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115th Congress    }                                            {   Report
                          HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session      }                                            {  115-253

======================================================================



 
 STATE, FOREIGN OPERATIONS, AND RELATED PROGRAMS APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 
                                  2018

                                _______
                                

 July 24, 2017.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Rogers of Kentucky, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted 
                             the following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                             MINORITY VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 3362]

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report in explanation of the accompanying bill making 
appropriations for the Department of State, foreign operations, 
and related programs, for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
2018, and for other purposes.

                        INDEX TO BILL AND REPORT

                                                            Page number

                                                            Bill Report
Overview...................................................
                                                                      4
Title I--Department of State and Related Agency:                2
                                                                     11
Department of State:                                            2
                                                                     11
        Administration of Foreign Affairs..................     2
                                                                     11
        Diplomatic and Consular Programs...................     2
                                                                     11
        Capital Investment Fund............................     5
                                                                     18
        Office of Inspector General........................     6
                                                                     18
        Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs.........     6
                                                                     19
        Representation Expenses............................     7
                                                                     20
        Protection of Foreign Missions and Officials.......     7
                                                                     21
        Embassy Security, Construction, and Maintenance....     7
                                                                     21
        Emergencies in the Diplomatic and Consular Service.     8
                                                                     23
        Repatriation Loans Program Account.................     8
                                                                     24
        Payment to the American Institute in Taiwan........     9
                                                                     24
        International Center, Washington, D.C..............     9
                                                                     24
        Payment to the Foreign Service Retirement and 
            Disability Fund................................     9
                                                                     25
International Organizations:                                    9
                                                                     25
        Contributions to International Organizations.......     9
                                                                     25
        Contributions for International Peacekeeping 
            Activities.....................................     9
                                                                     28
International Commissions:                                     15
                                                                     29
        International Boundary and Water Commission, United 
            States and Mexico..............................    15
                                                                     29
        American Sections, International Commissions.......    16
                                                                     30
        International Fisheries Commissions................    16
                                                                     30
        Related Agency.....................................    17
                                                                     31
                Broadcasting Board of Governors............    17
                                                                     31
        Related Programs...................................    19
                                                                     33
                The Asia Foundation........................    19
                                                                     33
                United States Institute of Peace...........    19
                                                                     34
                Center for Middle Eastern-Western Dialogue 
                    Trust Fund.............................    19
                                                                     34
                Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Program.....    20
                                                                     34
                Israeli Arab Scholarship Program...........    20
                                                                     34
                East-West Center...........................    20
                                                                     35
                National Endowment for Democracy...........    20
                                                                     35
        Other Commissions..................................    21
                                                                     36
                Commission for the Preservation of 
                    America's Heritage Abroad..............    21
                                                                     36
                United States Commission on International 
                    Religious Freedom......................    21
                                                                     36
                Commission on Security and Cooperation in 
                    Europe.................................    22
                                                                     36
                Congressional-Executive Commission on the 
                    People's Republic of China.............    22
                                                                     37
                United States-China Economic and Security 
                    Review Commission......................    22
                                                                     37
Title II--United States Agency for International 
    Development:                                               23
                                                                     37
        Funds Appropriated to the President................    23
                                                                     37
                Operating Expenses.........................    23
                                                                     37
                Capital Investment Fund....................    24
                                                                     39
                Office of Inspector General................    25
                                                                     39
Title III--Bilateral Economic Assistance:                      25
                                                                     39
        Funds Appropriated to the President................    25
                                                                     39
                Global Health Programs.....................    25
                                                                     39
                Development Assistance.....................    31
                                                                     44
                International Disaster Assistance..........    31
                                                                     49
                Transition Initiatives.....................    31
                                                                     50
                Complex Crises Fund........................
                                                                     50
                Development Credit Authority...............    32
                                                                     51
                Economic Support and Development Fund......
                                                                     51
                Economic Support Fund......................    34
                                                                     51
                Democracy Fund.............................    34
                                                                     54
                Assistance for Europe, Eurasia and Central 
                    Asia...................................    35
                                                                     54
        Department of State................................    36
                                                                     55
                Migration and Refugee Assistance...........    36
                                                                     55
                United States Emergency Refugee and 
                    Migration Assistance Fund..............
                                                                     57
        Independent Agencies...............................    37
                                                                     57
                Peace Corps................................    37
                                                                     57
                Millennium Challenge Corporation...........    38
                                                                     58
                Inter-American Foundation..................    41
                                                                     58
                United States African Development 
                    Foundation.............................    42
                                                                     58
        Department of the Treasury.........................    43
                                                                     59
                International Affairs Technical Assistance.    43
                                                                     59
Title IV--International Security Assistance:                   43
                                                                     59
        Department of State................................    43
                                                                     59
                International Narcotics Control and Law 
                    Enforcement............................    43
                                                                     59
                Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining 
                    and Related Programs...................    45
                                                                     60
                Peacekeeping Operations....................    47
                                                                     62
        Funds Appropriated to the President................    47
                                                                     62
                International Military Education and 
                    Training...............................    47
                                                                     62
                Foreign Military Financing Program.........    48
                                                                     63
Title V--Multilateral Assistance:                              52
                                                                     66
        Funds Appropriated to the President................
                                                                     66
                International Organizations and Programs...
                                                                     66
        International Financial Institutions...............    52
                                                                     66
                Global Environment Facility................
                                                                     67
                Contribution to the International 
                    Development Association................    52
                                                                     67
                Contribution to the International Bank for 
                    Reconstruction and Development.........    52
                                                                     67
                Contribution to the Inter-American 
                    Development Bank.......................    52
                                                                     67
                Contribution to the Asian Development Fund.    52
                                                                     67
                Contribution to the African Development 
                    Bank...................................    52
                                                                     67
                Contribution to the African Development 
                    Fund...................................    53
                                                                     68
                Contribution to the International Fund for 
                    Agricultural Development...............    53
                                                                     68
                Global Agriculture and Food Security 
                    Program................................
                                                                     68
Title VI--Export and Investment Assistance:                    53
                                                                     68
        Export-Import Bank of the United States............    53
                                                                     68
        Overseas Private Investment Corporation............    56
                                                                     69
        Trade and Development Agency.......................    58
                                                                     70
Title VII--General Provisions:                                 58
                                                                     70
Title VIII--Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on 
    Terrorism:                                                276
                                                                     94
        Department of State................................   276
                                                                     94
        Administration of Foreign Affairs..................   276
                                                                     94
                Diplomatic and Consular Programs...........   276
                                                                     95
                Office of Inspector General................   277
                                                                     95
                Embassy Security, Construction, and 
                    Maintenance............................   277
                                                                     95
        International Organizations........................   278
                                                                     95
                Contributions to International 
                    Organizations..........................   278
                                                                     95
                Contributions for International 
                    Peacekeeping Activities................   278
                                                                     95
        Related Agency.....................................
                                                                     96
                Broadcasting Board of Governors............
                                                                     96
        United States Agency for International Development.   279
                                                                     96
        Funds Appropriated to the President................   279
                                                                     96
                Operating Expenses.........................   279
                                                                     96
                Office of Inspector General................   279
                                                                     96
Bilateral Economic Assistance..............................   279
                                                                     97
        Funds Appropriated to the President................   279
                                                                     97
                International Disaster Assistance..........   279
                                                                     97
                Transition Initiatives.....................   280
                                                                     97
                Complex Crises Fund........................
                                                                     97
                Economic Support and Development Fund......
                                                                     98
                Economic Support Fund......................   280
                                                                     98
                Assistance for Europe, Eurasia and Central 
                    Asia...................................
                                                                     98
        Department of State................................   280
                                                                     98
                Migration and Refugee Assistance...........   280
                                                                     98
                United States Emergency Refugee and 
                    Migration Assistance Fund..............
                                                                     98
International Security Assistance..........................   281
                                                                     99
        Department of State................................   281
                                                                     99
                International Narcotics Control and Law 
                    Enforcement............................   281
                                                                     99
                Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining 
                    and Related Programs...................   281
                                                                     99
                Peacekeeping Operations....................   282
                                                                     99
        Funds Appropriated to the President................   282
                                                                    100
                Foreign Military Financing Program.........   282
                                                                    100
        General Provisions.................................   283
                                                                    100
Title IX--Additional General Provision:                       285
                                                                    100
        Spending Reduction Account.........................   285
                                                                    100
House of Representatives Reporting Requirements............
                                                                    100
Minority Views.............................................
                                                                    138

                                OVERVIEW

    United States economic and security interests are affected 
by long-standing challenges and emerging crises throughout the 
world. From continued chaos sown by the Islamic State in Iraq 
and Syria (ISIS); Russian aggression in Europe and Eurasia; 
renewed efforts by the Taliban to destabilize Afghanistan; 
conflict, disease, and the threat of famine in parts of Africa 
and Yemen; increased provocation by North Korea; and 
sophisticated criminal networks running drugs and fueling 
corruption in America's own backyard, now is not the time for 
the United States to back down from global engagement and its 
leadership role abroad. The Committee firmly believes that 
strategic investments in diplomacy and development, along with 
a strong national defense, are the essential components for 
addressing these challenges and protecting America's national 
security. Military power alone cannot solve all these problems, 
especially over the long term. Advancing United States national 
interests also requires effective diplomatic engagement and 
foreign assistance.
    However, the Committee recognizes that resources are 
limited, that the nation's debt is a weight on the economy and 
on future generations, and that spending must be curtailed in a 
responsible manner. The Committee supports steps to reduce 
waste, inefficiency, and duplication in agency operations and 
programs funded in this Act, and efforts to press other nations 
and donors to more equitably share in the global responsibility 
to defeat terrorism, support stabilization, promote development 
and good governance, and respond to humanitarian crises. The 
Committee is concerned, however, that the magnitude of the 
reductions proposed for United States diplomatic and 
development operations and programs in the fiscal year 2018 
request would be counterproductive to the economic and security 
interests of the nation and would undermine relationships with 
key partners and allies around the globe. The Committee 
recommendation, therefore, proposes to reduce spending in a 
manner that balances the need to responsibly allocate federal 
resources while protecting United States national interests.
    The Committee recommendation for fiscal year 2018 for 
activities under the jurisdiction of the Subcommittee on State, 
Foreign Operations, and Related Programs is $47,364,000,000 in 
new discretionary budget authority, which is $5,707,000,000 
below the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and is $6,842,174,000 
above the fiscal year 2018 request. Within the total funding 
provided, the recommendation includes $12,019,000,000 in title 
VIII for Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on 
Terrorism, pursuant to the authority contained in section 
251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
Control Act of 1985.
    The comparison to fiscal year 2017 excludes the 
$4,300,000,000 in additional funds appropriated in the Security 
Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 for defeating ISIS, other 
terrorist organizations, and violent extremism in Africa, 
Europe and Eurasia, the Middle East, and South and Central 
Asia, and to counter Russian influence. Such funding was 
appropriated by Congress for urgent overseas contingency 
operations.
    The Committee recommendation prioritizes security programs, 
including embassy security, international security assistance, 
and programs to support the campaign to defeat ISIS and other 
terrorist groups; programs that promote democracy and American 
ideals; humanitarian, global health, and economic and 
development assistance; and oversight, transparency, and 
accountability measures.
    The Committee recommendation, as detailed in the bill and 
this report, yields savings by not providing funding for 
several accounts and reducing funds for some multilateral 
development banks, international organizations, and programs of 
lower priority from the prior year.
    The Committee provides guidance under this heading on 
reprogramming, notification, reporting, and consultation 
requirements contained in the bill and this report.

                           SECURITY PROGRAMS

    The Committee continues its focus on supporting programs 
that are critical to the national security interests of the 
United States, as well as to the security of allies and 
partners in the fight against terrorism and those confronting 
Russian aggression.

Embassy Security

    The Committee continues to prioritize the security of 
diplomatic and development staff and the facilities where they 
work by maintaining the fiscal year 2017 level for Embassy 
Security, Construction, and Maintenance and Worldwide Security 
Protection, excluding supplemental amounts provided in the 
Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017. To ensure proper 
oversight of funds, the bill also enhances notification and 
reporting requirements for new embassy construction.

Near East

    The Committee continues to provide unwavering support for 
Israel's security, which is reflected by full funding for the 
United States-Israel Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) at 
$3,100,000,000. The Committee also maintains strong support for 
Egypt's security and economic needs by providing $1,456,000,000 
for assistance for Egypt and notes that sustaining security 
cooperation with Egypt is critical for stability in the region.
    The Committee recommendation strongly supports Jordan by 
providing not less than $1,280,000,000 to meet economic and 
security needs and to address the extraordinary strain on 
Jordan from unrest in the region as the country continues to 
host significant numbers of refugees.
    The Committee recommendation also provides critical 
assistance to disrupt and defeat ISIS and other terrorist 
groups and promote stability in Iraq and other areas impacted 
by such groups.
    The Committee notes the important role the countries of 
North Africa play with respect to global security and 
stability. Therefore the bill includes a new provision 
requiring a strategy from the Secretary of State on how 
diplomatic engagement and assistance will be prioritized for 
these countries. The Committee recommendation rejects the 
proposed cuts to Tunisia and Morocco and includes not less than 
the fiscal year 2017 level.
    The Committee is deeply concerned about the nuclear 
ambitions of Iran and the resulting threat to the United States 
and our allies. The Committee recommendation continues the 
conditions and reporting requirements from the prior year 
related to the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action and other 
matters related to sanctions on Iranian entities.
    The Committee recommendation maintains numerous 
restrictions on assistance for the Palestinian Authority (PA), 
including prohibiting funds if there is a Palestinian 
government formed through an agreement with Hamas, or if the PA 
is not acting to counter incitement of violence against 
Israelis. The bill also includes a requirement to reduce any 
funding by an amount equivalent to that expended by the PA, 
Palestine Liberation Organization, or any affiliated 
organization, as payments to prisoners who committed acts of 
terrorism. As a result of these conditions, no economic 
assistance has been provided directly to the PA since fiscal 
year 2013, and funds provided for other programs in the West 
Bank and Gaza have been significantly reduced.

Afghanistan and Pakistan

    The Committee notes the continued importance of United 
States assistance to secure and stabilize Afghanistan and 
Pakistan. The Committee understands that the staffing and 
programming requirements in these countries will remain under 
continuous review and, for that reason, has not designated 
specific funding recommendations. The Committee expects the 
Administration to refine its plans for programs, facilities, 
and staff in consultation with the appropriate congressional 
committees. The Committee further requires spend plans and 
advance notifications before funds are obligated for 
Afghanistan and Pakistan, pursuant to sections 7015 and 7076 of 
this Act.

Latin America

    To address security concerns in Latin America, the 
Committee recommendation provides support for Colombia, Mexico, 
and the Caribbean Basin. The Committee believes it is critical 
to continue strong support for counternarcotics and law 
enforcement efforts, as well as assistance for rule of law and 
judicial reform activities in the region, in order to fight 
drug trafficking and violent crime before it reaches the 
borders of the United States.
    The Committee recommendation provides $615,000,000 for the 
updated United States Strategy for Engagement in Central 
America to address the key factors in countries in Central 
America that contribute to the migration of undocumented 
Central Americans to the United States. The Committee continues 
conditions on the central governments of the Northern Triangle 
countries of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras to ensure 
their commitments are sustained.
    The funding recommendation prioritizes security and 
includes $334,225,000 for the Central America Regional Security 
Initiative (CARSI), in order to enhance border security; 
counter the activities of criminal gangs, drug traffickers and 
organized crime; and combat human smuggling and trafficking. 
The Committee believes that challenges in the region span more 
than just the Northern Triangle countries and includes funds to 
address security needs in neighboring countries, including 
Costa Rica and Panama. The Committee supports continued 
resources to train security forces in the region and expects 
the Government of Colombia to continue to contribute its 
expertise in this area.

Ukraine and Other Countries in Europe and Eurasia

    The Committee is troubled by the continued threat faced by 
Ukraine and other countries in Europe and Eurasia due to 
Russian aggression. In response, the Committee recommendation 
does the following: (1) prohibits any assistance to the central 
government of the Russian Federation; (2) provides funding for 
the Assistance for Europe, Eurasia and Central Asia account; 
(3) maintains robust assistance levels for Ukraine and Georgia, 
including increased levels under Foreign Military Financing 
Program; (4) continues the Countering Russian Influence Fund; 
and (5) makes funds available for broadcasting to the region to 
counter Russian propaganda and for independent media in 
Ukraine.

Programs to Combat Terrorism

    The Committee continues to be concerned about the threat of 
terrorism globally and provides support throughout the bill for 
programs to address this threat to the national security of the 
United States. The Committee recommendation provides 
$358,000,000 for antiterrorism programs, which is the same as 
the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and $134,950,000 above the 
request. Funds are intended to prevent and counter terrorist 
safe havens and to assist partners in the fight against ISIS 
and other terrorist groups. The Committee further notes the 
continued rise of terrorism in Africa and maintains the fiscal 
year 2017 enacted level for the Trans-Sahara Counterterrorism 
Partnership and the Partnership for Regional East Africa 
Counterterrorism.

Programs to Combat Transnational Crime

    The Committee supports the efforts of the Trump 
administration to tackle transnational crime including by fully 
funding the $58,000,000 request to support implementation of 
Presidential Executive Order on Enforcing Federal Law with 
Respect to Transnational Criminal Organizations and Preventing 
International Trafficking. Robust funding is also provided for 
counternarcotics programs globally. The Committee maintains 
strong support for programs to combat wildlife trafficking, 
which provides lucrative resources for criminal networks, some 
with links to terrorism. Often times these same networks are 
responsible for one of the most heinous crimes imaginable--
human trafficking. The Committee continues its commitment to 
address this issue by maintaining fiscal year 2017 levels for 
programs to combat trafficking in persons and also by fully 
funding the request for the Office to Monitor and Combat 
Trafficking in Persons at the Department of State. The 
Committee also provides increased funding to assist partner 
countries to prevent and respond to cybercrime.

          PROGRAMS THAT PROMOTE DEMOCRACY AND AMERICAN IDEALS

    The Committee notes that during this time of unprecedented 
political change in many countries around the world, American 
leadership is critical. It is imperative that assistance is 
provided to advance democracy worldwide. The Committee is 
concerned about continued repression of civil society in many 
countries, which inhibits the ability of citizens to exercise 
their fundamental freedoms, such as freedom of association, 
speech, and religion. This disturbing global trend requires a 
renewed focus on democracy promotion in order to overcome 
obstacles put in place by increasingly repressive governments.
    The Committee recommendation, therefore, exceeds the 
request for the National Endowment for Democracy and the 
Democracy Fund and maintains language in section 7032 that not 
less than $2,308,517,000 be made available for democracy 
programs, which is the same as the fiscal year 2017 enacted 
level. The Committee recommendation also funds international 
broadcasting activities above the request, continues to provide 
funding for the Peace Corps, and maintains significant funding 
for educational and cultural exchange programs in order to 
further promote American values and democratic principles.

            HUMANITARIAN, HEALTH, AND DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE

    The Committee notes that foreign assistance helps to 
advance foreign policy and national security objectives and 
that such support also reflects the values, generosity, and 
goodwill of the American people. The Committee understands that 
disease, hunger, poverty, and displacement of vulnerable people 
around the world can threaten and destabilize countries and 
governments and thereby undermine the national security of the 
United States.
    To address crises around the world resulting from large-
scale displacement and instability, the Committee 
recommendation includes $5,930,686,000, which is the same as 
the fiscal year 2017 level, excluding the additional amount 
appropriated for famine prevention, relief, and mitigation, and 
the additional amounts provided in the Security Assistance 
Appropriations Act, 2017. The Committee notes that the 
additional $990,000,000 provided for such purposes was intended 
to address urgent needs and yet significant balances remain 
available for obligation. The Committee urges the Administrator 
of the United States Agency for International Development 
(USAID) to expeditiously program the remaining famine relief 
balances and the Committee will review the need for further 
famine relief funds as the appropriation process proceeds.
    As the Syrian conflict continues and the security and 
humanitarian situation grows more complex in the surrounding 
region, the Committee remains concerned about the increasing 
burden and resulting instability in the communities that host 
refugees and displaced persons. In addition to funds provided 
under International Disaster Assistance and Migration and 
Refugee Assistance, the Committee recommendation directs that 
funds under Economic Support Fund and Development Assistance be 
made available to provide assistance to host communities with 
large refugee populations, and the Committee expects needs in 
Iraq, Jordan, and Lebanon to be prioritized.
    The Committee recommendation continues to devote 
significant resources to critical health concerns around the 
world, such as improving the health of mothers and children and 
combating HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. The Committee 
highlights the inclusion of funds to promote global health 
security and address emerging health threats.
    The Committee recommendation includes provisions that 
ensure the respect for life around the globe. In support of the 
Administration's Kemp-Kasten determination with respect to the 
United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the bill includes a 
prohibition against contributions to the UNFPA. In support of 
the Administration's Presidential Memorandum Regarding the 
Mexico City Policy, the bill includes a prohibition against 
global health assistance funds for foreign nongovernmental 
organizations that promote or perform abortions.
    Finally, the Committee recommendation continues to devote 
significant resources for Development Assistance and the 
Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) and notes that economic 
growth and education are key aspects of long-term development. 
The Committee continues to support independent evaluations and 
monitoring of development programs and course corrections for 
programs that are not meeting their stated goals.

              OVERSIGHT, TRANSPARENCY, AND ACCOUNTABILITY

    The Committee takes seriously its responsibility to conduct 
proper oversight, and thus far during calendar year 2017, the 
Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs 
held seven hearings and briefings in order to prioritize 
funding requests; understand the political, economic, and 
security situation in critical countries around the world; and 
improve transparency and effectiveness of programs. 
Additionally, the Surveys and Investigations staff of the 
Committee continues to review programs and provide updates on 
studies that began in prior years. The Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) also provides reports on matters 
within the jurisdiction of the Subcommittee, and the 
cooperation of GAO is greatly appreciated.
    Proper management of taxpayer dollars must be a focus of 
all United States Government agencies, and this is particularly 
important for the Department of State, USAID, and other 
agencies charged with advancing the interests of the United 
States around the world. Waste, fraud, and abuse in the 
programs funded in this bill will not be tolerated. Reflecting 
its commitment to oversight, transparency, and accountability, 
the Committee recommendation includes funds at, or above, the 
fiscal year 2017 level for the Inspectors General of agencies 
within the jurisdiction of the Subcommittee, and maintains or 
strengthens provisions contained in prior years on multi-year 
commitments, direct funding for governments and local 
organizations, financial management systems, and the United 
Nations (UN). In addition, the Committee continues its focus on 
reducing unnecessary expenditures and expects the Departments 
and agencies funded by this Act to work with the Office of 
Management and Budget (OMB) to reduce printing and reproduction 
costs and directs agencies to provide information in the 
congressional budget justification (CBJ) for fiscal year 2019 
on reductions made in fiscal year 2018 as a result of such 
efforts.
    The Committee notes with concern the management challenges 
faced by the Department of State and USAID. Earlier this year 
the Committee received testimony from the Inspector General of 
the Department of State that revealed a lack of emphasis on 
program management and accountability. The Committee expects 
the Secretary of State and the USAID Administrator to ensure 
each agency remains focused on improving all aspects of program 
management and accountability. The Committee urges each agency 
head to appoint a person at the highest level whose 
responsibility is to keep the agency focused on such management 
and oversight issues that are fundamental to good government.
    To assist in this effort, the Committee recommendation 
takes steps to promote improved management of resources 
provided in this Act with a focus on addressing deficiencies in 
information technology, improving financial management systems, 
e-mail and records management, and cyber-security. The 
Committee recommendation also provides funding for the 
ForeignAssistance.gov Web site to make foreign assistance data 
more accessible to the public.
    The Committee has deferred action on the proposal in the 
request to consolidate Economic Support Fund, Development 
Assistance, and other accounts with similar authorities. The 
Committee recommendation maintains the same account structure 
as prior years. The Committee awaits the organizational 
analysis of the Department of State and USAID and anticipates 
that the findings and recommendations may inform future 
decisions about account management, authorities, and 
consolidation.
    The Committee recommendation modifies the detailed 
reporting requirements related to potential reorganizations of 
the Department of State and USAID. It is essential that 
Congress be provided detailed information regarding any 
reorganization plan prior to its implementation.

 REPROGRAMMING, NOTIFICATION, REPORTING, AND CONSULTATION REQUIREMENTS

    The Committee recommendation grants limited reprogramming 
authorities to ensure that funds are devoted to the highest 
priorities, particularly due to changes in circumstances of 
countries facing unrest, terrorism, and violence. The Committee 
notes that reprogramming notifications must be submitted 
subject to the regular notification procedures of the 
Committees on Appropriations. For the purposes of the bill and 
this report, ``regular notification procedures'' means 
notification must be provided at least 15 days in advance of 
obligation of funds. The Committee cautions that, pursuant to 
section 7015(e) of this Act, advance notification requirements 
may only be waived if failure to do so would pose a substantial 
risk to human health or welfare. The Committee expects the use 
of this authority to be extremely rare and directs the 
Secretary of State and the USAID Administrator to use this 
authority judiciously. Additional notification requirements are 
added in fiscal year 2018 to ensure appropriate Congressional 
oversight of funds.
    For the purposes of the bill and this report, the terms 
``consultation requirements'' of the Committees on 
Appropriations, ``in consultation with'' the Committees on 
Appropriations, and ``consult with'' the Committees on 
Appropriations shall mean a consultation must occur with such 
Committees not later than 45 days after enactment of this Act, 
unless another timeframe is specified.

            TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND RELATED AGENCY


                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE


                   Administration of Foreign Affairs

    The Committee recommendation for Administration of Foreign 
Affairs provides funds for the broad range of activities 
necessary to support the operations and activities of more than 
275 diplomatic and consular posts in 190 countries. The 
Committee recommends a total of $8,609,029,000 for the 
activities of the Department of State in fiscal year 2018. Of 
the total amount provided, $8,450,129,000 is derived from 
discretionary funds and $158,900,000 is mandatory spending. 
Additional funds are provided under title VIII.
    Embassy Security.--The Committee recommendation provides 
$6,071,348,000, (including funding provided in title VIII) as 
detailed in the table below, to meet urgent security 
requirements. The total amount provided is the same as the 
fiscal year 2017 enacted level, excluding amounts appropriated 
by the Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017, and 
$1,172,274,000 above the fiscal year 2018 request. Funds are 
made available for the purchase of property and for 
construction, rehabilitation, and maintenance of United States 
diplomatic and consular missions and other posts overseas, the 
costs for the Department of State associated with the continued 
expansion of the Marine Security Guard Program, and the 
personnel and equipment required to protect United States 
Government employees and their families under Chief of Mission 
(COM) authority and property worldwide.

                            EMBASSY SECURITY
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              Budget
                    Program/Activity                         Authority
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Worldwide Security Protection...........................      $3,756,874
Embassy Security, Construction, and Maintenance.........       2,314,474
                                                         ---------------
    Total, Embassy Security.............................       6,071,348
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR PROGRAMS

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1,2\...................    $6,147,254,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request\1\...........................     5,283,786,000
Committee recommendation\1\...........................     5,449,289,000
    Change from enacted level.........................      -697,965,000
    Change from request...............................      +165,503,000
 
\1\In addition, the fiscal year 2017 enacted level, the fiscal year 2018
  request, and the Committee recommendation include funds under this
  heading in title VIII designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii)
  Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
\2\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level also excludes funds appropriated
  by the Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of
  P.L. 114-254).

    The Committee recommendation includes $5,449,289,000 for 
Diplomatic and Consular Programs, including up to 
$1,380,752,000 for Worldwide Security Protection (WSP). 
Additional funds are provided under title VIII.
    The Committee expects the Secretary of State to continue 
funding overseas inflation and Locally Employed Staff (LES) 
wage increases through funds made available in the Buying Power 
Maintenance Account.
    The Committee is concerned that the continued application 
of the hiring freeze to new hires, lateral transfers, and 
eligible family member employment is adversely affecting the 
functions of the Department of State. The Committee urges the 
Secretary of State to immediately reexamine the freeze 
guidance, particularly as it relates to lateral transfers and 
eligible family member employment.
    Funds made available under this heading are allocated in 
the following manner:
    Human resources.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$2,522,390,000 for human resources, of which $476,879,000 is 
for WSP. Funds support American salaries at overseas and 
domestic United States diplomatic missions.
    Overseas programs.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$1,260,517,000 for overseas programs. Funds for Overseas 
Programs support the operational programs of regional bureaus 
of the Department of State. Funds support the operations of 
United States embassies, consulates, and other diplomatic posts 
worldwide. Additional funds are provided under title VIII.
    Diplomatic policy and support.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $740,052,000 for the operational 
programs and management offices of the functional bureaus of 
the Department of State. The Committee recommendation includes 
$1,000,000 for the Office of the Special Coordinator for 
Tibetan Issues to carry out the responsibilities detailed in 
section 621(d) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, 
Fiscal Year 2003 (P.L. 107-228).
    Security programs.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$926,330,000 for security programs, of which $903,873,000 is 
for WSP. Funds support the personnel, equipment, and training 
necessary for the protection of diplomatic personnel, overseas 
diplomatic missions, residences, and domestic facilities and 
information.

Fees and Transfers

    The Committee recommendation also includes language similar 
to prior years and requested for fiscal year 2018, which: (1) 
permits not to exceed $10,000,000 to be transferred to 
Emergencies in the Diplomatic and Consular Service for 
emergency evacuations and the Rewards for Justice Program; (2) 
provides not to exceed $15,000 from reimbursements, surcharges, 
and fees for use of Blair House facilities in accordance with 
the Department of State Basic Authorities Act of 1956; and (3) 
makes available not to exceed $5,000,000 from fees and other 
payments authorized by section 810 of the United States 
Information and Educational Exchange Act.

Border Security Program

    In addition to the funds appropriated under this heading, 
an estimated $4,374,585,000 will become available through 
currently authorized fees and surcharges, as well as proposed 
extensions of expiring fees and surcharges, if authorized, for 
the Border Security Program. These funds will support the 
passport and visa program and maintain consular operations that 
protect United States citizens overseas, safeguard security 
interests of the United States, facilitate entry of legitimate 
travelers, and foster economic growth.
    Discontinuation of Visas for nationals of certain 
countries.--The Committee urges the Secretary of State to 
ensure that consular officers comply with section 1253 of title 
8 of the United States Code with the goal of ensuring all 
countries are accepting persons who are covered by such 
section. Not later than 90 days after enactment of this Act, 
the Secretary of State shall report to the Committees on 
Appropriations on the steps taken to ensure compliance with 
section 1253 of title 8, United States Code.
    Visa processing and training.--The Committee is aware of 
concerns over capacity and infrastructure issues at United 
States Government agencies with responsibility for visa 
processing which have led to greater processing delays, delayed 
travel for applicants, and lost business opportunities for 
United States companies. The Committee directs the Secretary of 
State, after consultation with other appropriate United States 
Government agencies, to, within applicable law, regulation, and 
executive action, address the capacity and infrastructure 
challenges in the visa processing system. The Committee further 
directs the Secretary of State to prioritize the national 
security interests of the United States when considering any 
modifications to the current visa review process.

Worldwide Security Protection

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,380,752,000 for 
WSP. Additional funds are provided under title VIII.
    The WSP program provides critical funding for the 
protection of life, property, and information of the Department 
of State and supports a worldwide guard force protecting 
overseas diplomatic missions, residences, and domestic 
facilities. Funds provided will support more than 3,500 
regional security officers and other United States direct hire 
security personnel, over 32,000 guards posted at more than 275 
overseas diplomatic missions and residencies. Funds also 
support enhanced high threat protection, security technology, 
cyber and information security, secure diplomatic courier 
operations, and protective services for the Secretary of State, 
the United States Ambassador to the UN, and foreign dignitaries 
visiting the United States.
    Within the amount provided for WSP, the Committee 
recommendation includes the amount requested for the 
Directorate of Operational Medicine, which has responsibility 
for contingency medical preparedness and the Department's 
biocontainment evacuation response, which includes the 
capability to support short-notice transnational deployment of 
security and crisis response teams and to evacuate Chief of 
Mission (COM) personnel from posts in crisis.
    Security training.--The Foreign Affairs Counter Threat 
(FACT) training course is one of the central training programs 
provided to COM personnel and their families to prepare them to 
safely live and work overseas. The Department of State has 
reported to the Committee that FACT training will be maintained 
at the Interim Training Facility until the new Foreign Affairs 
Training Center (FASTC) is fully operational. The Committee 
directs the Secretary of State to ensure that FACT training is 
not disrupted during the FASTC construction and transition 
process.
    Not later than 45 days after enactment of this Act, the 
Committee directs the Secretary of State to submit to the 
Committees on Appropriations a progress report on the FASTC 
project. Semi-annual progress reports should be submitted until 
completion of the project. Each report shall include the 
current cost estimate, training course transition plans, and 
steps taken to reduce the impact of any job losses that may 
result at existing training sites once FASTC becomes 
operational.
    Sensitive information.--Growing regional unrest and threats 
to United States diplomatic facilities and personnel have led 
to, and increased the risk of, the evacuation of overseas 
posts. The Committee urges the Secretary of State to ensure 
that overseas diplomatic posts have the necessary capabilities 
to quickly, safely, and permanently destroy sensitive 
information that must be left behind, including through 
exploring new tools and equipment to enhance such capabilities.

Other Matters

    Child abduction and access.--The Committee notes that when 
making use of the waiver in section 204 of the Goldman Act 
(P.L. 113-150), the Secretary of State is required to provide a 
detailed justification for such waiver involving a country with 
a pattern of non-compliance. The Committee expects the 
Secretary to comply with this requirement. Further, the 
Committee directs the Secretary to include in such 
justification the reason, if any, for why actions 4 through 8 
under section 204(d) are not being taken. Additionally, the 
Secretary shall include in the annual report required by 
section 101 of such Act a list of countries with pending cases 
that are more than 12 months old and shall also provide such 
report to the Committees on Appropriations.
    Columbia River Treaty.--The Committee encourages the 
Secretary of State to advance the United States negotiating 
position and use all appropriate actions to initiate at the 
earliest opportunity substantive and ongoing Treaty 
negotiations with the Government of Canada.
    Cultural Property.--The Cultural Properties Implementation 
Act (CPIA) requires countries participating in MOUs restricting 
cultural property take significant self-help measures. The 
Committee urges the Cultural Property Advisory Committee to 
consider the annual national expenditures on securing and 
inventorying cultural sites and museums in its annual reviews 
of the effectiveness of MOUs, as well as during the reviews 
required by the CPIA for extension of an MOU. The Committee 
also requests the Secretary of State review the feasibility of 
collecting and reporting on the cost of measures taken by 
partner countries in support of their cultural property MOU 
with the United States and be prepared to report on such review 
during the hearing process on the fiscal year 2019 budget 
request.
    Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor (DRL).--The Committee 
recommendation includes sufficient funds to continue human 
rights vetting and training at not less than the fiscal year 
2017 level. The recommendation also includes funds for the 
Office to Monitor and Combat anti-Semitism as authorized by the 
Global Anti-Semitism Act of 2004 (P.L. 108-332). The Committee 
remains concerned about the rise of Anti-Semitism and the 
increase in anti-Semitic incidents around the world, and urges 
the Secretary of State to appoint a Special Envoy to Monitor 
and Combat Anti-Semitism as quickly as possible.
    Holocaust Issues.--The Committee recognizes the important 
work of the Office of Holocaust Issues and urges the Secretary 
of State to ensure the office has sufficient funding to 
continue efforts to bring a measure of justice and assistance 
to Holocaust victims and their families and to assure that the 
Holocaust is remembered properly and accurately.
    Hong Kong Policy Act report.--Not later than 45 days after 
enactment of this Act, the Committee directs the Secretary of 
State to update the report described in section 301 of the 
United States-Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992 and to transmit it 
to the appropriate congressional committees.
    Intercountry adoptions.--The Committee continues to 
reaffirm its commitment to intercountry adoption as a means to 
offering a permanent family to a child and supports its 
inclusion among the range of options for providing permanency 
for children in accordance with the principles of the Hague 
Adoption Convention.
    The Committee urges the Department of State to proactively 
prioritize, and make funds available for, improving the 
capacity of foreign government agencies and nongovernmental 
organizations, through technical assistance that will help to 
prevent child abandonment and connect orphans, displaced, and 
abandoned children with permanent homes through family 
reunification, guardianship, and domestic and intercountry 
adoption.
    Furthermore, the Committee encourages the Department of 
State to better incorporate at the post level, policies that 
reflect the commitment of the United States Government to the 
principle that every child has a right to a permanent family; 
that advocate for consideration of international placement of 
children where in-country placement does not serve the child's 
best interests and does not provide appropriate, protective, 
and permanent care quickly; and to streamline and strengthen 
the United States Government intercountry adoption programs and 
processes.
    International religious freedom.--The Committee is pleased 
that the Department of State, through the Office of 
International Religious Freedom, is working to advance 
religious freedom programs and initiatives as a critical 
component of United States diplomatic efforts, pursuant to the 
International Religious Freedom Act (IRFA) of 1998. The 
Committee encourages the Secretary of State to consider 
elevating the position of the Ambassador-at-Large for Religious 
Freedom within the organizational structure of the Department 
of State.
    The Committee recognizes that the steady growth of 
religious persecution and decline of religious freedom around 
the world highlights the need to have United States diplomats 
trained to understand and advocate for religious freedom, as 
required by IRFA. The Committee recommendation includes up to 
$500,000 to continue the development of religious freedom 
training curriculum pursuant to Section 103 of the Frank R. 
Wolf International Religious Freedom Act (P.L. 114-281). In 
addition, the report required by section 103(b) of such Act 
shall also be provided to the Committees on Appropriations 
concurrent with the submission of such report to the Committee 
on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives and the 
Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate.
    Monitoring and combating trafficking in persons.--The 
Committee recommendation includes $13,822,000 for the Office to 
Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, as authorized by the 
Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000, as amended. Funds 
are provided to ensure the Office can fulfill the statutory 
mandates, including to support the coordination of the 
President's Interagency Task Force and Senior Policy Operating 
Group, deployment of rapid response teams, production of the 
Trafficking in Persons Report, implementation of child 
protection compacts, diplomatic engagement and technical 
assistance, and management and oversight of increased 
assistance appropriated in this Act to combat trafficking in 
persons.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State to post the 
National Human Trafficking Resources Center hotline, email 
address, and Web site information in all United States 
Embassies and Consulates in areas where visa applications are 
processed. The Committee also supports funds being made 
available to develop the Global Human Trafficking Hotline.
    Office of the Coordinator for Cyber Issues.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $5,497,000 for the Office of the 
Coordinator for Cyber Issues.
    Protecting American foreign investment.--The Committee 
appreciates the leadership of the Secretary of State in 
promoting American foreign investments. The Committee urges the 
Secretary, in coordination with the Secretary of Commerce and 
other Cabinet officials, to expand efforts to protect such 
investments and those targeted by foreign persons engaged in 
public or private sector corruption.
    Public access to federally funded research.--The Committee 
understands that Federal agencies with significant research 
portfolios have implemented policies to provide public access 
to federally funded research findings in accordance with 
guidance from the Office of Science and Technology Policy. The 
Committee encourages the Department of State and USAID to, 
where applicable, implement similar policies for providing 
public access to federally funded research results.
    Public diplomacy.--The Committee continues to support 
public diplomacy personnel and programs and expects the 
Secretary of State to include projected funding for public 
diplomacy in the operating plan required by section 7076 of 
this Act. The Committee recommends expanding public diplomacy 
efforts to counter Russian propaganda.
    Real property.--The Committee expects the Secretary of 
State to continue to help facilitate resolution of commercial 
disputes for United States entities seeking return of real 
property seized, held, or expropriated by foreign governments, 
such as the Cuban Government, as appropriate.
    Review of development finance activities.--Not later than 
180 days after enactment of this Act, the State Department, 
after consultation with OMB and other applicable federal 
agencies, shall submit to the appropriate congressional 
committees a review of all development finance programs across 
the United States Government. The review shall include 
recommendations on how federal agencies involved in development 
finance can be better integrated and coordinated to achieve 
maximum development impact. The review also should explore 
whether new or expanded authorities could create a more 
sustainable United States foreign assistance strategy through 
more development finance and less grant-based assistance, as 
well as consider gaps that can be filled with technical 
assistance.
    Small business.--The Secretary of State is encouraged to 
expand opportunities for small businesses to compete for 
Department of State contracts, including small businesses owned 
and controlled by socially and economically disadvantaged 
individuals.
    State Partnership Program.--The Committee believes the 
National Guard State Partnership Program strengthens security 
and disaster response cooperation between the United States and 
nations participating in the Partnership and builds 
professionalism and respect for civilian control of the 
military. The Committee expects the Department of State and the 
Department of Defense to continue to inform United States 
Embassy officials and foreign governments about the value of 
the State Partnership Program, including the objectives of the 
program, examples of successful engagements, and COM and 
Combatant Commander requests for the Program.
    United States citizens detained in Iran.--The Committee 
remains concerned about United States citizens and legal 
permanent residents missing and detained in Iran. The Committee 
urges the Secretary of State to prioritize these cases, and to 
continue to press the Government of Iran for the immediate 
release of those detained and to provide any information it 
possesses regarding any United States citizens that have 
disappeared within its borders.
    Workforce diversity.--The Committee supports the efforts of 
the Department of State to increase diversity in hiring, 
retention, and promotion within its workforce, including the 
allocation of funds to continue and expand its recruitment 
programs, professional development activities, and outreach 
efforts in fiscal year 2018. The Committee supports ongoing 
partnerships between the Department of State and community 
colleges, universities, and other institutions to improve the 
diversity and excellence of the United States Foreign Service 
(Foreign Service) by preparing both graduate and undergraduate 
students for positions in the Foreign Service, such as the 
Pickering and Rangel fellows programs. The Committee encourages 
the Secretary of State to explore new opportunities to partner 
with Hispanic Serving Institutions and Historically Black 
Colleges and Universities to further the goal of increasing 
workforce diversity.
    Funds in this Act under this heading are allocated 
according to the following table and are subject to sections 
7015 and 7076 of this Act.

                    DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR PROGRAMS
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                       Category                         Budget Authority
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Human Resources......................................          2,522,390
        Worldwide Security Protection................          [476,879]
Overseas Programs....................................          1,260,517
Diplomatic Policy and Support........................            740,052
Security Programs....................................            926,330
        Worldwide Security Protection................          [903,873]
                                                      ------------------
    Total, Diplomatic and Consular Programs..........          5,449,289
                                                      ------------------
    Total, Worldwide Security Protection.............        [1,380,752]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Bureau/Office (includes salary and bureau managed
                        funds)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Bureau of Administration:
        Freedom of Information Act...................             33,960
Bureau of Europe and Eurasia Affairs:
        Office of the Special Envoy for Holocaust                    568
         Issues......................................
Cultural Antiquities Task Force......................              1,000
Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor:
        Human Rights Vetting.........................              9,000
        Office of International Religious Freedom....              6,500
        [Of which for Religious Freedom Curriculum                 [500]
         Development]................................
        Special Envoy to Promote Religious Freedom of              1,000
         Religious Minorities in the Near East and
         South Central Asia..........................
Office of Terrorism Financing and Economic Sanctions               5,625
 Policy..............................................
Office to Combat Trafficking in Persons..............             13,822
Legal Advisor:
        Document Review Unit.........................              2,889
Office of the Secretary:
        Office of the Special Coordinator for Tibetan              1,000
         Issues......................................
        Office of Global Women's Issues..............              5,086
        Office of the Coordinator for Cyber Issues...              5,497
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                        CAPITAL INVESTMENT FUND

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................       $12,600,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................        15,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................        15,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................        +2,400,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $15,000,000 for 
Capital Investment Fund. Funds provided are in addition to an 
estimated $278,760,000 in expedited passport fees, which will 
be used to support the information technology modernization 
effort, for a total of $293,760,000 in fiscal year 2018 for 
support of the Information Technology Strategic Plan of the 
Department of State.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1,2\...................       $87,069,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request\1\...........................        72,562,000
Committee recommendation\1\...........................        73,869,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       -13,200,000
    Change from request...............................        +1,307,000
 
\1\In addition, the fiscal year 2017 enacted level, the fiscal year 2018
  request, and the Committee recommendation include funds under this
  heading in title VIII designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii)
  of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
\2\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level also excludes funds appropriated
  by the Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of
  P.L. 114-254).

    The Committee recommendation includes $73,869,000 for 
support of the oversight personnel and activities of the Office 
of Inspector General (OIG) at the Department of State. 
Additional funds are provided under title VIII.
    Funds provided under this heading will support the audits, 
investigations, and inspections of worldwide operations and 
programs of the Department of State and Broadcasting Board of 
Governors. The Committee expects the OIG to continue the 
coordination of audit plans and activities involving Department 
of State operations and programs in Afghanistan with the 
Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction 
(SIGAR) in order to ensure the development of comprehensive 
oversight plans and to avoid duplication.

               EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................      $634,143,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................       285,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................       590,900,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       -43,243,000
    Change from request...............................      +305,900,000
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $590,900,000 for 
Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs.
    Central and South America and Mexico.--The Committee 
directs the Department of State to continue support of 
educational and cultural exchange programs with Mexico and 
countries in Central and South America and to increase 
opportunities for participation of students from disadvantaged 
backgrounds or historically underserved populations at the high 
school, college, and post-graduate levels.
    Citizen Exchange Program.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $111,360,000 for the Citizen Exchange Program. Citizen 
exchange programs provide American and foreign participants the 
opportunity to gain knowledge and share expertise and 
experiences through professional, youth, cultural, and other 
exchanges. Funds are provided to support new competitive awards 
administered in cooperation with the various divisions within 
the Office of Citizen Exchanges, including through the Youth 
Programs Division to foster interaction between United States 
and foreign youth artists.
    Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange Program.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $4,125,000 for the Congress-Bundestag 
Youth Exchange Program. This program is integral for the 
continuation of a strong relationship between the United States 
and Germany.
    English Language Programs.--The Committee recommendation 
includes not less than $43,000,000 for English Language 
Programs. Within the amount provided, the Committee encourages 
the Department of State to maintain strong support for the 
English Language Fellow and Specialist Programs which bolster 
English language skills within critical world regions.
    Fulbright Program.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$236,000,000 for the Fulbright Program. Active in over 160 
countries, the program provides exchange opportunities to 
create and sustain mutual understanding between students, 
scholars, teachers, and professionals in the United States and 
those from other countries. Within the amount provided, funds 
are available for continued support of the Hubert H. Humphrey 
Fellowship program.
    Other exchanges.--The Committee recognizes the value of 
competitive exchange programs for young people, including the 
Youth Exchange and Study program; the Future Leaders Exchange; 
educator programs, including critical language programs; and 
programs providing overseas training in strategic languages for 
Americans. The Committee urges the Secretary of State to 
continue to prioritize exchange programs from countries with 
high importance to United States national security.
    Special academic, professional, and cultural exchanges.--
The Committee recommendation includes funds to continue support 
of special academic, professional, and cultural exchange 
programs where consistent with strategic priorities, including 
Mexico and Central America and the Tibetan exchanges and 
fellowships. The Committee expects funds for special academic, 
professional, and cultural exchange programs to be awarded on a 
competitive basis and the planned levels for each to be 
included in the fiscal year 2018 operating plan.
    Vietnam Education Foundation Act.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $2,500,000 under this heading for 
grants authorized by section 211 of the Vietnam Education 
Foundation Act of 2000, as amended. Additional funds for such 
grants are included under Development Assistance.
    Section 7076 of this Act includes a requirement that the 
Secretary of State submit to the Committees on Appropriations 
an operating plan for funds appropriated under this heading. 
The Committee expects that such plan will include the 
distribution of unobligated balances and recoveries, as well as 
any transfers to this account from other accounts in fiscal 
year 2018.
    Funds made available under this heading are allocated in 
the following manner and are subject to the requirements of 
sections 7015 and 7076 of this Act.

               EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   Program/Activity                     Budget Authority
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Academic Programs
    Fulbright Program................................           $236,000
    Global Academic Exchanges........................             55,541
    Special Academic Exchanges.......................             16,350
                                                      ------------------
        Subtotal, Academic Programs..................            307,891
Professional and Cultural Exchanges
    International Visitor Program....................             97,765
    Citizen Exchange Programs........................            111,360
        Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange............            [4,125]
    Special Professional and Cultural Exchanges......                575
                                                      ------------------
            Subtotal, Professional and Cultural                  209,700
             Exchanges...............................
Young Leaders Initiatives............................              8,822
Program and Performance..............................              5,493
Exchanges Support....................................             58,994
                                                      ------------------
    Total, Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs            590,900
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                        REPRESENTATION EXPENSES

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................        $8,030,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................         7,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................         7,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................        -1,030,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $7,000,000 for 
Representation Expenses authorized by section 905 of the 
Foreign Service Act of 1980.
    Funds provided under this heading are used to reimburse 
foreign service officers for expenditures incurred in their 
official capacities abroad in establishing and maintaining 
relations with officials of foreign governments and appropriate 
members of local communities. The Secretary of State is 
directed to submit semi-annual reports to the Committees on 
Appropriations containing detailed information on the allotment 
and expenditure of this appropriation.

              PROTECTION OF FOREIGN MISSIONS AND OFFICIALS

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................       $30,344,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................        30,890,000
Committee recommendation..............................        30,890,000
    Change from enacted level.........................          +546,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $30,890,000 for 
Protection of Foreign Missions and Officials.
    Funds provided under this heading are used to reimburse 
local governments and communities for the extraordinary costs 
incurred in providing protection for international 
organizations, foreign missions and officials, and foreign 
dignitaries under certain circumstances. To be eligible for 
reimbursement under the regular program, the costs must be 
incurred in a city with 20 or more consular or diplomatic 
missions staffed by accredited personnel and all costs must be 
certified as eligible by the Bureau of Diplomatic Security of 
the Department of State. In addition, funds may be used for 
reimbursement for an extraordinary event in a jurisdiction that 
does not meet the regular program eligibility requirements, if 
specifically allowed. The Committee expects the Department of 
State to provide reimbursement to local jurisdictions on a 
timely basis if claims are fully justified.
    The Department of State shall continue to submit to the 
Committees on Appropriations a semi-annual report on the number 
of claims for extraordinary protective services that have been 
submitted by eligible jurisdictions that are certified as 
meeting the program requirements and the amount of unobligated 
funds available to pay such claims.
    Section 7034(i) of this Act continues authority for the 
Secretary of State to transfer expired unobligated balances 
from funds made available under Diplomatic and Consular 
Programs. The Committee directs the Department of State to 
include any expired balances transferred to this heading in the 
report required by the previous paragraph.

            EMBASSY SECURITY, CONSTRUCTION, AND MAINTENANCE

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1,2\...................    $1,117,859,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................     1,142,200,000
Committee recommendation\1\...........................     2,242,696,000
    Change from enacted level.........................    +1,124,837,000
    Change from request...............................    +1,100,496,000
 
\1\In addition, the fiscal year 2017 enacted level and the Committee
  recommendation include funds under this heading in title VIII
  designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced Budget
  and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
\2\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level also excludes funds appropriated
  by the Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of
  P.L. 114-254).

    The Committee recommendation includes $2,242,696,000 for 
Embassy Security, Construction, and Maintenance. An additional 
$71,778,000 is provided under this heading in title VIII, which 
brings the total in the Act for Embassy Security, Construction, 
and Maintenance to $2,314,474,000.
    The recommendation designates $1,560,015,000, including 
funding provided in title VIII, for priority worldwide security 
upgrades, acquisition, and construction, and $754,459,000 for 
other repair, maintenance, construction, and operations costs.
    Embassy construction and maintenance program.--The 
Committee recommendation continues language in section 7004 
requiring all agencies and departments to fully meet their 
capital cost sharing obligations under subsection (e) of 
section 604 of the Secure Embassy Construction and 
Counterterrorism Act of 1999, in order to be allocated office 
space or other accommodations in newly constructed or renovated 
diplomatic facilities.
    The Committee recommendation does not include the requested 
authority to use prior year funds to augment the Capital 
Security Cost-Sharing Program (CSCS) contribution of the 
Department of State. Instead, the recommendation includes not 
less than $956,152,000 from funds made available under this 
heading in this Act for the Department's CSCS and Maintenance 
Cost Sharing (MCS) annual contributions. This amount, combined 
with $1,141,510,000 in estimated CSCS and MCS reimbursements 
from other agencies and $124,604,000 from consular fees, 
provides a total for maintenance, construction and design of 
embassy and consulate compounds of not less than $2,222,266,000 
for fiscal year 2018. This amount is consistent with the 
recommendation of the Benghazi Accountability Review Board and 
supports the accelerated multi-year program to construct new 
secure replacement facilities for the most vulnerable embassies 
and consulates.
    Notification and reporting requirements.--Section 7004(d) 
of this Act continues the enhanced notification requirements 
from prior Acts as a means of ensuring the Committee has the 
necessary information to conduct appropriate oversight of 
construction projects. For purposes of section 7004(d), the 
Department is directed to clearly define and consistently 
report the elements of each project factor and an explanation 
of any changes from previous reports or notifications for a 
project.
    Notifications made pursuant to section 7004(d) shall 
include, at a minimum, the following project factors: (1) the 
location and size of the property to be acquired, including the 
proximity to existing United States diplomatic facilities and 
host government ministries; (2) the justification of need for 
acquiring the property and construction of new facilities and 
the reconciled appraised value of the project; (3) the detailed 
breakdown of the total project costs, including, at a minimum, 
the projected schedule and the following cost categories: site 
acquisition, project development, planning, design, 
construction, other construction costs, including costs planned 
for the procurement of art, value added tax, contingencies, and 
any other relevant costs; (4) the revenues derived from, or 
estimated to be derived from, real property sales associated 
with the project, if applicable; (5) any unique requirements of 
the project that may increase the cost of the project, such as 
consular workload, legal environment, physical and/or security 
requirements, and seismic capabilities; (6) the number of 
waivers required pursuant to section 606 of Appendix G of 
Public Law 106-113, if applicable; (7) any religious, cultural, 
or political factors that may affect the cost, location, or 
construction timeline; (8) the current and projected number of 
desks, agency presence, and the projected number of United 
States direct hire staff, LES, and Third Country Nationals; (9) 
the current and projected number of beds, if applicable; (10) 
the most recent rightsizing analysis, and a justification for 
exceeding the staffing projections of such rightsizing 
analysis, if applicable; and (11) with respect to new projects 
not previously justified to the Committees on Appropriations, 
confirmation that the Department of State has completed the 
requisite value engineering studies required pursuant to OMB 
Circular A-131 and Bureau of Overseas Building Operations 
Policy and Procedure Directive, Cost 02 and the Department's 
adjudication of those recommendations.
    The Committee remains concerned about growth in costs 
associated with new embassy construction projects, particularly 
the Mexico City Embassy and Beirut Embassy projects. The 
Committee recommendation continues the requirement for 
quarterly reports for these projects in section 7004(h) of this 
Act. The reports should include the following: (1) the project 
factors as specified under Enhanced Notification Requirements 
in section 7004(d) of this Act that were used to develop the 
initial cost estimate to justify the project; (2) changes in 
these factors from the initial cost estimate to the current 
estimate, with an explanation of such changes; and (3) an 
explanation of cost containment measures being used to address 
cost growth from the initial estimates.
    Other repair, construction, and operations.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $754,459,000 for other repair, 
construction, and operations costs. These funds support the 
management of United States Government real property overseas, 
maintenance of Government-owned and long-term leased properties 
at over 275 locations, and leasing of office and functional 
facilities and residential units, not only for the Department 
of State, but also for all United States employees overseas 
under COM authority.
    Operating plan.--Section 7076 of this Act requires the 
Secretary of State to submit to the Committees on 
Appropriations an operating plan for funds appropriated under 
this heading. Such plan should include all resources available 
to the Department of State in fiscal year 2018 for operations, 
maintenance, and construction, and an accounting of the actual 
and anticipated proceeds of sales for all projects in fiscal 
year 2017.
    Project contingency savings.--The Committee understands 
from the information included in the notifications required by 
section 7004 of this Act that the Department of State has 
contingency savings on previously appropriated construction 
projects. The Committee directs the Secretary of State to 
submit a report to the Committees on Appropriations at the end 
of each fiscal quarter on such contingency savings.

           EMERGENCIES IN THE DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR SERVICE

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................        $7,900,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................         7,885,000
Committee recommendation..............................         7,885,000
    Change from enacted level.........................           -15,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $7,885,000 to enable 
the Secretary of State to meet unforeseen emergencies arising 
in the Diplomatic and Consular Service. Funding provided under 
this heading is available until expended.
    This appropriation provides resources for the Department of 
State to meet emergency requirements in the conduct of foreign 
affairs, including for the following purposes: (1) travel and 
subsistence expenses for relocation of American employees of 
the United States Government and their families from troubled 
areas to the United States or safe-haven posts; (2) allowances 
granted to Department of State employees and their dependents 
evacuated to the United States for the convenience of the 
Government; and (3) payment of rewards for information 
concerning terrorist activities.
    The recommendation continues prior year language providing 
the authority to transfer up to $1,000,000 from this heading to 
the Repatriation Loans Program heading. This authority will 
ensure an adequate level of resources for loans to American 
citizens through the Repatriation Loans Program, should 
additional funds be required in fiscal year 2018 due to an 
unanticipated increase in the number of loans.

                   REPATRIATION LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................        $1,300,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................         1,300,000
Committee recommendation..............................         1,300,000
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation includes a total of $1,300,000 
for the Repatriation Loans Program Account for the subsidy cost 
of repatriation loans totaling up to $2,440,856, as authorized 
by 22 U.S.C. 2671.

              PAYMENT TO THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE IN TAIWAN

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................       $31,963,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................        26,312,000
Committee recommendation..............................        30,557,000
    Change from enacted level.........................        -1,406,000
    Change from request...............................        +4,245,000
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $30,557,000 for 
Payment to the American Institute in Taiwan. The Committee 
recommendation supports operating expenses of the American 
Institute in Taiwan (AIT) and funds may also be made available 
for special projects and consular upgrades.
    The Taiwan Relations Act requires that programs concerning 
Taiwan be carried out by the AIT and authorizes funds to be 
appropriated to the Secretary of State to carry out the 
provisions of the Act. The Institute administers programs in 
the areas of economic and commercial services, cultural 
affairs, travel services, and logistics. The Department of 
State contracts with the AIT to carry out these activities.

                 International Center, Washington, D.C.


 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................        $1,320,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................           743,000
Committee recommendation..............................           743,000
    Change from enacted level.........................          -577,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $743,000 for the 
International Center, Washington, D.C.

     PAYMENT TO THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY FUND

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................      $158,900,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................       158,900,000
Committee recommendation..............................       158,900,000
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $158,900,000 for 
Payment to the Foreign Service Retirement and Disability Fund.
    This appropriation, which is a mandatory program for budget 
scorekeeping purposes, is authorized by the Foreign Service Act 
of 1980, which provides for an appropriation to the Fund in 30 
equal annual installments of the amount required for the 
unfunded liability created by new benefits, new groups of 
beneficiaries, or increased salaries on which benefits are 
computed. The Retirement Fund is maintained through 
contributions made by participants, matching government 
contributions, special government contributions (including this 
account), interest on investments, and voluntary contributions.

                      International Organizations


              CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1\.....................    $1,262,966,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request\1\...........................       900,195,000
Committee recommendation\1\...........................     1,074,645,000
    Change from enacted level.........................      -188,321,000
    Change from request...............................      +174,450,000
 
\1\In addition, the fiscal year 2017 enacted level, the fiscal year 2018
  request, and the Committee recommendation include funds under this
  heading in title VIII designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii)
  Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,074,645,000 for 
Contributions to International Organizations. Additional funds 
are provided under title VIII.
    The Committee expects the Secretary of State to prioritize 
payments for organizations whose work promotes human health and 
international security, including the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization (NATO) and the International Atomic Energy Agency 
(IAEA). The Committee recommendation provides funding above the 
request to ensure adequate resources for these and other such 
organizations. The Secretary of State is directed to consult 
with the Committees on Appropriations on these matters not 
later than 30 days after enactment of this Act.
    Capital projects.--The Committee recommendation does not 
include funding for the design, renovation, or construction of 
the UN Headquarters in New York and subsection 7048(f) of this 
Act prohibits funds in this Act from being used for such 
purposes. Not later than 90 days after enactment of this Act, 
the Committee directs the Secretary of State to provide a final 
report to the Committees on Appropriations on the UN Capital 
Master Plan (CMP), including its initial scope and costs, any 
modifications made, the total cost, contributions made to date 
by each UN member state, and any unmet requirements due to cost 
over-runs from the initial CMP or that resulted from additional 
requirements after the initial CMP.
    In accordance with subsection 7048(f), the operating plan 
submitted for this account shall include a list of ongoing and 
new capital projects funded by the plan. The following 
information shall also be included for each capital project 
with an estimated total assessed cost to all member states in 
excess of $100,000,000 over the life of the project: (1) the 
justification for the project; (2) a detailed summary of the 
proposed budget for the project, including costs for design, 
construction, project management, building fitout, and 
technology and security upgrades; (3) the assessed costs to be 
funded under the operating plan and an estimate of the total 
assessed cost to the United States for the project; (4) a 
description of the steps taken by the UN and the Department of 
State to keep costs within budget and the contingency plan to 
address potential cost overruns; and (5) a description of the 
risk management strategy and mechanisms to ensure transparency 
and accountability.
    Procurement.--The Committee expects the Department of State 
and USUN to monitor procurement processes at the UN and other 
international organizations and ensure that American 
manufacturers and suppliers are being provided fair treatment 
in bidding on projects and services.
    Report.--The Committee remains concerned with continued 
anti-Israel bias at the UN and strongly endorses the Department 
of State's withholding of a proportionate share of the costs to 
such UN entities deemed to be anti-Israeli. Pursuant to Public 
Law 98-164, as amended, the Committee notes that in fiscal year 
2016 the Secretary of State withheld funding to the following: 
the Division for Palestinian Rights in the Department of 
Political Affairs; the Committee on the Exercise of the 
Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People; and the Special 
Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human 
Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the 
Occupied Territories. The Committee supports this action and 
directs the Department to include a description of any anti-
Israel activities of these entities in the annual report 
submitted pursuant to section 4(a) of Public Law 79-264 on 
United States participation in the UN.
    UN budget.--The Committee recommendation includes language 
carried in the prior year requiring the Secretary of State to 
transmit to the Committees on Appropriations the most recent 
biennial budget prepared by the UN at the time of the 
submission of the President's budget to Congress. The Committee 
recommendation also includes language carried in the prior year 
requiring the Secretary of State to notify the Committees on 
Appropriations at least 15 days in advance of any UN action to 
increase funding for any UN program without identifying an 
offsetting decrease elsewhere in the UN budget.
    UN Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization 
(UNESCO).--The Committee notes that, due to the application of 
Public Law 101-246 and Public Law 103-236, United States 
contributions are currently being withheld from UNESCO. The 
Committee further notes that no funds were requested and none 
are provided in this Act for a contribution to UNESCO.
    The Committee notes with disappointment decision 41 COM 
8C.1 adopted by UNESCO on July 7, 2017, which is one-sided, 
runs contrary to history, and is not conducive towards peace 
between the Israelis and the Palestinians.
    UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC).--The Committee is 
concerned about the credibility and effectiveness of UNHRC and 
notes with disappointment the ascension to UNHRC of countries 
with poor human rights records. The Committee is also concerned 
with the continued, disproportionate focus of UNHRC on Israel. 
The Committee recommendation includes modified language in 
section 7048(c) of this Act prohibiting funds to UNHRC unless 
certain conditions are met.
    The Committee notes with concern the passage by the UNHRC 
of resolution A/HRC/31/L.39, which is counterproductive to 
achieving peace between Israel and the Palestinians. The 
Committee does not expect the United States to participate in 
the implementation of this resolution and directs the Secretary 
of State to urge the UNHRC and other countries to do the same. 
The Committee directs the Secretary to work with the UN High 
Commissioner for Human Rights to minimize the impact of the 
compilation of the database called for under that resolution.
    Not later than 60 days after enactment of this Act, the 
Committee directs the Secretary of State to submit an updated 
report to the Committees on Appropriations on all United States 
contributions to the UNHRC for the preceding fiscal year, 
including amounts provided through the UN Regular Budget and 
through voluntary contributions.
    UN reform.--The Committee expects the Department of State 
and the United States Mission to the UN (USUN) to make UN 
reform a high priority and to work with other UN member states 
to increase the accountability of the UN and other 
international organizations. The Committee supports efforts to 
make the UN and other international organizations more 
efficient, less costly and to ensure that costs are shared on a 
more equitable basis. The Committee understands that the 
Department of State is currently reviewing these organizations 
to see where reductions and reforms can be achieved. The 
Committee also supports efforts to examine and cancel expensive 
commercial leases and downsize operations in areas with high 
costs of living and construction costs. Not later than 180 days 
after enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State is directed 
to submit a report to the Committees on Appropriations on these 
matters. Such report should include a description of estimated 
cost savings and cost avoidance of reforms undertaken.
    The Committee supports efforts to increase accountability 
by strengthening internal controls and systems to investigate 
and eliminate waste, fraud, and abuse. The Committee expects 
the UN and each specialized agency to have a designated 
official to carry out an independent ethics function and to 
provide protection from retaliation to whistleblowers who 
volunteer information concerning ongoing waste, fraud, and 
abuse.
    The Committee is concerned about recent reports of 
excessive travel costs incurred by certain international 
organizations. The Committee includes modified language in 
section 7048(a) of this Act withholding a portion of funds 
until the Secretary of State reports that certain transparency 
and accountability requirements have been met, including 
policies and procedures regarding travel. The Committee directs 
the Secretary of State to continue to include information on 
each organization in the report submitted pursuant to this 
subsection.

        CONTRIBUTIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACEKEEPING ACTIVITIES

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level1.......................      $552,904,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request1.............................       268,886,000
Committee recommendation1.............................       529,909,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       -22,995,000
    Change from request...............................      +261,023,000
 
1In addition, the fiscal year 2017 enacted level, the fiscal year 2018
  request, and the Committee recommendation include funds under this
  heading in title VIII designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii)
  Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

    The Committee recommendation includes $529,909,000 for 
Contributions for International Peacekeeping Activities. 
Additional funds are provided under title VIII. The Committee 
provides funding for the United States share of the UN Support 
Office in Somalia under Peacekeeping Operations in title VIII 
instead of under this heading.
    The Committee continues to be concerned about the scope, 
duration, and costs of UN peacekeeping missions and supports 
the efforts of the Secretary of State and USUN to bring down 
costs while maintaining United States interests and 
international security. The Committee recommendation continues 
language directing the Secretary of State to work with the UN 
and members of the UN Security Council to evaluate and 
prioritize peacekeeping missions, and to consider a drawdown 
when mission goals have been substantially achieved. Not later 
than 90 days after enactment of this Act, the Secretary of 
State is directed to submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations describing efforts by the Department of State to 
review UN peacekeeping operations, including prioritization of 
missions and proposals for reducing the costs and scope of 
missions.
    The Committee recommendation continues language requiring 
notification at least 15 days in advance of voting for any new 
or expanded mission, including the estimated cost and duration 
of the mission, the objectives of the mission, the national 
interest that will be served, and the exit strategy. The 
Committee notes that the notification may be provided less than 
15 days in advance of voting for a new or expanded mission in 
the event of an emergency. The Committee expects the Secretary 
of State to ensure the appropriate and judicious application of 
this provision.
    The Committee recommendation continues language stating 
that funds shall be made available for peacekeeping activities 
unless the Secretary of State determines that American 
manufacturers and suppliers are not being provided equal 
procurement opportunities and language prohibiting funds for 
any peacekeeping mission that will involve United States Armed 
Forces under the command and control of a foreign national 
unless certain requirements have been met.
    Oversight and reform.--The Committee continues to support 
independent oversight of the UN to identify waste, fraud, and 
abuse, and the Committee supports reforms to ensure that such 
practices are eliminated. The Committee includes modified 
language in section 7048(a) of this Act withholding a portion 
of funds for the UN until the Secretary of State certifies that 
certain transparency and accountability requirements have been 
met, including policies and procedures regarding travel.
    Peacekeeping rate.--The Committee recommendation provides 
the resources necessary to fund the assessed cost of 
peacekeeping missions at the statutory level of 25 percent. The 
Committee support efforts by the Department of State and USUN 
to seek a reduction of the United States-assessed rate for 
international peacekeeping activities and ensure UN 
peacekeeping costs are shared on a more equitable basis. The 
Committee expects the Department to keep the Committee apprised 
of these efforts and directs that information on these matters 
be included in the 90 day report directed in the introduction 
under this heading.
    Trafficking in persons and sexual exploitation and abuse.--
The Committee remains concerned about cases of UN peacekeepers 
abusing the people they have been sent to protect. The 
Committee notes with great concern the continued sexual 
exploitation and abuse by UN peacekeepers and supports a zero-
tolerance policy. The Committee recommendation includes 
language carried in the prior year prohibiting funds unless the 
Secretary of State certifies and reports to the Committees on 
Appropriations on a peacekeeping mission-by-mission basis that 
the UN is implementing effective policies and procedures to 
prevent UN employees, contractor personnel, and peacekeeping 
troops serving in such mission from trafficking in persons, 
exploiting victims of trafficking, or committing acts of sexual 
exploitation and abuse or other violations of human rights.
    Section 7048(h) of this Act provides that funds 
appropriated by this Act shall be made available to implement 
section 301 of the Department of State Authorities Act, Fiscal 
Year 2017 (P.L. 114-323), which requires a United States 
strategy for combating sexual exploitation and abuse in UN 
peacekeeping operations. The Committee notes that section 303 
of Public Law 114-323 also states that it is the policy of the 
United States that security assistance should not be provided 
to any unit of the security forces of a foreign country if such 
unit has engaged in a gross violation of human rights or in 
acts of sexual exploitation or abuse, including while serving 
in a UN peacekeeping operation.

                       International Commissions


 INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................       $77,534,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................        72,648,000
Committee recommendation..............................        72,648,000
    Change from enacted level.........................        -4,886,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$72,648,000 for International Boundary and Water Commission, 
United States and Mexico, including $44,748,000 for Salaries 
and Expenses and $27,900,000 for Construction.
    The Committee recommendation includes not less than the 
request for the Rio Grande Flood Control System Rehabilitation 
Project to continue and maintain levee projects along the Rio 
Grande, including environmental, hydrologic, hydraulic, and low 
water weir studies along the Rio Grande Valley that are 
consistent with the projects outlined within the Mexican Water 
Treaty of 1944, Treaty Series 994.
    The Committee notes the treaty obligations of Mexico to 
supply water deliveries to the Rio Grande and recognizes the 
importance of transparency concerning such matters. The 
Committee directs International Boundary and Water Commission 
(IBWC) to regularly publish water delivery data on its Web 
site, including projections for the balance of water 
deliveries. The Committee expects IBWC to hold quarterly 
meetings with interested stakeholders to inform them of IBWC 
activities and receive feedback.
    The Committee is concerned about the adverse impact on 
communities in the United States from the release of effluent 
from Mexico. The Committee urges the Secretary of State and 
IBWC to work with the Government of Mexico to facilitate a 
resolution to this matter.

              AMERICAN SECTIONS, INTERNATIONAL COMMISSIONS

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................       $12,258,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................        12,184,000
Committee recommendation..............................        12,184,000
    Change from enacted level.........................           -74,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $12,184,000 for 
American Sections, International Commissions, of which 
$7,504,000 is for the International Joint Commission, 
$2,290,000 is for the International Boundary Commission, and 
$2,390,000 is for the Border Environment Cooperation 
Commission.
    Lake Ontario shoreline.--Not later than 90 days after 
enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit to 
the appropriate congressional committees a report on damages to 
the shoreline of Lake Ontario as a result of flooding during 
2017, including an assessment of damages attributable to the 
implementation of Plan 2014 by the International Joint 
Commission. The report shall also review and include options 
for providing compensation to shoreline property owners 
adversely affected by such flooding during 2017.

                  INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES COMMISSIONS

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................       $37,502,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................        33,871,000
Committee recommendation..............................        34,176,000
    Change from enacted level.........................        -3,326,000
    Change from request...............................          +305,000
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $34,176,000 for 
International Fisheries Commissions.
    Funds appropriated under this heading support the United 
States share of the expenses of the international fisheries 
commissions and related organizations, as well as the travel 
expenses of the United States commissioners. The commissions 
funded by this appropriation were established by treaties and 
agreements negotiated by the United States and were ratified by 
the President with the advice and consent of the Senate. The 
treaties protect access to shared international fisheries 
resources and support other vital economic and environmental 
interests. The commercial and recreational fisheries managed by 
these organizations generate income from $12 billion to $15 
billion annually for the United States.
    Funds made available under the heading are allocated in the 
following manner and are subject to the requirements of 
sections 7015 and 7076 of this Act:

                   INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES COMMISSIONS
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 Commission/Activity                    Budget Authority
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Great Lakes Fishery Commission.......................            $21,345
Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission..............              1,750
Pacific Salmon Commission............................              3,450
International Pacific Halibut Commission.............              4,200
Other Marine Conservation Organizations..............              3,431
                                                      ------------------
    Total, International Fisheries Commissions.......             34,176
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee recommendation includes funds necessary to 
fully support the anticipated United States treaty-mandated 
assessments, other expenses related to such commissions, and 
for the participation of non-government United States 
commissioners to the various commissions. The recommendation 
also includes the funds requested for Asian carp control by 
Great Lakes Fisheries Commission.

                             RELATED AGENCY


                    Broadcasting Board of Governors


 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1\.....................      $781,808,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................       688,154,000
Committee recommendation..............................       769,727,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       -12,081,000
    Change from request...............................       +81,573,000
 
\1\In addition, the fiscal year 2017 enacted level includes funds under
  this heading in title VIII designated pursuant to section
  251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control
  Act of 1985.

    The Committee recommendation includes $769,727,000 under 
this heading to carry out United States international 
communications activities and operations overseen by the 
Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG), of which $764,936,000 is 
for International Broadcasting Operations and $4,791,000 is for 
Broadcasting Capital Improvements.

                 INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING OPERATIONS

    The Committee recommendation includes $764,936,000 for 
International Broadcasting Operations. Additional funds are 
included in title VIII.
    This account funds the operating, program, and engineering 
costs of Voice of America (VOA), Radio Free Europe/Radio 
Liberty (RFE/RL), Radio Free Asia (RFA), the Middle East 
Broadcasting Networks, and BBG. The recommendation also 
includes funding for broadcasting to Cuba under this account. 
Funds made available under the heading are allocated in the 
following manner and are subject to the requirements of 
sections 7015 and 7076 of this Act:

                  INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING OPERATIONS
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   Federal Entities                     Budget Authority
------------------------------------------------------------------------
International Broadcasting Bureau....................            $55,457
    Internet Freedom and Circumvention Activities....           [13,800]
Voice of America.....................................            232,735
Office Cuba Broadcasting.............................             28,056
    Technology, Services and Innovation..............            176,975
                                                      ------------------
        Subtotal, Federal Entities...................            493,223
Independent Grantee Organizations:...................
        Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty..............            123,867
        Radio Free Asia..............................             42,346
        Middle East Broadcasting Networks............            105,500
                                                      ------------------
        Subtotal, Grantees...........................            271,713
                                                      ------------------
Total, International Broadcasting Operations.........            764,936
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee recommendation continues the requirement that 
the BBG notify the Committees on Appropriations within 15 days 
of any determination by the Board that any of its broadcast 
entities were found to be in violation of the principles, 
standards, or journalistic code of ethics.
    Countering Internet censorship.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $13,800,000 under International 
Broadcasting Bureau for global internet freedom for the 
expansion of unrestricted access to information on the Internet 
in accordance with section 7078 of this Act. In addition, 
$1,200,000 is included within funds provided for RFA for the 
personnel costs associated with Internet freedom activities, 
bringing the total provided for such programs to $15,000,000 
for fiscal year 2018.
    Subsection (e) of such section requires the BBG Chief 
Executive Officer (CEO) to submit to the Committees on 
Appropriations a spend plan for funds made available for 
programs to promote Internet freedom globally. Such spend plan 
shall detail amounts planned for support of the activities 
detailed in section 7078(b)(2), including amounts to be 
programmed by the Open Technology Fund.
    Countering ISIS and violent extremism.--The Committee 
recommendation includes funds for continued programming to 
counter the misinformation of ISIS and other violent extremist 
groups in the Middle East, and Central and South Asia.
    Countering Russian media.--The Committee expresses its 
strong support for efforts to counter Russia's aggressive 
disinformation and propaganda campaign, particularly through 
the development of effective Russian language programming. The 
Committee recommendation includes funds for countering Russian 
influence programming and urges the BBG to continue an 
aggressive multi-media effort aimed at Russians and Russian 
speakers, including the Current Time TV programming of RFE/RL 
and VOA. The Committee directs that BBG report to the 
Committees on Appropriations on options for increasing 
viewership and reach of Current Time.
    East Asia and the Pacific.--The Committee strongly supports 
the Tibetan language services of the VOA and RFA which the 
Committee understands provide the only sources of independent 
information accessible to the people of Tibet. The Committee 
recommendation provides $42,346,000 for RFA, including funds to 
continue the Tibetan language service.
    Korean programming.--The Committee recommendation includes 
sufficient funds for RFA and VOA to continue Korean programming 
enhancements begun in fiscal year 2017.
    Office of Cuba Broadcasting (OCB).--The Committee 
recommendation provides not less than $28,056,000 for OCB Radio 
and TV Marti, pursuant to the Radio Broadcasting to Cuba Act of 
1983, the Television Broadcasting to Cuba Act of 1990, and 
section 703(b) of the Department of State Authorities Act, 
Fiscal Year 2017.
    VOA Africa.--The Committee acknowledges the importance of 
VOA Africa programming, including programs in South Sudan, 
Somalia, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The 
Committee urges the BBG to continue to prioritize such 
programs.
    VOA Pakistan.--The Committee urges VOA to consider 
expanding Sindh language broadcasting.

                   BROADCASTING CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS

    The Committee recommendation includes $4,791,000 for 
broadcasting capital improvements.

                            RELATED PROGRAMS


                          The Asia Foundation


 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................       $17,000,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................                 0
Committee recommendation..............................        15,810,000
    Change from enacted level.........................        -1,190,000
    Change from request...............................       +15,810,000
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $15,810,000 for The 
Asia Foundation. The Committee recommendation does not assume 
the closure of The Asia Foundation (TAF), as proposed by the 
fiscal year 2018 request.
    Authorized by The Asia Foundation Act of 1983, TAF operates 
programs throughout Asia. TAF program priorities are developed 
in consultation with the Department of State and focus at the 
country and regional levels on building democratic institutions 
and improving governance, supporting policies and institutions 
required for open markets, increasing opportunities for women's 
participation and empowerment, and encouraging stability and 
cooperative relations among nations in the Asia-Pacific region.
    The Committee supports the efforts of TAF to seek donations 
from private foundations and corporations, competitively-bid 
awards from governmental and multilateral development agencies, 
and fee-based or reimbursable agreements as a means of 
sustaining program activities. The Committee directs TAF to 
include a summary table in the CBJ for fiscal year 2019 
detailing total revenue and support by category for fiscal year 
2017 and projected for fiscal year 2018.

                    United States Institute of Peace


 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................       $37,884,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................        19,117,000
Committee recommendation..............................        35,300,000
    Change from enacted level.........................        -2,584,000
    Change from request...............................       +16,183,000
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $35,300,000, for the 
United States Institute of Peace, as authorized. The Committee 
recommendation does not assume the closure of the United States 
Institute of Peace (USIP), as proposed by the fiscal year 2018 
request.
    The Committee notes that USIP receives funds from 
interagency transfers, reimbursements, and offsetting receipts 
to support USIP programs. The Committee urges USIP to continue 
to seek competitive awards from Federal agencies and to fully 
implement fee-based or reimbursable agreements, where 
appropriate, as a means of sustaining USIP activities and 
programs in a fiscally constrained environment. In addition, 
the Committee directs USIP to include information in the CBJ 
for fiscal year 2019 on the amount of funds received from other 
Federal agencies and the amount of revenue generated from fees 
and reimbursable agreements in fiscal year 2017, and projected 
for fiscal years 2018 and 2019.

         Center for Middle Eastern-Western Dialogue Trust Fund


 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................          $122,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................           140,000
Committee recommendation..............................           140,000
    Change from enacted level.........................           +18,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation for fiscal year 
2018 of interest and earnings from the Center for Middle 
Eastern-Western Dialogue Trust Fund, as authorized by section 
633 of Public Law 108-199. Interest and earnings for fiscal 
year 2019 are projected to total $140,000.

                 Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Program


 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................          $350,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................           158,000
Committee recommendation..............................           158,000
    Change from enacted level.........................          -192,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation for fiscal year 
2018 of interest and earnings from the Eisenhower Exchange 
Fellowship Program Trust Fund, as authorized by sections 4 and 
5 of the Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Act of 1990. Interest 
and earnings for fiscal year 2019 are projected to total 
$158,000.

                    Israeli Arab Scholarship Program


 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................           $47,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................            65,000
Committee recommendation..............................            65,000
    Change from enacted level.........................           +18,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommends an appropriation for fiscal year 
2018 of interest and earnings from the Israeli Arab Scholarship 
Endowment Fund, as authorized by section 214 of the Foreign 
Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993. 
Interest and earnings for fiscal year 2019 are projected to 
total $65,000.

                            East-West Center


 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................       $16,700,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................                 0
Committee recommendation..............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................       -16,700,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation does not include an 
appropriation for the East-West Center.

                    National Endowment for Democracy


 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................      $170,000,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................       103,500,000
Committee recommendation..............................       170,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0
    Change from request...............................       +66,500,000
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $170,000,000 for the 
National Endowment for Democracy.
    Of the total amount provided, the Committee directs that 
$117,500,000 shall be allocated in the traditional and 
customary manner, including for the core institutes.
    The remaining $52,500,000 shall be for democracy, human 
rights, and rule of law programs; as well as for the next phase 
of the National Endowment for Democracy (NED) mid- to long-term 
strategic approach and response to immediate and unanticipated 
challenges or opportunities, regarding which the President of 
the NED shall consult with the core institutes on the use of 
such funds, and the core institutes shall be eligible to 
receive funds for such purposes.
    The Committee remains concerned that new, more 
sophisticated, and transnational threats to democracy abroad 
have emerged in recent years. The NED, with its four core 
institutes, its global grants programs and activities, and its 
extensive experience, is uniquely positioned to lead a 
strategic response to such threats. The Committee commends the 
NED for building on its unparalleled experience and work in the 
most difficult political environments to develop a 
transnational approach to defending democratic norms, values, 
and institutions to address many key strategic challenges. The 
Department of State and USAID should recognize the ability of 
the NED to address these challenges.
    The Committee continues to support democracy and human 
rights programs for Tibet and directs that not less than the 
amounts provided in fiscal year 2017 be continued for such 
purposes.
    Not later than 45 days after enactment of this Act, the 
President of the NED is directed to submit a report to the 
Committees on Appropriations on the proposed uses of the funds 
provided under this heading on a regional and country basis. 
The report should include a description of programmatic goals 
for each region and country and how the planned use of funds 
will meet such goals. The Committee directs the NED to consult 
with the Committees on Appropriations in advance of any 
significant deviation from the plans outlined in such report. 
This grant should continue to be provided directly to the NED, 
and therefore funds under this heading shall not be subject to 
prior approval by the Department of State or USAID or to 
administrative or management surcharges, and minimal expenses, 
if any, should be charged to general Department of State 
operating expenses. Further, the NED should not be precluded 
from competitively bidding on other grant solicitations.

                           OTHER COMMISSIONS


      Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................          $888,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................           675,000
Committee recommendation..............................           675,000
    Change from enacted level.........................          -213,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $675,000 for 
Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad, 
as authorized.

      United States Commission on International Religious Freedom


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................        $3,500,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................         4,500,000
Committee recommendation..............................         4,500,000
    Change from enacted level.........................        +1,000,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $4,500,000 for the 
United States Commission on International Religious Freedom, as 
authorized by title II of the IRFA of 1998.
    The Commission conducts independent reviews, reports on 
facts and circumstances of violations of religious freedom 
abroad, and recommends options for United States policies with 
respect to foreign countries engaging in or tolerating 
violations of religious freedom.

            Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................        $2,579,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................         2,579,000
Committee recommendation..............................         2,579,000
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $2,579,000 for 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe, as authorized 
by Public Law 94-304.
    The Commission was established in 1976 to monitor the acts 
of the signatories that reflect compliance with or violation of 
the articles of the Final Act of the Conference on Security and 
Cooperation in Europe, with particular regard to provisions 
relating to human rights and cooperation in humanitarian 
fields.

  Congressional-Executive Commission on the People's Republic of China


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................        $2,000,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................         2,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................         2,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $2,000,000 for the 
Congressional-Executive Commission on the People's Republic of 
China.
    Established by the China Relations Act of 2000, the 
Commission's mission is to monitor compliance of the Government 
of the People's Republic of China (PRC) with international 
human rights standards and to track the development of the rule 
of law in the PRC. The Commission reports annually on these 
issues to the President and the Congressional leadership, 
making recommendations for policy action and legislation, when 
appropriate.

      United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................        $3,500,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................         3,500,000
Committee recommendation..............................         3,500,000
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $3,500,000 for United 
States-China Economic and Security Review Commission.
    The Committee recommendation continues by reference the 
authorities, conditions, and limitations carried under this 
heading in division F of Public Law 111-117 that provide an 
administrative framework for the operations of the Commission.
    Established by the National Defense Authorization Act, 
2001, the mission of the Commission is to monitor, investigate, 
and assess the ``national security implications of the 
bilateral trade and economic relationship'' between the United 
States and the PRC. The Commission reports annually on these 
issues to Congress, making recommendations for policy action 
and legislation when appropriate.

      TITLE II--UNITED STATES AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT


                  Funds Appropriated to the President


                           OPERATING EXPENSES

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1,2\...................    $1,204,609,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request1.............................     1,045,797,000
Committee recommendation 1............................     1,133,906,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       -70,703,000
    Change from request...............................       +88,109,000
 
1In addition, the fiscal year 2017 enacted level, the fiscal year 2018
  request, and the Committee recommendation include funds under this
  heading in title VIII designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii)
  of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
2The fiscal year 2017 enacted level also excludes funds appropriated by
  the Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of P.L.
  114-254).

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,133,906,000 for 
Operating Expenses. Additional funds are provided under title 
VIII.
    Funds under this heading are provided for salaries and 
expenses of employees of USAID, personal service contractors, 
and employees hired by other Federal agencies but assigned to 
USAID.
    The Committee directs the USAID Administrator to provide an 
update to the report required by House Report 114-154 to 
reflect employment data as of the end of fiscal year 2018 not 
later than November 15, 2018.
    The Committee notes that USAID must submit an operating 
plan to the Committees on Appropriations as required in section 
7076 of this Act.
    Diversity of the workforce.--The Committee expects the 
USAID Administrator to continue initiatives, including 
fellowships, to promote diversity in the workforce.
    Procurement.--The Committee directs the USAID Administrator 
to consult with the Committees on Appropriations on any 
proposed significant or substantive change to USAID guidance or 
directives related to acquisition and assistance prior to 
issuing such guidance or directives to USAID posts worldwide.
    The Committee directs USAID to ensure that technical 
officers comply with statutory and regulatory requirements in 
selecting the appropriate instrument type when administering 
all contracts and awards. USAID shall consult with the 
Committee on the guidelines used when selecting the appropriate 
mechanism.
    As in prior years, USAID is directed to notify the 
Committees on Appropriations 15 days prior to any procurement 
action that involves awarding of a sole source contract or 
other non-competitive grant or contract; raising the ceiling on 
an existing Indefinite Quantity Contract (IQC); issuing a new 
IQC; awarding an umbrella grant; or raising the ceiling on an 
existing umbrella grant. The Committee expects the thresholds 
for notification to be the same as in fiscal year 2012.
    The Committee remains concerned about USAID limiting 
competition for certain contracts and grants. The Committee 
directs the USAID Administrator to report to the Committees on 
Appropriations, not later than 30 days after enactment of this 
Act, on any procurement actions for which competition was 
limited, and the justification for each such action taken, 
during fiscal year 2017.
    The Committee continues to be concerned about the 
difficulty with which United States companies, including small, 
minority-owned, and disadvantaged business enterprises; 
universities; and non-governmental organizations have in 
navigating the acquisitions and assistance process at USAID. 
The Committee expects that, to the maximum extent practicable, 
the USAID Administrator shall ensure that United States small, 
minority-owned, veteran, and disadvantaged business enterprises 
fully participate in the provision of goods and services.
    The Committee recommends funding in title VI of this Act 
for the United States Trade and Development Agency (USTDA) to 
provide technical procurement advisory assistance and services 
for USAID and other Federal agencies for middle income and 
lower income countries that need assistance developing and 
aligning their standards and regulations with the broader 
international community.
    The Committee recommends that USAID increase the use of 
United States professional engineers and architects in the 
design, build, and oversight of construction projects funded by 
this Act.
    Science and technology research.--The Committee notes USAID 
issued their Public Access Plan on increasing access to the 
results of federally funded scientific research and urges 
continued implementation of such plan.

                        CAPITAL INVESTMENT FUND

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level1.......................      $174,985,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................       157,980,000
Committee recommendation..............................       174,985,000
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0
    Change from request...............................       +17,005,000
 
1The fiscal year 2017 enacted level excludes funds appropriated by the
  Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of P.L. 114-
  254).

    The Committee recommendation includes $174,985,000 for 
Capital Investment Fund and notes that USAID must submit an 
operating plan to the Committees on Appropriations as required 
in section 7076 of this Act.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level1.......................       $67,600,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................        69,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................        69,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................        +1,400,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 
1The fiscal year 2017 enacted level excludes funds appropriated by the
  Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of P.L. 114-
  254).

    The Committee recommendation includes $69,000,000 for 
Office of Inspector General and directs the Office of Inspector 
General (OIG) to submit its annual audit plan within the first 
quarter of fiscal year 2018. Additional funds are provided 
under title VIII.
    A vibrant private sector is a necessary condition for 
economic growth and poverty reduction. Not later than one year 
after enactment of this Act, the Committee directs the OIG to 
submit a report to the appropriate Congressional committees on 
how USAID, MCC, United States African Development Foundation, 
Inter-American Foundation, and Overseas Private Investment 
Corporation attract, include, and transition private capital 
into their projects.

                TITLE III--BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE


                  Funds Appropriated to the President


                         GLOBAL HEALTH PROGRAMS

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................    $8,724,950,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................     6,480,500,000
Committee recommendation..............................     8,321,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................      -403,950,000
    Change from request...............................    +1,840,500,000
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $8,321,000,000 for 
Global Health Programs.

USAID Global Health Programs

    The Committee recommendation includes $2,973,500,000 for 
USAID global health programs, of which $2,651,000,000 is new 
budget authority to be directly apportioned to USAID and 
$322,500,000 is repurposed funds. The Committee includes 
language similar to the request to repurpose unobligated 
balances appropriated under title IX of Division J of Public 
Law 113-235 for malaria programs and global health security.
    The Committee recommendation includes budgetary resources 
of $814,500,000 for maternal and child health; $125,000,000 for 
nutrition programs under this heading; $23,000,000 for programs 
benefiting vulnerable children; $241,000,000 to combat 
tuberculosis; $82,500,000 for global health security and 
emerging health threats; and $755,000,000 to prevent and treat 
malaria. Included under this heading is authority to provide a 
contribution to the UN Children's Fund (UNICEF), and the 
Committee recommendation includes $132,500,000 for such 
contribution.
    Global health security and emerging health threats.--The 
Committee recommendation includes $72,500,000 to promote global 
health security and to address emerging health threats 
overseas. Not later than 30 days after enactment of this Act, 
and prior to the initial obligation of funds, the Committee 
directs the USAID Administrator to submit to the Committees on 
Appropriations a report on the proposed uses of such funds on a 
country and project basis. The Committee directs that such 
report shall be updated and submitted to the Committees on 
Appropriations every 60 days until funds are obligated.
    In addition, the Committee recommendation includes 
$10,000,000 for the Emergency Reserve Fund established pursuant 
to section 7058(d)(2) of the Department of State, Foreign 
Operations, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2017 
(Division J of P.L. 115-31) to enable the United States and the 
international public health community to respond rapidly to 
emerging health threats. Funds in the Reserve Fund are 
available until expended, but may only be made available if, 
prior to obligation, the Secretary of State determines and 
reports to the Committees on Appropriations that it is in the 
national interest to respond to an emerging health threat that 
poses severe threats to human health.
    The Committee supports efforts to prevent and control 
vector-borne diseases and encourages USAID to coordinate such 
efforts with other agencies, incorporating, both proven and 
new, interventions that can be deployed rapidly and scaled up 
quickly into their programs.
    Malaria.--The Committee reaffirms its support for the 
Coordinator of United States Government Activities to Combat 
Malaria Globally as established in Public Law 110-293, 
including oversight of relevant programs across government 
agencies.
    Maternal and child health.--The health of a mother is 
directly related to the health of her children, and the 
Committee continues its commitment to maintain an emphasis on 
expanding access to programs that have proven effective in 
reducing maternal and child mortality. From funds provided 
under this heading, the Committee directs USAID to increase 
funding for programs to prevent and treat obstetric fistula. 
Within the funds provided, the Committee also encourages USAID 
to continue supporting programs for maternal and neonatal 
tetanus. The Committee looks forward to USAID's annual report 
on progress towards ending preventable child and maternal 
deaths.
    Subject to the consultation requirements of the Committees 
on Appropriations, USAID shall consider the need and cost-
effectiveness of supporting programs that focus on the 
following health issues: children with hydrocephalus; children 
with autism; programs for children with disabling burn 
injuries; non-communicable diseases; and neurological 
disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and dementia.
    The Committee encourages the USAID Administrator, in 
consultation with the United States Office of the Global AIDS 
Coordinator (OGAC) and the Director of the Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention (CDC), to give attention and support to 
increasing access to quality health care through frontline 
health workers, particularly at the community level, as part of 
their strategy to prevent child and maternal deaths and ensure 
global health security.
    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs).--The Committee notes 
the success of USAID in combating NTDs and supports the 
continuation of these life-saving programs.
    Nutrition.--The Committee directs that not less than 
$125,000,000 be provided for nutrition programs under this 
heading, including continued funding for Vitamin A and iodine 
deficiency disorder programs. The Committee supports effective 
nutrition interventions to reduce stunting, increase 
breastfeeding, promote early childhood development, and treat 
severe malnutrition.
    Polio.--The Committee provides $59,000,000 for programs to 
combat and eradicate polio, of which not less than $51,500,000 
is provided under this heading. The Committee notes that global 
polio eradication programs are also funded by the CDC.
    Reproductive health and voluntary family planning.--Section 
7058 of this Act includes a limitation of not more than 
$461,000,000 for reproductive health and voluntary family 
planning programs in this Act. This provision also addresses 
funds provided under Economic Support Fund for such programs.
    The Committee recommendation continues prior year language 
that does the following: (1) requires that none of the funds 
appropriated in this Act, or any unobligated balances, may be 
made available to any organization or program, which as 
determined by the President, supports or participates in the 
management of a program of coercive abortion or involuntary 
sterilization; (2) states that funds cannot be used to pay for 
the performance of abortions as a method of family planning or 
to motivate or coerce any person to practice abortion; (3) 
specifies that population funds shall be available only to 
voluntary family planning projects that offer, either directly 
or through referral, information about access to a broad range 
of family planning methods and services; (4) requires that in 
awarding grants for natural family planning under section 104 
of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, no applicant shall be 
discriminated against because of such applicant's religious or 
conscientious commitment to offer only natural family planning; 
and (5) requires the provision of accurate information related 
to condoms.
    The Committee includes language in section 7056 of this Act 
prohibiting funds for any foreign nongovernmental organization 
that promotes or performs abortion, except in cases of rape or 
incest or when the life of the mother would be endangered if 
the fetus were carried to term.
    The Committee urges USAID to promote the awareness and use 
of technology-based fertility-awareness methods of family 
planning that are proven effective.
    Research.--The Committee directs the Department of State 
and USAID to coordinate and undertake a consultative process 
with the Department of Defense, the CDC, the National 
Institutes of Health (NIH), the Food and Drug Administration, 
and OGAC as agencies develop their global health research 
priorities to ensure that United States investments in global 
health research are efficient, coordinated, and streamlined. 
The Committee looks forward to USAID's annual health related 
research and development report, which, among other things, 
outlines the Agency's process to support the uptake of global 
health products and interventions.
    Tuberculosis.--The Committee expects the USAID 
Administrator to consult with the Committees on Appropriations 
regarding the use of funds in this Act to implement the 
President's National Action Plan for Combating Drug Resistant 
Tuberculosis.
    Vaccines.--The Committee recommends a United States 
contribution of $290,000,000 for GAVI, the Vaccine Alliance in 
recognition that vaccines are key to decreasing the number of 
children who die before age five.
    The Committee agrees that developing a vaccine is essential 
to the fight against malaria and HIV and encourages USAID to 
continue funding to support their advancement as part of a 
comprehensive prevention, diagnostic, and treatment strategy to 
reduce malaria and HIV worldwide.
    Vulnerable children.--The Committee directs that not less 
than $23,000,000 shall be provided to support programs and 
activities that address the needs of vulnerable children, 
including childhood blindness programs.
    The Committee notes that six priority countries were 
selected for the United States Government Action Plan on 
Children in Adversity (APCA). The Committee encourages USAID to 
work to develop a coordinated strategy across all government 
agencies and a process for collaborative country planning for 
each of these six countries. The Committee directs the USAID 
Administrator to regularly update the Committee on APCA 
implementation.
    The Committee supports implementation of all three core 
objectives under the APCA, which focus on building strong 
beginnings, putting family care first, and protecting children 
from violence, exploitation, abuse, and neglect. The Committee 
encourages USAID to apply Displaced Children and Orphans Fund 
resources to plan and budget for activities that support all 
APCA core objectives, including, but not limited to, increasing 
the percentage of children living within appropriate, 
permanent, and protective family care; reducing the percentage 
of children living in institutions; and increasing adequate 
nutrition, education opportunities, care, and protection for 
families and their children.

HIV/AIDS Prevention and Treatment

    The Committee recommendation includes $6,000,000,000 to 
fight HIV/AIDS, which is the same amount as the fiscal year 
2017 enacted level. Of this amount, the Committee 
recommendation includes $5,670,000,000 to be directly 
apportioned to the Department of State. The Committee 
recommends continued support for a United States contribution 
to the Joint UN Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS).
    The Committee recognizes the significant achievements of 
the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) through 
the support of anti-retroviral treatment, testing, counseling, 
and other prevention measures. The Committee is concerned about 
the growing infection rate among women and girls and recommends 
their prioritization within programs to prevent and treat HIV, 
especially pregnant women to prevent mother-to-child 
transmission. Additionally, the Committee recommends that OGAC 
build upon the success of the Accelerating Children's Treatment 
Initiative, including a focus on capacity for HIV diagnostics 
and anti-retroviral treatment for infants and young children at 
the highest risk of dying without treatment.
    The Committee supports OGAC's engagement with post-
secondary institutions as authorized in section 204(c) of 
Public Law 110-293.
    For PEPFAR, sustainability means that a country has 
services, systems, and resources to effectively and efficiently 
control the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Sustainability requires a long-
term commitment from a country to ensure it establishes and 
maintains sufficient levels of fiscal ability, technical 
capability, political will, and citizen engagement. The 
Committee directs PEPFAR to include in its annual report a 
country-by-country assessment of sustainability and the 
country-specific obstacles to sustainability.
    Microbicides.--The Committee recommends continued support 
for microbicide development and directs OGAC to coordinate with 
USAID, NIH, other Federal agencies, and donors in order to 
advance microbicide development and implementation. The 
Committee directs OGAC to update the Committees on 
Appropriations on a regular basis on the progress made in 
achieving an effective microbicide.
    Public-private partnerships.--The Committee recognizes the 
important work by OGAC in partnering with the private sector 
and other institutional donors to leverage public and private 
investments in global health. These efforts are instrumental in 
combating a number of health issues unique to the survival of 
women and mothers in sub-Saharan Africa, including screening 
for disease, education and awareness campaigns, and other 
critical improvements to the overall health systems and 
services in some of the most underserved areas. The Committee 
encourages OGAC to consider expanding these efforts to improve 
the health of women worldwide.
    The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria 
(Global Fund).--The Committee is supportive of the Global Fund 
and its performance-based, results-oriented multilateral 
funding mechanism to combat HIV/AIDS and other infectious 
diseases. The Committee recommends up to $1,350,000,000 to meet 
such commitment, and any funds not able to be obligated because 
of statutory limitations may be available for bilateral PEPFAR 
programs.
    Oversight of the Global Fund remains a top priority, as 
well as continued support for an independent Office of the 
Inspector General. Therefore, the Committee recommendation 
continues language withholding 10 percent of funds provided to 
the Global Fund until the Secretary of State certifies to the 
Committees on Appropriations that the Secretariat and Board of 
the Global Fund have not adopted policies that would make the 
work of the OIG less transparent or less comprehensive.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State to provide to 
the Committees on Appropriations an update to the report 
required in House Report 113-185 on Global Fund issues related 
to financial systems, taxation, the United Nations Development 
Programme, and Secretariat budget transparency.
    Vulnerable children.--The Committee encourages OGAC to 
continue to align existing programs for vulnerable children 
with the goals and objectives of APCA and ensure that orphans 
and vulnerable children remain a priority within PEPFAR country 
programs. The Committee supports the continued integration of 
APCA's first objective into PEPFAR Mother-to-Child Transmission 
Programs; continued programming that focuses on strengthening 
families and preventing family separation, as well as 
identifying children outside of parental care for placement 
into permanent families; and continued support for efforts to 
meet the needs of children living outside of family care.

                         DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................    $2,995,465,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................                 0
Committee recommendation..............................     2,780,971,000
    Change from enacted level.........................      -214,494,000
    Change from request...............................    +2,780,971,000
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $2,780,971,000 for 
Development Assistance.
    The Committee recommendation does not endorse the proposal 
in the fiscal year 2018 request to eliminate or significantly 
reduce development programs in the least developed countries 
and expects such programming to continue.

Agriculture

    The Committee includes $1,000,600,000 for food security and 
agriculture development as authorized by the Global Food 
Security Act of 2016 (P.L. 114-195). The Committee appreciates 
the whole-of-government approach presented in the Global Food 
Security Strategy and directs the USAID Administrator to 
consult with the Committees on Appropriations on such strategy, 
including the benchmarks and performance metrics. The Committee 
recognizes the importance of biofortification as a part of the 
global food security strategy and urges continued support for 
such efforts. The Committee notes the positive impact large-
scale irrigation systems could have if accessible to 
smallholder farmers and directs the USAID Administrator to 
consult with the Committees on Appropriations on such efforts.
    The Committee provides $15,000,000 for a contribution as 
authorized by section 3202 of Public Law 110-246, as amended by 
section 3206 of Public Law 113-79.
    Feed the Future Innovation Labs.--The Committee 
recommendation includes not less than $60,000,000 for the Feed 
the Future Innovation Labs, and the Committee commends USAID 
for its increased engagement with United States universities to 
capitalize on the unparalleled research capacities of United 
States institutions of higher education to solve the world's 
most challenging agricultural development and food security 
problems. The Committee expects that the request level for the 
Feed the Future Innovation Labs will be designated in the CBJ 
for fiscal year 2019.
    Interagency collaboration.--The Committee notes reports 
that have called attention to global food security challenges 
to meet growing demand, from addressing water demands, energy 
costs, and issues relating to the distribution, utilization, 
and waste of food. The Committee expects the President to work 
with the Department of State, USAID, and relevant domestic 
agencies to align domestic and global efforts related to food 
security, including to identify research and engagement 
priorities.
    Spend plan.--Pursuant to section 7076 of this Act, the 
USAID Administrator is required to submit a spend plan on food 
security and agriculture development and the Committee expects 
such plan to detail the proposed use of funds by account, 
office, and country prior to funds being obligated. The spend 
plan should also identify the level of resources recipient 
countries are investing in their own food security and 
agriculture development plans.

Economic Growth

    Microenterprise and microfinance.--The Committee 
recommendation includes not less than $265,000,000 in this Act 
for microenterprise and microfinance development programs. The 
Committee notes that USAID is required to target half of all 
microfinance and microenterprise funds to the very poor, 
defined as those living on less than $1.25 a day, pursuant to 
section 251(c) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961. The 
Committee directs the USAID Administrator to prioritize 
investments in microenterprise and microfinance in sub-Saharan 
Africa to reach the poorest and most marginalized and to 
consult with the Committees on Appropriations on efforts to 
focus existing resources for this purpose. The Committee 
encourages investment in a variety of financial services that 
allow the poor to save, borrow, and access insurance, 
remittances, and other key services. The Committee supports 
microenterprise and microfinance programs to promote economic 
development in Mexico and Central America.
    The Committee supports funding consistent with prior years 
to support the programs and activities of the Office of Private 
Capital and Microenterprise.
    Trade capacity building.--The Committee continues to 
support capacity building activities related to countries with 
free trade agreements to ensure that United States workers and 
businesses can compete on a level playing field.

Education

    American Schools and Hospitals Abroad (ASHA).--The 
Committee recommendation includes $26,000,000 for the ASHA 
program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2017 enacted 
level. The Committee continues to recognize the important 
contributions made to United States foreign policy interests by 
institutions funded by this program, including fostering a 
positive image of the United States around the world. The 
Committee notes the distinct mandate of ASHA from other USAID 
development programs, including the focus on public diplomacy 
and fostering American values, ideas, and practices. The 
Committee also notes that many of the successful ASHA programs 
operate in countries that are largely absent of other USAID 
programs. USAID should consider the strategic impact that ASHA 
programs can have in particular countries and regions in 
fostering a stronger commitment to fundamental American values. 
The Committee expects ASHA funds to continue to be allocated 
through an open and competitive process. The Committee expects 
USAID to allocate funds to administer the ASHA program from 
funds provided for Operating Expenses on a proportionate basis 
with other agency programs.
    Basic education.--The Committee believes basic education 
should be a key component of the United States Government 
strategy in developing countries. An educated citizenry will 
result in sustained economic growth, strengthened democratic 
institutions, the empowerment of women and girls, and decreased 
extremism. The Committee recommendation includes not less than 
$800,000,000 for basic education programs in this Act and 
directs USAID to use meaningful metrics in evaluating its basic 
education programs. The Committee supports increased United 
States participation in the Global Partnership for Education 
and includes not less than $87,500,000 for a contribution.
    The Committee is concerned that USAID has not sufficiently 
integrated programs for pre-primary education into the basic 
education strategy. Not later than 90 days after enactment of 
this Act, the USAID Administrator is directed to submit a 
report to the Committees on Appropriations on the criteria used 
to determine where pre-primary education programs are funded. 
The report should also include a list of countries and funding 
levels for all current pre-primary education programs. The 
Committee encourages the USAID Administrator to explore 
opportunities to promote early child development through 
ongoing activities and programs, including screening for early 
development delays and training for caregivers about behaviors 
that promote brain development.
    The Committee believes that schools can be centers of 
learning and development for an entire community and expects 
programs in other sectors to be integrated with schools and 
educational programs as much as possible. USAID should 
prioritize technical assistance for local governments to foster 
communities of learning and should encourage recipient 
countries and other donors to pursue comprehensive development 
efforts to support these programs. The Committee recommends 
USAID provide technical assistance to local partners in order 
to implement and scale leadership development programs to 
facilitate and sustain educational opportunities. USAID is 
directed to consult with the Committees on Appropriations on 
this initiative on a regular basis, as well as stakeholders, 
during continued implementation of the basic education strategy 
to sustain progress in literacy and basic education programs. 
Such consultations should include how the strategy will impact 
all age groups. The Committee supports funds for basic 
education programs in the Western Hemisphere. The Committee 
recommends USAID consider school-based eye health programs to 
help ensure access to eyeglasses for children.
    The Committee notes that violence against children can be 
pervasive in settings where children are expected to be safe 
and protected, such as homes and schools, and the negative 
impact such violence has on education outcomes. The Committee 
therefore encourages that basic education programs support the 
objectives and outcomes outlined in the APCA.
    The Committee notes the reporting requirement contained in 
section 7060(a) of this Act and directs USAID to continue to 
consult with the Committees on Appropriations on progress made 
to reduce the funding pipeline of basic education assistance.
    Higher education.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$235,000,000 for assistance for higher education, which is the 
same as the fiscal year 2017 level. $10,000,000 is included for 
partnerships between higher education institutions in the 
United States and Malawi. The Committee notes the important 
role United States universities have played in advancing recent 
innovations in e-learning and directs USAID to include a focus 
within the partnerships to increase access to higher education 
through the use of this technology.
    In addition, the Committee recommendation includes not less 
than $35,000,000 for programs to build institutional capacity 
of universities and colleges in developing nations through 
partnerships with United States universities. The Committee 
directs USAID to initiate new competitive grants for 
partnerships of a sufficient length and size to make a 
transformational impact on colleges and universities in 
developing nations.
    The Committee supports the work of the USAID Global 
Development Lab to accelerate the creation, testing, and 
scaling of high-impact approaches to development and directs 
that funds consistent with prior years be made available to 
continue the Higher Education Solutions Network.
    The Committee supports funds for higher education programs 
in the Western Hemisphere. The Committee notes that reaching 
underserved populations in Latin America and the Caribbean with 
educational programs of sufficient duration to provide 
leadership, language skills, and career training is important 
for countries' economic and social development. Therefore, the 
Committee urges USAID to prioritize educational opportunities 
at post-secondary institutions for underserved populations in 
the region.
    The Committee includes further direction on funds made 
available under this heading for Vietnam in section 7043 of 
this report and expects the USAID Administrator to consult with 
the Committees on Appropriations on the use of funds for higher 
education programs in the country.
    The Committee expects funds provided for higher education 
to be made available through open and competitive processes.

Global Programs

    The Committee includes language on conservation and 
programs to combat trafficking in persons under section 7060 of 
this report.
    African descent.--The Committee directs the USAID 
Administrator to continue to consult with the Committees on 
Appropriations on steps taken by USAID to address the specific 
needs of people of African descent in countries in which USAID 
operates.
    Burn prevention.--The Committee supports burn prevention 
efforts through the distribution of fire-safe cookstoves and 
directs that USAID consult with the Committees on 
Appropriations on the estimated need and cost effectiveness of 
programs that focus on essential treatment for children with 
disabling burn injuries. The Committee further directs that 
USAID integrate burn prevention and treatment into existing 
programs, as appropriate.
    Child marriage.--The Committee recommends funding at not 
less than the fiscal year 2017 level for programs that reduce 
the incidence of child marriage and to meet the needs of 
married girls. The Committee notes advances made in Kenya 
against child marriage and encourages the USAID Administrator 
to support such efforts.
    Cooperative Development Program.--The Committee provides 
$12,000,000 for USAID's Cooperative Development Program. The 
Committee directs the USAID Administrator to consult with the 
Committees on Appropriations on cooperative development 
programs for financial systems including how USAID is complying 
with the requirements of 22 U.S.C. Sec.  2151i(2).
    Domestic resource mobilization.--The Committee supports the 
efforts of USAID and the Office of Technical Assistance of the 
Department of the Treasury to help countries better mobilize 
their own financial resources. Domestic resource mobilization 
offers the opportunity to create tools and capacity in partner 
countries to increase the accountability of governments to 
their people and significantly raise new resources to invest in 
and achieve their health, education, and other development 
goals. The USAID Administrator shall consult with the 
Committees on Appropriations to identify specific countries 
where such assistance should be programmed.
    Measuring results.--The Committee notes the mainstreaming 
of country ownership throughout USAID's revised program cycle 
guidance and requests USAID adopt agency-wide metrics with 
which to measure progress achieving locally owned sustainable 
development.
    Ocean Freight Reimbursement Program.--The Committee 
includes $1,500,000 for USAID's Ocean Freight Reimbursement 
Program to continue support for Private Voluntary Organizations 
through a competitive grant program pursuant to section 123(b) 
of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961. The USAID Administrator 
is directed to consult with the Committees on Appropriations on 
the administration of the program for fiscal year 2018.
    Public-private partnerships and innovative solutions.--The 
Committee supports USAID's continued engagement with private 
sector to leverage additional funding and to support innovative 
solutions to development and global health problems, including 
through the Global Development Lab.
    Reconciliation programs.--The Committee provides 
$26,000,000 under this heading and Economic Support Fund to 
support people-to-people reconciliation programs that bring 
together individuals of different ethnic, religious, and 
political backgrounds from areas of civil strife and war, of 
which $10,000,000 shall be for reconciliation activities 
between Israelis and Palestinians. Funds shall be awarded 
through a competitive grant process. The Committee expects the 
Department of State and USAID to ensure that funds provided for 
reconciliation programs in the Middle East include a rigorous 
vetting and evaluation process and are consistent with United 
States foreign policy objectives in the region.
    Victims of torture.--The Committee supports continued 
funding for the USAID victims of torture programs.
    Water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH).--The Committee 
recommendation includes not less than $400,000,000 in this Act 
for long-term, sustainable water supply, sanitation, and 
hygiene projects pursuant only to Public Law 109-121, as 
amended by Public Law 113-289. The Committee directs that not 
less than $145,000,000 of such funds be made available for 
programs and activities in sub-Saharan Africa, which should be 
prioritized for the poorest communities and countries in 
accordance with Public Law 113-289. The Committee expects these 
programs to include robust monitoring and evaluation and 
directs USAID to consult with the Committees on Appropriations 
on these efforts. Access to adequate water, sanitation, and 
hygiene is a critical component of disease prevention, and the 
Committee supports greater integration of WASH services with 
nutrition and health programs, which reinforces priority 
actions identified in the USAID Water and Development Strategy. 
The Committee notes that a lack of access to toilets, adequate 
sanitation, and hygiene products impacts women and girls in 
particular and recommends USAID address this issue in the 
design of WASH programs. The Committee directs the USAID 
Administrator to submit a report, not later than 90 days after 
enactment of this Act, on how such issues are included in the 
design and implementation of WASH programs, including ensuring 
the availability of feminine hygiene products. The Committee 
notes the work of academic institutions in WASH programs in 
West Africa and supports catalytic approaches that increase 
capacity of national and regional institutions to replicate 
successful models for safe water and sanitation and improved 
hygiene throughout the region.

                   INTERNATIONAL DISASTER ASSISTANCE

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1,2\...................      $498,483,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request\1\...........................       690,259,000
Committee recommendation\1\...........................     1,033,483,000
    Change from enacted level.........................      +535,000,000
    Change from request...............................     +343,224,000
 
\1\In addition, the fiscal year 2017 enacted level, the fiscal year 2018
  request, and the Committee recommendation include funds under this
  heading in title VIII designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A) of
  the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
\2\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level also excludes funds appropriated
  by the Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of
  P.L. 114-254).

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,033,483,000 for 
International Disaster Assistance, when combined with funds 
provided under title VIII the total is $2,821,686,000.
    This account funds humanitarian relief, rehabilitation, and 
reconstruction in countries affected by natural and man-made 
disasters, as well as support for disaster mitigation, disaster 
risk reduction, prevention, and preparedness. This includes the 
purchase of commodities, such as temporary shelter, blankets, 
and supplementary and therapeutic food; potable water; medical 
supplies; and agricultural rehabilitation. Program 
beneficiaries include disaster victims, conflict victims, and 
internally displaced persons. Funds are also provided for the 
Emergency Food Security Program, as authorized in the Global 
Food Security Act of 2016 (P.L. 114-195).
    The Committee notes that additional funds were provided 
under this heading in title VIII of division J of Public Law 
115-31 for famine prevention, relief, and mitigation. These 
funds were intended to address urgent needs and the Committee 
notes that at this time significant balances remain available 
for obligation. The Committee urges the USAID Administrator to 
expeditiously program the remaining famine relief balances. The 
Committee will review the need for further famine relief funds 
as the appropriation process proceeds.
    Child protection.--The Committee recognizes the need for 
additional protection of children in conflict and crisis 
settings and encourages the Office of Foreign Disaster 
Assistance to play an increasing leadership role to protect 
children in humanitarian crises.

                         TRANSITION INITIATIVES

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1,2\...................       $35,600,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request\1\...........................        30,000,000
Committee recommendation\1\...........................        30,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................        -5,600,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 
\1\In addition, the fiscal year 2017 enacted level, the fiscal year 2018
  request, and the Committee recommendation include funds under this
  heading in title VIII designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A) of
  the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
\2\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level also excludes funds appropriated
  by the Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of
  P.L. 114-254).

    The Committee recommendation includes $30,000,000 for 
Transition Initiatives. When combined with funds provided under 
title VIII, the amount recommended is the same as the request.
    Funds provided in this account support programs targeting 
key transitions to democracy for countries in crisis and quick-
impact activities for conflict prevention or stabilization.
    The Committee recommendation continues the following 
requirements: (1) funds made available under this heading may 
only be administered by the Office of Transition Initiatives 
(OTI); (2) five days prior to starting a new program, USAID 
must submit a report to the Committees on Appropriations; and 
(3) up to $15,000,000 of funds appropriated by this Act to 
carry out the provisions of part I of the Foreign Assistance 
Act of 1961 may be used for the purposes and with the 
authorities provided under this heading if the Secretary of 
State determines it is in the national interest and following 
consultation with the Committees on Appropriations.
    The Committee directs OTI to submit a report to the 
Committees on Appropriations summarizing new, ongoing, and 
completed country programs implemented by OTI in fiscal year 
2018, including programs supported with transferred funds, 
subject to the reporting requirements of the Committees on 
Appropriations.

                          COMPLEX CRISES FUND

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1\.....................       $10,000,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................                 0
Committee recommendation..............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................       -10,000,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 
\1\In addition, the fiscal year 2017 enacted level includes funds under
  this heading in title VIII designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)
  of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

    The Committee recommendation does not include an 
appropriation for the Complex Crises Fund.

                      DEVELOPMENT CREDIT AUTHORITY

 
 
 
Program Account:
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................       $50,000,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................        60,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................        50,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0
    Change from request...............................       -10,000,000
Administrative Expenses:
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................       $10,000,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................         9,120,000
Committee recommendation..............................         9,120,000
    Change from enacted level.........................          -880,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation includes a ceiling of 
$50,000,000 on the amount that may be transferred from 
bilateral economic assistance accounts for the subsidy cost of 
loan guarantees under the Development Credit Authority (DCA) 
program. The Committee recommendation includes an appropriation 
of $9,120,000 for administrative expenses.
    The Act includes a requirement that USAID notify the 
Committees on Appropriations prior to the use of gifts for DCA 
transactions or in transactions resulting in negative subsidy.
    The Committee notes that USAID must submit a spending 
report to the Committees on Appropriations as required in 
section 7076 of this Act.

                 ECONOMIC SUPPORT AND DEVELOPMENT FUND

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................                $0
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................     2,229,350,000
Committee recommendation..............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0
    Change from request...............................    -2,229,350,000
 

    The Committee notes there is merit to consolidating certain 
accounts if it achieves efficiencies while maintaining the 
integrity of the authorized purposes of such accounts. However, 
given that the management review at the Department of State and 
USAID has not concluded and the authorizing congressional 
committees of jurisdiction have not yet had a chance to review 
such consolidations, the Committee has deferred the decision to 
consolidate accounts and therefore does not recommend funds 
under this heading.

                         ECONOMIC SUPPORT FUND

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1,2\...................    $1,041,761,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request\1\...........................                 0
Committee recommendation\1\...........................     1,041,761,000
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0
    Change from request...............................    +1,041,761,000
 
\1\In addition, the fiscal year 2017 enacted level, the fiscal year 2018
  request, and the Committee recommendation include funds under this
  heading in title VIII designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A) of
  the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
\2\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level also excludes funds appropriated
  by the Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of
  P.L. 114-254).

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,041,761,000 for 
Economic Support Fund. Additional funds are provided under 
title VIII.
    The Committee notes that funds are requested under this 
heading to advance United States interests by helping countries 
meet political, economic, and security needs.

Africa

    The Committee provides additional direction on programs in 
this region under section 7042 of this report.
    Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).--The Committee 
recommendation includes $71,000,000 for the DRC, which is the 
same as the request. Funds are provided to support economic and 
agricultural development opportunities, as a result of the 
improving investment climate in the DRC, including in eastern 
DRC. Funds should also support democracy and governance, rule 
of law, and civil society capacity building. The Committee 
notes the success of public-private partnerships to help small 
farmers with agricultural development initiatives and 
encourages USAID to continue to support such efforts.
    Somalia.--The Committee supports continued funding for 
Somalia to support the formation of legitimate, durable 
institutions that will enhance peace and stability in the 
country. The Secretary of State is directed to submit an update 
to the report required under this heading in House Report 114-
693.

East Asia and the Pacific

    People's Republic of China (PRC).--The Committee 
recommendation includes a prohibition on direct assistance to 
the Government of the PRC from this account.
    Tibet.--The Committee includes $8,000,000, which is the 
same as the fiscal year 2017 enacted level, to support 
activities that preserve cultural traditions and promote 
sustainable development and environmental conservation in 
Tibetan communities in the Tibetan Autonomous Region and in 
other Tibetan autonomous areas in the PRC. The Committee notes 
the development challenges facing Tibetan communities in South 
Asia and includes $6,000,000, which is the same as the fiscal 
year 2017 enacted level, to continue to support Tibetan 
communities in India and Nepal in the areas of education, 
skills development, and entrepreneurship.

Near East

    The Committee provides additional direction on programs in 
the region under section 7041 of this report.
    Lebanon scholarships.--The Committee includes not less than 
$12,000,000 for scholarships for Lebanese students with high 
financial need to attend not-for-profit educational 
institutions in Lebanon that meet standards comparable to those 
required for American accreditation. Students graduating from 
public and private high schools in Lebanon should be eligible 
for scholarships if they demonstrate financial need, have 
strong academic records, and show potential to contribute to 
the long-term political, economic, and social development of 
Lebanon. The Committee directs that these funds be awarded 
through an open and competitive process.
    Middle East Partnership Initiative (MEPI) scholarship 
program.--The Committee includes $12,000,000 to continue the 
MEPI scholarship program.
    Middle East Regional Cooperation Program.--The Committee 
includes $5,000,000 for the Middle East Regional Cooperation 
Program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2017 level.
    Near East Regional Democracy.--The Committee includes 
$32,000,000 for the Near East Regional Democracy program, which 
is the same as the fiscal year 2017 enacted level. The 
Committee expects a portion of the funds provided above the 
request to be used to support programs to increase the 
participation of women in politics, including as candidates in 
elections, and in consultation with diaspora communities in the 
United States.
    Scholarship program for refugees in Lebanon.--The Committee 
includes $2,000,000 to continue the university pilot program 
for refugees in Lebanon. Such funds are in addition to funds 
made available for assistance for Lebanon under this heading. 
The USAID Administrator is directed to consult with the 
Committees on Appropriations on an ongoing basis on how the 
program will be administered consistent with the Lebanon 
scholarship program at not-for-profit educational institutions 
in Lebanon that meet the standards required for American 
accreditation, and other matters related to implementation.

South and Central Asia

    The Committee provides additional direction on programs in 
this region under section 7044 of this report.
    The Committee supports regional economic integration 
programs that support transit, trade, and energy linkages in 
the region and increase economic growth and stability by 
expanding trade through neighboring countries.

Western Hemisphere

    Cuba.--The Committee recommendation includes $30,000,000 
for programs to promote democracy and strengthen civil society 
in Cuba, of which not less than $8,000,000 shall be for the 
NED. The remaining funds should be administered by DRL, the 
Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs and USAID, and the 
Committee encourages these bureaus and USAID to consider the 
unique capabilities of the core institutes of the NED in 
implementing similar programs. The Committee directs that funds 
shall only be used for programs and activities pursuant to 
section 109(a) of the Cuban Liberty and Solidarity (LIBERTAD) 
Act of 1996 and section 1705 of the Cuban Democracy Act of 
1992, and shall not be used for business promotion, economic 
reform, entrepreneurship or any other assistance that is not 
democracy-building. With respect to grantee selection and 
implementation, the Committee directs that grants exceeding 
$1,000,000, or to be implemented over a period of 12 months, 
shall be awarded only to organizations with experience 
promoting democracy inside Cuba.
    Venezuela.--The Committee recommendation provides 
$8,000,000 for democracy programs in Venezuela.
    Other Assistance for Latin America and the Caribbean.--The 
Committee provides direction for other countries and programs 
in Latin America and the Caribbean under section 7045 of this 
report.

Global Programs

    Foreign assistance resources.--The Committee recommendation 
includes the request for the Office of U.S. Foreign Assistance 
Resources to support aid transparency and evaluation.
    Green Climate Fund (GCF).--Section 7034 prohibits funds in 
this Act and prior Acts making appropriations for the 
Department of State, foreign operations, and related programs 
for a contribution, grant, or any other payment to the GCF.
    Independent media.--The Committee continues to support 
assistance for independent media, including in Afghanistan, 
Burma, and Pakistan.
    National Ocean Policy.--The Committee notes that no funds 
are requested in fiscal year 2018 for the implementation of the 
National Ocean Policy, and the Committee recommendation 
includes no funding for this purpose. The Committee further 
notes that any funds obligated in support of this policy are 
subject to the notification requirements contained in this Act.
    Parliamentary exchanges.--The Committee includes $1,900,000 
for the House Democracy Partnership and encourages coordination 
with USAID in implementing parliamentary strengthening 
programs.
    The Committee notes concerns about USAID decreasing 
legislative strengthening programs in emerging and 
transitioning democracies. The Committee directs the USAID 
Administrator to support legislative strengthening programs in 
those countries where the House Democracy Partnership is 
engaged in an active program.
    Rule of law and judicial reform.--The Committee believes 
the rule of law is fundamental to promoting democracy and 
sustainable development. The Committee notes that the rule of 
law is strengthened by promoting independent judiciaries, human 
rights and women's rights, combating human trafficking and 
corruption, and increasing public accountability and access to 
justice. The Committee continues to support programs to develop 
fair and transparent judicial systems that advance the rule of 
law worldwide.

                             DEMOCRACY FUND

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level.......................       $210,500,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request.............................                  0
Committee recommendation.............................        210,500,000
    Change from enacted level........................                  0
    Change from request..............................       +210,500,000
 

    The Committee includes $210,500,000 for Democracy Fund, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2017 enacted level.
    Funds included under this heading were requested under 
Economic Support and Development Fund. Of the funds provided, 
$145,375,000 shall be for the Human Rights and Democracy Fund 
of DRL at the Department of State, and $65,125,000 shall be for 
the Bureau for Democracy, Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance 
at USAID.

            ASSISTANCE FOR EUROPE, EURASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1,2\...................      $291,638,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................                 0
Committee recommendation..............................       691,571,000
    Change from enacted level.........................      +399,933,000
    Change from request...............................      +691,571,000
 
\1\In addition, the fiscal year 2017 enacted level includes funds under
  this heading in title VIII designated pursuant to section
  251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control
  Act of 1985.
\2\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level also excludes funds appropriated
  by the Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of
  P.L. 114-254).

    The Committee recommendation includes $691,571,000 for 
Assistance for Europe, Eurasia and Central Asia. Additional 
funds are provided under title VIII.
    Cyprus.--The Committee is aware that no funds are requested 
for Cyprus, but should the Secretary of State decide to provide 
funds, such assistance should only be used only for measures 
aimed at reunification and designed to reduce tensions and 
promote peace and cooperation between the two communities on 
Cyprus. The Committee notes that such programs are subject to 
the requirements of section 7015 of this Act.
    Moldova.--The Committee recommendation includes sufficient 
funding to continue programs under this heading for Moldova.
    Reconciliation programs.--The Committee expects that funds 
will be made available to further the economic, social 
development, and reconciliation goals of Public Law 99-415 at 
levels consistent with amounts provided in prior years.
    Research and training.--The Committee recommendation 
supports programs made pursuant to section 7034(d) of this Act 
for research and training authorized by the Soviet-Eastern 
European Research and Training Act of 1983.

                          Department of State


                    MIGRATION AND REFUGEE ASSISTANCE

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1,2\...................      $912,802,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request\1\...........................       715,241,000
Committee recommendation\1\...........................       877,802,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       -35,000,000
    Change from request...............................      +162,561,000
 
\1\In addition, the fiscal year 2017 enacted level, the fiscal year 2018
  request, and the Committee recommendation include funds under this
  heading in title VIII designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii)
  of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
\2\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level also excludes funds appropriated
  by the Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of
  P.L. 114-254).

    The Committee recommendation includes $877,802,000 for 
Migration and Refugee Assistance. When combined with additional 
funds for Migration and Refugee Assistance provided under title 
VIII, the amount recommended is the same as the fiscal year 
2017 enacted level less additional amounts made available in 
the Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017.
    Of the funds made available under this heading in this 
title, the Committee recommendation includes not less than 
$35,000,000 to respond to small-scale emergency humanitarian 
requirements.
    Minority communities.--Conflict and instability in the 
Middle East and Africa intensify the challenges facing minority 
communities, including Christian populations. The Committee 
urges the Secretary of State to ensure that eligible 
individuals and families from such communities have access to 
humanitarian assistance and resettlement services.
    Resettlement in Israel.--The Committee recommendation 
includes not less than $7,500,000 for refugees from the former 
Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, and other refugees resettling in 
Israel, which is the same as the request and similar to 
language carried in prior years.
    Syrian refugee assistance.--Not later than 90 days after 
enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit to 
the Committee on Appropriations, a report detailing country 
commitments and plans, including non-traditional donors, to 
assist in the Syrian refugee crisis. The report should also 
include the type and duration of the pledge, and whether such 
countries have followed through with their commitments. The 
report shall be submitted in unclassified form, but may include 
a classified annex.
    Tibetan refugees.--The Committee supports the continued 
allocation of funds to assist Tibetan refugees in Nepal and 
India at a level commensurate with prior years. The Committee 
is concerned about reports that Nepalese officials have handed 
over Tibetan refugees to Chinese border authorities, in 
contravention of Nepal's international obligations to protect 
refugees fleeing persecution. The Committee supports efforts by 
the Secretary of State to work with the Government of Nepal to 
provide safe transit for Tibetan refugees and legal protections 
to Tibetans residing in Nepal.
    United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) 
accountability.--The Committee recommendation includes language 
in section 7048(d) of this Act prohibiting funds appropriated 
under this heading from being made available to UNRWA until the 
Secretary of State certifies and reports to the Committees on 
Appropriations that UNRWA is:
    (1) utilizing Operations Support Officers in the West Bank, 
Gaza, and other fields of operation to inspect UNRWA 
installations and reporting any inappropriate use;
    (2) acting promptly to address any staff or beneficiary 
violation of its own policies (including the policies on 
neutrality and impartiality of employees) and the legal 
requirements under section 301(c) of the Foreign Assistance Act 
of 1961;
    (3) implementing procedures to maintain the neutrality of 
its facilities, including implementing a no-weapons policy, and 
conducting regular inspections of its installations, to ensure 
they are only used for humanitarian or other appropriate 
purposes;
    (4) taking necessary and appropriate measures to ensure it 
is operating in compliance with the conditions of section 
301(c) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 and continuing 
regular reporting to the Department of State on actions it has 
taken to ensure conformance with such conditions;
    (5) taking steps to ensure the content of all educational 
materials currently taught in UNRWA-administered schools and 
summer camps is consistent with the values of human rights, 
dignity, and tolerance and does not induce incitement;
    (6) not engaging in operations with financial institutions 
or related entities in violation of relevant United States law, 
and is taking steps to improve the financial transparency of 
the organization; and
    (7) in compliance with the UN Board of Auditors' biennial 
audit requirements and is implementing in a timely fashion the 
Board's recommendations.
    The Committee directs that in reviewing whether UNRWA is 
meeting the requirements of paragraph (2), the Secretary of 
State shall ensure that UNRWA's employment policies prohibit 
staff from being members of militant political parties or a 
Foreign Terrorist Organization designated pursuant to section 
219 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, including members 
of Hamas.
    House Report 114-693 directed the Secretary of State to 
include in the annual report required by section 4 of the 
United Nations Participation Act of 1945 (Public Law 79-264) a 
justification of why it is in the national interest of the 
United States to provide funds to UNRWA. It further directed 
the Secretary to include in the justification an analysis of 
the current definition of Palestinian refugees that is used by 
UNRWA, how that definition corresponds with, or differs from, 
that used by UNHCR, other UN agencies, and the United States 
Government, and whether such definition furthers the prospects 
for lasting peace in the region. In addition, the Committee 
further urges the Secretary of State, in consultation with the 
United States Ambassador to the UN and other donor countries, 
to review UNRWA's contemporary mandate as approved by the UN 
General assembly and report back to the Committees on 
Appropriations about the findings of that review.

     UNITED STATES EMERGENCY REFUGEE AND MIGRATION ASSISTANCE FUND

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1\.....................       $10,000,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................                 0
Committee recommendation..............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................       -10,000,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 
\1\In addition, the fiscal year 2017 enacted level includes funds under
  this heading in title VIII designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)
  of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

    The Committee recommendation does not include funds under 
this heading. Funds previously provided under the heading have 
been included under Migration and Refugee Assistance. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of State to provide a report to 
the Committees on Appropriations on any available balances 
remaining under the Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance 
Fund not later than 45 days after enactment of this Act.

                          Independent Agencies


                              PEACE CORPS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................      $410,000,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................       398,221,000
Committee recommendation..............................       398,221,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       -11,779,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $398,221,000 for 
Peace Corps.
    The Committee recommendation for Peace Corps will provide 
support for the positive contributions of Americans serving as 
volunteers throughout the world, including volunteer safety and 
security operations. The Committee recommendation continues the 
ban on the use of funds for abortion, with certain exceptions, 
and requires an operating plan pursuant to section 7076 of this 
Act.
    The Committee recommendation continues the requirement that 
the Peace Corps consult with and notify the Committees on 
Appropriations prior to any decisions to open, close, 
significantly reduce, or suspend a domestic or overseas office 
or country program. The Committee directs the Director of the 
Peace Corps to submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations, listing all decisions made during the fiscal 
year to change the status of offices or country programs and 
the justifications for such decisions, subject to the reporting 
procedures of the Committees on Appropriations.

                    MILLENNIUM CHALLENGE CORPORATION

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................      $905,000,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................       800,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................       800,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................      -105,000,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $800,000,000 for 
Millennium Challenge Corporation. The Committee recommendation 
includes a limitation of $102,400,000 for administrative 
expenses and not more than $100,000 may be for representational 
expenses.
    Corruption.--The Committee directs the CEO of the 
Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) to continue to update 
the Committees on Appropriations on efforts to seek better data 
on governance and other measures of corruption.
    MCC mandate.--The Committee continues to direct the CEO of 
the MCC to include the corresponding economic rate of return 
estimated for each line item funded in the compact in 
congressional notifications submitted for new compacts.
    Reporting requirements.--The Committee directs the MCC to 
continue to adhere to the directives contained in House Report 
114-154 with respect to reporting requirements.

                       INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................       $22,500,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................         4,565,000
Committee recommendation..............................        11,250,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       -11,250,000
    Change from request...............................        +6,685,000
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $11,250,000 for the 
Inter-American Foundation. The Committee recommendation does 
not assume the closure of the Inter-American Foundation (IAF), 
as proposed by the fiscal year 2018 request.
    The Committee directs the IAF to consult with the 
Committees on Appropriations prior to exercising the authority 
in section 7024 of this Act.

              UNITED STATES AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................       $30,000,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................         8,332,000
Committee recommendation..............................        15,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       -15,000,000
    Change from request...............................        +6,668,000
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $15,000,000 for the 
United States African Development Foundation. The Committee 
recommendation does not assume the closure of the United States 
African Development Foundation (USADF), as proposed by the 
fiscal year 2018 request.
    The Committee directs the USADF to consult with the 
Committees on Appropriations prior to exercising the authority 
in section 7024 of this Act for new grants.
    The Committee notes that the USADF must submit an operating 
plan to the Committees on Appropriations as required in section 
7076 of this Act.

                       Department of the Treasury


               INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................       $30,000,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................        25,455,000
Committee recommendation..............................        25,455,000
    Change from enacted level.........................        -4,545,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $25,455,000 for 
International Affairs Technical Assistance by the Department of 
the Treasury.

              TITLE IV--INTERNATIONAL SECURITY ASSISTANCE


                          Department of State


          INTERNATIONAL NARCOTICS CONTROL AND LAW ENFORCEMENT

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1,2\...................      $889,664,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request\1\...........................       695,550,000
Committee recommendation\1\...........................       848,139,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       -41,525,000
    Change from request...............................      +152,589,000
 
\1\In addition, the fiscal year 2017 enacted level, the fiscal year 2018
  request, and the Committee recommendation include funds under this
  heading in title VIII designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii)
  of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
\2\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level also excludes funds appropriated
  by the Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of
  P.L. 114-254).

    The Committee recommendation includes $848,139,000 for 
International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement. Additional 
funds are provided under title VIII.
    Funds for certain programs under this heading are allocated 
according to the following table and subject to section 7019 of 
this Act:

           INTERNATIONAL NARCOTICS CONTROL AND LAW ENFORCEMENT
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   Program/Activity                     Budget Authority
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Caribbean Basin Security Initiative..................            $25,200
Central America Regional Security Initiative.........            230,000
Colombia.............................................            143,000
Combating wildlife poaching and trafficking..........             50,000
Countering Russian Influence Fund....................             20,000
Cybercrime and Intellectual Property Rights..........             10,000
Demand Reduction.....................................             12,500
Egypt................................................              2,000
Georgia..............................................              4,000
International Law Enforcement Academies..............             25,000
International Organized Crime........................             58,000
Mexico...............................................             90,000
Morocco..............................................              5,000
Peru.................................................             33,500
Tunisia..............................................             13,000
Ukraine..............................................             30,000
Western Hemisphere Regional Security Cooperation.....             10,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Not later than 45 days after enactment of this Act and 
prior to the initial obligation of funds appropriated under 
this heading, the Committee directs the Secretary of State to 
submit a report to the Committees on Appropriations on the 
proposed uses of funds in a manner similar to prior years. The 
Committee notes that such report does not meet the notification 
requirements under section 7015 of this Act.

Programs

    Cybercrime and intellectual property rights.--The Committee 
recommendation supports the efforts of United States Government 
agencies to build the capacity of partner nations to combat 
cybercrime and strengthen law enforcement in the area of 
intellectual property rights. The Committee recommendation 
provides funding above the request to address the evolving 
threats in cyberspace and assist partner countries to prevent 
and respond to cybercrime. Not later than 45 days after 
enactment of this Act and prior to the initial obligation of 
funds for such purposes, the Secretary of State is directed to 
submit a spend plan to the Committees on Appropriations of 
assistance planned under this heading to combat cybercrime, 
including bilateral and global programs funded under this 
heading, along with a description of the activities planned for 
each country.
    The Committee supports the placement of Intellectual 
Property Law Enforcement Coordinators in locations around the 
world to help coordinate United States training and mentor 
partner enforcement agencies.
    International organized crime.--The Committee 
recommendation incudes $58,000,000 for programs to combat 
international organized crime, which is the same as the 
request. Not later than 45 days after enactment of this Act, 
the Secretary of State is directed to submit a spend plan to 
the Committees on Appropriations of assistance planned under 
this heading to combat international organization crime, 
including bilateral and global programs funded under this 
heading, along with a description of the activities planned for 
each country.

    NONPROLIFERATION, ANTI-TERRORISM, DEMINING AND RELATED PROGRAMS

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1,2\...................      $500,696,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request\1\...........................       312,766,000
Committee recommendation\1\...........................       617,873,000
    Change from enacted level.........................      +117,177,000
    Change from request...............................      +305,107,000
 
\1\In addition, the fiscal year 2017 enacted level, the fiscal year 2018
  request, and the Committee recommendation include funds under this
  heading in title VIII designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii)
  of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
\2\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level also excludes funds appropriated
  by the Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of
  P.L. 114-254).

    The Committee recommendation includes $617,873,000 for 
Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining and Related 
Programs. Additional funds are provided under title VIII. Funds 
for certain programs under this heading are allocated according 
to the following table and subject to section 7019 of this Act:

     NONPROLIFERATION, ANTI-TERRORISM, DEMINING AND RELATED PROGRAMS
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   Program/Activity                    Budget  Authority
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Nonproliferation programs............................           $283,556
    Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund............           [25,000]
    Export Control and Related Border Security                  [59,656]
     Assistance......................................
    Global Threat Reduction..........................           [70,000]
Anti-terrorism programs..............................            358,000
    Antiterrorism Assistance Program.................          [182,000]
        [of which, airport and aviation security]....           [20,000]
    Counterterrorism Financing.......................           [12,500]
    Terrorist Interdiction Program...................           [36,000]
    Counterterrorism Partnerships Fund...............          [127,500]
Conventional Weapons Destruction.....................            196,900
                                                      ------------------
    Total, Non-Proliferation, Anti-terrorism,                    838,456
     Demining and Related Programs...................
                                                      ------------------
        of which, OCO................................          [220,583]
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Nonproliferation programs.--The Committee includes 
$283,556,000 for Nonproliferation Programs. The Committee 
emphasizes that nonproliferation programs of the Department of 
State and other Federal agencies are critical United States 
national security. The Committee urges close coordination among 
all agencies involved in nonproliferation activities.
    The Committee recommendation includes not less than the 
request for a voluntary contribution to the IAEA to support 
programs that promote nuclear safeguards, nuclear safety and 
security, the responsible use of nuclear energy, and the 
peaceful uses of nuclear technologies. The Committee expects 
the Secretary of State to prioritize funding to support the 
IAEA's verification activities, including monitoring Iran's 
nuclear commitments under the Joint Comprehensive Plan of 
Action.
    Antiterrorism programs.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $358,500,000 in this Act for Antiterrorism programs, 
including $182,000,000 for the Antiterrorism Assistance 
Program, which provides counterterrorism law enforcement 
training to partner countries.
    The Committee recommendation provides $20,000,000 to 
strengthen international airport and aviation security, 
including passenger and baggage screening, and crisis response. 
In programming such funds, the Department of State should 
consider national security risks to the United States and the 
extent to which countries are meeting international standards 
for airport and aviation security. Not later than 45 days after 
enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State is directed to 
submit an updated spend plan to bolster airport and aviation 
security in key countries.
    The Committee recommendation supports efforts of the 
Department of State and other Federal agencies to assist 
foreign countries to detect, disrupt, and dismantle terrorist 
financial networks. The Committee recommendation also supports 
efforts to assist countries at risk from terrorist activity 
enhance their border security capabilities through the 
Terrorist Interdiction Program.
    The Committee recommendation includes $127,500,000 in this 
Act for the Counterterrorism Partnerships Fund.
    Conventional Weapons Destruction.--The Committee includes 
$196,900,000 for Conventional Weapons Destruction Programs and 
encourages the Secretary of State to continue support for 
programs in Angola, Zimbabwe, Cambodia, Sri Lanka, Laos, and 
Vietnam.
    The Committee notes the increases in funding for demining 
programs over the last decade and believes an examination is 
needed to ensure strategic direction of these programs. The 
Committee urges the Secretary of State to conduct an assessment 
of such programs, which should include: consideration of United 
States national security interests; risk factors in each 
country; cooperation of host countries in program 
implementation; efficiency and effectiveness of ongoing 
programs; and support for similar activities from sources other 
than the United States Government. The Committee recommends the 
Secretary establish goals and graduation criteria for each 
country. The Committee directs the Secretary to consult with 
the appropriate congressional committees on these matters not 
later than 45 days after enactment of this Act.

                        PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1,2\...................      $135,041,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request\1\...........................       122,300,000
Committee recommendation\1\...........................       135,041,000
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0
    Change from request...............................       +12,741,000
 
\1\In addition, the fiscal year 2017 enacted level, the fiscal year 2018
  request, and the Committee recommendation include funds under this
  heading in title VIII designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii)
  of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
\2\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level also excludes funds appropriated
  by the Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of
  P.L. 114-254).

    The Committee recommendation includes $135,041,000 for 
Peacekeeping Operations. Additional funds are provided under 
title VIII.
    Child soldiers.--The Committee includes language in section 
7034 of this Act requiring that funds should not be used to 
support military training or operations that include child 
soldiers.
    Global Peace Operations Initiative.--The Committee includes 
$61,000,000 for the Global Peace Operations Initiative, which 
is the same as the fiscal year 2017 level, including to support 
the Africa Contingency Operations Training and Assistance 
program.
    Near East.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$31,000,000 for the Multinational Force and Observers Mission 
(MFO) in the Sinai, which is the same as the request. The 
Committee directs that funds made available above the level of 
the United States contribution are intended to address ongoing 
force protection requirements and emerging needs to protect and 
sustain the MFO mission in the Sinai.
    Somalia.--Consistent with prior years, the Committee 
recommendation includes funds under this heading in title VIII 
for the UN Support Office for the African Union Mission in 
Somalia, instead of under Contributions for International 
Peacekeeping Activities. The Committee recommendation allows 
bills to be paid for such mission up to the statutory rate.

                  Funds Appropriated to the President


             INTERNATIONAL MILITARY EDUCATION AND TRAINING

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................      $110,300,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................       100,160,000
Committee recommendation..............................       105,160,000
    Change from enacted level.........................        -5,140,000
    Change from request...............................        +5,000,000
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $105,160,000 for 
International Military Education and Training.
    The Committee notes that International Military Education 
and Training (IMET) and Expanded International Military 
Education and Training (E-IMET) programs are a valuable part of 
United States security assistance. In addition to providing 
professional training and education, IMET exposes foreign 
students to American democratic values, particularly respect 
for civilian control of the military and the government, and 
internationally recognized standards of individual and human 
rights. IMET and E-IMET serve as tools to strengthen military 
alliances and international coalitions that are critical to 
United States national security.
    Burma.--The Committee recommendation does not include 
assistance for Burma under this heading.
    Country levels.-- The Committee provides not less than the 
fiscal year 2017 level for Malta. The Committee recommendation 
does not provide funding for Nicaragua.
    Countering Russian Influence Fund.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $5,000,000 for the Countering Russian 
Influence Fund.
    Report.--The Secretary of State, in consultation with the 
Secretary of Defense, is directed to submit a report to the 
appropriate congressional committees on changes made in the 
current fiscal year to enhance IMET and E-IMET and 
recommendations for the following fiscal year. Such report 
should be submitted concurrently with the report required by 
section 7034(b)(6) of this Act.

                   FOREIGN MILITARY FINANCING PROGRAM

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1,2\...................    $4,785,805,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request\1\...........................     4,670,713,000
Committee recommendation\1\...........................     5,625,863,000
    Change from enacted level.........................      +840,058,000
    Change from request...............................      +955,150,000
 
\1\In addition, the fiscal year 2017 enacted level, the fiscal year 2018
  request, and the Committee recommendation include funds under this
  heading in title VIII designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii)
  of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
\2\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level also excludes funds appropriated
  by the Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of
  P.L. 114-254).

    The Committee recommendation includes $5,625,863,000 for 
Foreign Military Financing Program. Additional funds are 
provided under title VIII.
    The Committee recognizes that the Foreign Military 
Financing Program is a key component of building partner nation 
capacity to address common threats and helping allies and 
partners defend themselves. Foreign Military Financing Program 
provides grants for the acquisition of United States defense 
equipment, services, and training. The Committee notes that 
such assistance enables nations to improve defensive 
capabilities, fosters bilateral military relationships with the 
United States, and builds interoperability in joint missions.
    The Committee recommendation continues prior year language 
allowing the Secretary of State to expedite the procurement of 
defense articles or services for foreign security forces, 
following consultation with, and notification of, the 
Committees on Appropriations.
    Funds for certain programs under this heading are allocated 
according to the following table and subject to section 7019 of 
this Act:

                   FOREIGN MILITARY FINANCING PROGRAM
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              Budget
                    Program/Activity                         Authority
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Belize..................................................          $1,000
Colombia................................................          38,525
Costa Rica..............................................           5,000
Countering Russian Influence Fund.......................          50,000
Egypt...................................................       1,300,000
El Salvador.............................................           1,900
Estonia.................................................           8,000
Georgia.................................................          35,000
Guatemala...............................................           1,740
Honduras................................................           4,500
Israel..................................................       3,100,000
Iraq....................................................         250,000
Jordan..................................................         450,000
Latvia..................................................           8,000
Lithuania...............................................           8,000
Mexico..................................................           5,000
Moldova.................................................          12,750
Morocco.................................................          10,000
Panama..................................................           2,000
Peru....................................................           1,800
State Western Hemisphere Regional/Central America.......          12,500
State Western Hemisphere Regional/Caribbean Basin                  7,500
 Security Initiative....................................
Tunisia.................................................          65,000
Ukraine.................................................          95,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Argentina.--The Committee notes renewed security 
cooperation and engagement between Argentina and the United 
States. The Committee supports the use of funds in this Act and 
prior Acts making appropriations for the Department of State, 
foreign operations, and related programs for mutually agreed 
upon goals in the areas of counternarcotics, law enforcement, 
and peacekeeping.
    Asia and the Pacific.--The Committee remains concerned 
about the military modernization of the PRC and the increasing 
frequency of aggressive claims in territorial disputes, 
including on the seas and in cyberspace. The Committee 
encourages the Administration to continue to engage with allies 
in the region on the political, economic, and military 
implications of the strategic rise of the PRC, including 
through military assistance and sales programs. Foreign 
Military Financing Program resources should emphasize building 
the maritime security capabilities of United States partners in 
Southeast Asia and the Pacific. The Secretary of State should 
also work with the Secretary of Defense to provide excess 
defense articles applicable to maritime security missions to 
countries in the region, as appropriate.
    Burma.--The Committee recommendation does not include 
assistance for Burma under this heading.
    Child soldiers.--The Committee includes language in section 
7034 of this Act requiring that funds should not be used to 
support military training or operations that include child 
soldiers.
    Foreign Military Sales and Foreign Military Financing 
Program.--The Committee remains concerned that interagency 
processes have kept agreed-upon security assistance and sales 
from being delivered promptly and efficiently. Section 7034(b) 
of this Act directs that funds provided under Foreign Military 
Financing Program be made available to increase the efficiency 
and effectiveness of foreign military sales programs. The 
Secretary of State is also directed to identify in the 
submission of subsequent CBJ documents any resources required 
by the Department of State to support measures to increase the 
efficiency and effectiveness of such programs.
    The Secretary of State is directed to continue cooperating 
with the ongoing review being conducted by the Government 
Accountability Office to identify reforms that can be made by 
the Departments of State and Defense to increase the efficiency 
and effectiveness of the foreign military sales process.
    In accordance with subsection (b)(7)(B), the Secretary of 
State, in coordination with the Secretary of Defense, shall 
include a list of cases under development for major defense 
equipment (as defined in section 47 of the Arms Export Control 
Act) that are above the thresholds identified in section 36(b) 
of the Arms Export Control Act for which the letter of request 
is over 180 days old, consultations have not begun with the 
committees of jurisdiction, and a Letter of Offer has not been 
submitted. Such list shall include: (1) the date of the letter 
of request; (2) the amount of the proposed sale; and (3) a 
description of the defense article or service. The report shall 
be submitted in unclassified form, but may be accompanied by a 
classified annex, if necessary. The Secretary of State, in 
coordination with the Secretary of Defense, shall also be 
prepared to discuss the status of each case, including whether 
the case has been received by the Department of State.
    Israel.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$3,100,000,000 in grants for military assistance to Israel, 
which is the same as the budget request. The Committee notes 
that of the funds provided for assistance for Israel, not less 
than $815,300,000 is for offshore procurement of military 
equipment. The Committee recommendation continues prior year 
language that funds shall be made available within 30 days of 
enactment of this Act.
    The Committee notes that the Committee recommendation 
supports the last installment of the current $30,000,000,000 
ten-year United States-Israel MOU. The Committee further notes 
the continued importance of Israel as a major strategic partner 
and ally of the United States in an increasingly unstable and 
critical region of the world. The Committee recognizes that the 
United States-Israel partnership is integral to United States 
national security interests in the region and supports the 
continuation of the MOU framework to strengthen the strategic 
partnership to the benefit of both the United States and 
Israel. The Committee emphasizes that the MOU reflects the 
commitment of the United States to the security of Israel and 
to ensuring that Israel's qualitative military edge and defense 
capabilities are maintained.
    Kosovo.--The Committee supports continued assistance to the 
Kosovo Security Force as it makes the gradual transition to a 
multiethnic army for the Republic of Kosovo.
    Lebanon.--The Committee recommendation includes language in 
section 7041(e) of this Act requiring that certain conditions 
be met prior to the obligation of funds for assistance for 
Lebanon. The Committee intends that assistance provided to the 
Lebanese Armed Forces (LAF) will not be used against Israel, 
and such assistance will not affect Israel's qualitative 
military edge in the region. The Committee notes that section 
7041(e) prohibits funds for the Lebanese Internal Security 
Forces or the LAF if either organization is controlled by a 
foreign terrorist organization and the Committee directs the 
Secretary of State to consult with the Committee regarding the 
rigorous implementation of this provision.
    Not later than 90 days after enactment of this Act, the 
Committee further directs the Secretary of State to submit a 
report to the Committees on Appropriations, in classified form 
if necessary, on the performance of the LAF, including an 
assessment of the operational capabilities of such forces and 
how the training, curriculum, and equipment provided by the 
United States contributes to those capabilities. The Committee 
directs the Secretary of State to regularly consult with the 
Committees on Appropriations on the activities of the LAF and 
assistance provided by the United States.
    Loan authority.--The Committee recommendation does not 
include the requested authority for loan assistance on a global 
basis. The Committee will consider providing this authority on 
a country-by-country basis and recommends the Department of 
State include in future congressional budget justifications a 
detailed analysis and justification for any country for which 
loan authority is requested.

                    TITLE V--MULTILATERAL ASSISTANCE


                  Funds Appropriated to the President


                INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND PROGRAMS

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................      $339,000,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................                 0
Committee recommendation..............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................      -339,000,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation does not include an 
appropriation for International Organizations and Programs. The 
Committee notes that funds for a contribution to UNICEF are 
provided under Global Health Programs.

                  International Financial Institutions

    International Monetary Fund (IMF) internal budget.--The 
Committee expects the Secretary of the Treasury to submit to 
the Committees on Appropriations the information required in 
House Report 114-154 regarding IMF surcharges on loans and the 
internal budget for the IMF and directs the Secretary to 
provide updated information on such matters for calendar year 
2017.
    Green Climate Fund.--Section 7034 of this Act prohibits the 
use of funds in this Act and prior Acts making appropriations 
for the Department of State, foreign operations, and related 
programs for a contribution, grant, or any other payment to the 
GCF.

Concerns about the World Bank Group

    Budget support.--The Committee continues to be concerned 
about the use of budget support, through Development Policy 
Loans and Program for Results. Not later than 90 days after 
enactment of this Act, the Committee directs the Secretary of 
the Treasury to report to the Committees on Appropriations on 
the ten countries receiving the highest levels of lending for 
each instrument during calendar year 2017.

                      GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT FACILITY

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................      $146,563,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................       102,375,000
Committee recommendation..............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................      -146,563,000
    Change from request...............................      -102,375,000
 

    The Committee recommendation includes funds for the 
biodiversity activities of the Global Environment Facility 
under title III of this Act.

       CONTRIBUTION TO THE INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................    $1,197,128,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................     1,097,010,000
Committee recommendation..............................       658,661,000
    Change from enacted level.........................      -538,467,000
    Change from request...............................      -438,349,000
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $658,661,000 for 
Contribution to the International Development Association.

     CONTRIBUTION TO THE INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND 
                              DEVELOPMENT

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................        $5,963,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................                 0
Committee recommendation..............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................        -5,963,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation does not include an 
appropriation for Contribution to the International Bank for 
Reconstruction and Development.

          CONTRIBUTION TO THE INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................       $21,940,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................                 0
Committee recommendation..............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................       -21,940,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation does not include an 
appropriation for Contribution to the Inter-American 
Development Bank.

               CONTRIBUTION TO THE ASIAN DEVELOPMENT FUND

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................       $99,233,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................        47,395,000
Committee recommendation..............................        47,395,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       -51,838,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $47,395,000 for 
Contribution to the Asian Development Fund.

              CONTRIBUTION TO THE AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................       $32,418,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................        32,418,000
Committee recommendation..............................        32,418,000
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $32,418,000 for 
Contribution to the African Development Bank.
    The Committee recommends a limitation on the amount that 
the United States Governor of the African Development Bank may 
subscribe to the callable portion of the United States share of 
the General Capital Increase.

              CONTRIBUTION TO THE AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FUND

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................      $214,332,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................       171,300,000
Committee recommendation..............................       109,387,000
    Change from enacted level.........................      -104,945,000
    Change from request...............................       -61,913,000
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $109,387,000 for 
Contribution to the African Development Fund.

  CONTRIBUTION TO THE INTERNATIONAL FUND FOR AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................       $30,000,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................        30,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................        30,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $30,000,000 for 
Contribution to the International Fund for Agricultural 
Development.

              GLOBAL AGRICULTURE AND FOOD SECURITY PROGRAM

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................       $23,000,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................                 0
Committee recommendation..............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................       -23,000,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation does not include an 
appropriation for Global Agriculture and Food Security Program.

               TITLE VI--EXPORT AND INVESTMENT ASSISTANCE


                Export-Import Bank of the United States


                           INSPECTOR GENERAL

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................        $5,700,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................         5,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................         5,700,000
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0
    Change from request...............................          +700,000
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $5,700,000 for the 
Office of Inspector General.
    The Committee directs the Office of Inspector General to 
submit to the Committees on Appropriations its annual audit 
plan within the first quarter of fiscal year 2018.

                        ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................      $110,000,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................        95,500,000
Committee recommendation..............................        95,500,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       -14,500,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $95,500,000 for 
Administrative Expenses and does not include funds for a 
subsidy appropriation.

                Overseas Private Investment Corporation


                           NONCREDIT ACCOUNT

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................       $70,000,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................        60,800,000
Committee recommendation..............................        60,800,000
    Change from enacted level.........................        -9,200,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $60,800,000 for 
Noncredit Account for the administrative expenses of the 
Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC).

                            PROGRAM ACCOUNT

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................       $20,000,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................                 0
Committee recommendation..............................        10,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       -10,000,000
    Change from request...............................       +10,000,000
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $10,000,000 for the 
cost of OPIC's direct and guaranteed loan credit programs. The 
Committee directs the President of OPIC to submit a report on 
obligations not less than 14 days after the end of each month 
and include the weekly amount of the principal and subsidy 
obligated in the previous month; the weekly amount of principal 
and subsidy deobligated; the net amount of obligated principal 
and subsidy by geography, sector, and credit score; the 
corresponding amount of subsidy remaining for the fiscal year 
expressed as a dollar amount and percentage; and a projection 
of the following month's expected obligations of principal and 
subsidy.
    The Committee recommendation does not extend the 
authorization of OPIC, but defers such action to the 
authorizing committees of jurisdiction. The Committee 
recommendation does not assume the closure of OPIC, as proposed 
by the fiscal year 2018 request.
    The Committee directs the President of OPIC to include in 
the CBJ for fiscal year 2019 a confidential annex that 
describes new loans, guarantees, and insurance approved in 
fiscal year 2018 by category, recipient, country, level of OPIC 
resources provided, and source year of financing used, as well 
as any updates to the previous report. The Committee also 
directs OPIC to provide additional detail, including a 
description of the positive and negative subsidy assigned to 
the largest projects and the level of guarantee provided.
    The Committee directs OPIC to continue to adhere to the 
directives contained in House Report 112-494 with respect to 
investment funds, local currency guarantees, and non-
governmental and private and voluntary organizations.

                      TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT AGENCY

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................        $75,000,00
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................        12,105,000
Committee recommendation..............................        70,500,000
    Change from enacted level.........................        -4,500,000
    Change from request...............................       +58,395,000
 

    The Committee recommendation includes $70,500,000 for the 
United States Trade and Development Agency. The Committee 
recommendation does not assume the closure of the United States 
Trade and Development Agency (USTDA), as proposed by the fiscal 
year 2018 request.
    Procurement assistance.--The Committee recommendation 
includes funds to support global procurement assistance from 
USTDA to educate and train foreign governments and public 
officials about how to establish procurement practices and 
policies for programs funded in this Act by USAID, MCC, and 
Department of State assistance programs. The Committee expects 
that such assistance will focus on training on risk mitigation 
measures, as well as on integrating life-cycle cost analysis 
and best-value determination in a fair, transparent manner.

                     TITLE VII--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Sec. 7001 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding allowances and differentials.
    Sec. 7002 includes language carried in the prior year 
requiring agencies to provide quarterly reports on the 
cumulative balances of any unobligated funds.
    Sec. 7003 includes language carried in the prior year 
requiring that consulting service contracts shall be a matter 
of public record.
    Sec. 7004 includes language modified from the prior year 
with respect to the construction and use of diplomatic 
facilities, setting limitations and expanding notification and 
oversight requirements, and placing conditions and restrictions 
on certain funds.
    Sec. 7005 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding certain personnel actions and the authority to 
transfer funds between appropriations accounts.
    Sec. 7006 includes language modified from the prior year on 
Department of State management.
    Sec. 7007 includes language carried in the prior year 
prohibiting assistance for the governments of Cuba, North 
Korea, Iran, and Syria.
    Sec. 7008 includes language carried in the prior year 
prohibiting assistance for countries whose duly elected head of 
government is deposed by military coup or decree, or a coup or 
decree in which the military plays a decisive role; requiring a 
determination; and providing a waiver under certain conditions.
    Sec. 7009 includes language carried in the prior year 
setting limitations and conditions on transfers between 
appropriations accounts, requiring audits of certain transfers, 
and reporting requirements on transfers for the Department of 
State and USAID.
    Sec. 7010 includes language carried in the prior year 
prohibiting first-class travel and setting certain limitations 
on computer networks and the promotion of tobacco.
    Sec. 7011 includes language modified from the prior year 
regarding the availability of funds made available in the Act 
and new language placing a limitation on the authority until 
the Secretary of State submits the reports required under this 
section for the last two fiscal years.
    Sec. 7012 includes language carried in the prior year 
prohibiting assistance for countries in default and allowing 
exceptions in certain circumstances.
    Sec. 7013 includes language carried in the prior year 
withholding assistance to a country where such assistance is 
subject to taxation, unless the Secretary of State makes 
certain determinations, and updating a reporting requirement.
    The Committee notes that the taxation of foreign assistance 
by recipient countries remains a problem and directs the 
Secretary of State to prioritize finding a resolution to the 
issue by developing a comprehensive plan that addresses 
failures in preventing taxation of United States assistance.
    Sec. 7014 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding the reservation of funds and the designation of 
certain funding levels.
    Sec. 7015 includes language modified from the prior year 
establishing the notification requirements for funds made 
available in the Act.
    The Committee notes that all notification requirements 
apply to funds appropriated in title VIII and designated 
pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced Budget and 
Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
    Subsection (g) includes modified language requiring 
notification for certain trust funds. The Committee directs 
that such notifications include the following information: (1) 
the office or bureau at USAID, the Department of State, or the 
Department of the Treasury that will oversee programs and 
expenditures of the trust fund; (2) the Web site link to 
publicly available expenditures of the trust fund; (3) 
assurances that the provisions of this Act or in statute 
pertaining to funds provided by title III will be adhered to 
and enforced; (4) a copy of the administrative agreement 
between the international finance institution (IFI) and the 
United States, or if not available, a draft of the pending 
agreement; and (5) whether direct government assistance will be 
provided by the trust fund and specific risk mitigation and 
anti-corruption steps being taken by the trust fund.
    Sec. 7016 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding the notification requirements concerning the 
provision of excess Department of Defense articles.
    Sec. 7017 includes language similar to the prior year 
regarding the availability of funds for international 
organizations and programs.
    Sec. 7018 includes language carried in the prior year 
prohibiting funding for abortions and involuntary 
sterilization.
    Sec. 7019 includes language modified from the prior year 
regarding funding directives specified in tables in the report 
accompanying the Act.
    Sec. 7020 includes language carried in the prior year 
prohibiting the use of assistance for certain representation 
expenses.
    Sec. 7021 includes language carried in the prior year 
prohibiting assistance for governments that support 
international terrorism.
    Sec. 7022 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding authorization requirements.
    Sec. 7023 includes language carried in the prior year 
defining the terms ``program, project, and activity''.
    Sec. 7024 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding certain authorities for the Peace Corps, IAF, and the 
USADF.
    Sec. 7025 includes language carried in the prior year 
relating to commerce, trade, and surplus commodities.
    Sec. 7026 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding the requirement that separate accounts be established 
for cash transfers and assistance that generates local 
currencies and establishing certain conditions on the use of 
those funds.
    Sec. 7027 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding assistance through nongovernmental organizations and 
assistance provided under the Food for Peace Act.
    Sec. 7028 includes language modified from the prior year 
conditioning funds provided to local organizations through 
limited competitions.
    Sec. 7029 includes language modified from the prior year 
establishing certain conditions on funds appropriated to IFIs.
    Sec. 7030 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding debt-for-development programs.
    Sec. 7031 includes language modified from the prior year 
regarding management of direct assistance to governments, 
budget transparency of recipient countries, corruption and 
human rights violations, and the foreign assistance Web site.
    In subsection (c), the Committee notes that the Department 
of State has interpreted the term ``significant corruption'' in 
this subsection to be corrupt activities that would result in a 
denial under the 2004 Presidential Proclamation 7750.
    Sec. 7032 contains language modified from the prior year 
regarding democracy programs funded in this Act.
    The Committee continues to support the efforts of the 
Parliamentary Forum for Democracy in advancing democracy and 
democratic institutions around the world. The Committee directs 
the Secretary of State and USAID Administrator, in consultation 
with NED, to consult with the Committees on Appropriations, not 
later than 45 days after enactment of this Act, on how to 
expand such efforts.
    The Committee expects country strategies to include 
performance measures for democracy programs which examine 
outcome, output, and efficiency measures.
    With respect to the provision of assistance made available 
in this Act for democracy programs, the Secretary of State and 
USAID Administrator should prioritize using organizations with 
significant experience implementing such programs and that 
demonstrate successful outcomes.
    The Committee supports continued investments in programs 
that enhance the success of elections, including through 
comprehensive programs that use flexible and cost-effective 
methods to help prepare for and manage elections, train 
political parties, educate voters, and enhance transparency and 
accountability.
    Sec. 7033 includes language modified from the prior year 
regarding international religious freedom.
    Subsection (a) designates funds for the Office of 
International Religious Freedom, including for the continued 
development and implementation of an international religious 
freedom curriculum in accordance with section 708 of the 
Foreign Service Act of 1980, as amended by the IRFA.
    Subsection (b)(2) designates $10,000,000 from funds 
appropriated under Economic Support Fund for programs to 
protect vulnerable and persecuted religious minorities, 
including for programs authorized by section 5 of H.R. 390, the 
Iraq and Syria Genocide Emergency Relief and Accountability Act 
of 2017, as passed by the House of Representatives on June 6, 
2017.
    Paragraphs (3) and (4) of subsection (b) include directives 
concerning the provision of humanitarian assistance for relief 
for vulnerable and persecuted religious minorities and the 
delivery of international broadcasting programs related to 
religious freedom.
    Sec. 7034 includes language modified from the prior year 
granting certain special authorities and limitations relating 
to funds made available in the Act.
    Subsection (b)(3)(B) is language carried in the prior year 
directing funds for DNA forensic technology to combat human 
trafficking in Central America and Mexico. These funds are in 
addition to funds made available pursuant to section 7060(f) of 
this Act. The Committee notes that DNA forensic science and DNA 
databases have a unique capability to confirm identities and 
have proven to be an effective tool in deterring and preventing 
human trafficking. The Committee expects the Department of 
State to work in partnership to further develop the capacity of 
the governments of Central America and Mexico to utilize DNA 
forensic science and databases to combat trafficking in 
persons. These efforts should include collaboration with local 
law enforcement, civil society, and academic institutions and 
also leverage investments from the private sector. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of State to consult with the 
Committees on Appropriations, not later than 45 days after 
enactment of this Act, on the use of such funds. The Committee 
expects these funds to be provided through an open and 
competitive process.
    Sec. 7035 continues language carried in the prior year 
related to the Arab League Boycott of Israel. The Committee is 
concerned about international efforts to stigmatize and isolate 
Israel through the boycott, divestment, and sanctions (BDS) 
movement. The Committee directs, as part of the annual report 
to Congress on the Arab League Boycott of Israel, that the 
President add information about the BDS campaign, covering 
companies, international organizations, countries, and other 
organizations, including state investment vehicles, that are 
involved in promoting the movement, as well as specific steps 
the Department of State has taken and expects to take to 
discourage or end politically-motivated efforts to boycott, 
divest from, or sanction Israel or Israeli entities.
    Sec. 7036 includes language carried in the prior year 
establishing limitations on the use of funds in support of a 
Palestinian state.
    Sec. 7037 includes language carried in the prior year 
establishing restrictions on the use of funds for the purpose 
of conducting official United States Government business with 
the Palestinian Authority.
    Sec. 7038 includes language carried in the prior year 
restricting assistance to the Palestinian Broadcasting 
Corporation.
    Sec. 7039 includes language carried in the prior year 
placing conditions on assistance for the West Bank and Gaza.
    Sec. 7040 includes language modified from the prior year 
placing limitations on any assistance for the Palestinian 
Authority and regarding Hamas.
    Sec. 7041 includes language modified from the prior year 
regarding countries in the Middle East and North Africa.
    Egypt.--Subsection (a) is modified from the prior year.
    Funds for Egypt are allocated according to the following 
table and subject to section 7019 of this Act:

                                  EGYPT
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                       Account                          Budget Authority
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Economic Support Fund................................           $150,000
International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement..              2,000
Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining and                     3,000
 Related Programs....................................
International Military Education and Training........              1,800
Foreign Military Financing Program...................          1,300,000
                                                      ------------------
    Total............................................          1,456,800
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee directs that not less than $35,000,000 of the 
funds made available for assistance for Egypt under Economic 
Support Fund should be made available for higher education 
programs, including not less than $10,000,000 for scholarships 
at not-for-profit institutions for Egyptian students with high 
financial need.
    The Committee encourages the USAID Administrator to 
implement programs that assist orphans and vulnerable children 
in Egypt, including children from religiously diverse 
populations.
    Iran.--Subsection (b) includes language carried from the 
prior year regarding policy and bilateral and international 
sanctions with respect to the involvement of the Government of 
Iran in nuclear and ballistic missile development, support of 
terrorism, and compliance with the Joint Comprehensive Plan of 
Action.
    For the purposes of the report required by subsection 
(b)(3)(B), the term ``international community'' shall mean the 
UN, the PRC, France, Germany, the Russian Federation, the 
United Kingdom, and the European Union.
    Iraq.--Subsection (c) is similar to language carried in the 
prior year regarding the use and distribution of assistance for 
Iraq, including in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq and other areas 
impacted by the conflict in Syria, and among religious and 
ethnic minority populations in Iraq.
    The USAID Administrator and the Secretary of State are 
directed to support programs in Iraq that address sectarianism, 
assist vulnerable populations, and strengthen governance, 
including promoting civil society. Programs should advance 
peace and reconciliation goals, at national and local levels, 
and build a strong foundation for the long-term stability of 
Iraq. In addition, the Committee supports efforts to protect 
and preserve cultural antiquities in Iraq that have been 
targeted or damaged by ISIS, including in the recently 
liberated city of Mosul.
    The Committee remains concerned about the safe return of 
Iraqi ethnic and religious minorities, including Christians, 
Yezidis, and other groups who have been victimized by genocide, 
to their ancestral homelands in the Nineveh Plain, Tel Afar, 
and Sinjar areas of Iraq. Support for such individuals and 
communities should, to the maximum extent practicable, take 
into account the unique needs and security requirements 
necessary to for safe repatriation. The Committee urges the 
Secretary of State to make available from funds appropriated by 
this Act, assistance for securitization and stabilization in 
the Nineveh Plain, Tel Afar, Sinjar, and surrounding areas of 
Iraq. Such assistance should include support for demining and 
clearing of hazardous materials; interim zones of stability; 
restoration of basic services such as water and electricity, 
and repair of infrastructure; training related to security, 
local law enforcement, and pursuit of justice; and support for 
civil society and activities that promote dialogue between 
local leadership and coalition partners. The Committee 
encourages USAID to establish psychosocial support programs to 
benefit religious and ethnic minorities affected by ISIS, 
prioritizing trauma therapy and care for children and survivors 
of sexual slavery.
    Jordan.--Subsection (d) includes language modified from the 
prior year by deleting paragraph (2).
    The Committee recommendation includes not less than 
$1,280,000,000 for assistance for Jordan. Funds for Jordan are 
allocated according to the following table and subject to 
section 7019 of this Act:

                                 JORDAN
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                       Account                          Budget Authority
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Economic Support Fund................................           $812,400
Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining and                    13,600
 Related Programs....................................
International Military Education and Training........              4,000
Foreign Military Financing Program...................            450,000
                                                      ------------------
    Total............................................          1,280,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee notes the importance of the relationship with 
the Kingdom of Jordan and the strong leadership that Jordan 
continues to play in advancing peace and stability in the 
region and in the ongoing campaign to defeat ISIS. The United 
States should continue to support critical economic aid and to 
provide the assistance needed to ensure Jordan's success in 
coalition operations, including to strengthen Jordan's borders 
with Iraq and Syria.
    Lebanon.--Subsection (e) is modified from the prior year by 
deleting language making Economic Support Fund available 
notwithstanding a certain provision of law.
    Libya.--Subsection (f) is modified from the prior year by 
deleting a funding directive and language on infrastructure 
projects.
    Morocco.--Subsection (g) includes language modified from 
the prior year.
    The Committee recommendation includes not less than 
$38,500,000 for assistance for Morocco. Funds for Morocco 
allocated according to the following table and subject to 
section 7019 of this Act:

                                 MOROCCO
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                       Account                          Budget Authority
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Economic Support Fund................................            $20,000
International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement..              5,000
Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining and                     1,500
 Related Programs....................................
International Military Education and Training........              2,000
Foreign Military Financing Program...................             10,000
                                                      ------------------
    Total............................................             38,500
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee recommendation makes funds available for 
assistance for any region or territory administered by Morocco, 
including the Western Sahara. The Committee expects funds to 
support democratic reforms and economic development. The 
Committee remains concerned by the failure to resolve the 
longstanding dispute over the Western Sahara and the protracted 
refugee situation in the Polisario-run camps near Tindouf, 
Algeria. The Committee believes that the Secretary of State 
should pursue a negotiated settlement to the dispute, 
consistent with United States policy to support a solution to 
the issue based on a formula of autonomy under Moroccan 
sovereignty. These redoubled diplomatic efforts can lead to a 
realistic and lasting settlement, the completion of a UN 
peacekeeping mission that has existed for over 25 years, and a 
more stable region. The Committee also encourages the 
Administration to support private sector investment in the 
Western Sahara. The Committee recommendation includes a 
requirement to consult with the Committees on Appropriations on 
all of these issues not later than 45 days after enactment of 
this Act.
    Refugee Assistance in North Africa.--Subsection (h) 
includes language similar to the prior year regarding refugee 
assistance in North Africa. The Committee notes that the UN 
Security Council (UNSC), through adoption of UNSC resolution 
2351, reiterated its request for consideration of a refugee 
registration in the Tindouf refugee camps and emphasized 
efforts be made in this regard. The Committee supports funds 
being made available to support such efforts. Given the 
unprecedented demand for humanitarian assistance globally, the 
Committee emphasizes the need for transparency and 
accountability of humanitarian resources.
    Strategy requirement.--Subsection (i) includes new language 
that requires the Secretary of State, in consultation with the 
Secretary of Defense, to submit to the appropriate 
congressional committees a strategy on United States engagement 
in North Africa not later than 60 days after enactment of this 
Act. The Committee notes the important role the countries of 
North Africa play with respect to global security and 
stability. The Secretary of State should prioritize issues 
affecting the future of these countries and ensure adequate 
diplomatic and assistance resources are made available to 
support their needs.
    Syria.--Subsection (j) is modified by limiting the 
authority related to non-lethal assistance to address the needs 
of civilians affected by conflict in Syria to title III funds, 
and by deleting paragraph (2) on explosive ordnance disposal 
programs and paragraph (3) on Syrian organizations.
    The Committee notes the declaration of genocide made by the 
Secretary of State on March 18, 2016. Section 7033(b)(2) of 
this Act directs that funds be made available for programs to 
protect vulnerable and persecuted religious minorities, 
including programs authorized by section 5 of H.R. 390, the 
Iraq and Syria Genocide Emergency Relief and Accountability Act 
of 2017, as passed by the House of Representatives on June 6, 
2017.
    The Committee remains concerned about the lengthy 
displacement of Syrians and the ongoing burden they face, as 
well as the continued strain Syrian refugees are placing on 
host communities. The Committee urges the Department of State 
to continue to: (1) assist host countries expand their national 
systems to accommodate refugee needs; (2) increase host country 
capacity to deliver basic services to their own citizens; (3) 
strengthen the ability of local governments to respond to the 
refugee influx; (4) employ policies and programs to close gaps 
in distribution of need-based aid to at-risk minority 
populations; and (5) ensure that refugees have freedom of 
movement and meaningful access to economic opportunity.
    Tunisia.--Subsection (k) includes language carried in the 
prior year related to funding levels for Tunisia.
    Funds for Tunisia are allocated according to the following 
table and subject to section 7019 of this Act:

                                 TUNISIA
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                       Account                          Budget Authority
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Economic Support Fund................................            $79,000
International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement..             13,000
Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining and                     6,100
 Related Programs....................................
International Military Education and Training........              2,300
Foreign Military Financing Program...................             65,000
                                                      ------------------
    Total............................................            165,400
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    West Bank and Gaza.--Subsection (l), West Bank and Gaza, is 
modified from the prior year by deleting the waiver and 
modifying the requirements with respect to the International 
Criminal Court, modifying a funding reduction, and modifying 
the reporting requirement. The report required in paragraph (3) 
shall include steps taken by the Secretary of State as well as 
the Palestinian Authority to end the practice of payments to 
individuals imprisoned for acts of terrorism.
    Yemen.--The Committee notes the significant health and 
humanitarian needs in Yemen and expects funds to be made 
available for such purposes.
    Sec. 7042 includes modified language from the prior year 
regarding assistance for Africa.
    Boko Haram.--The Committee notes with concern the ongoing 
attacks on civilians by Boko Haram and related food insecurity. 
The Committee directs that funds be made available at not less 
than the fiscal year 2017 level for protection of civilian 
populations and to support victims of violence from Boko Haram. 
The Committee encourages USAID to address the unique needs of 
these victims, especially women and girls, into its 
programming. Funds made available in this Act for Cameroon, 
Chad, Niger, and Nigeria may be used for counterterrorism 
programs, specifically to combat Boko Haram.
    Electrify Africa.--The Committee supports continued funding 
to carry out the objectives of the Electrify Africa Act of 2015 
(P.L. 114-121).
    Ethiopia.--The Committee encourages the Secretary of State 
to consider whether the Government of Ethiopia has made reforms 
to improve human rights and governance, when determining 
whether to provide assistance to such government.
    Kenya.--The Committee is concerned about police abuse in 
Kenya and directs the Secretary of State to support programs 
that further the investigations and prosecutions of such abuse.
    Lord's Resistance Army.--The Committee directs the 
Department of State to continue the reporting requirement 
contained in the explanatory statement accompanying Public Law 
113-76 on the Lord's Resistance Army during fiscal year 2018.
    South Sudan.--Funds in this Act may not be made available 
to the central Government of South Sudan until the Secretary of 
State certifies that the conditions in section 7042(f) of this 
Act have been met. The Committee commends the work of the Panel 
of Experts on South Sudan, which presented its final report in 
February 2016. The Panel found evidence that senior leaders on 
both sides of the conflict in South Sudan violated the August 
2015 Comprehensive Peace Agreement and met the criteria of the 
UN Security Council for the imposition of targeted sanctions. 
The Committee directs the Secretary of State to encourage 
members of the international community to implement and enforce 
meaningful, targeted sanctions on those responsible for the 
ongoing conflict. The Committee prioritizes funding to ensure 
that the Joint Monitoring and Evaluation Commission and the 
Hybrid Court of the African Union have the necessary resources, 
technical expertise, and support to quickly and effectively 
fulfill their respective roles in implementing the overall 
provisions of the peace agreement. The Secretary of State is 
directed to ensure that data collected by bodies charged with 
monitoring ceasefire violations, attacks against civilians, 
violations of international humanitarian law, and general human 
rights monitoring is shared in a timely manner and is made 
publicly available, as appropriate.
    The Committee notes the presence of civil society 
organizations and grassroots movements in South Sudan and 
encourages the USAID Administrator to prioritize funding for 
such groups in order to support accountability and 
reconciliation among communities impacted by violence. The 
Committee also continues to support global health programs and 
programs for clean water, agriculture development, and other 
livelihood activities that build the resilience of communities. 
The Committee notes such programs can also serve to build and 
maintain peace and encourages including those objectives in 
economic development programs.
    Sec. 7043 includes language modified from the prior year 
containing limitations, directives, and authorities for 
diplomatic and development activities and programs in Burma, 
Cambodia, North Korea, the PRC, and Tibet.
    Burma.--The Committee recommendation continues the 
authority and funding for economic and development assistance 
for the people of Burma, but does not include funding for 
Foreign Military Financing Program and International Military 
Education and Training. The Committee provides assistance to 
address the needs of displaced communities on the Thai-Burma 
border. The Committee recognizes a transition is underway in 
Burma that may require adjustments in programming to these 
communities and directs the USAID Administrator to consult with 
the Committee on any proposed changes in levels or types of 
assistance provided. The Committee supports funds for global 
health programs in Burma.
    Laos.--The Committee directs the Secretary of State, in 
consultation with the Secretary of Defense, to submit a report 
not later than 90 days after enactment of this Act to the 
appropriate congressional committees describing the assistance 
the Government of Laos provides to recover the remains of and 
account for missing United States personnel, including any 
unfilled Department of Defense requests.
    Philippines.--Extrajudicial killings in the Philippines, 
particularly those committed in the conduct of the anti-drug 
campaign, call into question the commitment of the central 
Government of the Philippines to human rights, due process, and 
the rule of law. The Committee recognizes the need to remain 
engaged with the Philippine government and strongly encourages 
the Department of State to strictly monitor United States 
assistance, including Foreign Military Financing, with respect 
to the accountability and professionalism of security force 
personnel.
    The report required in subsection (e) shall include an 
assessment of: 1) The extent to which the Government of the 
Philippines is investigating and prosecuting extrajudicial 
executions and forced disappearances connected with its anti-
drug campaign, 2) the participation rate of security forces in 
human rights and ethics training, and 3) the extent to which 
the Government of the Philippines is strengthening the capacity 
of the Philippine justice sector institutions.
    The Committee recommendation includes funding for public 
health programs in the Philippines that consist of integrated 
and comprehensive drug treatment and rehabilitation in line 
with international standards under the International Narcotics 
Control and Law Enforcement demand reduction program.
    Vietnam.--The Committee recommendation includes $55,500,000 
under Development Assistance for Vietnam. The Committee expects 
that funds appropriated under Educational and Cultural Exchange 
Programs and Development Assistance will support activities 
authorized by section 211 of the Vietnam Education Foundation 
Act of 2000, as amended.
    Sec. 7044 includes language modified from the prior year 
containing limitations, directives, and authorities for 
diplomatic and development activities and programs in South and 
Central Asia and for regional programs.
    Afghanistan and Pakistan.--The Committee includes funds 
under International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement for 
the recruitment, retention, and professionalization of women in 
the police forces of Afghanistan and Pakistan.
    The authority referenced in section 7044(a)(4)(B) shall not 
be exercised unless the Secretary of State, in consultation 
with the USAID Administrator, reports to the Committees on 
Appropriations that: (1) adequate financial controls and 
oversight are in place, including monitoring of project 
implementation and resource disbursements in all parts of the 
country; and (2) that the recipient has established regular, 
transparent, and comprehensive reporting procedures regarding 
the use of United States assistance.
    The Committee notes with concern allegations of sexual 
abuse of boys by members of the Afghan security forces and 
expects the Secretary of State to consult on how funds provided 
for Afghanistan in this Act, as applicable, are working to 
prevent such acts, including through the required vetting for 
security assistance.
    Bangladesh.--The Committee directs the Secretary of State 
to submit a report, not later than 90 days after the enactment 
of this Act, to the Committees on Appropriations on the extent 
to which the Government of Bangladesh is supporting human 
rights and workers' rights; implementing policies to protect 
freedom of expression, association, and religion, and due 
process of law; and ensuring free, fair, and participatory 
elections. The Committee directs that funds made available by 
this Act for assistance for Bangladesh shall include programs 
to improve labor conditions in readymade garment, shrimp, and 
fish industries.
    Sec. 7045 includes language modified from the prior year 
regarding programs and funding for Latin America and the 
Caribbean.
    Caribbean Basin Security Initiative (CBSI).--Funds for CBSI 
are allocated according to the following table and subject to 
section 7019 of this Act:

                   CARIBBEAN BASIN SECURITY INITIATIVE
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                       Account                          Budget Authority
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Economic Support Fund................................            $25,000
International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement..             25,200
Foreign Military Financing Program...................              7,500
                                                      ------------------
    Total............................................             57,700
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee recommendation supports activities to combat 
organized crime and drug-related violence in a region 
particularly susceptible to the drug trade.
    Not later than 45 days after enactment of this Act, the 
Committee directs the Secretary of State, in coordination with 
the USAID Administrator, to provide to the Committees on 
Appropriations a report on the uses of all funds provided for 
CBSI on a country-by-country basis for each program, project, 
and activity for fiscal years 2010 through 2017, and integrate 
such information into the ForeignAssistance.gov Web site, as 
appropriate.
    Central America.--The Department of State, Foreign 
Operations and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2017, 
required the Secretary of State to review and update the United 
States Strategy for Engagement in Central America (the 
Strategy). The Act also required that the Strategy address the 
key factors in countries in Central America that contribute to 
the migration of undocumented Central Americans to the United 
States. Subsection (a)(1) of this Act provides that 
$615,000,000 should be made available for countries in Central 
America to implement the updated Strategy. Such funds are 
allocated according to the following table and subject to 
section 7019 of this Act:

        UNITED STATES STRATEGY FOR ENGAGEMENT IN CENTRAL AMERICA
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   Program/Activity                     Budget Authority
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Global Health Programs
    Guatemala........................................            $12,000
        Subtotal, Global Health Programs.............             12,000
Development Assistance
    El Salvador......................................             52,590
    Guatemala........................................             88,885
    Honduras.........................................             77,560
    Nicaragua........................................              6,500
    Northern Triangle Incentive Award................             10,000
        Subtotal, Development Assistance.............            235,535
Economic Support Fund
    Central America Regional Security Initiative.....            104,225
    [Northern Triangle Incentive Award]..............            [4,000]
        Subtotal, Economic Support Fund..............            104,225
International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement
    Central America Regional Security Initiative.....            230,000
    [Costa Rica].....................................           [25,000]
    [DNA forensic technology]........................            [6,000]
    [Northern Triangle Incentive Award]..............            [6,000]
        Subtotal, International Narcotics Control and            230,000
         Law Enforcement.............................
Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining and
 Related Programs
    Panama...........................................                500
        Subtotal, Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism,                  500
         Demining and Related Programs...............
International Military Education and Training
    Belize...........................................                250
    Costa Rica.......................................                725
    El Salvador......................................                800
    Guatemala........................................                800
    Honduras.........................................                800
    Panama...........................................                725
        Subtotal, International Military Education                 4,100
         and Training................................
Foreign Military Financing Program
    Belize...........................................              1,000
    Costa Rica.......................................              5,000
    El Salvador......................................              1,900
    Guatemala........................................              1,740
    Honduras.........................................              4,500
    Panama...........................................              2,000
    State Western Hemisphere Regional................             12,500
        Subtotal, Foreign Military Financing Program.             28,640
                                                      ------------------
        Total, United States Strategy for Engagement             615,000
         in Central America..........................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee recommendation does not include funds for 
cash transfer assistance or major infrastructure projects for 
countries in Central America. Such projects should be financed 
from sources other than the United States Government. The 
Secretary of State should continue to support regional security 
and economic initiatives, including the Plan of the Alliance 
for Prosperity in the Northern Triangle in Central America, to 
the extent such initiatives are consistent with the Strategy.
    Subsection (a)(2) requires a multi-year spend plan that 
includes a description of how such funds shall prioritize 
addressing the key factors in countries in Central America that 
contribute to the migration of undocumented Central Americans 
to the United States. In accordance with this subsection, the 
plan shall describe in detail the proposed uses of assistance 
from this Act for each country and the amounts allocated from 
prior Acts (since fiscal year 2015) to support the Strategy. 
The plan shall also describe: (1) how such assistance differs 
from, complements, and leverages funds allocated by each 
foreign government, other donors (including IFIs), and other 
United States Government agencies; (2) the amounts of funding 
from such sources; (3) funds planned to be transferred or 
otherwise provided to other United States government agencies, 
IFIs, and organizations and offices listed in the table below, 
and the purpose; (4) and the funding levels planned for each of 
the central governments of El Salvador, Guatemala, and 
Honduras.
    Subsection (a)(3) continues the withholding of assistance 
made available for each of the central governments of El 
Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras, unless the Secretary of 
State certifies and reports that such government is taking 
effective steps to meet certain conditions. The Committee notes 
that these conditions have helped maintain the focus on reform 
and increased accountability for United States taxpayer 
dollars.
    To further incentivize reform and progress in the region, 
subsection (a)(4) reserves funds for a Northern Triangle 
Incentive Award. In accordance with this subsection, this award 
may be made available to El Salvador, Guatemala, or Honduras, 
only if the Secretary of State determines and reports that a 
country has made extraordinary progress in meeting two or more 
of the conditions enumerated in subsection (a)(3). Such a 
determination may only be made following the submission of the 
reports made for a country pursuant to paragraphs (3)(A) and 
(3)(B). In making the determination, the Committee recommends a 
focus on clauses (ii) and (iii) of paragraph (3)(A) as well as 
clauses (ii) and (v) of paragraph (3)(B). $20,000,000 is 
designated for the award, to be issued in total for only one 
country.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State, in 
coordination with the USAID Administrator, to update the plan 
for monitoring and evaluation to reflect the updated Strategy 
and to issue a progress report with results not later than 
October 30, 2018. The report should be submitted to the 
appropriate congressional committees and posted to the 
Department of State and USAID Web sites.
    The Committee recommendation maintains country notification 
requirements for Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras and 
directs that such notifications: (1) indicate whether funds 
will support current or new programs, the central government of 
such country, an IFI, or an organization or office listed in 
the table below; (2) describe how programs align with the 
Strategy and the plan for monitoring and evaluation; and (3) 
describe the cost-matching arrangements made pursuant to 
section 7045(a)(1). The Committee expects congressional 
notifications submitted for the International Commission 
Against Impunity in Guatemala and the Mission to Support the 
Fight against Corruption and Impunity in Honduras to specify 
the activities to be supported, the planned agency oversight of 
such funds, and a brief description of the activities and 
investigations undertaken by the entity during the previous six 
months.
    The Committee is concerned about reports that United States 
business entities that operate in El Salvador, Guatemala, and 
Honduras are being subject to tax withholdings in excess of 
amounts legally due and delays in reimbursements. The Secretary 
of State is directed to include: (1) in the report required by 
subparagraph (3)(B) of subsection (a) (relating to clause 
(xi)), a description of efforts to improve transparency in the 
tax collection system; and (2) in the report required by 
subparagraph (3)(B) (relating to clause (xii)), a description 
of efforts to increase the timeliness of reimbursements to 
United States business entities.
    The Committee recommendation supports programs in the 
Northern Triangle to address the key factors that contribute to 
the migration of undocumented Central Americans to the United 
States. The Committee expects the Secretary of State and USAID 
Administrator to monitor and evaluate the effects of these 
programs on such factors and, where feasible, their effects on 
the migration itself. Not later than 45 days after enactment, 
the Secretary of State and USAID Administrator are directed to 
consult with the Committees on Appropriations on these matters.
    The Committee recommendation includes funding under 
Development Assistance to support governance, transparency, and 
accountability; increase food security and education; and 
reduce poverty. The Committee encourages USAID to seek partners 
with extensive regional experience in working with all levels 
of government, international organizations, civil society, and 
the private sector. The Committee supports agricultural 
programs that seek to capitalize on the region's comparative 
advantages and encourages engagement with small- and medium-
scale farmers to enable them to participate in value chains and 
increase their access to markets. The Committee encourages 
USAID to utilize the knowledge and experience of the United 
States land-grant university system in working on such issues. 
The Committee also encourages USAID to work with host countries 
on reforms to strengthen their ability to provide technical 
assistance and disseminate agricultural practices, including 
through more effective agricultural extension services.
    The Committee recommends up to $10,000,000 for a transfer 
from Development Assistance to the Inter-American Foundation, 
following consultation with the Committees on Appropriations.
    The Committee believes that citizen security is a 
prerequisite for long-term development and sustained economic 
growth in the region and includes funding for the Central 
America Regional Security Initiative (CARSI). CARSI programs 
should bolster border security; counter criminal gangs, drug 
traffickers and organized crime; combat human smuggling and 
trafficking; provide training for law enforcement; and provide 
crime prevention programs that target at-risk youth.
    The Committee recommendation supports efforts to strengthen 
the rule of law by combating corruption and impunity. Within 
the total funding provided for the Strategy, funds for certain 
organizations and offices are allocated according to the 
following table and subject to section 7019 of this Act:

                        ORGANIZATIONS AND OFFICES
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                       Program                          Budget Authority
------------------------------------------------------------------------
International Commission Against Impunity in                      $5,500
 Guatemala...........................................
Mission to Support the Fight Against Corruption and                4,500
 Impunity in Honduras................................
Office of the Attorney General/Public Ministry, El                 9,000
 Salvador............................................
Office of the Attorney General/Public Ministry,                   10,000
 Guatemala...........................................
Office of the Attorney General/Public Ministry,                    5,500
 Honduras............................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee supports efforts to strengthen the 
investigative capacity of the Salvadoran National Civil Police 
and the Salvadoran Public Prosecutors to lead effective 
criminal investigations and prosecutions of crimes against 
women and children, including sexual violence. The Committee 
also supports programs to increase the capability of police 
sexual assault units in Guatemala.
    The Committee recommendation supports programs to reduce 
impunity and strengthen the rule of law by increasing the use 
of forensic technology and scientific evidence and reducing the 
dependence on witness testimony in court cases. The Committee 
encourages the Department of State and USAID to share best 
practices regarding these programs to encourage the adoption of 
such methods in the region more broadly.
    The Committee recommendation includes not less than 
$6,000,000 from CARSI funds for programs to combat human 
trafficking in Central America through the use of DNA forensic 
technology, in accordance with section 7034(b)(3)(B) of this 
Act. The Committee provides further direction on these matters 
in this report under that section.
    Not later than 45 days after the enactment of this Act, the 
Committee directs the Secretary of State, in coordination with 
the USAID Administrator, to provide to the Committees on 
Appropriations a report on the uses of all funds provided for 
CARSI on a country-by-country basis for each program, project, 
and activity for fiscal years 2010 through 2017, and integrate 
such information into the ForeignAssistance.gov Web site, as 
appropriate.
    The Committee recommendation includes Foreign Military 
Financing Program funding to support efforts by the security 
forces of Central American countries to increase border and 
maritime security, particularly in areas at risk of 
exploitation by transnational criminal organizations.
    Colombia.--The Committee supports Colombia's efforts to 
expand state presence, provide citizen security and access to 
government services, counter illicit crop cultivation and 
narcotics trafficking, and establish a lasting and durable 
peace. The Committee recognizes the strategic importance of 
Colombia and notes the improvements made in the everyday lives 
of the Colombian people that have resulted over the last 17 
years. The Committee is concerned, however, about the 
significant increase in coca production in Colombia.
    Subsection (b)(1) provides not less than $335,925,000 for 
assistance for Colombia. Such funds are allocated according to 
the following table and subject to section 7019 of this Act:

                                COLOMBIA
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                       Account                          Budget Authority
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Economic Support Fund................................           $133,000
International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement..            143,000
Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining and                    20,000
 Related Programs....................................
International Military Education and Training........              1,400
Foreign Military Financing Program...................             38,525
                                                      ------------------
    Total............................................            335,925
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Subsection (b)(2) continues the prohibition on payment of 
reparations to conflict victims or compensation to demobilized 
combatants associated with a peace agreement.
    In accordance with subsection (b)(3), the multi-year spend 
plan shall describe in detail the proposed uses of funds by 
account and activity, including those activities specified in 
subparagraphs (A) through (E) of paragraph (1), and the amounts 
made available from prior Acts. The spend plan shall also 
include the following information for any funds made available 
to support the implementation of the peace agreement: (1) an 
estimate of planned funding by fiscal year and account; (2) an 
estimate of the commitments and expenditures required by the 
Government of Colombia to implement the agreement; and (3) an 
explanation of how assistance made available by this Act and 
prior Acts to support implementation of the agreement will be 
coordinated with resources allocated by the Government of 
Colombia and other donors, including IFIs.
    The Committee includes funding under International 
Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement to combat illegal armed 
groups and drug trafficking organizations, strengthen the 
Colombian National Police, and prevent illicit narcotics from 
reaching the United States. In accordance with subsection 
(b)(4), 30 percent of the funds made available by this Act 
under Economic Support Fund and International Narcotics Control 
and Law Enforcement for assistance for Colombia may be 
obligated only after the Secretary of State certifies and 
reports to the Committees on Appropriations that Colombia has 
reduced overall illicit drug cultivation, production, and 
trafficking, including through eradication and interdiction 
activities, and provides metrics to support such certification.
    The Committee recommendation supports expanding civilian 
government institutions into former conflict zones, addressing 
humanitarian and development needs of populations in war-torn 
areas, and support for Afro-Colombians and indigenous 
communities. The Committee encourages funding for Colombian 
civil society, programs to support truth and reconciliation, 
support for victims, the protection of human rights defenders 
and other vulnerable groups, peacebuilding, and verification of 
the implementation of the accords.
    The Committee assumes that up to $7,000,000 of funds 
available under Economic Support Fund will be transferred to 
Migration and Refugee Assistance, as in prior years, to augment 
support to nongovernmental and international organizations that 
provide assistance to Colombian refugees in neighboring 
countries.
    The Committee encourages a continued focus on justice and 
rule of law activities, including within the Colombian Armed 
Forces. Not later than 90 days after enactment of this Act, the 
Secretary of State is directed to submit a report to the 
Committees on Appropriations on these issues. The report should 
include steps taken by the Government of Colombia to do the 
following: (1) subject cases involving members of the Colombian 
military who have been credibly alleged to have violated human 
rights to civilian jurisdiction; (2) uphold its international 
obligations by holding accountable persons responsible for 
crimes against humanity, war crimes, and other gross violations 
of human rights; (3) continue to dismantle illegal armed 
groups; and (4) take effective steps to protect the rights of 
human rights defenders, and indigenous and Afro-Colombian 
communities.
    The Committee is concerned about reports of anti-
competitive policies in Colombia that limit the ability of 
United States companies to compete fairly in Colombia's market, 
particularly with respect to policies regarding heavy duty 
trucks. The Secretary of State is directed to include such 
information in the report on outstanding commercial and trade 
disputes between the United States and Colombia required by the 
explanatory statement that accompanied the Department of State, 
Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 
2017. The Secretary is also directed to update such report and 
submit it to the Committees on Appropriations six months after 
the submission of the first report.
    No funds appropriated or otherwise made available for 
assistance for Colombia by this Act and prior Acts making 
appropriations for the Department of State, foreign operations, 
and related programs may be made available for the 
Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) or the National 
Liberation Army in Colombia, as such entities are designated as 
foreign terrorist organizations pursuant to section 219 of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1189).
    Cuba.--Subsection (c) includes language prohibiting funds 
from being used for the establishment of a United States 
diplomatic presence in Cuba or to facilitate the establishment 
or operation of a diplomatic mission of Cuba in the United 
States beyond that which was in existence prior to December 17, 
2014, with certain exceptions and limitations, until the 
President determines and reports to the Committees on 
Appropriations the requirements and factors specified in 
section 205 of the Cuban Liberty and Democratic Solidarity 
(LIBERTAD) Act of 1996 have been met, including the extent to 
which the Government of Cuba has extradited or otherwise 
rendered to the United States all persons sought by the United 
States Department of Justice for crimes committed in the United 
States, such as Joanne Chesimard. The provision also includes 
language concerning Cuba democracy promotion programs.
    Haiti.--Subsection (d) withholds funding for assistance for 
the central Government of Haiti unless the Secretary of State 
certifies and reports that the Government of Haiti is taking 
certain steps. The Committee remains concerned about the lack 
of progress in self-reliance and governance in Haiti and 
encourages the USAID Administrator to prioritize programs that 
can be sustained.
    Mexico.--Funds for Mexico are allocated according to the 
following table and subject to section 7019 of this Act:

                                 MEXICO
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                       Account                          Budget Authority
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Economic Support Fund................................            $39,000
International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement..             90,000
Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining and                     1,160
 Related Programs....................................
International Military Education and Training........              1,500
Foreign Military Financing Program...................              5,000
                                                      ------------------
    Total............................................            136,660
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee recommendation provides funding under 
Economic Support Fund for assistance for Mexico for programs to 
support justice reform, promote good governance, promote human 
rights, implement crime and violence prevention programs, and 
facilitate United States-Mexico trade and investment. The 
Committee recommendation provides funding under International 
Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement to combat transnational 
organized crime, increase border security, promote due process 
and the rule of law, and reduce the flow of illicit narcotics, 
particularly heroin and fentanyl, into the United States.
    The Committee recognizes that the United States and Mexico 
face difficult challenges in securing our shared border while 
also facilitating the efficient flow of commerce and trade. The 
Committee believes that efforts to address these challenges 
could be strengthened through the development of common or 
complementary approaches in areas of mutual interest such as 
border security and law enforcement. The Committee encourages 
the Department of State, in cooperation with other United 
States Government agencies, to explore new opportunities for 
cooperation with Mexican authorities, including training 
opportunities by state and local law enforcement entities in 
the United States.
    The Committee notes the efforts of the Government of Mexico 
to address the migration of unaccompanied, undocumented minors 
from Central America traveling to the United States. The 
Committee recommendation includes funding to continue to 
support efforts to secure Mexico's borders and encourages a 
continued focus on Mexico's southern border with Guatemala and 
Belize.
    Not later than 60 days after enactment of this Act, the 
Committee directs the Department of State, in consultation with 
other relevant agencies, to provide a report to the Committees 
on Appropriations describing the implementation of assistance 
for Mexico since fiscal year 2008. Such report should include 
information on activities and funding in support of border 
security, including Mexico's southern border.
    The Committee urges the Secretary of State to engage in 
negotiations with Mexico to seek the return of items of 
historical value, including to facilitate the repatriation of a 
flag which was flown at the battle of the Alamo.
    Other Assistance for Latin America.--Funds provided under 
International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement for Western 
Hemisphere Regional Security Cooperation are in addition to 
amounts otherwise provided for bilateral and regional programs 
under that heading. The Committee directs the Secretary of 
State to program these funds in a manner similar to prior 
years.
    The Committee is concerned about reports of the removal of 
United States minors to countries in Latin America and the 
Caribbean, including to Brazil and Trinidad and Tobago, that 
stem from custody disputes. The Committee urges the Secretary 
of State to advocate for the expeditious return of these 
minors.
    Section 7046 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding assistance for Ukraine and other Independent States 
of the former Soviet Union.
    Georgia.--Funds for Georgia are allocated according to the 
following table and subject to section 7019 of this Act:

                                 GEORGIA
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                       Account                          Budget Authority
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Assistance for Europe, Eurasia and Central Asia......            $58,025
International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement..              4,000
Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining and                     1,100
 Related Programs....................................
International Military Education and Training........              2,200
Foreign Military Financing Program...................             35,000
                                                      ------------------
    Total............................................            100,325
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Ukraine.--Subsection (a) provides not less than 
$410,465,000 for assistance for Ukraine. Funds for certain 
programs are allocated according to the following table and 
subject to section 7019 of this Act:

                                 UKRAINE
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                       Account                          Budget Authority
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Assistance for Europe, Eurasia and Central Asia......           $239,685
International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement..             30,000
Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining, and                   10,000
 Related Programs....................................
International Military Education and Training........              2,900
Foreign Military Financing Program...................             95,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee recommendation includes not less than the 
$32,880,000 for Global Health Programs which, when combined 
with the amounts in the table above, provides not less than 
$410,465,000 for Ukraine.
    The Committee recommendation helps further stabilize 
Ukraine's economy and supports economic and political reform, 
including reforms to combat corruption. The recommendation also 
supports Ukraine's security and its capacity to counter Russian 
influence and aggression, and promotes Ukraine's orientation to 
the West.
    The Committee encourages the Department of State and USAID 
to support the agricultural sector in Ukraine in order to 
improve exports, as well as increase engagement with rural 
women and small to medium-size farm holders. The Committee also 
supports assistance for independent media in Ukraine.
    The Committee supports funds to assist youth and other 
vulnerable populations, particularly those affected by violence 
and in need of access to mental health services. The Committee 
remains concerned about the humanitarian needs of those 
displaced due to the conflict and urges the Secretary of State 
and USAID Administrator to ensure that sufficient funds are 
made available to support such needs.
    The Committee recommendation provides funding under Foreign 
Military Financing Program to help Ukraine defend its sovereign 
territory against Russian aggression. The Committee notes that 
Ukraine, as a formal NATO partner, is eligible for the full 
range of activities listed in the NATO Partnership Cooperation 
Menu, which comprises more than 1,600 activities such as 
multilateral training exercises and equipment modernization. 
The Committee directs the Secretary of State to ensure that 
Ukraine has the appropriate training, lethal defensive weapons, 
and other equipment to continue to work closely with NATO.
    The Committee recommendation provides funding under 
International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement to 
strengthen the rule of law and fight corruption. Funding should 
strengthen and help professionalize Ukraine's law enforcement 
bodies and build upon the success of the Patrol Police reform 
effort. Programs should also support agencies of the Government 
of Ukraine dedicated to targeting corruption.
    The Committee recommendation supports efforts to increase 
security, reduce tensions, and monitor the situation in 
Ukraine, including through the Organization for Security and 
Cooperation in Europe Special Monitoring Mission in Ukraine.
    Sec. 7047 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding authority for the President to draw down certain 
funds to support UN war crimes tribunals or commissions.
    Sec. 7048 includes language modified from the prior year 
relating to conditions on funds for the UN and other 
international organizations.
    Sec. 7049 includes language carried in the prior year 
related to assistance made available for community-based 
policing programs.
    Sec. 7050 includes language carried in the prior year 
limiting funding for publicity or propaganda purposes within 
the United States.
    Sec. 7051 includes language carried in the prior year 
limiting funds available under the Act from being used to 
support attendance at international conferences.
    Sec. 7052 includes language similar to the prior year 
relating to aircraft transfer and coordination.
    Sec. 7053 includes language carried in the prior year 
relating to unpaid parking fines and real property taxes owed 
by foreign governments.
    Sec. 7054 includes language carried in the prior year 
relating to landmines and cluster munitions.
    Sec. 7055 includes language modified from the prior year 
related to the continuous supervision and general direction of 
economic and military assistance.
    Sec. 7056 is a new provision prohibiting funds to UNFPA and 
prohibiting the award of global health assistance funds to 
foreign nongovernmental organizations that promote or perform 
abortion, with certain exceptions.
    Sec. 7057 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding certain management conditions and authorities of 
USAID.
    Sec. 7058 includes language modified from the prior year 
regarding global health activities, placing a funding 
limitation on international family planning programs, 
conditioning contributions to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, 
Tuberculosis and Malaria, and providing certain authorities.
    Sec. 7059 includes modified language carried from the prior 
year regarding programs that support gender equality by 
deleting subsection (e) on extremism. The Committee directs the 
Ambassador-at-Large for Global Women's Issues, Department of 
State, and the Senior Coordinator for Gender Equality and 
Women's Empowerment, USAID, to jointly submit a report, not 
later than 180 days after enactment of this Act, on the 
allocation of funds for gender-related programs and activities 
for the previous fiscal year.
    The Committee encourages the Secretary of State to ensure 
women's participation is increased in peacekeeping operations 
and other security assistance programs, as appropriate.
    Sec. 7060 includes language modified from the prior year 
regarding assistance for programs related to basic education, 
higher education, conservation, food security and agriculture 
development, microenterprise, programs to combat trafficking in 
persons, and water and sanitation.
    Subsection (b) includes not less than $265,000,000 in title 
III for biodiversity conservation programs, which is the same 
as the fiscal year 2017 enacted level. The Act provides an 
additional $102,375,000 to support biodiversity conservation 
programs of the Global Environment Facility, in lieu of the 
contribution requested under title V. Such funds may only be 
made available on a grant basis and are subject to prior 
consultation with, and the regular notification procedures of, 
the Committees on Appropriations.
    The Committee notes funds from biodiversity programs are 
used to meet the funding directive to combat wildlife poaching 
and trafficking. The Committee supports continued funding to 
implement and enforce the Lacey Act (section 8204 of P.L. 110-
246), $10,500,000 for biodiversity programs in the Brazilian 
Amazon, including efforts that seek to build the capacity of 
Brazil to manage its own protected areas, and $20,000,000 for 
such programs in the Andean Amazon. The Committee also 
encourages programs to support Guatemala's Mayan Biosphere. The 
Committee notes that demand for paper and wood products is 
rapidly increasing and that programs that support responsible 
forest management are needed to assist in protecting vulnerable 
forests, such as high conservation value forests, from illegal 
logging and encroachment.
    The Committee remains concerned about the wildlife poaching 
and trafficking crisis and the continued negative effect it is 
having on international security and stability and the 
implications for endangered species. The Committee notes that 
the illegal trade in wildlife and wildlife products is 
estimated at $8,000,000,000 to $10,000,000,000 annually. The 
Committee recognizes the severity of poaching in Africa, 
particularly with respect to elephant ivory and rhinoceros 
horn, and the destabilizing effect it has on regional security, 
including by providing a significant source of financing for 
armed groups with links to transnational organized crime and 
terrorism.
    The Act provides not less than $90,664,000 in titles III 
and IV be made available to address this urgent crisis, and the 
Committee directs not less than $10,000,000 of such funds for 
programs to combat rhinoceros poaching.
    Funds to address the wildlife poaching and trafficking 
crisis should be used to strengthen law enforcement capacity; 
address poaching at the source; build capacity for site-based 
protection of wildlife; disrupt trafficking routes; enhance 
regional cooperation and anti-trafficking networks; support 
regional wildlife enforcement networks, including not less than 
the fiscal year 2017 enacted level for the Wildlife Enforcement 
Network Southern Africa; improve port and border security at 
key transit points; promote community-based approaches for 
wildlife protection; and support programs to reduce consumer 
demand.
    The Committee encourages continued implementation of the 
National Strategy for Combating Wildlife Trafficking. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of State to update the strategy 
required by the joint explanatory statement of Public Law 113-
76, and expects such strategy to include how funds are being 
used to implement the National Strategy for Combating Wildlife 
Trafficking. The Committee notes such strategy calls for the 
use of innovative and science-based analytical tools to combat 
wildlife poaching and trafficking. The Committee supports 
efforts to engage with the private sector and nongovernmental 
organizations in the development and use of such tools.
    The Committee directs the Department of State and USAID to 
work with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), 
the Department of the Treasury, and the Office of the Director 
of National Intelligence to integrate information and share 
data to support a common platform that will inform strategies 
to combat money laundering and illicit trade.
    The Committee notes the continued need for training and 
equipment of security forces to address poaching and wildlife 
trafficking and expects these requirements to be addressed, 
including through the provision of excess defense articles and 
the expedited procurement of defense articles and services, as 
appropriate.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of State, the USAID 
Administrator, and the Director of USFWS to consult with the 
Committees on Appropriations on the use of funds provided for 
programs to combat wildlife trafficking and directs that the 
CBJ for fiscal year 2019 include country and program funding 
levels for such programs. The Committee also directs USAID and 
the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement 
Affairs to include monitoring and evaluation components in 
wildlife trafficking implementation agreements and include data 
from such monitoring and evaluation efforts in its reports to 
Congress.
    The Committee expects that international conservation 
programs administered by the Department of State and USAID will 
utilize expertise from across the United States Government, 
including in partnership with the USFWS, the United States 
Forest Service, and other agencies, as appropriate, at levels 
consistent with fiscal year 2017. The Committee notes the 
ongoing threats to other endangered species and supports 
continued funding for programs to protect great apes and 
tigers, including for habitat conservation.
    The Committee expects the Secretary of State to work with 
countries rich in biodiversity and wildlife habitats to make a 
sustained commitment of budgetary resources to combat wildlife 
trafficking and promote community conservation.
    The Committee supports continued United States leadership 
of the Congo Basin Forest Partnership and includes $39,400,000 
for the Central Africa Regional Program for the Environment 
(CARPE). The Committee directs that $17,500,000 of the funds 
made available for CARPE be apportioned directly to the USFWS 
to support further development and implementation of a Central 
African regional wildlife law enforcement network and to build 
local capacity for wildlife protection in such region. These 
programs should include the professionalization of park guards 
and other wildlife law enforcement officials and the provision 
of tools and technologies for measuring, evaluating, and 
improving the effectiveness of wildlife law enforcement patrols 
and site-based protection and conservation activities.
    The Committee notes that the success of CARPE depends on 
building the capacity of Central African governments to 
professionally manage and protect their countries' resources. 
MOUs and cooperative agreements should be used to provide a 
roadmap, with benchmarks for measuring progress, to carry out 
environmental impact assessments, social and environmental 
management plans, fisheries management, and training of an 
effective force for wildlife conservation and park management. 
Buy-in by governments, in coordination with other implementing 
partners, is necessary for CARPE to become a comprehensive and 
sustainable program.
    Subsection (f), Programs to Combat Trafficking in Persons, 
includes not less than $65,000,000. Of the amounts provided, 
$40,000,000 is included under International Narcotics Control 
and Law Enforcement. The Committee notes $13,822,000 is 
provided under Diplomatic and Consular Programs for the 
operational costs of the Office to Monitor and Combat 
Trafficking in Persons, which is described further under 
Diplomatic and Consular Programs in this report. The Committee 
continues to support programs to end modern slavery.
    The Committee directs that $5,000,000 be made available for 
child protection compacts. The Committee expects that funds 
will be prioritized for countries with the greatest need and to 
continue to support child protection compacts pursuant to 
Public Law 113-94.
    The Committee urges the USAID Administrator to strengthen 
implementation of the Counter-Trafficking in Persons (C-TIP) 
policy. The Administrator should ensure that USAID personnel 
and implementing partners are appropriately educated and 
trained according to the C-TIP Field Guide. C-TIP activities 
should be integrated into other development programs, project 
design, and methods for program evaluation. The Committee 
believes the Secretary of State and the USAID Administrator 
should ensure that foreign assistance programs relating to 
humanitarian assistance, food security, poverty reduction, 
social and economic growth and development, education, and 
democracy and governance contribute to decreased vulnerability 
to or prevalence of human trafficking and forced labor, 
consistent with United States policy, including with section 
107A(e) of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000.
    Not later than 90 days after enactment of this Act, the 
Secretary of State, in consultation with the USAID 
Administrator, is directed to submit a report to the Committees 
on Appropriations on obligations and expenditures of all fiscal 
year 2017 funds managed by the Department of State and USAID to 
combat human trafficking and forced labor. The report shall 
include funding by program, project, and activity and describe 
the management structure at the Department of State and USAID 
used to program such funds.
    Sec. 7061 is language modified from the prior year 
concerning countries significantly impacted by internally 
displaced persons or refugees.
    Sec. 7062 includes language carried in the prior year 
prohibiting funds to implement the Arms Trade Treaty.
    Sec. 7063 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding timely access by Inspectors General to records, 
documents, or other materials available to a department or 
agency of the United States.
    Sec. 7064 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding the transfer of individuals detained at Guantanamo 
Bay, Cuba.
    Sec. 7065 includes language carried in the prior year on 
multi-year pledges.
    Sec. 7066 includes language modified from the prior year 
prohibiting funds for the use of torture.
    Sec. 7067 includes language carried in the prior year 
prohibiting funds for a country that does not cooperate in the 
extradition to the United States of certain individuals.
    Sec. 7068 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding commercial leasing of defense articles.
    Sec. 7069 includes new rescissions of unobligated balances 
for Development Assistance, the North American Development 
Bank, Export and Import Bank, and the Advanced Technology 
Vehicle Manufacturing Program.
    Sec. 7070 includes language modified from the prior year 
regarding countering Russian influence and aggression. 
Subsection (d)(1) makes funds available for assistance to 
counter Russian influence and aggression in countries in Europe 
and Eurasia, which is allocated according to the following 
table and subject to section 7019 of this Act:

                    COUNTERING RUSSIAN INFLUENCE FUND
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                       Account                          Budget Authority
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Assistance for Europe, Eurasia and Central Asia......            $30,000
International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement..             20,000
International Military Education and Training........              5,000
Foreign Military Financing Program...................             50,000
                                                      ------------------
    Total............................................            105,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Such funds are in addition to amounts made available for 
bilateral assistance for such countries.
    The Committee recommendation deletes a reporting 
requirement carried in the prior year and expects the 
Department of State to continue to include such information in 
the Annual Country Reports on Human Rights.
    Sec. 7071 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding the International Monetary Fund.
    Sec. 7072 includes language carried in the prior year 
designating an amount for the Special Defense Acquisition Fund.
    Sec. 7073 includes language modified from the prior year 
making funds available for activities to counter foreign 
fighters and violent extremist organizations.
    Sec. 7074 includes language carried in the prior year 
establishing restrictions on enterprise funds.
    Sec. 7075 includes language carried in the prior year 
prohibiting funds for programs in contravention of this Act.
    Sec. 7076 includes language modified from the prior year 
requiring operating and spend plans for funds provided in this 
Act.
    The regional security initiatives to be addressed in the 
spend plans required by subsection (b)(1)(B) shall include 
CBSI; CARSI; the Trans-Sahara Counterterrorism Partnership; the 
Partnership for Regional East Africa Counterterrorism; the 
Global Peace Operations Initiative, including Africa 
Contingency Operations Training and Assistance; the Africa 
Conflict Stabilization and Border Security program; the African 
Military Education Program; the Africa Maritime Security 
Initiative; the Africa Regional Counterterrorism fund; the 
Counterterrorism Partnerships Fund; and the Countering Russian 
Influence Fund.
    Sec. 7077 includes language modified from the prior year 
concerning public posting of reports and documents, records 
management, and cybersecurity. The Department of State Office 
of Inspector General reports referenced in subsection 
(c)(3)(C)(v) of this Act shall include ``Office of Security: 
Evaluation of Email Records Management and Cybersecurity 
Requirements'' (ESP-16-03, 5/2016); ``Management of Inactive 
User Accounts Within the Department of State's Active 
Directory'' (AUD-IT-16-37, 6/2016); and ``Compliance Follow-Up 
Review of the Department of State's Implementation of Executive 
Order 13526, Classified National Security Information'' (AUD-
SI-16-43, 9/2016).
    Sec. 7078 includes language modified from the prior year 
regarding Internet freedom programs.
    Sec. 7079 includes language modified from the prior year 
establishing certain limitations on assistance that may impact 
jobs in the United States.
    Sec. 7080 includes new language regarding the Export-Import 
Bank of the United States.

  TITLE VIII--OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS/GLOBAL WAR ON TERRORISM

    Title VIII of the Committee recommendation includes an 
additional $12,019,000,000, which is designated pursuant to 
section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
Deficit Control Act of 1985 for OCO/GWOT. Such funds are 
intended to address the extraordinary costs of diplomatic and 
development operations overseas, including embassy security; 
security assistance, economic stabilization, and peacekeeping 
programs; humanitarian activities; law enforcement and 
antiterrorism efforts; and oversight activities. Funds in this 
title are subject to the operating and spend plan requirements 
of section 7076 of this Act, where applicable.

                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE


                   Administration of Foreign Affairs


                    DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1\.....................    $2,410,386,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................     2,975,971,000
Committee recommendation..............................     2,975,971,000
    Change from enacted level.........................      +565,585,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 
\1\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level excludes funds appropriated by the
  Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of P.L. 114-
  254).

    The Committee recommendation includes an additional 
$2,975,971,000 for Diplomatic and Consular Programs, including 
$2,376,122,000 for WSP. The full amount is designated pursuant 
to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced Budget and 
Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 and will support the 
costs of operations and security in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and 
Iraq.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1\.....................       $54,900,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................        68,100,000
Committee recommendation..............................        68,100,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       +13,200,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 
\1\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level excludes funds appropriated by the
  Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of P.L. 114-
  254).

    The Committee recommendation includes an additional 
$68,100,000 for Office of Inspector General. The full amount is 
designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced 
Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 and will 
support reviews, audits, and investigations by SIGAR.

            EMBASSY SECURITY, CONSTRUCTION, AND MAINTENANCE

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1\.....................    $1,238,800,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................                 0
Committee recommendation..............................        71,778,000
    Change from enacted level.........................    -1,167,022,000
    Change from request...............................       +71,778,000
 
\1\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level excludes funds appropriated by the
  Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of P.L. 114-
  254).

    The Committee recommendation includes an additional 
$71,778,000 for Embassy Security, Construction, and Maintenance 
for Worldwide Security Upgrades. The full amount is designated 
pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced Budget and 
Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                      International Organizations


              CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................       $96,240,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................        96,240,000
Committee recommendation..............................        96,240,000
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation includes an additional 
$96,240,000 for Contributions to International Organizations. 
The full amount is designated pursuant to section 
251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
Control Act of 1985 and will support UN missions in 
Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya, and Somalia.

        CONTRIBUTIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACEKEEPING ACTIVITIES

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................    $1,354,660,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................       927,224,000
Committee recommendation..............................       965,906,000
    Change from enacted level.........................      -388,754,000
    Change from request...............................       +38,682,000
 

    The Committee recommendation includes an additional 
$965,906,000 for Contributions for International Peacekeeping 
Activities. The full amount is designated pursuant to section 
251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
Control Act of 1985 and will support peacekeeping activities in 
Africa and the Near East.

                             RELATED AGENCY


                    Broadcasting Board of Governors


                 INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING OPERATIONS

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................        $4,800,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................                 0
Committee recommendation..............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................        -4,800,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation does not include an additional 
appropriation for International Broadcasting Operations.

           UNITED STATES AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT


                  Funds Appropriated to the President


                           OPERATING EXPENSES

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1\.....................      $152,080,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................       136,555,000
Committee recommendation..............................       136,555,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       -15,525,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 
\1\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level excludes funds appropriated by the
  Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of P.L. 114-
  254).

    The Committee recommendation includes an additional 
$136,555,000 for Operating Expenses. The full amount is 
designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced 
Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 and will 
support USAID operations in Afghanistan.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1\.....................                $0
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................         2,500,000
Committee recommendation..............................         2,500,000
    Change from enacted level.........................        +2,500,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 
\1\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level excludes funds appropriated by the
  Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of P.L. 114-
  254).

    The Committee recommendation includes an additional 
$2,500,000 for Office of Inspector General. The full amount is 
designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced 
Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 and will 
support USAID operations in Afghanistan.

                     BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE


                  Funds Appropriated to the President


                   INTERNATIONAL DISASTER ASSISTANCE

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1\.....................    $3,313,203,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................     1,817,941,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,788,203,000
    Change from enacted level.........................    -1,525,000,000
    Change from request...............................       -29,738,000
 
\1\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level excludes funds appropriated by the
  Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of P.L. 114-
  254).

    The Committee recommendation includes an additional 
$1,788,203,000 for International Disaster Assistance. The full 
amount is designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of 
the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 
and will support the extraordinary costs of the United States 
response to international disasters and crises, including those 
resulting from conflict in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq, and 
Syria.

                         TRANSITION INITIATIVES

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1\.....................       $37,000,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................        62,043,000
Committee recommendation..............................        62,043,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       +25,043,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 
\1\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level excludes funds appropriated by the
  Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of P.L. 114-
  254).

    The Committee recommendation includes an additional 
$62,043,000 for Transition Initiatives. The full amount is 
designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced 
Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 and will 
support conflict countries and countries emerging from 
conflict.

                          COMPLEX CRISES FUND

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................       $20,000,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................                 0
Committee recommendation..............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................       -20,000,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation does not include an 
appropriation for Complex Crises Fund.

                 ECONOMIC SUPPORT AND DEVELOPMENT FUND

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................                $0
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................     2,708,800,000
Committee recommendation..............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0
    Change from request...............................    -2,708,800,000
 

    The Committee recommendation does not include an 
appropriation for Economic Support and Development Fund.

                         ECONOMIC SUPPORT FUND

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1\.....................    $2,609,242,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................                 0
Committee recommendation..............................     2,353,672,000
    Change from enacted level.........................      -255,570,000
    Change from request...............................    +2,353,672,000
 
\1\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level excludes funds appropriated by the
  Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of P.L. 114-
  254).

    The Committee recommendation includes an additional 
$2,353,672,000 for Economic Support Fund. The full amount is 
designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced 
Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 and will 
support the costs of assistance for Afghanistan, Pakistan, and 
Iraq.

            ASSISTANCE FOR EUROPE, EURASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1\.....................      $453,696,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................                 0
Committee recommendation..............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................      -453,696,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 
\1\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level excludes funds appropriated by the
  Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of P.L. 114-
  254).

    The Committee recommendation does not include an additional 
appropriation for Assistance for Europe, Eurasia and Central 
Asia.

                          Department of State


                    MIGRATION AND REFUGEE ASSISTANCE

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1\.....................    $2,146,198,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................     2,030,900,000
Committee recommendation..............................     2,231,198,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       +85,000,000
    Change from request...............................      +200,298,000
 
\1\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level excludes funds appropriated by the
  Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of P.L. 114-
  254).

    The Committee recommendation includes an additional 
$2,231,198,000 for Migration and Refugee Assistance. The full 
amount is designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of 
the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 
and will support the extraordinary cost of overseas assistance 
to respond to refugee crises.

     UNITED STATES EMERGENCY REFUGEE AND MIGRATION ASSISTANCE FUND

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level........................       $40,000,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................                 0
Committee recommendation..............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................       -40,000,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
 

    The Committee recommendation does not include an additional 
appropriation for United States Emergency Refugee and Migration 
Assistance Fund.

                   INTERNATIONAL SECURITY ASSISTANCE


                          Department of State


          INTERNATIONAL NARCOTICS CONTROL AND LAW ENFORCEMENT

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1\.....................      $412,260,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................       196,250,000
Committee recommendation..............................       417,951,000
    Change from enacted level.........................        +5,691,000
    Change from request...............................      +221,701,000
 
\1\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level excludes funds appropriated by the
  Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of P.L. 114-
  254).

    The Committee recommendation includes an additional 
$417,951,000 for International Narcotics Control and Law 
Enforcement. The full amount is designated pursuant to section 
251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
Control Act of 1985 and will support assistance for countries 
in conflict and areas of instability and violence, including 
Afghanistan and Pakistan.

    NONPROLIFERATION, ANTI-TERRORISM, DEMINING AND RELATED PROGRAMS

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1\.....................      $341,754,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................       365,840,000
Committee recommendation..............................       220,583,000
    Change from enacted level.........................      -121,171,000
    Change from request...............................      -145,257,000
 
\1\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level excludes funds appropriated by the
  Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of P.L. 114-
  254).

    The Committee recommendation includes an additional 
$220,583,000 for Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining and 
Related Programs. The full amount is designated pursuant to 
section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
Deficit Control Act of 1985 and will support countries in 
conflict and area of instability and violence.

                        PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1\.....................      $473,973,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................       179,100,000
Committee recommendation..............................       325,213,000
    Change from enacted level.........................      -148,760,000
    Change from request...............................      +146,113,000
 
\1\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level excludes funds appropriated by the
  Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of P.L. 114-
  254).

    The Committee recommendation includes an additional 
$325,213,000 for Peacekeeping Operations. The full amount is 
designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced 
Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 and will 
support peacekeeping activities, including the UN Support 
Office in Somalia.

                  Funds Appropriated to the President


                   FOREIGN MILITARY FINANCING PROGRAM

 
 
 
Fiscal Year 2017 enacted level\1\.....................    $1,325,808,000
Fiscal Year 2018 request..............................       450,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................       460,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................      -865,808,000
    Change from request...............................       +10,000,000
 
\1\The fiscal year 2017 enacted level excludes funds appropriated by the
  Security Assistance Appropriations Act, 2017 (division B of P.L. 114-
  254).

    The Committee recommendation includes an additional 
$460,000,000 for Foreign Military Financing Program. The full 
amount is designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of 
the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 
and will support security assistance in countries in conflict 
and areas of instability and violence, including to counter 
Russian influence and aggression.

                     GENERAL PROVISIONS--TITLE VIII

    Sec. 8001 includes language carried in the prior year 
noting that funds appropriated by this title are in addition to 
amounts appropriated or otherwise made available.
    Sec. 8002 includes language carried in the prior year 
directing that funds appropriated by this title are subject to 
the authorities and conditions applicable to such headings in 
prior titles, unless noted otherwise.
    Sec. 8003 includes modified language making funds available 
for the Counterterrorism Partnerships Fund.
    Sec. 8004 is a new provision that rescinds funds.
    Sec. 8005 includes language providing that each amount 
designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced 
Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 in this title 
shall be available only if the President subsequently so 
designates all such amounts and transmits such designations to 
the Congress.

                 TITLE IX--ADDITIONAL GENERAL PROVISION


                       SPENDING REDUCTION ACCOUNT

    Section 9001 establishes a spending reduction account.

             HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES REPORTING REQUIREMENT

    The following materials are submitted in accordance with 
various requirements of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives:

                          Full Committee Votes



         Statement of General Performance Goals and Objectives

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is a statement of 
general performance goals and objectives for which this measure 
authorizes funding: The Committee on Appropriations considers 
program performance, including a program's success in 
developing and attaining outcome-related goals and objectives, 
in developing funding recommendations.

                              Rescissions

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table is submitted 
describing the rescissions recommended in the accompanying 
bill:

 
 
 
Development Assistance................................       $29,906,927
North American Development Bank.......................        10,000,000
Export-Import Bank....................................       165,000,000
Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan            1,090,000,000
 Program..............................................
Economic Support Fund (OCO/GWOT)......................       156,913,000
 

                           Transfers of Funds

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following list includes the 
transfers of funds included in the accompanying bill:
    In title III, under ``Peace Corps'', language is included 
to transfer funds to the Foreign Currency Fluctuations Account.
    In title VIII, under ``Diplomatic and Consular Programs'', 
language is included to permit the transfer of funds to other 
departments and agencies for Afghanistan.

   Disclosure of Earmarks and Congressionally Directed Spending Items

    Pursuant to clause 9 of rule XXI of the Rules of the House 
of Representatives, neither the bill nor this report contain 
any congressional earmarks, limited tax benefits, or limited 
tariff benefits as defined in clause 9 of rule XXI of the Rules 
of the House of Representatives.

          Compliance With Rule XIII, Cl. 3(e) (Ramseyer Rule)

  In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italics, existing law in which no change 
is proposed is shown in roman):

      FOREIGN OPERATIONS, EXPORT FINANCING, AND RELATED PROGRAMS 
                        APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 1990

TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


       establishing categories of aliens for purposes of refugee 
                             determinations

  Sec. 599D. (a) In General.--In the case of an alien who is 
within a category of aliens established under subsection (b), 
the alien may establish, for purposes of admission as a refugee 
under section 207 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, that 
the alien has a well-founded fear of persecution on account of 
race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social 
group, or political opinion by asserting such a fear and 
asserting a credible basis for concern about the possibility of 
such persecution.
  (b) Establishment of Categories.--
          (1) For purposes of subsection (a), the Attorney 
        General, in consultation with the Secretary of State 
        and the Coordinator for Refugee Affairs, shall 
        establish--
                  (A) one or more categories of aliens who are 
                or were nationals and residents of an 
                independent state of the former Soviet Union or 
                of Estonia, Latvia, or Lithuania and who share 
                common characteristics that identify them as 
                targets of persecution in that state on account 
                of race, religion, nationality, membership in a 
                particular social group, or political opinion,
                  (B) one or more categories of aliens who are 
                or were nationals and residents of Vietnam, 
                Laos, or Cambodia and who share common 
                characteristics that identify them as targets 
                of persecution in such respective foreign state 
                on such an account; and
          (C) one or more categories of aliens who are or were 
        nationals and residents of the Islamic Republic or Iran 
        who, as members of a religious minority in Iran, share 
        common characteristics that identify them as targets of 
        persecution in that state on account of race, religion, 
        nationality, membership in a particular social group, 
        or political opinion.
          (2)(A) Aliens who are (or were) nationals and 
        residents of an independent state of the former Soviet 
        Union or of Estonia, Latvia, or Lithuania and who are 
        Jews or Evangelical Christians shall be deemed a 
        category of alien established under paragraph (1)(A).
          (B) Aliens who are (or were) nationals of an 
        independent state of the former Soviet Union or of 
        Estonia, Latvia, or Lithuania and who are current 
        members of, and demonstrate public, active, and 
        continuous participation (or attempted participation) 
        in the religious activities of, the Ukrainian Catholic 
        Church or the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, shall be 
        deemed a category of alien established under paragraph 
        (1)(A).
          (C) Aliens who are (or were) nationals and residents 
        of Vietnam, Laos, or Cambodia and who are members of 
        categories of individuals determined, by the Attorney 
        General in accordance with ``Immigration and 
        Naturalization Service Worldwide Guidelines for 
        Overseas Refugee Processing'' (issued by the 
        Immigration and Naturalization Service in August 1983) 
        shall be deemed a category of alien established under 
        paragraph (1)(B).
          (3) Within the number of admissions of refugees 
        allocated for each of fiscal years 1990, 1991, and 1992 
        for refugees who are nationals of the Soviet Union 
        under section 207(a)(3) of the Immigration and 
        Nationality Act (and within the number of such 
        admissions allocated for each of fiscal years 1993, 
        1994, 1995, and 1996 for refugees who are nationals of 
        the independent states of the former Soviet Union, 
        Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania under such section) and 
        within the number of such admissions allocated for each 
        of fiscal years 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 
        1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 
        2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 
        [and 2017] 2017, and 2018 for refugees who are 
        nationals of the independent states of the former 
        Soviet Union, Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania under such 
        section, notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
        the President shall allocate one thousand of such 
        admissions for such fiscal year to refugees who are 
        within the category of aliens described in paragraph 
        (2)(B).
  (c) Written Reasons for Denials of Refugee Status.--Each 
decision to deny an application for refugee status of an alien 
who is within a category established under this section shall 
be in writing and shall state, to the maximum extent feasible, 
the reason for the denial.
  (d) Permitting Certain Aliens Within Categories to Reapply 
for Refugee Status.--Each alien who is within a category 
established under this section and who (after August 14, 1988, 
and before the date of the enactment of this Act) was denied 
refugee status shall be permitted to reapply for such status. 
Such an application shall be determined taking into account the 
application of this section.
  (e) Period of Application.--
          (1) Subsections (a) and (b) shall take effect on the 
        date of the enactment of this Act and shall only apply 
        to applications for refugee status submitted before 
        October 1, [2017] 2018.
          (2) Subsection (c) shall apply to decisions made 
        after the date of the enactment of this Act and before 
        October 1, [2017] 2018.
          (3) Subsection (d) shall take effect on the date of 
        the enactment of this Act and shall only apply to 
        reapplications for refugee status submitted before 
        October 1, [2017] 2018.

    adjustment of status for certain soviet and indochinese parolees

  Sec. 599E. (a) In General.--The Attorney General shall adjust 
the status of an alien described in subsection (b) to that of 
an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence if the 
alien--
          (1) applies for such adjustment,
          (2) has been physically present in the United States 
        for at least 1 year and is physically present in the 
        United States on the date the application for such 
        adjustment is filed,
          (3) is admissible to the United States as an 
        immigrant, except as provided in subsection (c), and
          (4) pays a fee (determined by the Attorney General) 
        for the processing of such application.
  (b) Aliens Eligible for Adjustment of Status.--The benefits 
provided in subsection (a) shall only apply to an alien who--
          (1) was a national of an independent state of the 
        former Soviet Union or of Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, 
        Vietnam, Laos, or Cambodia, and
          (2) was inspected and granted parole into the United 
        States during the period beginning on August 15, 1988, 
        and ending on September 30, [2017] 2018, after being 
        denied refugee status.
  (c) Waiver of Certain Grounds for Inadmissibility.--The 
provisions of paragraphs (4), (5), and (7)(A) of section 212(a) 
of the Immigration and Nationality Act shall not apply to 
adjustment of status under this section and the Attorney 
General may waive any other provision of such section (other 
than paragraph (2)(C) or subparagraph (A), (B), (C), or (E) of 
paragraph (3)) with respect to such an adjustment for 
humanitarian purposes, to assure family unity, or when it is 
otherwise in the public interest.
  (d) Date of Approval.--Upon the approval of such an 
application for adjustment of status, the Attorney General 
shall create a record of the alien's admission as a lawful 
permanent resident as of the date of the alien's inspection and 
parole described in subsection (b)(2).
  (e) No Offset in Number of Visas Available.--When an alien is 
granted the status of having been lawfully admitted for 
permanent residence under this section, the Secretary of State 
shall not be required to reduce the number of immigrant visas 
authorized to be issued under the Immigration and Nationality 
Act.
                              ----------                              


DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2005

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                                TITLE X

OTHER MATTERS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


CHAPTER 2--BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                    GENERAL PROVISIONS, THIS CHAPTER

  Sec. 12001. (a)(1) Notwithstanding section 514 of the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2321h), the President may 
transfer to Israel, in exchange for concessions to be 
negotiated by the Secretary of Defense, with the concurrence of 
the Secretary of State, any or all of the items described in 
paragraph (2).
  (2) The items referred to in paragraph (1) are armor, 
artillery, automatic weapons ammunition, missiles, and other 
munitions that--
          (A) are obsolete or surplus items;
          (B) are in the inventory of the Department of 
        Defense;
          (C) are intended for use as reserve stocks for 
        Israel; and
          (D) are located in a stockpile in Israel.
  (b) The value of concessions negotiated pursuant to 
subsection (a) shall be at least equal to the fair market value 
of the items transferred. The concessions may include cash 
compensation, services, waiver of charges otherwise payable by 
the United States, and other items of value.
  (c) Not later than 30 days before making a transfer under the 
authority of this section, the President shall transmit a 
notification of the proposed transfer to the Committees on 
Foreign Relations and Armed Services of the Senate and the 
Committees on International Relations and Armed Services of the 
House of Representatives. The notification shall identify the 
items to be transferred and the concessions to be received.
  (d) No transfer may be made under the authority of this 
section after September 30, [2018] 2019.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


FOREIGN ASSISTANCE ACT OF 1961

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


TITLE XII--FAMINE PREVENTION AND FREEDOM FROM HUNGER

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Chapter 2--Military Assistance

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


  Sec. 514. Stockpiling of Defense Articles for Foreign 
Countries.--(a) No defense article in the inventory of the 
Department of Defense which is set aside, reserved, or in any 
way earmarked or intended for future use by any foreign country 
may be made available to or for use by any foreign country 
unless such transfer is authorized under this Act or the Arms 
Export Control Act, or any subsequent corresponding 
legislation, and the value of such transfer is charged against 
funds authorized under such legislation or against the 
limitations specified in such legislation, as appropriate, for 
the fiscal period in which such defense article is transferred. 
For purposes of this subsection, ``value'' means the 
acquisition cost plus crating, packing, handling, and 
transportation costs incurred in carrying out this section.
  (b)(1) The value of defense articles to be set aside, 
earmarked, reserved, or intended for use as war reserve stocks 
for allied or other foreign countries (other than for purposes 
of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization or in the 
implementation of agreements with Israel) in stockpiles located 
in foreign countries may not exceed in any fiscal year an 
amount that is specified in security assistance authorizing 
legislation for that fiscal year.
  (2)(A) The value of such additions to stockpiles of defense 
articles in foreign countries shall not exceed $200,000,000 for 
each of fiscal years 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, [and 2018] 
2018, and 2019.
  (B) Of the amount specified in subparagraph (A) for a fiscal 
year, not more than $200,000,000 may be made available for 
stockpiles in the State of Israel.
  (c) Location of Stockpiles of Defense Articles.--
          (1) Limitation.--Except as provided in paragraph (2), 
        no stockpile of defense articles may be located outside 
        the boundaries of a United States military base or a 
        military base used primarily by the United States.
          (2) Exceptions.--Paragraph (1) shall not apply with 
        respect to stockpiles of defense articles located in 
        the Republic of Korea, Thailand, any country that is a 
        member of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, any 
        country that is a major non-NATO ally, or any other 
        country the President may designate. At least 15 days 
        before designating a country pursuant to the last 
        clause of the preceding sentence, the President shall 
        notify the congressional committees specified in 
        section 634A(a) in accordance with the procedures 
        applicable to reprogramming notifications under that 
        section.
  (d) No defense article transferred from any stockpile which 
is made available to or for use by any foreign country may be 
considered an excess defense article for the purpose of 
determining the value thereof.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


                           PUBLIC LAW 106-46

SECTION 1. CLARIFICATION OF QUORUM REQUIREMENT FOR THE EXPORT-IMPORT 
                    BANK OF THE UNITED STATES.

  (a) In General.--Section 3(c)(6) of the Export-Import Bank 
Act of 1945 (12 U.S.C. 635a(c)(6)) is amended to read as 
follows:
  ``(6) A quorum of the Board of Directors shall consist of at 
least three members.''.
  (b) Exception.--Notwithstanding section 3(c)(6) of the 
Export-Import Bank Act of 1945, if, during the period that 
begins on [July 21, 1999, and ends on December 2, 1999] October 
1, 2017, and ends on September 30, 2019, there are fewer than 
three persons holding office on the Board of Directors of the 
Export-Import Bank of the United States, the entire membership 
of such Board of Directors shall constitute a quorum until the 
end of such period.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


               Changes in the Application of Existing Law

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1)(A) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the following statements are 
submitted describing the effect of provisions in the 
accompanying bill that directly or indirectly change the 
application of existing law.
    Language is included in various parts of the bill to 
continue ongoing activities in fiscal year 2018 that require 
annual authorization or additional legislation, which to date 
has not been enacted. The bill includes provisions that place 
limitations on the use of funds in the bill or change existing 
limitations and that might under some circumstances be 
construed as changing the application of existing law. The bill 
includes a number of provisions that have been virtually 
unchanged for many years, which are technically considered 
legislation. The bill provides that several of the 
appropriations shall remain available for obligation beyond the 
current fiscal year. In all cases it is deemed desirable to 
carry such language in order to provide for orderly 
administration of such programs and effective use of funds. In 
various places in the bill, the Committee recommendation 
continues the prior year practice of designating amounts within 
appropriation accounts in order to fund specific programs and 
has adjusted some designations.
    The bill contains general provisions and other language 
that has been carried in the bill in past years that include 
limitations and conditions on funding provided in the Act.
    Additional changes in the fiscal year 2018 bill, which may 
be construed as changing existing law, are as follows:
Title I
    Under ``Diplomatic and Consular Programs'', language 
similar to the prior year providing transfer authority to other 
accounts within ``Administration of Foreign Affairs'', 
limitations on certain programs, offices, and activities.
    Under ``Diplomatic and Consular Programs'', language 
carried in the prior year designating the availability and use 
of certain fees and transfers from other agencies, and 
conditioning the obligation of certain funds made available for 
security training.
    Under ``Office of Inspector General'', language carried in 
the prior year notwithstanding section 209(a)(1) of the Foreign 
Service Act of 1980 as it relates to post inspections.
    Under ``Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs'', 
language modified from the prior year on the use of certain 
fees, and a notification requirement.
    Under ``Embassy Security, Construction, and Maintenance'', 
language carried in the prior year placing limitations on the 
uses of funds, restricting representation expenses, and 
requiring submission of an operating plan.
    Under ``Emergencies in the Diplomatic and Consular 
Service'', language carried in the prior year permitting the 
transfer of not to exceed $1,000,000 to the ``Repatriation 
Loans Program Account''.
    Under ``Contributions to International Organizations'', 
language similar to the prior year limiting the use of funds, 
and establishing a number of notification and reporting 
requirements.
    Under ``Contributions for International Peacekeeping 
Activities'', language similar to the prior year limiting the 
use of funds and establishing a number of notification and 
reporting requirements.
    Under ``International Boundary and Water Commission, United 
States and Mexico'' and ``American Sections, International 
Commissions'', language carried in the prior year limiting 
representation expenses.
    Under ``American Sections, International Commissions'', 
language carried in the prior year limiting representation 
expenses.
    Under ``International Fisheries Commissions'', language 
carried in the prior year providing authority to pay United 
States expenses in advance, pursuant to 31 U.S.C. 3324.
    Under ``International Broadcasting Operations'', language 
carried in the prior year setting limitations on funds 
available for certain expenses and receipts, requiring the 
Broadcasting Board of Governors make funds available to expand 
unrestricted access to information on the Internet, extending 
certain personnel authorities, requiring a notification of 
certain programs, restricting representation expenses, and 
requiring notifications.
    Under ``Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Program'', language 
carried in the prior year limiting the use of funds relating to 
compensation.
    Under ``Commission for the Preservation of America's 
Heritage Abroad'', language carried in the prior year allowing 
the Commission to procure certain services notwithstanding 
paragraph (3) of section 312304(b) of Public Law 113-287 during 
fiscal year 2018 and requiring notification.
    Under ``United States-China Economic and Security Review 
Commission'', language carried in the prior year incorporating 
by reference several provisos relating to personnel and 
financial management authorities that were carried in in the 
Department of State, Foreign Operations, and Related 
Appropriations Act, 2010.
Title II
    Under ``Operating Expenses, United States Agency for 
International Development'', language carried in the prior year 
limiting financing construction or entering into leases, 
allowing transfers of funds, and limiting and restricting 
representation and entertainment expenses.
    Under ``Capital Investment Fund'', language carried in the 
prior year requiring notifications.

Title III

    Under ``Global Health Programs'', language carried in the 
prior year placing restrictions and requirements related to 
family planning and abortion, requiring direct apportionment to 
agencies, designating the use of funds, requiring 
notifications, and setting a cap on administrative expenses.
    Under ``Transition Initiatives'', language carried in the 
prior year designating the use of funds, requiring a report 
prior to the initiation of a country program, and allowing the 
use of additional funds in the Act for the same purposes as 
funds under this heading following consultation.
    Under ``Development Credit Authority'', language carried in 
the prior year authorizing transfers, setting funding and 
financing limitations, and requiring notification.
    Under ``Assistance for Europe, Eurasia and Central Asia'', 
language carried in the prior year providing notwithstanding 
authority, designating responsibilities for the administration 
of assistance, and designating certain funds for purposes of 
administrative authorities.
    Under ``Migration and Refugee Assistance'', language 
carried in the prior year designating amounts for small-scale 
emergency humanitarian requirements and for refugees resettling 
in Israel.
    Under ``Peace Corps'', language carried in the prior year 
limiting representation expenses, requiring prior 
consultations, allowing the Director to transfer funds to help 
mitigate exchange rate losses, and placing limitations on 
certain activities.
    Under ``Millennium Challenge Corporation'', language 
modified from the prior year placing a cap on administrative 
expenses, establishing certain funding conditions and 
notification requirements, and limiting and restricting 
entertainment and representation expenses.
    Under ``Inter-American Foundation'', language carried in 
the prior year limiting representation expenses.
    Under ``United States African Development Foundation'', 
language carried in the prior year allowing for the investment 
of project funding by grantees, limiting the use of interest 
earned, waiving certain limitations due to currency 
fluctuations subject to notification, and allowing certain 
building leases in Africa.
    Under ``International Affairs Technical Assistance'', 
language carried in the prior year providing funds 
notwithstanding any other provision of law.

Title IV

    Under ``International Narcotics Control and Law 
Enforcement'', language modified from the prior year giving the 
Department of State the authority to provide excess property to 
a foreign country, waiving a section of the Foreign Assistance 
Act subject to notification, requiring notification for certain 
transfers, and permitting funds for certain purposes.
    Under ``Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining and 
Related Programs'', language similar to the prior year 
designating the use of funds, providing authorities for funds, 
and establishing certain funding conditions and notification 
requirements.
    Under ``Peacekeeping Operations'', language carried in the 
prior year designating the use of funds, providing certain 
authorities, establishing prohibitions for the use of funds, 
and requiring notifications.
    Under ``International Military Education and Training'', 
language modified in the prior year allowing certain civilian 
personnel to receive training and limiting entertainment 
expenses.
    Under ``Foreign Military Financing Program'', language 
similar to the prior year requiring consultations and 
notifications, designating the use of funds, establishing 
requirements for the disbursement and transfer of certain 
funds, establishing limitations and conditions on funds, and 
establishing prohibitions for the use of funds, and limiting 
representation and entertainment expenses.

Title VI

    Under ``Export-Import Bank of the United States, Program 
Account'', language carried in the prior year allowing for 
certain expenditures and setting limitations on funds.
    Under ``Export-Import Bank of the United States, 
Administrative Expenses'', language carried in the prior year 
limiting representation expenses, allowing for the collection 
of certain fees, and requiring notifications.
    Under ``Export-Import Bank of the United States, Receipts 
Collected'', language carried in the prior year requiring 
sufficient fees to cover costs.
    Under ``Overseas Private Investment Corporation, Noncredit 
Account'', language carried in the prior year limiting 
representation expenses, and providing that certain costs shall 
not be considered administrative costs.
    Under ``Overseas Private Investment Corporation, Program 
Account'', language carried in the prior year designating 
transfer authority from ``Noncredit Account'', providing 
program authority in Iraq, requiring certain notifications, and 
designating funds for administrative expenses.
    Under ``Trade and Development Agency'', language carried in 
the prior year restricting representation and entertainment 
allowances and designating the use of funds.

Title VII

    Sec. 7001 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding allowances and differentials.
    Sec. 7002 includes language carried in the prior year 
requiring agencies to provide quarterly reports on the 
cumulative balances of any unobligated funds.
    Sec. 7003 includes language carried in the prior rear 
requiring that consulting service contracts shall be a matter 
of public record.
    Sec. 7004 includes language modified from the prior year 
with respect to the construction and use of diplomatic 
facilities, setting limitations and expanding notification and 
oversight requirements, and placing conditions and restrictions 
on certain funds.
    Sec. 7005 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding certain personnel actions and the authority to 
transfer funds between appropriations accounts.
    Sec. 7006 includes language modified from the prior year on 
Department of State management.
    Sec. 7007 includes language carried in the prior year 
prohibiting assistance for the governments of Cuba, North 
Korea, Iran, and Syria.
    Sec. 7008 includes language carried in the prior year 
prohibiting assistance for countries whose duly elected head of 
government is deposed by military coup or decree, or a coup or 
decree in which the military plays a decisive role, requires a 
determination, and provides a waiver under certain conditions.
    Sec. 7009 includes language carried in the prior year 
setting limitations and conditions on transfers between 
appropriations accounts, requiring audits of certain transfers, 
and reporting requirements on transfers for the Department of 
State and USAID.
    Sec. 7010 includes language carried in the prior year 
prohibiting first-class travel, and setting certain limitations 
on computer networks, and the promotion of tobacco products.
    Sec. 7011 includes language modified from the prior year 
regarding the availability of funds made available in the Act 
and new language placing a limitation on the authority until 
the Secretary of State submits the reports required under this 
section for the last two fiscal years.
    Sec. 7012 includes language carried in the prior year 
prohibiting assistance for countries in default and allowing 
exceptions in certain circumstances.
    Sec. 7013 includes language carried in the prior year 
withholding assistance to a country where such assistance is 
subject to taxation, unless the Secretary of State makes 
certain determinations, and updating a reporting requirement.
    Sec. 7014 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding the reservation of funds and the designation of 
certain funding levels.
    Sec. 7015 includes language modified from the prior year 
establishing the notification requirements regarding funds made 
available in the Act.
    Sec. 7016 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding the notification requirements concerning the 
provision of excess Department of Defense articles.
    Sec. 7017 includes language similar to the prior year 
regarding the availability of funds for international 
organizations and programs.
    Sec. 7018 includes language carried in the prior year 
prohibiting funding for abortions and involuntary 
sterilization.
    Sec. 7019 includes language similar to the prior year 
regarding funding directives specified in tables in the report 
accompanying the Act.
    Sec. 7020 includes language carried in the prior year 
prohibiting the use of assistance for certain representation 
expenses.
    Sec. 7021 includes language carried in the prior year 
prohibiting assistance for governments that support 
international terrorism.
    Sec. 7022 includes language similar to the prior year 
regarding authorization requirements.
    Sec. 7023 includes language carried in the prior year 
defining the terms ``program, project, and activity''.
    Sec. 7024 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding certain authorities for the Peace Corps, Inter-
American Foundation, and the United States African Development 
Foundation.
    Sec. 7025 includes limitation language carried in the prior 
year relating to commerce, trade, and surplus commodities.
    Sec. 7026 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding the requirement that separate accounts be established 
for cash transfers and assistance that generates local 
currencies and establishing certain conditions on the use of 
those funds.
    Sec. 7027 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding assistance through nongovernmental organizations and 
assistance provided under the Food for Peace Act.
    Sec. 7028 includes language modified from the prior year 
conditioning funds provided to local organizations through 
limited competitions.
    Sec. 7029 includes language modified from the prior year 
establishing certain conditions on funds appropriated to 
international financial institutions.
    Sec. 7030 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding debt-for-development programs.
    Sec. 7031 includes language modified from the prior year 
regarding management of direct assistance to governments, 
budget transparency of recipient countries, corruption and 
human rights violations, and the foreign assistance Web site.
    Sec. 7032 contains language modified from the prior year 
regarding democracy programs funded in this Act.
    Sec. 7033 includes language modified from the prior year on 
assistance regarding international religious freedom.
    Sec. 7034 includes language modified from the prior year 
granting certain special authorities and limitations relating 
to funds made available in the Act.
    Sec. 7035 continues language carried in the prior year 
related to the Arab League Boycott of Israel.
    Sec. 7036 includes language carried in the prior year 
establishing limitations on the use of funds in support of a 
Palestinian state.
    Sec. 7037 includes language carried in the prior year 
establishing restrictions on the use of funds for the purpose 
of conducting official United States Government business with 
the Palestinian Authority.
    Sec. 7039 includes language carried in the prior year 
placing conditions on assistance for the West Bank and Gaza.
    Sec. 7040 includes language modified from the prior year 
placing limitations on any assistance for the Palestinian 
Authority and regarding Hamas.
    Sec. 7041 includes language modified from the prior year 
regarding countries in the Middle East and North Africa.
    Sec. 7042 includes modified language from the prior year 
regarding assistance for Africa.
    Sec. 7043 includes language modified from the prior year 
regarding assistance for East Asia and the Pacific.
    Sec. 7044 includes language modified from the prior year 
regarding assistance for South and Central Asia.
    Sec. 7045 includes language modified from the prior year 
regarding assistance for Latin America and the Caribbean.
    Sec. 7046 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding assistance for Ukraine and other Independent States 
of the former Soviet Union.
    Sec. 7047 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding authority for the President to drawdown certain funds 
to support UN war crimes tribunals or commissions.
    Sec. 7048 includes language modified from the prior year 
relating to conditions on the funds for the UN and other 
international organizations.
    Sec. 7049 includes language carried in the prior year 
related to assistance made available for community-based 
policing programs.
    Sec. 7050 includes language carried in the prior year 
limiting funding for publicity or propaganda purposes within 
the United States.
    Sec. 7051 includes language carried in the prior year 
limiting funds available under the Act from being used to 
support attendance at international conferences.
    Sec. 7052 includes language similar to the prior year 
relating to aircraft transfer and coordination.
    Sec. 7053 includes language carried in the prior year 
relating to unpaid parking fines and real property taxes owed 
by foreign countries.
    Sec. 7054 includes language carried in the prior year 
relating to land mines and cluster munitions.
    Sec. 7055 includes language modified from the prior year 
related to the continuous supervision and general direction of 
economic and military assistance.
    Sec. 7056 includes new language prohibiting funds to UNFPA 
and prohibiting funds for global health assistance to foreign 
nongovernmental organizations that promote or perform abortion.
    Sec. 7057 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding certain management conditions and authorities of 
USAID.
    Sec. 7058 includes language modified from the prior year 
regarding global health activities, placing a funding 
limitation on international family planning programs, and 
conditioning contributions to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, 
Tuberculosis and Malaria, and conferring certain authorities.
    Sec. 7059 includes language modified from the prior year 
regarding programs that support gender equality.
    Sec. 7060 includes language modified from the prior year 
regarding assistance for programs related to basic education, 
higher education, conservation, food security and agriculture 
development, microenterprise, trafficking in persons, and water 
and sanitation.
    Sec. 7061 includes language modified from the prior year 
regarding assistance to countries impacted by significant 
refugee populations or internally displaced persons.
    Sec. 7063 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding timely access by Inspectors General to records, 
documents, or other materials available to a department or 
agency of the United States.
    Sec. 7064 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding the transfer of individuals detained at Guantanamo 
Bay, Cuba.
    Sec. 7065 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding multi-year pledges.
    Sec. 7066 includes language modified from the prior year 
prohibiting funds for the use of torture.
    Sec. 7067 includes language similar to the prior year 
prohibiting funds for a country that does not cooperate in the 
extradition to the United States of certain individuals.
    Sec. 7068 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding commercial leasing of defense articles.
    Sec. 7069 includes new rescissions.
    Sec. 7070 includes language modified from the prior year 
regarding countering Russian influence and aggression.
    Sec. 7071 includes language carried in the prior year 
regarding lending by the International Monetary Fund.
    Sec. 7073 includes language modified from the prior year 
making funds available to counter foreign fighters and violent 
extremist organizations.
    Sec. 7074 includes language carried in the prior year 
establishing restrictions on enterprise funds.
    Sec. 7075 includes language carried in the prior year 
prohibiting funds for programs in contravention of this Act.
    Sec. 7076 includes language modified from the prior year 
requiring spending and operating plans for funds provided in 
this Act.
    Sec. 7077 includes language modified from the prior year 
regarding public posting of reports and documents, records 
management, and cybersecurity.
    Sec. 7078 includes language modified from the prior year 
regarding Internet freedom programs.
    Sec. 7079 includes language modified from the prior year 
establishing certain limitations impacting jobs in the United 
States.
    Sec. 7080 includes new language regarding the Export-Import 
Bank of the United States.

Title VIII

    Under ``Diplomatic and Consular Programs'', language 
carried in the prior year allowing the transfer of funds to 
other federal departments and agencies, designating funds, and 
requiring notification of any such transfers.
    Under ``Office of Inspector General'', language similar to 
the prior year designating an amount for the Special Inspector 
General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, limiting printing and 
reproduction costs, and providing certain personnel 
authorities.
    Under ``Peacekeeping Operations'', language carried in the 
prior year providing authority for the use of such funds to pay 
assessed expenses.
    Sec. 8002 includes language carried in the prior year 
stating that funds appropriated in title VIII shall be 
available under the authorities and conditions applicable to 
such appropriations accounts, unless noted otherwise.
    Sec. 8003 includes language modified from the prior year 
making funds available for the Counterterrorism Partnerships 
Fund.

                  Appropriations Not Authorized By Law

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1)(B) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the following table lists the 
appropriations in the accompanying bill which are not 
authorized by law for the period concerned:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                           Appropriations in
         Agency/Activity               Last Year         Authorization       Last Year of     Appropriations  in
                                      Authorized             Level           Authorization         the Bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of State/              2003..............  $5,290,390,000....  $5,874,914,000....  $11,565,978,000
 Administration of Foreign
 Affairs.
Department of State/              2003..............  $1,529,702,000....  $1,672,000,000....  $2,666,700,000
 International Organizations.
Department of State/              2003..............  $71,385,000.......  $57,730,000.......  $119,008,000
 International Commissions.
Broadcasting Board of Governors.  2003..............  $644,486,000......  $599,560,000......  $769,727,000
Department of State/Related       2003..............  $72,000,000.......  $69,986,000.......  $186,173,000
 Programs.
United States Institute of Peace  2014..............  Such sums as may    $37,000,000.......  $35,300,000
                                                       be necessary.
Operating Expenses of the United  1987..............  $387,000,000......  $340,600,000......  $1,270,461,000
 States Agency for International
 Development.
Capital Investment Fund.........  None..............  NA................  NA................  $174,985,000
Operating Expenses of the United  1987..............  $21,750,000.......  $21,000,000.......  $71,500,000
 States Agency for International
 Development--Inspector General.
Global Health Programs (see note  Population (1987);  Population          Population          $2,321,000,000
 below).                          Health and Disease   ($290,000,000);.    ($234,625,000);.   (includes
                                   Prevention         Health and Disease  Health and Disease   $461,000,000 for
                                   (1987); Child       Prevention          Prevention          Population)
                                   Survival Fund       ($180,000,000);     ($166,762,000);
                                   (1987).             Child Survival      Child Survival
                                                       Fund                Fund (75,000,000).
                                                       ($75,000,000).
Global Health Programs: HIV/AIDS  2013..............  $48,000,000,000     $5,720,499,000....  $6,000,000,000
                                                       over 5 years.
Development Assistance (see note  Agriculture;        Agriculture         Agriculture         $2,780,971,000
 below).                           (1987) Education    ($760,000,000);     ($693,613,000);     (programs
                                   (1987); Energy      Education           Education           difficult to
                                   and selected        ($180,000,000);     ($155,000,000);     determine due to
                                   development         Energy and          Energy and          changing
                                   activities (1987).  selected            selected            definitions of
                                                       development         development         programs since
                                                       activities          activities          last authorized)
                                                       ($207,000,000).     ($149,990,000).
Transition Initiatives..........  None (same          NA................  NA................  $92,043,000
                                   authorities as
                                   International
                                   Disaster
                                   Assistance).
Development Credit Authority....  None..............  NA................  NA................  (by transfer)
                                                                                               $50,000,000
Development Credit Authority--    None..............  NA................  NA................  $9,120,000
 administrative expenses.
Economic Support Fund...........  1987..............  $3,800,000,000....  $3,555,000,000....  $3,395,433,000
Democracy Fund..................  None..............  NA................  NA................  $210,500,000
Assistance for Europe, Eurasia    1993..............  $410,000,000......  N/A...............  691,571,000
 and Central Asia.
Migration and Refugee Assistance  2003..............  $820,000,000......  $781,884,000......  $3,109,000,000
Peace Corps.....................  2003..............  $365,000,000......  $295,069,000......  $398,221,000
Millennium Challenge Corporation  2005..............  Such sums as may    $1,488,000,000....  $800,000,000
                                                       be necessary.
Inter-American Foundation.......  1993..............  $31,000,000.......  $30,960,000.......  $11,250,000
United States African             1987..............  $3,872,000........  $6,500,000........  $15,000,000
 Development Foundation.
Department of the Treasury,       1999..............  $5,000,000........  $1,500,000........  $25,455,000
 International Affairs Technical
 Assistance.
International Narcotics Control   1994..............  $171,500,000......  $100,000,000......  $1,266,090,000
 and Law Enforcement.
Nonproliferation, Anti-           2003..............  $226,200,000......  NA................  $838,456,000
 terrorism, Demining and Related
 Programs (see note below).
Peacekeeping Operations.........  1999..............  $83,000,000.......  $76,500,000.......  $460,254,000
International Military Education  2003..............  $85,000,000.......  $79,480,000.......  $105,160,000
 and Training.
Foreign Military Financing......  2003..............  $4,107,000,000....  $6,104,632,000....  $6,085,863,000
International Development         2015..............  $3,871,800,000....  $1,287,800,000....  $658,661,000
 Association.
Asian Development Fund..........  2015..............  $359,600,000......  $104,977,000......  $47,395,000
African Development Fund........  2015..............  $585,000,000......  $32,418,000.......  $109,387,000
Overseas Private Investment       2016..............  Such sums as may    $70,000,000.......  $60,800,000
 Corporation Administrative                            be necessary.
 Expenses.
Overseas Private Investment       2016..............  Such sums as may    $20,000,000.......  $10,000,000
 Corporation Program Account.                          be necessary.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note: Amounts for Administration of Foreign Affairs, International Organizations, Operating Expenses, Transition
  Initiatives, Economic Support Fund, Migration and Refugee Assistance, Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism,
  Demining and Related Programs, and Foreign Military Financing Program include funds appropriated in title VIII
  of the bill and designated for OCO/GWOT pursuant to the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of
  1985.
Note: Programs recommended herein under ``Global Health Programs'' were last authorized under a different
  account structure than that recommended in this bill; the account structure included a number of functional
  accounts, as described above.
Note: Funds for the United States Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance Program (ERMA) are authorized in
  such amounts as may be necessary; however, appropriations which would result in a balance in the fund of more
  than $100,000,000 are prohibited (22 U.S.C. 2601(c)) absent a waiver of this provision of law.
Note: Programs recommended herein under ``Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining and Related Programs''
  include some major programs for which authorizations of appropriations were provided for fiscal year 2002;
  these programs include $73,000,000 authorized for antiterrorism assistance and $142,000,000 authorized for
  nonproliferation activities. In addition, some programs now in this account were previously in accounts which
  had authorizations of appropriations in prior years.

                 Comparison With the Budget Resolution

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives and section 308(a)(1)(A) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the following table compares 
the levels of new budget authority provided in the bill with 
the appropriate allocation under section 302(b) of the Budget 
Act.

                        [In millions of dollars]


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                         Budget Authority                     Outlays
                                                 ---------------------------------------------------------------
                                                     Committee                       Committee
                                                    Allocation    Amount in Bill    Allocation    Amount in Bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
General Purpose.................................          35,345          35,345          42,984       \1\45,209
Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on             12,019          12,019           7,071        \1\4,725
 Terrorism......................................
Mandatory.......................................             159             159             159            159
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

                      Five Year Outlay Projections

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII and section 
308(a)(1)(B) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the 
following table contains five-year projections associated with 
the budget authority provided in the accompanying bill as 
provided to the Committee by the Congressional Budget Office.

                        [In millions of dollars]


 
 
 
2018..................................................         \1\18,290
2019..................................................            12,150
2020..................................................             8,150
2021..................................................             4,773
2022 and future years.................................             4,788
 
\1\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

               Assistance to State and Local Governments

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII and section 
308(a)(1)(C) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the 
Congressional Budget Office has provided the following 
estimates of new budget authority and outlays provided by the 
accompanying bill for financial assistance to State and local 
governments.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                              Budget
                                             authority        Outlays
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Financial assistance to State and local                0            \1\0
 governments............................
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

                          Program Duplication

    No provision of this bill establishes or reauthorizes a 
program of the Federal Government known to be duplicative of 
another Federal program, a program that was included in any 
report from the Government Accountability Office to Congress 
pursuant to section 21 of Public Law 111-139, or a program 
related to a program identified in the most recent Catalog of 
Federal Domestic Assistance.

                          Directed Rulemaking

    The bill does not direct any rule making.

      Comparative Statement of New Budget (Obligational) Authority

    The following table provides a detailed summary, for each 
department and agency, comparing the amounts recommended in the 
bill with fiscal year 2017 enacted amounts and budget estimates 
presented for fiscal year 2018:



                             MINORITY VIEWS

    The Department of State, Foreign Operations, and Related 
Programs appropriations bill supports the diplomatic and 
development efforts critical to maintaining U.S. global 
leadership and protecting our country's national security. 
Investments in this bill provide the State Department, U.S. 
Agency for International Development (USAID), and other 
agencies the resources to help reduce global poverty, 
strengthen democratic political systems, and create greater 
political and economic stability.
    Disease, disaster, terrorism and economic strife around the 
world threaten the security, safety, and well-being of 
Americans at home and abroad. A strong and capable State 
Department and USAID with well-staffed embassies and missions 
effectively represent our interests in this interconnected 
world; oversee assistance programs; and build bridges with host 
governments, civil societies, and the private sector that are 
vital to our national security and economic interests. The 
investments in this bill are often the best means to ensure our 
nation does not have to pursue military solutions that are 
costlier in both lives and treasure.
    This is why the cuts sustained in the bill must be restored 
through bipartisan negotiations to raise the caps under the 
Budget Control Act for Defense and Non-Defense bills. Our 
commitment to our men and women in uniform, senior citizens, 
working mothers, and citizens overseas cannot be met under the 
current budget caps.
    As the fiscal year 2018 appropriations process developed, 
the Committee Democrats were united in opposition to 
considering bills without complete 302b allocations, which 
failed to provide the American people with a full budget 
blueprint for federal spending. Committee Democrats can only 
assume this piecemeal approach was designed to hide excessive 
cuts and the failure to adopt a budget in the House, leaving 
the Appropriations Committee to consider bills without knowing 
the topline level. Marking up appropriations bills without any 
sense of the whole was irresponsible and counterproductive, and 
it had dire consequences for the State and Foreign Operations 
bill.
    During his confirmation hearing, Secretary of State Rex 
Tillerson stated, ``Quite simply, we are the only global 
superpower with the means and the moral compass capable of 
shaping the world for good. If we do not lead, we risk plunging 
the world deeper into confusion and danger.''
    Most of my colleagues and I share this belief, which is why 
I am so troubled both by the fiscal year 2018 request put 
forward by the President as well as the allocation provided for 
this bill. The allocation provides $35,345,000,000 in core 
funding and $12,019,000,000 in Overseas Contingency Operations 
(OCO) funding, totaling $47,364,000,000. While this is 
$7,266,000,000 higher than the President's request, it is 
$10,007,000,000, or more than 17%, below the fiscal year 2017 
enacted level.
    Not only is the allocation for State and Foreign Operations 
the largest proportional cut to any of the twelve House 
appropriations bills, it is also insufficient to respond to the 
global challenges threatening the interests of U.S. citizens 
and meet the global commitments of the United States. With mass 
migration in the Middle East and North Africa; proliferation on 
the Korean Peninsula; famine threatening a historical number of 
countries; and increasing Russian aggression, U.S. global 
engagement is essential.
    Despite the disappointing process and resulting allocation, 
Chairman Rogers made an effort to meet several Democratic 
priorities. The bill sustains unwavering, bipartisan support 
for our close allies, Israel and Jordan. I appreciate the 
Chairman's work to preserve funding for basic education, water 
and sanitation, democracy and governance, and women's 
empowerment. These efforts provide communities the foundations 
for inclusive economic growth and poverty reduction.
    While the bill rejects many of President Trump's most 
extreme and destabilizing proposals, the recommended cuts would 
make regions less stable and diminish our global leadership by 
severely reducing or eliminating funding for programs such as 
international family planning, multilateral cooperation, and 
climate change.
    Additionally, the bill expands the Global Gag Rule to all 
global health programs and prohibits U.S. contributions to the 
United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). Expanding the Global 
Gag Rule when the impact is unknown would be dangerous and 
jeopardize lives. Coupled with a prohibition on UNFPA, one of 
our best partners in global women's health, the bill would 
leave more people without access to health services and make 
U.S. assistance less effective. I offered an amendment to 
strike the expansion of this ill-advised policy and the 
prohibition on UNFPA and was disappointed it failed on a 
largely party line vote of 23-29. Representative Barbara Lee 
offered an amendment to undo the ban on funding to UNFPA and 
strike the cap of $461,000,000 on bilateral family planning 
funds, which was rejected on a similar party line vote.
    Another casualty of the inadequate allocation is the 
reneging on our commitments to multilateral institutions, such 
as the United Nations (UN) and the multilateral development 
banks. Decreases in assistance to multilaterals, including an 
18.4% cut to our UN contributions and failure to meet our 
obligations for assessed peacekeeping bills, sends a signal to 
the rest of the world that the U.S. no longer keeps its 
promises to allies and partners. The bill disproportionately 
cuts the International Development Association and the African 
Development Fund, two institutions that help lift the poorest 
countries out of poverty and become self-sustaining. 
Additionally, this bill ends all funding to the International 
Organizations and Programs account, terminating U.S. support 
for critical international partners, such as UNDP and UN Women. 
Representative Barbara Lee's amendment to restore this account 
was defeated in a 22-30 vote.
    The excessive cuts and distribution of resources in this 
bill are not the approach we should take. Faced with an 
inadequate allocation, the U.S. should prioritize areas in 
which we can get the most from each dollar. Partnerships with 
multilateral institutions stretch our resources farther toward 
meeting shared goals.
    Businesses recognize the role multilateral cooperation and 
investment play in advancing our domestic economy. According to 
the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, international trade accounts for 
half of all U.S. manufacturing jobs, and 300,000 of our small 
and medium businesses export internationally. Multilateral 
engagement assists in the development of markets for U.S. goods 
and services and incentivizes increased transparency, good 
governance, and an improved investment climate.
    Nowhere is multilateral partnership more important than 
with the environment. Regrettably, the bill prohibits U.S. 
contributions to the Green Climate Fund and discontinues a 
contribution to the Global Environment Facility that 
traditionally has bipartisan support. Through these 
prohibitions, the United States retreats from our historic 
leadership on climate change, a global threat that must be 
faced urgently and can only be tackled through international 
cooperation.
    While the hope may be that other nations will fill the gaps 
created by these cuts, we risk the void being filled by those 
who oppose our values and interests. Democratic members offered 
amendments by Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz on the 
Global Environment Facility and Representative Dutch 
Ruppersberger on the International Development Association, 
both of which were withdrawn due to opposition from the 
majority.
    In another amendment rejected by a mostly party line vote, 
Representative Mark Pocan reinforced the application of the 
domestic and foreign emoluments clause of the United States 
Constitution to the State and Foreign Operations bill. The 
framers of the Constitution were wise in drafting the 
emoluments clause as a means to avoid corruption and 
international influence on our government. It is deeply 
disturbing and disappointing that the Committee could not agree 
to a basic tenet of our democracy and insist that U.S. 
taxpayers' funds not be used to enrich the President.
    My colleagues also offered several amendments to address 
rumored office closures in advance of the planned 
reorganization of the State Department and USAID. The Chairman 
offered welcome assurances that Congress would be consulted in 
any reorganization sought by the Secretary of State. While I 
believe a reorganization could bring improvements to efficiency 
and effectiveness, any restructuring and reform effort must 
work from the bottom up without preordained targets. I urge the 
Department to focus their attention on the tracking of 
resources; the rationalization of service delivery and 
implementer; and the coordination of effort within the U.S. 
government.
    Finally, the process for development and diplomacy cannot 
be truncated, and a retreat from America's role in the world 
will not make Americans safer or our nation stronger. The State 
and Foreign Operations bill is a critical tool to protect 
national security, carry out our diplomatic agenda, support 
economic interests, and express the values of the U.S. by 
addressing humanitarian needs abroad. Supporting programs which 
build stronger and more stable communities around the world by 
raising the health, education and economic well-being of 
citizens as well as building government capacity for 
generations to come are integral to a vibrant United States 
economy and long-lasting security. Due to the low allocation, 
the cuts in this bill endanger our efforts and strategic goals.
    I hope my Republican colleagues will reconsider the funding 
cuts and policy riders in this bill that would make it more 
difficult to achieve these priorities. I look forward to 
working with Chairman Rogers and my colleagues in the House to 
improve the bill.

                                   Nita M. Lowey.