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115th Congress     }                                  {        Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session       }                                  {       115-239

======================================================================



 
       DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2018

                                _______
                                

 July 21, 2017.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

 Mr. Carter of Texas, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted 
                             the following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                             MINORITY VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 3355]

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report in explanation of the accompanying bill making 
appropriations for the Department of Homeland Security for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 2018.

                        INDEX TO BILL AND REPORT

                                                            Page number

                                                            Bill Report
TITLE I--DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT, OPERATIONS, INTELLIGENCE, 
    AND OVERSIGHT
        Office of the Secretary and Executive Management...     2
                                                                      4
                Operations and Support.....................     2
                                                                      5
        Management Directorate.............................     2
                                                                      8
                Operations and Support.....................     2
                                                                      8
                Procurement, Construction, and Improvements     3
                                                                     11
                Research and Development...................     3
                                                                     12
        Intelligence, Analysis, and Operations Coordination     3
                                                                     12
                Operations and Support.....................     3
                                                                     13
        Office of Inspector General........................     3
                                                                     14
                Operations and Support.....................     3
                                                                     14
                Administrative Provisions..................     4
                                                                     14
TITLE II--SECURITY, ENFORCEMENT, AND INVESTIGATIONS
        U.S. Customs and Border Protection.................     7
                                                                     15
                Operations and Support.....................     7
                                                                     15
                Procurement, Construction, and Improvements     9
                                                                     26
        U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement...........     9
                                                                     27
                Operations and Support.....................     9
                                                                     27
                Procurement, Construction, and Improvements    10
                                                                     37
        Transportation Security Administration.............    10
                                                                     38
                Operations and Support.....................    10
                                                                     38
                Procurement, Construction, and Improvements    11
                                                                     41
                Research and Development...................    11
                                                                     42
        Coast Guard........................................    12
                                                                     42
                Operating Expenses.........................    12
                                                                     43
                Environmental Compliance and Restoration...    12
                                                                     45
                Reserve Training...........................    13
                                                                     45
                Acquisition, Construction, and Improvements    13
                                                                     46
                Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation    13
                                                                     47
                Health Care Fund Contribution..............
                                                                     48
                Retired Pay................................    14
                                                                     48
        United States Secret Service.......................    14
                                                                     48
                Operations and Support.....................    14
                                                                     49
                Procurement, Construction, and Improvements    16
                                                                     50
                Research and Development...................    16
                                                                     51
        Administrative Provisions..........................    16
                                                                     51
TITLE III--PROTECTION, PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND RECOVERY
        National Protection and Programs Directorate.......    24
                                                                     53
                Operations and Support.....................    24
                                                                     53
                Federal Protective Service.................    24
                                                                     58
                Procurement, Construction, and Improvements    24
                                                                     58
                Research and Development...................    24
                                                                     59
        Office of Health Affairs...........................    25
                                                                     60
                Operations and Support.....................    25
                                                                     60
        Federal Emergency Management Agency................    25
                                                                     61
                Operations and Support.....................    25
                                                                     61
                Procurement, Construction, and Improvements    25
                                                                     63
                Federal Assistance.........................    25
                                                                     64
                Disaster Relief Fund.......................    28
                                                                     68
                National Flood Insurance Fund..............    29
                                                                     69
TITLE IV--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TRAINING, AND SERVICES
        U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services..........    34
                                                                     70
                Operations and Support.....................    34
                                                                     71
                Procurement, Construction, and Improvements    34
                                                                     72
        Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers...........    34
                                                                     72
                Operations and Support.....................    34
                                                                     73
        Science and Technology Directorate.................    35
                                                                     73
                Operations and Support.....................    35
                                                                     74
                Research and Development...................    35
                                                                     75
        Domestic Nuclear Detection Office..................    35
                                                                     77
                Operations and Support.....................    35
                                                                     77
                Procurement, Construction, and Improvements    35
                                                                     77
                Research and Development...................    36
                                                                     78
                Federal Assistance.........................    36
                                                                     78
TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS                                    39
                                                                     79
        This Act...........................................
                                                                     79
        Compliance with House Rules........................
                                                                     93
        Tables.............................................
                                                                    106

                                Overview

    The fiscal year 2018 President's budget request for the 
Department of Homeland Security (DHS) reflects major policy 
changes for how it secures the border and enforces immigration 
laws inside the United States. Despite these policy shifts, the 
objective for DHS remains the same--to ensure a homeland that 
is safe, secure, and resilient against terrorism and other 
hazards.
    The fiscal year 2018 request proposes $50,794,385,000 in 
total discretionary funds for DHS, of which $1,906,213,000 is 
classified as budget function 050 (defense) funding and of 
which $48,888,172,000 is classified as non-defense funding, of 
which $6,793,000,000 is disaster relief.
    For border security, the budget request includes an 
increase above fiscal year 2017 of $1,720,180,000 for U.S. 
Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to support a strategy of 
attaining operational control of the border. Operational 
control is to be achieved through four primary capabilities:
          (1) domain awareness, defined as the ability to 
        detect, identify, and classify;
          (2) impedance and denial, consisting of the ability 
        to prevent and deter illicit cross border activity;
          (3) access and mobility, to enable the law 
        enforcement response to illicit activity; and
          (4) mission readiness, which is achieved when Border 
        Patrol agents are trained appropriately and have the 
        equipment and tools needed to conduct their mission 
        successfully and safely.
    The budget request includes a $1,130,222,000 increase above 
fiscal year 2017 for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement 
(ICE) to promote robust enforcement of immigration laws. This 
increase supports the expansion of ICE enforcement activities 
to categories of individuals whose removal had previously been 
deferred, including those with orders of removal issued prior 
to January 1, 2014, and individuals with no record of criminal 
convictions.
    The Committee is pleased that the request fully funds the 
fiscal year 2018 requirements for the United States Secret 
Service, thus assuring that both its agents and Uniformed 
Division officers are compensated for overtime and relocations. 
Furthermore, the request helps reduce the need for overtime 
through additional hiring.
    Funding is proposed to increase the capacity of the E-
Verify system in preparation for a potential transition to 
mandatory use at the national level in the future.
    Cuts proposed for the Federal Emergency Management Agency 
(FEMA) grant programs are troubling because the risk of 
terrorist attacks has not diminished since September 11, 2001, 
particularly in high threat, high density urban areas. Ensuring 
that communities are prepared to prevent, mitigate, effectively 
respond to, and recover from acts of terrorism should not be 
short-changed. Consequently, the Committee's recommendation 
sustains FEMA grant programs at fiscal year 2017 levels. 
Likewise, cuts to ICE's Visa Security Program--which ensures 
law enforcement officers have an opportunity to review visa 
applications and interview applicants prior to their arrival in 
the United States--have been restored to fiscal year 2017 
levels.
    Of concern is the Administration's assumption that a 
proposed increase in the aviation passenger security fee will 
reduce the Transportation Security Administration's requirement 
for discretionary funding by $500,000,000. The prior 
Administration routinely proposed similar fee increases, which 
have little or no chance of being enacted. DHS should fight for 
a topline budget increase rather than employ tactics that put 
it at risk of being unable to carry out its national security 
mission.
    The Committee is pleased with the headway that has been 
made to strengthen and institutionalize DHS's management 
processes. Despite commendable progress, more can be done 
particularly in the areas of planning and programming for 
required capabilities. DHS components--especially those that 
are operational--would benefit from a more transparent, 
rigorous, and common approach. DHS should leverage the Joint 
Requirements Council (JRC) to ensure that enterprise solutions 
are used whenever appropriate and cost effective.
    As the Committee has opined in prior reports, it will take 
time to establish a culture of joint operations and 
interoperability. DHS's components will have to overcome 
longstanding parochial instincts and better integrate into 
joint command-and-control structures. But the Committee 
believes that, in a world where threats emerge without warning, 
leveraging the power that a more joint DHS can bring is vital 
to protecting the homeland.

                                Summary

    The Committee recommendation includes $51,121,000,000, 
including $44,328,000,000 within the bill's 302(b) budget 
allocation, and $6,793,000,000 as a budget cap adjustment for 
disaster relief. Title I contains funds for departmental 
management activities. Title II ensures the Department's 
frontline operational components have adequate resources to 
carry out effectively their security, enforcement, and 
investigative missions. Title III includes funds necessary to 
prepare for, respond to, and recover from natural disasters; 
chemical, biological, radiological, or explosive attacks; and 
cyber-attacks on the population or the nation's critical 
infrastructure. Title IV supports law enforcement training; 
citizenship, immigration, and employment eligibility 
verification services; nuclear and radiological detection; and 
research and development functions. Title V includes basic 
general provisions for oversight, reprogramming guidance, 
transfer authority, reports, and funding limitations.

    TITLE I--DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT, OPERATIONS, INTELLIGENCE, AND 
                               OVERSIGHT


                                Mission

    The mission of Departmental Management, Operations, 
Intelligence, and Oversight is to provide leadership and 
services to DHS components, formulate policy guidance and 
directives, collect and disseminate intelligence, and maintain 
visibility of all DHS operations. The Office of the Secretary, 
the executive management offices, and the Management 
Directorate support departmental efforts to achieve strategic 
goals and to deliver quality administrative support services 
for human resources; manage facilities, property, equipment, 
and other material resources; ensure safety, health, and 
environmental protection; and identify and track performance 
measurements relating to DHS missions.

            Office of the Secretary and Executive Management


                                Mission

    The Office of the Secretary and Executive Management (OSEM) 
provides policy guidance to operating bureaus within the 
organization; plans and executes departmental strategies to 
accomplish agency objectives; and provides leadership to the 
Department.

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $137,034,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................       130,307,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       138,997,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................        +1,963,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................        +8,690,000
 

    The Operations and Support (O&S;) appropriation supports the 
costs incurred for day-to-day operation and maintenance of 
OSEM, including salaries, services, supplies, utilities, 
travel, training, transportation, and minor procurement, 
construction, and improvement projects.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $138,997,000 for O&S;, $8,690,000 
above the amount requested and $1,963,000 above the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2017.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget Request      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Support
    Office of the Secretary.......        $18,043,000        $18,028,000
    Office of Policy..............         36,837,000         41,624,000
    Office of Public Affairs......          5,143,000          5,000,000
    Office of Legislative Affairs.          5,056,000          5,056,000
    Office of Partnership and              12,603,000         13,422,000
     Engagement...................
    Office of General Counsel.....         18,501,000         18,501,000
    Office for Civil Rights and            20,679,000         23,571,000
     Civil Liberties..............
    Office of the Citizenship and           5,944,000          5,944,000
     Immigration Services
     Ombudsman....................
    Privacy Office................          7,501,000          7,851,000
                                   -------------------------------------
        Total, Operations and            $130,307,000       $138,997,000
         Support..................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Over the last several years, the Department has adopted a 
standard practice of artificially reducing its budget request 
by proposing fee increases that are unlikely to be enacted, and 
fiscal year 2018 is no exception. As a consequence, the 
Department's total discretionary funding requirement is far 
higher than represented in the budget request. If a topline 
discretionary funding increase is required in order for DHS 
components to meet mission requirements, DHS leadership is 
directed to work with the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) 
to directly propose that funding. Until that happens, official 
reception and representation funds in the Office of the 
Secretary are limited to $30,000, which is $15,000 below the 
request.
    Now that the roles, missions, and processes of the Joint 
Requirements Council (JRC) have been established, DHS should 
consider whether the organization should be moved from the 
Office of the Secretary to the Management Directorate, which is 
a better functional fit. If so, DHS is directed to make the 
change for fiscal year 2018 through a transfer of funds under 
the authority provided in section 503 of this Act, and to 
memorialize it in the fiscal year 2019 budget request. As in 
the past, DHS is directed to provide quarterly briefings to the 
Committee on the activities of the JRC.
    The explanatory statement accompanying Public Law 115-31, 
along with House Report 114-668, directed the Secretary to 
convene a Public Complaint and Feedback System working group to 
support the sharing of best practices and the standardization 
of feedback mechanisms, processes, customer service metrics, 
and reporting across the Department. The Committee reiterates 
its support for this effort and looks forward to the first 
update on the progress of the working group by the deadline of 
August 3, 2017.
    The Department should continue to provide assistance, as 
appropriate, to state police crime labs to ensure that federal 
requirements do not burden state resources. DHS shall report 
annually on its use of and partnerships with state crime labs, 
including funding associated with such use and partnerships, 
and should fully reimburse state crime labs it uses. The 
Committee notes that the Department's partnerships with crime 
labs are particularly important in border states.
    The U.S. remains highly vulnerable to the impacts of a 
natural or intentional biological or chemical event that could 
be devastating to our citizens, our food supply, and our 
economy. The Committee is concerned there is a lack of 
coordination between DHS, the U.S. Department of Agriculture 
(USDA), and other federal agencies on efforts to address risks 
to the agricultural supply. DHS and USDA are directed to brief 
the Committees not later than 180 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act on the coordination between the two 
departments and other relevant federal agencies on efforts to 
address agro-threats. The briefing shall include an assessment 
of existing capabilities and capability gaps surrounding 
intelligence and information gathering and surveillance 
activities on agro-threats, including animal health, crop 
health, impacts to human health, insect vectors, and impacts to 
the national economy. The briefing shall also address how 
agencies will collaborate on the future operation and funding 
of the National Bio- and Agro-defense Facility (NBAF), 
including a plan for the transition of Plum Island to NBAF.
    The Committee has increased the Office of Policy by 
$4,787,400 above the request to accelerate the build-out of the 
Immigration Data Integration Initiative. This initiative 
continues departmental efforts directed by the Committees on 
Appropriations in prior years based on bipartisan, bicameral 
concerns about the inability of the Department to provide 
timely reporting of border security and immigration enforcement 
data. Such data is important for informing component operations 
and for providing oversight. Specifically, the initiative will 
enable DHS to develop uniform immigration data standards; 
provide stakeholders with real- or near real-time access to 
relevant data; ensure that immigration records are fully 
linkable across DHS and other federal agency data systems; and 
meet transparency requirements directed by the Committees on 
Appropriations and under recent Executive Orders and 
Presidential Memoranda on border security, interior 
enforcement, and preventing terrorist travel.
    A more formal engagement between the Department and 
appropriate Mexican authorities could help facilitate the 
development of common or complementary approaches in areas of 
mutual interest, including border infrastructure, immigration 
enforcement, facilitating the flow of low-risk cargo and 
passengers, cross-border violence, and criminal networks. The 
Committee encourages the Department, in partnership with the 
Department of State, to explore new opportunities for 
cooperation with Mexican authorities, such as a cross-border 
working group, and to report back to the Committee within 90 
days of the date of enactment of this Act.
    As the Department continues to implement the REAL ID Act, 
the Committee encourages continued collaboration with states, 
including the appropriate use of reasonable extensions that 
provide additional time for states to come into compliance with 
the required minimum standards.
    The Blue Campaign, a department-wide initiative to combat 
human trafficking, has historically been funded through end-of-
year contributions from components and detailed personnel, an 
approach that is not appropriate for the program's long-term 
sustainment. The fiscal year 2017 DHS Appropriations Act 
included direct funding of $819,000 for the Blue Campaign to 
support dedicated personnel, as requested, and to begin 
transitioning the program away from a reliance on component 
contributions. Unfortunately, the fiscal year 2018 request 
proposed no direct funding for the program. The Committee 
recommends $819,000 in continued direct funding for personnel 
and directs the Secretary to sustain the program at its total 
fiscal year 2016 level of $5,150,000 in fiscal year 2017 and 
fiscal year 2018, using component contributions to cover non-
personnel program costs. DHS shall account for and propose 
full, direct funding for the program in the justification 
materials that accompany the fiscal year 2019 budget 
submission, as directed in the explanatory statement 
accompanying Public Law 115-31.
    The Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (CRCL) 
works collaboratively with DHS components to improve policies, 
practices, standards, and training related to civil rights and 
civil liberties while also supporting homeland security 
missions. The Committee recommends $23,571,000 for CRCL, 
$1,000,000 above the fiscal year 2017 level, to sustain 
enhancements provided for the Compliance Branch in fiscal year 
2017 and to accommodate a higher workload in fiscal year 2018 
across CRCL, including oversight of significant planned new 
hiring by CBP and ICE, the expansion of ICE enforcement 
activities and detention capacity, and the expansion of the 
287(g) program. CRCL shall ensure that all individuals whose 
complaints it investigates receive information within 30 days 
of the completion of an investigation regarding the outcome of 
such complaints, as appropriate, including findings of fact, 
findings of law, and available remedies.
    The Office of Citizenship and Immigration Services 
Ombudsman is funded at $5,944,000 and the Privacy Office is 
funded at $7,851,000, which supports the current services level 
of activity for both offices.

                         Management Directorate


 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $619,156,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................       768,664,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       726,431,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................      +107,275,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................       -42,233,000
 

                                Mission

    The mission of the Management Directorate is to ensure 
delivery of effective and efficient business and management 
services across DHS to enable the Department to achieve its 
mission to secure the United States. It does so by providing 
policy, guidance, operational oversight and support, and 
solutions for the management of the Department.

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $597,817,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................       696,131,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       696,131,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       +98,314,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

    The Operations and Support (O&S;) account supports 
enterprise leadership and business administration services, 
including: financial management, acquisition oversight, 
workforce management, physical and personnel security 
requirements, administrative supplies and services, non-
programmatic information technology, day-to-day management of 
headquarters-related property and assets, daily communications, 
and other general day-to-day management and administration.

                             Recommendation

    As requested, the Committee recommends $696,131,000 for 
O&S;, $98,314,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2017. 
Of the total, the bill recommends two years of funding 
availability totaling $227,516,000 of which $188,217,000 is for 
the Office of the Chief Information Officer, $2,931,000 is for 
the Nebraska Avenue Complex, and $36,368,000 is for the Office 
of the Chief Readiness Support Officer.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget Request      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Support
    Immediate Office of the Under          $6,867,000         $6,867,000
     Secretary for Management.....
    Office of the Chief Readiness          70,900,000         70,900,000
     Support Officer..............
    Office of the Chief Human              56,852,000         56,852,000
     Capital Officer..............
    Office of the Chief Security           74,963,000         74,963,000
     Officer......................
    Office of the Chief                   102,615,000        102,615,000
     Procurement Officer..........
    Office of the Chief Financial          66,369,000         66,369,000
     Officer......................
    Office of the Chief                   317,565,000        317,565,000
     Information Officer..........
                                   -------------------------------------
      Total, Operations and              $696,131,000       $696,131,000
       Support....................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Office of the Chief Readiness Support Officer is 
directed to continue refining a DHS-wide inventory of real 
estate, vehicle fleets, and equipment for the purpose of 
establishing a table of equipment for each component of the DHS 
enterprise.
    House Report 114-668 directed the Department to provide a 
plan to the Committee requiring all component-level field 
offices to consolidate space, services, and assets. The 
Committee looks forward to receiving this plan by the due date 
of August 3, 2017.
    The Committee directs the Department's Chief Acquisition 
Officer to provide a briefing of summary ratings for all Level 
1 and 2 programs on a quarterly basis.
    Within the amount recommended for the Office of the Chief 
Human Capital Officer is $3,000,000 to continue the 
Cybersecurity Internship Program.
    Included in the amount for the Office of the Chief 
Financial Officer (OCFO) is $2,635,000 to develop a planning, 
programming, budgeting, and execution tool and $3,256,000 to 
establish a manpower analysis tool that can provide modeling 
and financial analysis capability.
    Annual obligation plans for each DHS component shall be 
provided to the Committee not later than 45 days after the date 
of enactment of this Act with updates of actual obligations 
provided not later than 30 days after the end of each quarter. 
For the annual obligation plan, DHS is directed to establish a 
template that shall be used by every DHS component and shall 
include quarterly spending targets for each account and 
program, project, and activity (PPA). The initial submission 
shall account for any undistributed cuts and will be used as a 
baseline for subsequent reprogrammings or transfers in 
accordance with section 503 of this Act. This requirement shall 
apply to the fiscal year 2018 enacted budget.
    DHS is commended for continuing the department-wide effort 
to improve budget justification materials, including 
acquisition documents that are more transparent and provide 
useful insight into cost, schedule, and delivery. O&S; 
justification material, while much improved, continues to 
include unnecessary background information, be repetitive, and 
vary by component. DHS should consider developing a template 
for O&S; justifications with established cost drivers that each 
component is required to utilize, especially operational 
components. Given its interest in this issue, the Committee 
will be requesting regular updates on DHS's progress.
    With the exception of the Coast Guard, all DHS component 
budgets are now formulated in four appropriations account 
categories that use common definitions and have similar cost 
drivers and pricing rules. The period of appropriation 
availability for each category is not standardized across 
components, however, which hinders consistent planning, 
programming, budgeting, and execution. As part of the fiscal 
year 2019 budget request, the Department shall submit a 
proposal with more consistent periods of availability for all 
DHS and component appropriations accounts.
    Other differences among components include the PPA levels 
that serve as controls for the purposes of reprogramming 
notification thresholds. While some appropriations are divided 
into only a single tier of PPAs, others have one or even two 
additional sub-tier levels. In addition to being inconsistent, 
some of the sub-tiers contain relatively small amounts of 
funding, impeding day-to-day management decisions by requiring 
a reprogramming notification to the Committees before even 
small movements of funds can be made. To begin to address this 
issue, the Committee recommends the consolidation of small, 
sub-tier PPAs under the appropriations for some components. In 
addition, the Committee directs DHS OCFO to review the existing 
PPA structure, provide recommendations for improvement to the 
Committee by October 1, 2017, and propose the new PPA format in 
the fiscal year 2019 budget request.
    The Committee recognizes the Department's progress in 
requirements development and validation. Establishing the JRC 
and implementing the Joint Requirements Integration Management 
System better enable DHS to identify and validate all joint 
operational requirements and link requirements and resources. 
However, for the requirements process to be truly effective, 
DHS components need to further develop their own requirements 
generation processes. Therefore, the Department is directed to 
require the operational components to establish requirements 
functions that can address all emerging and extant requirements 
across each component's range of missions. For the smaller 
components who might not possess the resources to establish 
this capability, the Department should help them develop their 
requirements as well.
    Multiple operational components at DHS lack comprehensive 
plans to systematically replace vehicles and radios, which are 
key tools of the trade for law enforcement officers. The 
estimated cost to replace these assets is excessive and 
probably unaffordable if requested in a lump sum. With the 
projected growth in the size of the investigative force, this 
requirement will only increase over time. Within 60 days after 
the date of enactment of this Act, DHS, in collaboration with 
the requisite components, shall brief the Committee on joint 
plans to recapitalize and replace vehicles and radios. The 
Committee directs CFO to require components to provide exhibits 
in future budget submissions detailing the schedule and costs 
to maintain the viability of its fleet of vehicles and radios.
    The Committee recognizes the Department's progress in 
evolving its Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Execution 
System (PPBES). The Department should continue to mature the 
PPBES process by developing a system of record that tracks 
funding from programming through execution. DHS is directed to 
formally establish a requirement for this capability and 
utilize an existing product that meets its needs while ensuring 
all components provide input to the process.
    In order to ensure the long-term security of technology 
used to safeguard documents issued by the Department, the 
Committee directs DHS to review the availability of 
technologies to encrypt radio-frequency identification (RFID) 
documents and the feasibility of upgrading and encrypting 
current and future RFID documents. DHS shall brief the 
Committee on its assessment not later than 180 days after the 
date of enactment of this Act.
    The Committee notes the private sector's use of training 
and certification as a successful way to retain cybersecurity 
professionals and appreciates the Department's efforts to 
utilize tuition assistance for employees in pursuit of formal 
degrees or industry recognized certifications. In order to 
maximize the Department's efforts, the Committee directs the 
Secretary to review the transferability of cybersecurity 
training programs and certification testing opportunities 
across both the public and private sector, and to identify 
resource constraints or other obstacles that might inhibit the 
success of such retention efforts.
    House Report 114-215 made clear the Committee's concerns 
regarding the Department's failure to adequately address 
shortfalls in its interoperable communications and required a 
briefing from the Chief Information Officer on the Department's 
plan to close those interoperability gaps. Despite this 
requirement, and multiple Office of Inspector General (OIG) 
reports indicating failures and providing recommendations, 
there continue to be numerous communications gaps. Currently, 
there are a number of local, state, and federal partnerships 
using systems that increase the availability of interoperable 
communications to all levels of first responders and serve as a 
link for daily operations. The Committee directs the Department 
to examine the practicality and supportability of leveraging 
such partnerships to close existing DHS gaps, and to brief the 
Committee on its findings within 180 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act.
    The Committee remains concerned with the compliance with 
Homeland Security Presidential Directive 12, Policy for a 
Common Identification Standard for Federal Employees and 
Contractors, which mandates a federal standard for secure and 
reliable forms of identification used to gain access to secure 
facilities where there is a potential for terrorist attack. The 
Committee is aware of existing technology solutions to verify 
access credentials in real-time that may aid in implementation 
of this policy, and directs DHS to review the solutions and 
brief the Committee not later than 90 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................       $18,839,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................        69,988,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        27,755,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................        +8,916,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................       -42,233,000
 

    The Procurement, Construction, and Improvements (PC&I;) 
appropriation provides support for the planning, operational 
development, engineering, and purchase of one or more assets 
prior to sustainment. Information technology included in the 
account provides useful software and hardware in an operational 
environment, including non-tangible assets.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $27,755,000 for PC&I;, $42,233,000 
below the request and $8,916,000 above the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2017.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget Request      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Procurement, Construction, and
 Improvements
    Construction and Facility                   - - -              - - -
     Improvements.................
    Mission Support Assets and            $69,988,000        $27,755,000
     Infrastructure...............
                                   -------------------------------------
        Total, Procurement,               $69,988,000        $27,755,000
         Construction, and
         Improvements.............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    With reservations, the Committee recommends $42,233,000 for 
financial systems modernization (FSM) as requested; this amount 
is included in a title V general provision. After many years of 
effort and an investment of $133,000,000, DHS has concluded 
that the Interior Business Center (IBC) at the U.S. Department 
of Interior is unable to deliver a fully auditable financial 
management solution that meets DHS's requirements. Reasons for 
the failure of this effort are multi-fold, including inadequate 
program management, inexperienced staff, lack of transparency 
in communications and governance, IBC's failure to understand 
the requirements and complexities of developing a solution for 
an agency of DHS's size, and shortcomings in the initial 
discovery process, which should have better identified these 
challenges. Another critical factor is the initial OMB 
directive pushing the Department in the direction of a federal 
shared service provider, without which the Department may well 
have been more cautious in engaging the IBC.
    To mitigate the damage of this failed initiative, DHS is 
undertaking several actions. The first is to sever the three 
existing but incomplete software releases and any salvageable 
hardware from the IBC and determine an appropriate alternative 
hosting and software development vehicle. The second is to 
develop an acquisition strategy that can successfully modernize 
the financial systems for remaining DHS customers. To that end, 
DHS is directed to follow Management Directive 102-01 and to 
open any competition to private sector solutions.
    DHS is directed to work with the General Services 
Administration (GSA) to revise the Enhanced Plan for the build-
out of the St. Elizabeths Complex, incorporating lessons 
learned from the ongoing Center Building renovation, and update 
the Committee on changes to the cost and schedule of the 
project.

                        RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................        $2,500,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................         2,545,000
Recommended in the bill...............................         2,545,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................           +45,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

    The Research and Development (R&D;) Appropriation provides 
funds for prototype applications, technical demonstrations, 
planning, and development of emerging technologies that can be 
used to support DHS missions, primarily the Office of the Chief 
Information Officer.

                             Recommendation

    As requested, the Committee recommends $2,545,000 for R&D;, 
$45,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2017.

          INTELLIGENCE, ANALYSIS, AND OPERATIONS COORDINATION

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $263,551,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................       252,405,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       252,405,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       -11,146,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

                                Mission

    The missions supported through Intelligence, Analysis, and 
Operations Coordination are twofold: to equip the Homeland 
Security enterprise with timely intelligence and information to 
keep the homeland safe, secure, and resilient; and to provide 
operations coordination, information sharing, situational 
awareness, a common operating picture, and departmental 
continuity.

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $263,551,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................       252,405,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       252,405,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       -11,146,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

    The Operations and Support (O&S;) appropriation supports the 
Office of Intelligence and Analysis (I&A;), which collects, 
evaluates, and disseminates intelligence information, and the 
Office of Operations Coordination, which provides incident 
management and operational coordination.

                             Recommendation

    As requested, the Committee recommends $252,405,000 for 
O&S;, $11,146,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2017.

                          Classified Programs

    Recommended adjustments to classified programs and more 
detailed oversight of funding for I&A; are addressed in the 
classified annex accompanying this report.
    The Committee understands that the State of Texas is 
considering the relocation of the North Texas Fusion Center 
(NTFC) to the Dallas Fort Worth International Airport (DFW), 
where it would be co-located with DFW public safety assets, 
TSA, and the Federal Aviation Administration. DFW, which has 
the highest threat level of any critical infrastructure target 
in the Dallas-Fort Worth region, has a robust operation and 911 
dispatch capability but lacks an intelligence center to 
collect, collate, analyze, and disseminate classified 
intelligence or public information regarding potential 
terrorist threats or criminal activity impacting the airport. 
Supported by the State of Texas and certified by DHS, the NTFC 
serves 20 counties in North Texas with a cumulative population 
of approximately eight million people and 209 law enforcement 
agencies. The relocation of the NTFC is intended to create a 
command operations center capable of addressing all emerging 
threats in the North Texas region. Immediate benefits of this 
co-location include the alignment of tactical real time crime 
operations with advanced fusion intelligence analysis, and the 
rapid expansion of information sharing and analytic 
collaboration among North Texas public safety entities through 
geographic proximity. The Committee expects I&A; to keep it 
apprised of this and other potential developments related to 
the state fusions centers.

                      Office of Inspector General


 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $175,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018\1\...................       133,974,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       154,830,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       -20,170,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................       +20,856,000
 
\1\The budget request for fiscal year 2018 proposes a directed transfer
  of $24,000,000 to this account from the Disaster Relief Fund
  appropriation, resulting in a total requested funding level for the
  OIG of $157,974,000,

                                Mission

    The DHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) conducts and 
supervises independent audits, investigations, and inspections 
of the programs and operations of DHS, and recommends ways for 
DHS to carry out its responsibilities in the most effective, 
efficient, and economical manner possible. The OIG is charged 
with deterring, identifying, and addressing fraud, abuse, 
mismanagement, and waste of taxpayer funds invested in DHS.

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $175,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018\1\...................       133,974,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       154,830,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       -20,170,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................       +20,856,000
 
\1\1The budget request for fiscal year 2018 proposes a directed transfer
  of $24,000,000 to this account from the Disaster Relief Fund
  appropriation, resulting in a total requested funding level for the
  OIG of $157,974,000,

    The Operations and Support (O&S;) account supports OIG 
personnel, assessments of the Department's risks and 
weaknesses, and the promotion of efficient and effective uses 
of limited resources.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $154,830,000 for O&S;, $20,856,000 
above the amount requested and $20,170,000 below the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2017. Adding the proposed directed 
transfer of $24,000,000 to this account from the FEMA Disaster 
Relief Fund results in the recommendation being $3,044,000 
below the amount requested. Of the funds provided, the OIG is 
directed to allocate not less than $20,856,000 to disaster-
related investigations and audits.
    As ICE expands the number of jurisdictions participating in 
the 287(g) program, it will be important to ensure that it has 
processes in place to monitor the performance of 287(g)-
designated officers. The Committee directs the OIG to review 
ICE's implementation and oversight of the 287(g) program, 
including training; data collection; civil liberties 
protections; and complaint processes.

              TITLE I--ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--THIS ACT

    Section 101. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision requiring the Secretary to submit the Future Years 
Homeland Security Program at the same time as the President's 
budget proposal.
    Section 102. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision requiring the Chief Financial Officer to submit 
monthly budget execution and staffing reports within 30 days 
after the close of each month.
    Section 103. The Committee continues a provision regarding 
grants or contracts awarded by means other than full and open 
competition and requires the Inspector General to review them 
and report the results to the Committees.
    Section 104. The Committee continues a provision requiring 
the Secretary to link all contracts that provide award fees to 
successful acquisition outcomes.
    Section 105. The Committee continues a provision requiring 
the Secretary, in conjunction with the Secretary of Treasury, 
to notify the Committees of any proposed transfers from the 
Department of Treasury Forfeiture Fund to any agency at DHS.
    Section 106. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision related to official costs of the Secretary and Deputy 
Secretary.
    Section 107. The Committee continues a provision requiring 
the Secretary to submit reports on visa overstay data and to 
post border security metrics on its website.

          TITLE II--SECURITY, ENFORCEMENT, AND INVESTIGATIONS


                   U.S. Customs and Border Protection


 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................   $12,186,881,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................    13,907,061,000
Recommended in the bill...............................    13,813,035,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................    +1,626,154,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................       -94,026,000
 

                                Mission

    The mission of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) is 
to enforce laws regarding the admission of foreign-born persons 
into the United States, facilitate the flow of legitimate trade 
and travel, and ensure all persons and cargo enter the U.S. 
legally and safely through official checkpoints at ports of 
entry.

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................   $11,175,449,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................    11,592,341,000
Recommended in the bill...............................    11,553,315,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................      +377,866,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................       -39,026,000
 

    The Operations and Support (O&S;) appropriation funds all 
appropriated operating costs required to achieve CBP's dual 
mission of preventing suspected terrorists, terrorist weapons, 
and other contraband from entering the United States, while 
also facilitating the flow of legitimate trade and travel into 
and out of the United States. The primary drivers behind these 
costs are the salaries and benefits of CBP operational and 
mission support personnel. The balance of this appropriation is 
comprised of the operations and maintenance costs necessary to 
sustain CBP equipment and facilities.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $11,553,315,000 for O&S;, 
$39,026,000 below the amount requested and $377,866,000 above 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2017. Included in the total 
is $3,274,000 derived from the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund. 
The recommendation includes full funding for agent and officer 
hiring initiatives, although the Committee remains concerned 
with the ability of CBP to hire the requested staff.
    The fiscal year 2018 President's budget request assumed 
$157,000,000 in revenue collections generated through the 
redirection of the Electronic System for Travel Authorization 
(ESTA) surcharge fee for Brand USA. The recommendation does not 
include the proposal as it requires new authorization 
legislation that has not been enacted and is not under the 
jurisdiction of the Committee.
    While the recommendation supports all hiring initiatives 
including the request for 500 new Border Patrol agents, it 
includes a reduction to the adjustment to base pay of 
$135,000,000 due to under execution of planned hiring in fiscal 
year 2017 and a re-estimation of the cost of various full-time 
equivalents (FTE) that were inaccurately or inconsistently 
priced. For the second year in a row, the CBP budget proposed a 
massive increase in excess of $260,000,000 across all PPAs for 
``adjustments to base pay'' associated with maturation of the 
workforce and annualization of prior year hiring. However, CBP 
has been unable to explain how the upward and downward 
adjustments were calculated, and how those adjustments align 
with FTE in the PPAs. Additionally, CBP has been unable to 
articulate which fiscal year 2017 positions are being 
annualized.
    The Committee remains concerned that attrition continues to 
outpace hiring at CBP. Over the last two years, Congress has 
routinely provided requested funding increases as CBP has 
explored new and innovative strategies to improve hiring 
processes and stem attrition. While some progress has been made 
in reducing the time it takes to hire, attrition has outpaced 
net hiring by 445 positions through the first eight months of 
fiscal year 2017, a loss of capability that cannot continue. To 
expand the hiring pool, CBP should consider allowing field 
level offices to take the lead on recruiting. Agents and 
officers know their communities and are likely the best face of 
CBP for potential recruits. Another potential approach would be 
to use exhibitions of the Border Patrol Pistol Team as a 
recruitment tool, particularly if paired with the establishment 
of a marksmanship program. CBP is directed to brief the 
Committee not later than 60 days after the date of enactment of 
this Act on its progress in addressing its continued critical 
human capital challenges, to include an assessment of these and 
any other new hiring or retention strategies it is considering.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget Request      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Support
    Border Security Operations
        U.S. Border Patrol
            Operations............     $3,787,694,000     $3,787,694,000
            Assets and Support....        670,895,000        653,895,000
        Office of Training and             77,512,000         77,512,000
         Development..............
                                   -------------------------------------
                Subtotal, Border        4,536,101,000      4,519,101,000
                 Security
                 Operations.......
    Trade and Travel Operations
        Office of Field Operations
            Domestic Operations...      2,681,171,000      2,833,171,000
            International                 142,272,000        142,272,000
             Operations...........
            Targeting Operations..        236,572,000        221,572,000
            Assets and Support....        840,315,000        840,315,000
        Office of Trade...........        263,301,000        252,926,000
        Office of Training and             47,186,000         47,186,000
         Development..............
                                   -------------------------------------
                Subtotal, Trade         4,210,817,000      4,337,442,000
                 and Travel
                 Operations.......
    Integrated Operations
        Air and Marine Operations
            Operations............        311,136,000        301,414,000
            Assets and Support....        520,046,000        520,046,000
            Air and Marine                 46,183,000         46,183,000
             Operations Center....
        Office of International            39,784,000         39,784,000
         Affairs..................
        Office of Intelligence....         50,984,000         50,984,000
        Office of Training and              6,534,000          6,534,000
         Development..............
        Operations Support........        103,571,000        103,571,000
                                   -------------------------------------
                Subtotal,               1,078,238,000      1,068,516,000
                 Integrated
                 Operations.......
    Mission Support
        Enterprise Services.......      1,460,254,000      1,459,325,000
            (Harbor Maintenance           (3,274,000)        (3,274,000)
             Trust Fund)..........
        Office of Professional            204,679,000        201,679,000
         Responsibility...........
        Executive Leadership and          102,252,000        102,252,000
         Oversight................
                                   -------------------------------------
                Subtotal, Mission       1,767,185,000      1,763,256,000
                 Support..........
    Adjustment to Base Pay                      - - -       -135,000,000
     Reduction
                                   -------------------------------------
                Total, Operations     $11,592,341,000    $11,553,315,000
                 and Support......
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       Border Security Operations

    The Committee recommends $4,519,101,000 for Border Security 
Operations, $17,000,000 below the amount requested and 
$178,658,000 above the amount provided for fiscal year 2017. 
The recommendation includes the following changes to the 
request: a decrease of $20,000,000 from facilities and an 
increase of $3,000,000 for electronic global information system 
efforts to incorporate real-time activity, blue force tracking, 
and supporting data and infrastructure to better visualize 
operations and support critical analytic mapping.
    The Committee strongly supports small unmanned aerial 
systems (UAS) for surveillance of the border and directs CBP to 
provide a briefing on the results on the ongoing demonstration 
efforts for small UAS and planned procurements not later than 
30 days after the completion of the demonstrations.
    The Committee notes that CBP uses an oversight framework 
and procedures that ensure that the use of its UAS is in 
compliance with privacy and civil liberty laws and standards. 
To effectively monitor such compliance, the Committee expects 
DHS to track the number of times these systems are used along 
the border, in a maritime environment, or in support of state, 
local, and tribal law enforcement entities, and directs DHS to 
make this information publicly available.
    The Committee is aware of new, innovative uses of fiber 
optic technology for intrusion detection and communications. 
CBP is directed to review this type of technology and brief the 
Committee not later than 60 days after the date of enactment of 
this Act on the feasibility and potential benefit of 
incorporating it into its border security systems.
    The Committee directs CBP to provide an update, within 60 
days after the date of enactment of this Act, on its integrated 
strategy for controlling Carrizo cane along the Rio Grande in 
Texas. The update should include the current status and results 
of bio-control activities; an inventory of border acreage that 
requires control of Carrizo cane to support Border Patrol 
operations; the percentage of such acreage that is routinely 
controlled through bio-control agents, mechanical topping, or a 
combination of the two; the annual cost of such control 
activities; goals for increasing the acreage on which Carrizo 
cane is routinely controlled; additional funding required to 
achieve such goals; challenges to achieving such goals; and 
related efforts to collaborate with the Science and Technology 
Directorate, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Texas 
State Soil and Water Conservation Board, and the Government of 
Mexico.
    The Committee directs CBP to survey Border Patrol stations 
along the southwest border, as appropriate, regarding the 
number and effectiveness of rescue beacons within their areas 
of responsibility (AOR); the criteria used to determine where 
rescue beacons can be usefully placed; and where additional 
rescue beacons placed within their AOR could help save lives. 
Within 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act, CBP 
shall brief the Committee on its search and rescue efforts 
during fiscal year 2017, including (1) the number of deaths, by 
sector and cause of death; (2) the number of rescue beacons, 
frequency of beacon activation, and rescues in response to 
beacon activation, by sector; (3) the results of the survey of 
Border Patrol stations on rescue beacons; and (4) options for 
reducing the number of migrant deaths along the border, 
including an assessment on the effectiveness of water supply 
sites and rescue beacons and the potential for increased 
collaboration with non-governmental organizations.
    Border Patrol sector chiefs often have the most 
comprehensive understanding of the challenges faced in their 
geographic AOR. The Committee encourages all state, local, 
tribal, and federal law enforcement agencies working in the 
southwest border region to collaborate and operationally 
coordinate, when feasible, with sector chiefs in their 
respective geographical regions.
    The Committee directs CBP to collect and publicly report on 
its website data pertaining to all checkpoints, transportation 
checks, and roving patrol stops, to be updated semi-annually 
with all necessary redactions of personally identifiable 
information about specific individuals. For roving patrols, the 
data should include: (1) the total number of use of force 
incidents and arrests by location; (2) the citizenship status 
of subjects arrested; and (3) the amount and type of property 
seized. For transportation checks, the data should include: (1) 
a description of the boarding of public conveyance by CBP in 
air, maritime and ground stations, ports, and terminals when an 
arrest is made; (2) the total number of use of force incidents 
and arrests by location; (3) the citizenship status when an 
arrest is made; and (4) the amount and type of property seized. 
For checkpoints, the data should include (1) the location of 
all tactical and permanent checkpoints that were in operation 
for any period of time; (2) the total number of use of force 
incidents and arrests by location; (3) the citizenship status 
of subjects arrested following secondary inspection; (4) the 
amount and type of property seized; and (5) a description of 
how the agency uses information collected by cameras and 
license plate readers.

                      Trade and Travel Operations

    The Committee recommends $4,337,442,000 for Trade and 
Travel Operations, $126,625,000 above the amount requested and 
$152,279,000 above the amount provided for fiscal year 2017. 
The recommendation includes the following decreases to the 
request: $5,000,000 from the new Commercial Technology 
Innovation Program initiative; $10,375,000 from the Office of 
Trade increase due to incorrect pricing of FTEs; and 
$15,000,000 from the proposed National Targeting Center (NTC) 
enhancements. While the Committee strongly supports CBP's 
targeting efforts, the Committee notes that NTC funding has 
almost quadrupled in just four years.
    The Committee directs CBP to provide a detailed expenditure 
plan for biometric exit activities within 90 days of the date 
of enactment of this Act, as directed in House Report 114-668.
    The workload staffing model used by CBP indicates the need 
for more than 2,000 additional officers at the ports of entry. 
The Department has again proposed increases to immigration 
inspection fees to support these required officers that are 
unlikely to be enacted by Congress. Because most foreign-source 
illegal drugs and contraband are transported through the ports 
of entry, the Committee expects future budget requests to 
propose additional discretionary resources to help close the 
gap in requirements for CBP officers at the ports.
    While CBP's resource allocation model has greatly improved 
its ability to make informed staffing decisions, the Committee 
understands that CBP must routinely update the model to account 
for new trade and travel data and to address any newly 
identified gaps, including airport expansions. Any 
modifications to the model shall be described in the fiscal 
year 2019 budget. To avoid law enforcement and security 
sensitivities, CBP is encouraged to provide staffing 
requirements at the field office level and to continue to work 
with expanding airports on options to alleviate wait times.
    House Report 114-668 encouraged CBP to work with the U.S. 
Department of Agriculture to explore how existing staff can be 
leveraged to better address the agriculture inspection 
workload, such as through the authorization of additional work 
hours or dual certification. The Committee expects the 
Department to continue to work to alleviate personnel 
constraints placed on ports of entry, particularly those on the 
U.S.-Mexico border with regard to phytosanitary certifications 
for exported goods.
    Within 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, 
CBP shall report to the Committee on the following for all 
ports of entry: the methodology for allocating officer overtime 
resources; the overtime funding levels for fiscal years 2015, 
2016, and 2017, at the national, regional, and port of entry 
levels; the number of officers who received overtime pay in 
those years; and the number that reached the overtime cap in 
those years, at the national, regional, and port of entry 
levels. The report should also address the process for 
determining official hours of operation at a port of entry, and 
how the hours might be changed to accommodate airport and 
airline schedules.
    The Committee notes that CBP is taking steps to improve the 
efficiency and effectiveness of its automated cargo processing 
system for tractor-trailers crossing our nation's land borders, 
including launching a proof-of-concept pilot at the Juarez-
Lincoln Port of Entry in Laredo, Texas. The Committee urges CBP 
to continue to prioritize these activities and directs CBP to 
provide a briefing on its efforts to improve automated cargo 
processing for tractor-trailers at land ports of entry not 
later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this Act.
    The Committee reminds CBP that its donation acceptance 
authority requires it to take into account the impact of each 
donation proposal on nearby ports of entry; the operations and 
maintenance costs related to such donation; and the impact of 
the proposed donation on staffing requirements. Donations 
should not have the effect of diverting resources, including 
CBP officers, to one port of entry at the expense of another.
    CBP should provide regular updates on its public website 
regarding its progress in implementing recommendations from GAO 
Report 16-542, Antidumping and Countervailing Duties: CBP 
Action Needed to Reduce Duty Processing Errors and Mitigate 
Nonpayment Risk, and on the status of implementing the 
requirements of Executive Order 13785, Establishing Enhanced 
Collection and Enforcement of Antidumping and Countervailing 
Duties and Violation of Trade and Customs Laws.
    The Committee directs CBP to provide, within 90 days after 
the date of enactment of this Act, a report on the following 
for a representative group of domestic sea ports of entry for 
each of the prior three fiscal years: the estimated value of 
all goods entered for consumption; the percentage of maritime 
cargo scanned with non-intrusive inspection (NII) technology; 
the annual manpower, non-manpower recurring, and non-recurring 
costs incurred, including the number and cost of NII equipment; 
the value and types of contraband interdicted; and annual 
revenue generated in duties, taxes, and fees.
    During testimony before the Committee, a CBP official 
confirmed that, due to space constraints at ports of entry 
along the U.S.-Mexico border, it temporarily denied entry to 
the United States to some individuals who asserted a fear of 
returning to their home countries or an intention to seek 
asylum under U.S. law. More recently, the Committee has become 
aware of allegations that instances of this practice may be 
continuing. While the Committee understands that the OIG is 
reviewing the circumstances of such denials, it urges DHS to 
take appropriate steps to ensure that the United States is 
meeting its legal obligations to asylum seekers, such as 
through guidance to the field reminding officers and agents 
about CBP's legal responsibilities.
    The Committee remains concerned that the agency has adopted 
a policy that disallows drawback claims under section 
1313(j)(2) for refund of taxes imposed on certain imported 
products. As noted in House Report 114-668, CBP is required to 
refund any duties, taxes, and fees imposed on imported products 
if they are later exported or destroyed, or if commercially 
interchangeable products manufactured in the United States are 
subsequently exported. The Committee strongly encourages CBP to 
quickly complete and provide to the Committees the related 
report directed in House Report 114-668.
    Consistent with House Report 114-668, the Committee 
strongly encourages CBP to give priority consideration to an 
application for port of entry status to any user fee airport 
that served at least 75,000 deplaned international passengers 
in the previous calendar year.
    The recommendation includes not less than $11,000,000 for 
the border security deployment program. CBP is encouraged to 
continue to procure license plate reader technology.
    Currently CBP and the Science and Technology Directorate 
are working to assess commercially available drive-through X-
ray imaging systems to determine the operational throughput 
that can be achieved for personal vehicles and commercial cargo 
(trucks and buses) in primary, secondary, and outbound lanes. 
Such technology could significantly advance CBP's ability to 
intercept contraband at the ports of entry by using low to 
medium energy systems that allow a driver to remain in a 
vehicle while the inspection occurs; combination backscatter 
and transmission capability to increase material 
discrimination; under-vehicle inspection that provides a clear 
picture of the undercarriage with the ability to zoom into 
specific spots for a closer view; and smaller footprint 
designs. Not later than 60 days after the date of enactment of 
this Act, CBP shall brief the Committee on the status of the 
assessment, including a plan for demonstrating how promising 
systems would operate at a port of entry and the estimated cost 
of implementing such systems.
    CBP is encouraged to continue its collaboration with the 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) on the re-engineering of 
the FWS Message Set for the Automated Commercial Environment, 
with pilot testing initiated as soon as is feasible. Providing 
a centralized online access point to connect CBP, the trade 
community, and partner government agencies will enhance 
government data collection for international trade transactions 
while expediting cargo processing and protecting against 
prohibited shipments.
    When international airports have insufficient volumes of 
international passenger arrivals to justify the use of non-
reimbursable inspection services by CBP, they obtain such 
services by paying a fee. When a domestic airport is attempting 
to become a User Fee Airport (UFA) so that it can begin 
receiving international flights, it must obtain the support of 
its state governor, develop a business plan, install inspection 
facilities, and complete a Memorandum of Agreement with CBP. 
The Committee encourages CBP to work closely with airports 
applying to become UFAs and provide constructive feedback on 
navigating the UFA process.
    House Report 114-668 required the Department to brief the 
Committee on the results of the Request for Information (RFI) 
soliciting proposals to improve maritime cargo security and 
make progress towards achieving the 100 percent overseas 
scanning requirement, and any promising proposals, best 
practices, and pilots that could be realistically implemented 
within the next two years. To date, the Committee has not 
received the results or a briefing on the RFI responses. 
Therefore, the Committee directs the Department to brief the 
committee on the status the RFI responses no later than 
September 15, 2017.
    The Committee directs CBP to brief the committee within 120 
days of the date of enactment of this Act on a plan to develop 
a risk-based assessment and importer intelligence capability in 
compliance with section 115 of the Trade Facilitation and Trade 
Enforcement Act of 2015 (TFTEA) (Pub. L. 114-125).
    There has been tremendous growth in imported products that 
are certified organic under the United States Department of 
Agriculture (USDA) organic standards. Imported products that 
are certified organic are not currently tracked, so the total 
quantity and origin of imported organic products is unknown. 
The Committee urges CBP to add questions into the Automated 
Commercial Environment to track imported products that are 
certified organic under USDA organic standards.

                         Integrated Operations

    The Committee recommends $1,068,516,000 for Integrated 
Operations, $9,722,000 below the amount requested and 
$36,696,000 above the amount provided for fiscal year 2017. The 
recommendation includes a decrease of $9,722,000 due to the 
repricing of requested FTE for Air and Marine Operations (AMO).
    The Tethered Aerostat Radar System (TARS), which has been a 
critical surveillance capability used to help maintain 
operational control of the U.S. southern border and associated 
air space for over 30 years, has exceeded its intended 
operating service life. The fiscal year 2017 Act provided 
$18,142,000 for the deployment of two TARS technology 
enhancements, to include the field testing of key technologies 
identified in the analysis of alternatives that have performed 
well in Department of Defense (DoD) missions. The Committee 
directs CBP to provide a briefing not later than 60 days after 
the date of enactment of this Act on the status of the field 
test and plans for recapitalization of the system.
    While the Committee believes that UAS provide a vital 
situational awareness capability to CBP, the agency has 
struggled to increase flight hours using the existing fleet. 
Not later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this Act, 
CBP shall brief the Committee on the appropriate number of 
pilots, support personnel, and UAS required to achieve 24/7 
operations on the border. The brief should also address the 
various standards for UAS pilots and how the standards differ 
from those of DoD.

                            Mission Support

    The Committee recommends $1,763,256,000 for Mission 
Support, $3,929,000 below the amount requested and $145,233,000 
above the amount provided in fiscal year 2017.
    To improve oversight on the execution of funding for 
personnel, the Committee expects CBP to submit a report not 
later than 15 days after the end of each month on staffing 
numbers, to include gains and losses by pay period during the 
month.
    With regard to the submission of expenditure plans directed 
under the Office of the Chief Financial Officer heading in 
title I of this report, the Committee directs that CBP's plan 
also include obligation and budget execution data by PPA, sub-
PPA, project, and sub-project or severable end item for multi-
year funding appropriated in prior years; anticipated 
carryover; and the planned obligation of carryover in future 
years until all funds are obligated.
    The Committee encourages the Department to use an 
independent project delivery system to help manage the design, 
construction, and operation of southwest border infrastructure. 
The project delivery system should provide a single common 
operating picture to all federal agencies and contractors 
engaged in the development of infrastructure so that program 
managers can exert appropriate control over factors affecting 
cost, schedule, change orders, unnecessary rework, sensor 
coverage optimization, and eminent domain decisions.
    The Committee continues to direct CBP to report the death 
of any individual in CBP custody or the death of any individual 
subsequent to the use of force by CBP personnel within 24 
hours, including relevant details regarding the circumstances 
of the fatality.
    The Committee is aware of new, innovative technologies, to 
include ocular motor-based technologies, that have been 
deployed internationally to combat insider threats, vet 
immigration and other applications, and can be used together 
with polygraph tests to reduce the time and cost associated 
with pre-employment screening while improving efficiency. The 
Committee directs the Department to review new technologies 
that may be effective in improving the hiring process and 
increasing vetting accuracy, and provide a briefing to the 
Committee on the results not later than 60 days after the date 
of enactment of this Act.
    The Committee remains concerned with the attrition rate 
among CBP officers and agents and understands that compensation 
levels may be contributing to the problem. CBP is directed to 
brief the Committee not later than 60 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act on options to address pay parity relative 
to other DHS components and other federal law enforcement 
agencies, as well as on the potential use of special pays.
    CBP is currently conducting a six-month trial of an 
alternative polygraph exam, the Test for Espionage, Sabotage, 
and Corruption (TES-C), for its law enforcement personnel as 
part of an effort to make the hiring process more efficient and 
effective at weeding out ineligible applicants. The trial was 
initiated because CBP determined that the Law Enforcement Pre-
Employment Test (LEPET), which CBP has used historically, takes 
longer than necessary, imprecisely focuses on CBP's criteria 
for disqualifying past drug use, and is unnecessarily 
adversarial in approach. CBP worked with the National Center 
for Credibility Assessment (NCCA) to adapt an existing exam, 
the Test for Espionage and Sabotage (TES), to focus more 
heavily on corruption, resulting in the NCCA-approved TES-C 
that CBP is currently piloting. As directed by Congress in the 
explanatory statement accompanying Public Law 115-31, CBP 
intends to directly compare the results of using the TES-C with 
those of the LEPET for similar populations to ensure that any 
future adoption of the TES-C on a permanent basis does not 
introduce risk into the hiring process. Separately from the 
TES-C trial, CBP is also taking steps to improve its approach 
to the continuous evaluation of current personnel throughout 
their career at CBP. The Committee expects CBP to be fully 
transparent regarding the results and analysis of the TES-C 
trial, including the posting of all non-sensitive information 
regarding the trial on its public website. A detailed report to 
congressional committees of jurisdiction on the results of the 
trial is due upon its completion.
    The Committee directs DHS to provide a report not later 
than 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act describing 
in detail how it is complying with the Buy American Act and 
Kissel Amendment including what measures it is taking to ensure 
compliance. The report shall also include the following: the 
total number of uniforms purchased in fiscal year 2016 and 
fiscal year 2017; the estimated cost for uniforms to be 
manufactured and produced outside and inside the United States; 
and status of all contracts for uniform procurement.
    The Committee is concerned by a reported increase in 
individuals fraudulently entering the United States on non-
immigrant visas in order to give birth in this country. While 
individuals are welcome to come to the U.S. on a tourist or 
other visa, it is against the law to apply for admission under 
false pretenses. The Committee is also concerned with reports 
that different ports of entry may not be consistently applying 
CBP guidance in this area, allowing individuals seeking to 
exploit the visa process to direct pregnant women to specific 
ports of entry with more lenient admission practices. The 
Committee directs CBP to investigate these fraud allegations 
and take steps to ensure that admission criteria are applied 
uniformly across ports of entry.
    The Committee notes that the Acting Commissioner recently 
directed the formation of a CBP working group to identify 
deficiencies and opportunities for improvement in the ability 
of AMO to satisfy air and marine support requirements for the 
Border Patrol and other departmental components. The Committee 
encourages the working group to ensure that it also considers 
the need for AMO support in critical source and transit zones. 
CBP is directed to provide regular updates on the schedule and 
progress of the working group, and to brief the Committee on 
the recommendations it makes to the Acting Commissioner. Until 
AMO is capable of fulfilling support requirements for the 
Border Patrol, the Committee urges CBP to continue to request 
air surveillance support from DoD through Operation Phalanx.
    The Committee is concerned by reports of the separation of 
some family units after apprehension by CBP or prior to 
crossing the border. CBP should ensure that processing 
decisions consider family unity as a primary factor and, to the 
greatest extent possible, that separated family units are 
reunited prior to removal, release from CBP custody, or 
transfer to ICE or Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) 
custody.
    The Committee is aware of concerns that CBP activities and 
policies may sometimes lack public transparency and may be 
subject to inadequate data collection and reporting. The 
Committee directs CBP to reiterate its commitment to a policy 
of ``maximum disclosure, minimum delay'' in releasing 
information to the media and public; continue to post all 
policies and guidelines that may be of interest to the public 
on the agency's website; and continue--or expand as 
practicable--data collection that more effectively detects and 
deters abuse, strengthens accountability, and ensures effective 
use of limited resources.
    Beginning within 60 days after the date of enactment of 
this Act, CBP shall report to the Committee on the numbers of 
detainees currently held by CBP for more than 48 and 72 hours, 
respectively. This reporting should be updated monthly and 
include a list of all CBP facilities used for holding 
detainees, including the average daily population and daily 
population at the time of publication.
    The recommendation includes $5,000,000, as proposed for 
continued demonstrations and infrastructure investments 
associated with the CBP Camera Technology Initiative. The 
Committee understands that funds provided in the fiscal year 
2017 Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act for 
this program will be used for a Camera Technology Operational 
Demonstration and Evaluation of Incident-Driven Video Recording 
Systems (IVDRS), which combines Body Worn Cameras, Vehicle 
Mounted Cameras, and fixed cameras in selected operational 
environments. CBP plans to evaluate the procured cameras in the 
field setting in the coming months and will continue to develop 
its operational and technical requirements for incident-based 
camera technology, including data infrastructure and security 
needs, policy and privacy considerations, and collective 
bargaining obligations. CBP currently plans to use fiscal year 
2018 funding to finish the IDVRS demonstrations and to support 
an independent evaluation of the program.
    The Committee expects CBP, working with the DHS Office for 
Civil Rights and Civil Liberties and the DHS Privacy Office, to 
establish clear policies on the use of cameras to ensure they 
protect the privacy of both CBP personnel and the public. 
Within 60 days after the date of enactment of this Act, CBP 
shall brief the Committee on its plans for taking the camera 
initiative from the demonstration phase to the operational 
phase. The briefing should also address CBP's policies for how 
and when such devices will be used; how CBP will alert members 
of the public when cameras are in operation; how recorded data 
will be controlled; the period of time such data will be 
retained; and who will have access to such data, including 
individuals recorded and CBP personnel, and under what 
circumstances.
    The recommendation includes $3,307,000 to hire 30 
additional criminal investigators in the Office of Professional 
Responsibility. This funding is in addition to $10,972,000 
provided for 40 additional criminal investigators in the fiscal 
year 2017 Act. These new positions will support the thorough 
vetting of new law enforcement personnel and the timely 
investigation of corruption and use of force allegations 
involving CBP personnel. The Committee directs CBP to make 
information on corruption and use of force allegations publicly 
available on its website, including at a minimum: (1) a 
description of each case reviewed by a national Use of Force 
Review Board (UFRB) and a summary of the UFRB's findings; (2) a 
description of each case addressed through CBP's internal 
review process and a summary of the findings; (3) a statistical 
summary of local UFRB activity; and (4) a description of any 
changes to policy, tactics, or training that were made based on 
CBP's or the UFRB's findings and the timeline for their 
implementation.
    The Committee directs CBP to provide a briefing not later 
than 60 days after the date of enactment of this Act on border 
search authorities and how such authorities are implemented. 
The briefing shall cover federal statutes and regulations that 
allow for the inspection of baggage and merchandise, including 
electronic devices, arriving into the U.S. Customs territory 
from places outside the United States.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $771,017,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................     2,063,719,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     2,008,719,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................    +1,237,702,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................       -55,000,000
 

    The Procurement, Construction, and Improvements (PC&I;) 
appropriation provides funds necessary for the planning, 
operational development, engineering, and purchase of one or 
more assets (end items) prior to sustainment.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $2,008,719,000 for PC&I;, 
$55,000,000 below the amount requested and $1,237,702,000 above 
the amount provided for fiscal year 2017.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget request      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Procurement, Construction, and
 Improvement
    Border Security Assets and         $1,715,163,000     $1,702,163,000
     Infrastructure...............
    Trade and Travel Assets and           109,240,000        109,240,000
     Infrastructure...............
    Integrated Operations Assets
     and Infrastructure
        Airframes and Sensors.....        137,335,000        106,335,000
        Watercraft................          3,573,000          3,573,000
        Other Systems and Assets..         12,200,000          1,200,000
    Construction and Facility              59,775,000         59,775,000
     Improvements.................
    Mission Support Assets and             26,433,000         26,433,000
     Improvements.................
                                   -------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Procurement,         $2,063,719,000     $2,008,719,000
         Construction, and
         Improvements.............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

               Border Security Assets and Infrastructure

    The Committee recommends $1,702,163,000 for Border Security 
Assets and Infrastructure, $13,000,000 below the amount 
requested and $1,169,121,000 above the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2017.
    The recommendation includes the requested $1,571,239,000 
for border infrastructure construction, including: $784,000,000 
for 32 miles of new border fencing in Rio Grande Valley (RGV), 
TX; $498,000,000 for 28 miles of new levee wall in RGV, and 
$251,000,000 for 14 miles of secondary fencing in San Diego, 
CA. This funding is in addition to funding appropriated in 
fiscal year 2017 to replace 40 miles of primary fencing, 
including: $15,000,000 for 2 miles in El Centro, CA; 
$102,000,000 for 14 miles in San Diego, CA; and $175,000,000 
for 24 miles in El Paso, TX.
    ``CBP is directed to post on its website information 
regarding its plans and activities, as appropriate, related to 
the construction of new physical infrastructure along the 
southern border, including related activities of the U.S. Army 
Corps of Engineers (USACE) and the use of funds transferred to 
USACE for such activities.
    Additionally, as requested, the recommendation includes: 
$8,955,000 for Cross Border Tunnel Threat; $17,438,000 for 
Integrated Fixed Towers; $1,600,000 for Mobile Video 
Surveillance Systems; $20,000,000 for Unattended Ground 
Sensors; and $49,738,000 for border road construction. The 
recommendation decreases Remote Video Surveillance Systems due 
to the inability to execute the funds for production in fiscal 
year 2018.

               Trade and Travel Assets and Infrastructure

    The Committee recommends $109,240,000 for Trade and Travel 
Assets and Infrastructure for non-intrusive inspection systems, 
the same as the amount requested and $38,098,000 above the 
amount provided for fiscal year 2017.

            Integrated Operations Assets and Infrastructure

    The Committee recommends $111,108,000 for Integrated 
Operations Assets and Infrastructure, $42,000,000 below the 
amount requested and $4,950,000 below the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2017. As requested, the recommendation includes: 
$55,530,000 for two multi-role enforcement aircraft; $3,300,000 
for FAA Next Generation radar systems; $7,800,000 for various 
sensor upgrades; $14,034,000 for one medium lift helicopter; 
and $13,250,000 for tactical communications. The recommendation 
also includes $12,321,000 for two light enforcement 
helicopters, a reduction of $31,000,000 due to anticipated 
acquisition delays.

                U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement


 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................    $6,435,240,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................     7,565,462,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     7,054,942,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................      +619,702,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................      -510,520,000
 

                                Mission

    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) enforces 
federal laws governing border control, customs, trade, and 
immigration to promote homeland security and public safety.
    Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) is responsible for 
disrupting and dismantling transnational criminal threats 
facing the United States. HSI special agents also conduct 
national security investigations targeting violations of the 
nation's customs and immigration laws. Enforcement and Removal 
Operations (ERO) enforces the nation's immigration laws by 
identifying and apprehending removable aliens, detaining 
apprehended individuals when necessary, and removing them from 
the United States in a manner consistent with legal processes 
and procedures.

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................    $6,405,440,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................     7,512,563,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     7,002,043,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................      +596,603,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................      -510,520,000
 

    The Operations and Support (O&S;) appropriation supports the 
prevention of terrorism, securing the nation's borders, 
enforcing U.S. immigration laws, and safeguarding cyberspace 
through the enforcement of federal laws governing trade and 
travel.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $7,002,043,000 for O&S;, 
$510,520,000 below the amount requested and $596,603,000 above 
the amount provided for fiscal year 2017. Of the total, the 
bill recommends two years of funding availability for the 
amount of $20,000,000 for activities authorized under 18 U.S.C. 
2510-2522, and $13,700,000 for the Visa Security Program and 
investigations abroad.
    The Committee's recommendation promotes the goals of: 
enforcing all immigration and customs laws; investigating and 
dismantling transnational criminal organizations, including 
those that traffic and smuggle people--especially children--as 
well as narcotics, weapons, and other contraband into the 
United States; ascertaining facts about the composition of the 
detained and non-detained alien population in removal 
proceedings and their legal claims; screening 100 percent of 
visa applications; and increasing the size of the workforce.
    The Committee notes that ICE's request for 51,379 detention 
beds was predicated on a combination of several factors, 
including an average daily population (ADP) of over 42,000 
detainees at the start of the fiscal year; a major increase in 
detentions resulting from the addition of 1,000 officers and 
agents; expanded 287(g) participation; and the reinstatement of 
the Secure Communities program. The ADP for the beginning of 
fiscal year 2018 is now projected to be 38,000, and the process 
of hiring and training new personnel will delay any significant 
increase in the number of ICE officers for interior enforcement 
until late in fiscal year 2018. Therefore, the recommendation 
supports an ADP of 44,000, which is an increase of 4,676 beds 
and $704,530,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2017.
    The Committee's recommendation includes full funding for 
the request to hire 1,606 additional officers, agents, and 
support staff. However, ICE's budget request for pay and 
benefits was built on the assumption of ending fiscal year 2017 
with 20,570 personnel onboard and annualized the cost for that 
level of manning to determine the pay baseline for fiscal year 
2018. Given current manning levels, hiring, and attrition, ICE 
will likely fall short of that estimate by over 1,000 
positions, reducing the amount required in fiscal year 2018. 
Therefore, the Committee includes a $92,950,000 decrease to the 
baseline for expected under execution of salary and benefits.
    The Committee is concerned about the findings of the OIG 
regarding over 850 aliens who were granted U.S. citizenship 
even though they had previously been ordered removed under 
another identity (OIG-16-130). At issue was the unavailability 
of digital fingerprint records that could have accurately 
identified these individuals and their ineligibility for 
naturalization. According to the report, ICE has identified 
148,000 older fingerprint records that have not yet been 
digitized for aliens with final deportation orders or who have 
criminal records or are fugitives. Until these records have 
been digitized and included in DHS and FBI fingerprint 
databases, USCIS risks making additional immigration benefit 
decisions without complete information, potentially resulting 
in the naturalization of more individuals who may be ineligible 
for citizenship or who may be trying to obtain U.S. citizenship 
fraudulently. Within 90 days after the date of enactment of 
this Act, ICE shall brief the Committee on its progress in 
digitizing paper based fingerprint records, as well as the 
status of efforts to identify and refer to the Department of 
Justice the individuals identified in the OIG report.
    As noted in title I of this report, the Committee is 
concerned that ICE lacks a comprehensive plan to systematically 
replace vehicles and radios, which are key tools of the trade 
for law enforcement officers. Over 3,800 vehicles operated by 
HSI, representing 50 percent of the HSI fleet, are eligible for 
replacement based on age or mileage, and 11,000 vehicular and 
mobile radios will be obsolete by the year 2020 because the 
manufacturer no longer produces them and will not guarantee the 
availability of parts by that time. The estimated cost to 
replace these assets exceeds $190,000,000, a bill neither the 
Department nor the Congress can afford to provide in a lump 
sum. With the projected growth in the size of the investigative 
force, this requirement will only increase over time. Within 60 
days after the date of enactment of this Act, ICE shall brief 
the Committee on its plans to recapitalize and replace vehicles 
and radios.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget request      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Support
    Homeland Security
     Investigations
        Domestic Investigations...     $1,798,095,000     $1,810,095,000
        International                     140,873,000        158,873,000
         Investigations...........
        Intelligence..............         79,905,000         79,905,000
                                   -------------------------------------
            Subtotal, Homeland          2,018,873,000      2,048,873,000
             Security
             Investigations.......
    Enforcement and Removal
     Operations
        Custody Operations........      3,601,472,000      3,240,596,000
        Fugitive Operations.......        184,668,000        184,668,000
        Criminal Alien Program....        412,080,000        412,080,000
        Alternatives to Detention.        177,700,000        177,700,000
        Transportation and Removal        484,894,000        398,200,000
         Program..................
                                   -------------------------------------
            Subtotal, Enforcement       4,860,814,000      4,413,244,000
             and Removal
             Operations...........
    Mission Support...............        350,391,000        350,391,000
    Office of the Principal Legal         282,485,000        282,485,000
     Advisor......................
    Adjustment to Base Pay                      - - -        -92,950,000
     Reduction....................
                                   -------------------------------------
            Total, Operations and      $7,512,563,000     $7,002,043,000
             Support..............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    Homeland Security Investigations

    The Committee recommends $2,048,873,000 for HSI, 
$30,000,000 above the request and $24,320,000 below the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2017.
    Domestic Investigations. The Committee recommends a total 
of $1,810,095,000 for Domestic Investigations for high-priority 
mission areas, including activities at the Child Exploitation 
Unit at the Cyber Crime Center and Operation Angel Watch; 
commercial fraud and intellectual property rights enforcement; 
anti-proliferation; gangs and transnational criminal 
organizations; cybercrimes investigations; and anti-terrorism 
activities.
    The Committee notes that the fiscal year 2018 request did 
not include funding within Domestic Investigations to sustain 
enhancements for programs of ongoing congressional interest, 
such as the Angel Watch Center, the Child Exploitation Unit, 
and human trafficking investigations. It has been clear through 
report language and increased funding that these programs are a 
Committee priority. The recommendation includes $12,000,000 to 
sustain these programs at fiscal year 2017 levels. ICE is 
directed to maintain the increased levels of effort for all 
high-priority mission areas, including child exploitation and 
human trafficking activities, when preparing its budget 
submission for fiscal year 2019.
    Within the amount provided, not less than $5,000,000 is to 
enhance the Angel Watch Center and investigations into severe 
forms of human trafficking, and to expand investigations 
against suspected human traffickers. The Committee encourages 
ICE to work with appropriate nonprofit organizations and victim 
service providers to improve the training of ICE officers in 
the field to assist in the identification of human trafficking 
victims and provide appropriate referrals to victim service 
organizations.
    Not less than $305,000 is to promote public awareness of 
the child pornography tip line and not less than $15,770,000 is 
for investigations of forced labor law violations, to include 
forced child labor. ICE is directed to continue to submit an 
annual report on expenditures and performance metrics 
associated with forced labor law enforcement activities.
    Of the amount provided, not less than $5,000,000 is to 
enhance child exploitation investigations. The Committee 
strongly supports the Human Exploitation Rescue Operative 
(HERO) Child-Rescue Corps, a partnership among HSI and the U.S. 
Special Operations Command, and the National Association to 
Protect Children. Under this program, wounded and injured 
Special Operations Forces veterans are trained in high-tech 
computer forensics and law enforcement to support 
investigations into online child sexual exploitation. HERO 
interns who graduate from the program are placed into full-time 
positions with ICE, other federal, state, and local law 
enforcement agencies, and other organizations that require 
personnel with specialized computer forensic skills. The 
Committee directs ICE to sustain prior year enhancements for 
dedicated personnel and funding for the HERO program and 
related Computer Forensic Analyst positions focused on child 
exploitation investigations. In addition, ICE should continue 
to train at least two classes of HEROs annually through the 
program and employ HERO graduates at ICE or place them with 
other agencies or organizations with related missions. The 
Committee continues to support the concept of instituting a 
paid apprenticeship in lieu of the current unpaid internship 
for HERO participants, and directs ICE to brief the Committee 
on options for establishing paid apprenticeships within 30 days 
after the date of enactment of this Act.
    The recommendation includes $15,000,000 for intellectual 
property enforcement through HSI, including the National 
Intellectual Property Rights Coordination Center (NIPRCC). The 
Committee directs ICE to ensure that the NIPRCC is properly 
staffed in order to facilitate continued enforcement actions 
against theft of U.S. intellectual property, particularly 
online.
    Based on a new wave of digital copyright piracy involving 
devices and software that connect consumers' televisions 
directly to copyright-theft sites, the Committee also directs 
ICE to increase investigation and enforcement to thwart illicit 
streaming involving media boxes and televisions. In addition, 
the next iteration of the annual report on federal intellectual 
property enforcement activities required by the Prioritizing 
Resources and Organization for Intellectual Property Act of 
2008 (15 U.S.C 8114) should provide specific details regarding 
online copyright piracy enforcement activities.
    International Investigations. The Committee recommends 
$158,873,000 for International Investigations, $18,000,000 
above the request and $162,000 below the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2017.
    This funding enables HSI agents in 62 offices in 46 
countries to conduct law enforcement activities and provide 
investigative support to domestic offices in combating 
transnational crime focusing on human smuggling and 
trafficking; trafficking of narcotics, money, weapons, and 
sensitive technologies; and sexual exploitation of children, 
including child sex tourism. HSI partners with foreign and 
domestic counterparts to conduct international law enforcement 
operations and support removals from the United States.
    Within the total for International Investigations, the 
Committee recommends $32,128,000 for the Visa Security Program 
(VSP), $18,000,000 above the request.
    VSP currently screens visa applicants at 32 visa-issuing 
posts in 28 countries to protect the U.S. against terrorists 
and criminal organizations by preventing foreign nationals who 
pose a threat to national security from entering or residing 
within the United States. ICE agents collaborate with their 
security and intelligence partners to enhance existing 
information and identify previously unknown threats, instead of 
solely denying travel to suspect travelers.
    ICE is directed to continue to expand the VSP program where 
operationally feasible at high threat posts abroad and to fully 
program and budget for this sustained level of operations and 
growth in its fiscal year 2019 budget request.

                   Enforcement and Removal Operations

    The Committee recommends $4,413,244,000 for ERO, 
$447,570,000 below the amount requested and $704,530,000 above 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2017. The recommendation 
enables ERO to successfully execute its mission of enforcing 
the nation's immigration laws by identifying and apprehending 
removable aliens, detaining apprehended individuals when 
necessary, and removing them from the United States in a manner 
consistent with legal processes and procedures.
    The Committee fully supports ICE's efforts to enhance 
public safety in the interior of the United States through 
enforcement of immigration laws and believes doing so 
strengthens the security of the nation. The Committee 
understands it is ICE's policy that enforcement actions at 
sensitive locations--identified as schools, healthcare 
facilities, places of worship, religious or civil ceremonies or 
observances, and public demonstrations--should generally be 
avoided, and require either prior approval from an appropriate 
supervisory official or exigent circumstances necessitating 
immediate action. The policy is intended to ensure that anyone 
seeking to participate in activities or utilize services 
provided at such locations are free to do so without fear or 
hesitation. The Committee expects ICE to continue to follow 
this policy, which balances the requirement to enforce the law 
with impacts these actions may have on communities.
    Section 9 of Executive Order 13768, Enhancing Public Safety 
in the Interior of the United States, authorizes the Secretary 
to designate jurisdictions not in compliance with 8 U.S.C. 1373 
as sanctuary jurisdictions. Under 8 U.S.C. 1373, state or local 
government entities or officials are prohibited from 
restricting any government entity or official from sending ICE 
information regarding the citizenship or immigration status of 
any individual in their custody. Jurisdictions that fail to 
cooperate with federal immigration authorities, by practice, 
policy, or local statute, threaten the nation's security by 
releasing criminal aliens, some of whom may be violent or 
otherwise dangerous, back into local communities. This practice 
places ICE and other law enforcement officers in personal 
jeopardy, requiring them to track down and apprehend dangerous 
aliens in a non-secure environment. The Committee encourages 
the Secretary to make public the criteria by which designations 
under section 9 of Executive Order 13768 will be made, 
including how compliance with 8 U.S.C. 1373 will be determined 
and any additional criteria.
    The Committee is aware that some jurisdictions are 
concerned that providing information to ICE on individuals in 
their custody or participating in certain custody transfers 
might harm relationships with their communities, potentially 
reducing the reporting of criminal acts by victims and 
witnesses, and that some jurisdictions have questioned whether 
they have the legal authority to continue holding individuals 
on the basis of an ICE detainer. While working to expand the 
number of jurisdictions that comply with ICE detainers, ICE 
should also continue to work with law enforcement agencies 
(LEA) that are willing to notify ICE prior to releasing 
individuals who are enforcement priorities. To the extent that 
notifications have not always provided ICE with enough advance 
warning to take custody of criminal aliens, ICE should continue 
working with such LEAs to ensure that notifications are made in 
a more timely fashion.
    Executive Order 13768 also eliminated the Priority 
Enforcement Program (PEP) and reinstated the Secure Communities 
program. The essential distinction between the two programs is 
the manner in which ICE seeks the transfer of individuals into 
its custody from local LEAs. Under Secure Communities, ICE 
issues detainers to LEAs, requesting that they maintain custody 
of individuals identified by ICE as enforcement priorities for 
up to 48 hours beyond the time the individuals would otherwise 
be released. Under PEP, ICE primarily issued requests that LEAs 
notify ICE prior to the time when such individuals would 
normally be released, although detainers were still issued 
under some circumstances. Within 90 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act, and monthly thereafter, the Director of 
ICE shall submit to the Committee a Secure Communities report, 
including the number of detainer requests issued, actual 
custody transfers to ICE, and releases by state and local law 
enforcement jurisdiction, criminal category, conviction status, 
date of any conviction, immigration status, gender, country of 
citizenship, and enforcement priority, and shall make this 
information publicly available on its website.
    In accordance with 8 U.S.C. 1232(c)(2)(B), ICE is required 
to take custody of any unaccompanied alien child who reaches 
the age of 18 while in the custody of the Office of Refugee 
Resettlement (ORR) and place them in the least restrictive 
setting available after taking into account the alien's danger 
to self, danger to the community, risk of flight, and any 
recommendations in ORR's post-18 plan for that individual. The 
Committee directs ICE to provide semi-annual updates to the 
Committee on the number of unaccompanied alien children who 
turn 18 while in ORR custody and are subsequently transferred 
to ICE. The first update, due within 60 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act, shall include a description of the 
Juvenile Coordinator's methodology for determining placement in 
the least restrictive setting available and for considering an 
alien's risk to self or the community, risk of flight, and 
post-18 plan. Each update shall delineate transfers by ICE area 
of responsibility and most recent category of ORR placement, 
and shall detail ICE's placement decision (detention, ATD, 
Order of Supervision, or own recognizance) for each alien.
    ICE is currently evaluating the use of body-worn cameras 
for potential use in its field enforcement activities, and 
notes that such cameras can be important tools for both holding 
law enforcement personnel accountable and for exonerating 
officers accused of wrongdoing. As ICE continues this 
assessment, the Committee notes that CBP has begun an 
initiative to incorporate body-worn cameras into its 
enforcement activities, and encourages ICE to consult with CBP 
to identify lessons learned related to use protocols and data 
access and retention.
    Custody Operations. The Committee recommends $3,240,596,000 
for Custody Operations, $360,876,000 below the request and 
$535,184,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2017. As 
noted above, the recommendation supports an average daily 
detained population of 44,000 aliens.
    Presently, 9.2 percent of the detained population is housed 
in ICE-owned Service Processing Centers (SPC). The remaining 
detention capacity is provided through contracts with private 
sector detention facility companies or through Inter-
Governmental Service Agreements (IGSAs) with state and local 
governments and law enforcement agencies. Due to the high up-
front costs associated with expanding SPCs, the Committee 
understands that increases to detention capacity during fiscal 
year 2018 will be achieved through an expansion of private 
sector contracts and IGSAs.
    ICE is directed to make public all final detention facility 
inspection reports within 60 days of inspection; complete and 
make public an initial report regarding any in-custody death 
within 30 days of such death, with subsequent reporting to be 
completed and released within 60 days of the initial report 
unless additional time is required for redacting personally 
identifiable information; make public a full list, updated 
monthly, of all facilities in use for detention of adults and/
or children, including the average daily population, the type 
of contract, the governing detention standards, and the 
complement of on-board medical and mental health personnel; 
ensure that non-governmental organizations are provided 
independent and timely access to all facilities for the purpose 
of providing representation, legal education, and programming, 
and for purposes of monitoring and visitation; and update 
detainee location information in the ICE Detainee Online 
Locator system within 48 hours of detention and 24 hours of 
completion of any transfer.
    Of the 199 facilities used by ICE for detention operations, 
150 are designated as over-72 hour facilities, including ICE-
owned SPCs, contract detention facilities (CDFs), and 
facilities accessed through IGSAs with local jurisdictions. ICE 
has IGSAs with another 49 local and county jails where 
detention is limited to 72 or fewer hours. Currently, 57 
percent of the detained population is held in over-72 hour 
facilities that meet the 2011 Performance Based National 
Detention Standards (PBNDS). ICE has indicated that its goal is 
to bring the percentage of the detained population subject to 
the 2011 PBNDS up to 80 percent over the next few years.
    In fiscal year 2018, ICE is proposing to move to a 
different detention facility framework, consisting of Under 
Seven-Day (USD) facilities; Over Seven-Day (OSD) facilities; 
and Dedicated Over Seven-Day (DOSD) facilities. USD facilities 
would include those currently designated as under 72-hour 
facilities, along with other local or county facilities--
primarily in rural areas where temporary housing is required to 
facilitate an imminent removal or while ICE arranges placement 
in a longer term facility. Non-dedicated OSD facilities would 
also include local and county jails, while DOSDs would consist 
of SPCs, CDFs, and other dedicated facilities accessed through 
IGSAs. DOSDs would adhere to the 2011 PBNDS, while USD and non-
dedicated OSD facilities would be held to a subset of those 
standards.
    While the Committee understands that ICE's intention in 
adopting this new framework is to increase its flexibility in 
managing the detained population and ensure the availability of 
detention capacity, it is concerned about the potential impact 
on detention standards. If ICE proceeds in establishing this 
new framework, it should adopt specific detention standards for 
USD and OSD facilities that are developed through a transparent 
process, such as the informal comment and roundtable process 
the agency employed when developing the 2008 PBNDS.
    Within 60 days after the date of enactment of this Act, ICE 
shall brief the Committee on the status of its plan to move to 
an alternative detention facility framework, including details 
regarding its stakeholder outreach efforts as described above; 
specifics on detention standards for new categories of 
detention facilities; and how inspections for each category of 
facility will be conducted, including any improvements to 
current inspection processes.
    Under departmental regulations to implement Prison Rape 
Elimination Act (PREA) standards, all new, renewed, or 
substantively modified detention facility contracts must 
include a requirement that the facility adhere to such 
standards. ICE has now incorporated those standards into 
facility contracts representing 64 percent of its average daily 
population in detention, and will continue to expand the 
covered population as contracts are signed, renewed, or 
modified. Within 60 days after the date of enactment of this 
Act, ICE shall brief the Committee on its planned schedule for 
achieving 100 percent compliance with PREA requirements, the 
results of completed PREA audits, and an assessment of whether 
the standards are effective in protecting sensitive 
populations, such as transgender individuals and those with 
disabilities. The Committee again encourages ICE to consider 
collaborating with the National PREA Resource Center, which is 
supported by the Department of Justice, to help facilitate PREA 
compliance.
    ICE is directed to provide a report not later than 90 days 
after the date of enactment of this Act detailing the number 
and type of detention contracts and IGSAs in effect and all 
costs associated with them.
    The Committee expects ICE to apply the terms of the Lyon v. 
ICE, et al. Settlement Agreement regarding detainee telephone 
access to all of its detention facilities to the greatest 
extent possible, and directs ICE to brief the Committee on the 
status of ensuring such access within 90 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act.
    ICE is expected to ensure that individuals being 
transferred from CBP to ICE custody, in ICE custody, or under 
ICE supervision have opportunities to report family separation 
incidents and to verify the status, location, and disposition 
of family members. ICE should also ensure that field officers 
are appropriately trained on the requirements of ICE's Parental 
Interest Directive and on mechanisms to reunite family units. 
ICE shall not rescind or change the policies contained in this 
directive.
    ICE is directed to notify the Committee prior to releasing 
any illegal immigrants in custody due to budgetary reasons, 
including an explanation of how ICE assessed the potential risk 
to the community and the risk of absconding associated with the 
release.
    Fugitive Operations. The Committee recommends $184,668,000 
for Fugitive Operations, the same as the amount requested and 
$32,873,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2017. The 
recommendation fully supports the current operational level of 
Fugitive Operations teams. The Committee expects Fugitive 
Operations to continue to prioritize the apprehension and 
removal of criminal aliens and those individuals who pose a 
risk to national security and public safety, as described in 
Executive Order 13768.
    Criminal Alien Program. The Committee recommends 
$412,080,000 for the Criminal Alien Program (CAP), the same as 
the amount requested and $99,730,000 above the amount provided 
in fiscal year 2017. The Committee expects CAP to continue to 
prioritize the removal of criminal aliens and those individuals 
who pose a risk to national security and public safety.
    Section 287(g) of the Immigration and Nationality Act 
authorizes ICE to enter into memoranda of understanding with 
state and local law enforcement entities, through which ICE 
delegates limited authority to enforce federal immigration laws 
within their jurisdictions under ICE's direct supervision. 
These agreements serve as an extension of CAP by directly 
supporting ICE's efforts to determine the immigration status of 
individuals taken into custody by local law enforcement in the 
course of their normal law enforcement duties. The Committee 
supports ICE's efforts to increase the number of state and 
local law enforcement entities participating in the 287(g) 
program in order to identify criminal aliens and recommends the 
requested level of $24,321,000 to support the program.
    As ICE expands the number of jurisdictions participating in 
the 287(g) program, it must maintain processes to monitor the 
performance and oversight of 287(g)-designated officers, make 
program transparency a high priority, and proactively address 
stakeholder concerns. The Committee expects the Office of 
State, Local, and Tribal Cooperation to continue outreach and 
communications to public stakeholders, and directs ICE to 
continue to require the establishment and regular use of 
steering committees for each jurisdiction, including the 
participation of external stakeholders. Steering committees are 
focused on improving program oversight and direction; 
identifying challenges and concerns; increasing transparency; 
and providing stakeholders and community leaders opportunities 
to communicate community-level perspectives.
    The Committee also expects ICE, the Office of Inspector 
General, and the Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties to 
continue providing rigorous oversight of the 287(g) program, 
and directs ICE to notify the Committee prior to implementing 
any significant changes to the program, including any changes 
to training requirements, data collection, or selection 
criteria.
    ICE is directed to provide an annual report to the 
Committee on the 287(g) program, due not later than 60 days 
after the end of each fiscal year, including details on 
steering committee membership and activities for participating 
jurisdictions; performance data, including nationality, level 
of criminality, and enforcement priority level of individuals 
placed into removal proceedings by 287(g)-designated officers; 
and any plans for future expansion of or changes to the 
program.
    Alternatives to Detention. The Committee recommends 
$177,700,000 for Alternatives to Detention (ATD), the same as 
the amount requested and $5,575,000 below the amount provided 
for fiscal year 2017. The recommendation supports an average 
daily population of 79,000 participants in the program, which 
places low-risk aliens under various degrees of supervision or 
electronic monitoring, in lieu of detention, to ensure their 
appearance at immigration hearings and for removal.
    The Committee supports the use of effective alternatives to 
detention for appropriate detainee populations but remains 
concerned with the lack of timely data on participant 
compliance with release conditions. This lack of data denies 
the Committee the ability to accurately assess the 
effectiveness of the program when considering the 
prioritization of limited resources. ICE is directed to 
continue to provide performance reports to the Committee on the 
ATD program, as described in House Report 114-668.
    The Committee is aware that ICE recently discontinued its 
family case management pilot (FCMP) within the ATD program. 
According to ICE, while some aspects of the pilot showed 
promise for increased compliance, it determined that the 
initial performance data did not warrant continuing the pilot 
given its higher cost compared to the standard intensive 
supervision program.
    To improve compliance rates under the standard ATD program, 
ICE should consider incorporating some of the beneficial 
elements of the FCMP, such as requiring a legal orientation 
briefing for participants. Further, because personal 
interactions with a case manager appear to improve compliance 
rates, ICE should dedicate additional personnel to the ATD 
technology-only program to increase the ratio of supervisory 
officers to ATD participants. Finally, ICE should explore 
opportunities to continue working with community-based 
organizations that directly provide case management services, 
including referrals to services already available in the 
community that are associated with higher ATD compliance rates.
    Transportation and Removal Program. The Committee 
recommends $398,200,000 for the Transportation and Removal 
Program, $86,694,000 below the amount requested and $42,318,000 
above the amount provided in fiscal year 2017. The 
recommendation supports an ADP of 44,000.
    The Committee expects DHS to continue to repatriate 
removable individuals in a manner that ensures their safety, 
including continued adherence to Local Repatriation 
Arrangements with the Government of Mexico. Consistent with 
prior years, ICE shall also continue submitting semi-annual 
reports to the Committees on the removal of parents of U.S. 
citizen minors.

                            Mission Support

    The Committee recommends $350,391,000 for Mission Support, 
the same as the amount requested and $14,142,000 below the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2017. The Committee remains 
troubled by ICE's approach to budgeting for service-wide costs 
(SWC), such as rent, overtime, utilities, and security. 
Although SWC are managed centrally by the Management and 
Administration directorate, SWC are included in the budgets of 
the programs and components. ICE then obligates funds for these 
costs using post-enactment assessments against the 
appropriations of agency components and programs. Burying SWC 
in mission budgets makes oversight by ICE leadership and 
Congress significantly more difficult, contributing to 
unchecked cost growth. For the fiscal year 2019 budget, ICE is 
directed to reflect SWC in appropriate Mission Support sub-PPAs 
or through one or more new SWC PPAs within Mission Support, and 
to provide separate budget estimates and detailed 
justifications for all SWC.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................       $29,800,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................        52,899,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        52,899,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       +23,099,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

    ICE's Procurement, Construction, and Improvements (PC&I;) 
appropriation provides funds necessary for the planning, 
operational development, engineering, and purchase of 
headquarters and operational assets prior to the sustainment 
phase. ICE programs funded through PC&I; support the 
improvement, deployment, and modernization of facilities and 
information technology applications, systems, and 
infrastructure, which enable ICE to administer and enforce 
customs and immigration laws.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $52,899,000 for PC&I;, the same as 
the amount requested and $23,099,000 above the amount provided 
in fiscal year 2017.
    The Committee directs CBP and ICE to continue semi-annual 
briefings on efforts to modernize the TECS system, which is 
used for immigration enforcement case management and for 
screening and determinations related to admissibility to the 
United States.

                 Transportation Security Administration


 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................    $7,316,140,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................     7,091,669,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     7,156,378,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................      -159,762,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................       +64,709,000
 

                                Mission

    The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is charged 
with protecting U.S. transportation systems, while ensuring the 
freedom of movement of people and commerce.

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................    $7,105,047,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................     7,018,165,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     7,082,874,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       -22,173,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................       +64,709,000
 

    The Operations and Support (O&S;) appropriation funds TSA's 
operating salaries and expenses. This appropriation provides 
funding for TSA screening operations, including in-flight 
security, a strong security regulation and enforcement presence 
on-site at the nation's commercial airports, multi-modal 
regulation compliance inspections and deterrence programs, and 
support for operational and headquarters personnel, systems, 
and infrastructure.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $7,082,874,000 for O&S;, 
$64,709,000 above the amount requested and $22,173,000 below 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2017. Funds within this 
account are partially offset through the collection of aviation 
security fees. Of the total, the bill recommends two years of 
funding availability for $1,770,719,000, to provide flexibility 
for TSA in managing its screening workforce.
    The fiscal year 2018 President's budget request assumes 
$500,000,000 in new revenue collections generated by an 
increase in aviation passenger security fees as a further 
offset to TSA's discretionary appropriations. The 
recommendation does not reflect the implementation of the 
Administration's proposal, as it requires new authorization 
legislation that has not been enacted and is not under the 
jurisdiction of the Committee.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget Request      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Support
    Aviation Screening Operations
        Screening Workforce
            Screening Partnership        $175,580,000       $175,580,000
             Program..............
            Screener Personnel,         3,128,064,000      3,205,064,000
             Compensation, and
             Benefits.............
            Screener Training and         233,061,000        233,061,000
             Other................
        Airport Management........        643,797,000        643,797,000
        Canines...................        151,764,000        151,764,000
        Screening Technology              387,882,000        387,882,000
         Maintenance..............
        Secure Flight.............        102,763,000        102,763,000
                                   -------------------------------------
                Subtotal, Aviation      4,822,911,000      4,899,911,000
                 Screening
                 Operations.......
    Other Operations and
     Enforcement
        Inflight Security
            Federal Air Marshals..        803,905,000        788,855,000
            Federal Flight Deck            19,514,000         22,273,000
             Officer and Crew
             Training.............
        Aviation Regulation.......        173,535,000        173,535,000
        Air Cargo.................        102,721,000        102,721,000
        Intelligence and TSOC.....         79,790,000         79,790,000
        Surface Programs..........         86,316,000         86,316,000
        Vetting Programs..........         60,215,000         60,215,000
                                   -------------------------------------
                Subtotal, Other         1,325,996,000      1,313,705,000
                 Operations and
                 Support..........
    Mission Support...............        869,258,000        869,258,000
                                   -------------------------------------
                Total, Operations       7,018,165,000      7,082,874,000
                 and Support
                 (gross)..........
    Aviation Passenger Security        -2,470,000,000     -2,470,000,000
     Fees (offsetting collections)
    Passenger Security Fee               -500,000,000              - - -
     Increase (offsetting
     collections) (legislative
     proposal)....................
                                   -------------------------------------
    Total, Operations and Support      $4,048,165,000     $4,612,874,000
     (net)........................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                     Aviation Screening Operations

    The Committee recommends $4,899,911,000 for Aviation 
Screening Operations, $77,000,000 above the amount requested 
and $148,195,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2017. 
The increase above the request is to maintain existing TSA 
staffing at airport exit lanes, as required by law.
    The Committee is concerned that, despite the continued 
upward trend in air travel, TSA continues to use artificially 
low estimates for anticipated growth in passenger volume when 
developing its Transportation Security Officer staffing 
requirements, resulting in multiple reprogramming actions in 
the year of execution to address rising wait times, or Congress 
appropriating additional funds above the budget request to 
address these unrealistic assumptions. The Committee supports 
TSA's efforts to seek innovative improvements in efficiency and 
security, and not solely relying on increases in staffing and 
overtime to address growth in air travel. Unless the agency 
uses realistic projections when developing its budget request, 
however, it will simply continue to set itself up for failure.
    TSA shall ensure that its aviation screening processes take 
into consideration the privacy and civil liberties interests of 
passengers and crews, consistent with applicable laws, 
regulations, and guidance. House Report 114-668 directed TSA to 
explore methods of data collection and analysis related to the 
referral of individuals for secondary screenings as a way to 
ensure its screening practices guard against profiling based on 
race, national origin, or religion. The Committee directs TSA 
to provide a briefing, not later than 90 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act, on its analysis of data collection 
methods and the feasibility of releasing such data to the 
public at the end of each fiscal year.
    The Committee is concerned by multiple reports of airport 
employees with access to secure areas who have used their 
positions to commit criminal acts or become associated with 
terrorist organizations. The Committee encourages TSA to review 
its existing employee credentialing processes and airport 
access control protocols to reduce this vulnerability, 
including the costs, benefits, and feasibility of deploying 
additional physical infrastructure, technology, security 
staffing, and/or screening of personnel prior to accessing 
sterile areas.
    The Committee has long supported the use of explosives 
detection canine teams and has consistently added funding to 
expand TSA's deployment of these effective assets. The 
recommendation supports a total of 1,047 canine teams, 
including the 50 teams added in fiscal year 2017. TSA shall 
brief the Committees not later than 90 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act on its canine requirements and plans for 
expanding the program, including efforts to further increase 
training capacity at the Canine Training Center at Joint Base 
San Antonio-Lackland.
    In accordance with the direction and funding in Public Law 
115-31, TSA is in the process of establishing a third party 
canine certification program for air cargo that will begin 
operating in fiscal year 2018. Although TSA requested no 
resources in the fiscal year 2018 budget for this new program, 
the Committee understands the funds provided in fiscal year 
2017 for this purpose will adequately support TSA's first-year 
implementation costs. The Committee expects to see funding for 
the third party canine program included in the fiscal year 2019 
budget request.
    TSA should review its methodology for the deployment of 
stand-alone explosives detection systems to determine whether 
to consider additional factors that may contribute to an 
airport's requirement for these systems, such as customer 
service, airline logistics, existing belt system design, 
exclusive airline use areas, and recent infrastructure 
investment.
    The Committee commends TSA on the success of its Public 
Area Security Summits, which bring together issue-area experts, 
industry professionals, and government officials to share best 
practices and craft innovative solutions for protecting the 
public areas of airports. The Committee encourages the group to 
continue to work toward integrating plans for communications 
and operations centers through its Public Area Security 
National Framework, which is a critical tool for helping 
airports enhance their threat prevention systems.

                    Other Operations and Enforcement

    The Committee recommends $1,313,705,000 for Other 
Operations and Enforcement, $12,291,000 below the amount 
requested and $93,786,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2017.
    Within the recommendation is $788,855,000 for the Federal 
Air Marshal Service (FAMS), $15,050,000 below the request and 
$14,098,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2017 due 
to projected underexecution of personnel funds.
    The recommendation also includes $22,273,000 for the 
Federal Flight Deck Officer and Flight Crew Training (FFDO) 
program, an increase of $2,759,000 above the request and the 
same as the amount provided in fiscal year 2017, to maximize 
FLETC training capacity for FFDO pilots and to procure 
additional equipment to support increased participation in the 
program. The Committee directs TSA to provide a briefing not 
later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this Act on 
FFDO enrollment, training, and recertification.
    The Committee encourages TSA to continue to work with its 
government and industry partners to educate stakeholders and 
advance the deployment of an emergency-ready tracking system 
for highway security-sensitive materials.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $206,093,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................        53,314,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        53,314,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................      -152,779,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

    The Procurement, Construction, and Improvements (PC&I;) 
appropriation provides funds, above certain threshold amounts, 
necessary for the manufacture, purchase, or enhancement of one 
or more assets prior to sustainment.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $53,314,000 for PC&I;, the same as 
the amount requested and $152,779,000 below the amount provided 
in fiscal year 2017. The reduction below fiscal year 2017 is 
due to the transfer of funding requested for personnel and 
operations and sustainment activities from the PC&I; 
appropriation to the O&S; appropriation, consistent with the 
guidance in the DHS Financial Policy Manual and the direction 
in the explanatory statement accompanying Public Law 115-31.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget request      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Procurement, Construction, and
 Improvements
    Aviation Screening
     Infrastructure
        Checkpoint Support........         $4,019,000         $4,019,000
        Checked Baggage...........         33,004,000         33,004,000
    Infrastructure for Other
     Operations
        Vetting Programs..........         16,291,000         16,291,000
                                   -------------------------------------
            Total, Procurement,           $53,314,000        $53,314,000
             Construction, and
             Improvements.........
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                   Aviation Screening Infrastructure

    As requested, the Committee recommends $37,023,000 for 
Aviation Screening Infrastructure, $133,387,000 below the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2017.
    The Committee supports TSA's efforts to deploy next 
generation capabilities, such as computed tomography systems, 
to checkpoints. However, as existing technology in the field 
begins to reach the end of its useful life, TSA must ensure 
detection capabilities are maintained until these next 
generation systems are ready to be deployed. Further, any 
acquisition of new systems must appropriately adhere to the 
Federal Acquisition Regulation guidance regarding the use of 
competitive procedures.
    Any award by TSA to deploy explosives detection systems 
shall be based on risk, the airport's current reliance on other 
screening solutions, lobby congestion resulting in increased 
security concerns, high injury rates, airport readiness, and 
increased cost effectiveness.
    As directed in the explanatory statement accompanying 
Public Law 114-113, TSA has established a seven-step plan to 
solicit, review, and validate airport requests for 
reimbursement for the cost of in-line baggage screening systems 
installed prior to 2008. TSA is currently in the process of 
validating project cost information submitted by airports to 
determine allowable and allocable expenses, and anticipates 
having a finalized airport reimbursement list by November 2017. 
Upon finalization, TSA shall brief the Committee on next steps, 
including an anticipated date by which TSA expects to begin 
reimbursement of validated claims.

                  Infrastructure for Other Operations

    As requested, the Committee recommends $16,291,000 for 
Infrastructure for Other Operations, $9,991,000 above the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2017.
    TSA is directed to provide an update on the Technology 
Infrastructure Modernization program not later than 60 days 
after the date of enactment of this Act.

                        RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................        $5,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................        20,190,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        20,190,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       +15,190,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

    Research and Development (R&D;) funds necessary technology 
demonstration, prototype testing, and system development in 
support of TSA's passenger, baggage, and intermodal screening 
functions.

                             Recommendation

    As requested, the Committee recommends $20,190,000 for R&D;, 
$15,190,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2017.
    The Committee supports TSA's work with the Innovation Task 
Force to facilitate collaboration among TSA, industry 
stakeholders, and airports to develop, test, and deploy new 
screening technologies and other innovative airport security 
solutions. TSA is directed to brief the Committee on the status 
of these efforts within 90 days after the date of enactment of 
this Act.

                              Coast Guard


 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................   $10,454,511,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................    10,441,258,000
Recommended in the bill...............................    10,486,258,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       +31,747,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................       +45,000,000
 

                                Mission

    The Coast Guard is the principal federal agency charged 
with maritime safety, security, and stewardship. The Coast 
Guard is a military, multi-mission, maritime service within the 
Department of Homeland Security and one of the nation's five 
armed services. The core roles of the Coast Guard are to 
protect the public, the environment, and U.S. economic and 
security interests in any maritime region in which those 
interests may be at risk, including international waters and 
America's coasts, ports, and inland waterways. Both the Arctic 
and the Antarctic regions fall within the scope of Coast Guard 
responsibilities.

                           OPERATING EXPENSES

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017\1\....................    $7,079,628,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018\2\...................     7,213,464,000
Recommended in the bill\3\............................     7,163,464,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       +83,836,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................       -50,000,000
 
\1\Includes funding for the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT)/Overseas
  Contingency Operations (OCO).
\2\Funding for the Coast Guard related to GWOT/OCO is requested under
  Navy, Operations and Maintenance.
\3\Does not include funding for GWOT/OCO.

    The Operating Expenses (OE) appropriation funds the Coast 
Guard's 11 statutory missions and other activities in support 
of DHS and national priorities. The OE appropriation funds 
military and civilian Coast Guard personnel, as well as the 
operation and maintenance of new and existing Coast Guard 
fleets, equipment, facilities, and programs.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $7,163,464,000 for OE, $50,000,000 
below the amount requested and $83,836,000 above the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2017.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget request      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operating Expenses
    Military Pay and Allowances...     $3,711,095,000     $3,711,095,000
    Civilian Pay and Benefits.....        851,178,000        851,178,000
    Training and Recruiting.......        190,668,000        190,668,000
    Operating Funds and Unit Level        895,518,000        875,518,000
     Maintenance..................
    Centrally Managed Accounts....        142,788,000        142,788,000
    Intermediate and Depot Level        1,422,217,000      1,392,217,000
     Maintenance..................
                                   -------------------------------------
        Total, Operating Expenses.     $7,213,464,000     $7,163,464,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee notes that, unlike previous budget 
submissions, the Coast Guard's request for Military and 
Civilian Personnel reflects realistic FTE projections and cost 
assumptions. Nevertheless, the Committee is concerned that the 
Coast Guard has yet to complete a Manpower Requirements 
Analysis (MRA), as directed by the Coast Guard Authorization 
Act of 2015, to determine the size of the force needed. The 
Coast Guard is directed to complete the MRA before it submits 
the fiscal year 2019 request.
    Currently, the Coast Guard is the only branch of the Armed 
Services for which personnel health information does not reside 
in the Department of Defense (DoD) health system. The Committee 
is very concerned that the Coast Guard has been without an 
electronic health record (EHR) since 2015 and understands the 
Coast Guard is currently conducting market research for the 
acquisition of a new system that will likely not be operational 
until 2019 at the earliest. In the meantime, Coast Guard 
medical records are maintained the old fashioned way--on paper. 
It appears the Coast Guard is simply kicking this can down the 
road, potentially at the expense of reducing the quality of 
healthcare for its service members.
    The Department of Veterans Affairs' recent decision to 
adopt the DoD EHR was a recognition of the urgent and essential 
requirement to adopt a system that allows for seamless 
interoperability and integrated health information between 
these two Departments and improves health care delivery for 
service members and veterans. In light of this decision, the 
Committee directs the Coast Guard to provide, within 60 days 
after the date of enactment of this Act, a business case 
analysis for adopting the same approach employed by the 
Department of Veterans Affairs to acquire the next-generation 
EHR system.
    The Committee directs the Coast Guard to continue to 
provide an annual report, due within 90 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act, on the number of expedited requests for 
transfer made by victims of sexual assault during the prior 
fiscal year, including the number of applications denied and a 
description of the rationale for each denied request. The 
report shall also include the number of service members served 
by the Special Victim Counsel program during the same period.
    The Committee is aware of the extraordinary demands made on 
members of the Coast Guard and their families. Access to child 
care is critical to supporting Coast Guard families, 
particularly for those assigned to remote Coast Guard stations. 
Of the amount recommended for Operating Expenses, $1,000,000 is 
to increase the child care subsidy for Coast Guard families 
residing in high cost-of-living areas. Within 90 days after the 
date of enactment of this Act, the Coast Guard shall brief the 
Committee on its plan to implement the increased subsidy. In 
addition, the Committee directs the Coast Guard to conduct and 
report to the Committee the results of a survey of its 
personnel regarding the cost and availability of child care as 
well as the effect of access to child care on retention.
    Within 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, 
the Coast Guard shall brief the Committee on its progress, 
working with the Department of Commerce, in implementing the 
Illegal, Unreported, and Unregulated Fishing Enforcement Act of 
2015 (Public Law 114-81). The Coast Guard should address its 
current capability to limit access to U.S. ports by vessels 
found to be in violation of fishing laws, including any related 
technological or resource limitations it faces.
    The Committee is aware that the U.S. Navy has an ongoing 
program to develop and field advanced ballistic shielding on 
Crew Served Weapon Stations that will provide increased 
protection at lower weight with high durability in the marine 
environment. The Committee encourages the Coast Guard to assess 
whether this protection system is appropriate for Coast Guard 
vessels.
    The Committee is concerned with increasing number of hoax 
distress calls the Coast Guard receives. These calls are not 
only resource intensive, but they also place Coast Guard 
service members at risk needlessly, and have the potential to 
divert search and rescue assets away from a real emergency. The 
Coast Guard is directed to brief the Committee on steps to 
reduce the number of false distress calls and what steps can be 
taken to investigate and prosecute the perpetrators.
    The fiscal year 2017 bill included $6,000,000 to carry out 
a pilot fishing safety training and research program, as 
authorized by section 309 of the Coast Guard Reauthorization 
Act of 2014 (Public Law 113-281). The Coast Guard is directed 
to brief the Committee on the results of this pilot not later 
than 60 days after the date of enactment of this Act.
    The Committee recognizes the Coast Guard's current efforts 
to partner with communities to promote Science, Technology, 
Engineering, and Mathematics education standards in 
nontraditional classroom settings, and encourages further 
expansion of the Partnership in Education Program, particularly 
through the increased participation of Coast Guard Academy 
cadets.

                ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE AND RESTORATION

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................       $13,315,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................        13,397,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        13,397,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................           +82,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

    The Environmental Compliance and Restoration appropriation 
provides funding for environmental cleanup, sustainment, and 
restoration of current and former contaminated Coast Guard 
facilities. Additionally, it funds engineering remedies on 
Coast Guard assets for the purpose of obtaining or restoring 
compliance with environmental laws and preventing contamination 
and environmental damage.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $13,397,000 for Environmental 
Compliance and Restoration, the same as the amount requested 
and $82,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2017.

                            RESERVE TRAINING

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $112,302,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................       114,875,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       114,875,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................        +2,573,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

    The Reserve Training appropriation facilitates training, 
operation, and administration of the Coast Guard Reserve 
Program.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $114,875,000 for Reserve Training, 
the same as the amount requested and $2,573,000 above the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2017.

              ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................    $1,370,007,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................     1,203,745,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     1,298,745,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       -71,262,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................       +95,000,000
 

    Acquisition, Construction, and Improvements (AC&I;) provides 
for the acquisition, procurement, construction, rehabilitation, 
and improvement of vessels, aircraft, shore facilities and 
military housing, aids to navigation (ATON) systems and 
facilities, and command, control, communications, and computer 
systems and related equipment.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $1,298,745,000 for AC&I;, 
$95,000,000 above the amount requested and $71,262,000 below 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2017.
    The Committee recommends a rescission of $95,000,000 in 
title V of this bill from funds provided in fiscal year 2017 
for long lead time material for a tenth National Security 
Cutter that was neither requested by the Coast Guard nor is a 
requirement.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget request      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Acquisition, Construction, and
 Improvements
    Vessels
        Survey and Design--Vessels         $1,500,000         $1,500,000
         and Boats................
        In-Service Vessel                  60,500,000         60,500,000
         Sustainment..............
        National Security Cutter..         54,000,000         54,000,000
        Offshore Patrol Cutter....        500,000,000        500,000,000
        Fast Response Cutter......        240,000,000        240,000,000
        Cutter Boats..............          1,000,000          1,000,000
        Polar Ice Breaking Vessel.         19,000,000         19,000,000
        Inland Waterways and                1,100,000          1,100,000
         Western Rivers Cutter....
                                   -------------------------------------
            Subtotal, Vessels.....        877,100,000        877,100,000
    Aircraft
        HC-27J Conversion/                 52,000,000         52,000,000
         Sustainment..............
        HC-130J Acquisition/                5,600,000        100,600,000
         Conversion/Sustainment...
        HH-65 Conversion/                  22,000,000         22,000,000
         Sustainment..............
        MH-60T Sustainment........          2,500,000          2,500,000
        Small Unmanned Aircraft               500,000            500,000
         Systems..................
                                   -------------------------------------
            Subtotal, Aircraft....         82,600,000        177,600,000
    Other Acquisition Programs
        Other Equipment and                 4,000,000          4,000,000
         Systems..................
        Program Oversight and              15,000,000         15,000,000
         Management...............
        C4ISR.....................         22,000,000         22,000,000
        CG Logistics Information            9,800,000          9,800,000
         Management System (CG-
         LIMS)....................
                                   -------------------------------------
            Subtotal, Other                50,800,000         50,800,000
             Acquisition Programs.
    Shore Facilities and Aids to
     Navigation
        Major Construction;                10,000,000         10,000,000
         Housing; ATON; and Survey
         and Design...............
        Major Acquisition Systems          60,000,000         60,000,000
         Infrastructure...........
        Minor Shore...............          5,000,000          5,000,000
                                   -------------------------------------
            Subtotal, Shore                75,000,000         75,000,000
             Facilities and Aids
             to Navigation........
    Personnel and Related Support         118,245,000        118,245,000
     Costs
                                   -------------------------------------
            Subtotal, Acquisition,     $1,203,745,000     $1,298,745,000
             Construction, and
             Improvements.........
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Coast Guard is directed to continue to brief the 
Committee quarterly on all major acquisitions, consistent with 
the direction in the explanatory statement accompanying Public 
Law 114-4.

                                Vessels

    Polar Ice Breaking Vessel. The Committee is concerned with 
the increasing Russian military presence in the Arctic region. 
As Russia continues to reopen Cold War era bases and conduct 
military exercises in the region, it is essential that the 
United States maintain a robust capability to operate in the 
region to ensure its national security and economic interests 
are protected, and to counter Russian aggression. The Committee 
acknowledges the Coast Guard's long-term requirements for 
additional heavy and medium icebreakers as its current 
inventory reaches the end of service life. A potential 
capability gap may require the Coast Guard to consider unique, 
short-term procurement strategies. The Committee directs the 
Coast Guard to examine capabilities of existing vessels to 
operate in the Arctic as evidenced by industry-conducted ice 
trials to determine what Coast Guard statutory requirements 
could be met by such vessels. Further, the Committee encourages 
the Secretary of Homeland Security to work with the Secretary 
of Defense on a strategy for the future procurement of 
additional heavy icebreakers, which are essential to the 
maritime security interests of the United States and allies in 
the region.

                                Aircraft

    HC-130J Acquisition/Conversion/Sustainment. The Committee 
recommends $100,600,000 for the HC-130J aircraft program, 
$95,000,000 above the request and $11,200,000 below the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2017. The recommendation includes 
funding to procure one HC-130J aircraft. The Secretary is 
expected to include adequate funding in the fiscal year 2019 
budget request to normalize the recapitalization of the HC-130 
fleet in order to improve mission capability and avoid 
unnecessary and expensive service life extension upgrades for 
the HC-130H.

              RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................       $36,319,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................        18,641,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        18,641,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       -17,678,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

    Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E;) funding 
sustains critical Coast Guard mission capabilities through 
applied research, testing, development, and evaluation 
programs. Several RDT&E; programs include partnerships with 
other DHS components, DoD, and other federal and private 
research organizations.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $18,641,000 for RDT&E;, the same as 
the amount requested and $17,678,000 below the amount provided 
in fiscal year 2017.

                    HEALTH CARE FUND CONTRIBUTION\1\

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $176,000,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................       204,136,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       204,136,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       +28,136,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 
\1\This is a permanent indefinite discretionary appropriation.

    The Health Care Fund Contribution accrues the Coast Guard's 
military Medicare-eligible health benefit contribution to the 
DoD Medicare-Eligible Retiree Health Care Fund. Contributions 
are for future Medicare-eligible retirees, as well as retiree 
dependents and their potential survivors.

                             Recommendation

    While this account requires no annual action by Congress, 
the Committee affirms the expenditure of $204,136,000 for the 
Medicare-eligible retiree health care fund contribution, 
$28,136,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2017 and 
consistent with the CBO-estimated requirement for fiscal year 
2018.

                              RETIRED PAY

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................    $1,666,940,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................     1,673,000,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     1,673,000,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................        +6,060,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

    The Retired Pay appropriation provides payments as 
identified under the Retired Serviceman's Family Protection and 
Survivor Benefits Plans and other retired personnel 
entitlements identified under prior-year National Defense 
Authorization Acts. This appropriation also includes funding 
for medical care of retired personnel and their dependents.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $1,673,000,000 for Retired Pay, 
the same as the amount requested and $6,060,000 above the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2017. A provision in the bill 
allows funds to remain available until expended. The Coast 
Guard's Retired Pay appropriation is a mandatory budgetary 
activity.

                      United States Secret Service


 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................    $2,045,578,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................     1,943,626,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     1,957,495,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       -88,083,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................       +13,869,000
 

                                Mission

    The United States Secret Service (USSS) has statutory 
authority to carry out two primary missions: protecting the 
nation's leaders and investigating financial and electronic 
crimes. The Secret Service protects and investigates threats 
against the President and Vice President, their families, 
visiting heads of state, and other designated individuals; 
protects the White House, Vice President's Residence, foreign 
missions, and certain other facilities within Washington, D.C.; 
and coordinates the security at National Special Security 
Events (NSSEs). The Secret Service also investigates violations 
of laws relating to counterfeiting of obligations and 
securities of the United States; financial crimes include, but 
are not limited to, access device fraud, financial institution 
fraud, identity theft, and computer fraud; and computer-based 
attacks on financial, banking, and telecommunications 
infrastructure. In addition, the agency provides support for 
investigations related to missing and exploited children.

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................    $1,879,463,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................     1,879,346,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     1,893,215,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       +13,752,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................       +13,869,000
 

    The USSS Operations and Support (O&S;) appropriation funds 
necessary operations, mission support, and associated 
management and administration costs, to include salaries in 
support of the following mission-based PPAs: Mission Support, 
Protective Operations, Field Operations, and Basic and In-
Service Training and Professional Development.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $1,893,215,000 for O&S;, 
$13,869,000 above the amount requested and $13,752,000 above 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2017.
    The Committee recommends that $33,692,000 remain available 
until September 30, 2019, of which $5,482,000 is for the James 
J. Rowley Training Center; $4,710,000 is for Operational 
Mission Support; $18,000,000 is for protective travel; and 
$4,500,000 is for NSSEs. In the future, however, the Committee 
will continue to transition all O&S; appropriations across the 
Department to a single year of availability, with very limited 
exceptions for sub-appropriation amounts when additional 
flexibility is fully justified. USSS should attempt to obligate 
all of its O&S; funding during fiscal year 2018, and should 
budget for fiscal year 2019 under an assumption of a single 
year of funding availability.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget request      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Support
    Protective Operations
        Protection of Persons and        $705,566,000       $705,566,000
         Facilities...............
        Protective Countermeasures         46,862,000         46,862,000
        Protective Intelligence...         47,547,000         47,547,000
        Presidential Campaigns and          4,500,000          4,500,000
         National Special Security
         Events...................
                                   -------------------------------------
            Subtotal, Protective          804,475,000        804,475,000
             Operations...........
    Field Operations
        Domestic and International        588,653,000        588,653,000
         Field Operations.........
        Support for Missing and             7,582,000          7,582,000
         Exploited Children
         Investigations...........
        Support for Computer                    - - -         13,869,000
         Forensics Training.......
                                   -------------------------------------
            Subtotal, Field               596,235,000        610,104,000
             Operations...........
    Basic and In-Service Training          64,078,000         64,078,000
     and Professional Development.
    Mission Support...............        414,558,000        414,558,000
                                   -------------------------------------
        Total, Operations and          $1,879,346,000     $1,893,215,000
         Support..................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         Protective Operations

    The Committee recommends $804,475,000 for Protective 
Operations, the same as the amount requested and $22,071,000 
above the amount provided in fiscal year 2017. Within 90 days 
after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secret Service 
shall brief the Committee on its protection operations, 
including details on protection costs for each of the mission 
categories; an updated assessment of whether the fiscal year 
2018 funding level is sufficient to address these protection 
requirements; and a description of the methodology used to 
estimate funding levels needed for protection operations.

                            Field Operations

    The Committee recommends $610,104,000 for Field Operations, 
$13,869,000 above the request and $177,911,000 below the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2017. The amount includes $13,869,000 
for continued support of electronic crimes investigations and 
training through the Electronic Crimes Special Agent Program, 
its network of Electronic Crimes Task Forces, and the National 
Computer Forensics Institute.
    Additionally, the recommendation includes $7,582,000 for 
support of missing and exploited children investigations, 
including $1,312,000 for personnel costs, $6,000,000 for grant 
assistance, and $266,000 for equipment and other related costs. 
The total is equal to the fiscal year 2017 level and the amount 
requested.
    The Secret Service continues to show significant results 
from its efforts to stop the counterfeiting of U.S. currency in 
concert with its law enforcement counterparts in Colombia and 
Peru, and is building on this effort in its other international 
field offices. The Committee expects the Secret Service, in 
conjunction with the DHS Office of Policy, to keep it informed 
of developments related to counterfeiting and other 
international investigative mission areas.
    The USSS may not obligate any funding for the purpose of 
opening a new permanent domestic or overseas office or location 
unless the Committees have been notified 15 days in advance of 
such obligation.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $163,615,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................        64,030,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        64,030,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       -99,585,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

    The Procurement, Construction, and Improvements (PC&I;) 
appropriation provides the funds--above certain threshold 
amounts--necessary for the manufacture, purchase, or 
enhancement of one or more assets prior to sustainment.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $64,030,000 for PC&I;, the same as 
the request and $99,585,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2017.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget request      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Procurement, Construction, and
 Improvements
    Protection Assets and                 $39,012,000        $39,012,000
     Infrastructure...............
    Operational Communications/            25,018,000         25,018,000
     Information Technology.......
                                   -------------------------------------
        Total, Procurement,               $64,030,000        $64,030,000
         Construction, and
         Improvements.............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                        RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................        $2,500,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................           250,000
Recommended in the bill...............................           250,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................        -2,250,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

    Research and Development (R&D;) funds are used to develop 
new technologies and products, which maintain or increase 
capability or capacity. The R&D; appropriation funds projects 
through Technology Readiness Level 6 in the pursuit of enhanced 
technologies and products for front-line use.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $250,000 for R&D;, the same as the 
request and $2,250,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 
2017.

             TITLE II--ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--THIS ACT

    Section 201. The Committee continues a provision by 
reference regarding overtime compensation.
    Section 202. The Committee continues a provision allowing 
CBP to sustain or increase operations in Puerto Rico with 
appropriated funds.
    Section 203. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision prohibiting the transfer of aircraft and related 
equipment out of CBP unless certain conditions are met.
    Section 204. The Committee continues a provision regarding 
the availability of COBRA fee revenue.
    Section 205. The Committee continues a provision allowing 
CBP access to certain reimbursements for preclearance 
activities.
    Section 206. The Committee continues a provision regarding 
the importation of prescription drugs by an individual for 
personal use.
    Section 207. The Committee continues a provision regarding 
waivers of the Jones Act.
    Section 208. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting funds from being used by DHS to approve, license, 
facilitate, authorize, or allow the trafficking or import of 
property confiscated by the Cuban Government.
    Section 209. The Committee continues a provision allowing 
the Secretary to reprogram funds within and transfer funds to 
``U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement--Operations and 
Support'' to ensure the detention of aliens prioritized for 
removal.
    Section 210. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting the use of funds provided under the heading ``U.S. 
Immigration and Customs Enforcement--Operations and Support'' 
for the 287(g) program if the terms of the agreement governing 
the delegation of authority have been materially violated.
    Section 211. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting the use of funds provided under the heading ``U.S. 
Immigration and Customs Enforcement--Operations and Support'' 
to contract for detention services if the facility receives 
less than ``adequate'' ratings in two consecutive performance 
evaluations.
    Section 212. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision clarifying that certain elected and appointed 
officials are not exempt from federal passenger and baggage 
screening.
    Section 213. The Committee continues a provision 
authorizing TSA to use funds from the Aviation Security Capital 
Fund for the procurement and installation of explosives 
detection systems or for other purposes authorized by law.
    Section 214. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting funds made available by this Act under the heading 
``Coast Guard--Operating Expenses'' for recreational vessel 
expenses, except to the extent fees are collected from owners 
of yachts and credited to this appropriation.
    Section 215. The Committee continues a provision allowing 
up to $10,000,000 to be reprogrammed to or from Military Pay 
and Allowances within ``Coast Guard--Operating Expenses''.
    Section 216. The Committee continues a provision allowing 
the Secret Service to obligate funds in anticipation of 
reimbursement for personnel receiving training.
    Section 217. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting funds made available to the Secret Service for the 
protection of the head of a federal agency other than the 
Secretary of Homeland Security, except where the Director has 
entered into a reimbursable agreement for such protection 
services.
    Section 218. The Committee continues a provision allowing 
the reprogramming of funds within ``United States Secret 
Service--Operations and Support''.
    Section 219. The Committee continues a provision allowing 
for funds made available for ``United States Secret Service--
Operations and Support'' to be available for travel of 
employees on protective missions without regard to limitations 
on such expenditures in this or any other Act after 
notification to the Committees on Appropriation.

      TITLE III--PROTECTION, PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND RECOVERY


              National Protection and Programs Directorate


 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................    $1,818,772,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................     1,801,434,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     1,773,221,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       -45,551,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................       -28,213,000
 

                                Mission

    The National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD) is 
focused on enhancing the security of the nation's physical and 
cyber infrastructure and interoperable communications systems; 
preventing terrorism and enhancing security; safeguarding and 
securing cyberspace; and strengthening national preparedness 
and resilience. Secure and resilient infrastructure is 
essential for national security, economic vitality, and public 
health and safety.

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................    $1,372,268,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................     1,455,275,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     1,427,062,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       +54,794,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................       -28,213,000
 

    The Operations and Support (O&S;) appropriation supports 
NPPD core operations to enhance the security and resilience of 
infrastructure against terrorist attacks, cyber events, natural 
disasters, and other large-scale incidents. The O&S; 
appropriation funds the costs of necessary operations, mission 
support, and associated management and administration to 
execute these programs.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $1,427,062,000 for O&S;, 
$28,213,000 below the amount requested and $54,794,000 above 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2017. The reduction to the 
request is due to budget constraints on funding for Defense 
functions.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget Request     Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Support
    Cybersecurity
        Cyber Readiness and
         Response
            NCCIC Operations......        116,471,000        112,977,000
                (CERT)............       (93,921,000)       (93,921,000)
            NCCIC Planning and             84,494,000         81,959,000
             Exercises............
                (CERT)............       (63,775,000)       (63,775,000)
                                   -------------------------------------
                Subtotal, Cyber          $200,965,000       $194,936,000
                 Readiness and
                 Response.........
        Cyber Infrastructure
         Resilience
            Cybersecurity Advisors         14,693,000         14,252,000
            Enhanced Cybersecurity         17,157,000         16,642,000
             Services.............
            Cybersecurity                  10,093,000          9,790,000
             Education and
             Awareness............
                                   -------------------------------------
                Subtotal, Cyber            41,943,000         40,684,000
                 Infrastructure
                 Resilience.......
        Federal Cybersecurity
            Federal Network                42,766,000         41,483,000
             Resilience...........
            Continuous Diagnostics         93,780,000         91,967,000
             and Mitigation.......
             National                     341,103,000        333,629,000
             Cybersecurity
             Protection System....
                                   -------------------------------------
                Subtotal, Federal         477,649,000        467,079,000
                 Cybersecurity....
                                   -------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Cybersecurity...        720,557,000        702,699,000
     Infrastructure Protection
        Infrastructure Capacity
         Building
             Sector Risk                   44,491,000         43,156,000
             Management...........
            Protective Security            35,677,000         34,607,000
             Advisors.............
            Bombing Prevention....         14,739,000         14,297,000
            Infrastructure                 20,608,000         19,990,000
             Information and
             Sensitive Data
             Protection...........
                                   -------------------------------------
                Subtotal,                 115,515,000        112,050,000
                 Infrastructure
                 Capacity Building
        Infrastructure Security            72,440,000         70,267,000
         Compliance...............
                                   -------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Infrastructure          187,955,000        182,317,000
         Protection...............
    Emergency Communications
        Emergency Communications           49,966,000         48,467,000
         Preparedness.............
        Priority
         Telecommunications
         Services.................
            GETS/WPS/SRAS/TSP.....         56,319,000         54,629,000
            Next Generation                 7,636,000          7,407,000
             Networks Priority
             Services.............
                                   -------------------------------------
                Subtotal, Priority         63,955,000         62,036,000
                 Telecommunication
                 s Services.......
                                   -------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Emergency               113,921,000        110,503,000
         Communications...........
    Integrated Operations
        Cyber and Infrastructure
         Analysis
            National                        8,912,000          8,645,000
             Infrastructure
             Simulation Analysis
             Center (NISAC).......
             Infrastructure                34,410,000         33,378,000
             Analysis.............
                                   -------------------------------------
                Subtotal, Cyber            43,322,000         42,023,000
                 and
                 Infrastructure
                 Analysis.........
        Critical Infrastructure            21,222,000         21,222,000
         Situational Awareness....
             [Defense]............       (19,312,000)       (19,312,000)
        Stakeholder Engagement and         46,904,000         46,904,000
         Requirements.............
             [Defense]............       (42,214,000)       (42,214,000)
        Strategy, Policy, and              14,448,000         14,448,000
         Plans....................
             [Defense]............        (9,536,000)        (9,536,000)
                                   -------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Integrated              125,896,000        124,597,000
         Operations...............
     Office of Biometric Identity
     Management
        Identity and Screening             68,826,000         68,826,000
         Program Operations.......
        IDENT/Homeland Advanced           150,603,000        150,603,000
         Recognition Technology...
                                   -------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Office of               219,429,000        219,429,000
         Biometric Identity
         Management...............
    Mission Support...............         87,517,000         87,517,000
        [Defense].................       (27,130,000)       (27,130,000)
                                   -------------------------------------
        Total, Operations and          $1,455,275,000     $1,427,062,000
         Support..................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                             Cybersecurity

    The Committee recommends $702,699,000 for Cybersecurity, 
$17,858,000 below the amount requested and $33,285,000 above 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2017. The Cybersecurity PPA 
advances computer security preparedness and the response to 
cyberattacks and incidents. The program includes activities to 
secure federal networks, respond to incidents, disseminate 
actionable information, and collaborate with private sector 
partners to secure critical infrastructure.
    The fiscal year 2017 National Defense Authorization Act 
required DHS to provide Congress with a departmental 
cybersecurity strategy. The Committee urges DHS to accelerate 
the completion of the cybersecurity strategy in light of recent 
cyber events and encourages the Department to continue to 
engage with relevant public and private stakeholders to prevent 
future cyber intrusions. DHS, and its relevant components, 
should prioritize information technology (IT) supply chain risk 
management in the development of the department's cyber 
strategy. NPPD shall brief the Committee on IT supply chain 
vulnerabilities not later than 90 days after the enactment of 
this Act.
    Cyber Readiness and Response. The Committee recommends 
$194,936,000 for Cyber Readiness and Response, $6,029,000 below 
the amount requested and $1,968,000 below the amount provided 
in fiscal year 2017.
    This program funds efforts to ensure the security and 
resilience of the nation's critical infrastructure from 
physical and cyber threats, including the activities of the 
National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center 
(NCCIC). The NCCIC is the federal government's civilian hub for 
24x7 cyber situational awareness, incident response, 
coordination, information sharing, and analysis. The Committee 
strongly supports NPPD's plans to expand the capabilities of 
NCCIC.
    The Committee encourages NPPD to implement measures to 
increase NCCIC operational efficiency and coordination, 
especially with regard to the activities of the United States 
Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) and the Industrial 
Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT), 
including process improvements and increased capability to 
support incident response, training, and risk assessments.
    Cyber Infrastructure Resilience. The Committee recommends 
$40,684,000 for Cyber Infrastructure Resilience, $1,259,000 
below the amount requested and $3,369,000 below the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2017.
    The Cyber Infrastructure Resilience program funds efforts 
to increase the security and resilience of critical 
infrastructure (CI) systems and networks through partnership 
and information sharing efforts with owners and operators, and 
promotion of cybersecurity awareness, training, and education.
    The Committee is aware that NPPD is currently working to 
integrate election infrastructure into the National 
Infrastructure Protection Plan. Although the primary 
responsibility for securing elections belongs to state and 
local election officials, DHS and the federal government share 
information and provide technical assistance on a voluntary 
basis to assist them with this responsibility. The Committee 
encourages NPPD to continue to collaborate with key 
stakeholders, including state and local election officials, the 
Election Assistance Commission, the National Association of 
Secretaries of State, the National Association of State 
Election Directors, and the Multi-State Information Sharing and 
Analysis Center (MS-ISAC), to identify vulnerabilities in state 
election infrastructure and develop strategies to prevent cyber 
intrusions. NPPD shall brief the Committee not later than 90 
days after the date of enactment of this Act on its assessment 
of such vulnerabilities and its plans to work with election 
officials to prevent cyber intrusions.
    The recommendation supports the Enhanced Cybersecurity 
Services (ECS) program, a voluntary information sharing program 
providing classified threat information to qualified employees 
of CI owners and operators; the Cybersecurity Advisors (CSA) 
initiative; and the Cyber Education and Awareness program to 
develop the cybersecurity workforce pipeline.
    Federal Cybersecurity. The Committee recommends 
$467,079,000 for Federal Cybersecurity, $10,570,000 below the 
amount requested and $38,622,000 above the amount provided in 
fiscal year 2017. The recommendation supports the continued 
deployment of Continuous Diagnostics and Mitigation (CDM) 
technology and the National Cybersecurity Protection System 
(NCPS), also known as ``EINSTEIN.''
    For fiscal year 2018, the Committee encourages the 
acceleration of Phase II of NPPD's non-signature based 
intrusion detection and prevention pilot program. The pilot 
should prioritize technologies from commercial and open sources 
that rapidly analyze anomalies to automatically discover 
previously unidentified malware and indicators of malicious 
activity. NPPD is directed to brief the Committee on the pilot 
program's progress within 180 days after the date of enactment 
of this Act.

                       Infrastructure Protection

    The Committee recommends $182,317,000 for Infrastructure 
Protection, $5,638,000 below the amount requested and 
$3,975,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2017. The 
Infrastructure Protection program leads and coordinates 
national programs and policies on CI and resilience, and 
develops strong partnerships across government and the private 
sector. The program conducts and facilitates vulnerability and 
consequence assessments to help CI owners and operators and 
state, local, tribal, and territorial partners understand and 
address risks to CI. Additionally, it provides information on 
emerging threats and hazards and offers tools and training to 
partners to help them manage such risks to critical 
infrastructure.
    Infrastructure Capacity Building. The Committee recommends 
$112,050,000 for Infrastructure Capacity Building, $3,465,000 
below the amount requested and $4,685,000 below the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2017. Infrastructure Capacity Building 
activities include Sector Risk Management, Protective Security 
Advisors, Bombing Prevention, and Infrastructure Information 
and Sensitive Data Protection.
    The Committee supports NPPD's efforts to pursue new, 
innovative technologies for rapid deployment, identify projects 
to solve resilient design challenges, develop tools to support 
infrastructure investment decisions, and create products to 
help detect malicious activity. Accordingly, of the amount 
provided for National Infrastructure Protection Plan 
Management, $2,000,000 is designated for the Technology 
Development and Deployment Program to define agency needs, 
identify requirements for community level critical 
infrastructure protection and resilience, and rapidly develop, 
test, and transition to use technologies that address these 
needs and requirements.
    Infrastructure Security Compliance. The Committee 
recommends $70,267,000 for Infrastructure Security Compliance, 
$2,173,000 below the amount requested and $710,000 above the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2017. Funding for Infrastructure 
Security Compliance supports efforts to secure the nation's 
high-risk chemical facilities through systematic regulation, 
inspection, and enforcement under the authority of the Chemical 
Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards Act.

                        Emergency Communications

    The Committee recommends $110,503,000 for Emergency 
Communications, $3,418,000 below the amount requested and 
$8,462,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2017. The 
Emergency Communications program is responsible for advancing 
the nation's interoperable emergency communications 
capabilities to ensure first responders and government 
officials are able to communicate in the event of disasters.
    Emergency Communications Preparedness. The Committee 
recommends $48,467,000 for Emergency Communications 
Preparedness, $1,499,000 below the amount requested and 
$4,370,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2017. The 
recommendation supports specialized modeling and analysis to 
predict and mitigate the effects of communications failures 
during times of crisis.
    Priority Telecommunications Services. The Committee 
recommends $62,036,000 for Priority Telecommunications Services 
(PTS), $1,919,000 below the amount requested and $4,092,000 
above the amount provided in fiscal year 2017. Funds for PTS 
enable National Security/Emergency Preparedness voice 
telecommunications for government and industry organizations to 
maintain essential operations and coordinate response and 
recovery efforts during emergencies when networks are congested 
or degraded. Additionally, PTS ensures new network 
infrastructure is capable of satisfying priority 
telecommunications requirements as carriers evolve to next-
generation networks.

                         Integrated Operations

    The Committee recommends $124,597,000 for Integrated 
Operations, $1,299,000 below the amount requested and 
$14,913,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2017. The 
Integrated Operations program ensures domain awareness by 
sustaining command and control, coordination, information 
sharing, and situational awareness supporting multiple mission 
programs. This program includes various organizations that 
carry out functions such as consequence analysis, decision 
support and modeling, 24x7 critical infrastructure watch 
operations, emergency preparedness, stakeholder engagement, 
external affairs, privacy, and strategic planning.
    Cyber and Infrastructure Analysis. The Committee recommends 
$42,023,000 for Cyber and Infrastructure Analysis, $1,299,000 
below the amount requested and $143,000 above the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2017.
    The Office of Cyber and Infrastructure Analysis enhances 
protection of the nation's critical infrastructure through an 
integrated analytical approach to evaluating the potential 
consequences of disruption from physical or cyber threats and 
incidents. This analysis informs decisions to strengthen 
infrastructure security and resilience, as well as response and 
recovery efforts, during natural, man-made, or cyber incidents.
    Because the country's highly integrated electrical grid is 
vulnerable to cyber-attacks, physical attacks, and natural 
disasters, it is imperative to fully understand the 
interdependencies among information technology, operational 
technology, and physical security. Of the total recommended, 
$2,000,000 is for evaluating the resiliency of utility grids 
through real and simulated experimentation to test 
technologies, train operators, and quantify impacts and risks 
in order to prioritize response tactics and investment 
strategies.

                Office of Biometric Identity Management

    The Committee recommends $219,429,000 for the Office of 
Biometric Identity Management (OBIM), the same as the amount 
requested and $16,000,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2017.
    OBIM provides biometric identification services to help 
federal, state, and local government partners accurately 
identify individuals they encounter to determine if they pose a 
risk to the United States. Through the IDENT/Homeland Advanced 
Recognition Technology (HART) database, OBIM shares 
information, provides analyses, updates watchlists, and ensures 
the integrity of biographic and biometric data.

                       FEDERAL PROTECTIVE SERVICE

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................    $1,451,078,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................     1,476,055,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     1,476,055,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       +24,977,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $1,476,055,000 for the Federal 
Protective Service (FPS), the same as the amount requested and 
$24,977,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2017. This 
amount is fully offset by fees collected from FPS customer 
agencies.
    The Secretary and the Director of OMB shall certify in 
writing to the Committees, not later than 60 days after the 
date of enactment of this Act, that the operations of FPS will 
be fully funded in fiscal year 2018 through the collection of 
security fees. Should insufficient fee revenue be collected to 
fully fund operations, an expenditure plan is required 
describing how security risks will be adequately addressed. 
Within this recommended funding level, FPS shall align staffing 
resources with mission requirements.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $440,035,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................       335,033,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       335,033,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................      -105,002,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

    NPPD's Procurement, Construction, and Improvements (PC&I;) 
appropriation supports the planning, operational development, 
engineering, and acquisition of assets that support the 
security and resilience of physical and cyber infrastructure.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $335,033,000 for PC&I;, the same as 
the amount requested and $105,002,000 below the amount provided 
in fiscal year 2017.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget request     Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Procurement, Construction, and
 Improvements
    Cybersecurity
        Continuous Diagnostics and       $185,180,000       $185,180,000
         Mitigation...............
        National Cybersecurity             56,129,000         56,129,000
         Protection System........
                                   -------------------------------------
            Subtotal,                     241,309,000        241,309,000
             Cybersecurity........
    Emergency Communications
        Next Generation Networks           48,905,000         48,905,000
         Priority Services........
                                   -------------------------------------
            Subtotal, Emergency            48,905,000         48,905,000
             Communications.......
    Biometric Identity Management
        IDENT/Homeland Advanced            40,100,000         40,100,000
         Recognition Technology...
                                   -------------------------------------
            Subtotal, Biometric            40,100,000         40,100,000
             Identity Management..
    Integrated Operations Assets
     and Infrastructure
        Modeling Capability                   500,000            500,000
         Transition Environment...
                                   -------------------------------------
            Subtotal, Integrated              500,000            500,000
             Operations Assets and
             Infrastructure.......
    Infrastructure Protection
        Infrastructure Protection           4,219,000          4,219,000
         (IP) Gateway.............
                                   -------------------------------------
            Subtotal,                       4,219,000          4,219,000
             Infrastructure
             Protection...........
                                   -------------------------------------
        Total, Procurement,              $335,033,000       $335,033,000
         Construction, and
         Improvements.............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                             Cybersecurity

    Continuous Diagnostics and Mitigation. Recognizing the 
ever-changing cybersecurity landscape and the increase in 
associated vulnerabilities, the Committee fully supports NPPD's 
program strategy to evolve and extend CDM protections beyond 
the network to include data protection. The Assistant Secretary 
of NPPD for Cybersecurity and Communications shall brief the 
Committee not later than 180 days after the date of enactment 
of this Act on the timeline and acquisition strategy to 
implement Phase 4 data protection capabilities (Digital Rights 
Management, Data Masking, Micro-Segmentation, Enhanced 
Encryption, and Mobile Device Management) across all ``.gov'' 
civilian agencies.
    The Committee also encourages NPPD to invest in Network 
Traffic Visibility solutions in Phase 3 to enhance the 
detection of cyber threats across federal networks.

                        RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................        $6,469,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................        11,126,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        11,126,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................        +4,657,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

    The Research and Development (R&D;) appropriation supports 
the search for new or refined products and processes to 
maintain or increase national economic productive capacity.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $11,126,000 for R&D;, the same as 
the amount requested and $4,657,000 above the amount provided 
in fiscal year 2017.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget request     Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Research and Development
    Cybersecurity.................         $4,695,000         $4,695,000
    Infrastructure Protection.....          2,431,000          2,431,000
    Integrated Operations.........          4,000,000          4,000,000
                                   -------------------------------------
        Total, Research and               $11,126,000        $11,126,000
         Development..............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                        Office of Health Affairs


 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $123,548,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................       111,319,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       119,319,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................        -4,229,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................        +8,000,000
 

                                Mission

    The Office of Health Affairs (OHA) serves as the principal 
authority for health and medical issues at DHS. OHA provides 
biological and chemical defense, medical, public health, and 
scientific expertise to support the DHS mission to safeguard 
the nation.

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $123,548,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................       111,319,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       119,319,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................        -4,229,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................        +8,000,000
 

    The Operations and Support (O&S;) appropriation funds the 
management of a national biodetection system; activities to 
advise DHS leadership about health security issues and guide 
DHS policies to keep its workforce safe, and coordinate with 
the medical first responder community and stakeholders at all 
levels of government to prepare for, respond to, and recover 
from mass casualty incidents and health consequences of 
terrorism and disasters; and the development of policy, plans, 
and exercises related to biological and chemical defense, 
infectious diseases, and health security to support the DHS 
mission.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $119,319,000 for O&S;, $8,000,000 
above the amount requested and $4,229,000 below the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2017.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget request     Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Support
    Chemical and Biological               $77,380,000        $77,380,000
     Readiness....................
    Health and Medical Readiness..          4,120,000          4,120,000
    Integrated Operations.........          1,400,000          9,400,000
    Mission Support...............         28,419,000         28,419,000
        Total, Operations and            $111,319,000       $119,319,000
         Support..................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The budget proposes the elimination of the National 
Biosurveillance Integration Center (NBIC), but provides little 
substantive justification or assessment of the resulting 
impacts on the Department and on federal, state, local, and 
private sector partners. Absent such justification, the 
recommendation includes $8,000,000 above the request to 
continue to support NBIC as authorized by Public Law 110-53. 
The Committee encourages NBIC to continue its engagement in 
support of a visualization tool that incorporates data from 
state and local entities that can serve as a bio-preparedness 
tool for emergency response, emergency management, and law 
enforcement at all levels of government.

                  Federal Emergency Management Agency


 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................   $11,395,532,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................    10,519,570,000
Recommended in the bill...............................    11,434,207,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       +38,675,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................      +914,637,000
 
Note: Totals include funding designated by the Congress as being for
  disaster relief pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(D) of the Balanced
  Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                                Mission

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) helps build, 
sustain, and improve the nation's capability to prepare for, 
protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all 
hazards through disaster response, recovery, and grant programs 
supporting first responders, emergency management, mitigation 
activities, and preparedness.

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................    $1,048,551,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................     1,014,748,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     1,027,135,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       -21,416,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................       +12,387,000
 

    Operations and Support (O&S;) provides core mission 
development and maintenance of an integrated, nationwide 
capability to prepare for, mitigate against, respond to, and 
recover from the consequences of major disasters and 
emergencies regardless of cause, in partnership with other 
federal agencies, state, local, tribal, and territorial 
governments, volunteer organizations, and the private sector. 
Activities supported by this account incorporate the essential 
command and control functions, mitigate long-term risks, ensure 
the continuity and restoration of essential services and 
functions, and provide leadership to build, sustain, and 
improve the coordination and delivery of support to citizens 
and state, local, tribal, and territorial governments.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $1,027,135,000 for O&S;, 
$12,387,000 above the amount requested and $21,416,000 below 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2017.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget request     Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Support
    Regional Operations...........       $156,417,000       $156,417,000
    Mitigation....................         36,141,000         36,141,000
    Preparedness and Protection...        131,981,000        131,981,000
    Response and Recovery
        Response..................        175,226,000        182,893,000
            (Urban Search and            (27,513,000)       (35,180,000)
             Rescue)..............
        Recovery..................         46,694,000         46,694,000
    Mission Support...............        468,289,000        473,009,000
                                   -------------------------------------
            Total, Operations and      $1,014,748,000     $1,027,135,000
             Support..............
            (Defense).............       (42,945,000)       (42,945,000)
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                               Mitigation

    As requested, the Committee recommends $36,141,000 for 
Mitigation, the same as the amount requested and $7,928,000 
above the amount provided in fiscal year 2017.
    The Committee remains concerned about the adequacy of 
protective structures in tornado-prone areas of the country. 
Based on studies by the National Institute of Standards and 
Technology, model codes requiring community safe rooms for new 
school buildings and other facilities associated with schools 
where people regularly assemble have been improved in recent 
years. However, such changes may be insufficient in light of 
the devastating storms and tornadoes that have ripped through 
the Midwest and southern states, which have resulted in a 
tragic loss of human lives and caused millions of dollars in 
property damage. As part of its efforts to improve the 
resiliency of structures, the Committee recommends that FEMA 
consider the adoption of uniform national guidelines for safe 
room design and construction, as well as a requirement that 
safe rooms be incorporated into the design and construction of 
federally-funded structures located in areas prone to severe 
weather and hazards.

                         Response and Recovery

    The Committee recommends $229,587,000 for Response and 
Recovery, $7,667,000 above the amount requested and $14,345,000 
below the amount provided in fiscal year 2017. Within the 
recommendation is $35,180,000 for the Urban Search and Rescue 
Response System (USAR), $7,667,000 above the request, to 
continue to support the 28 USAR Task Forces.
    House Report 114-668 directed FEMA to assess the 
feasibility and costs of establishing national veterinary 
professional emergency teams, which would deploy with USAR 
teams to assist with veterinary care of search and rescue 
canines and other related response and recovery efforts, and to 
brief the Committee on its assessment not later than 180 days 
after the date of enactment. In conducting this assessment, the 
Committee encourages FEMA to work with the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture and Department of Health and Human Services with 
similar veterinary emergency teams to codify best practices and 
ensure efforts are not duplicative across agencies.

                            Mission Support

    The Committee recommends $473,009,000 for Mission Support, 
$4,720,000 above the amount requested and $93,000 above the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2017. The increase above the 
request reflects the transfer of funding from the Procurement, 
Construction, and Improvements (PC&I;) appropriation for the 
sustainment of the existing financial management system, which 
is more appropriately funded within O&S.;
    FEMA utilizes or supports many geospatial information 
systems (GIS) technologies for response, planning, and 
mitigation. The Committee recognizes that GIS can provide 
critical information to first responders but also represents a 
vast amount of data that can complicate response efforts, 
particularly for federal, state, and local governments with 
inadequate access to GIS solutions. FEMA should work with 
federal, state, and local partners to integrate GIS platforms 
to better inform disaster response, guide government 
acquisition of GIS technologies, and improve the quality of GIS 
tools available to first responders.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................       $35,273,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................        89,996,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        76,578,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       +41,305,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................       -13,418,000
 

    PC&I; provide funds necessary for the planning, operational 
development, engineering, and purchase of one or more assets 
prior to sustainment.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $76,578,000 for PC&I;, $13,418,000 
below the amount requested and $41,305,000 above the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2017.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget request     Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Procurement, Construction, and
 Improvements
        Operational Communications/       $12,018,000        $12,018,000
         Information Technology...
        Construction and Facility          44,519,000         44,519,000
         Improvements.............
        Mission Support Assets and         33,459,000         20,041,000
         Infrastructure...........
                                   -------------------------------------
            Total, Procurement,           $89,996,000        $76,578,000
             Construction, and
             Improvements.........
                                   -------------------------------------
            (Defense).............       (53,262,000)       (53,262,000)
------------------------------------------------------------------------

           Operational Communications/Information Technology

    As requested, the Committee recommends $12,018,000 for 
Operational Communications/Information Technology, $9,218,000 
above the amount provided in fiscal year 2017, to support 
Integrated Public Alert Warning System program modernization.

                 Construction and Facility Improvements

    As requested, the Committee recommends $44,519,000 for 
Construction and Facility Improvements, $23,469,000 above the 
amount provided in fiscal year 2017. The recommendation 
includes $41,244,000 for the Mount Weather Emergency Operations 
Center facility; $1,778,000 for facility upgrades at the Center 
for Domestic Preparedness; and $1,497,000 for the National 
Emergency Training Center. Consistent with prior years, FEMA 
shall brief the Committee on an updated capital infrastructure 
investment plan not later than 60 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act.

               Mission Support Assets and Infrastructure

    The Committee recommends $20,041,000 for Mission Support 
Assets and Infrastructure, $13,418,000 below the amount 
requested and $8,618,000 above the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2017. The reduction below the request is due to the delay 
in financial system modernization efforts.

                           FEDERAL ASSISTANCE

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................    $2,983,458,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................     2,064,130,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     3,003,798,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       +20,340,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................      +939,668,000
 

    The Federal Assistance (FA) appropriation enables FEMA to 
provide federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial 
jurisdictions with grants, training, exercises, and other 
support to prevent, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and 
recover from terrorism and natural disasters.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $3,003,798,000 for FA, 
$939,668,000 above the amount requested and $20,340,000 above 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2017. The recommendation 
restores the cuts proposed in the budget request to FEMA's 
grants and education, training, and exercise programs to 
support first responders.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget request     Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Federal Assistance
    Grants                          .................  .................
        State Homeland Security          $349,362,000       $467,000,000
         Grant Program............
            (Operation                          - - -       (55,000,000)
             Stonegarden).........
        Urban Area Security               448,844,000        630,000,000
         Initiative...............
            (Nonprofit Security)..              - - -       (50,000,000)
        Public Transportation              47,809,000        100,000,000
         Security Assistance......
            (Amtrak Security).....              - - -       (10,000,000)
        Port Security Grants......         47,809,000        100,000,000
        Assistance to Firefighter         344,344,000        345,000,000
         Grants...................
        Staffing for Adequate Fire        344,344,000        345,000,000
         and Emergency Response
         (SAFER) Grants...........
        Emergency Management              279,335,000        350,000,000
         Performance Grants.......
        National Predisaster               39,016,000        100,000,000
         Mitigation Fund..........
        Flood Hazard Mapping and                - - -        177,531,000
         Risk Analysis Program
         (RiskMAP)................
        Emergency Food and Shelter              - - -        120,000,000
                                   -------------------------------------
            Subtotal, Grants......      1,900,863,000      2,734,531,000
    Education, Training, and               63,771,000         63,771,000
     Exercises Center for Domestic
     Preparedness
        Center for Homeland                17,966,000         17,966,000
         Defense and Security.....
        Emergency Management               18,824,000         18,824,000
         Institute................
        U.S. Fire Administration..         41,913,000         41,913,000
        National Domestic                       - - -         98,000,000
         Preparedness Consortium..
        Continuing Training Grants              - - -          8,000,000
        National Exercise Program.         20,793,000         20,793,000
                                   -------------------------------------
            Subtotal, Education,          163,267,000        269,267,000
             Training, and
             Exercises............
                                   -------------------------------------
        Total, Federal Assistance.     $2,064,130,000     $3,003,798,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                 Grants

    The Committee recommends $2,734,531,000 for Grants, 
$833,668,000 above the amount requested and $25,000,000 above 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2017.
    The Committee notes that in fiscal year 2017, $41,000,000 
was provided to reimburse state and local law enforcement for 
extraordinary costs associated with the protection of the 
President in jurisdictions where the President maintains a 
residence. The Committee will continue to monitor the need for 
additional funding for this purpose in fiscal year 2018 as the 
bill moves through the appropriations process.
    The Committee remains concerned about potential attacks on 
public accommodations such as sports stadiums, movie theaters, 
shopping centers, and 1 other social gathering sites. These 
targets are especially concerning because they are easy to 
attack and difficult to defend. Therefore, the Committee 
directs the DHS to brief the Committee on the major challenges 
we face in securing these targets and a strategy for how 
federal, state, local entities, or pivate partnerships can 
better secure these targets; and what resources are available 
to address this threat.
    State Homeland Security Grant Program. The Committee 
recommends $467,000,000 for the State Homeland Security Grant 
Program (SHSGP), $117,638,000 above the amount requested and 
the same as the amount provided in fiscal year 2017.
    Within the funds available for SHSGP, the Committee 
recommends $55,000,000 for Operation Stonegarden grants, which 
should be awarded and administered consistent with direction in 
prior year reports. As part of the fiscal year 2019 budget 
request, FEMA shall include performance measures for Operation 
Stonegarden that clearly demonstrate the extent to which 
funding for the program can be tied to progress in achieving 
program goals, along with estimates for how proposed funding 
would contribute to additional progress. These performance 
measures should be consistent with 31 U.S.C. 1116 and should 
include outcome measures, as defined by 31 U.S.C. 1115(h).
    State governments play an important role in protecting 
individuals, businesses, and state and local agencies from 
cyber-attacks. The Committee notes that cybersecurity is 
identified as a core capability gap in the annual National 
Preparedness Report. While FEMA does not prescribe minimum 
funding amounts for specific capability gaps, FEMA is urged to 
continue to encourage states to address critical cybersecurity 
vulnerabilities through existing SHSGP grant funding.
    Urban Area Security Initiative. The Committee recommends 
$630,000,000 for the Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI), 
$181,156,000 above the amount requested and $25,000,000 above 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2017. The increase above 
fiscal year 2017 is for the Nonprofit Security Grant Program.
    The Committee expects the Secretary to prioritize UASI 
funding towards urban areas that are subject to the greatest 
terrorism risk, and to allocate resources in proportion to that 
risk. Consistent with fiscal year 2017, the Department shall 
limit UASI funding to urban areas representing up to 85 percent 
of the national urban area risk.
    Firefighter Assistance Grants. The Committee recommends 
$690,000,000 for firefighter assistance grants, of which 
$345,000,000 is for the Assistance to Firefighters Grant 
program for firefighter equipment, training, vehicles, and 
other resources, and $345,000,000 is for firefighter jobs under 
the Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response grant 
program. The total amount is $1,312,000 above the request and 
the same as the amount provided in fiscal year 2017.
    Today, crude oil-by-rail communities and their first 
responders lack the equipment, training, and operational 
support they need to meet the public safety challenges posed by 
derailments. FEMA is encouraged to give high priority 
consideration to grants providing for planning, training, and 
equipment to firefighters for crude oil-by-rail and ethanol-by-
rail derailment and incident response to help meet the needs of 
our most vulnerable communities and first responders.
    National Predisaster Mitigation Fund. The Committee 
recommends $100,000,000 for the National Predisaster Mitigation 
Fund (PDM), $60,984,000 above the amount requested and the same 
as the amount provided in fiscal year 2017. PDM grants are one 
of the only sources of federal mitigation funding for 
communities prior to a disaster. It has been repeatedly 
demonstrated that these types of investments lead to 
significant savings by mitigating risks, reducing damage from 
future disasters, and lowering flood insurance premiums.
    Flood Hazard Mapping and Risk Analysis. The Committee 
recommends $177,531,000 for Flood Hazard Mapping and Risk 
Analysis, $177,531,000 above the amount requested and the same 
as the amount provided in fiscal year 2017. In lieu of 
discretionary funding for FEMA's Risk Mapping, Assessment, and 
Planning (Risk MAP) program, the fiscal year 2018 budget 
proposed to establish a new surcharge on National Flood 
Insurance Program (NFIP) policies to fund these activities. The 
Committee believes the Risk MAP program is critical to a wide 
range of users, not just flood insurance policy holders. In 
addition to informing flood insurance rates, flood mapping data 
is used to establish zoning, land use, and building standards, 
and to support infrastructure, transportation, and emergency 
management planning and response. Therefore, the recommendation 
sustains funding for the program at fiscal year 2017 levels.
    Accurate flood mapping data is the foundation of ensuring 
that communities are resilient in the face of disaster. FEMA's 
data collection and modeling processes must be transparent from 
beginning to end and involve the active participation of local 
jurisdictions to ensure maps accurately reflect local 
conditions and minimize costs to local communities. FEMA is 
directed to assess its existing processes to identify potential 
areas for improvement, including the process for reviewing and 
responding to appeals of preliminary Flood Insurance Rate Maps 
received from local communities. FEMA shall brief the Committee 
not later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this Act 
on any changes planned or implemented as a result of this 
assessment.
    Further, FEMA is directed to allocate flood map funding to 
assist local governments and cooperating technical partners in 
acquiring the data collection tools necessary to produce 
accurate, local data that meet FEMA's standards for use in the 
agency's modeling processes to re-map local jurisdictions.

                   Education, Training, and Exercises

    The Committee recommends $269,267,000 for Education, 
Training, and Exercises, $106,000,000 above the amount 
requested and $4,660,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2017.
    The Committee recognizes that FEMA plays a unique role in 
raising the baseline capabilities of all first responders and 
is committed to maintaining unique FEMA training opportunities 
related to chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and 
explosives incidents to improve national readiness.
    National Domestic Preparedness Consortium. The Committee 
recommends $98,000,000 for the National Domestic Preparedness 
Consortium (NDPC), $98,000,000 above the amount requested and 
$3,000,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2017. The 
NDPC provides critical training for the counter-terrorism 
preparedness needs of the nation's emergency first responders 
within the context of all hazards, including chemical, 
biological, radiological, and explosive weapons of mass 
destruction.
    Continuing Training Grants. The Committee recommends 
$8,000,000 for Continuing Training Grants, $8,000,000 above the 
amount requested and the same as the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2017. Funding supports training related to: crisis 
management for school-based incidents; mass fatality planning 
and response; the development of emergency operations plans, 
including interagency communications and coordination and 
response planning for individuals with access and functional 
needs; rail car safety, particularly for the transportation of 
crude oil and other hazardous materials; media engagement 
strategies for first responders; agro-terrorism; food and 
animal safety; environmental health and hazardous materials 
incidents; and the development and delivery of cybersecurity-
related training, exercises, and technical assistance. Within 
the total, FEMA shall prioritize funding of not less than 
$3,000,000, to be competitively awarded, for FEMA-certified 
rural and tribal training.

                          DISASTER RELIEF FUND

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................    $7,328,515,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................     7,351,720,000
Recommended in the bill...............................     7,327,720,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................          -795,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................       -24,000,000
 
Note: Totals include funding designated by the Congress as being for
  disaster relief pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(D) of the Balanced
  Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

    FEMA uses the Disaster Relief Fund (DRF) appropriation to 
direct, coordinate, manage, and fund eligible response and 
recovery efforts associated with domestic major disasters and 
emergencies that overwhelm state and tribal resources pursuant 
to the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency 
Assistance Act, P.L. 93-288 (as amended). Specifically, the DRF 
supports the pre-disaster surge of personnel, equipment, and 
supplies; response and recovery efforts following emergency 
declarations and major disaster declarations; fire management 
assistance grants (FMAG); and Disaster Readiness and Support. 
Response and recovery activities include emergency protection 
and debris removal; the repair and replacement of qualifying 
disaster-damaged public infrastructure and facilities; eligible 
hazard mitigation initiatives; financial assistance to eligible 
disaster survivors; and FMAG for qualifying large wildfires on 
non-federal property.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends a total of $7,327,720,000 for the 
DRF, including $6,793,000,000 that is designated by the 
Congress as being for disaster relief pursuant to section 
251(b)(2)(D) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
Control Act of 1985. Consistent with the fiscal year 2017 DHS 
Appropriations Act, the recommendation does not include the 
proposed $24,000,000 transfer to the OIG for audits of 
disaster-related grant awards, and instead provides the funds 
directly to the OIG for better congressional oversight.
    While prior year statutory requirements for annual and 
monthly DRF reporting are not continued, FEMA shall submit to 
the Committees and post to the Agency's website such 
information in the same manner as directed in Public Law 114 4.
    The Committee recognizes the economic stress that can be 
placed on rural regions of the nation following a disaster. In 
particular, many rural communities located in states with large 
population centers are often disadvantaged by the disaster 
declaration process. The Disaster Declaration Improvement Act 
(H.R. 1665), which passed the House unanimously on May 5, 2017, 
directs the Administrator of FEMA, in making recommendations to 
the President regarding a major disaster declaration, to give 
greater weight and consideration to severe local impact of 
disasters. FEMA shall brief the Committee not later than 60 
days after the date of enactment of this Act on how FEMA would 
implement this directive if enacted in law.

                     NATIONAL FLOOD INSURANCE FUND

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $181,799,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................       253,500,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       203,500,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       +21,701,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................       -50,000,000
 

    The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is a voluntary 
federal program that enables property owners to purchase flood 
insurance when participating communities adopt and enforce 
floodplain management requirements that reduce the future 
economic impact of floods on private and public structures.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $13,573,000 for salaries and 
expenses associated with flood management and $189,927,000 for 
flood plain management and flood mapping. Flood mitigation 
funds are available until September 30, 2019, and are offset by 
premium collections. In addition, the bill establishes 
obligation limitations on the use of mandatory NFIP 
collections, including $175,000,000 for flood mitigation and 
flood mitigation assistance grants and $5,000,000 for the 
Office of the Flood Insurance Advocate (OFIA). The 
recommendation does not include the proposals to establish a 
new surcharge or to increase premiums and surcharges on flood 
insurance policies, as the authorization of these proposals is 
not under the jurisdiction of this Committee.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget Request     Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
National Flood Insurance Fund
    Floodplain Management and            $239,927,000       $189,927,000
     Mapping......................
    Mission Support...............         13,573,000         13,573,000
                                   -------------------------------------
        Total, National Flood            $253,500,000       $203,500,000
         Insurance Fund...........
        Offsetting Fee Collections       -253,500,000       -203,500,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee continues to support the OFIA and encourages 
the Advocate to assist policy holders in accessing resources to 
validate applicable premium rates as FEMA establishes the 
rating criteria for all NFIP policies. The Advocate is required 
to aid potential policy holders under the NFIP in obtaining and 
verifying accurate and reliable flood insurance rate 
information when purchasing or renewing a flood insurance 
policy under the Homeowner Flood Insurance Affordability Act of 
2014.
    Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs) are the basis for 
establishing the floodplain management responsibilities of 
communities participating in the Community Rating System 
program and for determining which properties require flood 
insurance coverage as a condition of receiving a mortgage from 
a federally regulated or insured lender. The Committee is aware 
that, as FEMA updates FIRMs across the country, it requests 
documentation from local communities and levee sponsors to 
demonstrate that levees meet or continue to meet the regulatory 
criteria for accreditation. According to a November 2014 
Memorandum of Understanding between FEMA and the U.S. Army 
Corps of Engineers (USACE), levee inspection reports by USACE 
may satisfy certain criteria for FEMA accreditation. FEMA is 
directed to work closely with USACE to share information 
related to levee accreditation and avoid imposing unnecessary 
costs on levee sponsors or surrounding communities.
    In many communities, particularly in coastal areas, there 
are often a relatively small number of high-value homes 
existing alongside far more modest homes and businesses that 
have been present for decades, with a commensurate disparity in 
household income and financial resources. The Committee is 
aware of concerns that the use of micro-simulation models in 
determining eligibility for NFIP vouchers would result in 
skewed assumptions regarding average home values and incomes of 
NFIP policy holders, resulting in the disqualification of some 
homeowners who truly need the vouchers. As a means to address 
affordability of the NFIP, it is critical that accurate data be 
used in determining eligibility for and distribution of 
vouchers. For the forthcoming statutorily mandated 
affordability framework in which vouchers are being considered, 
FEMA is directed to collaborate with the Department of Housing 
and Urban Development and the U.S. Census Bureau to use data on 
actual home values and household income instead of simply 
relying on micro-simulation modeling.

             TITLE III--ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--THIS ACT


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    Section 301. The Committee continues a provision limiting 
expenses for administration of grants.
    Section 302. The Committee continues a provision specifying 
timeframes for grant applications and awards.
    Section 303. The Committee continues a provision that 
requires five day advance notification for certain grant awards 
under ``FEMA--Federal Assistance''.
    Section 304. The Committee continues a provision that 
addresses the availability of certain grant funds for the 
installation of communications towers.
    Section 305. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision allowing reimbursements for the costs of providing 
humanitarian relief to unaccompanied alien children and to 
alien adults and their minor children to be an eligible use for 
certain Homeland Security grants.
    Section 306. The Committee continues a provision providing 
for the receipt and expenditure of fees collected for the 
Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program, as authorized by 
Public Law 105-276.

        TITLE IV--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TRAINING, AND SERVICES


           United States Citizenship and Immigration Services


 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $121,139,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................       131,513,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       131,513,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       +10,374,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

                                Mission

    The mission of United States Citizenship and Immigration 
Services (USCIS) is to adjudicate and grant immigration and 
citizenship benefits, provide accurate and useful information 
to customers, and promote an awareness and understanding of 
citizenship in support of immigrant integration, while 
protecting the integrity of the nation's immigration system. 
Funded primarily through fees, the only discretionary spending 
is for the E-Verify program, an information technology system 
that enables employers to determine a job applicant's 
eligibility to work in the United States.

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $103,912,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................       108,856,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       108,856,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................        +4,944,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

    The USCIS Operations and Support (O&S;) appropriation 
encompasses the funding for ongoing mission operations, mission 
support, and associated management and administration costs of 
the E-Verify program.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $108,856,000 in discretionary 
funding for O&S;, the same as the amount requested and 
$4,944,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2017.
    The Committee directs DHS, not later than 60 days after the 
date of enactment of this Act, to brief the Committee on 
changes to the vetting process for benefit programs, as 
directed by the Executive Order, Protecting the Nation from 
Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States.
    As in prior years, the bill makes available $10,000,000 in 
fee revenue to support the Citizenship and Integration Grant 
Program. In addition, USCIS continues to have the authority to 
accept private donations to support this program. The Committee 
directs USCIS to provide an update on its planned use of this 
authority not later than 30 days after the date of enactment of 
this Act.
    The Committee directs DHS to administer the H-2B and H-2A 
visa programs in a manner consistent with the law and to 
continue to process applications as quickly as possible.
    As directed in House Report 114-668, USCIS shall continue 
to brief the Committee on its framework for prioritizing 
Immigration Benefit Fraud Assessments, to include how USCIS 
currently applies fraud prevention and detection techniques.
    The Committee encourages USCIS to maintain naturalization 
fees at an affordable level and expects the continued use of 
fee waivers for applicants who can demonstrate an inability to 
pay the naturalization fee. USCIS is also encouraged to 
consider whether the current naturalization fee is a barrier to 
naturalization for those earning between 150 percent and 200 
percent of the federal poverty guidelines, who are not 
currently eligible for a fee waiver.
    A recent GAO report on the Systematic Alien Verification 
for Entitlements (SAVE) system (GAO-17-204) found that, while 
the system accurately reported the status of benefit applicants 
99 percent of the time, the majority of user agencies did not 
complete additional steps to verify an applicant's immigration 
status when prompted by the system to do so. In addition, the 
report found that USCIS's mechanisms for allowing benefit 
applicants to correct inaccurate personal information was 
inadequate, and concluded that the SAVE Monitoring and 
Compliance Branch lacks a documented, risk-based strategy for 
monitoring user agencies. The Committee expects USCIS to 
provide regular updates on the status of complying with the 
report's nine recommendations.
    The Committee encourages USCIS to work with CBP to provide 
lawful permanent residents who arrive at ports of entry with 
information about the naturalization process and to encourage 
them to apply for U.S. citizenship. USCIS and CBP can provide 
this information through Automated Passport Control self-
service kiosks or through naturalization videos or signage 
created by the Office of Citizenship for display at USCIS 
locations and in the passport control or customs lines where 
lawful permanent residents wait to re-enter the United States.
    The Committee urges USCIS to dedicate additional resources 
to the adjudication of U visas for victims of certain crimes 
who have suffered mental or physical abuse and are helpful to 
law enforcement or government officials in the investigation or 
prosecution of criminal activity.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................       $15,227,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................        22,657,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        22,657,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................         7,430,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

    The USCIS Procurement, Construction, and Improvements 
(PC&I;) appropriation funds the planning and acquisition costs 
for the E-Verify program, which helps U.S. employers ensure 
they have a legal workforce by providing employment 
authorization status verification of their recently hired 
employees. The PC&I; appropriation helps ensure the integrity of 
the immigration system through strengthening and modernizing 
the infrastructure supporting the E-Verify program.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $22,657,000 in discretionary 
funding for PC&I;, the same as the request and $7,430,000 above 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2017.

                Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers


 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $242,518,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................       272,759,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       260,099,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       +17,581,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................       -12,660,000
 

                                Mission

    The Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC) serves 
as an interagency law enforcement training organization for 
over 90 federal agencies and numerous state, local, tribal, and 
international law enforcement agencies.

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $242,518,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................       272,759,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       260,099,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       +17,581,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................       -12,660,000
 

    The Operations and Support (O&S;) appropriation funds 
expenses in support of the Law Enforcement Training and Mission 
Support PPAs, including: salaries and benefits; supplies, 
services, and equipment; travel; basic training tuition and 
overhead; minor construction and maintenance; and supplies, 
services, and equipment, among other expenses.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $260,099,000 for O&S;, $12,660,000 
below the amount requested and $17,581,000 above the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2017. The reduction to the request 
reflects updated hiring timelines by CBP and ICE.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget Request      Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Support
    Law Enforcement Training......       $244,725,000       $232,065,000
    Mission Support...............         28,034,000         28,034,000
                                   -------------------------------------
        Total, Operations and            $272,759,000       $260,099,000
         Support..................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Director of FLETC shall schedule basic or advanced law 
enforcement training, or both, at all four training facilities 
to ensure they are operated at the highest capacity throughout 
the fiscal year.

                   Science and Technology Directorate


 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $781,746,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................       627,324,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       638,100,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................      -143,646,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................       +10,776,000
 

                                Mission

    The mission of the Science and Technology Directorate (S&T;) 
is to conduct and support research, development, developmental 
and operational testing and evaluation, and the timely 
transition of homeland security capabilities to federal, state, 
and local operational end users.

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $311,122,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................       254,618,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       254,618,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       -56,504,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

    The Operations and Support (O&S;) appropriation funds the 
management of S&T; activities to deliver advanced technology 
solutions to DHS components and first responders.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $254,618,000 for O&S;, the same as 
the amount requested and $56,504,000 below the amount provided 
in fiscal year 2017.
    Without prejudice, and due to funding limitations, the 
recommendation does not include support for three laboratory 
facilities owned and operated by S&T; that the Administration 
proposed for closure. Although the Department has asserted that 
much of the work performed at these facilities is not directly 
tied to the DHS mission or that research and capabilities 
within the DHS mission space may be replicated at other 
facilities, it has not sufficiently justified the proposed 
closures or adequately planned for how their operations will be 
either phased out or could be realigned to other agencies. The 
closure of the National Urban Security Technology Laboratory 
and the Chemical Security Analysis Center will reduce the 
ability the homeland security community to prepare, protect and 
respond to radiological, nuclear and chemical threats. In 
addition, the Committee is very concerned that the closure of 
the National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center 
(NBACC) will result in a loss in capability to the federal 
government in the field of bio-forensics and bio-threats, which 
has broader implications for the safety of the American people. 
Therefore, the Committee directs S&T; to work with other federal 
stakeholders which utilize the facility to determine whether 
NBACC should be transitioned to another agency and, if so, 
plan, prepare for, and implement an orderly transition during 
fiscal year 2018. S&T; and other federal stakeholders identified 
by S&T;, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation, shall 
jointly brief the Committee not later than 60 days after the 
date of enactment of this Act on its transition plan and 
timeline for execution. If the joint determination is for S&T; 
to maintain ownership of NBACC, the briefing shall address an 
appropriate plan for other federal stakeholders to reimburse 
S&T; for their share of the costs incurred to operate the 
facility, conduct R&D;, and perform additional activities in 
furtherance of those agencies missions. In the meantime, 
pending final dispositions on the proposed closures of the 
three labs in a final appropriations Act, S&T; is directed to 
refrain from making any final decisions that would begin or 
require the closure of the three labs.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget request     Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Support
    Laboratory Facilities.........        $92,243,000        $92,243,000
    Acquisition and Operations             42,552,000         42,552,000
     Analysis.....................
    Mission Support...............        119,823,000        119,823,000
                                   -------------------------------------
        Total, Operations and            $254,618,000       $254,618,000
         Support..................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                        RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $470,624,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................       372,706,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       383,482,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       -87,142,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................       +10,776,000
 

    The Research and Development (R&D;) appropriation funds 
state-of-the-art technology and solutions to meet the needs of 
DHS components and the first responder community, including 
critical homeland security-related research and education at 
U.S. colleges and universities to address high-priority, DHS-
related challenges and to enhance homeland security 
capabilities over the long term.

                             Recommendation

    The Committee recommends $383,482,000 for R&D;, $10,776,000 
above the amount requested and $87,142,000 below the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2017.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget request     Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Research and Development
    Research, Development, and           $342,982,000       $342,982,000
     Innovation...................
    University Programs...........         29,724,000         40,500,000
                                   -------------------------------------
        Total, Research and              $372,706,000       $383,482,000
         Development..............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                 Research, Development, and Innovation

    The Committee recommends $342,982,000 for Research, 
Development, and Innovation (RD&I;), the same as the amount 
requested and $87,142,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 2017. S&T; is directed to brief the Committee not later 
than 30 days after the date of enactment of this Act on the 
proposed allocation of RD&I; funds by project and thrust area, 
and to update the Committee on any changes from the original 
allocation.
    The Committee supports the continued implementation of the 
Integrated Product Team process, which prioritizes R&D; 
activities across the Department and directly links S&T; 
projects to component-identified and validated technological 
capability gaps. Further, the Committee continues to support 
S&T;'s Apex programs, which focus on critical research areas 
such as developing and fielding next generation first responder 
technology.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of the resilience 
and security of the nation's critical infrastructure--both 
physical and cyber--to national security and economic vitality. 
S&T; is encouraged to support R&D; and education initiatives to 
strengthen these efforts in a collaborative, interdisciplinary 
manner that leverages the private sector, academic 
institutions, industry, and other federal government 
organizations.
    S&T; and the Coast Guard are encouraged to continue existing 
partnerships with museums and schools on oceanographic programs 
that support science, technology, engineering, and math 
education, and consider expanding these programs with minority-
serving institutions.
    The Committee encourages the continued collaboration 
between S&T; and the Israeli Ministry of Public Security in the 
development of first responder and cybersecurity technologies, 
as authorized in Public Law 114-304.
    The Committee is concerned with the security 
vulnerabilities of our nation's mass transit and passenger rail 
systems, and the ability of violent extremist organizations or 
individuals to exploit weaknesses in existing rail safety 
systems. Therefore, the Committee strongly encourages DHS to 
explore ways to better utilize its laboratory facilities to 
rapidly research, develop, prototype, and deploy cutting-edge 
counterterrorism technologies to close any counterterrorism 
gaps in our mass transit and passenger rail systems.
    The Committee supports S&T;'s efforts to develop, promote, 
and transfer open source software and other open technologies, 
including activities conducted through the DHS Homeland Open 
Security Technology program and associated activities.
    The Committee is aware of a recent datacasting pilot 
program which DHS conducted in collaboration with Houston 
Public Media and the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory. 
The Committee is encouraged by this novel application of 
existing technology and use of available electromagnetic 
spectrum and requests a briefing on this program and the 
Department's plans for future deployment within 60 days after 
the date of enactment of this Act.
    The Committee commends DHS on issuing its Plan to Support 
Increased Public Access to the Results of Research Funded by 
the Federal Government on December 27, 2016. The Committee 
urges the Department to continue its efforts towards full 
implementation of the plan and directs S&T; to provide an update 
on its progress not later than 30 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act.
    The Committee supports the new S&T; Small Unmanned Aircraft 
Systems Demonstration Range Facility, and encourages S&T; to 
leverage this facility to advance research on maritime UAS 
systems and sensors.
    The Committee is aware of ongoing R&D; by both S&T; and the 
Coast Guard on promising technologies that can search wide 
swaths of open ocean from an aircraft and detect a person in 
the water. These technologies have the potential to greatly 
enhance the Coast Guard's search and rescue mission, as well as 
be used in several other homeland security applications. S&T; 
and the Coast Guard are encouraged to continue their efforts in 
this field and to brief the Committees on the status not later 
than 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act.

                          University Programs

    The Committee recommends $40,500,000 for University 
Programs, $10,776,000 above the amount requested and the same 
as the amount provided in fiscal year 2017. The recommendation 
restores the proposed cuts to University Programs to ensure 
S&T;'s ability to maintain 10 Centers of Excellence. The 
Committee encourages S&T; to prioritize collaborations with 
research universities to support research in critical homeland 
security topics, including border security, cybersecurity, 
supply chain defense, biological threats, animal defense, 
modeling and simulation, and first responder safety.

                   Domestic Nuclear Detection Office


 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $352,484,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................       330,440,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       330,440,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       -22,044,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

                                Mission

    The mission of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office is to 
prevent nuclear terrorism by continuously improving 
capabilities to deter, detect, respond to, and attribute 
attacks, in coordination with domestic and international 
partners.

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................       $50,042,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................        54,664,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        54,664,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................        +4,622,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

    The Operations and Support (O&S;) appropriation supports the 
day-to-day operation and maintenance of the organization, 
including, but not limited to, salaries, services, supplies, 
utilities, travel, training, and transportation, as well as 
minor procurement, construction, and improvement projects.

                             Recommendation

    As requested, the Committee recommends $54,664,000 for O&S;, 
$4,622,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2017.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $101,053,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................        87,096,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        87,096,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       -13,957,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

    Procurement, Construction, and Improvements (PC&I;) provides 
funds necessary for the planning, operational development, 
engineering, and purchase of one or more assets prior to 
sustainment.

                             Recommendation

    As requested, the Committee recommends $87,096,000 for 
PC&I;, $13,957,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 
2017.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget request     Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Procurement, Construction, and
 Improvements
    Large Scale Detection Systems.        $62,524,000        $62,524,000
    Human Portable Radiation/              24,572,000         24,572,000
     Nuclear Detection Systems....
                                   -------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Procurement,            $87,096,000        $87,096,000
         Construction, and
         Improvements.............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                        RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................      $155,061,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................       144,161,000
Recommended in the bill...............................       144,161,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................       -10,900,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

    The Research and Development (R&D;) appropriation supports 
fundamental knowledge discovery, basic and applied research, 
technology and systems development leading to product 
acquisition, test and evaluation, and associated costs.

                             Recommendation

    As requested, the Committee recommends $144,161,000 for 
R&D;, $10,900,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2017.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget request     Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Research and Development
    Architecture Planning and             $15,937,000        $15,937,000
     Analysis.....................
    Transformational Research and          60,581,000         60,581,000
     Development..................
    Detection Capability                   15,155,000         15,155,000
     Development..................
    Detection Capability                   34,127,000         34,127,000
     Assessments..................
    Nuclear Forensics.............         18,361,000         18,361,000
                                   -------------------------------------
        Total, Research and              $144,161,000       $144,161,000
         Development..............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                           FEDERAL ASSISTANCE

 
 
 
Appropriation, fiscal year 2017.......................       $46,328,000
Budget request, fiscal year 2018......................        44,519,000
Recommended in the bill...............................        44,519,000
Bill compared with:
    Appropriation, fiscal year 2017...................        -1,809,000
    Budget request, fiscal year 2018..................             - - -
 

    The Federal Assistance (FA) appropriation supports 
integration and outreach efforts necessary to ensure that 
federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial (FSLTT) partners 
have access to and the knowledge of how to leverage available 
resources to support the radiological/nuclear detection 
mission. It also helps ensure that radiological/nuclear 
detection equipment deployed by FSLTT partners are accompanied 
by the appropriate concepts of operations, training, exercises, 
and radiological/nuclear alarm response protocols.

                             Recommendation

    As requested, the Committee recommends $44,519,000 for FA, 
$1,809,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2017.
    A comparison of the budget request to the Committee 
recommended level by budget activity is as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                      Budget request     Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Federal Assistance
    Federal, State, Local,                $23,384,000        $23,384,000
     Territorial, and Tribal
     Support......................
    Securing the Cities...........         21,135,000         21,135,000
                                   -------------------------------------
        Total, Federal Assistance.        $44,519,000        $44,519,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

             TITLE IV--ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--THIS ACT

    Section 401. The Committee continues a provision allowing 
USCIS to acquire, operate, equip, and dispose of up to five 
vehicles under certain scenarios.
    Section 402. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting USCIS from granting immigration benefits unless the 
results of background checks are completed prior to the 
granting of the benefit and the results do not preclude the 
granting of the benefit.
    Section 403. The Committee continues a provision limiting 
the use of A-76 competitions by USCIS.
    Section 404. The Committee continues a provision making 
immigration examination fee collections explicitly available 
for immigrant integration grants, not to exceed $10,000,000, in 
fiscal year 2018.
    Section 405. The Committee continues a provision 
authorizing FLETC to distribute funds for incurred training 
expenses.
    Section 406. The Committee continues a provision directing 
the FLETC Accreditation Board to lead the federal law 
enforcement training accreditation process to measure and 
assess federal law enforcement training programs, facilities, 
and instructors.
    Section 407. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision establishing the ``Federal Law Enforcement Training 
Centers--Procurement, Construction, and Improvements'' 
appropriation, and allowing for the acceptance of transfers 
from government agencies into this appropriation.
    Section 408. The Committee continues a provision 
classifying FLETC instructor staff as inherently governmental 
for certain considerations.

                 TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS--THIS ACT


             (INCLUDING TRANSFERS AND RESCISSIONS OF FUNDS)

    Section 501. The Committee continues a provision limiting 
the availability of appropriations to one year unless otherwise 
expressly provided.
    Section 502. The Committee continues a provision providing 
that unexpended balances of prior year appropriations may be 
merged with new appropriation accounts and used for the same 
purpose, subject to reprogramming guidelines.
    Section 503. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision limiting authority to reprogram funds within an 
appropriation above a specified threshold unless the Department 
provides notification to the Committees on Appropriations at 
least 15 days in advance, and providing authority to transfer 
not more than 5 percent between appropriations accounts, with a 
requirement for a 30-day advance notification. A detailed 
funding table identifying each congressional control level for 
reprogramming purposes is included at the end of this report.
    These reprogramming and transfer requirements shall be 
complied with by all agencies funded by the Department of 
Homeland Security Appropriations Act, 2017. In addition, the 
Department shall submit reprogramming and transfer 
notifications on a timely basis and provide complete 
explanations of the reallocations proposed, including detailed 
justifications of the increases and offsets, and any specific 
impact the proposed changes will have on the budget request for 
the following fiscal year and future-year appropriations 
requirements. Each notification submitted to the Committees 
should include a detailed table showing the proposed revisions 
at the account, program, project, and activity level to the 
funding and FTE levels for the current fiscal year and the 
levels requested in the President's budget for the following 
fiscal year.
    The Department shall manage its programs and activities 
within the levels appropriated, and should only submit 
reprogramming or transfer notifications in cases of 
unforeseeable and compelling circumstances that could not have 
been predicted when formulating the budget request for the 
budget year. When the Department submits a reprogramming or 
transfer notification to the Committees and does not receive 
identical responses from the House and the Senate, it is 
expected to reconcile the House and the Senate differences 
before proceeding.
    The Department is not to submit a notification for a 
reprogramming or transfer of funds after June 30 except in 
extraordinary circumstances that imminently threaten the safety 
of human life or the protection of property. If a reprogramming 
or transfer is needed after June 30, the notice should contain 
sufficient documentation as to why it meets this statutory 
exception.
    Deobligated funds are also subject to the reprogramming and 
transfer guidelines and requirements set forth in this section.
    The Secretary is permitted to transfer up to $20,000,000 to 
address immigration emergencies.
    Section 504. The Committee continues a provision by 
reference prohibiting funds appropriated or otherwise made 
available to the Department to make payment to the Working 
Capital Fund (WCF), except for activities and amounts allowed 
in the President's fiscal year 2018 budget request. Funds 
provided to the WCF are available until expended. The 
Department can only charge components for direct usage of the 
WCF and these funds may be used only for the purposes 
consistent with the WCF uses of the contributing component. Any 
funds paid in advance or for reimbursement must reflect the 
full cost of each service. The Department shall submit a 
notification prior to adding a new activity to the fund or 
eliminating an existing activity from the fund. For activities 
added to the fund, such notifications shall detail the source 
of funds by PPA. In addition, the Department shall submit 
quarterly WCF execution reports to the Committees that include 
activity-level detail.
    Section 505. The Committee continues a provision providing 
that not to exceed 50 percent of unobligated balances from 
prior year appropriations for each Operations and Support 
appropriation, the Coast Guard's Operating Expenses 
appropriation, and amounts for salaries and expenses in the 
Coast Guard's Reserve Training and Acquisition, Construction, 
and Improvements accounts, shall remain available through 
fiscal year 2019, subject to section 503 reprogramming 
requirements.
    Section 506. The Committee continues a provision that deems 
intelligence activities to be specifically authorized during 
fiscal year 2018 until the enactment of an Act authorizing 
intelligence activities for fiscal year 2018.
    Section 507. The Committee continues a provision requiring 
notification to the Committees at least three days before DHS 
executes or announces grant allocations; grant awards; contract 
awards, including contracts covered by the Federal Acquisition 
Regulation; other transaction agreements; letters of intent; a 
task or delivery order on multiple award contracts totaling 
$1,000,000 or more; a task or delivery order greater than 
$10,000,000 from multi-year funds; or sole-source grant awards. 
Notifications shall include a description of projects or 
activities to be funded and their location, including city, 
county, and state.
    Section 508. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting all agencies from purchasing, constructing, or 
leasing additional facilities for federal law enforcement 
training without advance notification to the Committees.
    Section 509. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting the use of funds for any construction, repair, 
alteration, or acquisition project for which a prospectus, if 
required under chapter 33 of title 40, United States Code, has 
not been approved.
    Section 510. The Committee continues a provision that 
consolidates by reference prior-year statutory provisions 
related to a contracting officer's technical representative 
training; sensitive security information; and the use of funds 
in conformance with section 303 of the Energy Policy Act of 
1992.
    Section 511. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting the use of funds in contravention of the Buy 
American Act.
    Section 512. The Committee continues a provision regarding 
the oath of allegiance required by section 337 of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act.
    Section 513. The Committee continues a provision by 
reference that prohibits funding for any position designated as 
a Principal Federal Official during a Stafford Act declared 
disaster or emergency.
    Section 514. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting funds for planning, testing, piloting, or 
developing a national identification card.
    Section 515. The Committee continues a provision directing 
that any official required by this Act to report or certify to 
the Committees on Appropriations may not delegate such 
authority unless expressly authorized to do so in this Act.
    Section 516. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting the use of funds for the transfer or release of 
individuals detained at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo 
Bay, Cuba into or within the United States.
    Section 517. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting funds in this Act to be used for first-class 
travel.
    Section 518. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting the use of funds to employ illegal workers as 
described in Section 274A(h)(3) of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act.
    Section 519. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting funds appropriated or otherwise made available by 
this Act to pay for award or incentive fees for contractors 
with below satisfactory performance or performance that fails 
to meet the basic requirements of the contract.
    Section 520. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting the use of funds to enter into a federal contract 
unless the contract meets requirements of the Federal Property 
and Administrative Services Act of 1949 or chapter 137 of title 
10 U.S.C., and the Federal Acquisition Regulation, unless the 
contract is otherwise authorized by statute without regard to 
this section.
    Section 521. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision providing $42,233,000 for financial systems 
modernization activities.
    Section 522. The Committee continues a provision requiring 
DHS computer systems to block electronic access to pornography, 
except for law enforcement purposes.
    Section 523. The Committee continues a provision regarding 
the transfer of firearms by federal law enforcement personnel.
    Section 524. The Committee continues a provision regarding 
funding restrictions and reporting requirements related to 
conferences occurring outside of the United States.
    Section 525. The Committee continues a provision 
prohibiting funds to reimburse any federal department or agency 
for its participation in a National Special Security Event.
    Section 526. The Committee continues a provision requiring 
a notification, including justification materials, prior to 
implementing any structural pay reform that affects more than 
100 full-time positions or costs more than $5,000,000.
    Section 527. The Committee continues a provision directing 
the Department to post on a public website reports required by 
the Committees on Appropriations unless public posting 
compromises homeland or national security or contains 
proprietary information.
    Section 528. The Committee continues a provision 
authorizing minor procurement, construction, and improvements 
under Operations and Support appropriations, as specified.
    Section 529. The Committee continues a provision related to 
the Arms Trade Treaty.
    Section 530. The Committee includes a new provision to 
authorize DHS to fund out of existing discretionary 
appropriations the expenses of primary and secondary schooling 
of eligible dependents in areas in territories where Department 
of Defense schools are unavailable and public schools available 
do not adequately meet education requirements.
    Section 531. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision rescinding unobligated balances from specified 
programs.
    Section 532. The Committee continues a provision rescinding 
specified funds from the Treasury Forfeiture Fund.
    Section 533. The Committee continues and modifies a 
provision rescinding unobligated balances from the FEMA DRF.
    Section 534. The Committee includes a provision allowing 
the Department to designate ports of entry.
    Section 535. The Committee includes a provision prohibiting 
ICE from paying for abortions except in certain circumstances.
    Section 536. The Committee includes a provision prohibiting 
ICE from requiring any person to perform an abortion.
    Section 537. The Committee includes a provision to clarify 
ICE's obligation to provide escort services outside the 
detention facility.
    Section 538. The Committee includes a provision regarding 
the H-2A seasonal agriculture worker program.
    Section 539. The Committee includes a provision granting 
lawful permanent resident status in the U.S. to Charlie Gard 
and his family for the purposes of medical treatment.
    Section 540. The Committee includes a provision changing 
the statute of limitations for the recovery of FEMA Public 
Assistance Grants.
    Section 541. The Committee includes a Spending Reduction 
Account, as required in House of Representatives Rules.

    APPROPRIATIONS CAN BE USED ONLY FOR THE PURPOSES FOR WHICH MADE

    Title 31 of the United States Code makes clear that 
appropriations can be used only for the purposes for which they 
were appropriated as follows:
    Section 1301. Application.
    (a) Appropriations shall be applied only to the objects for 
which the appropriations were made except as otherwise provided 
by law.

              HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES REPORT REQUIREMENTS

    The following items are included in accordance with various 
requirements of the Rules of the House of Representatives.


         STATEMENT OF GENERAL PERFORMANCE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII off the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the following is a statement of 
general performance goals and objectives for which this measure 
authorizes funding:
    The Committee on Appropriations considers program 
performance, including a program's success in developing and 
attaining outcome-related goals and objectives, in developing 
funding recommendations.

                          RESCISSION OF FUNDS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table is submitted 
describing the rescissions recommended in the accompanying 
bill:
        Account / Activity                                   Rescissions
TSA, Operations and Support (P.L. 115-31)....................$12,928,000
Coast Guard, Alteration of Bridges (P.L. 108-334)............. 1,786,000
Coast Guard, Alteration of Bridges (P.L. 109-90).............. 1,920,000
Coast Guard, Alteration of Bridges (P.L. 109-295)............. 1,791,000
Coast Guard, Alteration of Bridges (P.L. 110-161)............. 3,222,000
Coast Guard, Alteration of Bridges (P.L. 111-83).............. 3,681,000
Coast Guard, AC&I; (P.L. 114-113)..............................25,000,000
Coast Guard, AC&I; (P.L. 115-31)...............................95,000,000
Treasury Asset Forfeiture Fund...............................187,000,000
FEMA, Disaster Relief Fund...................................875,575,000

                           TRANSFER OF FUNDS

    Neither the bill nor report contain any provisions that 
specifically direct the transfer of funds.

    DISCLOSURE OF EARMARKS AND CONGRESSIONAL DIRECTED SPENDING ITEMS

    Neither the bill nor the report contains any Congressional 
earmarks, limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as 
defined in clause 9 of rule XXI.

          Compliance With Rule XIII, Cl. 3(e) (Ramseyer Rule)

  In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italics, existing law in which no change 
is proposed is shown in roman):

ROBERT T. STAFFORD DISASTER RELIEF AND EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE ACT

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


TITLE VII--MISCELLANEOUS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 705. DISASTER GRANT CLOSEOUT PROCEDURES.

  (a) Statute of Limitations.--
          (1) In general.--[Except] Notwithstanding section 
        3716(e) of title 31, United States Code, and except as 
        provided in paragraph (2), no administrative action to 
        recover any payment made to a State or local government 
        for disaster or emergency assistance under this Act 
        shall be initiated in any forum after the date that is 
        3 years after the date of transmission of the final 
        expenditure [report for the disaster or emergency] 
        report for project completion as certified by the 
        grantee.
          (2) Fraud exception.--The limitation under paragraph 
        (1) shall apply unless there is evidence of civil or 
        criminal fraud.
  (b) Rebuttal of Presumption of Record Maintenance.--
          (1) In general.--In any dispute arising under this 
        section after the date that is 3 years after the date 
        of transmission of the final expenditure [report for 
        the disaster or emergency] report for project 
        completion as certified by the grantee, there shall be 
        a presumption that accounting records were maintained 
        that adequately identify the source and application of 
        funds provided for financially assisted activities.
          (2) Affirmative evidence.--The presumption described 
        in paragraph (1) may be rebutted only on production of 
        affirmative evidence that the State or local government 
        did not maintain documentation described in that 
        paragraph.
          (3) Inability to produce documentation.--The 
        inability of the Federal, State, or local government to 
        produce source documentation supporting expenditure 
        reports later than 3 years after the date of 
        transmission of the final expenditure report for 
        project completion as certified by the grantee shall 
        not constitute evidence to rebut the presumption 
        described in paragraph (1).
          (4) Right of access.--The period during which the 
        Federal, State, or local government has the right to 
        access source documentation shall not be limited to the 
        required 3-year retention period referred to in 
        paragraph (3), but shall last as long as the records 
        are maintained.
  (c) Binding Nature of Grant Requirements.--A State or local 
government shall not be liable for reimbursement or any other 
penalty for any payment made under this Act if--
          (1) the payment was authorized by an approved 
        agreement specifying the costs;
          (2) the costs were reasonable; and
          (3) the purpose of the grant was accomplished.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


              Compliance With Rule XIII, Clause 3(f)(1)(A)

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee has inserted at the 
appropriate place in the report a description of the effects of 
provisions proposed in the accompanying bill which may be 
considered, under certain circumstances, to change the 
application of existing law, either directly or indirectly.
    The bill provides, in some instances, funding of agencies 
and activities where legislation has not yet been finalized. In 
addition, the bill carries language, in some instances, 
permitting activities not authorized by law. Additionally, the 
Committee includes a number of general provisions.

    TITLE I--DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT, OPERATIONS, INTELLIGENCE, AND 
                               OVERSIGHT

            Office of the Secretary and Executive Management

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
executive management for operations and support, including 
funds for reception and representation expenses.

                         Management Directorate

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
operations and support, including funds for reception and 
representation expenses and provides two-year availability of 
funds for certain activities.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

    The Committee includes language providing for funds for 
procurement, construction, and improvements.

                        RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
research and development.

          Intelligence, Analysis, and Operations Coordination

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

    The Committee includes language providing funds for the 
Office of Intelligence and Analysis and the Office of 
Operations Coordination, including funding for official 
representation expenses, and provides two-year availability of 
funds for certain activities.

                      Office of Inspector General

                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

    The Committee includes language providing funds for the 
Office of Inspector General as well as certain confidential 
operational expenses, including the payment of informants.

                       Administrative Provisions

    Language requiring the Secretary to submit the Future Years 
Homeland Security Program at the same time as the President's 
budget proposal.
    Language requiring the Chief Financial Officer to submit 
monthly budget execution and staffing reports within 30 days 
after the close of each month.
    Language regarding grants or contracts awarded by means 
other than full and open competition and requires the Inspector 
General to review them and report the results to the 
Committees.
    Language requiring the Secretary to link all contracts that 
provide award fees to successful acquisition outcomes.
    Language requiring the Secretary, in conjunction with the 
Secretary of Treasury, to notify the Committees of any proposed 
transfers from the Department of Treasury Forfeiture Fund to 
any agency at DHS.
    Language related to official costs of the Secretary and 
Deputy Secretary.
    Language requiring the Secretary to submit reports on visa 
overstay data and to post border security metrics on its 
website.

          TITLE II--SECURITY, ENFORCEMENT, AND INVESTIGATIONS


                   U.S. Customs and Border Protection


                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

    The Committee includes language making funds available for 
operations and support including funds for the transportation 
of unaccompanied minor aliens; air and marine assistance to 
other law enforcement agencies and humanitarian efforts; 
purchase or lease of vehicles; maintenance, and procurement of 
marine vessels, aircraft, unmanned aircraft systems; 
contracting with individuals for personal services; Harbor 
Maintenance Fee collections; official reception and 
representation expenses; Customs User Fee collections; payment 
of rental space in connection with preclearance operations; and 
compensation of informants. The Committee provides two-year 
availability of funds for certain activities.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
procurement, construction, and improvements, to include 
procurements to buy, maintain, or operate aircraft and unmanned 
aircraft systems.

                U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement


                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
operations and support, including funds for reception and 
representation expenses, salaries and benefits of operational 
and mission support personnel, and the operation and 
maintenance necessary to sustain the daily effectiveness of 
equipment and facilities. The Committee includes language 
making funds available for the civil enforcement of immigration 
and customs laws, including the detention and removal of 
immigration status violators; special operations; for 
compensation to informants; for the reimbursement of other 
Federal agencies for certain costs; for the purchase or lease 
of vehicles; for maintenance, minor construction, and minor 
improvements of owned and leased facilities; and for the 
enforcement of child labor laws. The Committee provides two-
year availability of funds for certain activities.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
procurement, construction, renovation, and improvements.

                 Transportation Security Administration


                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
operations and support, including funds for reception and 
representation expenses, and establishes conditions under which 
security fees are collected and credited.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
procurement, construction, and improvements.

                        RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
research and development.

                              Coast Guard


                           OPERATING EXPENSES

    The Committee language providing funds for the operations 
and maintenance of the Coast Guard, including passenger motor 
vehicles; small boats; repairs and service life-replacements; 
purchase, lease, or improvement of other equipment; minor shore 
construction projects; recreation and welfare; defense-related 
activities; and the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund. The 
Committee also includes language on reception and 
representation expenses.

                ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE AND RESTORATION

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
environmental compliance and restoration of the Coast Guard.

                            RESERVE TRAINING

    The Committee includes language providing funds for the 
Coast Guard Reserve, including maintenance and operation of the 
Reserve Program; personnel and training costs; and equipment 
and services.

              ACQUISITIONS, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

    The Committee includes language providing funds for the 
Coast Guard acquisition, construction, renovation, and 
improvement of aids to navigation, shore facilities, vessels, 
and aircraft.

              RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
research, development, test, and evaluation; and for 
maintenance, rehabilitation, lease and operation of facilities 
and equipment. The Committee includes language authorizing 
funds to be derived from the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund; 
and authorizing funds received from state and local 
governments, other public authorities, private sources, and 
foreign countries to be credited to this account and used for 
certain purposes.

                              RETIRED PAY

    The Committee includes language providing funds for retired 
pay and medical care for the Coast Guard's retired personnel 
and their dependents and makes these funds available until 
expended.

                      United States Secret Service


                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

    The Committee includes language that provides funds for 
operations and support to include funds for the purchase and 
replacement of vehicles; the hire of passenger motor vehicles; 
aircraft; purchase of motorcycles; rental of certain buildings; 
improvements to buildings as may be necessary for protective 
missions; firearms matches; presentation of awards; research; 
advance payment for commercial accommodations; per diem and 
subsistence allowances; official reception and representation 
expenses; technical assistance and equipment to foreign law 
enforcement organizations. The Committee provides for two-year 
availability of funds for certain activities.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
procurement, construction, and improvement of facilities.

                        RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
research and development.

                       Administrative Provisions

    Language regarding overtime compensation.
    Language allowing CBP to sustain or increase operations in 
Puerto Rico.
    Language the transfer of aircraft and related equipment out 
of CBP unless certain conditions are met.
    Language regarding the availability of COBRA fee revenue.
    Language allowing CBP access to certain reimbursements for 
preclearance activities.
    Language regarding the importation of prescription drugs by 
an individual for personal use.
    Language regarding waivers of the Jones Act.
    Language prohibiting funds from being used by DHS to 
approve, license, facilitate, authorize, or allow the 
trafficking or import of property confiscated by the Cuban 
Government.
    Language allowing the Secretary to reprogram funds within 
and transfer funds to ``U.S. Immigration and Customs 
Enforcement--Operations and Support'' to ensure the detention 
of aliens prioritized for removal.
    Language prohibiting the use of funds provided under the 
heading ``U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement--Operations 
and Support'' for the 287(g) program if the terms of the 
agreement governing the delegation of authority have been 
materially violated.
    Language prohibiting the use of funds provided under the 
heading ``U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement--Operations 
and Support'' to contract for detention services if the 
facility receives less than ``adequate'' ratings in two 
consecutive performance evaluations.
    Language clarifying that certain elected and appointed 
officials are not exempt from federal passenger and baggage 
screening.
    Language authorizing TSA to use funds from the Aviation 
Security Capital Fund for the procurement and installation of 
explosives detection systems or for other purposes authorized 
by law.
    Language prohibiting funds made available by this Act under 
the heading ``Coast Guard--Operating Expenses'' for 
recreational vessel expenses, except to the extent fees are 
collected from owners of yachts and credited to this 
appropriation.
    Language allowing up to $10,000,000 to be reprogrammed to 
or from Military Pay and Allowances within ``Coast Guard--
Operating Expenses''.
    Language allowing the Secret Service to obligate funds in 
anticipation of reimbursement for personnel receiving training.
    Language prohibiting funds made available to the Secret 
Service for the protection of the head of a federal agency 
other than the Secretary of Homeland Security, except where the 
Director has entered into a reimbursable agreement for such 
protection services.
    Language allowing the reprogramming of funds within 
``United States Secret Service--Operations and Support''.
    Language allowing for funds made available for ``United 
States Secret Service--Operations and Support'' to be available 
for travel of employees on protective missions without regard 
to limitations on such expenditures in this or any other Act 
after notification to the Committees on Appropriation.

      TITLE III--PROTECTION, PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND RECOVERY


              National Protection and Programs Directorate


                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
operations and support, including funds for reception and 
representation expenses. The Committee provides for two-year 
availability of funds for certain activities.

                       FEDERAL PROTECTIVE SERVICE

    The Committee includes language making funds available 
until expended for the operations of the Federal Protective 
Service

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
procurement, construction, and improvements.

                        RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
research and development.

                        Office of Health Affairs


                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
operations and support, including two-year availability of 
funds for certain activities.

                  Federal Emergency Management Agency


                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
operations and support.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
procurement, construction, renovation, and improvements.

                           FEDERAL ASSISTANCE

    The Committee includes language providing funds for grants, 
contracts, cooperative agreements, and other activities, 
including for terrorism prevention, public transportation and 
railroad security, port security, firefighter assistance, 
emergency management, predisaster mitigation, flood hazard 
mapping and risk analysis, emergency food and shelter, and 
education, training, exercises, technical assistance, and other 
programs.

                          DISASTER RELIEF FUND

    The Committee includes language making funds available 
until expended for the Disaster Relief Fund.

                     NATIONAL FLOOD INSURANCE FUND

    The Committee includes language making funds available for 
mission support associated with flood management and programs 
and activities under the National Flood Insurance Fund, 
including flood plain management and flood mapping. The 
Committee includes provisions limiting operating expenses, 
commissions and taxes of agents, interest on Treasury 
borrowings, and flood mitigation activities associated with the 
National Flood Insurance Act of 1968. The Committee includes 
language permitting additional fees collected to be credited as 
an offsetting collection and available for floodplain 
management, and language providing that not to exceed four 
percent of the total appropriation is available for 
administrative cost and that funds are available for the Flood 
Insurance Advocate.

                       Administrative Provisions

    Language limiting expenses for administration of grants.
    Language specifying timeframes for grant applications and 
awards.
    Language requires five day advance notification for certain 
grant awards under ``FEMA--Federal Assistance''.
    Language that addresses the availability of certain grant 
funds for the installation of communications towers.
    Language allowing reimbursements for the costs of providing 
humanitarian relief to unaccompanied alien children and to 
alien adults and their minor children to be an eligible use for 
certain Homeland Security grants.
    Language providing for the receipt and expenditure of fees 
collected for the Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program, 
as authorized by Public Law 105-276.

        TITLE IV--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TRAINING, AND SERVICES


               U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services


                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

    The Committee includes language making funds available for 
operations and support for the E-Verify program.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

    The Committee includes language making funds available for 
the E-Verify program for procurement, construction, and 
improvements.

                Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers


                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

    The Committee includes language making funds available for 
operations and support including for official representation 
expenses and purchase of police-type pursuit vehicles. The 
Committee provides two-year availability of funds for certain 
activities.

                   Science and Technology Directorate


                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
operations and support for the Science and Technology 
Directorate. The Committee provides two-year availability of 
funds for certain activities.

                        RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
research and development.

                   Domestic Nuclear Detection Office


                         OPERATIONS AND SUPPORT

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
operations and support for the Domestic Nuclear Detection 
Office.

              PROCUREMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND IMPROVEMENTS

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
procurement, construction, renovation, and improvements.

                        RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee includes language providing funds for 
research and development.

                           FEDERAL ASSISTANCE

    The Committee includes language providing funds for federal 
assistance through grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, 
and other activities.

                       Administrative Provisions

    Language allowing USCIS to acquire, operate, equip, and 
dispose of up to five vehicles under certain scenarios.
    Language prohibiting USCIS from granting immigration 
benefits unless the results of background checks are completed 
prior to the granting of the benefit and the results do not 
preclude the granting of the benefit.
    Language limiting the use of A-76 competitions by USCIS.
    Language making immigration examination fee collections 
explicitly available for immigrant integration grants, not to 
exceed $10,000,000, in fiscal year 2018.
    Language authorizing FLETC to distribute funds for incurred 
training expenses.
    Language directing the FLETC Accreditation Board to lead 
the federal law enforcement training accreditation process to 
measure and assess federal law enforcement training programs, 
facilities, and instructors.
    Language establishing the ``Federal Law Enforcement 
Training Centers--Procurement, Construction, and Improvements'' 
appropriation, and allowing for the acceptance of transfers 
from government agencies into this appropriation.
    Language classifying FLETC instructor staff as inherently 
governmental for certain considerations.

                      TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Language limiting the availability of appropriations to one 
year unless otherwise expressly provided.
    Language that unexpended balances of prior year 
appropriations may be merged with new appropriation accounts 
and used for the same purpose, subject to reprogramming 
guidelines.
    Language limiting authority to reprogram funds within an 
appropriation above a specified threshold unless the Department 
provides notification to the Committees on Appropriations at 
least 15 days in advance, and providing authority to transfer 
not more than 5 percent between appropriations accounts, with a 
requirement for a 30-day advance notification. A detailed 
funding table identifying each congressional control level for 
reprogramming purposes is included at the end of this report.
    Language prohibiting funds appropriated or otherwise made 
available to the Department to make payment to the Working 
Capital Fund (WCF), except for activities and amounts allowed 
in the President's fiscal year 2018 budget request. Funds 
provided to the WCF are available until expended. The 
Department can only charge components for direct usage of the 
WCF and these funds may be used only for the purposes 
consistent with the WCF uses of the contributing component. Any 
funds paid in advance or for reimbursement must reflect the 
full cost of each service. The Department shall submit a 
notification prior to adding a new activity to the fund or 
eliminating an existing activity from the fund. For activities 
added to the fund, such notifications shall detail the source 
of funds by PPA. In addition, the Department shall submit 
quarterly WCF execution reports to the Committees that include 
activity-level detail.
    Language providing that not to exceed 50 percent of 
unobligated balances from prior year appropriations for each 
Operations and Support appropriation, the Coast Guard's 
Operating Expenses appropriation, and amounts for salaries and 
expenses in the Coast Guard's Reserve Training and Acquisition, 
Construction, and Improvements accounts, shall remain available 
through fiscal year 2019, subject to section 503 reprogramming 
requirements.
    Language that deems intelligence activities to be 
specifically authorized during fiscal year 2018 until the 
enactment of an Act authorizing intelligence activities for 
fiscal year 2018.
    Language requiring notification to the Committees at least 
three days before DHS executes or announces grant allocations; 
grant awards; contract awards, including contracts covered by 
the Federal Acquisition Regulation; other transaction 
agreements; letters of intent; a task or delivery order on 
multiple award contracts totaling $1,000,000 or more; a task or 
delivery order greater than $10,000,000 from multi-year funds; 
or sole-source grant awards. Notifications shall include a 
description of projects or activities to be funded and their 
location, including city, county, and state.
    Language prohibiting all agencies from purchasing, 
constructing, or leasing additional facilities for federal law 
enforcement training without advance notification to the 
Committees.
    Language prohibiting the use of funds for any construction, 
repair, alteration, or acquisition project for which a 
prospectus, if required under chapter 33 of title 40, United 
States Code, has not been approved.
    Language that consolidates by reference prior-year 
statutory provisions related to a contracting officer's 
technical representative training; sensitive security 
information; and the use of funds in conformance with section 
303 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992.
    Language prohibiting the use of funds in contravention of 
the Buy American Act.
    Language prohibiting the use of funds to amend the oath of 
allegiance required by section 337 of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act.
    Language that prohibits funding for any position designated 
as a Principal Federal Official during a Stafford Act declared 
disaster or emergency.
    Language prohibiting funds for planning, testing, piloting, 
or developing a national identification card.
    Language directing that any official required by this Act 
to report or certify to the Committees on Appropriations may 
not delegate such authority unless expressly authorized to do 
so in this Act.
    Language prohibiting the use of funds for the transfer or 
release of individuals detained at United States Naval Station, 
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, into or within the United States.
    Language prohibiting funds in this Act to be used for 
first-class travel.
    Language prohibiting the use of funds to employ illegal 
workers as described in Section 274A(h)(3) of the Immigration 
and Nationality Act.
    Language prohibiting funds appropriated or otherwise made 
available by this Act to pay for award or incentive fees for 
contractors with below satisfactory performance or performance 
that fails to meet the basic requirements of the contract.
    Language prohibiting the use of funds to enter into a 
federal contract unless the contract meets requirements of the 
Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 or 
chapter 137 of title 10 U.S.C., and the Federal Acquisition 
Regulation, unless the contract is otherwise authorized by 
statute without regard to this section.
    Language providing $42,233,000 for financial systems 
modernization activities.
    Language requiring DHS computer systems to block electronic 
access to pornography, except for law enforcement purposes.
    Language regarding the transfer of firearms by federal law 
enforcement personnel.
    Language regarding funding restrictions and reporting 
requirements related to conferences occurring outside of the 
United States.
    Language prohibiting funds to reimburse any federal 
department or agency for its participation in a National 
Special Security Event.
    Language requiring a notification, including justification 
materials, prior to implementing any structural pay reform that 
affects more than 100 full-time positions or costs more than 
$5,000,000.
    Language directing the Department to post on a public 
website reports required by the Committees on Appropriations 
unless public posting compromises homeland or national security 
or contains proprietary information.
    Language authorizing minor procurement, construction, and 
improvements under Operations and Support appropriations.
    Language related to the Arms Trade Treaty.
    Language to authorize DHS to fund out of existing 
discretionary appropriations the expenses of primary and 
secondary schooling of eligible dependents in areas in 
territories where Department of Defense schools are unavailable 
and public schools available do not adequately meet education 
requirements.
    Language rescinding unobligated balances from specified 
programs.
    Language rescinding specified funds from the Treasury 
Forfeiture Fund.
    Language rescinding unobligated balances from the FEMA DRF.
    Language allowing the Department to designate ports of 
entry.
    Language prohibiting ICE from paying for abortions except 
in certain circumstances.
    Language prohibiting ICE from requiring any person to 
perform an abortion.
    Language clarifying ICE's obligation to provide escort 
services outside the detention facility.
    Language regarding the H-2A seasonal agriculture worker 
program.
    Language granting lawful permanent resident status in the 
U.S. to Charlie Gard and his family for the purposes of medical 
treatment.
    Language changing the statute of limitations for the 
recovery of FEMA Public Assistance Grants.
    Language specifying the amount by which new budget 
authority in the bill is less than the fiscal year 2017 budget 
allocation.

                  APPROPRIATIONS NOT AUTHORIZED BY LAW

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1) of rule XIII of the House of 
Representatives, the following table lists the appropriations 
in the accompanying bill that are not authorized by law:


                   COMPARISON WITH BUDGET RESOLUTION

    Section 308(a)(1)(A) of the Congressional Budget Act 
requires the report accompanying a bill providing new budget 
authority to contain a statement comparing the levels in the 
bill to the suballocations submitted under section 302(b) of 
the Act for the most recently agreed to concurrent resolution 
on the budget for the applicable fiscal year. That information 
is provided in the table headed ``Comparison of Reported Bill 
to Section 302(b) Suballocation.''

                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                  302(b) allocation             This bill
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                                                                 Budget                    Budget
                                                               Authority     Outlays     Authority     Outlays
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
General purpose discretionary...............................       44,328       48,500       44,328    \1\48,347
    Disaster designation\2\.................................        6,793          340        6,793          340
Mandatory...................................................        1,673        1,666        1,673        1,666
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior year authority.
\2\The bill includes amounts designated for disaster relief pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(D) of the Balanced
  Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985. Such amounts are a permissable adjustment authorized by that
  Act as well as allowed for by the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.

                      FIVE YEAR OUTLAY PROJECTIONS

    In compliance with section 308(a)(1)(B) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, the following table contains five-year projections 
associated with the budget authority provided in the 
accompanying bill:

 
                                                         Millions
 
Outlays:
  2018.........................................                \1\31,266
  2019.........................................                    8,588
  2020.........................................                    5,777
  2021.........................................                    1,970
  2022.........................................                    4,442
 
\1\Excludes outlays from prior year authority.

               ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS

    In accordance with section 308(a)(1)(C) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, the financial assistance to State and local 
governments is as follows:

 
                                                         Millions
 
Budget Authority...............................                    3,049
Fiscal Year 2018 outlays resulting therefrom...                   \1\404
 
\1\Excludes outlays from prior year authority.

                          PROGRAM DUPLICATION

    No provision of this bill establishes or reauthorizes a 
program of the Federal Government known to be duplicative of 
another Federal program, a program that was included in any 
report from the Government Accountability Office to Congress 
pursuant to section 21 of Public Law 111-139, or a program 
identified in the most recent Catalog of Federal Domestic 
Assistance.

                          DIRECTED RULE MAKING

    Neither the bill nor report contain any provision that 
specifically directs the promulgation or completion of a rule.

                    DETAILED EXPLANATIONS IN REPORT

    The following table contains detailed funding 
recommendations at the program, project, and activity (PPA) 
level.



                             MINORITY VIEWS

    The allocation for the fiscal year 2018 Homeland Security 
Appropriations bill is $44,328,000,000, an increase of 
$1,920,000,000 above the fiscal year 2017 bill. This 4.5 
percent increase contrasts with the cuts sustained in other 
Non-Defense appropriations bills. Such a large relative 
increase for the Homeland bill underscores the need for the 
Appropriations Committee to ensure that taxpayer dollars are 
allocated wisely, based on careful prioritization, substantive 
justification, and a clear nexus to the security of the nation. 
Unfortunately, the major funding increases in the bill fail to 
meet those criteria.

                           FUNDING PRIORITIES

    On the positive side, the bill addresses several bipartisan 
and Democratic priorities, including maintaining the current 
funding levels for first responder and anti-terrorism grants; 
doubling the Non-profit Security Grant Program from $25,000,000 
to $50,000,000; and maintaining funding for flood mapping and 
the Emergency Food and Shelter Program. It also provides a 
targeted increase for the Office for Civil Rights and Civil 
Liberties for continued oversight of immigration enforcement 
and DHS partnerships with state and local law enforcement 
agencies, and for other priority oversight areas. In addition, 
the bill continues the Cybersecurity Internship Program; 
increases funding above the request for new Coast Guard assets; 
provides additional funding for ICE investigations into child 
exploitation; and restores funding for Science and Technology 
Centers of Excellence.

                        IMMIGRATION ENFORCEMENT

    While there is much in this bill that Democrats can 
support, the new administration has significantly changed the 
dynamic on immigration enforcement. The unfortunate result is 
that we cannot in good conscience support this year's bill in 
its current form.
    Alarmingly, the bill provides a $705,000,000 increase for 
immigration enforcement in the interior of the United States, 
including an average daily population in detention of 44,000 
detention beds, an increase of 4,676 from the current year and 
10,000 above fiscal year 2016. The increase would also support 
the hiring of 1,000 additional U.S. Immigration and Customs 
Enforcement (ICE) officers and agents who would be focused 
primarily on interior enforcement.
    The Trump Administration has claimed that its more 
aggressive enforcement approach in the interior of the United 
States is critically important to the national security and 
public safety of the country. While there is certainly no 
disagreement we should be removing dangerous individuals, ICE 
is targeting the parents of unaccompanied children who cross 
the southern border to seek asylum. It is targeting people who 
have lived, worked, and paid taxes in this country for years, 
or even decades with no criminal infractions.
    The result so far has been a 157 percent increase in ICE's 
interior arrests of non-criminals compared to last year. These 
arrests are not required for national security or public 
safety, and have tragic consequences for individuals, families, 
and communities all over this country. Many in law enforcement 
tell us people are afraid to report serious crimes, including 
acts of domestic violence, and they are less willing to come 
forward as witnesses to crimes. Teachers tell us that immigrant 
and U.S. Citizen children alike are afraid to go to school, or 
to just go out and play, for fear their parents will be gone 
when they return home. The trauma that is being inflicted on 
entire communities throughout our country cannot be overstated.
    Given that being in this country illegally is a civil 
violation, why would we choose to fund such excessive 
immigration enforcement over activities to combat real 
terrorist and criminal threats? Comprehensive immigration 
reform--combining strong enforcement with a path to legal 
status for many who are already living in the United States--is 
the only solution to this problem. For years, however, the 
majority in the House has blocked bipartisan efforts to fix it.
    We have a moral, as well as legal, responsibility when it 
comes to immigration enforcement. Just as other law enforcement 
agencies have discretion, ICE too can utilize discretion to 
enforce our immigration laws fairly and justly. Existing 
resources, used wisely, are sufficient for addressing the 
threat posed by criminal aliens who are truly dangerous
    The Committee majority rejected an amendment that would 
have cut the $705,000,000 increase proposed in the bill for ICE 
interior immigration enforcement, reallocating $543,000,000 to 
hiring an additional 2,310 CBP officers and $161,500,000 
million for enhanced ICE investigations into human trafficking, 
child exploitation, intellectual property, financial, and 
narcotics violations, and national security investigations. By 
adopting this amendment, the Committee could have prioritized 
criminal investigations, border security, and the facilitation 
of trade and travel over civil immigration enforcement that is 
far more aggressive than necessary.

                         BORDER INFRASTRUCTURE

    Another area of great concern is the $1.6 billion in the 
bill for new border infrastructure. The fiscal year 2017 
funding bill required the Secretary to submit a risk-based plan 
for improving security along the border, but we have yet to 
receive that plan. The Committee should not even consider such 
significant new investments without a comprehensive plan backed 
by clear justification that warrants the enormous cost.
    The truth is that the President's malignant rhetoric on 
immigration has poisoned the waters on this issue, making it 
near difficult to reach practical consensus. We simply cannot 
support throwing scarce taxpayer dollars at one of the 
President's misguided campaign promises.

                        UNMET FUNDING PRIORITIES

    Instead of unjustified investments in border infrastructure 
and the expansion of overly aggressive immigration enforcement, 
we should be investing more of our limited resources in cyber 
security, human trafficking investigations, and Coast Guard 
vessels and aircraft, because currently our drug interdiction 
efforts intercept only a fraction of the drugs that are being 
trafficked in the Caribbean Sea and Eastern Pacific Ocean. We 
should be investing much more in new customs officers and 
research and technology, and should restore funding for TSA's 
Law Enforcement Officer Reimbursement Program and Visible 
Intermodal Prevention and Response teams.

                             CYBERSECURITY

    Unfortunately, the funding level for government-wide 
cybersecurity activities and acquisitions is underfunded in the 
bill by at least $28 million, a direct result of the 
subcommittee's limited allocation for Defense function 
programs. To ensure that upgrades to federal cyber networks are 
deployed on time and that the National Protection and Programs 
Directorate has the capacity to respond to cyber threats, the 
subcommittee's Defense function will need to match the funding 
request, at a minimum, before the bill is enacted into law.

                         SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

    While the bill restores proposed funding cuts to University 
Centers of Excellence, it adopts the proposed $87,000,000 cut 
from Research, Development, and Innovation at the Science and 
Technology Directorate (S&T;), along with the proposed 
$42,000,000 cut to Laboratory Facilities. Fortunately, the 
manager's amendment adopted by the Committee includes report 
language directing the Department to provide better 
justification for the proposed elimination of three established 
S&T; laboratories, and directs S&T; to refrain from taking steps 
to close the labs pending the enactment of final fiscal year 
2018 appropriations legislation.

                        COAST GUARD ICEBREAKERS

    An amendment offered during Committee consideration of the 
bill would have redirected $2,300,000,000 from border 
infrastructure and ICE immigration enforcement to the Coast 
Guard's polar icebreaker acquisition program. The proposed new 
border infrastructure has not been justified and the bill's 
recommended increases for ICE hiring and detention beds do not 
have a security focus. In contrast, the need for heavy 
icebreakers is very well documented and focused on national 
security. A draft report from the National Academy of Sciences 
(NAS) released just last week, warned that,

          ``The United States has insufficient assets to 
        protect its interests, implement U.S. policy, execute 
        its laws, and meet its obligations in the Arctic and 
        Antarctic because it lacks adequate icebreaking 
        capability.''

    This is because the Coast Guard currently has only one 
functioning heavy icebreaker, the Polar Star, which was built 
in 1976 and is well past its 30-year expected operational life. 
It is no longer reliable, and the cost to maintain it will 
continue to rise. At this point, its primary mission is to 
clear a path through the ice to our research facilities in 
Antarctica, which means that the only icebreaking asset we have 
in the Arctic is the Healy, the Coast Guard's only medium class 
icebreaker. The Polar Star is expected to continue functioning 
for just three to seven years--leaving the United States with 
no heavy icebreaking capability.
    Given that Russia has 41 icebreakers focused on the Arctic 
that are active or under construction, four of which are heavy 
icebreakers, we are falling farther and farther behind. This 
puts the United States at a tremendous disadvantage since we 
are unable to operate in parts of the Arctic Ocean for months 
at a time. The National Academy report goes on to recommend 
that,

          ``The United States Congress should fund the 
        construction of four polar icebreakers of common design 
        that would be owned and operated by the United States 
        Coast Guard.''

    The fiscal year 2017 Defense funding bill included 
$150,000,000 as a down payment on what is expected to be nearly 
a $1,000,000,000 price tag for the first ship. However the 
National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 2018 the 
House recently passed includes a provision prohibiting the 
Pentagon from using any fiscal year 2018 funds to acquire an 
icebreaker for the Coast Guard; an amendment to strike that 
provision failed on a recorded vote.
    The solution is to fund the remaining cost of acquiring 
heavy icebreakers directly through the Coast Guard budget. 
While the Coast Guard plans to sign an acquisition contract in 
fiscal year 2019, it will release a Request for Proposals in 
fiscal year 2018. Having the funds in hand during the 
solicitation process would help the Coast Guard get a better 
deal on the cost of the needed icebreakers.
    Combined with the $150,000,000 appropriated in fiscal year 
2017, this amendment would have made available a total of 
$2,450,000,000, approximately enough to cover the cost of three 
heavy icebreakers. According to the NAS report, acquiring three 
ships at one time would likely save the government nearly $160 
million per vessel. With this one amendment, the Committee 
could have put the United States on a path to securing our 
sovereign interests in the Arctic region. Instead, the 
amendment was defeated on a party-line vote.

                     DHS HEADQUARTERS CONSOLIDATION

    Consistent with the request, the bill fails to provide 
funding for the DHS headquarters consolidation project under 
construction on the St. Elizabeths campus in Southeast 
Washington, DC. In 2015, the Department revised its plan for 
St. Elizabeths to consolidate the footprint, reduce costs, and 
accelerate the construction schedule. We have passed the point 
of no return on this project. In fact, we are now at the phase 
that would lead to the most savings by allowing components to 
move from expensive, leased spaces to the new consolidated 
headquarters campus. On both fiscal grounds and to improve the 
cohesiveness of DHS operations, we must continue to make 
progress on the headquarters project.

         AVAILABILITY OF REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH SERVICES FOR WOMEN

    Over strong Democratic objections, the Committee once again 
adopted an unnecessary amendment regarding the availability of 
reproductive health services for women detained by ICE. These 
restrictions on the use of federal funds for abortion 
procedures are already applicable to ICE and the Department of 
Homeland Security and are specifically formalized in Part 4.4 
of ICE's 2011 Performance Based National Detention Standards.
    While many of us believe that those restrictions are 
excessive and unnecessary, we fail to see the point of 
interjecting this divisive issue into a Homeland Security 
funding bill.
    Before a similar amendment was offered five years ago, this 
bill had never touched on the topic of abortion because it is 
not relevant to the Department of Homeland Security and falls 
far outside the lines of jurisdiction of the Subcommittee. We 
will continue to work to remove the amendment's unnecessary 
provisions from the bill.

                                DREAMERS

    We were highly disappointed by the failure of the Committee 
to adopt an amendment to give the Department the authority to 
continue the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program 
(DACA), which failed on a party-line vote. Although we are 
confident that the Secretary implicitly has such authority 
today, the amendment would have made it explicit.
    DACA provides an official way for young people who were 
brought to this country as children--also known as Dreamers--to 
continue living here, in the only home they know or remember. 
It allows them to continue their studies and work legally in 
the economy. To be eligible, they must have clean records 
verified by background checks.
    The President said he will be the one to decide if DACA 
continues, but the threat of court challenges by some states 
has called into question whether that will ultimately be the 
case. This amendment would simply make clear that the President 
has the authority to continue the program if he chooses to do 
so.
    When DACA participants first signed up for the program, it 
was an opportunity to come out of the shadows, to put anxieties 
of the past behind them and focus on the future. It would be 
the very definition of cruelty to take that away from them now. 
Yet not a single member of the majority voted for this simple, 
straightforward amendment.
    Much of the stated opposition to the amendment during 
Committee debate was that it intruded into the jurisdiction of 
the Judiciary Committee. Aside from the fact that the Committee 
readily adopted other authorizing provisions in the manager's 
amendment and as individual amendments, a follow-up amendment 
on DACA by Mr. Aguilar, offered in the form of a funding 
limitation and well within the jurisdiction of the 
Appropriations Committee, also failed to garner a majority of 
the votes.
    The truth is that the Committee regularly agrees to include 
authorizing provisions that have bipartisan support in 
Appropriations bills when members find the justification for 
them compelling. We can think of nothing more compelling than 
helping these Dreamers who find themselves in such dire 
circumstances through no fault of their own

                               CONCLUSION

    In closing, we want to extend our appreciation for the 
efforts of the subcommittee Chairman and his staff to work with 
the minority throughout the development of this bill. 
Consistent with prior years, the Chairman has carried out his 
responsibilities honorably, fairly, and collaboratively. Even 
when we must disagree, we do it with respect for one another 
and respect for the institution in which we are honored to 
serve.
                                   Nita M. Lowey.
                                   Lucille Roybal-Allard.

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