with the existing, competitive national selection 
process.
    Community Forest and Open Space Conservation.--The 
Committee recommends $1,950,000 for Community Forest and Open 
Space Conservation, $50,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted 
level and $1,950,000 above the budget request.
    Urban and Community Forestry.--The Committee recommends 
$27,324,000 for Urban and Community, $716,000 below the fiscal 
year 2017 enacted level and $27,324,000 above the budget 
request.
    International Forestry.--The Committee recommends 
$8,000,000 for International Forestry, equal to the fiscal year 
2017 enacted level and $880,000 above the budget request.

                         NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................    $1,513,318,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................     1,747,442,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................     1,885,827,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................      +372,509,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................      +138,385,000
 

    The Committee recommends $1,885,827,000 for the National 
Forest System, $372,509,000 above the fiscal year 2017 enacted 
level and $138,385,000 above the budget request. The Committee 
accepts the proposal to transfer Hazardous Fuels from the 
Wildland Fire Management account to the National Forest System 
account.
    Land Management Planning, Assessment, and Monitoring.--The 
Committee recommends $178,263,000 for Land Management Planning, 
Assessment, and Monitoring, $4,665,000 below the fiscal year 
2017 enacted level and $13,263,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee is aware that the Service, Bureau of 
Reclamation and others worked together during fiscal years 2016 
and 2017 to initiate a multi-year study to generate new 
knowledge to quantitatively establish the benefits of forest 
management practices in the Sierra Nevada that could 
potentially generate water supply and other benefits to the 
Central Valley Project and the State Water Project. The 
Committee supports the Service's continued participation, 
through the Western Watershed Enhancement Partnership program, 
in the analysis of science-based fuel reductions that are 
mutually beneficial to national forest health and water supply 
yield and, if merited, recommendations for further 
Congressional action.
    Recreation, Heritage and Wilderness.--The Committee 
recommends $257,848,000 for Recreation, Heritage and 
Wilderness, $6,747,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level 
and $4,968,000 above the budget request. Of the funds available 
to Manage Recreation Operations, $750,000 shall be for the 
maintenance of rural airstrips.
    Palisades Wilderness Study Area.--Congress intended for 
existing and historic motorized recreational uses to continue 
in wilderness study areas as designated in the 1984 Wyoming 
Wilderness Act. The Committee is aware that recent decisions by 
the Service have misconstrued this intent, which has had the 
effect of limiting previously established winter motorized 
uses. The Committee directs the Service to review its decisions 
and provide a report within 30 days of enactment of this Act to 
the Committee on its plan to remedy the concerns.
    Off-Highway Vehicle Report.--The Committee directs the 
Service to provide a report on its off-highway vehicle (OHV) 
mixed-use analysis. The report should include information on 
how OHV access to forest roads would affect recreational 
opportunities and related economic activity in forest 
communities; how many miles potentially could become available; 
estimated budget needs for expanded access; plans for opening 
new routes; and how other vehicles, such as all-terrain 
vehicles, could be utilized by wounded veterans and disabled 
citizens. The Committee reminds the Service of the importance 
of making the national forests as accessible as possible to the 
American people and requests that the Service work with States, 
local officials, communities, and partners as it implements the 
travel analysis process.
    Special-use Permits.--The Committee encourages the Service 
to increase the pace and scale of its evaluation of special-use 
permits in order to improve access to public lands and generate 
additional economic activity in the national forests and forest 
communities.
    Kisatchie National Forest.--The Committee is concerned 
about reports that the Service has insufficiently scoped the 
Breezy Hill Trail construction proposal and failed to 
adequately consider public comments, as required by the 
National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). As such, the 
Committee directs the Service to provide a report within 30 
days of enactment of this Act on how it intends to comply with 
all NEPA requirements, ensure public participation, and engage 
local communities regarding this proposal.
    Grazing Management.--The Committee recommends $56,856,000 
for Grazing Management, equal to the fiscal year 2017 enacted 
level and $6,256,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee encourages the Service to improve its 
monitoring of grazing permits in allotments where riparian 
streamside health is a concern for listed or threatened 
species. The Committee also requests each Forest Service region 
increase transparency and reporting on how their monitoring 
resources are used on the ground to satisfy monitoring 
requirements or for other purposes.
    Hazardous Fuels.--The Committee recommends $392,500,000 for 
hazardous fuels, $2,500,000 above the fiscal year 2017 level 
and $38,212,000 above the budget request. The Committee accepts 
the proposal to move Hazardous Fuels to the National Forest 
System from Wildland Fire Management.
    The Committee directs the Service to use the best available 
science that takes into account historical fire data, landscape 
characteristics, and forest composition as well as the effects 
of past and current human influences, such as development and 
land-use patterns, and climatic conditions to identify the 
highest priority areas for hazardous fuel reduction and forest 
health and management treatments. The Committee also recommends 
prioritizing funding for proactive hazardous fuels management 
and fire mitigation in high-priority areas to protect life and 
property.
    Forest Products.--The Committee recommends $370,305,000 for 
Forest Products, $2,500,000 above the fiscal year 2017 enacted 
level and $11,184,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee believes timber sales are a vital component 
of forest health. The budget request assumes 3.2 billion board 
feet of timber volume will be sold in fiscal year 2018. The 
Committee encourages the Service to work toward sales of 4 
billion board feet.
    Vegetation and Watershed Management.--The Committee 
recommends $180,000,000 for Vegetation and Watershed 
Management, $4,716,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level 
and $5,600,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee directs the Service to establish a pilot 
program to promote voluntary vegetation management along 
electric transmission and distribution rights-of-way to reduce 
the threat of catastrophic wildfire.
    Wildlife and Fisheries Habitat Management.--The Committee 
recommends $136,430,000 for Wildlife and Fisheries Habitat 
Management, $4,036,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level 
$11,430,000 above the budget request.
    Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Fund.--The 
Committee recommends $38,980,000, for the Collaborative Forest 
Landscape Restoration Fund, $1,020,000 below the fiscal year 
2017 enacted level and $38,980,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee recognizes the need to ensure forest 
resiliency and support multiple uses on national forest lands. 
The Committee urges the Service to incorporate a variety of 
landscapes, including wet forests, as it develops future 
projects for the Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration 
Program.
    Minerals and Geology Management.--The Committee recommends 
$73,642,000 for Minerals and Geology Management, $1,927,000 
below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and $5,642,000 above 
the budget request.
    The Committee expects that the Service will not promulgate 
regulations under the authority provided by section 2508 of 
Public Law 102-486 regarding certain oil and gas activities 
where the Federal government has acquired an interest in 
surface lands but not in oil and gas deposits that may be 
present under these lands. The Committee intends that the Third 
Circuit Court of Appeals decision in Minard Run Oil Co. v. U.S. 
Forest Serv., 670 F.3d 236 (3d Cir. 2011) will continue to 
apply to all Forest Service actions regarding oil and gas 
development of outstanding and reserved mineral rights on the 
Allegheny National Forest.
    Landownership Management.--The Committee recommends 
$71,850,000 for Landownership Management, $1,880,000 below the 
fiscal year 2017 enacted level and $2,850,000 above the budget 
request.
    The Committee is concerned about significant delays in 
processing rights-of-way and property access requests and 
directs the Service to update its regulations and processes 
related to these requests to ensure they are efficient, fair, 
and standardized across the Nation.
    Law Enforcement Operations.--The Committee recommends 
$129,153,000 for Law Enforcement Operations, $2,500,000 above 
the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and equal to the budget 
request.
    Avalanche Mitigation.--The Committee is concerned about 
avalanche dangers in the National Forest System, including the 
Cottonwood Canyons in Utah, and encourages the Service to 
continue efforts to work cooperatively with other Federal and 
State agencies to mitigate avalanches.
    Bill Language.--The Committee includes the following bill 
language in Title IV General Provisions: Section 407, allowing 
forest management plans to expire if the Forest Service has 
made a good faith effort to update plans commensurate with 
appropriated funds; Section 410, regarding timber sales of 
Alaskan western red cedar; Section 423, allowing the Forest 
Service to renew grazing permits; Section 425, extending the 
Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act for one year; Section 
435, prohibiting the use of appropriated funds to close areas 
open to recreational hunting and shooting as of January 1, 
2013; and Section 436, making vacant allotments for permittees 
affected by drought or wildfire.

                  CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT AND MAINTENANCE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $364,014,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        99,693,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       354,733,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................        -9,281,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................      +255,040,000
 

    The Committee recommends $354,733,000 for Capital 
Improvement and Maintenance, $9,281,000 below the fiscal year 
2017 enacted level and $255,040,000 above the budget request.
    Facilities Maintenance and Construction.--The Committee 
recommends $69,570,000 for Facilities Maintenance and 
Construction, $1,820,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted 
level and $57,820,000 above the budget request.
    Road Maintenance and Construction.--The Committee 
recommends $170,630,000 for Road Maintenance and Construction, 
$4,464,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and 
$95,387,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee encourages the Service to seek out and work 
with partners to address access and congestion issues and 
provide additional transit options for visitors to the national 
forests.
    Trail Maintenance and Construction.--The Committee 
recommends $75,553,000 for Trail Maintenance and Construction, 
$1,977,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and 
$62,853,000 above the budget request.
    Legacy Roads and Trail Remediation.--The Committee 
recommends $38,980,000 for Legacy Roads and Trails, $1,020,000 
below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and $38,980,000 above 
the budget request.
    The Committee did not include bill language for legacy 
roads and trails remediation as it is not needed. The Service 
is expected to allocate this funding in a manner proportionate 
to the distribution of roads in need of attention across the 
National Forest System and to direct funds to regions most in 
need of road remediation.

                            LAND ACQUISITION

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $54,415,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................         7,000,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        25,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       -29,415,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................       +18,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends $25,000,000 for Land Acquisition, 
$29,415,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and 
$18,000,000 above the budget request. A detailed table of 
funding recommendations below the account level is provided at 
the end of this report.
    The Committee does not have sufficient information to 
recommend specific Federal acquisition projects at this time, 
but will review and recommend levels of funding for projects 
submitted to the Committee in accordance with the direction 
provided in the explanatory statement accompanying Public Law 
115-31.
    The Committee is pleased with the cooperative agreement 
between the USFS and local authorities in Skamania County and 
encourages the Service to remain supportive of the agreement 
and to move forward with the land transfer process.
    The Committee supports the continuation of efforts to 
resolve the long-standing management challenges regarding 
school trust lands within the Boundary Waters Canoe Area in the 
Superior National Forest in Minnesota and encourages the 
Service to collaborate with nonprofit partners on the private 
forestland exchange alternative, which will provide the added 
benefit of preserving valuable forestlands outside of Superior 
National Forest.

         ACQUISITION OF LANDS FOR NATIONAL FORESTS SPECIAL ACTS

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................          $950,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................           850,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................           850,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................          -100,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $850,000 for Acquisition of Lands 
for National Forests Special Acts, equal to the budget request.

            ACQUISITION OF LANDS TO COMPLETE LAND EXCHANGES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................          $216,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................           192,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................           192,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................           -24,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $192,000 for Acquisition of Lands 
to Complete Land Exchanges under the Act of December 4, 1967 
(16 U.S.C. 484a), equal to the budget request. The Committee 
provides no-year funding authority for this account and 
includes the Ozark-St. Francis and Ouchita National Forests in 
Arkansas, as requested.

                         RANGE BETTERMENT FUND

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................        $2,320,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................         2,065,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................         2,065,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................          -255,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $2,065,000 for the Range 
Betterment Fund, equal to the budget request, to be derived 
from grazing receipts from national forests (Public Law 94-579) 
and to be used for range rehabilitation, protection, and 
improvements including seeding, reseeding, fence construction, 
weed control, water development, and fish and wildlife habitat 
enhancement in 16 western States.

    GIFTS, DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS FOR FOREST AND RANGELAND RESEARCH

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................           $45,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................            45,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................            45,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $45,000 for Gifts, Donations and 
Bequests for Forest and Rangeland Research, equal to the budget 
request.

        MANAGEMENT OF NATIONAL FOREST LANDS FOR SUBSISTENCE USES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................        $2,500,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................         2,225,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................         2,225,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................          -275,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $2,225,000 for the Management of 
National Forest Lands for Subsistence Uses in Alaska, equal to 
the budget request.

                             WILDLAND FIRE

    The Wildland Fire Management account supports the wildland 
fire activities of the Forest Service. The Committee recommends 
a total of $2,506,357,000 for the Forest Service wildland fire 
accounts. This fully funds the fire accounts at the 10-year 
average of expenditures. The Committee accepts the proposal to 
transfer Hazardous Fuels from the Wildland Fire Management 
account to the National Forest System account.

                        WILDLAND FIRE MANAGEMENT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................    $2,833,415,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................     2,495,038,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................     2,506,357,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................      -327,058,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................       +11,319,000
 

    The Committee recommends $2,506,357,000 for Wildland Fire 
Management, $327,058,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted 
level and $11,319,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee accepts the proposal to include all costs for 
suppression in the Wildland Fire Management account and notes 
that most of the decrease is related to the proposal to move 
hazardous fuels from the Wildland Fire Management account to 
the National Forest System account.
    The Committee directs the Service to update the Large 
Airtanker Modernization Strategy, dated January 17, 2012, to 
reflect current needs and trends in its wildland fire 
management program.
    The Committee is aware that the North Cascades Smokejumper 
Base may need facility upgrades, improvements, and renovations 
to meet Federal Aviation Administration compliance standards 
and requirements. The Committee understands the value to the 
local community of maintaining the North Cascades Smokejumper 
Base in Winthrop, Washington, and appreciates the site's 
historical significance as the birthplace of the United States' 
Smokejumping program. The Committee directs the Service provide 
a report on the needs of the North Cascades Smokejumper Base, 
as well as its other smokejumper bases, and to include in the 
report a description of the effect each has on the economy and 
disaster preparedness level of its local community.
    Wildland Fire Preparedness.--The Committee recommends 
$1,339,620,000 for Wildfire Preparedness, $257,000,000 above 
the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and equal to the budget 
request. The Committee supports the Service's plan to account 
for ``Base 8'' staff costs in the preparedness budget line 
item.
    Wildland Fire Suppression Operations.--The Committee 
recommends $1,056,818,000 for Wildfire Suppression Operations, 
$191,182,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and equal 
to the budget request. The Committee recommendation fully meets 
the 10-year average expenditure on all suppression activities.
    Fire Plan Research and Development.--The Committee 
recommends $19,290,000 for Fire Plan Research and Development, 
$505,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and 
$1,690,000 above the budget request.
    State Fire Assistance.--The Committee recommends 
$76,011,000 for State Fire Assistance, $1,989,000 below the 
fiscal year 2017 enacted level and $6,611,000 above the budget 
request.
    Volunteer Fire Assistance.--The Committee recommends 
$14,618,000 for Volunteer Fire Assistance, $382,000 below the 
fiscal year 2017 enacted level and $3,018,000 above the budget 
request.

                FLAME WILDFIRE SUPPRESSION RESERVE FUND

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $342,000,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................                 0
Recommended, 2018.....................................                 0
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................      -342,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $0 for the FLAME Wildfire 
Suppression Reserve Fund, $342,000,000 below the fiscal year 
2017 enacted level and equal to the budget request. As noted 
above, the Committee accepts the proposal to include all costs 
for suppression in the Wildland Fire Management account.

               ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS, FOREST SERVICE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    The Committee has included administrative provisions as 
requested, unless otherwise stated below.
    The Committee has included new administrative provisions 
regarding the availability of the FLAME Wildfire Suppression 
Fund and the development of an Administrative Control of Funds 
regulation.

                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES


                         Indian Health Service

    The provision of Federal health services to Indians is 
based on a relationship between Indian Tribes and the U.S. 
Government first set forth in the 1830s by the U.S. Supreme 
Court under Chief Justice John Marshall. Numerous treaties, 
statutes, constitutional provisions, and international laws 
have reconfirmed this relationship. Principal among these is 
the Snyder Act of 1921, which provides the basic authority for 
most Indian health services provided by the Federal government 
to American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN). The Indian 
Health Service (IHS) provides direct health care services in 28 
hospitals, 61 health centers, three school health centers, and 
34 health stations. Tribes and Tribal groups, through contracts 
and compacts with the IHS, operate 17 hospitals, 249 health 
centers, six school health centers, and 70 health stations 
(including 164 Alaska Native village clinics).

                         INDIAN HEALTH SERVICES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................    $3,694,462,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................     3,574,365,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................     3,867,260,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................      +172,798,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................      +292,895,000
 

    The Committee recommends $3,867,260,000 for Indian Health 
Services. All proposed cuts are restored and IHS is expected to 
continue all programs at fiscal year 2017 enacted levels except 
as otherwise discussed below and summarized in the table at the 
end of this report.
    Current Services.--The recommendation includes an increase 
of $23,543,000 above the fiscal year 2017 enacted level to 
cover estimated pay cost increases.
    Indian Health Care Improvement Fund.--The recommendation 
includes $130,000,000 for the Indian Health Care Improvement 
Fund in order to reduce health care disparities across the IHS 
system.
    Staffing for New Facilities.--The recommendation includes 
$17,978,000 for the staffing of newly opened health facilities, 
as requested. Funds for the staffing of new facilities are 
limited to facilities funded through the Health Care Facilities 
Construction Priority System or the Joint Venture Construction 
Program that have opened in fiscal year 2017 or will open in 
fiscal year 2018. None of these funds may be allocated to a 
facility until such facility has achieved beneficial occupancy 
status.
    Accreditation Emergencies.--The Committee considers the 
loss or potential loss of a Medicare or Medicaid agreement with 
the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) at any 
facility to be an accreditation emergency. The recommendation 
includes a total of $29,000,000 for accreditation emergencies 
at an alarming number of facilities over the past year. Funds 
may be used for personnel or other expenses essential for 
sustaining operations of an affected service unit, including 
but not to exceed $4,000,000 for Purchased/Referred Care. These 
are not intended to be recurring base funds. The Director 
should reallocate the funds annually as necessary to ensure 
that agreements with CMS are reinstated, and to restore third-
party collection shortfalls. Shortfalls should be calculated 
relative to a baseline, which should be the average of the 
collections in each of the two fiscal years preceding the year 
in which an agreement with CMS was terminated or put on notice 
of termination.
    Domestic Violence Prevention Program.--The recommendation 
includes $12,967,278 for the Domestic Violence Prevention 
Program, equal to the fiscal year 2017 enacted level.
    Prescription Drug Monitoring.--The recommendation includes 
$1,000,000 for Prescription Drug Monitoring, equal to the 
fiscal year 2017 enacted level.
    Village Built Clinics.--The recommendation includes 
$11,000,000 for the village built clinics leasing program, 
equal to the fiscal year 2017 enacted level.
    Dental Health.--The recommendation includes $185,920,000 
for Dental Health, $6,169,000 above the budget request and 
$3,323,000 above the fiscal year 2017 enacted level. The 
Service is encouraged to coordinate with the Bureau of Indian 
Education (BIE) to integrate preventive dental care at schools 
within the BIE system.
    The Committee has recognized for many years the dire need 
to increase oral health care to American Indians/Alaska 
Natives. Because of funding increases, an additional 263,565 
dental services were provided in fiscal year 2016. However, the 
demand for dental treatment remains overwhelming due to the 
high incidence of dental caries (cavities) in AI/AN children. 
Over 80 percent of AI/AN children ages 6-9 and 13-15 years 
suffer from dental caries, while less than 50 percent of the 
U.S. population in the same age cohort have experienced tooth 
decay. The Committee recognizes that more needs to be done to 
fully address the need for oral health care.
    Purchased/Referred Care (formerly Contract Health 
Services).--The recommendation includes $928,830,000 for 
Purchased/Referred Care (PRC), equal to the fiscal year 2017 
enacted level. The Committee remains concerned about the 
inequitable distribution of funds as reported by the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO-12-446).
    The IHS is encouraged to evaluate the feasibility of 
entering into reimbursable agreements with Federal health 
facilities outside of the IHS system for patient referrals. 
Such agreements should be considered only when such referrals 
save costs and patient travel times relative to referrals to 
the nearest non-Federal health facilities, and when such 
referrals do not significantly increase patient wait times at 
such Federal facilities.
    Urban Indian Health.--The recommendation includes 
$47,943,000 for Urban Indian Health, $3,202,000 above the 
budget request. IHS is expected to continue to include current 
services estimates for Urban Indian Health in future budget 
requests.
    Seven out of ten American Indians/Alaska Natives live in 
urban centers and receive vital culturally appropriate health 
services from urban Indian health organizations. As such, many 
Indian veterans obtain their health care services from these 
organizations. Currently the Veterans' Administration (VA) and 
the Indian Health Service are operating under a memorandum of 
understanding (MOU) which is effective through June 30, 2019. 
Under this agreement, VA reimburses care provided to Indian 
veterans at IHS facilities and Tribal health programs.
    The MOU recognizes the importance of a coordinated and 
cohesive effort on a national scope to meet the needs of 
individual tribes, villages, islands, and communities, through 
VA, IHS, Tribal and Urban Indian health programs; however, to 
date, there has not been equitable reimbursement for the 
culturally appropriate services provided to Native individuals, 
including Native veterans.
    This year, House Report 115-188 accompanying the fiscal 
year 2018 Military Construction, Veterans' Administration, and 
Related Agencies Appropriation bill included a directive 
requiring the VA to prepare a report for the Appropriations 
Committee examining the impact of Indian veterans receiving 
health services at urban clinics and the annual estimated cost 
differential for VA to reimburse IHS rather than provide 
services directly in these urban areas. The report is also to 
estimate the capacity of Indian urban clinics to treat 
increased Indian veteran caseloads and include any data 
supporting the use of the higher negotiated reimbursement rate 
in urban settings versus rural areas. The report is due 90 days 
after enactment of the Act, and the Committee directs IHS to 
work with the VA to complete this report.
    Indian Health Professions.--The recommendation includes 
$49,363,000 for Indian Health Professions, $6,021,000 above the 
budget request. The American Indians into Psychology Program is 
continued at not less than $715,077.
    Loan repayment has proven to be the Service's best 
recruitment tool for staffing health professionals. The 
Committee was dismayed to learn that the Service has three 
thousand vacancies for health professionals. Overall, this is a 
vacancy rate of 20 percent, with a physician shortage rate of 
30 percent and a dentist rate of 18 percent. The Committee has 
included $49,363,000 to better enable the Service to recruit 
and retain health providers. The Service is urged to consider 
making health administrators a higher priority for loan 
repayments, in consultation with Tribes.
    Governing Boards.--The accreditation crisis in the Great 
Plains and the subsequent House provision have highlighted the 
need for IHS facilities to be significantly more inclusive of 
Tribes in the decision-making process. The Committees on 
Appropriations are encouraged by the IHS's own recent 
initiative to reform its governing boards, but reforms are 
limited under existing statutes. The Committees are aware that 
the authorizing committees of jurisdiction are examining this 
issue and support these efforts to improve the communication 
and collaboration between the IHS and Tribes at direct service 
facilities.
    Indian Health Care Improvement Act.--It has been over six 
years since the permanent reauthorization of the Indian Health 
Care Improvement Act (IHCIA), yet many of the provisions in the 
law remain unfunded. Tribes have specifically requested that 
priority areas for funding focus on diabetes treatment and 
prevention, behavioral health, and health professions. The 
Committee requests that the Service provide, no later than 90 
days after the date of enactment of this Act, a detailed plan 
with specific dollars identified to fully fund and implement 
the IHCIA.
    Reimbursable Funding.--The Committee directs the Service to 
report, within 180 days of enactment of this Act, on patient 
population and service growth over the past ten years and the 
funding sources used to provide for these medical services. The 
IHS is to include a breakdown, by dollar amount and percentage, 
of funding sources which supplement appropriated dollars to 
cover the provision of medical services at IHS operated and 
tribally contracted and compacted facilities. The Committee is 
interested in detailed information on whether medical services 
have been able to expand over this time period as a result of 
increases in the ability to charge medical services to 
supplementary funding sources. As a point of comparison, and to 
the extent possible, the Service shall compare these impacts 
across the twelve IHS areas, with the degree to which patient 
populations services in the respective states has increased.

                         CONTRACT SUPPORT COSTS

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $800,000,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................       717,970,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       717,970,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       -82,030,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends an indefinite appropriation 
estimated to be $717,970,000 for contract support costs 
incurred by the agency as required by law. The bill includes 
language making available for two years such sums as are 
necessary to meet the Federal government's full legal 
obligation, and prohibiting the transfer of funds to any other 
account for any other purpose.

                        INDIAN HEALTH FACILITIES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $545,424,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................       446,956,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       551,643,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................        +6,219,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................      +104,687,000
 

    The Committee recommends $551,643,000 for Indian Health 
Facilities, $6,219,000 above the fiscal year 2017 enacted level 
and $104,687,000 above the budget request. All proposed cuts 
are restored and IHS is expected to continue all programs at 
fiscal year 2017 enacted levels except as otherwise discussed 
below and summarized in the table at the end of this report.
    Staffing for New Facilities.--The recommendation includes 
$2,022,000 for the staffing of newly opened health facilities. 
The stipulations included in the Indian Health Services account 
regarding the allocation of funds pertain to this account as 
well.
    Current Services.--The recommendation includes an increase 
of $2,440,000 above the fiscal year 2017 enacted level to cover 
estimated pay cost increases.
    Indian Health Care Improvement Fund.--The bill includes 
language allowing funds in the Indian Health Care Improvement 
Fund to be used for activities in the Facilities account.
    Health Care Facilities Construction.--The recommendation 
includes $117,991,000 for health care facilities construction, 
$17,991,000 above the budget request and equal to the fiscal 
year 2017 enacted level.
    The Committee remains dedicated to providing access to 
health care for IHS patients across the system. The IHS is 
expected to aggressively work down the current Health 
Facilities Construction Priority System list, as well as work 
with the Department and Tribes to examine alternative financing 
arrangements and meritorious regional demonstration projects 
authorized under the Indian Health Care Improvement Act that 
that would effectively close the service gap. Within 60 days of 
enactment of this Act, the Service shall submit a spending plan 
to the Committees on Appropriations that details the project-
level distribution of funds provided for healthcare facilities 
construction.
    The IHS has no defined benefit package and is not designed 
to be comparable to the private sector health care system. IHS 
does not provide the same health services in each area. Health 
services provided to a community depend upon the facilities and 
services available in the local area, the facilities' financial 
and personnel resources (42 CFR 136.11 (c)), and the needs of 
the service population. In order to determine whether IHS 
patients across the system have comparable access to 
healthcare, the IHS is directed to conduct and publish a gap 
analysis of the locations and capacities of patient health 
facilities relative to the IHS user population. The analysis 
should include: facilities within the IHS system, including 
facilities on the Health Facilities Construction Priority 
System list and the Joint Venture Construction Program list; 
and where possible facilities within private or other Federal 
health systems for which arrangements with IHS exist, or should 
exist, to see IHS patients.

                     National Institutes of Health


          NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES

    The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, an 
agency within the National Institutes of Health, was authorized 
in section 311(a) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 and in section 126(g) 
of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 to 
conduct certain research and worker training activities 
associated with the Nation's Hazardous Substance Superfund 
program.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $77,349,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        59,607,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        75,370,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................        -1,979,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................       +15,763,000
 

    The Committee recommends $75,370,000 for the National 
Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, $1,979,000 below 
the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and $15,763,000 above the 
budget request.

            Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry


            TOXIC SUBSTANCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry 
(ATSDR), an agency in the Department of Health and Human 
Services, was created in section 104(i) of the Comprehensive 
Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act 
(CERCLA) of 1980. The Agency's mission is to serve the public 
through responsive public health actions to promote healthy and 
safe environments and prevent harmful toxic exposures. ATSDR 
assesses hazardous exposures in communities near toxic waste 
sites and advises the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and 
other government agencies, community groups and industry 
partners on actions needed to protect people's health. In 
addition, ATSDR conducts toxicological and applied research to 
support environmental assessments, supports health surveillance 
systems and registries, develops and disseminates information 
on hazardous substances, provides education and training on 
hazardous exposures, and responds to environmental emergencies. 
Through a national network of scientists and public health 
practitioners in State health departments, regional EPA offices 
and headquarters, ATSDR helps to protect people from acute 
toxic exposures that occur from hazardous leaks and spills, 
environment-related poisonings, and natural and terrorism-
related disasters.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $74,961,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        62,000,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        72,780,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................        -1,911,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................       +10,780,000
 

    The Committee recommends $72,780,000 for the Agency for 
Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, $1,911,000 below the 
fiscal year 2017 level and $10,780,000 above the budget 
request.

                         OTHER RELATED AGENCIES


                   Executive Office of the President


  COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

    The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) was established 
by Congress under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 
(NEPA). The Office of Environmental Quality (OEQ), which 
provides professional and administrative staff for the Council, 
was established in the Environmental Quality Improvement Act of 
1970. The Council on Environmental Quality has statutory 
responsibility for overseeing Federal agency implementation of 
the requirements of NEPA. CEQ also assists in coordinating 
environmental programs among the Federal agencies in the 
Executive Branch.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................        $3,000,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................         2,994,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................         2,994,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................            -6,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $2,994,000 for the Council on 
Environmental Quality and Office of Environmental Quality, 
$6,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and equal to 
the budget request.

             Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB) is 
an independent Federal agency charged with investigating 
industrial chemical accidents. The board members are appointed 
by the President and confirmed by the Senate. The CSB conducts 
root-cause investigations of chemical accidents at fixed 
industrial facilities. Root causes are usually deficiencies in 
safety management systems, but can be any factor that would 
have prevented the accident if that factor had not occurred. 
Other accident causes often involve equipment failures, human 
errors, unforeseen chemical reactions or other hazards. CSB 
does not issue fines or citations, but does make 
recommendations to plants, regulatory agencies such as the 
Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the 
Environmental Protection Agency, industry organizations, and 
labor groups. Congress designed the CSB to be non-regulatory 
and independent of other agencies so that its investigations 
might, where appropriate, review the effectiveness of 
regulations and regulatory enforcement.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $11,000,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................         9,420,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        11,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        +1,580,000
 

    The bill provides $11,000,000 for Salaries and Expenses of 
the Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board. The Board 
has the important responsibility of independently investigating 
industrial chemical accidents and collaborating with industry 
and professional organizations to share safety lessons that can 
prevent catastrophic incidents and the Committee expects this 
work to continue.

              Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation was 
established by Public Law 93-531 to plan and conduct relocation 
activities associated with the settlement of a land dispute 
between the Navajo Nation and the Hopi Tribe.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $15,431,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        14,970,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        15,431,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................          +461,000
 

    The Committee recommends $15,431,000 for the Office of 
Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation (Office), equal to the fiscal 
year 2017 enacted level. Of this amount, $200,000 shall be 
transferred to the Inspector General of the Department of the 
Interior for continued oversight of planning, transition, and 
closure of the Office.
    The Committee has directed the Office to begin to 
communicate with Congress, the affected Tribes, and the 
Department of the Interior about what will be required to 
ensure relocation benefits and necessary support services are 
provided in accordance with the specifications in Public Law 
93-531 and to initiate closure of the Office. The Committee 
requests continuation of the quarterly reports and a 
comprehensive plan for closing the Office, as outlined in House 
Report 114-632. Legal analysis on whether any enacting 
legislation is required to transfer or maintain any identified 
functions to another agency or organization should also be 
included. The Office should be transparent about the path 
forward and should actively consult with all affected parties 
and agencies.

    Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and Arts 
                              Development


                        PAYMENT TO THE INSTITUTE

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $15,212,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        11,596,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................         9,835,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................        -5,377,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        -1,761,000
 

    The Committee recommends $9,835,000 in direct 
appropriations for the Institute of American Indian and Alaska 
Native Culture and Arts Development. The Committee notes that 
the budget request failed to account for a one-time funding 
increase in fiscal year 2017 to put the Institute's budget on a 
school year cycle instead of a fiscal year cycle. The total 
operating level appropriated in fiscal year 2017 for the 
Institute was $9,835,000. The Committee recommends the same 
amount for 2018.

                        SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION

    The Smithsonian Institution is the world's largest museum 
and research complex, with 19 museums and galleries, numerous 
research centers, libraries, archives, and the National 
Zoological Park. Funded by both private and Federal sources, 
the Smithsonian is unique in the Federal establishment. Created 
by an Act of Congress in 1846 to carry out the trust included 
in James Smithson's will, it has been engaged for 171 years in 
the ``increase and diffusion of knowledge.'' Last year, the 
Smithsonian attracted over 29 million visits to its museums, 
galleries, and zoological park. Additional millions also view 
Smithsonian traveling exhibitions and participate in the annual 
Folklife Festival on the National Mall. As custodian of the 
National Collections, the Smithsonian is responsible for more 
than 156 million art objects, natural history specimens, and 
artifacts. These scientific and cultural collections are a 
vital resource for global research and conservation efforts. 
The collections are displayed for the enjoyment and education 
of visitors and are available for research by the staff of the 
Institution and by thousands of visiting students, scientists, 
and historians each year.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $729,444,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................       719,000,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       716,600,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       -12,844,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        -2,400,000
 

    The Committee recommends $716,600,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses of the Smithsonian Institution, $12,844,000 below the 
fiscal year 2017 enacted level and $2,400,000 below the budget 
request.
    Additional Guidance.--The following additional direction 
and guidance is provided with respect to funding provided 
within this account:
    Collections Care.--The Committee maintains its longstanding 
commitment to the preservation of priceless, irreplaceable 
Smithsonian Institution collections and has provided funds for 
the collections care initiative. The Committee is pleased with 
continuing efforts to improve the long-term inventory, 
preservation, and storage of historical collections.
    National Museum of African American History and Culture.--
The Committee maintains its longstanding support of the 
National Museum of African American History and Culture 
(NMAAHC). The Committee has provided funds for museum 
maintenance, facility operations, and security, as requested.
    Latino Programs, Exhibitions, Collections and Public 
Outreach.--The Committee supports the Smithsonian Latino 
Center's goal of promoting the inclusion of Latino 
contributions in Smithsonian Institution programs, exhibitions, 
collections and public outreach. The Committee urges 
collaboration among interested parties to advance these goals 
more fully by utilizing existing Smithsonian Institution museum 
locations for the expansion of the Smithsonian Latino Center's 
programming, exhibition and collection space. The Committee has 
provided funds, as requested, to support the Institution's 
Latino initiatives.
    Asian Pacific American Initiatives and Outreach.--The 
Smithsonian is directed to continue its efforts, at the fiscal 
year 2017 enacted funding level, toward developing programs and 
expanding outreach to promote a better understanding of the 
Asian Pacific American experience.
    Historical flag collection.--The Committee is aware that 
the Smithsonian Institution may have the potential opportunity 
to acquire a rare, historically significant private collection 
of American flags and ephemera that would substantially enhance 
the Museum's permanent collection. The Committee understands 
that the Smithsonian is not currently seeking Congressional 
funding for this acquisition and encourages private/public 
partnerships that would be beneficial to the Smithsonian's 
effort to acquire these flags and artifacts that are of 
significant educational value and reflect our Nation's history.

                           FACILITIES CAPITAL

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $133,903,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................       228,000,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       168,500,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       +34,597,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................       -59,500,000
 

    The Committee recommends $168,500,000 for the Facilities 
Capital account, $34,597,000 above the fiscal year 2017 enacted 
level.
    The recommendation includes funding as requested to 
complete construction of the Dulles Storage Module at the 
National Air and Space Museum's Udvar-Hazy Center. This 
critical addition of collections storage space at the 
Smithsonian's Dulles site will establish a permanent facility 
to gather collections from the antiquated buildings at the 
Garber facility in Suitland, Maryland, which are being phased 
out after 60 years of service. In the near term, this storage 
module will serve the Smithsonian's immediate need for 
temporary collections swing space during the National Air and 
Space Museum's Revitalization Project, and will provide 
critically needed collections consolidation space for the 
Institution's long-term storage needs.
    The Committee supports revitalization of Smithsonian 
Institution facilities and the planning and design of future 
projects. Within funds provided, the Committee urges the 
Smithsonian to support the highest priority projects on the 
Facilities Capital Program list, including the multi-year 
revitalization of the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), 
scheduled to begin in fiscal year 2018.
    The NASM faces mechanical, structural, and security 
challenges that necessitate action to ensure the facility's 
long-term viability. The NASM is the most visited museum in the 
United States and second most visited museum in the world with 
between seven and eight million visitors annually. The 
Committee remains concerned, however, that the multi-year cost-
estimates for the project exceed $600 million.
    Given the scope and scale of this effort, this project is 
likely to place additional pressure on Smithsonian annual 
budgets for the foreseeable future. The Committee urges the 
Smithsonian to evaluate potential partnership and philanthropic 
opportunities that may provide additional non-Federal sources 
of funding to assist in offsetting the costs of this and other 
revitalization projects.

                        NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART

    The National Gallery of Art is one of the world's great 
galleries. Its magnificent works of art, displayed for the 
benefit of millions of visitors annually, and its two iconic 
buildings and sculpture garden, serve as an example of a 
successful cooperative endeavor between private individuals and 
institutions and the Federal government. With the special 
exhibitions shown in the Gallery, and through the many 
exhibitions which travel across the country, the Gallery brings 
great art treasures to Washington, DC, and to the Nation. 
Through its educational and teacher training programs and its 
website, the Gallery provides art history materials, rich 
online educational materials, direct loans, and broadcast 
programs to millions of Americans in every State.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $132,961,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................       130,000,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       132,961,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        +2,961,000
 

    The Committee recommends $132,961,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses of the National Gallery of Art, equal to the fiscal 
year 2017 enacted level and $2,961,000 above the budget 
request.
    Bill Language.--The Committee has included bill language 
specifying the amount provided for Special Exhibitions.

            REPAIR, RESTORATION AND RENOVATION OF BUILDINGS

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $22,564,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        17,000,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        22,564,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        +5,564,000
 

    The Committee recommends $22,564,000 for Repair, 
Restoration and Renovation of buildings at the National Gallery 
of Art, equal to the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and 
$5,564,000 above the budget request.
    Bill Language.--The Committee has included bill language, 
as requested, relating to lease agreements of no more than 10 
years that addresses space needs created by ongoing renovations 
in the Master Facilities Plan.

             John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

    The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts is a 
living memorial to the late President Kennedy and is the 
National Center for the Performing Arts. The Center houses nine 
stages and seven theaters which have a total of more than 7,300 
seats. The Center consists of over 1.5 million square feet of 
usable floor space with visitation averaging 8,000 on a daily 
basis. The support systems in the building often operate at 
capacity 18 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year.

                       OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $22,260,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        23,740,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        23,740,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................        +1,480,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $23,740,000 for Operations and 
Maintenance, as requested.

                     CAPITAL REPAIR AND RESTORATION

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $14,140,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        13,000,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        13,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................        -1,140,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $13,000,000 for Capital Repair and 
Restoration, as requested.

            Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars 
promotes policy-relevant research and dialogue to increase 
understanding and enhance the capabilities and knowledge of 
leaders, citizens, and institutions worldwide. The Center hosts 
scholars and policy makers to do their own advanced study, 
research and writing and facilitates debate and discussions 
among scholars, public officials, journalists and business 
leaders from across the country on relevant, major long-term 
issues facing this Nation and the world.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $10,500,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................         7,474,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        10,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................          -500,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        +2,526,000
 

    The Committee recommends $10,000,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for 
Scholars, $500,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and 
$2,526,000 above the budget request.

           National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities


                    National Endowment for the Arts


                       GRANTS AND ADMINISTRATION

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $149,849,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        29,019,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       145,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................        -4,849,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................      +115,981,000
 

    The Committee recommends $145,000,000 for the National 
Endowment for the Arts (NEA), $4,849,000 below the fiscal year 
2017 enacted level and $115,981,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee notes the broad bipartisan support of the NEA 
in commending the NEA's participation in the National 
Initiative for Arts & Health in the Military. This 
collaborative effort involving Federal agencies, the military, 
and nonprofit and private sector partners is working to advance 
the policy, research, and practice of arts therapy for military 
veterans and their families. Through the innovative program, 
``Creative Forces: NEA Military Healing Arts Network,'' the NEA 
is partnering with the Departments of Defense and Veterans 
Affairs to place creative arts therapies at the core of 
patient-centered care and increase access to therapeutic arts 
activities in local communities.
    The Committee commends the NEA for its ongoing 
collaboration with the National Intrepid Center of Excellence 
at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Since 2011, 
this unique partnership has supported creative and innovative 
arts therapies for service members. In 2013, this collaborative 
relationship expanded to bring Creative Arts Therapies to 
military patients at the Fort Belvoir Community Hospital Brain 
Injury Clinic in Virginia to evaluate the potential health 
benefits of creative arts therapy interventions for service 
members with Traumatic Brain Injury and Post Traumatic Stress. 
Today, the NEA is engaged in this transformative approach to 
healing at 11 clinical sites across the country.
    The Committee values greatly the longstanding collaborative 
relationship between the NEA and the States. State Arts 
Agencies support the arts for communities at the grassroots 
level regardless of their geographic location, providing much 
of their funding to smaller organizations, community groups, 
and schools.
    The Committee remains committed to supporting proven 
national initiatives with broad geographic reach. The Big Read, 
Challenge America, and Shakespeare in American Communities are 
among the cost-effective grant programs with broad, bipartisan 
congressional support that meet these criteria, supporting the 
NEA's goal of extending the arts to underserved populations in 
both urban and rural communities across the United States.
    Bill Language.--Each year, the Committee provides in bill 
language specific guidelines under which the Endowment is 
directed to distribute taxpayer dollars in support of the arts. 
With the exception of established honorific programs, grant 
funding to individual artists is strictly prohibited. The 
Committee directs that priority be given to providing services 
or grant funding for projects, productions, or programs that 
encourage public knowledge, education, understanding, and 
appreciation of the arts. Any reduction in support to the 
States for arts education should be no more than proportional 
to other funding decreases taken in other NEA programs.
    Reforms originally instituted by the Committee in P.L. 108-
447 relating to grant guidelines and program priorities are 
fully restated in Sections 413 and 414 of the bill. The 
Committee expects the NEA to adhere to them fully. These 
reforms maintain broad bipartisan support and continue to serve 
well both the NEA and the public.

                 National Endowment for the Humanities


         GRANTS AND ADMINISTRATION (INCLUDING MATCHING GRANTS)

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................      $149,848,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        42,307,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................       145,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................        -4,848,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................      +102,693,000
 

    The Committee recommends a total of $145,000,000 for the 
National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), $4,848,000 below 
the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and $102,693,000 above the 
budget request.
    The Committee notes the broad bipartisan support of the NEH 
in commending the NEH for its support of grant programs to 
benefit wounded warriors and to ensure educational 
opportunities for veterans and service members transitioning to 
civilian life. In partnership with NEH, State humanities 
councils have developed and delivered local programs that 
support veterans, their families and caregivers. The Committee 
encourages the NEH to fully support efforts to connect the 
humanities to the experience of veterans and provide 
educational opportunities to these American heroes.
    The Committee commends the NEH for its ongoing support to 
American Indian and Alaska Native communities in preserving 
their cultural and linguistic heritage through the Documenting 
Endangered Languages program and a variety of preservation and 
access grants that enable American Indian and Alaska Native 
communities to preserve cultural artifacts and make them 
broadly accessible. It also commends the NEH for providing 
educational opportunities to Tribal communities through the 
Humanities Initiatives at Tribal Colleges and Universities 
program.
    The Committee commends the NEH Federal/State Partnership 
for its ongoing, successful collaboration with State humanities 
councils in each of the 50 states as well as Washington, DC, 
the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, 
the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and American 
Samoa. The Committee recognizes the State humanities councils 
for the scope and reach of public humanities programming in 
Congressional districts across the nation, which serve rural 
areas, promote family literacy, and support cultural tourism 
that contributes to local economies. Every NEH dollar received 
by a council is matched by a local contribution. In recent 
years, the proportion of NEH program funds supporting the work 
of State humanities councils has grown to nearly 40 percent. 
The Committee urges the NEH to provide program funding to 
support the work of State humanities councils consistent with 
the guidance provided in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 
2017.

                        Commission of Fine Arts

    The Commission of Fine Arts was established in 1910 to 
advise the government on matters pertaining to the design of 
national symbols, and particularly to guide the architectural 
development of Washington, DC. The Commission's work includes 
advice on designs for parks, public buildings, public art, as 
well as the design of national monuments, coins and medals, and 
overseas American military cemeteries. In addition, the 
Commission conducts design reviews of semipublic and private 
structures within the Old Georgetown Historic District and 
within certain areas of the National Capital that are adjacent 
to areas of Federal interest. The Commission reviews 
approximately 750 projects annually. The Commission also 
administers the National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs 
program.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................        $2,762,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................         2,600,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................         2,600,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................          -162,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $2,600,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses of the Commission of Fine Arts, $162,000 below the 
fiscal year 2017 enacted level and equal to the budget request.

               National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs


 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................        $2,000,000
Budget Estimate, 2018.................................                 0
Recommended, 2018.....................................         2,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        +2,000,000
 

    The National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs (NCACA) 
program was established in Public Law 99-190 to support 
organizations that perform, exhibit, and/or present the arts in 
the Nation's Capital. NCACA provides grants to support Ford's 
Theater, the National Symphony Orchestra, the National Museum 
of Women in the Arts, and other arts organizations. The 
Committee recommends $2,000,000, equal to the fiscal year 2017 
enacted level.

               Advisory Council on Historic Preservation


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 established 
the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP). The ACHP 
was granted permanent authorization as part of the National 
Historic Preservation Act Amendments of 2006 (Public Law 109-
453). The ACHP promotes the preservation, enhancement, and 
productive use of our Nation's historic resources and advises 
the President and Congress on national historic preservation 
policy.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................        $6,493,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................         6,400,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................         6,400,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................           -93,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $6,400,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses of the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation 
(ACHP), $93,000 below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and 
equal to the budget request.

                  National Capital Planning Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The National Capital Planning Act of 1952 designated the 
National Capital Planning Commission as the central planning 
agency for the Federal government in the National Capital 
Region. The three major functions of the Commission are to 
prepare and adopt the Federal elements of the National Capital 
Comprehensive Plan; prepare an annual report on a five-year 
projection of the Federal Capital Improvement Program; and 
review plans and proposals submitted to the Commission.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................        $8,099,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................         7,948,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................         7,948,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................          -151,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends $7,948,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses of the National Capital Planning Commission, $151,000 
below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and equal to the 
budget request.

                United States Holocaust Memorial Museum


                       HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL MUSEUM

    In 1980, Congress passed legislation creating a 65-member 
Holocaust Memorial Council with the mandate to create and 
oversee a living memorial/museum to victims of the Holocaust. 
The museum opened in April 1993. Construction costs for the 
museum came solely from donated funds raised by the U.S. 
Holocaust Memorial Museum Campaign, and appropriated funds were 
used for planning and development of programmatic components, 
overall administrative support, and annual commemorative 
observances. Since the opening of the museum, appropriated 
funds have been provided to pay for the ongoing operating costs 
of the museum as authorized by Public Law 102-529 and Public 
Law 106-292. Private funds support educational outreach 
throughout the United States.

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $57,000,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        54,000,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        57,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        +3,000,000
 

    The Committee recommends $57,000,000 for the Holocaust 
Memorial Museum, equal to the fiscal year 2017 enacted level 
and $3,000,000 above the budget request.

                Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission

    The Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission was created by 
Congress in 1999 through Public Law 106-79 for the purpose of 
establishing a permanent national memorial to Dwight D. 
Eisenhower, Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces in Europe in 
World War II and 34th President of the United States. The 
Commission consists of 12 members, four members of the House of 
Representatives, four Senators, and four private citizens 
appointed by the President.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................        $1,600,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................         1,800,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................         1,600,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................          -200,000
 

    The bill includes $1,600,000 for the Salaries and Expenses 
account, equal to the fiscal year 2017 enacted level. The 
Committee supports the construction of a permanent memorial to 
Dwight D. Eisenhower. It is the Committee's understanding that 
groundbreaking for the memorial will occur later this year 
following necessary approvals from the Commission of Fine Arts 
and the National Capital Planning Commission. The bill includes 
language in Section 419 of Title IV General Provisions 
extending the memorial's site authority.

                          CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................       $45,000,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................        85,000,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................        15,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................       -30,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................       -70,000,000
 

    The bill includes $15,000,000 for the Capital Construction 
account. The fiscal year 2018 budget request was developed 
prior to the enactment of the fiscal year 2017 budget which 
provided $45,000,000 toward construction of the memorial. When 
combined with prior year unobligated balances in the 
construction account, funds provided in fiscal year 2017 and in 
this bill, will allow significant progress to be made on the 
memorial when construction commences later this year.

                 Women's Suffrage Centennial Commission

    The Women's Suffrage Centennial Commission was established 
by Congress in 2017 in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 
2017, P.L. 115-31. The purpose of the commission is to study 
and make recommendations for the national commemoration of the 
ratification of the 19th amendment to the U.S. Constitution on 
August 18, 1920, that guaranteed women the right to vote.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................        $2,000,000
Budget estimate, 2018.................................                 0
Recommended, 2018.....................................         1,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................        -1,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        +1,000,000
 

    The bill provides $1,000,000 for the salaries and expenses 
of the Women's Suffrage Centennial Commission. The Committee 
looks forward to the appointment of the members of the 
commission and receiving additional information on its plans 
for the commemoration of the 19th amendment to the U.S. 
Constitution.

                   World War I Centennial Commission

    The U.S. World War I Centennial Commission was created by 
an Act of Congress in 2013 as an independent agency of the 
Legislative Branch of the United States government. Members of 
the 12-member Commission were appointed by the President and 
the leaders of the Senate and the House of Representatives, as 
well as the American Legion, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, and 
the National World War I Museum. The Commission's mission is to 
plan, develop, and execute programs, projects and activities to 
commemorate the Centennial of World War I.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation enacted, 2017...........................                $0
Budget estimate, 2018.................................         7,000,000
Recommended, 2018.....................................         3,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2017...............................        +3,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2018.............................        -4,000,000
 

    The bill provides $3,000,000 for salaries and expenses of 
the World War I Centennial Commission, and bill language as 
requested.

                      TITLE IV--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Section 401 continues a provision prohibiting activities to 
promote public support or opposition to legislative proposals.
    Section 402 continues a provision providing for annual 
appropriations unless expressly provided otherwise in this Act.
    Section 403 continues a provision providing restrictions on 
departmental assessments unless approved by the Committee on 
Appropriations.
    Section 404 continues a limitation on accepting and 
processing applications for patents and on the patenting of 
Federal lands; permits processing of grandfathered 
applications; and permits third-party contractors to process 
grandfathered applications.
    Section 405 continues a provision regarding the payment of 
contract support costs for prior fiscal years.
    Section 406 addresses the payment of contract support costs 
for fiscal year 2018.
    Section 407 continues a provision allowing Forest Service 
land management plans to be more than 15 years old if the 
Secretary is acting in good faith to update such plans and 
prohibiting the use of funds to implement new wilderness 
directives under the planning rule.
    Section 408 continues a provision limiting preleasing, 
leasing, and related activities within the boundaries of 
National Monuments.
    Section 409 continues a provision which restricts funding 
for acquisition of land from being used for declarations of 
taking or complaints in condemnation.
    Section 410 continues a provision addressing timber sales 
involving Alaskan western red cedar.
    Section 411 continues a provision which prohibits no-bid 
contracts and grants except under certain circumstances.
    Section 412 continues a provision which requires public 
disclosure of certain reports.
    Section 413 continues a provision which delineates the 
grant guidelines for the National Endowment for the Arts.
    Section 414 continues a provision which delineates the 
program priorities for the programs managed by the National 
Endowment for the Arts.
    Section 415 continues a provision requiring the Department 
of the Interior, the EPA, the Forest Service, and the Indian 
Health Service to provide the Committees on Appropriations a 
quarterly report on the status of balances of appropriations.
    Section 416 provides a one-year extension of the current 
recreation fee authority.
    Section 417 continues a provision prohibiting the use of 
funds to promulgate or implement any regulation requiring the 
issuance of permits under title V of the Clean Air Act for 
carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, water vapor, or methane 
emissions.
    Section 418 continues a provision prohibiting the use of 
funds to implement any provision in a rule if that provision 
requires mandatory reporting of greenhouse gas emissions from 
manure management systems.
    Section 419 continues a provision from the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2017 modifying authorities relating to the 
Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission.
    Section 420 prohibits the use of funds to regulate the lead 
content of ammunition or fishing tackle.
    Section 421 continues a provision through fiscal year 2019 
authorizing the Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary of 
Agriculture to consider local contractors when awarding 
contracts for certain activities on public lands.
    Section 422 extends the authorization for the Chesapeake 
Bay Initiative.
    Section 423 extends certain authorities through fiscal year 
2018 allowing the Forest Service to renew grazing permits.
    Section 424 prohibits the use of funds to maintain or 
establish a computer network unless such network is designed to 
block pornography websites.
    Section 425 extends the authority of the Forest Service 
Facility Realignment and Enhancement Act.
    Section 426 sets requirement for the use of American iron 
and steel for certain loans and grants.
    Section 427 continues the prohibition on the use of funds 
to destroy any building or structures on Midway Island that 
have been recommended by the U.S. Navy for inclusion in the 
National Register of Historic Places.
    Section 428 addresses carbon emissions from forest biomass.
    Section 429 reauthorizes funding for one year for the John 
F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.
    Section 430 prohibits the use of funds to require permits 
for the discharge of dredged or fill material for certain 
agricultural activities.
    Section 431 addresses the Waters of the United States rule.
    Section 432 addresses the implementation of national 
ambient air quality standards for ozone.
    Section 433 prohibits the use of funds to finalize, 
implement, administer, or enforce a proposed rule for financial 
responsibility requirements under CERCLA.
    Section 434 prohibits the use of funds to issue any 
regulation under the Solid Waste Disposal Act that applies to 
an animal feeding operation.
    Section 435 prohibits the use of funds for the National 
Ocean Policy developed under Executive Order 13547.
    Section 436 prohibits the use of funds to limit 
recreational shooting and hunting on Federal and public lands 
except for public safety.
    Section 437 makes available vacant allotments for 
permittees impacted by drought or wildland fire.
    Section 438 limits funds for activities related to wind 
turbines less than 24 nautical miles from the State of Maryland 
shoreline.
    Section 439 establishes a Spending Reduction Account in the 
bill.

                    Bill-Wide Reporting Requirements

    The following items are included in accordance with various 
requirements of the Rules of the House of Representatives:


         STATEMENT OF GENERAL PERFORMANCE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is a statement of 
general performance goals and objectives for which this measure 
authorizes funding:
    The Committee on Appropriations considers program 
performance, including a program's success in developing and 
attaining outcome-related goals and objectives, in developing 
funding recommendations.

                          RESCISSION OF FUNDS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table is submitted 
describing the rescission recommended in the accompanying bill:
    Department and activity:
    Amounts recommended for rescission:
    Department of the Interior: Bureau of Land Management (Land 
Acquisition): $1,769,000.
    Department of the Interior: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
(Land Acquisition): $4,572,000.
    Department of the Interior: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
(Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund): $3,000,000.
    Department of the Interior: Land and Water Conservation 
Fund (contract authority) $28,020,000.
    Department of the Interior: National Park Service (Land 
Acquisition): $4,500,000.
    Department of the Interior: Bureau of Ocean Energy 
Management, $25,000,000.
    Department of the Interior: Bureau of Safety and 
Environmental Enforcement, $12,000,000.
    Environmental Protection Agency: Science and Technology, 
$27,000,000.
    Environmental Protection Agency, Environmental Programs and 
Management, $41,000,000.
    Environmental Protection Agency, State and Tribal 
Assistance Grants (STAG), $60,000,000.

                           TRANSFERS OF FUNDS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table is submitted 
describing the transfers of funds in the accompanying bill.


   DISCLOSURE OF EARMARKS AND CONGRESSIONALLY DIRECTED SPENDING ITEMS

    Neither the bill nor the report contain any congressional 
earmarks, limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as 
defined by clause 9 of rule XXI.

          Compliance With Rule XIII, Cl. 3(e) (Ramseyer Rule)

  In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italics, existing law in which no change 
is proposed is shown in roman):

PUBLIC LAW 112-74

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



   DIVISION E--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, ENVIRONMENT, AND RELATED 
                   AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2012


                                TITLE I


DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *






  BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT ACTIONS REGARDING GRAZING ON PUBLIC LANDS

  Sec. 122. (a) Exhaustion of Administrative Review Required.--
          (1) For [fiscal years 2012 through 2020,] fiscal year 
        2012 and each fiscal year thereafter, a person may 
        bring a civil action challenging a decision of the 
        Bureau of Land Management concerning grazing on public 
        lands (as defined in section 103(e) of the Federal Land 
        Policy and Management Act of 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1702(e))) 
        in a Federal district court only if the person has 
        exhausted the administrative hearings and appeals 
        procedures established by the Department of the 
        Interior, including having filed a timely appeal and a 
        request for stay.
          (2) An issue may be considered in the judicial review 
        of a decision referred to in paragraph (1) only if the 
        issue was raised in the administrative review process 
        described in such paragraph.
          (3) An exception to the requirement of exhausting the 
        administrative review process before seeking judicial 
        review shall be available if a Federal court finds that 
        the agency failed or was unable to make information 
        timely available during the administrative review 
        process for issues of material fact. For the purposes 
        of this paragraph, the term ``timely'' means within 120 
        calendar days after the date that the challenge to the 
        agency action or amendment at issue is received for 
        administrative review.
  (b) Acceptance of Donation of Certain Existing Permits or 
Leases.--
          (1) During fiscal year 2012 and thereafter, the 
        Secretary of the Interior shall accept the donation of 
        any valid existing permits or leases authorizing 
        grazing on public lands within the California Desert 
        Conservation Area. With respect to each permit or lease 
        donated under this paragraph, the Secretary shall 
        terminate the grazing permit or lease, ensure a 
        permanent end (except as provided in paragraph (2)), to 
        grazing on the land covered by the permit or lease, and 
        make the land available for mitigation by allocating 
        the forage to wildlife use consistent with any 
        applicable Habitat Conservation Plan, section 
        10(a)(1)(B) permit, or section 7 consultation under the 
        Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 1531 et 
        seq.).
          (2) If the land covered by a permit or lease donated 
        under paragraph (1) is also covered by another valid 
        existing permit or lease that is not donated under such 
        paragraph, the Secretary of the Interior shall reduce 
        the authorized grazing level on the land covered by the 
        permit or lease to reflect the donation of the permit 
        or lease under paragraph (1). To ensure that there is a 
        permanent reduction in the level of grazing on the land 
        covered by a permit or lease donated under paragraph 
        (1), the Secretary shall not allow grazing use to 
        exceed the authorized level under the remaining valid 
        existing permit or lease that is not donated.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                                TITLE IV


GENERAL PROVISIONS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *






                        CONTRACTING AUTHORITIES

  Sec. 412. In awarding a Federal contract with funds made 
available by this Act, notwithstanding Federal Government 
procurement and contracting laws, the Secretary of Agriculture 
and the Secretary of the Interior (the ``Secretaries'') may, in 
evaluating bids and proposals, through [fiscal year 2017] 
fiscal year 2019, give consideration to local contractors who 
are from, and who provide employment and training for, 
dislocated and displaced workers in an economically 
disadvantaged rural community, including those historically 
timber-dependent areas that have been affected by reduced 
timber harvesting on Federal lands and other forest-dependent 
rural communities isolated from significant alternative 
employment opportunities:  Provided, That notwithstanding 
Federal Government procurement and contracting laws the 
Secretaries may award contracts, grants or cooperative 
agreements to local non-profit entities, Youth Conservation 
Corps or related partnerships with State, local or non-profit 
youth groups, or small or micro-business or disadvantaged 
business:  Provided further, That the contract, grant, or 
cooperative agreement is for forest hazardous fuels reduction, 
watershed or water quality monitoring or restoration, wildlife 
or fish population monitoring, road decommissioning, trail 
maintenance or improvement, or habitat restoration or 
management:  Provided further, That the terms ``rural 
community'' and ``economically disadvantaged'' shall have the 
same meanings as in section 2374 of Public Law 101-624 (16 
U.S.C. 6612):  Provided further, That the Secretaries shall 
develop guidance to implement this section:  Provided further, 
That nothing in this section shall be construed as relieving 
the Secretaries of any duty under applicable procurement laws, 
except as provided in this section.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


FEDERAL LANDS RECREATION ENHANCEMENT ACT

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



DIVISION J--OTHER MATTERS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



TITLE VIII--FEDERAL LANDS RECREATION ENHANCEMENT ACT

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



SEC. 810. SUNSET PROVISION.

  The authority of the Secretary to carry out this Act shall 
terminate [September 30, 2018] September 30, 2019.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2000

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                               TITLE VIII


GENERAL PROVISIONS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


  Sec. 8162. Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial. (a) Findings.--
Congress finds that--
          (1) the people of the United States feel a deep debt 
        of gratitude to Dwight D. Eisenhower, who served as 
        Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces in Europe in 
        World War II and subsequently as 34th President of the 
        United States; and
          (2) an appropriate permanent memorial to Dwight D. 
        Eisenhower should be created to perpetuate his memory 
        and his contributions to the United States.
  (b) Commission.--There is established a commission to be 
known as the ``Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission'' 
(referred to in this section as the ``Commission'').
  (c) Membership.--The Commission shall be composed of--
          (1) four persons appointed by the President, not more 
        than two of whom may be members of the same political 
        party;
          (2) four Members of the Senate appointed by the 
        President Pro Tempore of the Senate in consultation 
        with the Majority Leader and Minority Leader of the 
        Senate, of which not more than two appointees may be 
        members of the same political party; and
          (3) four Members of the House of Representatives 
        appointed by the Speaker of the House of 
        Representatives in consultation with the Majority 
        Leader and Minority Leader of the House of 
        Representatives, of which not more than two appointees 
        may be members of the same political party.
  (d) Chair and Vice Chair.--The members of the Commission 
shall select a Chair and Vice Chair of the Commission. The 
Chair and Vice Chair shall not be members of the same political 
party.
  (e) Vacancies.--Any vacancy in the Commission shall not 
affect its powers if a quorum is present, but shall be filled 
in the same manner as the original appointment.
  (f) Meetings.--
          (1) Initial meeting.--Not later than 45 days after 
        the date on which a majority of the members of the 
        Commission have been appointed, the Commission shall 
        hold its first meeting.
          (2) Subsequent meetings.--The Commission shall meet 
        at the call of the Chair.
  (g) Quorum.--A majority of the members of the Commission 
shall constitute a quorum but a lesser number of members may 
hold hearings.
  (h) No Compensation.--A member of the Commission shall serve 
without compensation, but may be reimbursed for expenses 
incurred in carrying out the duties of the Commission.
  (i) Duties.--The Commission shall consider and formulate 
plans for such a permanent memorial to Dwight D. Eisenhower, 
including its nature, design, construction, and location.
  (j) Powers of the Commission.--
          (1) In general.--
                  (A) Powers.--The Commission may--
                          (i) make such expenditures for 
                        services and materials for the purpose 
                        of carrying out this section as the 
                        Commission considers advisable from 
                        funds appropriated or received as gifts 
                        for that purpose;
                          (ii) solicit and accept contributions 
                        to be used in carrying out this section 
                        or to be used in connection with the 
                        construction or other expenses of the 
                        memorial;
                          (iii) hold hearings and enter into 
                        contracts;
                          (iv) enter into contracts for 
                        specialized or professional services as 
                        necessary to carry out this section; 
                        and
                          (v) take such actions as are 
                        necessary to carry out this section.
                  (B) Specialized or professional services.--
                Services under subparagraph (A)(iv) may be--
                          (i) obtained without regard to the 
                        provisions of title 5, United States 
                        Code, including section 3109 of that 
                        title; and
                          (ii) may be paid without regard to 
                        the provisions of title 5, United 
                        States Code, including chapter 51 and 
                        subchapter III of chapter 53 of that 
                        title.
          (2) Gifts of property.--The Commission may accept 
        gifts of real or personal property to be used in 
        carrying out this section, including to be used in 
        connection with the construction or other expenses of 
        the memorial.
          (3) Federal cooperation.--At the request of the 
        Commission, a Federal department or agency may provide 
        any information or other assistance to the Commission 
        that the head of the Federal department or agency 
        determines to be appropriate.
          (4) Powers of members and agents.--
                  (A) In general.--If authorized by the 
                Commission, any member or agent of the 
                Commission may take any action that the 
                Commission is authorized to take under this 
                section.
                  (B) Architect.--The Commission may appoint an 
                architect as an agent of the Commission to--
                          (i) represent the Commission on 
                        various governmental source selection 
                        and planning boards on the selection of 
                        the firms that will design and 
                        construct the memorial; and
                          (ii) perform other duties as 
                        designated by the Chairperson of the 
                        Commission.
                  (C) Treatment.--An authorized member or agent 
                of the Commission (including an individual 
                appointed under subparagraph (B)) providing 
                services to the Commission shall be considered 
                an employee of the Federal Government in the 
                performance of those services for the purposes 
                of chapter 171 of title 28, United States Code, 
                relating to tort claims.
          (5) Travel.--Each member of the Commission shall be 
        allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of 
        subsistence, at rates authorized for employees of 
        agencies under subchapter I of chapter 57 of title 5, 
        United States Code, while away from their homes or 
        regular places of business in the performance of 
        services for the Commission.
  (k) Reports.--The Commission shall--
          (1) report the plans under subsection (i), together 
        with recommendations, to the President and the Congress 
        at the earliest practicable date; and
          (2) in the interim, make annual reports on its 
        progress to the President and the Congress.
  (l) Applicability of Other Laws.--The Federal Advisory 
Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.) shall not apply to the 
Commission.
  (m) Authority to Establish Memorial.--
          (1) In general.--The Commission may establish a 
        permanent memorial to Dwight D. Eisenhower on land 
        under the jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Interior 
        in the District of Columbia or its environs.
          (2) Compliance with standards for commemorative 
        works.--The establishment of the memorial shall be in 
        accordance with the Commemorative Works Act (40 U.S.C. 
        1001 et seq.).
          (3) Expiration.--Any reference in section 8903(e) of 
        title 40, U.S.C. to the expiration at the end of, or 
        extension beyond, a 7-year period shall be considered 
        to be a reference to an expiration on, or extension 
        beyond, [September 30, 2017] September 30, 2018.
  (n) Memorial Fund.--
          (1) Establishment.--There is created in the Treasury 
        a fund for the memorial to Dwight D. Eisenhower that 
        includes amounts contributed under subsection (j)(2).
          (2) Use of fund.--The fund shall be used for the 
        expenses of establishing the memorial.
          (3) Interest.--The Secretary of the Treasury shall 
        credit to the fund the interest on obligations held in 
        the fund.
  (o) Staff and Support Services.--
          (1) In general.--
                  (A) Powers.--The Commission may--
                          (i) make such expenditures for 
                        services and materials for the purpose 
                        of carrying out this section as the 
                        Commission considers advisable from 
                        funds appropriated or received as gifts 
                        for that purpose;
                          (ii) solicit and accept contributions 
                        to be used in carrying out this section 
                        or to be used in connection with the 
                        construction or other expenses of the 
                        memorial;
                          (iii) hold hearings and enter into 
                        contracts;
                          (iv) enter into contracts for 
                        specialized or professional services as 
                        necessary to carry out this section; 
                        and
                          (v) take such actions as are 
                        necessary to carry out this section.
                  (B) Specialized or professional services.--
                Services under subparagraph (A)(iv) may be--
                          (i) obtained without regard to the 
                        provisions of title 5, United States 
                        Code, including section 3109 of that 
                        title; and
                          (ii) may be paid without regard to 
                        the provisions of title 5, United 
                        States Code, including chapter 51 and 
                        subchapter III of chapter 53 of that 
                        title.
          (2) Gifts of property.--The Commission may accept 
        gifts of real or personal property to be used in 
        carrying out this section, including to be used in 
        connection with the construction or other expenses of 
        the memorial.
          (3) Federal cooperation.--At the request of the 
        Commission, a Federal department or agency may provide 
        any information or other assistance to the Commission 
        that the head of the Federal department or agency 
        determines to be appropriate.
          (4) Powers of members and agents.--
                  (A) In general.--If authorized by the 
                Commission, any member or agent of the 
                Commission may take any action that the 
                Commission is authorized to take under this 
                section.
                  (B) Architect.--The Commission may appoint an 
                architect as an agent of the Commission to--
                          (i) represent the Commission on 
                        various governmental source selection 
                        and planning boards on the selection of 
                        the firms that will design and 
                        construct the memorial; and
                          (ii) perform other duties as 
                        designated by the Chairperson of the 
                        Commission.
                  (C) Treatment.--An authorized member or agent 
                of the Commission (including an individual 
                appointed under subparagraph (B)) providing 
                services to the Commission shall be considered 
                an employee of the Federal Government in the 
                performance of those services for the purposes 
                of chapter 171 of title 28, United States Code, 
                relating to tort claims.
          (5) Travel.--Each member of the Commission shall be 
        allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of 
        subsistence, at rates authorized for employees of 
        agencies under subchapter I of chapter 57 of title 5, 
        United States Code, while away from their homes or 
        regular places of business in the performance of 
        services for the Commission.
  (p) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to 
be appropriated such sums as necessary to carry out this 
section.
  (q) Appropriation of Funds.--In addition to amounts provided 
elsewhere in this Act, there is appropriated to the Commission 
$300,000, to remain available until expended.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


CHESAPEAKE BAY INITIATIVE ACT OF 1998

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



TITLE V--CHESAPEAKE BAY INITIATIVE

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 502. CHESAPEAKE BAY GATEWAYS AND WATERTRAILS.

  (a) Chesapeake Bay Gateways and Watertrails Network.--
          (1) In general.--The Secretary of the Interior 
        (referred to in this section as the ``Secretary''), in 
        cooperation with the Administrator of the Environmental 
        Protection Agency (referred to in this section as the 
        ``Administrator''), shall provide technical and 
        financial assistance, in cooperation with other Federal 
        agencies, State and local governments, nonprofit 
        organizations, and the private sector--
                  (A) to identify, conserve, restore, and 
                interpret natural, recreational, historical, 
                and cultural resources within the Chesapeake 
                Bay Watershed;
                  (B) to identify and utilize the collective 
                resources as Chesapeake Bay Gateways sites for 
                enhancing public education of and access to the 
                Chesapeake Bay;
                  (C) to link the Chesapeake Bay Gateways sites 
                with trails, tour roads, scenic byways, and 
                other connections as determined by the 
                Secretary;
                  (D) to develop and establish Chesapeake Bay 
                Watertrails comprising water routes and 
                connections to Chesapeake Bay Gateways sites 
                and other land resources within the Chesapeake 
                Bay Watershed; and
                  (E) to create a network of Chesapeake Bay 
                Gateways sites and Chesapeake Bay Watertrails.
          (2) Components.--Components of the Chesapeake Bay 
        Gateways and Watertrails Network may include--
                  (A) State or Federal parks or refuges;
                  (B) historic seaports;
                  (C) archaeological, cultural, historical, or 
                recreational sites; or
                  (D) other public access and interpretive 
                sites as selected by the Secretary.
  (b) Chesapeake Bay Gateways Grants Assistance Program.--
          (1) In general.--The Secretary, in cooperation with 
        the Administrator, shall establish a Chesapeake Bay 
        Gateways Grants Assistance Program to aid State and 
        local governments, local communities, nonprofit 
        organizations, and the private sector in conserving, 
        restoring, and interpreting important historic, 
        cultural, recreational, and natural resources within 
        the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.
          (2) Criteria.--The Secretary, in cooperation with the 
        Administrator, shall develop appropriate eligibility, 
        prioritization, and review criteria for grants under 
        this section.
          (3) Matching funds and administrative expenses.--A 
        grant under this section--
                  (A) shall not exceed 50 percent of eligible 
                project costs;
                  (B) shall be made on the condition that non-
                Federal sources, including in-kind 
                contributions of services or materials, provide 
                the remainder of eligible project costs; and
                  (C) shall be made on the condition that not 
                more than 10 percent of all eligible project 
                costs be used for administrative expenses.
  (c) Authorization of Appropriations.--There is authorized to 
be appropriated to carry out this section $3,000,000 for each 
of fiscal years 1999 through [2017] 2019.
                              ----------                              


FOREST SERVICE FACILITY REALIGNMENT AND ENHANCEMENT ACT OF 2005

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                                TITLE V


FOREST SERVICE FACILITY REALIGNMENT AND ENHANCEMENT

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



SEC. 503. AUTHORIZATION FOR CONVEYANCE OF FOREST SERVICE ADMINISTRATIVE 
                    SITES.

  (a) Conveyances Authorized.--In the manner provided by this 
title, the Secretary may convey an administrative site, or an 
interest in an administrative site, that is under the 
jurisdiction of the Secretary.
  (b) Means of Conveyance.--The conveyance of an administrative 
site under this title may be made--
          (1) by sale;
          (2) by lease;
          (3) by exchange;
          (4) by a combination of sale and exchange; or
          (5) by such other means as the Secretary considers 
        appropriate.
  (c) Size of Conveyance.--An administrative site or compound 
of administrative sites disposed of in a single conveyance 
under this title may not exceed 40 acres.
  (d) Certain Lands Excluded.--The following Federal land may 
not be conveyed under this title:
          (1) Any land within a unit of the National Forest 
        System that is exclusively designated for natural area 
        or recreational purposes.
          (2) Any land included within the National Wilderness 
        Preservation System, the Wild and Scenic River System, 
        or a National Monument.
          (3) Any land that the Secretary determines--
                  (A) is needed for resource management 
                purposes or to provide access to other land or 
                water;
                  (B) is surrounded by National Forest System 
                land or other publicly owned land, if 
                conveyance would not be in the public interest 
                due to the creation of a non-Federal inholding 
                that would preclude the efficient management of 
                the surrounding land; or
                  (C) would be in the public interest to 
                retain.
  (e) Congressional Notifications.--
          (1) Notice of anticipated use of authority.--As part 
        of the annual budget justification documents provided 
        to the Committee on Appropriations of the House of 
        Representatives and the Committee on Appropriations of 
        the Senate, the Secretary shall include--
                  (A) a list of the anticipated conveyances to 
                be made, including the anticipated revenue that 
                may be obtained, using the authority provided 
                by this title or other conveyance authorities 
                available to the Secretary;
                  (B) a discussion of the intended purposes of 
                any new revenue obtained using this authority 
                or other conveyance authorities available to 
                the Secretary, and a list of any individual 
                projects that exceed $500,000; and
                  (C) a presentation of accomplishments of 
                previous years using this authority or other 
                conveyance authorities available to the 
                Secretary.
          (2) Notice of changes to conveyance list.--If the 
        Secretary proposes to convey an administrative site 
        under this title or using other conveyance authorities 
        available to the Secretary and the administrative site 
        is not included on a list provided under paragraph 
        (1)(A), the Secretary shall submit to the congressional 
        committees specified in paragraph (3) written notice of 
        the proposed conveyance, including the anticipated 
        revenue that may be obtained from the conveyance.
          (3) Notice of use of authority.--At least once a 
        year, the Secretary shall submit to the Committee on 
        Agriculture, the Committee on Appropriations, and the 
        Committee on Resources of the House of Representatives 
        and the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and 
        Forestry, the Committee on Appropriations, and the 
        Committee on Energy and Natural Resources of the Senate 
        a report containing a description of all conveyances of 
        National Forest System land made by the Secretary under 
        this title or other conveyance authorities during the 
        period covered by the report.
  (f) Duration of Authority.--The authority of the Secretary to 
initiate the conveyance of an administrative site under this 
title expires on September 30, [2016] 2018.
  (g) Repeal of Pilot Conveyance Authority.--Effective 
September 30, 2006, section 329 of the Department of the 
Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2002 (16 
U.S.C. 580d note; Public Law 107-63), is repealed. 
Notwithstanding the repeal of such section, the Secretary may 
complete the conveyance under such section of any 
administrative site whose conveyance was initiated under such 
section before that date.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


JOHN F. KENNEDY CENTER ACT

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



SEC. 13. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  [(a) Maintenance, Repair, and Security.--There is authorized 
to be appropriated to the Board to carry out section 
4(a)(1)(H), $22,260,000 for fiscal year 2017.
  [(b) Capital Projects.--There is authorized to be 
appropriated to the Board to carry out subparagraphs (F) and 
(G) of section 4(a)(1), $14,140,000 for fiscal year 2017.]
  (a)  Maintenance, Repair, and Security.--There is authorized 
to be appropriated to the Board to carry out section 
4(a)(1)(H), $24,000,000 for fiscal year 2018.
  (b)  Capital Projects.--There is authorized to be 
appropriated to the Board to carry out subparagraphs (F) and 
(G) of section 4(a)(1), $13,000,000 for fiscal year 2018.
  (c) John F. Kennedy Center Plaza.--There is authorized to be 
appropriated to the Secretary of Transportation for capital 
costs incurred in the planning, design, engineering, and 
construction of the project authorized by section 12 (including 
roadway improvements related to the North and South 
Interchanges and construction of the John F. Kennedy Center 
Plaza, but not including construction of any buildings on the 
plaza) a total of $400,000,000 for fiscal years 2003 through 
2010. Such sums shall remain available until expended.
  (d) Photovoltaic System.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Board such sums as are necessary to carry 
out section 7, to remain available until expended.
  (e) Limitation on Use of Funds.--No funds appropriated 
pursuant to this section may be used for any direct expense 
incurred in the production of a performing arts attraction, for 
personnel who are involved in performing arts administration 
(including any supply or equipment used by the personnel), or 
for production, staging, public relations, marketing, 
fundraising, ticket sales, or education. Funds appropriated 
directly to the Board shall not affect nor diminish other 
Federal funds sought for any performing arts function and may 
be used to reimburse the Board for that portion of costs that 
are Federal costs reasonably allocated to building services and 
theater maintenance and repair.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                 CHANGES IN APPLICATION OF EXISTING LAW

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1)(A) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the following statements are 
submitted describing the effect of provisions in the 
accompanying bill, which directly or indirectly change the 
application of existing law. In most instances these provisions 
have been included in prior appropriations Acts.
    The bill includes the following changes in application of 
existing law:

                              OVERALL BILL

    Providing that certain appropriations remain available 
until expended or extends the availability of funds beyond the 
fiscal year where programs or projects are continuing but for 
which legislation does not specifically authorize such extended 
availability. This authority tends to result in savings by 
preventing the practice of committing funds on low priority 
projects at the end of the fiscal year to avoid losing the 
funds.
    Limiting, in certain instances, the obligation of funds for 
particular functions or programs. These limitations include 
restrictions on the obligation of funds for administrative 
expenses, travel expenses, the use of consultants, and 
programmatic areas within the overall jurisdiction of a 
particular agency.
    Limiting official entertainment or reception and 
representation expenses for selected agencies in the bill.
    Continuing ongoing activities of those Federal agencies, 
which require annual authorization or additional legislation, 
which has not been enacted.

                  TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR


                       Bureau of Land Management


                   MANAGEMENT OF LANDS AND RESOURCES

    Providing funds to the Bureau for the management of lands 
and resources.
    Permitting the use of fees for processing applications for 
permit to drill.
    Permitting the use of mining fee collections for program 
operations.
    Permitting the use of fees from communication site rentals.

                            LAND ACQUISITION

    Requiring that funding for the program is derived from the 
Land and Water Conservation Fund.
    Rescinding unobligated balances from prior appropriations.

                   OREGON AND CALIFORNIA GRANT LANDS

    Providing funds for the Oregon and California Grant Lands.
    Authorizing the transfer of certain collections from the 
Oregon and California Land Grants Fund to the Treasury.

                           RANGE IMPROVEMENTS

    Allowing certain funds to be transferred to the Department 
of the Interior for range improvements.

               SERVICE CHARGES, DEPOSITS, AND FORFEITURES

    Allowing the use of certain collected funds for certain 
administrative costs and operation of termination of certain 
facilities.
    Allowing the use of funds on any damaged public lands.
    Authorizing the Secretary to use monies from forfeitures, 
compromises or settlements for improvement, protection and 
rehabilitation of public lands under certain conditions.

                       MISCELLANEOUS TRUST FUNDS

    Allowing certain contributed funds to be advanced for 
administrative costs and other activities of the Bureau.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Permitting the Bureau to enter into agreements with public 
and private entities, including States.
    Permitting the Bureau to manage improvements to which the 
United States has title.
    Permitting the payment of rewards for information on 
violations of law on Bureau lands.
    Providing for cost-sharing arrangements for printing 
services.
    Permitting the Bureau to conduct certain projects for State 
governments on a reimbursable basis.
    Prohibiting the use of funds for the destruction of wild 
horses and burros.

                United States Fish and Wildlife Service


                          RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

    Limiting funds for certain Endangered Species Act programs.

                            LAND ACQUISITION

    Requiring that funding shall be derived from the Land and 
Water Conservation Fund.
    Providing that funding for projects may not be used for 
administrative costs.
    Rescinding unobligated balances from prior appropriations.

            COOPERATIVE ENDANGERED SPECIES CONSERVATION FUND

    Providing that a portion of the appropriation shall be 
derived from the Land and Water Conservation Fund.

                    STATE AND TRIBAL WILDLIFE GRANTS

    Providing for a State and Tribal wildlife grants program.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Providing that programs may be carried out by direct 
expenditure, contracts, grants, cooperative agreements and 
reimbursable agreements with public and private entities.
    Providing for repair of damage to public roads.
    Providing options for the purchase of land not to exceed 
$1.
    Permitting cost-shared arrangements for printing services.
    Permitting the acceptance of donated aircraft.
    Providing that fees collected for non-toxic shot review and 
approval shall be available without further appropriation for 
the expenses of non-toxic shot review related expenses.

                         National Park Service


                 OPERATION OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM

    Designating funds for Everglades restoration.
    Providing for repair, rehabilitation and maintenance of 
National Park Service assets.

                  NATIONAL RECREATION AND PRESERVATION

    Providing for expenses not otherwise provided for.

                         HISTORIC PRESERVATION

    Providing for expenses derived from the Historic 
Preservation Fund.

                              CONSTRUCTION

    Providing funds for construction, improvements, repair or 
replacement of physical facilities, and management planning and 
compliance for areas administered by the National Park Service.
    Providing that a single procurement may be issued for any 
project funded in fiscal year 2017 with a future phase 
indicated in the National Park Service 5-year Line Item 
Construction Plan.
    Providing that the solicitation and contract shall contain 
the availability of funds clause.
    Providing that fees may be made available for the cost of 
adjustments and changes within the original scope of effort for 
projects funded by the Construction appropriation.
    Providing that the Secretary of the Interior shall consult 
with the Committees on Appropriations in accordance with 
reprogramming thresholds prior to making any changes authorized 
by this section.

                    LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND

    Rescinding Land and Water Conservation Fund contract 
authority.

                 LAND ACQUISITION AND STATE ASSISTANCE

    Requiring that funding for the program is derived from the 
Land and Water Conservation Fund.
    Rescinding unobligated balances from prior appropriations.

                          CENTENNIAL CHALLENGE

    Providing funds for Centennial Challenge projects with no 
less than 50 percent of the cost of each project derived from 
non-Federal sources.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Allowing certain franchise fees to be available for 
expenditure without further appropriation to extinguish or 
reduce liability for certain possessory interests.
    Providing for the retention of administrative costs under 
certain Land and Water Conservation Fund programs.
    Allowing National Park Service funds to be transferred to 
the Federal Highway Administration for purposes authorized 
under 23 U.S.C. 204 for reasonable administrative support 
costs.

                    United States Geological Survey


                 SURVEYS, INVESTIGATIONS, AND RESEARCH

    Providing funds to classify lands as to their mineral and 
water resources.
    Providing funds to give engineering supervision to power 
permittees and Federal Energy Regulatory Commission licensees.
    Providing funds to publish and disseminate data relative to 
the foregoing activities.
    Limiting funds for the conduct of new surveys on private 
property without permission.
    Limiting funds for cooperative topographic mapping or water 
resource data collection and investigations.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Allowing funds to be used for certain contracting, 
construction, maintenance, acquisition, and representation 
expenses.
    Permitting the use of certain contracts, grants, and 
cooperative agreements.
    Recognizing students and recent graduates as Federal 
employees for the purposes of travel and work injury 
compensation.

                   Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

    Permitting funds for mineral leasing and environmental 
study; enforcing laws and contracts; and for matching grants.
    Providing that funds may be used which shall be derived 
from non-refundable cost recovery fees collected in 2017.
    Permitting the use of certain excess receipts from Outer 
Continental Shelf leasing activities.
    Providing for reasonable expenses related to volunteer 
beach and marine cleanup activities.
    Prohibiting the use of funds for regulating non-lease 
holders.

             Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement

    Permitting funds for mineral leasing and environmental 
study; enforcing laws and contracts; and for matching grants.
    Providing that funds may be used which shall be derived 
from non-refundable cost recovery fees.
    Permitting the use of certain excess receipts from Outer 
Continental Shelf leasing activities.
    Permitting the use of funds derived from non-refundable 
inspection fees.
    Requiring that not less than 50 percent of inspection fees 
expended be used on personnel, expanding capacity and reviewing 
applications for permit to drill.

                           OIL SPILL RESEARCH

    Providing that funds shall be derived from the Oil Spill 
Liability Trust Fund.

          Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement


                       REGULATION AND TECHNOLOGY

    Permitting payment to State and Tribal personnel for travel 
and per diem expenses for training.
    Permitting the use of certain offsetting collections from 
permit fees.

                    ABANDONED MINE RECLAMATION FUND

    Allowing the use of debt recovery to pay for debt 
collection.
    Allowing that certain funds made available under title IV 
of Public Law 95-87 may be used for any required non-Federal 
share of the cost of certain projects.
    Allowing funds to be used for travel expenses of State and 
Tribal personnel while attending certain OSM training.
    Providing that funds shall be used for economic and 
community development in conjunction with reclamation 
priorities.

        Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian Education


                      OPERATION OF INDIAN PROGRAMS

    Limiting funds for official reception and representation 
expenses.
    Limiting funds for welfare assistance payments, except for 
disaster relief.
    Allowing Tribal priority allocation funds to be used for 
unmet welfare assistance costs.
    Providing forward-funding for school operations of Bureau-
funded schools and other education programs.
    Providing that limited funds shall be available until 
expended for certain purposes.
    Limiting funds for education-related administrative cost 
grants.
    Allowing the transfer of certain forestry funds.
    Allowing the use of funds to purchase uniforms or other 
identifying articles of clothing for personnel.

                         CONTRACT SUPPORT COSTS

    Providing for such sums as are necessary to fully fund 
contract support costs.
    Prohibiting the transfer of funds from any other account to 
fund contract support costs.

                              CONSTRUCTION

    Providing for the transfer of Navajo irrigation project 
funds to the Bureau of Reclamation.
    Providing that six percent of Federal Highway Trust Fund 
contract authority may be used for construction management 
costs.
    Providing Safety of Dams funds on a non-reimbursable basis.
    Requiring the use of administrative and cost accounting 
principles for certain school construction projects and 
exempting such projects from certain requirements.
    Requiring conformance with building codes and health and 
safety standards.
    Specifying the procedure for dispute resolution.
    Limiting the control of construction projects when certain 
time frames have not been met.
    Allowing reimbursement of construction costs from the 
Office of Special Trustee.

                 INDIAN GUARANTEED LOAN PROGRAM ACCOUNT

    Limiting funds for administrative expenses and for 
subsidizing total loan principal.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Allowing the use of funds for direct expenditure, 
contracts, cooperative agreements, compacts, and grants.
    Allowing contracting for the San Carlos Irrigation Project.
    Limiting the use of funds for certain contracts, grants and 
cooperative agreements.
    Allowing Tribes to return appropriated funds.
    Prohibiting funding of Alaska schools.
    Limiting the number of schools and the expansion of grade 
levels in individual schools.
    Specifying distribution of indirect and administrative 
costs for certain Tribes.
    Limiting the expansion of satellite school locations.

                          Departmental Offices


             OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    Allowing the use of certain funds for official reception 
and representation expenses.
    Permitting payments to former Bureau of Mines workers.
    Designating funds for consolidated appraisal services to be 
derived from the Land and Water Conservation Fund.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Allowing certain payments authorized for the Payments in 
Lieu of Taxes Program to be retained for administrative 
expenses.
    Providing that the amounts provided are the only amounts 
available for payments authorized under chapter 69 of title 31, 
United States Code.
    Providing that in the event sums appropriated are 
insufficient to make the full payments then the payment to each 
local government shall be made proportionally.
    Providing that the Secretary may make adjustments to 
payment to individual units of local government to correct for 
prior overpayments or underpayments.
    Providing that no Payments in Lieu of Taxes Program payment 
be made to otherwise eligible units of local government if the 
computed amount of the payment is less than $100.

                            Insular Affairs


                       ASSISTANCE TO TERRITORIES

    Designating funds for various programs and for salaries and 
expenses of the Office of Insular Affairs.
    Allowing audits of the financial transactions of the 
Territorial and Insular governments by the GAO.
    Providing grant funding under certain terms of the 
Agreement of the Special Representatives on Future United 
States Financial Assistance for the Northern Mariana Islands.
    Providing for capital infrastructure in various 
Territories.
    Allowing appropriations for disaster assistance to be used 
as non-Federal matching funds for hazard mitigation grants.

               ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS, INSULAR AFFAIRS

    Allowing, at the request of the Governor of Guam, for 
certain discretionary or mandatory funds to be used to assist 
securing certain rural electrification loans through the U.S. 
Department of Agriculture.

             Office of Special Trustee for American Indians


                         FEDERAL TRUST PROGRAMS

    Limiting the amount of funding available for the historical 
accounting of Indian trust fund accounts.
    Allowing transfers to other Department of the Interior 
accounts.
    Providing no-year funding for certain Indian Self-
Determination Act grants.
    Exempting quarterly statements for Indian trust accounts 
$15 or less.
    Requiring annual statements and records maintenance for 
Indian trust accounts.
    Limiting use of funds to correct administrative errors in 
Indian trust accounts.
    Permitting the use of recoveries from erroneous payments 
pursuant to Indian trust accounts.
    Exempting reconciliation of Special Deposit Accounts with 
low balances in certain circumstances.
    Allowing for limited aggregation of trust accounts of 
individuals whose whereabouts are unknown.

                        DEPARTMENT WIDE PROGRAMS


                        Wildland Fire Management

    Providing funds for wildland fire management.
    Designating funds for renovation or construction of fire 
facilities and designating funds for Wildfire suppression 
operations.
    Permitting the repayments of funds transferred from other 
accounts for firefighting.
    Designating funds for hazardous fuels and burned area 
rehabilitation.
    Permitting the use of funds for lodging and subsistence of 
firefighters.
    Permitting the use of grants, contracts and cooperative 
agreements for hazardous fuels reduction, including cost-
sharing and local assistance.
    Permitting cost-sharing of cooperative agreements with non-
Federal entities under certain circumstances.
    Providing for local competition for hazardous fuel 
reduction activities.
    Permitting reimbursement to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service for 
consultation activities under the Endangered Species Act.
    Providing certain terms for leases of real property with 
local governments.
    Providing for the transfer of funds between the Department 
of the Interior and the Department of Agriculture for wildland 
fire management.
    Providing funds for support of Federal emergency response 
actions.
    Allowing for international forestry assistance to or 
through the Department of State.

                    CENTRAL HAZARDOUS MATERIALS FUND

    Providing funds for response action, including associated 
activities, performed pursuant to the Comprehensive 
Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act.

                          WORKING CAPITAL FUND

    Allowing funds for the financial and business management 
system and information technology improvement.
    Prohibiting use of funds to establish reserves in the 
working capital fund with exceptions.
    Allowing assessments for reasonable charges for training 
services at the National Indian Program Center and use of these 
funds under certain conditions.
    Providing space and related facilities or the lease of 
related facilities, equipment or professional services of the 
National Indian Program Training Center to state, local and 
Tribal employees or other persons for cultural, educational or 
recreational activities.
    Providing that the Secretary may enter into grants and 
cooperative agreements to support the Office of Natural 
Resource Revenue's collection and disbursement of royalties, 
fees, and other mineral revenue proceeds, as authorized by law.

                        ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISION

    Allowing acquisition and sale of certain aircraft.

                       PAYMENTS IN LIEU OF TAXES

    Extending funding for Payments in Lieu of Taxes.

                  OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE

    Designating funds for mineral revenue management 
activities.
    Allowing certain refunds of overpayments in connection with 
certain Indian leases.

             General Provisions, Department of the Interior

    Allowing transfer of funds for certain reconstruction of 
facilities, aircraft or utilities in emergency situations.
    Allowing transfer of funds in certain emergency situations, 
including wildfires and oil spill response, if other funds 
provided in other accounts will be exhausted within 30 days and 
a supplemental appropriation is requested as promptly as 
possible.
    Permitting the Department to use limited funding for 
certain services.
    Permitting the transfer of funds between the Bureau of 
Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian Education and the Office of 
Special Trustee for American Indians and limiting amounts for 
historical accounting activities.
    Authorizing the redistribution of Tribal Priority 
Allocation funds to address unmet needs.
    Authorizing the acquisition of lands and leases for Ellis, 
Governors and Liberty Islands.
    Providing the authority for the Secretary to collect 
nonrefundable inspection fees.
    Permitting the reorganization of the Bureau of Ocean Energy 
Management, Enforcement and Regulation.
    Permitting the Secretary of the Interior to enter into 
long-term agreements for wild horse and burro holding 
facilities.
    Requiring the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to mark 
hatchery salmon.
    Addressing BLM actions regarding grazing on public lands.
    Continuing a provision allowing the Bureau of Indian 
Affairs and Bureau of Indian Education to more efficiently and 
effectively perform reimbursable work.
    Regarding status reviews and determinations for sage-grouse 
pursuant to the Endangered Species Act.
    Permitting the transfer of excess wild horses and burros 
for work purposes.
    Prohibiting the use of funds to list in the National 
Register of Historic Places property deemed crucial to national 
security and military training.
    Requiring the reissuance of certain final rules and 
prohibiting such rules from further judicial review.
    Prohibiting the treatment of gray wolves range-wide as an 
endangered or threatened species.

               TITLE II--ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY


                         Science and Technology

    Providing for operating expenses in support of research and 
development.
    Designating funding for National Priorities research as 
specified in the report accompanying this Act.

                 ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS AND MANAGEMENT

    Allowing hire and maintenance of passenger motor vehicles 
and operation of aircraft and purchase of reprints and library 
memberships in societies or associations which issue 
publications to members only or at a price to members lower 
than to subscribers who are not members.
    Limiting amounts for official representation and reception 
expenses.
    Providing two-year funding availability for administrative 
costs of Brownfields program.
    Limitation of funds for the Chemical Risk Review and 
Reduction program.
    Designating funding for National Priorities as specified in 
the report accompanying this Act.
    Designating funding for Geographical programs as specified 
in the report accompanying this Act.

            HAZARDOUS WASTE ELECTRONIC MANIFEST SYSTEM FUND

    Providing for the collection and expenditure of fees.

                     HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE SUPERFUND

    Allowing distribution of funds to purchase services from 
other agencies under certain circumstances.
    Providing for the transfer of funds within certain agency 
accounts.

                LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAM

    Providing for grants to Federally-recognized Indian Tribes.

                   STATE AND TRIBAL ASSISTANCE GRANTS

    Limiting funding amounts for certain programs.
    Specifying funding for capitalization grants for the Clean 
Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Funds and allowing 
certain amounts for additional subsidies.
    Designating funds for specific sections of law.
    Providing waivers for certain uses of Clean Water and 
Drinking Water State Revolving Funds for State administrative 
costs for grants to federally-recognized Indian Tribes and 
grants to specific Territories and Freely Associated States.
    Requiring that 10 percent Clean Water and 20 percent of 
Drinking Water funds shall be used by States for forgiveness of 
principal or negative interest loans.
    Prohibiting the use of funds for jurisdictions that permit 
development or construction of additional colonia areas.
    Providing certain grants under authority of Section 103, 
Clean Air Act.
    Providing funding for environmental information exchange 
network initiatives grants, statistical surveys of water 
resources and enhancements to State monitoring programs, Tribal 
grants, and underground storage tank projects.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Allowing awards of grants to federally-recognized Indian 
Tribes.
    Authorizing the collection and obligation of pesticide 
registration service fees.
    Authorizing the collection and obligations of TSCA fees.
    Allowing the transfer of funds from the ``Environmental 
Programs and Management'' account to support the Great Lakes 
Restoration Initiative and providing for certain interagency 
agreements and grants to various entities in support of this 
effort.
    Providing amounts for construction, alteration, repair, 
rehabilitation, and renovation of facilities.
    Providing for grants to federally recognized Tribes.
    Providing amounts for competitive grants under the National 
Estuary Program.

                      TITLE III--RELATED AGENCIES


                             Forest Service


  OFFICE OF THE UNDER SECRETARY FOR NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT

    Providing funds for the office of the Under Secretary for 
Natural Resources and Environment.

                     FOREST AND RANGELAND RESEARCH

    Providing funds for forest and rangeland research.
    Designating funds for the forest inventory and analysis 
program.

                       STATE AND PRIVATE FORESTRY

    Providing for forest health management, including 
treatments of certain pests or invasive plants, and for 
restoring damaged forests, and for cooperative forestry, 
education and land conservation activities, and conducting an 
international program.
    Deriving certain funds from the Land and Water Conservation 
Fund.

                         NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM

    Providing funds for the National Forest System.
    Depositing funds in the Collaborative Forest Landscape 
Restoration Fund.
    Designating funds for forest products.

                  CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT AND MAINTENANCE

    Providing funds for construction, reconstruction, and 
maintenance and acquisition of buildings and other facilities 
and infrastructure; and for construction, capital improvement, 
decommissioning, and maintenance of forest roads and trails.
    Requiring that funds becoming available in fiscal year 2018 
for the road and trails fund (16 U.S.C. 501) shall be 
transferred to the Treasury.

                            LAND ACQUISITION

    Requiring that funding for the program is derived from the 
Land and Water Conservation Fund.

         ACQUISITION OF LANDS FOR NATIONAL FORESTS SPECIAL ACTS

    Requiring that funding for the program is derived from 
forest receipts.

            ACQUISITION OF LANDS TO COMPLETE LAND EXCHANGES

    Requiring that funding for the program is derived from 
funds deposited by State, county, or municipal governments and 
non-Federal parties pursuant to Land Sale and Exchange Acts.

                         RANGE BETTERMENT FUND

    Providing that fifty percent of monies received for grazing 
fees shall be used for range improvements and limiting 
administrative expenses to six percent.

                     GIFTS, DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS

    Providing for gifts, donations and bequest per Federal law.

          MANAGEMENT OF NATIONAL FORESTS FOR SUBSISTENCE USES

    Providing funds for subsistence uses per the Alaska 
National Interest Lands Conservation Act.

                        Wildland Fire Management

    Permitting the use of funds for emergency rehabilitation 
and restoration and hazardous fuels reduction to support 
emergency response and wildfire suppression.
    Allowing the use of wildland fire funds to repay advances 
from other accounts.
    Allowing reimbursement of States for certain wildfire 
emergency activities.
    Allowing funds to be available for emergency 
rehabilitation, hazardous fuels reduction and emergency 
response.
    Designating funds for suppression, hazardous fuels 
reduction and national fire plan research.
    Designating funds for State fire assistance and volunteer 
fire assistance Federal and State and private lands.
    Providing for cooperative agreements and grants.
    Allowing funds available for Community Forest Restoration 
Act to be used on non-Federal land.
    Limiting the transfer of wildland fire management funds 
between the Department of the Interior and the Department of 
Agriculture.
    Designating the use of hazardous fuels reduction funds for 
biomass grants.
    Providing that funds designated for suppression shall be 
assessed for cost pools.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Permitting the purchase of passenger motor vehicles and 
proceeds from the sale of aircraft may be used to purchase 
replacement aircraft.
    Allowing funds for certain employment contracts.
    Allowing funds to be used for purchase and alteration of 
buildings.
    Allowing for acquisition of certain lands and interests.
    Allowing expenses for certain volunteer activities.
    Providing for the cost of uniforms.
    Providing for debt collections on certain contracts.
    Allowing transfer of funds in certain emergency situations 
if all other funds provided for wildfire suppression will be 
obligated within 30 days and the Secretary notifies the 
Committees.
    Allowing funds to be used through the Agency for 
International Development for work in foreign countries and to 
support other forestry activities outside of the United States.
    Allowing the Forest Service, acting for the International 
Program, to sign certain funding agreements with foreign 
governments and institutions as well as with certain domestic 
agencies.
    Authorizing the expenditure or transfer of funds for wild 
horse and burro activities.
    Prohibiting the transfer of funds under the Department of 
Agriculture transfer authority under certain conditions.
    Limiting the transfer of funds for the Working Capital Fund 
and Department Reimbursable Program (also known as Greenbook 
charges).
    Limiting funds to support the Youth Conservation Corps and 
Public Lands Corps.
    Limiting the use of funds for official reception and 
representation expenses.
    Providing for matching funds for the National Forest 
Foundation.
    Providing for matching funds for the National Fish and 
Wildlife Foundation.
    Allowing funds to be used for technical assistance for 
rural communities.
    Allowing funds for payments to counties in the Columbia 
River Gorge National Scenic Area.
    Allowing funds to be used for the Older Americans Act.
    Permitting funding assessments for facilities maintenance, 
rent, utilities, and other support services.
    Limiting funds to reimburse the Office of General Counsel 
at the Department of Agriculture.
    Permitting eligible employees to be considered a Federal 
Employee.
    Requiring regular reporting of unobligated balances.
    Designating availability of funds appropriated in a 
previous fiscal year for the FLAME Wildfire Suppression Reserve 
Fund.

                         Indian Health Service


                         INDIAN HEALTH SERVICES

    Providing that Tribal contract and grant funding is deemed 
obligated at the time of grant or contract award and remains 
available until expended.
    Providing no-year funds for contract medical care including 
the Indian Catastrophic Health Emergency Fund.
    Providing for loan repayment under sections 104 and 108 of 
the Indian Health Care Improvement Act with certain conditions 
and making the funds available for certain other purposes.
    Providing for operational funds for leased space and 
accreditation emergencies.
    Providing for the allocation of certain funds.
    Providing that certain contracts and grants may be 
performed in two fiscal years.
    Providing for use of collections and reporting of 
collections under Title IV of the Indian Health Care 
Improvement Act.
    Providing no-year funding for scholarship funds.
    Providing for the collection of individually identifiable 
health information relating to the Americans with Disabilities 
Act by the Bureau of Indian Affairs.
    Permitting the use of Indian Health Care Improvement Fund 
monies for facilities improvement and providing no-year funding 
availability.

                         CONTRACT SUPPORT COSTS

    Providing for such sums as are necessary to fully fund 
contract support costs.
    Prohibiting the transfer of funds from any other account 
within the Indian Health Service to fund contract support 
costs.

                        Indian Health Facilities

    Providing that facilities funds may be used to purchase 
land, modular buildings and trailers.
    Providing for TRANSAM equipment to be purchased from the 
Department of Defense.
    Prohibiting the use of funds for sanitation facilities for 
new homes funded by the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development.
    Allowing for the purchase of ambulances.
    Providing for a demolition fund.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Providing for per diem expenses for senior level positions.
    Providing for payments for telephone service in private 
residences in the field, purchase of motor vehicles, aircraft 
and reprints.
    Providing for purchase and erection of modular buildings.
    Providing funds for uniforms.
    Allowing funding to be used for attendance at professional 
meetings.
    Providing that health care may be extended to non-Indians 
at Indian Health Service facilities, subject to charges, and 
for the expenditure of collected funds.
    Providing for transfers of funds from the Department of 
Housing and Urban Development to the Indian Health Service.
    Prohibiting limitations on certain Federal travel and 
transportation expenses.
    Requiring departmental assessments to be identified in 
annual budget justifications.
    Allowing de-obligation and re-obligation of funds applied 
to self-governance funding agreements.
    Prohibiting the expenditure of funds to implement new 
eligibility regulations.
    Permitting certain reimbursements for goods and services 
provided to Tribes.
    Providing that reimbursements for training, technical 
assistance, or services include total costs.
    Prohibiting changes in organizational structure without 
advance notification to Congress.

            Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry


            TOXIC SUBSTANCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH

    Providing for the conduct of health studies, testing, and 
monitoring.
    Providing deadlines for health assessments and studies.
    Limiting the number of toxicological profiles.

                   Executive Office of the President


  COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

    Limiting the use of funds for official reception and 
representation expenses.
    Designating the appointment and duties of the chairman.

              Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation

    Providing that funds in this and prior appropriations Acts 
shall be used to relocate persons certified as eligible.
    Providing that no person can be evicted unless a 
replacement home is provided.
    Providing that no relocatee is provided with more than one 
new or replacement home.
    Providing for the transfer of funds to the Department of 
the Interior Office of Inspector General.

             CHEMICAL SAFETY AND HAZARD INVESTIGATION BOARD

    Permitting use of funds for hire of passenger vehicles, 
uniforms or allowances with per diem rate limitations.
    Limiting the number of senior level positions.
    Designating the individual appointed to the position of 
Inspector General of the Environmental Protection Agency as the 
Inspector General of the Board.
    Directing use of personnel and limiting position 
appointments within the Board.

                        Smithsonian Institution


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    Limiting certain lease terms.
    Providing for purchase of passenger vehicles and certain 
rental, repair and cleaning of uniforms.
    Designating funds for certain programs and providing no-
year funds.
    Providing that funds may be used to support American 
overseas research centers.
    Allowing for advance payments to independent contractors 
performing research services or participating in official 
Smithsonian presentations.

                           FACILITIES CAPITAL

    Designating funds for maintenance, repair, rehabilitation, 
and construction and for consultant services.

                        National Gallery of Art


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    Allowing payment in advance for membership in library, 
museum, and art associations or societies.
    Allowing for purchase, repair, and cleaning of uniforms for 
guards and employees and allowances therefor.
    Allowing purchase or rental of devices for protecting 
buildings and contents thereof, and maintenance, alteration, 
improvement, and repair of buildings, approaches, and grounds.
    Providing for restoration and repair of works of art by 
contract under certain circumstances.
    Providing no-year funds for special exhibitions.

            REPAIR, RESTORATION, AND RENOVATION OF BUILDINGS

    Providing lease agreements of no more than 10 years 
addressing space needs created by renovations under the Master 
Facilities Plan.
    Permitting the Gallery to perform work by contract under 
certain circumstances.

             John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts


                       OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE

    Providing funds to the John F. Kennedy Center for the 
Performing Arts Kennedy Center for operational and maintenance 
costs.

                     CAPITAL REPAIR AND RESTORATION

    Providing funds to the John F. Kennedy Center for the 
Performing Arts Kennedy Center for facility repair.

            Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    Providing funds to the Woodrow Wilson Center for Scholars.
    Allowing for hire of passenger vehicles and services.

                    National Endowment for the Arts


                       GRANTS AND ADMINISTRATION

    Providing funds for the support of projects and productions 
in the arts, including arts education and public outreach 
activities.

                 National Endowment for the Humanities


                       GRANTS AND ADMINISTRATION

    Specifying funds to carry out the matching grants program.
    Allowing obligation of National Endowment for the 
Humanities current and prior year funds from gifts, bequests, 
and devises of money for which equal amounts have not 
previously been appropriated.

  ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS, NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE 
                               HUMANITIES

    Prohibiting the use of funds for grants and contracts which 
do not include the text of 18 U.S.C. 1913.
    Prohibiting the use of appropriated funds and permitting 
the use of non-appropriated funds for reception expenses.
    Allowing the chairperson of the National Endowment for the 
Arts to approve small grants under certain circumstances.

                        Commission of Fine Arts


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    Permitting the charging and use of fees for its 
publications and accepting gifts related to the history of the 
Nation's Capital.
    Providing that one-tenth of one percent of funds provided 
may be used for official reception and representation expenses.

               NATIONAL CAPITAL ARTS AND CULTURAL AFFAIRS

    Providing funding for the National Capital Arts and 
Cultural Affairs.

                  NATIONAL CAPITAL PLANNING COMMISSION

    Providing funding for the National Capital Planning 
Commission.
    Providing that one-quarter of one percent may be used for 
official reception and representational expenses.

                UNITED STATES HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL MUSEUM

    Designating funds for equipment replacement.
    Designating funds for repair, rehabilitation and for 
exhibition design and production and providing no year 
availability for these funds.

                Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    Providing funding for the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial 
Commission.

                          CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION

    Providing funding for design and construction of a memorial 
in honor of Dwight D. Eisenhower.
    Providing that the contract with respect to the procurement 
shall contain the availability of funds clause.
    Providing that funds appropriated shall satisfy the 
requirement for issuing a permit.

                   WORLD WAR I CENTENNIAL COMMISSION

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    Providing funding for the World War I Centennial 
Commission.
    Providing that the Commission may accept support from any 
executive branch agency for activities of the Commission.

                      TITLE IV--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Prohibiting the use of funds to promote or oppose 
legislative proposals on which congressional action is 
incomplete.
    Providing for annual appropriations unless expressly 
provided otherwise in this Act.
    Providing for disclosure of administrative expenses, 
assessments and requirements for operating plans.
    Continuing a limitation on accepting and processing 
applications for patents and on the patenting of Federal lands; 
permitting processing of grandfathered applications; and 
permitting third-party contractors to process grandfathered 
applications.
    Continuing a provision regarding the payment of contract 
support costs for prior fiscal years.
    Addressing the payment of contract support costs for fiscal 
year 2018.
    Continuing a provision allowing Forest Service land 
management plans to be more than 15 years old if the Secretary 
is acting in good faith to update such plans and prohibiting 
the use of funds to implement new wilderness directives under 
the planning rule.
    Limiting leasing and preleasing activities within National 
Monuments.
    Limiting takings for acquisition of lands except under 
certain conditions.
    Continuing a provision addressing timber sales involving 
Alaskan western red cedar.
    Prohibiting funds to enter into certain no-bid contracts 
except under certain conditions.
    Requiring reports to Congress to be posted on public agency 
websites.
    Continuing a provision that delineates grant guidelines for 
the National Endowment for the Arts.
    Continuing a provision that delineates program priorities 
for the programs managed by the National Endowment for the 
Arts.
    Requiring that the Department of the Interior, the EPA, the 
Forest Service, and the Indian Health Service provide the 
Committees on Appropriations a quarterly report on the status 
of balances of appropriations.
    Providing a one-year extension of the Federal Lands 
Recreation Enhancement Act.
    Continuing a provision prohibiting the use of funds to 
promulgate or implement any regulation requiring the issuance 
of permits under title V of the Clean Air Act for carbon 
dioxide, nitrous oxide, water vapor, or methane emissions.
    Continuing a provision prohibiting the use of funds to 
implement any provision in a rule if that provision requires 
mandatory reporting of greenhouse gas emissions from manure 
management systems.
    Modifying authorities relating to the Dwight D. Eisenhower 
Memorial Commission.
    Prohibiting the use of funds to regulate the lead content 
of ammunition or fishing tackle.
    Extending authorities for awarding contracts for certain 
activities on public lands.
    Extending the authority for the Chesapeake Bay Initiative.
    Extending certain authorities allowing the Forest Service 
to renew grazing permits.
    Prohibiting the use of funds to maintain or establish a 
computer network unless such network blocks the viewing, 
downloading, and exchanging of pornography.
    Extending the Forest Service Facility Realignment and 
Enhancement Act.
    Setting requirements for the use of American iron and steel 
for certain loans and grants.
    Prohibiting the use of funds to destroy buildings or 
structures on Midway Island recommended for inclusion in the 
National Register of Historic Places.
    Addressing carbon emissions from forest biomass.
    Extending by one year the authorization for the John F. 
Kennedy Center.
    Prohibiting the use of funds to require permits for the 
discharge of dredged or fill material for certain agriculture 
activities.
    Authorizing the withdrawal of the Waters of the United 
States rule.
    Addressing the implementation of national ambient air 
quality standards for ozone.
    Prohibiting the use of funds to finalize, implement, 
administer, or enforce any regulation that would establish new 
financial responsibility requirements under CERCLA.
    Prohibiting the use of funds to issue any regulation under 
the Solid Waste Disposal Act that applies to an animal feeding 
operation.
    Prohibiting the use of funds to further implementation of 
the National Ocean Policy under Executive Order 13547.
    Prohibiting the use of funds to limit recreational shooting 
and hunting on Federal and public lands except for public 
safety.
    Making available vacant grazing allotments for permittees 
impacted by drought or wildfire.
    Limits funds for activities related to wind turbines less 
than 24 nautical miles from the State of Maryland shoreline.
    Establishing a Spending Reduction Account in the bill.

                  Appropriations Not Authorized by Law

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1)(B) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the following table lists the 
appropriations in the accompanying bill which are not 
authorized by law:


                   COMPARISON WITH BUDGET RESOLUTION

    Section 308(a)(1)(A) of the Congressional Budget and 
Impoundment Control Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, requires that the report accompanying a bill providing 
new budget authority contain a statement detailing how the 
authority compares with the reports submitted under section 302 
of the Act for the most recently agreed to concurrent 
resolution on the budget for the fiscal year. This information 
follows:


                      FIVE-YEAR OUTLAY PROJECTIONS

    In compliance with section 308(a)(1)(B) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, the following table contains five-year projections 
associated with the budget authority provided in the 
accompanying bill:


               ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS

    In accordance with section 308(a)(1)(C) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, the financial assistance to State and local 
governments is as follows:


                          PROGRAM DUPLICATION

    No provision of this bill establishes or reauthorizes a 
program of the Federal government known to be duplicative of 
another Federal program, a program that was included in any 
report from the Government Accountability Office to Congress 
pursuant to section 21 of Public Law 111-139, or a program 
related to a program identified in the most recent Catalog of 
Federal Domestic Assistance.

                          DIRECTED RULE MAKING

    Pursuant to section 3(i) of H. Res. 5 (115th Congress), the 
bill includes the following direct rule makings:
    1) Endangered Species Act, gray wolves, Wyoming (in section 
116 of Title I)
    2) Endangered Species Act, gray wolves, western Great Lakes 
(in section 116 of Title I)
    3) Administrative Control of Funds (Forest Service--
Administrative Provisions in Title III).

                    TABLE OF FUNDING RECOMMENDATIONS

    The following table provides the amounts recommended by the 
Committee compared with the budget estimates by account.



                            DISSENTING VIEWS

    When Democrats controlled the Senate and White House, House 
Republicans passed ``no budget, no pay'' legislation to express 
their dismay with the Senate's failure to adopt a budget. With 
Republicans now in full control of the House, the Senate, and 
the White House, the nation's fiscal house is in a state of 
disrepair.
    More than three months after the April 15 deadline, not 
only is there no conferenced budget resolution, but--as of July 
20--the House and Senate have failed even to pass resolutions 
out of their own chambers. Meanwhile, the Appropriations 
Committee is left with budget caps that cut $8 billion from 
Non-Defense bills compared to fiscal year 2017.
    As a result, the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies 
(Interior) Appropriations bill falls short with insufficient 
funding in addition to harmful policy riders and a willful 
ignorance to address the reality of climate change.
    The bill underfunds the Environmental Protection Agency, 
which has already endured deep cuts over the past seven years. 
Since fiscal year 2010, the EPA has been reduced by $2.2 
billion and has 2,000 fewer staff. Adjusted for inflation, EPA 
has already been cut 30 percent below FY 2010 levels. Despite 
these alarming figures, the bill reduces the EPA even further, 
cutting the Agency by $528 million below the FY 2017 enacted 
level, which is 64 percent of the cut to the Subcommittee's 
overall allocation.
    We are at a defining moment in history when our actions to 
combat climate change will impact the world we pass on to our 
children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren. We cannot 
afford to disregard the overwhelming scientific evidence that 
the planet is warming, sea level is rising, and glaciers are 
melting. The recent and historic calving of a glacier in 
Antarctica the size of Delaware was a sobering reminder of the 
enormous consequences of a changing climate.
    The planet is experiencing more severe droughts, flooding, 
and wildfires that threaten lives and livelihoods. Climate 
change has the potential to adversely impact all Americans, as 
even noted in a Defense Department report, hitting vulnerable 
populations hardest, harming productivity in key economic 
sectors, and saddling future generations with costly economic 
and environmental burdens.
    Human actions play a role in climate change, and as elected 
leaders we cannot turn a blind eye to the obvious need for 
intervention. Disappointingly, the Majority ignores this 
reality and instead uses the Interior bill to expedite the 
degradation of our environment and contribute to conditions 
that facilitate climate change.
    EPA's regulatory role makes it the federal government's 
principal agency for reducing carbon emissions. The significant 
cuts in this bill would impact the Agency's ability to protect 
public health and the environment, and jeopardize clean air and 
water for our families and future generations.
    The bill also disinvests in climate change research, 
cutting the United States Geological Survey (USGS) by $46 
million below the FY 2017 enacted level. If the federal 
government is going to make educated and informed decisions, it 
must have the best available science, and cutting USGS research 
hinders the acquisition of that information. The disinvestment 
in these two agencies that research and mitigate climate change 
is reckless and irresponsible.
    Further evidence of the Trump Administration's disregard 
for the legacy we are leaving to future generations is the 
blatant funding reductions for natural resource conservation 
and wildlife protection.
    The Majority continues its assault on the Endangered 
Species Act in this bill, reducing funding for endangered 
species listing by 17 percent. This irresponsible cut opens the 
door for litigation and delays protecting and recovering 
vulnerable species.
    This bill also shortchanges the Land and Water Conservation 
Fund (LWCF), which since its inception has protected 
conservation and recreation land in every State and supported 
tens of thousands of State and local projects. Yet, despite its 
merits, this bill slashes the LWCF program by a third, even 
though this successful program enjoys bipartisan support.
    Once again the majority has failed to adopt the commonsense 
reforms championed in Representative Simpson's wildfire 
disaster funding bill. Every member of the Interior 
subcommittee is a cosponsor of that bill, yet the majority has 
balked, citing committee jurisdiction. The Administration did 
not propose a fix for wildland fire funding, and the majority 
has not proposed an approach wherein costs associated with 
wildfires can be responsibly met without usurping base funding 
of other agencies in the Interior bill. This year, $3.4 
billion, or 11 percent of the subcommittee's total allocation, 
would be spent on wildland fire. It is imperative we push for a 
solution to this problem as we monitor the devastating fires 
burning in the West. Wild fire disasters should be treated like 
any other covered disasters, such as flooding and tornadoes, 
that are payed for without requiring cuts to other important 
programs.
    Despite this bill's shortcomings in environmental 
protection and resource conservation, the subcommittee 
continues to maintain a non-partisan approach to addressing 
Native American issues, and the bill recommends an increase of 
$106 million over the FY 2017 enacted level for programs 
critical to Indian Country. The increased funding for the 
Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Indian Health Service is 
critical to fulfilling our federal trust and treaty 
responsibilities to tribal nations, including support for 
health care, education, and public safety.
    The bill also funds important Historic Preservation grant 
programs The bill provides $5 million for the Save America's 
Treasures program that preserves nationally significant sites, 
structures, and artifacts. Additionally, we note the bill 
provides $10.5 million for the Civil Rights Initiative grant 
program and $3 million for grants-in-aid to Historically Black 
Colleges and Universities.
    We applaud the Chairman for rejecting the Administration's 
proposal to eliminate funding for the National Endowment for 
the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities. These 
agencies honor and preserve the nation's rich cultural heritage 
and foster access to the arts and the humanities.
    Just as problematic as funding decisions in this bill are 
the policy provisions that undermine clean air and water 
protections, block the federal government's ability to use the 
Endangered Species Act, and effectively repeal the Waters of 
the United States Rule, which protects our wetlands and 
waterways.
    Democrats attempted to address many inadequacies through 
the amendment process in Committee. Ranking Member McCollum 
offered an amendment to remove 16 partisan riders, including 
those affecting the Department of the Interior and EPA. The 
majority strongly rejected these efforts. Ranking Member Lowey 
offered amendments to strike Endangered Species Act riders and 
prohibit drilling in the unique and pristine Arctic National 
Wildlife Refuge. These amendments failed along party lines, and 
the majority has thwarted the normal process and procedures set 
out in statute.
    Congressman Quigley offered an amendment to prohibit 
closure of EPA Regional offices. These regional offices are the 
front line in protecting public health and safeguarding our air 
and water. They play a crucial role through the relationships 
regional staff develop with states and local government and 
with industry. The Republicans defeated the amendment in a 
partisan vote of 21-29.
    The Trump Administration's withdrawal from the Paris 
Climate Accords fundamentally undermines American global 
leadership and endangers the future of our planet. Now, more 
than ever, it is imperative that Congress affirms the United 
States' commitment to addressing climate change. Congressman 
Cartwright offered an amendment to include report language 
recognizing that the consequences of climate change have the 
potential to adversely impact all Americans and encouraging 
agencies to create economically viable solutions to study and 
address the causes of climate change. The amendment failed, 21-
29, in a partisan vote.
    For all the reasons outlined, we cannot support this bill 
in its current form given the inclusion of ideological riders, 
dramatic cuts to environmental protection, and the insufficient 
allocation for the overall bill. Despite our current 
opposition, we intend to continue to work with Chairman Calvert 
through this year's appropriations process to produce a 
responsible bill that both parties can support.

                                   Betty McCollum.
                                   Nita M. Lowey.

                                  [all]