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115th Congress     }                                 {       Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session       }                                 {        115-339
======================================================================

 
PROVIDING FOR CONSIDERATION OF THE CONCURRENT RESOLUTION (H. CON. RES. 
    71) ESTABLISHING THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET FOR THE UNITED STATES 
   GOVERNMENT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2018 AND SETTING FORTH THE APPROPRIATE 
          BUDGETARY LEVELS FOR FISCAL YEARS 2019 THROUGH 2027

                                _______
                                

  October 3, 2017.--Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be 
                                printed

                                _______
                                

               Mr. Woodall, from the Committee on Rules, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                       [To accompany H. Res. 553]

    The Committee on Rules, having had under consideration 
House Resolution 553, by a record vote of 9 to 4, report the 
same to the House with the recommendation that the resolution 
be adopted.

                SUMMARY OF PROVISIONS OF THE RESOLUTION

    The resolution provides for consideration of H. Con. Res. 
71, establishing the congressional budget for the United States 
Government for fiscal year 2018 and setting forth the 
appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 2019 through 
2027, under a structured rule. The resolution provides four 
hours of general debate with three hours confined to the 
congressional budget equally divided and controlled by the 
chair and ranking minority member of the Committee on the 
Budget and one hour on the subject of economic goals and 
policies equally divided and controlled by Rep. Tiberi of Ohio 
and Rep. Carolyn Maloney of New York or their respective 
designees. The resolution waives all points of order against 
consideration of the concurrent resolution and provides that 
the concurrent resolution shall be considered as read. The 
resolution makes in order only those amendments printed in this 
report. Each such amendment may be offered only in the order 
printed in this report, may be offered only by a Member 
designated in this report, shall be considered as read, shall 
be debatable for the time specified in this report equally 
divided and controlled by the proponent and an opponent, and 
shall not be subject to amendment. The resolution waives all 
points of order against the amendments printed in this report 
except that the adoption of an amendment in the nature of a 
substitute shall constitute the conclusion of consideration of 
the concurrent resolution for amendment. The resolution 
provides, upon the conclusion of consideration of the 
concurrent resolution for amendment, a final period of general 
debate, which shall not exceed 10 minutes equally divided and 
controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the 
Committee on the Budget. The resolution permits the Chair of 
the Budget Committee to offer amendments in the House pursuant 
to section 305(a)(5) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 to 
achieve mathematical consistency. The resolution provides that 
the concurrent resolution shall not be subject to a demand for 
division of the question of its adoption.

                         EXPLANATION OF WAIVERS

    Although the resolution waives all points of order against 
consideration of the concurrent resolution, the Committee is 
not aware of any points of order. The waiver is prophylactic in 
nature.
    The waiver of all points order against the amendments 
printed in this report includes a waiver of clause 10(c) of 
rule XVIII, which prohibits amendments from proposing to change 
the appropriate level of public debt set forth in the 
concurrent resolution.

                            COMMITTEE VOTES

    The results of each record vote on an amendment or motion 
to report, together with the names of those voting for and 
against, are printed below:

Rules Committee record vote No. 116

    Motion by Mr. McGovern to make in order and provide the 
appropriate waivers for all submitted amendments to H. Con. 
Res. 71. Defeated: 4-9

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                Majority Members                      Vote               Minority Members               Vote
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. Cole........................................          Nay   Ms. Slaughter.....................          Yea
Mr. Woodall.....................................          Nay   Mr. McGovern......................          Yea
Mr. Burgess.....................................          Nay   Mr. Hastings of Florida...........          Yea
Mr. Collins.....................................          Nay   Mr. Polis.........................          Yea
Mr. Byrne.......................................          Nay
Mr. Newhouse....................................          Nay
Mr. Buck........................................          Nay
Ms. Cheney......................................          Nay
Mr. Sessions, Chairman..........................          Nay
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Rules Committee record vote No. 117

    Motion by Mr. McGovern to make in order and provide the 
appropriate waivers for amendment # 1, offered by Rep. McGovern 
(MA) and Rep. Lujan Grisham (NM), which prevents cuts to the 
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) by exempting 
SNAP from reconciliation instruction. Prevents stricter time 
limits and more onerous work requirements in SNAP, and prevents 
the program from being converted into a block grant. Defeated: 
4-9

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                Majority Members                      Vote               Minority Members               Vote
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. Cole........................................          Nay   Ms. Slaughter.....................          Yea
Mr. Woodall.....................................          Nay   Mr. McGovern......................          Yea
Mr. Burgess.....................................          Nay   Mr. Hastings of Florida...........          Yea
Mr. Collins.....................................          Nay   Mr. Polis.........................          Yea
Mr. Byrne.......................................          Nay
Mr. Newhouse....................................          Nay
Mr. Buck........................................          Nay
Ms. Cheney......................................          Nay
Mr. Sessions, Chairman..........................          Nay
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Rules Committee record vote No. 118

    Motion by Mr. Cole to report the rule. Adopted: 9-4

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                Majority Members                      Vote               Minority Members               Vote
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. Cole........................................          Yea   Ms. Slaughter.....................          Nay
Mr. Woodall.....................................          Yea   Mr. McGovern......................          Nay
Mr. Burgess.....................................          Yea   Mr. Hastings of Florida...........          Nay
Mr. Collins.....................................          Yea   Mr. Polis.........................          Nay
Mr. Byrne.......................................          Yea
Mr. Newhouse....................................          Yea
Mr. Buck........................................          Yea
Ms. Cheney......................................          Yea
Mr. Sessions, Chairman..........................          Yea
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                SUMMARY OF THE AMENDMENTS MADE IN ORDER

    1. Pocan (WI), Grijalva (AZ): PROGRESSIVE CAUCUS 
SUBSTITUTE. Provides a practical, progressive vision for our 
country by investing $2 trillion in 21st century infrastructure 
and jobs, tackling inequality, making corporations pay for 
their fair share and strengthening essential public programs. 
Includes comprehensive immigration reform, which protects DACA, 
and provides $200 billion for immediate hurricane disaster 
recovery efforts and climate change research. (30 minutes)
    2. Scott, Bobby (VA), Richmond (LA): CONGRESSIONAL BLACK 
CAUCUS (CBC) SUBSTITUTE. Makes significant investments in 
education, job training, transportation and infrastructure, and 
advanced research and development programs that will accelerate 
our economic recovery. It includes funding for a comprehensive 
jobs bill and targeted investments to reduce and eradicate 
poverty in America. Additionally, the CBC budget protects the 
social safety net without cutting Social Security, Medicare, 
Medicaid, or SNAP. The CBC budget makes tough but responsible 
decisions to raise new revenue by making our tax system fairer, 
saving more than $2.5 trillion on the deficit over the next 
decade. The CBC Budget will put our nation on a sustainable 
fiscal path by reducing our annual budget deficit to 2.7% of 
GDP by FY 2027. (30 minutes)
    3. McClintock (CA), Walker (NC): REPUBLICAN STUDY COMMITTEE 
SUBSTITUTE. Secures America's Future Economy by balancing the 
budget while bringing solvency to Social Security, Medicare, 
and the Federal Government, reforming the tax code, and 
providing for a strong national security. (30 minutes)
    4. Yarmuth (KY): DEMOCRATIC CAUCUS SUBSTITUTE. Focuses on 
fostering growth, creating good-paying jobs, and building an 
economy that works for everyone. It protects affordable health 
care for the middle class and struggling families, invests in 
America, and ensures national security. The resolution supports 
comprehensive immigration reform and disaster response funding 
to help Americans rebuild after the recent hurricanes. (30 
minutes)

                    TEXT OF AMENDMENTS MADE IN ORDER

 1. An Amendment To Be Offered by Representative Pocan of Wisconsin or 
                 His Designee, Debatable for 30 Minutes

  Strike all after the resolving clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. CONCURRENT RESOLUTION ON THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2018.

  (a) Declaration.--Congress declares that this concurrent 
resolution is the concurrent resolution on the budget for 
fiscal year 2018 and sets forth the appropriate budgetary 
levels for fiscal years 2017 and 2019 through 2027.
  (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this 
concurrent resolution is as follows:

Sec. 1. Concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2018.

                 TITLE I--RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS

Sec. 101. Recommended levels and amounts.
Sec. 102. Major functional categories.

                 TITLE II--ESTIMATES OF DIRECT SPENDING

Sec. 1. Direct spending.

               TITLE III--MISCELLANEOUS BUDGET ENFORCEMENT

Sec. 301. Point of order against advance Appropriations.
Sec. 302. Point of order against funding for certain immigration 
          enforcement efforts.

                TITLE I--RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS

SEC. 101. RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS.

  The following budgetary levels are appropriate for each of 
fiscal years 2017 through 2027:
          (1) Federal revenues.--For purposes of the 
        enforcement of this concurrent resolution:
                  (A) The recommended levels of Federal 
                revenues are as follows:
  Fiscal year 2017: $2,566,010,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2018: $3,231,053,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $3,754,112,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $3,852,015,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $4,011,871,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: $4,197,338,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: $4,295,865,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: $4,405,818,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: $4,617,110,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: $4,840,032,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: $5,069,484,000,000.
                  (B) The amounts by which the aggregate levels 
                of Federal revenues should be changed are as 
                follows:
  Fiscal year 2017: $0.
  Fiscal year 2018: $497,484,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $920,604,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $901,439,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $951,960,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: $1,014,422,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: $977,949,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: $943,390,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: $994,932,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: $1,050,654,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: $1,111,097,000,000.
          (2) New budget authority.--For purposes of the 
        enforcement of this concurrent resolution, the 
        appropriate levels of total new budget authority are as 
        follows:
  Fiscal year 2017: $3,558,164,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2018: $3,809,501,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $3,889,380,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $4,085,946,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $4,242,299,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: $4,524,849,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: $4,667,232,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: $4,840,870,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: $5,123,649,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: $5,359,292,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: $5,604,559,000,000.
          (3) Budget outlays.--For purposes of the enforcement 
        of this concurrent resolution, the appropriate levels 
        of total budget outlays are as follows:
  Fiscal year 2017: $3,411,968,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2018: $3,801,027,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $3,859,325,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $4,031,449,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $4,190,238,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: $4,474,256,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: $4,610,999,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: $4,770,214,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: $5,057,717,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: $5,301,376,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: $5,545,750,000,000.
          (4) Deficits (on-budget).--For purposes of the 
        enforcement of this concurrent resolution, the amounts 
        of the deficits (on-budget) are as follows:
  Fiscal year 2017: -$845,569,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2018: -$569,974,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: -$569,974,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: -$179,434,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: -$178,367,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: -$276,918,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: -$315,134,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: -$364,396,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: -$440,607,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: -$461,344,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: -$476,266,000,000.
          (5) Debt subject to limit.--The appropriate levels of 
        debt subject to limit are as follows:
  Fiscal year 2017: $20,611,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2018: $21,412,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $21,584,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $21,734,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $22,490,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: $22,950,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: $23,489,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: $24,111,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: $24,809,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: $25,597,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: $26,305,000,000.
          (6) Debt held by the public.--The appropriate levels 
        of debt held by the public are as follows:
  Fiscal year 2017: $15,093,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2018: $15,752,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $15,985,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $16,322,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $16,693,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: $17,202,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: $17,794,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: $18,483,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: $19,300,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: $20,195,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: $21,166,000,000.

SEC. 102. MAJOR FUNCTIONAL CATEGORIES.

  Congress determines and declares that the appropriate levels 
of new budget authority and outlays for fiscal years 2017 
through 2027 for each major functional category are:
          (1) National Defense (050):
                  Fiscal year 2017:
                  (A) New budget authority, $620,810,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $597,390,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $570,786,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $573,048,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $581,900,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $575,522,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $594,087,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $582,924,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $609,309,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $594,652,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $623,521,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $611,949,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $637,690,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $620,850,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $655,897,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $632,247,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $670,145,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $651,864,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $680,394,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $663,759,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $690,786,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $674,679,000,000.
          (2) International Affairs (150):
                  Fiscal year 2017:
                  (A) New budget authority, $65,918,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $50,533,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $55,508,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $50,831,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $60,425,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $55,384,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $64,369,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $59,870,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, 69,575,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $64,106,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $73,547,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $69,255,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $76,986,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $73,094,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $80,697,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $76,618,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $84,476,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $80,127,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $88,702,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $83,952,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $92,835,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $87,887,000,000.
          (3) General Science, Space, and Technology (250):
                  Fiscal year 2017:
                  (A) New budget authority, $31,562,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $30,853,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $35,239,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $33,151,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $37,743,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $35,678,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $39,747,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $37,880,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $42,204,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $40,117,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $44,567,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $42,522,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $46,123,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $44,442,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $47,766,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $46,120,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $49,490,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $47,818,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $51,349,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $49,597,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $53,198,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $51,390,000,000.
          (4) Energy (270):
                  Fiscal year 2017:
                  (A) New budget authority, $5,003,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $3,017,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $57,581,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $54,382,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $59,900,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $56,610,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $61,645,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $58,813,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $63,511,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $$60,658,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $65,073,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $62,314,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $64,918,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $62,631,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $65,290,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $63,142,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $66,119,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $64,100,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $69,437,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $67,375,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $70,575,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $68,547,000,000.
          (5) Natural Resources and Environment (300):
                  Fiscal year 2017:
                  (A) New budget authority, $40,851,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $41,010,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $122,495,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $122,147,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $125,237,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $124,382,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $128,313,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $127,136,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $69,915,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $68,294,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $72,613,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $70,715,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $74,531,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $72,930,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $76,400,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $74,852,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $78,455,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $76,818,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $80,604,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $78,839,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $82,820,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $81,015,000,000.
          (6) Agriculture (350):
                  Fiscal year 2017:
                  (A) New budget authority, $21,930,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $18,001,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $24,023,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $22,713,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $19,735,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $18,240,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $18,298,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $17,479,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $19,431,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $18,832,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $18,437,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $17,941,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $18,610,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $18,178,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $19,068,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $18,514,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $19,832,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $19,180,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $20,105,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $19,475,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $19,938,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $19,328,000,000.
          (7) Commerce and Housing Credit (370):
                  Fiscal year 2017:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$2,759,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$19,274,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $18,131,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $3,689,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $21,724,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $11,883,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $22,714,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $13,516,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $22,953,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $12,786,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $26,781,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $15,622,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $28,145,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $16,679,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $29,608,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $17,099,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $31,576,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $17,836,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $32,416,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $18,772,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $33,478,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $19,628,000,000.
          (8) Transportation (400):
                  Fiscal year 2017:
                  (A) New budget authority, $92,730,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $94,107,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $199,383,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $199,409,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $201,464,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $200,565,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $196,098,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays,$202,143,000,000 .
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $197,000,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $203,522,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $197,935,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $205,038,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $171,562,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $179,442,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $172,521,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $181,132,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $173,548,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $183,231,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $174,584,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $185,116,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $175,633,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $187,060,000,000.
          (9) Community and Regional Development (450):
                  Fiscal year 2017:
                  (A) New budget authority, $169,950,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $100,381,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $30,864,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $79,569,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $32,802,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $53,477,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $34,464,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $41,662,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $36,469,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $42,830,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $38,390,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $38,016,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $39,481,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $38,242,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $40,662,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $39,177,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $41,888,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $40,250,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $43,244,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $41,353,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $44,235,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $42,428,000,000.
          (10) Education, Training, Employment, and Social 
        Services (500):
                  Fiscal year 2017:
                  (A) New budget authority, $266,792,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $264,242,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $298,769,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $295,251,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $166,530,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $168,879,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $176,656,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $172,182,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $188,094,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $182,789,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $197,237,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $192,067,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $204,174,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $200,177,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $210,915,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $207,028,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $216,669,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $212,774,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $222,127,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $218,112,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $228,312,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $224,320,000,000.
          (11) Health (550):
                  Fiscal year 2017:
                  (A) New budget authority, $548,466,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $548,998,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $578,564,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $585,289,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $613,743,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $612,402,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $659,060,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $646,374,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $687,535,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $683,765,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $726,450,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $721,843,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $765,397,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $761,755,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $807,017,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $802,573,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $852,005,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $846,941,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $897,043,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $891,673,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $943,870,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $938,235,000,000.
          (12) Medicare (570):
                  Fiscal year 2017:
                  (A) New budget authority, $598,691,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $598,289,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $599,471,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $599,092,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $650,772,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $650,464,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $676,942,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $676,705,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $723,379,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $723,163,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $817,925,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, .$817,695,000,000
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $840,589,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $840,371,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $861,276,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $861,049,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $963,021,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $962,774,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $1,016,987,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $1,016,734,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $1,091,254,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $1,091,006,000,000.
          (13) Income Security (600):
                  Fiscal year 2017:
                  (A) New budget authority, $522,238,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, 512,949,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $574,926,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $554,174,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $641,400,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $624,323,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $691,701,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $675,708,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $737,828,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $721,824,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $785,273,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $775,704,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $819,551,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $807,162,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $855,396,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $837,727,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $904,334,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $887,787,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $947,417,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $937,276,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $995,029,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $984,004,000,000.
          (14) Social Security (650):
                  Fiscal year 2017:
                  (A) New budget authority, $36,132,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $36,155,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $39,621,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $39,621,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $43,402,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $43,402,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $46,861,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $46,861,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $50,700,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $50,700,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $54,722,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $54,722,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $59,082,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $59,082,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $64,228,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays,$64,228,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $69,774,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $69,774,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $75,499,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $75,499,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $81,931,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $81,931,000,000.
          (15) Veterans Benefits and Services (700):
                  Fiscal year 2017:
                  (A) New budget authority, $175,596,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $178,660,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $185,736,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $183,609,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $204,230,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $199,677,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $213,730,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $209,577,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $223,712,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $219,141,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $243,263,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $238,540,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $242,677,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $238,676,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $241,394,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $237,627,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $261,285,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $257,403,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $271,033,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $266,912,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $281,497,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $277,377,000,000.
          (16) Administration of Justice (750):
                  Fiscal year 2017:
                  (A) New budget authority, $64,048,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $57,167,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $72,673,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $64,686,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $66,260,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $66,774,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $69,134,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $70,886,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $72,276,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $75,047,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $74,994,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $76,549,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $77,448,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $77,463,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $80,013,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $78,824,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $82,656,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $81,269,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $91,519,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $90,803,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $95,033,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $93,445,000,000.
          (17) General Government (800):
                  Fiscal year 2017:
                  (A) New budget authority, $25,587,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $24,500,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $27,332,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $26,239,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $28,023,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $27,092,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $28,670,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $28,024,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $29,373,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $28,752,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $30,095,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $29,512,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $30,804,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $30,231,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $31,369,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $30,813,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $32,195,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $31,559,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $33,041,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $32,384,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $33,873,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $33,207,000,000.
          (18) Net Interest (900):
                  Fiscal year 2017:
                  (A) New budget authority, $358,153,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $358,153,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $379,086,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $379,086,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $408,318,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $408,318,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $444,136,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $444,136,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $482,207,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $482,207,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $518,277,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $518,277,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $554,698,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $554,698,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $588,258,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $588,258,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $621,248,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $621,248,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $654,736,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $654,736,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $682,812, 000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $682,937,000,000.
          (19) Allowances (920):
                  Fiscal year 2017:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$886,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $515,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $20,852,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $16,580,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $9,233,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $9,714,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $1,552,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $1,804,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$156,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $69,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$223,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $3,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$1,215,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$1,084,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $200,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $291,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$200,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$168,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $1,018,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $971,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $1,690,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $1,565,000,000.
          (20) Undistributed Offsetting Receipts (950):
                  Fiscal year 2017:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$83,167,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$83,167,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$82,782,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$82,782,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$85,754,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$85,754,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$85,454,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$85,454,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$87,183,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$87,183,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$88,846,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$88,846,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$89,285,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$89,285,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$92,809,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$92,809,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$101,023,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$101,023,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$98,551,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$98,551,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$101,256,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$101,256,000,000.

                 TITLE II--ESTIMATES OF DIRECT SPENDING

SEC. 1. DIRECT SPENDING.

  (a) Means-tested Direct Spending.--
          (1) For means-tested direct spending, the average 
        rate of growth in the total level of outlays during the 
        10-year period preceding fiscal year 2018 is 6.8 
        percent.
          (2) For means-tested direct spending, the estimated 
        average rate of growth in the total level of outlays 
        during the 11-year period beginning with fiscal year 
        2017 is 4.3 percent under current law.
          (3) The following reforms are proposed in this 
        concurrent resolution for means-tested direct spending:
                  (A) The People's Budget adopts former 
                President Obama's Earned Income Tax Credit 
                (EITC) to expand eligibility, including for 
                childless workers. Continues enhanced credits 
                originally implemented under the American 
                Recovery and Reinvestment Act to target those 
                most in need. This includes extending the Child 
                and Dependent Care Credit and the American 
                Opportunity Tax Credit through 2027.
                  (B) The People's Budget includes former 
                President Obama's proposal to boost the Child 
                Tax Credit maximum deduction to $3,000. It 
                makes key expansions permanent to protect 50 
                million Americans who would otherwise be at 
                jeopardy for losing part or all of their EITC 
                and CTC.
                  (C) The People's Budget creates a debt free 
                college that provides Federal matching program 
                to support state efforts to expand investment 
                in higher education, bring down costs for 
                students, and increase aid to students to help 
                them cover the total cost of college attendance 
                without taking on debt. The program would 
                encourage innovation by states and colleges to 
                improve efficiency and enable speedy and less-
                costly degree completion. By treating higher 
                education as a public good worth investing in, 
                we can once again make higher education 
                accessible to all.
                  (D) The People's Budget allows students to 
                refinance their student loans at low rates and 
                allows private borrowers to shift to more 
                affordable government loans. Allowing student 
                borrowers to reduce the value of their debt 
                will free up income for purchases and will 
                create a job-creating ripple effect throughout 
                the entire economy.
                  (E) The People's Budget restores cuts made to 
                the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program 
                (SNAP) and permanently adopts the enhanced 
                levels established in the American Recovery and 
                Reinvestment Act. The vast majority of SNAP 
                recipients are households with children, 
                seniors and individuals with disabilities, but 
                recent cuts lowered average benefits by $216 in 
                2014. Providing families with basic food 
                security through SNAP is one of the most 
                effective ways the Federal Government can 
                stimulate the economy.
                  (F) The People's Budget provides an 
                additional $10.8 billion for child nutrition 
                programs including program expansion and 
                improvements for summer meals; essential 
                improvements and expansion funding for 
                preschool nutrition including increases in meal 
                reimbursements to fulfill the new meal pattern, 
                an additional meal or snack for children in 
                long-term care, and expanded program 
                eligibility; and investments in school meals 
                and school kitchens.
                  (G) The People's Budget replaces the 40 
                percent excise tax with a public option to 
                allow the Secretary of Health and Human 
                Services to offer a public insurance option 
                within the health insurance marketplaces. This 
                ensures choice, competition, and stability in 
                coverage. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) 
                estimates the premium costs for Americans under 
                the public option will be 7 to 8 percent lower 
                than costs in private exchange plans. The 
                repeal of the excise tax costs $132 billion 
                while savings from the public option are $176 
                billion.
                  (H) The People's Budget continues funding for 
                the entire CHIP program until 2020.
                  (I) The People's Budget protects States 
                programs by fully retaining maintenance of 
                effort requirements and eliminating any States 
                ability to arbitrarily implement enrollment 
                caps. Without action, Federal funding for CHIP 
                will expire jeopardizing the health care 
                coverage of more than 10 million children and 
                pregnant women.
                  (J) The People's Budget permits the Secretary 
                of Health and Human Services (HHS) to negotiate 
                prescription drug prices with pharmaceutical 
                manufacturers. Giving HHS the ability to 
                negotiate prices, as the Department of Veterans 
                Affairs currently does, will save Medicare $429 
                billion and will reduce costs for seniors.
  (b) Nonmeans-tested Direct Spending.--
          (1) For nonmeans-tested direct spending, the average 
        rate of growth in the total level of outlays during the 
        10-year period preceding fiscal year 2018 is 4.8 
        percent.
          (2) For nonmeans-tested direct spending, the 
        estimated average rate of growth in the total level of 
        outlays during the 11-year period beginning with fiscal 
        year 2017 is 5.6 percent under current law.
          (3) The following reforms are proposed in this 
        concurrent resolution for nonmeans-tested direct 
        spending:
                  (A) The People's Budget allows those who have 
                lost a job through no fault of their own to 
                claim up to 99 weeks of unemployment benefits 
                in high-unemployment states for up to two 
                years.
                  (B) The People's Budget also adopts former 
                President Obama's reforms to improve solvencies 
                and incentivize job training.
                  (C) The People's Budget improves the 
                Affordable Care Act by repealing the excise tax 
                on high-priced health plans. Proponents of the 
                provision hoped that this tax would slow the 
                rate of growth of health costs, while raising 
                revenue. However, in an effort to avoid the 
                tax, employers who traditionally offer 
                excellent benefits have started offering less 
                generous plans. This is an ineffective tool to 
                bend the cost curve. Since the tax is attached 
                to premiums instead of coverage it has the 
                potential to hit plans it wasn't intended to 
                impact.
                  (D) The People's Budget establishes a 
                representative democracy that truly reflects 
                the diversity and values of our nation by 
                providing funding for the public financing of 
                campaigns. This gives a voice to small donors 
                that have been drowned out by dark money. 
                Public financing keeps politicians accountable 
                to the voters that elect them instead of to 
                special interest money. In the era of the 
                devastating Citizens United decision, big money 
                has taken the reins of our election process. It 
                is now more important than ever to provide 
                candidates with effective alternatives to 
                finance their campaigns.
                  (E) The People's Budget uses the Experimental 
                Price Index for the Elderly (CPI-E) to 
                calculate Cost of Living Adjustments (COLA) for 
                Federal retirement programs other than Social 
                Security. Affected programs include civil 
                service retirement, military retirement, 
                Supplemental Security Income, veteran's 
                pensions and compensations. CPI-E is the most 
                sensible and accurate measure of the real costs 
                that seniors face in retirement, current 
                underpricing of costs amount to cutting 
                benefits for those on fixed incomes.
                  (G) The People's Budget makes a down payment 
                of $1.9 trillion to help close the nation's 
                infrastructure deficit while protecting against 
                climate change and creating millions of living 
                wage jobs. The budget also helps boost private 
                financing for critical state and local projects 
                by creating a public-private infrastructure 
                bank. The American Society of Civil Engineers 
                (ASCE) estimates that the United States will 
                need to invest upwards of $2 trillion above 
                current levels over the next decade just to 
                make required repairs to roads, bridges, water, 
                and energy systems.

              TITLE III--MISCELLANEOUS BUDGET ENFORCEMENT

SEC. 301. POINT OF ORDER AGAINST ADVANCE APPROPRIATIONS.

  (a) In General.--In the House, except as provided in 
subsection (b), any bill, joint resolution, amendment or 
conference report making a general appropriations or continuing 
appropriation may not provide for advance appropriations.
  (b) Exceptions.--Advance appropriations may be provided for 
all programs administered by the Department of Veterans 
Affairs.
  (c) Definition.--In this section, the term ``advance 
appropriation'' means any new discretionary budget authority 
provided in a bill or joint resolution making general 
appropriations or any new discretionary budget authority 
provided in a bill or joint resolution making continuing 
appropriations for fiscal year 2018 that first becomes 
available for any fiscal year after 2018.

SEC. 302. POINT OF ORDER AGAINST FUNDING FOR CERTAIN IMMIGRATION 
                    ENFORCEMENT EFFORTS.

  It shall not be in order in the House of Representatives or 
the Senate to consider any bill or joint resolution, or 
amendment thereto or conference report thereon, that 
appropriates funds to implement Executive Order 13767, entitled 
``Border Security and Immigration Enforcement Improvements''.
Amend the title so as to read: ``Concurrent resolution setting 
forth the congressional budget for the United States Government 
for fiscal year 2018 and including the appropriate budgetary 
levels for fiscal year 2017 and fiscal years 2018-2027''.
                              ----------                              


 2. An Amendment To Be Offered by Representative Scott of Virginia or 
                 His Designee, Debatable for 30 Minutes

  Strike all after the resolving clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. CONCURRENT RESOLUTION ON THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2018.

  The Congress determines and declares that this concurrent 
resolution establishes the budget for fiscal year 2018 and sets 
forth appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 2018 
through 2027.

SEC. 2. RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS.

  The following budgetary levels are appropriate for each of 
fiscal years 2018 through 2027:
          (1) Federal revenues.--For purposes of the 
        enforcement of this concurrent resolution:
                  (A) The recommended levels of Federal 
                revenues are as follows:
  Fiscal year 2018: $2,944,569,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $3,089,508,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $3,274,576,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $3,420,911,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: $3,596,916,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: $3,749,916,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: $3,965,428,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: $4,166,178,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: $4,361,378,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: $4,619,387,000,000.
                  (B) The amounts by which the aggregate levels 
                of Federal revenues should be changed are as 
                follows:
  Fiscal year 2018: $211,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $256,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $324,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $361,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: $414,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: $432,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: $503,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: $544,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: $572,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: $661,000,000,000.
          (2) New budget authority.--For purposes of the 
        enforcement of this concurrent resolution, the 
        appropriate levels of total new budget authority are as 
        follows:
  Fiscal year 2018: $3,875,166,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $3,829,543,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $3,845,871,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $3,920,549,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: $4,149,670,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: $4,282,139,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: $4,411,746,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: $4,653,359,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: $4,865,876,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: $5,058,527,000,000.
          (3) Budget outlays.--For purposes of the enforcement 
        of this concurrent resolution, the appropriate levels 
        of total budget outlays are as follows:
  Fiscal year 2018: $3,538,175,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $3,808,907,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $3,890,015,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $3,963, 843,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: $4,167,060,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: $4,267,110,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: $4,373,622,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: $4,615,778,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: $4,833,878,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: $5,032,183,000,000.
          (4) Deficits (on-budget).--For purposes of the 
        enforcement of this concurrent resolution, the amounts 
        of the deficits (on-budget) are as follows:
  Fiscal year 2018: -$593,606,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: -$719,399,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: -$615,439,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: -$542,932,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: -$570,144,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: -$517,194,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: -$408,194,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: -$449,600,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: -$472,500,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: -$412,796,000,000.
          (5) Debt subject to limit.--The appropriate levels of 
        the public debt are as follows:
  Fiscal year 2018: $21,175,683,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $22,085,529,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $22,866,575,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $23,578,811,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: $24,291,408,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: $24,985,937,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: $25,599,925,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: $26,248,973,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: $26,981,444,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: $27,552,527,000,000.
          (6) Debt held by the public.--The appropriate levels 
        of debt held by the public are as follows:
  Fiscal year 2018: $15,515,893,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $16,336,714,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $17,080,338,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $17,782,001,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: $18,543,046,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: $19,291,339,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: $19,972,026,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: $20,739,642,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: $21,579,464,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: $22,413,681,000,000.

SEC. 3. MAJOR FUNCTIONAL CATEGORIES.

  The Congress determines and declares that the appropriate 
levels of new budget authority and outlays for fiscal years 
2018 through 2027 for each major functional category are:
          (1) National Defense (050):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $611,786,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $583,502,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $624,900,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $605,816,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $638,087,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $620,966,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $651,309,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $634,689,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $664,521,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $652,811,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $678,690,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $661,612,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $692,897,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $670,504,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $707,145,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $689,091,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $722,394,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $703,660,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $737,634,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $718,554,000,000.
          (2) International Affairs (150):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $48,264,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $42,815,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $46,630,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $42,945,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $46,563,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $42,812,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $46,563,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $43,970,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $45,705,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $44,635,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $46,744,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $45,271,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $47,817,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $46,175,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $48,897,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $47,039,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $49,539,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $47,725,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $50,634,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $48,596,000,000.
          (3) General Science, Space, and Technology (250):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $35,234,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $33,128,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $33,889,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $33,653,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $34,557,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $34,013,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $35,281,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $34,539,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $36,036,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $35,337,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $36,793,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $36,033,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $37,059,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $36,498,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $37,885,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $37,138,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $38,717,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $37,900,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $39,555,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $38,703,000,000.
          (4) Energy (270):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $8,500,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $4,864,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $7,468,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $5,614,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $6,876,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $5,684,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $6,507,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $5,334,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $6,459,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $5,169,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $5,504,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $4,195,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $4,997,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $3,712,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $4,926,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $3,746,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $7,216,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $6,054,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $7,341,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $6,248,000,000.
          (5) Natural Resources and Environment (300):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $45,791,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $44,939,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $45,710,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $45,911,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $46,980,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $46,966,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $46,986,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $47,068,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $48,107,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $47,647,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $49,257,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $48,620,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $50,280,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $49,582,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $51,469,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $50,643,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $52,625,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $51,731,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $53,866,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $52,965,000,000.
          (6) Agriculture (350):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $26,223,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $23,691,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $23,035,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $21,664,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $21,998,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $21,211,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $23,231,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $22,614,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $21,737,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $21,490,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $21,910,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $21,549,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $22,468,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $21,933,000,000..
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $23,232,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $22,586,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $23,505,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $22,867,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $23,373,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $22,755,000,000.
          (7) Commerce and Housing Credit (370):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $15,050,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $2,075,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $16,792,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $8,377,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $16,445,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $8,435,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $14,949,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $6,120,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $17,167,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $7,317,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $17,731,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $7,204,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $18,315,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $6,672,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $19,383,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $6,499,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $19,195,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $6,468,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $19,244,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $6,346,000,000.
          (8) Transportation (400):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $412,246,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $260,375,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $309,646,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $302,342,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $191,199,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $246,432,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $97,422,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $162,071,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $98,379,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $129,557,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $99,348,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $115,488,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $100,330,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $111,477,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $101,381,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $110,947,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $102,441,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $112,855,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $103,514,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $114,823,000,000.
          (9) Community and Regional Development (450):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $41,581,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $34,517,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $36,840,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $37,726,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $27,338,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $31,834,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $24,297,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $25,883,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $24,806,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $23,354,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $25,296,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $22,249,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $25,298,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $22,080,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $25,839,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $22,489,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $26,384,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $23,071,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $26,080,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $23,400,000,000.
          (10) Education, Training, Employment, and Social 
        Services (500):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $176,935,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $142,001,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $165,585,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $165,987,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $158,570,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $159,597,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $162,088,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $160,233,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $164,843,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $163,705,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $156,826,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $160,066,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $156,277,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $157,407,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $156,679,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $156,729,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $158,996,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $157,914,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $146,273,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $151,875,000,000.
          (11) Health (550):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $573,434,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $580,091,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $602,568,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $604,320,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $646,496,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $637,447,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $669,270,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $666,179,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $702,953,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $696,993,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $735,459,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $728,890,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $772,591,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $763,909,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $810,799,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $801,662,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $849,471,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $839,223,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $890,688,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $879,028,000,000.
          (12) Medicare (570):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $601,682,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $601,303,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $672,626,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $672,318,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $720,653,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $720,416,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $775,853,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $775,637,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $871,247,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $871,017,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $896,829,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $896,611,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $920,920,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $920,693,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $1,028,532,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $1,028,285,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $1,093,424,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $1,093,171,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $1,176,028,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $1,175,780,000,000.
          (13) Income Security (600):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $528,718,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $508,933,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $541,318,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $538,787,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $554,195,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $554,966,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $567,182,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $569,833,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $583,720,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $594,084,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $592,625,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $598,840,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $601,577,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $602,988,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $621,241,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $625,226,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $636,800,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $648,216,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $653,208,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $664,923,000,000.
          (14) Social Security (650):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $39,475,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $39,475,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $43,016,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $43,016,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $46,287,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $46,287,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $49,748,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $49,748,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $53,392,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $53,392,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $57,378,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $57,378,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $61,764,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $61,764,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $66,388,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $66,388,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $70,871,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $70,871,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $75,473,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $75,473,000,000.
          (15) Veterans Benefits and Services (700):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $183,573,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $181,049,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $198,367,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $195,432,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $203,192,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $201,863,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $209,704,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $207,846,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $225,035,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $223,431,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $222,849,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $220,873,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $217,808,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $216,712,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $235,899,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $234,040,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $243,591,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $241,380,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $252,030,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $249,835,000,000.
          (16) Administration of Justice (750):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $70,592,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $63,596,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $62,328,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $64,092,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $63,865,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $66,733,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $65,272,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $69,336,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $65,880,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $68,965,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $67,534,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $68,559,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $69,220,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $68,916,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $70,963,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $70,438,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $78,798,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $78,991,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $81,299,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $80,655,000,000.
          (17) General Government (800):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $27,065,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $25,734,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $27,477,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $26,458,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $28,100,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $27,418,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $28,777,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $28,134,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $29,473,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $28,882,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $30,156,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $29,575,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $30,693,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $30,129,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $31,492,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $30,848,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $32,309,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $31,644,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $33,111,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $32,437,000,000.
          (18) Net Interest (900):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $377,635,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $377,635,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $413,674,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $413,674,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $461,176,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $461,176,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $512,434,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $512,434,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $560,400,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $560,400,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $605,893,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $605,893,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $644,696,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $644,696,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $679,742,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $679,742,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $714,720,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $714,720,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $743,060,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $743,185,000,000.
          (19) Non-Allowances (920):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $134,164,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $70,964,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $43,428,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $66,529,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $18,748,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $41,212,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $20,859,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $29,359,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $18,656,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $27,721,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $24,602,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $27,491,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $29,548,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $30,587,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $32,490,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $33,268,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $43,431,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $43,971,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $47,372,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $47,860,000,000.
          (20) Undistributed Offsetting Receipts (950):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                          (A) New budget authority, -
                        $82,782,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, -$82,782,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                          (A) New budget authority, -
                        $85,754,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, -$85,754,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                          (A) New budget authority, -
                        $85,454,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, -$85,454,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                          (A) New budget authority, -
                        $87,183,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, -$87,183,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                          (A) New budget authority, -
                        $88,846,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, -$88,846,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                          (A) New budget authority, -
                        $89,285,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, -$89,285,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                          (A) New budget authority, -
                        $92,809,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, -$92,809,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                          (A) New budget authority, -
                        $101,023,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, -$101,023,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                          (A) New budget authority, -
                        $98,551,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, -$98,551,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                          (A) New budget authority, -
                        $101,256,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, -$101,256,000,000.
          (21) Overseas Contingency Operations (970):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                          (A) New budget authority, $0.
                          (B) Outlays, $0.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                          (A) New budget authority, $0.
                          (B) Outlays, $0.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                          (A) New budget authority, $0.
                          (B) Outlays, $0.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                          (A) New budget authority, $0.
                          (B) Outlays, $0.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                          (A) New budget authority, $0.
                          (B) Outlays, $0.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                          (A) New budget authority, $0.
                          (B) Outlays, $0.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                          (A) New budget authority, $0.
                          (B) Outlays, $0.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                          (A) New budget authority, $0.
                          (B) Outlays, $0.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                          (A) New budget authority, $0.
                          (B) Outlays, $0.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                          (A) New budget authority, $0.
                          (B) Outlays, $0.
                              ----------                              


     3. An Amendment To Be Offered by Representative McClintock of 
          California or His Designee, Debatable for 30 Minutes

  Strike all after the resolving clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. CONCURRENT RESOLUTION ON THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2018.

  (a) Declaration.--The Congress determines and declares that 
this concurrent resolution establishes the budget for fiscal 
year 2018 and sets forth appropriate budgetary levels for 
fiscal years 2019 through 2027.
  (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this 
concurrent resolution is as follows:

Sec. 1. Concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2018.

                 TITLE I--RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS

Sec. 101. Recommended levels and amounts.
Sec. 102. Major functional categories.

                        TITLE II--RECONCILIATION

Sec. 201. Reconciliation in the house of representatives.

                      TITLE III--BUDGET ENFORCEMENT

     Subtitle A--Budget Enforcement in the House of Representatives

Sec. 301. Point of order against increasing long-term direct spending.
Sec. 302. Allocation for Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on 
          Terrorism.
Sec. 303. Limitation on changes in certain mandatory programs.
Sec. 304. GAO report.
Sec. 305. Estimates of debt service costs.
Sec. 306. Fair-value credit estimates.
Sec. 307. Estimates of major direct spending legislation.
Sec. 308. Estimates of macroeconomic effects of major legislation.
Sec. 309. Adjustments for improved control of budgetary resources.
Sec. 310. Limitation on advance appropriations.
Sec. 311. Scoring rule for Energy Savings Performance Contracts.
Sec. 312. Estimates of land conveyances.
Sec. 313. Limitation on transfers from the general fund of the Treasury 
          to the Highway Trust Fund.
Sec. 314. Prohibition on the use of guarantee fees as an offset.
Sec. 315. Prohibition on use of Federal Reserve surpluses as an offset.

                      Subtitle B--Other Provisions

Sec. 321. Budgetary treatment of administrative expenses.
Sec. 322. Application and effect of changes in allocations and 
          aggregates.
Sec. 323. Adjustments to reflect changes in concepts and definitions.
Sec. 324. Adjustments to reflect updated budgetary estimates.
Sec. 325. Adjustment for certain emergency designations.
Sec. 326. Exercise of rulemaking powers.

                         TITLE IV--RESERVE FUNDS

Sec. 401. Reserve fund for the repeal of the 2010 health care laws.
Sec. 402. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for additional measures relating 
          to the replacement of Obamacare.
Sec. 403. Deficit-neutral reserve fund related to the Medicare 
          provisions of the 2010 health care laws.
Sec. 404. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for reforming the tax code.
Sec. 405. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for trade agreements.
Sec. 406. Reserve fund for revenue measures.
Sec. 407. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for infrastructure reform.
Sec. 408. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to reduce poverty and increase 
          opportunity and upward mobility.
Sec. 409. Implementation of a deficit and long-term debt reduction 
          agreement.
Sec. 410. Deficit-neutral reserve account for reforming SNAP.
Sec. 411. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for Social Security Disability 
          Insurance Reform.
Sec. 412. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for Federal retirement reform.
Sec. 413. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for defense sequester 
          replacement.
Sec. 414. Reserve fund for commercialization of air traffic control.

                       TITLE V--POLICY STATEMENTS

Sec. 501. Policy statement on Obamacare repeal.
Sec. 502. Policy statement on replacing Obamacare.
Sec. 503. Policy statement on Medicare.
Sec. 504. Policy statement on Medicaid State flexibility block grants.
Sec. 505. Policy statement on Social Security.
Sec. 506. Policy statement on means-tested welfare programs.
Sec. 507. Policy statement on reform of the Supplemental Nutrition 
          Assistance Program.
Sec. 508. Policy statement on work requirements.
Sec. 509. Policy statement on a carbon tax.
Sec. 510. Policy statement on economic growth and job creation.
Sec. 511. Policy statement on tax reform.
Sec. 512. Policy statement on trade.
Sec. 513. Policy statement on energy production.
Sec. 514. Policy statement on Federal regulatory budgeting and reform.
Sec. 515. Policy statement on Federal funding of abortion.
Sec. 516. Policy statement on transportation reform.
Sec. 517. Policy statement on the Department of Veterans Affairs.
Sec. 518. Policy statement on reducing unnecessary, wasteful, and 
          unauthorized spending.
Sec. 519. Policy statement on a balanced budget amendment.
Sec. 520. Policy statement on deficit reduction through the cancellation 
          of unobligated balances.
Sec. 521. Policy statement on reforming the congressional budget 
          process.
Sec. 522. Policy statement on Federal accounting.
Sec. 523. Policy statement on agency fees and spending.

                TITLE I--RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS

SEC. 101. RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS.

  The following budgetary levels are appropriate for each of 
fiscal years 2018 through 2027:
          (1) Federal revenues.--For purposes of the 
        enforcement of this resolution:
                  (A) The recommended levels of Federal 
                revenues are as follows:
  Fiscal year 2018: $2,668,877,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $2,756,890,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $2,850,457,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $2,947,616,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: $3,079,775,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: $3,210,906,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: $3,349,213,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: $3,502,499,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: $3,672,058,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: $3,842,299,000,000.
                  (B) The amounts by which the aggregate levels 
                of Federal revenues should be changed are as 
                follows:
  Fiscal year 2018: -$64,692,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: -$76,618,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: -$100,119,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: -$112,295,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: -$103,141,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: -$107,010,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: -$113,215,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: -$119,679,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: -$117,320,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: -$116,088,000,000.
          (2) New budget authority.--For purposes of the 
        enforcement of this resolution, the appropriate levels 
        of total new budget authority are as follows:
  Fiscal year 2018: $2,869,547,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $2,894,948,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $2,895,989,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $2,925,467,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: $3,056,667,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: $3,054,334,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: $3,152,483,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: $3,296,588,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: $3,397,043,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: $3,451,336,000,000.
          (3) Budget outlays.--For purposes of the enforcement 
        of this resolution, the appropriate levels of total 
        budget outlays are as follows:
  Fiscal year 2018: $2,809,440,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $2,876,701,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $2,881,466,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $2,955,056,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: $3,056,336,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: $3,039,746,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: $3,124,286,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: $3,264,841,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: $3,380,506,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: $3,435,219,000,000.
          (4) Deficits.--For purposes of the enforcement of 
        this resolution, the amounts of the deficits are as 
        follows:
  Fiscal year 2018: $140,563,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $119,811,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $31,009,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $7,440,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: -$23,439,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: -$171,160,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: -$224,927,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: -$237,658,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: -$291,552,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: -$407,080,000,000.
          (5) Public debt.--Pursuant to section 301(a)(5) of 
        the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 
        632(a)(5)), the appropriate levels of the public debt 
        are as follows:
  Fiscal year 2018: $20,705,790,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $21,342,481,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $21,881,784,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $22,365,586,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: $22,732,612,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: $22,971,856,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: $ 23,180,660,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: $23,283,603,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: $23,324,552,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: $23,082,487,000,000.
          (6) Debt held by the public.--The appropriate levels 
        of debt held by the public are as follows:
  Fiscal year 2018: $15,046,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $15,593,666,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $16,095,547,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $16,568,776,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: $16,984,250,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: $17,277,258,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: $17,552,761,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: $17,774,272,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: $17,922,572,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: $17,943,641,000,000.

SEC. 102. MAJOR FUNCTIONAL CATEGORIES.

  The Congress determines and declares that the budgetary 
levels of new budget authority and outlays for fiscal years 
2018 through 2027 for each major functional category are:
          (1) National Defense (050):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $676,050,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $652,657,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $676,241,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $651,644,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $676,460,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $650,005,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $674,719,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $647,508,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $673,902,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $660,780,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $688,039,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $673,944,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $702,217,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $684,734,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $716,434,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $703,603,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $732,456,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $719,347,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $747,635,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $734,397,000,000.
          (2) International Affairs (150):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $23,236,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $24,424,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $21,568,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $22,103,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $21,517,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $21,810,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $21,508,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $21,469,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $20,270,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $20,485,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $21,068,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $20,712,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $21,881,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $21,222,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $21,712,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $20,885,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $23,636,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $21,669,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $23,168,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $22,148,000,000.
          (3) General Science, Space, and Technology (250):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $22,308,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $23,519,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $22,775,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $22,977,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $23,253,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $22,986,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $23,767,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $23,276,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $24,304,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $23,709,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $24,844,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $24,141,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $25,393,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $24,567,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $25,979,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $25,050,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $26,573,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $25,549,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $27,172,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $26,041,000,000.
          (4) Energy (270):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$8,602,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$2,530,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$4,244,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$5,977,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$16,964,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$17,686,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$3,169,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$4,702,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$3,537,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$5,190,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$4,421,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$5,716,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$4,734,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$5,847,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$5,297,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$6,261,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$3,080,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$4,096,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$3,103,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$4,023,000,000.
          (5) Natural Resources and Environment (300):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $25,767,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $28,952,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $25,537,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $27,056,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $26,593,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $26,854,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $25,691,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $25,651,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $26,868,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $26,566,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $26,593,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $26,211,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $26,062,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $25,672,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $26,353,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $25,908,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $26,671,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $26,184,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $26,910,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $26,423,000,000.
          (6) Agriculture (350):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $14,107,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $13,344,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $9,013,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $8,632,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $9,551,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $9,313,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $6,276,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $6,084,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $7,061,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $6,864,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $7,335,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $7,157,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $7,647,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $7,424,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $8,077,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $7,817,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $8,397,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $8,139,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $8,968,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $8,702,000,000.
          (7) Commerce and Housing Credit (370):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$8,186,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$22,020,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$9,217,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$19,316,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$12,865,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$22,514,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$15,782,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$25,946,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$14,917,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$26,024,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$14,287,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$26,184,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$12,818,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$26,083,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$11,941,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$26,606,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$12,981,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$27,462,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$13,895,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$28,552,000,000.
          (8) Transportation (400):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $83,577,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $87,088,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $84,185,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $85,804,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $78,240,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $85,577,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $34,883,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $73,156,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $61,918,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $60,185,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $62,040,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $63,708,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $62,551,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $64,529,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $63,337,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $63,885,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $64,366,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $63,747,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $65,450,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $64,337,000,000.
          (9) Community and Regional Development (450):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $3,198,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $13,646,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $3,014,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $12,275,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $3,020,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $8,434,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $3,058,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $6,715,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $3,206,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $4,562,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $3,197,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $3,751,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $3,232,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $3,282,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $3,337,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $3,275,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $3,463,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $3,278,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $3,336,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $3,239,000,000.
          (10) Education, Training, Employment, and Social 
        Services (500):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $48,903,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $62,454,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $53,383,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $54,945,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $51,158,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $51,683,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $50,256,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $50,598,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $48,825,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $49,530,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $50,483,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $50,228,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $49,941,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $50,665,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $49,334,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $50,210,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $49,170,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $50,141,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $49,302,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $50,344,000,000.
          (11) Health (550):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $454,509,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $432,501,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $435,341,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $439,994,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $457,516,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $448,856,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $450,448,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $455,861,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $456,758,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $461,189,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $465,309,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $466,743,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $473,437,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $471,674,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $479,987,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $476,960,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $484,487,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $481,009,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $483,275,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $485,571,000,000.
          (12) Medicare (570):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $591,229,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $590,967,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $650,283,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $650,040,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $674,221,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $674,017,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $707,798,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $707,601,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $778,613,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $778,407,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $774,353,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $774,163,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $774,204,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $774,007,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $842,125,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $841,909,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $924,327,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $924,102,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $989,487,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $989,265,000,000.
          (13) Income Security (600):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $472,681,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $458,878,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $427,283,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $418,415,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $433,650,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $424,439,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $438,723,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $430,323,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $442,003,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $439,172,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $421,768,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $415,075,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $428,653,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $417,101,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $434,146,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $423,466,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $441,856,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $436,970,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $448,955,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $443,434,000,000.
          (14) Social Security (650):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $39,475,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $39,475,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $43,016,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $43,016,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $46,287,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $46,287,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $49,748,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $49,748,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $53,392,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $53,392,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $57,378,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $57,378,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $61,764,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $61,764,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $66,388,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $66,388,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $70,871,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $70,871,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $75,473,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $75,473,000,000.
          (15) Veterans Benefits and Services (700):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $176,704,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $178,038,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $191,507,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $190,235,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $194,930,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $193,931,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $199,751,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $197,856,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $215,442,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $213,337,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $212,567,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $210,444,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $209,943,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $207,908,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $227,991,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $225,820,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $234,947,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $232,660,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $243,718,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $241,501,000,000.
          (16) Administration of Justice (750):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $49,987,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $59,438,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $56,597,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $57,202,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $58,054,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $58,361,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $59,354,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $59,249,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $60,365,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $60,203,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $61,908,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $61,705,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $63,488,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $63,252,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $65,105,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $64,669,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $68,048,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $68,333,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $68,351,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $67,818,000,000.
          (17) General Government (800):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $17,757,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $17,400,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $17,972,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $17,497,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $17,346,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $17,159,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $16,959,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $16,817,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $16,488,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $16,407,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $19,594,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $19,325,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $19,274,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $19,140,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $18,930,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $18,796,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $18,518,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $18,400,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $18,035,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $17,942,000,000.
          (18) Net Interest (900):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $373,956,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $373,956,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $399,575,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $399,575,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $432,397,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $432,397,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $464,410,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $464,410,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $492,279,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $492,279,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $516,440,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $516,440,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $532,410,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $532,410,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $544,916,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $544,916,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $555,256,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $555,256,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $554,858,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $554,969,000,000.
          (19) Allowances (920):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$103,895,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$139,536,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$122,471,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$113,004,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$192,059,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$164,127,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$192,585,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$160,271,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$213,001,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$185,944,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$239,872,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$219,297,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$186,688,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$167,764,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$165,184,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$150,710,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$201,905,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$176,558,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$237,951,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$216,002,000,000.
          (20) Undistributed Offsetting Receipts (950):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$83,212,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$83,212,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$86,409,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$86,409,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$86,316,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$86,316,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$90,347,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$90,347,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$93,573,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$93,573,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$100,001,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$100,001,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$105,371,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$105,371,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$115,139,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$115,139,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$117,033,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$117,033,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$127,808,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$127,808,000,000.
          (21) Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on 
        Terrorism (970):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $0.
                  (B) Outlays, $0.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $0.
                  (B) Outlays, $0.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $0.
                  (B) Outlays, $0.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $0.
                  (B) Outlays, $0.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $0.
                  (B) Outlays, $0.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $0.
                  (B) Outlays, $0.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $0.
                  (B) Outlays, $0.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $0.
                  (B) Outlays, $0.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $0.
                  (B) Outlays, $0.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $0.
                  (B) Outlays, $0.

                        TITLE II--RECONCILIATION

SEC. 201. RECONCILIATION IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

  (a) Submission Providing for Deficit Reduction.--Not later 
than 90 days after the adoption of this resolution, the 
committees named in subsection (b) shall submit their 
recommendations on changes in laws within their jurisdictions 
to the Committee on the Budget that would achieve the specified 
reduction in the deficit for the period of fiscal years 2018 
through 2027.
  (b) Instructions.--
          (1) Committee on agriculture.--The Committee on 
        Agriculture shall submit changes in laws within its 
        jurisdiction sufficient to reduce the deficit by 
        $327,704,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2018 
        through 2027.
          (2) Committee on armed services.--The Committee on 
        Armed Services shall submit changes in laws within its 
        jurisdiction sufficient to reduce the deficit by 
        $32,601,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2018 
        through 2027.
          (3) Committee on education and the workforce.--The 
        Committee on Education and the Workforce shall submit 
        changes in laws within its jurisdiction sufficient to 
        reduce the deficit by $441,015,000,000 for the period 
        of fiscal years 2018 through 2027.
          (4) Committee on energy and commerce.--The Committee 
        on Energy and Commerce shall submit changes in laws 
        within its jurisdiction sufficient to reduce the 
        deficit by $2,665,188,000,000 for the period of fiscal 
        years 2018 through 2027.
          (5) Committee on financial services.--The Committee 
        on Financial Services shall submit changes in laws 
        within its jurisdiction sufficient to reduce the 
        deficit by $154,083,000,000 for the period of fiscal 
        years 2018 through 2027.
          (6) Committee on homeland security.--The Committee on 
        Homeland Security shall submit changes in laws within 
        its jurisdiction sufficient to reduce the deficit by 
        $24,689,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2018 
        through 2027.
          (7) Committee on the judiciary.--The Committee on the 
        Judiciary shall submit changes in laws within its 
        jurisdiction sufficient to reduce the deficit by 
        $67,178,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2018 
        through 2027.
          (8) Committee on natural resources.--The Committee on 
        Natural Resources shall submit changes in laws within 
        its jurisdiction sufficient to reduce the deficit by 
        $59,302,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2018 
        through 2027.
          (9) Committee on oversight and government reform.--
        The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform shall 
        submit changes in laws within its jurisdiction 
        sufficient to reduce the deficit by $447,960,000,000 
        for the period of fiscal years 2018 through 2027.
          (10) Committee on transportation and 
        infrastructure.--The Committee on Transportation and 
        Infrastructure shall submit changes in laws within its 
        jurisdiction sufficient to reduce the deficit by 
        $5,561,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2018 
        through 2027.
          (11) Committee on veterans' affairs.--The Committee 
        on Veterans' Affairs shall submit changes in laws 
        within its jurisdiction sufficient to reduce the 
        deficit by $49,022,000,000 for the period of fiscal 
        years 2018 through 2027.
          (12) Committee on ways and means.--The Committee on 
        Ways and Means shall submit changes in laws within its 
        jurisdiction sufficient to reduce the deficit by 
        $1,417,836,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2018 
        through 2027.
  (c) Revision of Budgetary Levels.--
          (1) In general.--In the House of Representatives, the 
        chair of the Committee on the Budget may file 
        appropriately revised allocations, aggregates, and 
        functional levels upon the consideration of a 
        reconciliation measure under section 310 of the 
        Congressional Budget Act of 1974 or amendment thereto, 
        or the submission of a conference report to the House 
        of Representatives pursuant to this section, if it is 
        in compliance with the reconciliation directives by 
        virtue of section 310(c) of the Congressional Budget 
        Act of 1974.
          (2) Revision.--Allocations and aggregates revised 
        pursuant to this subsection shall be considered to be 
        the allocations and aggregates established by this 
        concurrent resolution on the budget pursuant to section 
        301 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.
  (d) Purpose of Reconciliation Instructions.--It is the policy 
of this resolution that the reconciliation instructions 
provided pursuant to this section are to be used for--
          (1) enacting the mandatory spending reforms 
        recommended by this resolution; and
          (2) enacting comprehensive tax reform.

                     TITLE III--BUDGET ENFORCEMENT

     Subtitle A--Budget Enforcement in the House of Representatives

SEC. 301. POINT OF ORDER AGAINST INCREASING LONG-TERM DIRECT SPENDING.

  (a) Congressional Budget Office Analysis of Proposals.--The 
Director of the Congressional Budget Office shall, to the 
extent practicable, prepare an estimate of whether a measure 
would cause a net increase in direct spending in the House of 
Representatives, in excess of $5,000,000,000 in any of the 4 
consecutive 10-fiscal year periods beginning with the first 
fiscal year that is 10 fiscal years after the budget year 
provided for in the most recently agreed to concurrent 
resolution on the budget in the House of Representatives, for 
each bill or joint resolution other than an appropriation 
measure and any amendment thereto or conference report thereon.
  (b) Point of Order.--It shall not be in order in the House of 
Representatives to consider any bill or joint resolution, or 
amendment thereto or conference report thereon, that would 
cause a net increase in direct spending in excess of 
$5,000,000,000 in any of the 4 consecutive 10-fiscal year 
periods described in subsection (a).
  (c) Limitation.--In the House of Representatives, the 
provisions of this section shall not apply to any bills or 
joint resolutions, or amendments thereto or conference reports 
thereon, for which the chair of the Committee on the Budget has 
made adjustments to the allocations, levels, or limits 
contained in this concurrent resolution pursuant to section 
401.
  (d) Determinations of Budget Levels.--For purposes of this 
section, the levels of net increases in direct spending shall 
be determined on the basis of estimates provided by the chair 
of the Committee on the Budget of the House of Representatives.

SEC. 302. ALLOCATION FOR OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS/GLOBAL WAR ON 
                    TERRORISM.

  (a) Separate Allocation for Overseas Contingency Operations/
Global War on Terrorism.--In the House of Representatives, 
there shall be a separate allocation of new budget authority 
and outlays provided to the Committee on Appropriations for the 
purposes of Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on 
Terrorism, which shall be deemed to be an allocation under 
section 302(a) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974. Section 
302(a)(3) of such Act shall not apply to such separate 
allocation.
  (b) 302 Allocations.--The separate allocation referred to in 
subsection (a) shall be the exclusive allocation for Overseas 
Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism under section 
302(b) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974. The Committee 
on Appropriations of the House of Representatives may provide 
suballocations of such separate allocation under such section 
302(b).
  (c) Application.--For purposes of enforcing the separate 
allocation referred to in subsection (a) under section 302(f) 
of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the ``first fiscal 
year'' and the ``total of fiscal years'' shall be deemed to 
refer to fiscal year 2018. Section 302(c) of such Act shall not 
apply to such separate allocation.
  (d) Designations.--New budget authority or outlays shall only 
be counted toward the allocation referred to in subsection (a) 
if designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the 
Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
  (e) Adjustments.--For purposes of subsection (a) for fiscal 
year 2018, no adjustment shall be made under section 314(a) of 
the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 if any adjustment would be 
made under section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced Budget and 
Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
  (f) Adjustments to Fund Overseas Contingency Operations/
Global War on Terrorism.--In the House of Representatives, the 
chair of the Committee on the Budget may adjust the 
allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate budgetary levels 
related to Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on 
Terrorism or the allocation under section 302(a) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 to the Committee on 
Appropriations set forth in the report or joint explanatory 
statement of managers, as applicable, accompanying this 
concurrent resolution to account for new information.

SEC. 303. LIMITATION ON CHANGES IN CERTAIN MANDATORY PROGRAMS.

  (a) Definition.--In this section, the term ``change in 
mandatory programs'' means a provision that--
          (1) would have been estimated as affecting direct 
        spending or receipts under section 252 of the Balanced 
        Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (as in 
        effect prior to September 30, 2002) if the provision 
        was included in legislation other than appropriation 
        Acts; and
          (2) results in a net decrease in budget authority in 
        the budget year, but does not result in a net decrease 
        in outlays over the period of the total of the current 
        year, the budget year, and all fiscal years covered 
        under the most recently agreed to concurrent resolution 
        on the budget.
  (b) Point of Order in the House of Representatives.--
          (1) In general.--A provision in a bill or joint 
        resolution making appropriations for a full fiscal year 
        that proposes a change in mandatory programs that, if 
        enacted, would cause the absolute value of the total 
        budget authority of all such change in mandatory 
        programs enacted in relation to a full fiscal year to 
        be more than the amount specified in paragraph (3), 
        shall not be in order in the House of Representatives.
          (2) Amendments and conference reports.--It shall not 
        be in order in the House of Representatives to consider 
        an amendment to, or a conference report on, a bill or 
        joint resolution making appropriations for a full 
        fiscal year if such amendment thereto or conference 
        report thereon proposes a change in mandatory programs 
        that, if enacted, would cause the absolute value of the 
        total budget authority of all such change in mandatory 
        programs enacted in relation to a full fiscal year to 
        be more than the amount specified in paragraph (3).
          (3) Amount.--The amount specified in this paragraph 
        is--
                  (A) for fiscal year 2018, $17,000,000,000;
                  (B) for fiscal year 2019, $15,000,000,000; 
                and
                  (C) for fiscal year 2020, $13,000,000,000.
  (c) Determination.--For purposes of this section, budgetary 
levels shall be determined on the basis of estimates provided 
by the chair of the Committee on the Budget.

SEC. 304. GAO REPORT.

  (a) GAO Submission.--At a date specified by the chair of the 
Committee on the Budget of the House of Representatives, the 
Comptroller General, in consultation with the chair, the 
Director of the Congressional Budget Office, and the Director 
of the Office of Management and Budget, shall submit to the 
chair a comprehensive list of all current direct spending 
programs of the Government.
  (b) Publication.--The chair of the Committee on the Budget 
shall cause to be printed in the Congressional Record the list 
submitted under subsection (a). The chair shall publish such 
list on the Committee's public Web site. Such publication shall 
be searchable, sortable, and downloadable.

SEC. 305. ESTIMATES OF DEBT SERVICE COSTS.

  In the House of Representatives, the chair of the Committee 
on the Budget may direct the Congressional Budget Office to 
include in any estimate prepared under section 402 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 with respect to any bill or 
joint resolution, or an estimate of an amendment thereto or 
conference report thereon, an estimate of any change in debt 
service costs (if any) resulting from carrying out such bill or 
resolution. Any estimate of debt servicing costs provided under 
this section shall be advisory and shall not be used for 
purposes of enforcement of such Act, the Rules of the House of 
Representatives, or this concurrent resolution. This section 
shall not apply to authorizations of discretionary programs or 
to appropriation measures, but shall apply to changes in the 
authorization level of appropriated entitlements.

SEC. 306. FAIR-VALUE CREDIT ESTIMATES.

  (a) All Credit Programs.--Whenever the Director of the 
Congressional Budget Office provides an estimate of any measure 
that establishes or modifies any program providing loans or 
loan guarantees, the Director shall, to the extent practicable, 
provide a supplemental fair-value estimate of any loan or loan 
guarantee program if requested by the chair of the Committee on 
the Budget.
  (b) Student Financial Assistance and Housing Programs.--The 
Director of the Congressional Budget Office shall provide a 
supplemental fair-value estimate as part of any estimate for 
any measure establishing or modifying a program providing loans 
or loan guarantees for student financial assistance or housing 
(including residential mortgage).
  (c) Baseline Estimates.--The Congressional Budget Office 
shall include estimates, on a fair-value and credit reform 
basis, of loan and loan guarantee programs for student 
financial assistance, housing (including residential mortgage), 
and such other major loan and loan guarantee programs, as 
practicable, in its Budget and Economic Outlook: 2018 to 2027.

SEC. 307. ESTIMATES OF MAJOR DIRECT SPENDING LEGISLATION.

  The Congressional Budget Office shall prepare, to the extent 
practicable, an estimate of the outlay changes during the 
second and third decade of enactment for any direct spending 
legislative provision--
          (1) that proposes a change or changes to law that the 
        Congressional Budget Office determines has an outlay 
        impact in excess of 0.25 percent of the gross domestic 
        product of the United States during the first decade or 
        in the tenth year; or
          (2) for which the chair of the Committee on the 
        Budget of the House of Representatives requests such an 
        estimate.

SEC. 308. ESTIMATES OF MACROECONOMIC EFFECTS OF MAJOR LEGISLATION.

  (a) CBO and JCT Estimates.--During the 114th and 115th 
Congresses, any estimate provided by the Congressional Budget 
Office under section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 
1974 or by the Joint Committee on Taxation to the Congressional 
Budget Office under section 201(f) of such Act for major 
legislation considered in the House of Representatives shall, 
to the extent practicable, incorporate the budgetary effects of 
changes in economic output, employment, capital stock, and 
other macroeconomic variables resulting from such major 
legislation.
  (b) Contents.--Any estimate referred to in subsection (a) 
shall, to the extent practicable, include--
          (1) a qualitative assessment of the budgetary effects 
        (including macroeconomic variables described in 
        subsection (a)) of major legislation in the 20-fiscal 
        year period beginning after the last fiscal year of the 
        most recently agreed to concurrent resolution on the 
        budget that sets forth budgetary levels required under 
        section 301 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974; 
        and
          (2) an identification of the critical assumptions and 
        the source of data underlying that estimate.
  (c) Definitions.--In this section:
          (1) Major legislation.--The term ``major 
        legislation'' means a bill or joint resolution, or 
        amendment thereto or conference report thereon--
                  (A) for which an estimate is required to be 
                prepared pursuant to section 402 of the 
                Congressional Budget Act of 1974 and that 
                causes a gross budgetary effect (before 
                incorporating macroeconomic effects and not 
                including timing shifts) in a fiscal year in 
                the period of years of the most recently agreed 
                to concurrent resolution on the budget equal to 
                or greater than 0.25 percent of the current 
                projected gross domestic product of the United 
                States for that fiscal year; or
                  (B) designated as such by--
                          (i) the chair of the Committee on the 
                        Budget of the House of Representatives 
                        for all direct spending and revenue 
                        legislation; or
                          (ii) the Member who is Chairman or 
                        Vice Chairman of the Joint Committee on 
                        Taxation for revenue legislation.
          (2) Budgetary effects.--The term ``budgetary 
        effects'' means changes in revenues, direct spending 
        outlays, and deficits.
          (3) Timing shifts.--The term ``timing shifts'' 
        means--
                  (A) provisions that cause a delay of the date 
                on which outlays flowing from direct spending 
                would otherwise occur from one fiscal year to 
                the next fiscal year; or
                  (B) provisions that cause an acceleration of 
                the date on which revenues would otherwise 
                occur from one fiscal year to the prior fiscal 
                year.

SEC. 309. ADJUSTMENTS FOR IMPROVED CONTROL OF BUDGETARY RESOURCES.

  (a) Adjustments of Discretionary and Direct Spending 
Levels.--In the House of Representatives, if a committee (other 
than the Committee on Appropriations) reports a bill or joint 
resolution, or any amendment thereto is offered or any 
conference report thereon is submitted, providing for a 
decrease in direct spending (budget authority and outlays 
flowing therefrom) for any fiscal year and also provides for an 
authorization of appropriations for the same purpose, upon the 
enactment of such measure, the chair of the Committee on the 
Budget may decrease the allocation to such committee and 
increase the allocation of discretionary spending (budget 
authority and outlays flowing therefrom) to the Committee on 
Appropriations for fiscal year 2018 by an amount equal to the 
new budget authority (and outlays flowing therefrom) provided 
for in a bill or joint resolution making appropriations for the 
same purpose.
  (b) Determinations.--In the House of Representatives, for 
purposes of enforcing this concurrent resolution, the 
allocations and aggregate levels of new budget authority, 
outlays, direct spending, revenues, deficits, and surpluses for 
fiscal year 2018 and the period of fiscal years 2018 through 
2027 shall be determined on the basis of estimates made by the 
chair of the Committee on the Budget and such chair may adjust 
the applicable levels in this concurrent resolution.

SEC. 310. LIMITATION ON ADVANCE APPROPRIATIONS.

  (a) In General.--In the House of Representatives, except as 
provided for in subsection (b), any bill or joint resolution, 
or amendment thereto or conference report thereon, making a 
general appropriation or continuing appropriation may not 
provide advance appropriations.
  (b) Exceptions.--An advance appropriation may be provided for 
programs, projects, activities, or accounts identified in the 
report or the joint explanatory statement of managers, as 
applicable, accompanying this concurrent resolution under the 
heading--
          (1) General.--``Accounts Identified for Advance 
        Appropriations''.
          (2) Veterans.--``Veterans Accounts Identified for 
        Advance Appropriations''.
  (c) Limitations.--The aggregate level of advance 
appropriations shall not exceed--
          (1) General.--$28,852,000,000 in new budget authority 
        for all programs identified pursuant to subsection 
        (b)(1).
          (2) Veterans.--$70,699,313,000 in new budget 
        authority for programs in the Department of Veterans 
        Affairs identified pursuant to subsection (b)(2).
  (d) Definition.--The term ``advance appropriation'' means any 
new discretionary budget authority provided in a bill or joint 
resolution, or any amendment thereto or conference report 
thereon, making general appropriations or continuing 
appropriations, for the fiscal year following fiscal year 2018.

SEC. 311. SCORING RULE FOR ENERGY SAVINGS PERFORMANCE CONTRACTS.

  (a) In General.--The Director of the Congressional Budget 
Office shall estimate provisions of any bill or joint 
resolution, or amendment thereto or conference report thereon 
that affects the use of any covered energy savings contract on 
a net present value basis.
  (b) NPV Calculations.--The net present value of any covered 
energy savings contract shall be calculated as follows:
          (1) The discount rate shall reflect market risk.
          (2) The cash flows shall include, whether classified 
        as mandatory or discretionary, payments to contractors 
        under the terms of their contracts, payments to 
        contractors for other services, and direct savings in 
        energy and energy-related costs.
          (3) The stream of payments shall cover the period 
        covered by the contracts but not to exceed 25 years.
  (c) Definition.--As used in this section, the term ``covered 
energy savings contract'' means--
          (1) an energy savings performance contract authorized 
        under section 801 of the National Energy Conservation 
        Policy Act; or
          (2) a utility energy service contract, as described 
        in the Office of Management and Budget Memorandum on 
        Federal use of energy savings performance contracting, 
        dated July 25, 1998 (M-98-13), and the Office of 
        Management and Budget Memorandum on the Federal use of 
        energy saving performance contracts and utility energy 
        service contracts, dated September 28, 2012 (M-12-21), 
        or any successor to either memorandum.
  (d) Enforcement in the House of Representatives.--In the 
House of Representatives, if any present value calculated under 
subsection (b) results in a net savings, then such savings may 
not be used as an offset for purposes of budget enforcement.
  (e) Classification of Spending.--For purposes of budget 
enforcement, the estimated net present value of the budget 
authority provided by the measure, and outlays flowing 
therefrom, shall be classified as direct spending.
  (f) Sense of the House of Representatives.--It is the sense 
of the House of Representatives that--
          (1) the Director of the Office of Management and 
        Budget, in consultation with the Director of the 
        Congressional Budget Office, should separately identify 
        the cash flows under subsection (b)(2) and include such 
        information in the President's annual budget submission 
        under section 1105(a) of title 31, United States Code; 
        and
          (2) the scoring method used in this section should 
        not be used to score any contracts other than covered 
        energy savings contracts.

SEC. 312. ESTIMATES OF LAND CONVEYANCES.

  In the House of Representatives, the Director of the 
Congressional Budget Office shall include in any estimate 
prepared under section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 
1974 with respect to any measure that conveys Federal land to 
any non-Federal entity--
          (1) the methodology used to calculate such estimate;
          (2) a detailed justification of its estimate of any 
        change in revenue, offsetting receipts, or offsetting 
        collections resulting from such conveyance;
          (3) if requested by the chair of the Committee on the 
        Budget, any information provided by the Bureau of Land 
        Management or other applicable Federal agency, 
        including the source and date of such information, that 
        supports the estimate of any change in revenue, 
        offsetting receipts, or offsetting collections;
          (4) a description of any efforts to independently 
        verify such agency estimate; and
          (5) a statement of the assumptions underlying the 
        estimate of the budgetary effects that would be 
        generated by such parcel in CBO's baseline projections 
        as of the most recent publication or update.

SEC. 313. LIMITATION ON TRANSFERS FROM THE GENERAL FUND OF THE TREASURY 
                    TO THE HIGHWAY TRUST FUND.

  In the House of Representatives, for purposes of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the Balanced Budget and 
Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, and the rules or orders 
of the House of Representatives, a bill or joint resolution, or 
an amendment thereto or conference report thereon, that 
transfers funds from the general fund of the Treasury to the 
Highway Trust Fund shall be counted as new budget authority and 
outlays equal to the amount of the transfer in the fiscal year 
the transfer occurs.

SEC. 314. PROHIBITION ON THE USE OF GUARANTEE FEES AS AN OFFSET.

  In the House of Representatives, any provision of a bill or 
joint resolution, or amendment thereto or conference report 
thereon, that increases, or extends the increase of, any 
guarantee fees of the Federal National Mortgage Association or 
the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation shall not be counted 
for purposes of enforcing the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, 
this concurrent resolution, or clause 10 of rule XXI of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives.

SEC. 315. PROHIBITION ON USE OF FEDERAL RESERVE SURPLUSES AS AN OFFSET.

  In the House of Representatives, any provision of a bill or 
joint resolution, or amendment thereto or conference report 
thereon, that transfers any portion of the net surplus of the 
Federal Reserve System to the general fund of the Treasury 
shall not be counted for purposes of enforcing the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, this concurrent resolution, 
or clause 10 of rule XXI of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives.

                      Subtitle B--Other Provisions

SEC. 321. BUDGETARY TREATMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES.

  (a) In General.--In the House of Representatives, 
notwithstanding section 302(a)(1) of the Congressional Budget 
Act of 1974, section 13301 of the Budget Enforcement Act of 
1990, and section 2009a of title 39, United States Code, the 
report or the joint explanatory statement, as applicable, 
accompanying this concurrent resolution shall include in its 
allocation under section 302(a) of the Congressional Budget Act 
of 1974 to the Committee on Appropriations amounts for the 
discretionary administrative expenses of the Social Security 
Administration and the United States Postal Service.
  (b) Special Rule.--In the House of Representatives, for 
purposes of enforcing section 302(f) of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974, estimates of the level of total new budget 
authority and total outlays provided by a measure shall include 
any discretionary amounts described in subsection (a).

SEC. 322. APPLICATION AND EFFECT OF CHANGES IN ALLOCATIONS AND 
                    AGGREGATES.

  (a) Application.--In the House of Representatives, any 
adjustments of allocations and aggregates made pursuant to this 
concurrent resolution shall--
          (1) apply while that measure is under consideration;
          (2) take effect upon the enactment of that measure; 
        and
          (3) be published in the Congressional Record as soon 
        as practicable.
  (b) Effect of Changed Allocations and Aggregates.--Revised 
allocations and aggregates resulting from these adjustments 
shall be considered for the purposes of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974 as the allocations and aggregates contained 
in this concurrent resolution.
  (c) Budget Committee Determinations.--For purposes of this 
concurrent resolution, the budgetary levels for a fiscal year 
or period of fiscal years shall be determined on the basis of 
estimates made by the chair of the Committee on the Budget of 
the House of Representatives.
  (d) Aggregates, Allocations and Application.--In the House of 
Representatives, for purposes of this concurrent resolution and 
budget enforcement, the consideration of any bill or joint 
resolution, or amendment thereto or conference report thereon, 
for which the chair of the Committee on the Budget makes 
adjustments or revisions in the allocations, aggregates, and 
other budgetary levels of this concurrent resolution shall not 
be subject to the points of order set forth in clause 10 of 
rule XXI of the Rules of the House of Representatives or 
section 301 of this concurrent resolution.

SEC. 323. ADJUSTMENTS TO REFLECT CHANGES IN CONCEPTS AND DEFINITIONS.

  In the House of Representatives, the chair of the Committee 
on the Budget may adjust the appropriate aggregates, 
allocations, and other budgetary levels in this concurrent 
resolution for any change in budgetary concepts and definitions 
in accordance with section 251(b)(1) of the Balanced Budget and 
Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

SEC. 324. ADJUSTMENTS TO REFLECT UPDATED BUDGETARY ESTIMATES.

  In the House of Representatives, the chair of the Committee 
on the Budget may revise the appropriate aggregates, 
allocations, and other budgetary levels in this concurrent 
resolution to reflect any adjustments to the baseline made by 
the Congressional Budget Office.

SEC. 325. ADJUSTMENT FOR CERTAIN EMERGENCY DESIGNATIONS.

  In the House of Representatives, the chair of the Committee 
on the Budget may adjust the appropriate aggregates, 
allocations, and other budgetary levels for any bill or joint 
resolution, or amendment thereto or conference report thereon, 
that designates an emergency under section 4(g)(2) of the 
Statutory Pay-As-You-Go Act of 2010.

SEC. 326. EXERCISE OF RULEMAKING POWERS.

  The House of Representatives adopts the provisions of this 
title, title II, and title VII--
          (1) as an exercise of the rulemaking power of the 
        House of Representatives, and as such they shall be 
        considered as part of the rules of the House of 
        Representatives, and such rules shall supersede other 
        rules only to the extent that they are inconsistent 
        with such other rules; and
          (2) with full recognition of the constitutional right 
        of the House of Representatives to change those rules 
        at any time, in the same manner, and to the same extent 
        as is the case of any other rule of the House of 
        Representatives.

                        TITLE IV--RESERVE FUNDS

SEC. 401. RESERVE FUND FOR THE REPEAL OF THE 2010 HEALTH CARE LAWS.

  In the House, the chair of the Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this concurrent resolution for the budgetary effects 
of any bill or joint resolution, or amendment thereto or 
conference report thereon, that only consists of a full repeal 
the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the health 
care-related provisions of the Health Care and Education 
Reconciliation Act of 2010.

SEC. 402. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR ADDITIONAL MEASURES RELATING 
                    TO THE REPLACEMENT OF OBAMACARE.

  In the House, the chair of the Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this concurrent resolution for the budgetary effects 
of any bill or joint resolution, or amendment thereto or 
conference report thereon, that repeals or replaces provisions 
of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act or the Health 
Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, if such measure 
would not increase the deficit for the period of fiscal years 
2018 through 2027.

SEC. 403. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATED TO THE MEDICARE 
                    PROVISIONS OF THE 2010 HEALTH CARE LAWS.

  In the House, the chair of the Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this concurrent resolution for the budgetary effects 
of any bill or joint resolution, or amendment thereto or 
conference report thereon, that repeals all or part of the 
decreases in Medicare spending included in the Patient 
Protection and Affordable Care Act or the Health Care and 
Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, if such measure would not 
increase the deficit for the period of fiscal years 2018 
through 2027.

SEC. 404. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR REFORMING THE TAX CODE.

  In the House, if the Committee on Ways and Means reports a 
bill or joint resolution that reforms the Internal Revenue Code 
of 1986, the chair of the Committee on the Budget may revise 
the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in 
this concurrent resolution for the budgetary effects of any 
such bill or joint resolution, or amendment thereto or 
conference report thereon, if such measure would not increase 
the deficit for the period of fiscal years 2018 through 2027 
when the macroeconomic effects of such reforms are taken into 
account.

SEC. 405. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR TRADE AGREEMENTS.

  In the House, the chair of the Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this concurrent resolution for the budgetary effects 
of any bill or joint resolution reported by the Committee on 
Ways and Means, or amendment thereto or conference report 
thereon, that such chair determines are necessary to implement 
a trade agreement, and the budgetary levels for any companion 
measure that offsets such trade measure, if the combined cost 
of each measure would not increase the deficit over the period 
of fiscal years 2018 through 2027.

SEC. 406. RESERVE FUND FOR REVENUE MEASURES.

  In the House, the chair of the Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this concurrent resolution for the budgetary effects 
of any bill or joint resolution reported by the Committee on 
Ways and Means, or amendment thereto or conference report 
thereon, that decreases revenue.

SEC. 407. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR INFRASTRUCTURE REFORM.

  In the House, the chair of the Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this resolution for any bill or joint resolution, or 
amendment thereto or conference report thereon, if such measure 
reforms the Federal infrastructure funding system, but only if 
such measure would not increase the deficit over the period of 
fiscal years 2018 through 2027.

SEC. 408. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO REDUCE POVERTY AND INCREASE 
                    OPPORTUNITY AND UPWARD MOBILITY.

  In the House, the chair of the Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this resolution for any bill or joint resolution, or 
amendment thereto or conference report thereon, if such measure 
reforms policies and programs to reduce poverty and increase 
opportunity and upward mobility, but only if such measure would 
neither adversely impact job creation nor increase the deficit 
over the period of fiscal years 2018 through 2027.

SEC. 409. IMPLEMENTATION OF A DEFICIT AND LONG-TERM DEBT REDUCTION 
                    AGREEMENT.

  In the House, the chair of the Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this concurrent resolution to accommodate the 
enactment of a deficit and long-term debt reduction agreement 
if it includes permanent spending reductions and reforms to 
direct spending program, and does not increase outlays in any 
fiscal year.

SEC. 410. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE ACCOUNT FOR REFORMING SNAP.

  In the House, the chair of the Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this concurrent resolution for the budgetary effects 
of any bill or joint resolution, or amendment thereto or 
conference report thereon, that reforms the supplemental 
nutrition assistance program (SNAP), but only if such measure 
would not increase the deficit for the period of fiscal years 
2018 through 2027.

SEC. 411. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY 
                    INSURANCE REFORM.

  In the House, the chair of the Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this concurrent resolution for the budgetary effects 
of any bill or joint resolution, or amendment thereto or 
conference report thereon, that reforms the Social Security 
Disability Insurance program under title II of the Social 
Security Act, but only if such measure would not increase the 
deficit for the period of fiscal years 2018 through 2027.

SEC. 412. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR FEDERAL RETIREMENT REFORM.

  In the House, the chair of the Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations, aggregates, and other budgetary levels 
in this concurrent resolution for any bill or joint resolution, 
or amendment thereto or conference report thereon, if such 
measure reforms, improves and updates the Federal retirement 
system, as determined by such chair, but only if such measure 
would not increase the deficit over the period of fiscal years 
2018 through 2027.

SEC. 413. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR DEFENSE SEQUESTER 
                    REPLACEMENT.

  The chair of the Committee on the Budget may revise the 
allocations, aggregates, and other budgetary levels in this 
concurrent resolution for any bill or joint resolution, or 
amendment thereto or conference report thereon, if such measure 
supports the following activities: Department of Defense 
training and maintenance associated with combat readiness, 
modernization of equipment, auditability of financial 
statements, or military compensation and benefit reforms, by 
the amount provided for these purposes, but only if such 
measure would not increase the deficit (without counting any 
net revenue increases in that measure) over the period of 
fiscal years 2018 through 2027.

SEC. 414. RESERVE FUND FOR COMMERCIALIZATION OF AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL.

  (a) In General.--In the House of Representatives, the chair 
of the Committee on the Budget may adjust, at a time the chair 
deems appropriate, the section 302(a) allocation to the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and other 
applicable committees of the House of Representatives, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels established in this 
concurrent resolution for a bill or joint resolution, or 
amendment thereto or conference report thereon, that 
commercializes the operations of the air traffic control system 
if such measure reduces the discretionary spending limits in 
section 251(c) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
Control Act of 1985 by the amount that would otherwise be 
appropriated to the Federal Aviation Administration for air 
traffic control. Adjustments to the section 302(a) allocation 
to the Committee on Appropriations, consistent with the 
adjustments to the discretionary spending limits under such 
section 251(c), shall only be made upon enactment of such 
measure.
  (b) Definition.--For purposes of this section, a measure that 
commercializes the operations of the air traffic control system 
shall be a measure that establishes a federally chartered, not-
for-profit corporation that--
          (1) is authorized to provide air traffic control 
        services within the United States airspace;
          (2) sets user fees to finance its operations;
          (3) may borrow from private capital markets to 
        finance improvements;
          (4) is governed by a board of directors composed of a 
        CEO and directors whose fiduciary duty is to the 
        entity; and
          (5) becomes the employer of those employees directly 
        connected to providing air traffic control services and 
        who the Secretary transfers from the Federal 
        Government.

                       TITLE V--POLICY STATEMENTS

SEC. 501. POLICY STATEMENT ON OBAMACARE REPEAL.

  It is the policy of this resolution that the Patient 
Protection and Affordable Care Act (Public Law 111-148), and 
the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 
(Public Law 111-152) should be repealed.

SEC. 502. POLICY STATEMENT ON REPLACING OBAMACARE.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) Obamacare put Washington's priorities before 
        those of patients'. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has 
        failed to reduce health care premiums as promised. 
        Instead, the law mandated benefits and coverage levels, 
        denying patients the opportunity to choose the type of 
        coverage that best suits their health needs and driving 
        up health coverage costs. A typical family's health 
        care premiums were supposed to decline by $2,500; 
        instead, average premiums have increased 105 percent. A 
        study conducted by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget 
        Office (CBO) estimated premiums to continue rising over 
        the next decade, projecting an average increase of 8 
        percent per year between 2016 and 2018, and increasing 
        by nearly 60 percent by 2026.
          (2) President Obama pledged, ``If you like your 
        health care plan, you can keep your health care plan.'' 
        Instead, CBO now estimated 7 million Americans will 
        lose employment-based health coverage due to the health 
        care law, further limiting patient choice.
          (3) Then-Speaker of the House Pelosi stated that the 
        President's health care law would create 4 million jobs 
        over the life of the law and almost 400,000 jobs 
        immediately. Instead, CBO estimated that by 2025 
        Obamacare will reduce the number of hours worked by 
        approximately 2 million full-time equivalent workers, 
        compared with what would have occurred in the absence 
        of the law. Additionally, a study by the Mercatus 
        Center at George Mason University estimated that 
        Obamacare will reduce employment by up to 3 percent, or 
        about 4 million full-time equivalent workers.
          (4) Since the ACA was signed into law, the Obama 
        administration repeatedly failed to implement it as 
        written. President Obama's unilateral actions resulted 
        in numerous changes, delays, and exemptions. President 
        Obama signed into law another 24 changes made by 
        Congress. The Supreme Court struck down the forced 
        expansion of Medicaid; ruled the individual ``mandate'' 
        could only be characterized as a tax to remain 
        constitutional; and rejected the requirement that 
        closely held companies provide health insurance to 
        their employees even if it violates the companies' 
        religious beliefs. More than 7 years after enactment, 
        the courts continue to evaluate the legality of how 
        President Obama's administration implemented the law. 
        All of these changes prove the folly of the underlying 
        law; health care in the United States cannot be run 
        from a centralized bureaucracy.
          (5) Obamacare is unaffordable, intrusive, 
        overreaching, destructive, and unworkable. Its complex 
        structure of subsidies, mandates, and penalties 
        perversely impact individuals, married couples, and 
        families. Those who previously had insurance along with 
        those who did not have been funneled into a new system 
        that is providing less access to doctors and 
        treatments. Millions of Americans have been added to a 
        broken Medicaid system that is incapable of providing 
        the care promised. Cuts made to Medicare to fund a new 
        entitlement are undermining the health security of 
        seniors. Taxes and mandates are distorting the 
        insurance market and harming the broader economy, 
        resulting in fewer jobs and less opportunity. By 
        design, Obamacare put Washington at the center of our 
        health care system, at the expense of patients, 
        families, physicians, and businesses. The ACA should be 
        fully repealed, allowing for real patient-centered 
        health care reform that puts patients first, not 
        Washington.
  (b) Policy on Replacing Obamacare.--It is the policy of this 
resolution that Obamacare must not only be repealed, but also 
replaced by enacting the American Health Care Reform Act.

SEC. 503. POLICY STATEMENT ON MEDICARE.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) More than 50 million Americans depend on Medicare 
        for their health security.
          (2) The Medicare Trustees Report has repeatedly 
        recommended that Medicare's long-term financial 
        challenges be addressed soon. Each year without reform, 
        the financial condition of Medicare becomes more 
        precarious and the threat to those in or near 
        retirement becomes more pronounced. According to the 
        Medicare Trustees Report--
                  (A) the Hospital Insurance Trust Fund will be 
                exhausted in 2028 and unable to pay scheduled 
                benefits;
                  (B) Medicare enrollment is expected to 
                increase by over 50 percent in the next two 
                decades, as 10,000 baby boomers reach 
                retirement age each day;
                  (C) current workers' payroll contributions 
                pay for current beneficiaries; and
                  (D) most Medicare beneficiaries receive about 
                three dollars in Medicare benefits for every 
                one dollar paid into the program.
          (3) Failing to address this problem will leave 
        millions of American seniors without adequate health 
        security and younger generations burdened with enormous 
        debt to pay for spending levels that cannot be 
        sustained.
  (b) Policy on Medicare Reform.--It is the policy of this 
resolution to protect those in or near retirement from any 
disruptions to their Medicare benefits due to the program's 
impending bankruptcy, and instead offer beneficiaries more 
options, better care, with reduced costs for both benficiaries 
and the Federal Government, by modernizing Medicare.
  (c) Assumptions.--This resolution assumes reform of the 
Medicare program such that:
          (1) Medicare is preserved for current and future 
        beneficiaries.
          (2) Medicare is reformed to provide a premium support 
        payment and a selection of guaranteed health coverage 
        options from which recipients can choose a plan that 
        best suits their needs.
          (3) Medicare will maintain traditional fee-for-
        service as an option.
          (4) Medicare will provide additional assistance for 
        lower-income beneficiaries and those with greater 
        health risks.
          (5) Medicare spending is put on a sustainable path 
        and the Medicare program becomes solvent over the long-
        term.
          (6) The Medicare eligibility age is gradually 
        increased to keep pace with increases in longevity.
          (7) Medicare is simplified by combining parts A and B 
        and reforms to Medigap plans are implemented.

SEC. 504. POLICY STATEMENT ON MEDICAID STATE FLEXIBILITY BLOCK GRANTS.

  It is the policy of this resolution that Medicaid and the 
Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) should be block 
granted to the States in a manner prescribed by the State 
Health Flexibility Act.

SEC. 505. POLICY STATEMENT ON SOCIAL SECURITY.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) More than 55 million retirees, individuals with 
        disabilities, and survivors depend on Social Security. 
        Since enactment, Social Security has served as a vital 
        leg on the ``three-legged stool'' of retirement 
        security, which includes employer provided benefits as 
        well as personal savings.
          (2) The Social Security Trustees Report has 
        repeatedly recommended that Social Security's long-term 
        financial challenges be addressed soon. Each year 
        without reform, the financial condition of Social 
        Security becomes more precarious and the threat to 
        seniors and those receiving Social Security disability 
        benefits becomes more pronounced:
                  (A) In 2022, the Disability Insurance Trust 
                Fund will be exhausted and program revenues 
                will be unable to pay scheduled benefits.
                  (B) In 2034, the combined Old-Age and 
                Survivors and Disability Trust Funds will be 
                exhausted, and program revenues will be unable 
                to pay scheduled benefits.
                  (C) With the exhaustion of the Trust Funds in 
                2034, benefits will be cut nearly 25 percent 
                across the board, devastating those currently 
                in or near retirement and those who rely on 
                Social Security the most.
          (3) The Disability Insurance program provides an 
        income safety net for those with disabilities and their 
        families. However, the program is in serious financial 
        trouble. The number of beneficiaries has skyrocketed 
        from 2.7 million in 1970 to 10.6 million in 2016. At 
        the same time, the labor force participation rate has 
        now fallen to the lowest levels since the 1970s. As a 
        result, the Social Security Actuary now projects that 
        the Disability Insurance Trust Fund will be depleted in 
        2023.
          (4) If this program is not reformed, families who 
        rely on the lifeline that disability benefits provide 
        will face benefit cuts of up to 11 percent in 2023, 
        devastating individuals who need assistance the most.
          (5) Americans deserve action by the President, the 
        House, and the Senate to preserve and strengthen Social 
        Security. It is critical that action be taken to 
        address the looming insolvency of Social Security.
  (b) Policy on Social Security.--It is the policy of this 
resolution that Congress should work to make Social Security 
sustainably solvent. This resolution assumes these reforms will 
include the following policies, based upon the Social Security 
Reform Act:
          (1) Adoption of a more accurate measure for 
        calculating cost of living adjustments.
          (2) Adoption of adjustments to the full retirement 
        age to reflect longevity.
          (3) Makes Social Security benefits more progressive 
        over the long term, providing those most in need with a 
        safety net in retirement.
  (c) Policy on Disability Insurance.--It is the policy of this 
resolution that Congress and the President should enact 
legislation on a bipartisan basis to reform the Disability 
Insurance program prior to its insolvency in 2016 and should 
not raid the Social Security retirement system without reforms 
to the Disability Insurance system. This resolutions assumes 
that reforms to the Disability Insurance program will include--
          (1) encouraging work;
          (2) updates of the eligibility rules;
          (3) reducing fraud and abuse;
          (4) enactment of H.R. 2031, the Social Security 
        Disability Insurance and Unemployment Benefits Double 
        Dip Elimination Act, to prohibit individuals from 
        drawing benefits from both programs at the same time; 
        and
          (5) enactment of H.R. 1540, the Social Security 
        Disability Insurance Return to Work Act, to allow the 
        award of time-limited benefits for applicants whose 
        medical recovery is anticipated in order to create new 
        opportunities for beneficiaries.

SEC. 506. POLICY STATEMENT ON MEANS-TESTED WELFARE PROGRAMS.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds that:
          (1) Too many people are trapped at the bottom rungs 
        of the economic ladder, and every citizen should have 
        the opportunity to rise, escape from poverty, and 
        achieve their own potential.
          (2) In 1996, President Bill Clinton and congressional 
        Republicans enacted reforms that have moved families 
        off of Federal programs and enabled them to provide for 
        themselves.
          (3) Today, there are approximately 92 Federal 
        programs on which Government at the Federal and State 
        level spend more than $1 trillion annually that provide 
        benefits specifically to poor and low-income Americans.
          (4) It should be the goal of welfare programs to 
        encourage work and put people on a path to self-
        reliance.
  (b) Policy on Means-tested Welfare Programs.--It is the 
policy of this resolution that--
          (1) the welfare system should be reformed to give 
        states flexibility to implement and improve safety net 
        programs and that to be eligible for benefits, able 
        bodied adults without dependents should be required to 
        work or be preparing for work, including enrolling in 
        educational or job training programs, contributing 
        community service, or participating in a supervised job 
        search; and
          (2) the President's budget should disclose, in a 
        clear and transparent manner, the aggregate amount of 
        Federal welfare expenditures, as well as an estimate of 
        State and local spending for this purpose, over the 
        next ten years.

SEC. 507. POLICY STATEMENT ON REFORM OF THE SUPPLEMENTAL NUTRITION 
                    ASSISTANCE PROGRAM.

  (a) SNAP.--It is the policy of the resolution that the 
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program be reformed so that:
          (1) Nutrition assistance funds should be distributed 
        to the states as a block grant with funding subject to 
        the annual discretionary appropriations process.
          (2) Funds from the grant must be used by the states 
        to establish and maintain a work activation program for 
        able-bodied adults without dependents.
          (3) It is the goal of this proposal to move those in 
        need off of the assistance rolls and back into the 
        workforce and towards self-sufficiency.
  (b) Assumptions.--This resolution assumes that, pending the 
enactment of reforms described in (a), the conversion of the 
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program into a flexible State 
allotment tailored to meet each State's needs.

SEC. 508. POLICY STATEMENT ON WORK REQUIREMENTS.

  It is the policy of this resolution that all means-tested 
welfare programs should include work activation requirements 
for able-bodied adults.

SEC. 509. POLICY STATEMENT ON A CARBON TAX.

  It is the policy of this resolution that a carbon tax would 
be detrimental to American families and businesses, and is not 
in the best interest of the United States.

SEC. 510. POLICY STATEMENT ON ECONOMIC GROWTH AND JOB CREATION.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) Across the Nation, too many Americans are 
        struggling to make ends meet. The slowly falling 
        unemployment rate has masked an underlying crisis as 
        millions of Americans have abandoned the work force and 
        wages have stagnated. The labor force participation 
        rate has plummeted to levels not seen since the Carter 
        presidency.
          (2) Looking ahead, CBO expects the economy to grow by 
        an average of just 1.9 percent over the next 10 years. 
        That level of economic growth is simply unacceptable 
        and insufficient to expand opportunities and the 
        incomes of millions of middle-income Americans.
          (3) Sluggish economic growth has also contributed to 
        the country's fiscal woes. Subpar growth means that 
        revenue levels are lower than they would otherwise be 
        while government spending (e.g. welfare and income-
        support programs) is higher.
          (4) The unsustainable fiscal trajectory has cast a 
        shadow on the country's economic outlook. investors and 
        businesses make decisions on a forward-looking basis. 
        they know that today's large debt levels are simply 
        tomorrow's tax hikes, interest rate increases, or 
        inflation and they act accordingly. This debt overhang, 
        and the uncertainty it generates, can weigh on growth, 
        investment, and job creation.
          (5) Nearly all economists, including those at the 
        CBO, conclude that reducing budget deficits (thereby 
        bending the curve on debt levels) is a net positive for 
        economic growth over time.
          (6) If the Government remains on the current fiscal 
        path, future generations will face ever-higher debt 
        service costs, a decline in national savings, and a 
        ``crowding out'' of private investment. This dynamic 
        will eventually lead to a decline in economic output 
        and a diminution in our country's standard of living.
          (7) The key economic challenge is determining how to 
        expand the economic pie, not how best to divide up and 
        re-distribute a shrinking pie.
          (8) A stronger economy is vital to lowering deficit 
        levels and eventually balancing the budget. According 
        to CBO, if annual real GDP growth is just 0.1 
        percentage point higher over the budget window, 
        deficits would be reduced by $273 billion.
          (9) This budget resolution therefore embraces pro-
        growth policies, such as fundamental tax reform, that 
        will help foster a stronger economy, greater 
        opportunities and more job creation.
  (b) Policy on Economic Growth and Job Creation.--It is the 
policy of this resolution to promote faster economic growth and 
job creation. By putting the budget on a sustainable path, this 
resolution ends the debt-fueled uncertainty holding back job 
creators. Reforms to the tax code will put American businesses 
and workers in a better position to compete and thrive in the 
21st century global economy. This resolution targets the 
regulatory red tape and cronyism that stack the deck in favor 
of special interests. All of the reforms in this resolution 
serve as means to the larger end of helping the economy grow 
and expanding opportunity for all Americans.

SEC. 511. POLICY STATEMENT ON TAX REFORM.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) A reformed tax code should be simple, fair, and 
        promote (rather than impede) economic growth. The 
        United States tax code fails on all 3 counts: it is 
        complex, unfair, and inefficient. The tax code's 
        complexity distorts decisions to work, save, and 
        invest, which leads to slower economic growth, lower 
        wages, and less job creation.
          (2) High marginal tax rates lessen the incentives to 
        work, save, and invest, which reduces economic output 
        and job creation.
          (3) The United States corporate income tax rate is 
        the highest rate in the industrialized world. Tax rates 
        this high suppress wages, discourage investment and job 
        creation, distort business activity, and put American 
        businesses at a competitive disadvantage with foreign 
        competitors.
          (4) The ``world-wide'' structure of United States 
        international taxation essentially taxes earnings of 
        United States firms twice, putting them at a 
        significant competitive disadvantage with competitors 
        that have more competitive international tax systems.
          (5) The tax code imposes costs on American workers 
        through lower wages, consumers in higher prices, and 
        investors in diminished returns.
          (6) Closing tax loopholes to finance higher spending 
        does not constitute fundamental tax reform.
          (7) Tax reform should curb or eliminate loopholes and 
        use those savings to lower tax rates across the board, 
        not to fund more wasteful Government spending. 
        Washington has a spending problem, not a revenue 
        problem.
          (8) Many economists believe that fundamental tax 
        reform, including a broader tax base and lower tax 
        rates, would lead to greater labor supply and increased 
        investment, which would have a positive impact on total 
        national output.
  (b) Policy on Tax Reform.--It is the policy of this 
resolution that Congress should enact legislation that provides 
for a comprehensive reform of the United States tax code to 
promote economic growth, create American jobs, increase wages, 
and benefit American consumers, investors, and workers through 
fundamental tax reform that is revenue-neutral on a dynamic 
basis that provides for the following:
          (1) Targets revenue neutrality based on a dynamic 
        score that takes into account the macroeconomic effects 
        of reform.
          (2) Collapses the current seven brackets for 
        individuals into just three, with a top rate of no more 
        than 33 percent.
          (3) Simplifies the tax code to ensure that fewer 
        Americans will be required to itemize deductions.
          (4) Gives equal tax treatment to individual and 
        employer healthcare expenditures modeled on the 
        American Health Care Reform Act.
          (5) Encourages charitable giving.
          (6) Repeals the Death Tax.
          (7) Eliminates marriage penalties.
          (8) Provides tax-free universal savings accounts to 
        reward saving.
          (9) Repeals the alternative minimum tax.
          (10) Reduces double taxation by lowering the top 
        corporate rate to no more than 20 percent.
          (11) Reduces the rate for capital gains and 
        dividends.
          (12) Encourages net investment, savings, and 
        entrepreneurial activity, including full expensing.
          (13) Moves to a competitive territorial system of 
        international taxation.
          (14) Ends distortionary special interest giveaways, 
        such as the Wind Production Tax Credit.

SEC. 512. POLICY STATEMENT ON TRADE.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) Opening foreign markets to American exports is 
        vital to the United States economy and beneficial to 
        American workers and consumers.
          (2) The United States can increase economic 
        opportunities for American workers and businesses 
        through the elimination of foreign trade barriers to 
        United States goods and services.
          (3) American businesses and workers have shown that, 
        on a level playing field, they can excel and surpass 
        international competition.
  (b) Policy on Trade.--It is the policy of this concurrent 
resolution--
          (1) to pursue international trade, global commerce, 
        and a modern and competitive tax system to promote 
        domestic job creation;
          (2) that the United States should continue to seek 
        increased economic opportunities for American workers 
        and businesses through high-standard trade agreements 
        that satisfy negotiating objectives, including--
                  (A) the expansion of trade opportunities;
                  (B) adherence to trade agreements and rules 
                by the United States and its trading partners, 
                and
                  (C) the elimination of foreign trade barriers 
                to United States goods and services by opening 
                new markets and enforcing United States rights; 
                and
          (3) that any trade agreement entered into on behalf 
        of the United States should reflect the negotiating 
        objectives and adhere to the provisions requiring 
        improved consultation with Congress.

SEC. 513. POLICY STATEMENT ON ENERGY PRODUCTION.

  It is the policy of this resolution that the Arctic National 
Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) and currently unavailable areas of the 
Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) should be open for energy 
exploration and production.

SEC. 514. POLICY STATEMENT ON FEDERAL REGULATORY BUDGETING AND REFORM.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) Excessive Federal regulation--
                  (A) has hurt job creation, investment, wages, 
                competition, and economic growth, slowing the 
                Nation's recovery from the economic recession 
                and harming American households;
                  (B) operates as a regressive tax on poor and 
                lower-income households;
                  (C) displaces workers into long-term 
                unemployment or lower-paying jobs;
                  (D) adversely affects small businesses, the 
                primary source of new jobs; and
                  (E) impedes economic growth.
          (2) Federal agencies routinely fail to identify and 
        eliminate, minimize, or mitigate excess regulatory 
        costs through post-implementation assessments of their 
        regulations.
          (3) The United States Code of Federal Regulations now 
        contains over 185,000 pages of regulations in 242 
        volumes.
          (4) Notwithstanding the size and growth of Federal 
        regulations, Congress lacks an effective mechanism to 
        manage the level of new Federal regulatory costs 
        imposed each year. Other nations, meanwhile, have 
        successfully implemented the use of regulatory 
        budgeting to control excess regulation and regulatory 
        costs.
          (5) Implementation of the Affordable Care Act has 
        resulted in more than 177.9 million annual hours of 
        regulatory compliance paperwork, $37.1 billion of 
        regulatory compliance costs on the private sector, and 
        $13 billion in regulatory compliance costs on the 
        States.
          (6) Agencies impose costly regulations without 
        relying on sound science through the use of judicial 
        consent decrees and settlement agreements and the abuse 
        of interim compliance costs imposed on regulated 
        entities that bring legal challenges against newly 
        promulgated regulations.
  (b) Policy on Federal Regulatory Budgeting and Reform.--It is 
the policy of this concurrent resolution that the House should, 
in consultation with the public, consider legislation that--
          (1) promotes--
                  (A) economic growth, job creation, higher 
                wages, and increased investment by eliminating 
                unnecessary red tape and streamlining, 
                simplifying and lowering the costs of Federal 
                regulations; and
                  (B) the adoption of least-cost regulatory 
                alternatives to meet the objectives of Federal 
                regulatory statutes;
          (2) protects--
                  (A) the poor and lower-income households from 
                the regressive effects of excessive regulation; 
                and
                  (B) workers against the unnecessary 
                elimination of jobs and loss or reduction of 
                wages;
          (3) requires--
                  (A) an annual, congressional regulatory 
                budget that establishes annual costs of 
                regulations and allocates these costs amongst 
                Federal regulatory agencies;
                  (B) cost-benefit and regulatory impact 
                analysis for new regulations proposed and 
                promulgated by all Federal regulatory agencies;
                  (C) advance notice of proposed rulemaking and 
                makes evidentiary hearings available for 
                critical disputed issues in the development of 
                new major regulations; and
                  (D) congressional approval of all new major 
                regulations before the regulations can become 
                effective, ensuring that Congress can better 
                prevent the imposition of unsound costly new 
                regulations;
          (4) reduces--
                  (A) regulatory barriers to entry into markets 
                and other regulatory impediments to competition 
                and innovation; and
                  (B) the imposition of new Federal regulation 
                that duplicates, overlaps or conflicts with 
                State, local, and Tribal regulation or that 
                impose unfunded mandates on State, local, and 
                Tribal governments; and
          (5) eliminates the abuse of guidance to evade legal 
        requirements applicable to the development and 
        promulgation of new regulations.

SEC. 515. POLICY STATEMENT ON FEDERAL FUNDING OF ABORTION.

  It is the policy of this resolution that no taxpayer dollars 
shall go to any entity that provides abortion services.

SEC. 516. POLICY STATEMENT ON TRANSPORTATION REFORM.

  It is the policy of this resolution that State and local 
officials are in a much better position to understand the needs 
of local commuters, not bureaucrats in Washington. Federal 
funding for transportation should be phased down and limited to 
core Federal duties, including the interstate highway system, 
transportation infrastructure on Federal land, responding to 
emergencies, and research. As the level of Federal 
responsibility for transportation is reduced, Congress should 
also concurrently reduce the Federal gas tax.

SEC. 517. POLICY STATEMENT ON THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) For years, there has been serious concern 
        regarding the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) 
        bureaucratic mismanagement and continuous failure to 
        provide veterans timely access to health care.
          (2) In 2015, for the first time, VA health care was 
        added to Government Accountability Office's (GAO) 
        ``high-risk'' list, due to mismanagement and oversight 
        failures, which have resulted in untimely and 
        inefficient health care. According to GAO, ``the 
        absence of care and delays in providing care have 
        harmed veterans.''.
          (3) The VA's failure to provide timely and accessible 
        health care to our veterans is unacceptable. While 
        Congress has done its part for more than a decade by 
        providing sufficient funding for the VA, the 
        administration has mismanaged these resources, 
        resulting in proven adverse effects on veterans and 
        their families.
  (b) Policy on the Department of Veterans Affairs.--It is the 
policy of this concurrent resolution that--
          (1) the House Committee on Veterans' Affairs continue 
        its oversight efforts to ensure the VA reassesses its 
        core mission, including--
                  (A) reducing the number of bureaucratic 
                layers;
                  (B) reducing the number of senior and middle 
                managers;
                  (C) improving performance measure metrics;
                  (D) strengthening the administration and 
                oversight of contractors; and
                  (E) supporting opportunities for veterans to 
                pursue other viable options for their health 
                care needs; and
          (2) the House Committee on Veterans' Affairs and the 
        Committee on the Budget should continue to closely 
        monitor the VA's progress to ensure VA resources are 
        sufficient and efficiently provided to veterans.

SEC. 518. POLICY STATEMENT ON REDUCING UNNECESSARY, WASTEFUL, AND 
                    UNAUTHORIZED SPENDING.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) The Government Accountability Office (GAO) is 
        required by law to identify examples of waste, 
        duplication, and overlap in Federal programs, and has 
        so identified dozens of such examples.
          (2) In its report to Congress on Government 
        Efficiency and Effectiveness, the Comptroller General 
        has stated that addressing the identified waste, 
        duplication, and overlap in Federal programs could 
        ``lead to tens of billions of dollars of additional 
        savings.''
          (3) In 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, and 2017, 
        the GAO issued reports showing excessive duplication 
        and redundancy in Federal programs.
          (4) Federal agencies reported an estimated $137 
        billion in improper payments in fiscal year 2015.
          (5) Under clause 2 of rule XI of the Rules of the 
        House of Representatives, each standing committee must 
        hold at least one hearing during each 120-day period 
        following its establishment on waste, fraud, abuse, or 
        mismanagement in Government programs.
          (6) Clause 2(a)(1) of rule XXI of the House of 
        Representatives prohibits an appropriation for an 
        expenditure not previously authorized by law. Despite 
        this longstanding prohibition, more than $310 billion 
        has been appropriated for unauthorized programs in 
        fiscal year 2016, spanning 256 separate laws.
          (7) The findings resulting from congressional 
        oversight of Federal Government programs should result 
        in programmatic changes in both authorizing statutes 
        and program funding levels.
  (b) Policy on Reducing Unnecessary, Wasteful, and 
Unauthorized Spending.--
          (1) Each authorizing committee annually should 
        include in its Views and Estimates letter required 
        under section 301(d) of the Congressional Budget Act of 
        1974 recommendations to the Committee on the Budget of 
        programs within the jurisdiction of such committee 
        whose funding should be reduced or eliminated.
          (2) Committees of jurisdiction should review all 
        unauthorized programs funded through annual 
        appropriations to determine if the programs are 
        operating efficiently and effectively.
          (3) Committees should reauthorize those programs that 
        in the committees' judgment should continue to receive 
        funding.
          (4) For those programs not reauthorized by 
        committees, the House of Representatives should enforce 
        the limitations on funding such unauthorized programs 
        in the House rules.

SEC. 519. POLICY STATEMENT ON A BALANCED BUDGET AMENDMENT.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) The Government will collect approximately $3.4 
        trillion in taxes, but spend nearly $4 trillion to 
        maintain its operations, borrowing 14 cents of every 
        Federal dollar spent.
          (2) As of March 16, 2017, the national debt of the 
        Unites States was nearly $20 trillion.
          (3) A majority of States have petitioned the 
        Government to hold a constitutional convention to adopt 
        a balanced budget amendment to the Constitution.
          (4) Forty nine States have fiscal limitations in 
        their State constitutions, including the requirement to 
        annually balance the budget.
          (5) Five States, including Arizona, Georgia, Alaska, 
        Mississippi, and North Dakota, have agreed to the 
        Compact for a Balanced Budget, which is seeking to 
        amend the Constitution to require a balanced budget 
        through an Article V convention by April 12, 2021.
  (b) Policy on a Balanced Budget Constitutional Amendment.--It 
is the policy of this concurrent resolution that Congress 
should propose a balanced budget constitutional amendment for 
ratification by the States.

SEC. 520. POLICY STATEMENT ON DEFICIT REDUCTION THROUGH THE 
                    CANCELLATION OF UNOBLIGATED BALANCES.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) According to the most recent estimate from the 
        Office of Management and Budget, Federal agencies held 
        $921 billion in unobligated balances at the end of 
        fiscal year 2017.
          (2) These funds comprise both discretionary 
        appropriations and authorizations of mandatory spending 
        that remain available for expenditure.
          (3) In many cases, agencies are provided 
        appropriations that remain indefinitely available for 
        obligation.
          (4) The Congressional Budget Act of 1974 requires the 
        Office of Management and Budget to make funds available 
        to agencies for obligation and prohibits the 
        administration from withholding or cancelling 
        unobligated funds unless approved by an Act of 
        Congress.
  (b) Policy on Deficit Reduction Through the Cancellation of 
Unobligated Balances.--It is the policy of this concurrent 
resolution that--
          (1) greater congressional oversight is required to 
        review and identify potential savings from canceling 
        unobligated balances of funds that are no longer 
        needed;
          (2) the appropriate committees in the House should 
        identify and review accounts with unobligated balances 
        and rescind such balances that would not impede or 
        disrupt the fulfillment of important Federal 
        commitments;
          (3) the House, with the assistance of the Government 
        Accountability Office, the Inspectors General, and 
        appropriate agencies, should continue to review 
        unobligated balances and identify savings for deficit 
        reduction; and
          (4) unobligated balances in dormant accounts should 
        not be used to finance increases in spending.

SEC. 521. POLICY STATEMENT ON REFORMING THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET 
                    PROCESS.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) Enactment of the Congressional Budget and 
        Impoundment Control Act of 1974 was the first step 
        toward restoring constitutionally endowed legislative 
        responsibility over fundamental budget decision making.
          (2) However, the congressional budget process has 
        neither constrained spending nor inhibited the 
        expansion of Government. The growth of the Government, 
        primarily through a multiplicity of mandatory programs 
        and other forms of direct spending, has largely been 
        financed through borrowing and high tax rates.
          (3) The enforcement of the current budget process, 
        including congressional points of order and statutory 
        spending limits, have been too often waived or 
        circumvented. This contributes to a lack of 
        accountability, which has led to broad agreement that 
        reforming the system is a high necessity.
  (b) Policy on Reforming the Congressional Budget Process.--It 
is the policy of this concurrent resolution that Congress 
should--
          (1) restructure the fundamental procedures of budget 
        decision making;
          (2) reassert congressional power over spending and 
        revenue, restore the balance of power between Congress 
        and the President as the Congressional Budget Act of 
        1974 intended, and attain the maximum level of 
        accountability for budget decisions through efficient 
        and rigorous enforcement of budget rules;
          (3) improve incentives for lawmakers to budget as 
        intended by the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, 
        especially by adopting an annual budget resolution;
          (4) encourage more effective control over spending, 
        especially currently uncontrolled direct spending;
          (5) revise the methodology used in developing the 
        baseline, which is intended to reflect an objective 
        projection of the budgetary effects of current laws and 
        policies for future fiscal years, by removing any 
        tendency toward assuming higher spending levels;
          (6) promote efficient and timely budget actions to 
        ensure lawmakers complete their budget actions before 
        the start of the new fiscal year;
          (7) provide access to the best analysis of economic 
        conditions available and increase awareness of how 
        fiscal policy directly impacts economic growth and job 
        creation; and
          (8) eliminate the complexity of the budget process 
        and the biases that favor higher spending.
  (c) Legislation.--The Committee on the Budget of the House 
should draft legislation during the 115th Congress that 
rewrites the Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act 
of 1974 to fulfill the goals of making the congressional budget 
process more effective in ensuring taxpayers' dollars are spent 
wisely and efficiently. Such legislation shall--
          (1) attain greater simplicity without sacrificing the 
        rigor required to address--
                  (A) the complex issues of the domestic and 
                world economy;
                  (B) national security responsibilities; and
                  (C) the appropriate roles of rulemaking and 
                statutory enforcement mechanisms;
          (2) establish a new structure that assures the 
        congressional role in the budget process is applied 
        consistently without reliance on reactive legislating;
          (3) improve the elements of the current budget 
        process that have fulfilled the original purposes of 
        the Congressional Budget Act of 1974; and
          (4) rebuild the foundation of the budget process to 
        provide a solid basis from which additional reforms may 
        be developed.

SEC. 522. POLICY STATEMENT ON FEDERAL ACCOUNTING.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) Current accounting methods fail to capture and 
        present in a compelling manner the full scope of the 
        Government and its fiscal situation.
          (2) Most fiscal analyses produced by the 
        Congressional Budget Office (CBO) are conducted over a 
        10-year time horizon. The use of generational 
        accounting or a longer time horizon would provide a 
        more complete picture of the Government's fiscal 
        situation.
          (3) The Federal budget currently accounts for most 
        programs on a cash accounting basis, which records 
        revenue and expenses when cash is actually paid or 
        received. However, it accounts for loan and loan 
        guarantee programs on an accrual basis, which records 
        revenue when earned and expenses when incurred.
          (4) The Government Accountability Office has advised 
        that accrual accounting may provide a more accurate 
        estimate of the Government's liabilities than cash 
        accounting for some programs, specifically insurance 
        programs.
          (5) Accrual accounting under the Federal Credit 
        Reform Act of 1990 (FCRA) understates the risk and thus 
        the true cost of some Federal programs, including loans 
        and loan guarantees.
          (6) Fair value accounting better reflects the risk 
        associated with Federal loan and loan guarantee 
        programs by using a market based discount rate. CBO, 
        for example, uses fair value accounting to measure the 
        cost of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.
          (7) In comparing fair value accounting to FCRA, CBO 
        has concluded that ``adopting a fair-value approach 
        would provide a more comprehensive way to measure the 
        costs of Federal credit programs and would permit more 
        level comparisons between those costs and the costs of 
        other forms of Federal assistance''.
          (8) This concurrent resolution directs CBO to 
        estimate the costs of credit programs on a fair value 
        basis to fully capture the risk associated with Federal 
        credit programs.
  (b) Policy on Federal Accounting Methodologies.--It is the 
policy of this concurrent resolution that the House should, in 
consultation with CBO and other appropriate stakeholders, 
reform government-wide budget and accounting practices so 
Members and the public can better understand the fiscal 
situation of the United States and the options best suited to 
improving it.

SEC. 523. POLICY STATEMENT ON AGENCY FEES AND SPENDING.

  (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
          (1) A number of Federal agencies and organizations 
        have permanent authority to collect fees and other 
        offsetting collections and to spend these collected 
        funds.
          (2) The total amount of offsetting fees and 
        offsetting collections is estimated by the Office of 
        Management and Budget to be $513 billion in fiscal year 
        2017.
          (3) Agency budget justifications are, in some cases, 
        not fully transparent about the amount of program 
        activity funded through offsetting collections or fees. 
        This lack of transparency prevents effective and 
        accountable government.
  (b) Policy on Agency Fees and Spending.--It is the policy of 
this resolution that Congress must reassert its constitutional 
prerogative to control spending and conduct oversight. To do 
so, Congress should enact legislation requiring programs that 
are funded through fees, offsetting receipts, or offsetting 
collections to be allocated new budget authority annually. Such 
allocation may arise from--
          (1) legislation originating from the authorizing 
        committee of jurisdiction for the agency or program; or
          (2) fee and account specific allocations included in 
        annual appropriation Acts.
                              ----------                              


4. An Amendment To Be Offered by Representative Yarmuth of Kentucky or 
                 His Designee, Debatable for 30 Minutes

  Strike all after the resolving clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. CONCURRENT RESOLUTION ON THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2018.

  (a) Declaration.--Congress declares that this resolution is 
the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2018 
and that this resolution sets forth the appropriate budgetary 
levels for fiscal years 2019 through 2027.
  (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this 
concurrent resolution is as follows:

Sec. 1. Concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2018.

                 TITLE I--RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS

Sec. 101. Recommended levels and amounts.
Sec. 102. Major functional categories.

                         TITLE II--RESERVE FUNDS

Sec. 201. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for struggling families.
Sec. 202. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for health care improvements.
Sec. 203. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for job creation through 
          infrastructure and other investments and incentives.
Sec. 204. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for education.
Sec. 205. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for America's veterans and 
          service members.
Sec. 206. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for retirement security.
Sec. 207. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for increasing energy 
          independence and security.

                    TITLE III--ENFORCEMENT PROVISIONS

Sec. 301. Point of order against advance appropriations.
Sec. 302. Adjustments to discretionary spending limits.
Sec. 303. Costs of emergency needs, overseas contingency operations, and 
          disaster relief.
Sec. 304. Budgetary treatment of certain discretionary administrative 
          expenses.
Sec. 305. Application and effect of changes in allocations and 
          aggregates.
Sec. 306. Adjustments for changes in the baseline.
Sec. 307. Reinstatement of Pay-As-You-Go.
Sec. 308. Exercise of rulemaking powers.

                       TITLE IV--POLICY STATEMENTS

Sec. 401. Policy of the House on affordable health care coverage for 
          working families.
Sec. 402. Policy of the House on tax reform that provides support and 
          relief to hardworking American families.
Sec. 403. Policy of the House on defense and nondefense funding 
          increases.
Sec. 404. Policy of the House on immigration reform.
Sec. 405. Policy of the House on Social Security.
Sec. 406. Policy of the House on protecting the Medicare guarantee for 
          seniors and persons with disabilities.
Sec. 407. Policy of the House on financial stability and consumer 
          protection.
Sec. 408. Policy of the House on women's economic empowerment.
Sec. 409. Policy of the House on national security.
Sec. 410. Policy of the House on Veterans Affairs.
Sec. 411. Policy of the House on disaster response funding.
Sec. 412. Policy of the House on the Federal workforce.
Sec. 413. Policy of the House on climate change science.
Sec. 414. Policy of the House on increased efficiency and eliminating 
          waste.
Sec. 415. Policy of the House on the investigation of Russian 
          interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

                TITLE I--RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS


SEC. 101. RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS.

  The following budgetary levels are appropriate for each of 
fiscal years 2018 through 2027:
          (1) Federal revenues.--For purposes of the 
        enforcement of this resolution:
                  (A) The recommended levels of Federal 
                revenues are as follows:
  Fiscal year 2018: $2,844,981,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $2,964,383,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $3,113,506,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $3,241,213,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: $3,423,444,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: $3,597,540,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: $3,764,139,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: $3,953,862,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: $4,207,243,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: $4,452,763,000,000.
                  (B) The amounts by which the aggregate levels 
                of Federal revenues should be changed are as 
                follows:
  Fiscal year 2018: $111,412,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $130,875,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $162,930,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $181,302,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: $240,528,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: $279,624,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: $301,711,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: $331,684,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: $417,865,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: $494,376,000,000.
          (2) New budget authority.--For purposes of the 
        enforcement of this resolution, the appropriate levels 
        of total new budget authority are as follows:
  Fiscal year 2018: $3,367,297,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $3,461,508,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $3,629,655,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $3,799,113,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: $4,033,996,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: $4,174,442,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: $4,306,821,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: $4,541,077,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: $4,777,428,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: $4,981,428,000,000.
          (3) Budget outlays.--For purposes of the enforcement 
        of this resolution, the appropriate levels of total 
        budget outlays are as follows:
  Fiscal year 2018: $3,298,502,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $3,458,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $3,600,937,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $3,772,732,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: $4,013,050,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: $4,138,267,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: $4,256,084,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: $4,494,045,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: $4,734,200,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: $4,939,221,000,000.
          (4) Deficits.--For purposes of the enforcement of 
        this resolution, the amounts of the deficits are as 
        follows:
  Fiscal year 2018: $453,521,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $493,617,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $487,431,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $531,519,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: $589,606,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: $540,727,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: $491,945,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: $540,183,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: $526,957,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: $486,458,000,000.
          (5) Public debt.--Pursuant to section 301(a)(5) of 
        the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 
        632(a)(5)), the appropriate levels of the public debt 
        are as follows:
  Fiscal year 2018: $21,039,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $21,723,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $22,376,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $23,077,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: $23,809,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: $24,527,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: $25,225,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: $25,964,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: $26,751,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: $27,396,000,000,000.
          (6) Debt held by the public.--The appropriate levels 
        of debt held by the public are as follows:
  Fiscal year 2018: $15,379,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2019: $15,974,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2020: $16,590,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2021: $17,280,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2022: $18,061,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2023: $18,832,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2024: $19,597,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2025: $20,455,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2026: $21,349,000,000,000.
  Fiscal year 2027: $22,257,000,000,000.

SEC. 102. MAJOR FUNCTIONAL CATEGORIES.

  Congress determines and declares that the appropriate levels 
of new budget authority and outlays for fiscal years 2018 
through 2027 for each major functional category are:
          (1) National Defense (050):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $611,095,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $605,151,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $624,257,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $615,594,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $637,442,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $624,735,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $650,661,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $635,887,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $663,854,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $652,771,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $678,004,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $661,070,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $692,193,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $669,803,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $706,422,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $688,324,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $722,450,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $703,659,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $737,634,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $718,554,000,000.
          (2) International Affairs (150):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $52,701,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $50,093,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $52,067,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $50,535,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $51,871,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $50,799,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $51,619,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $50,165,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $50,398,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $50,235,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $50,981,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $50,156,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $51,530,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $50,335,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $52,045,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $50,582,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $52,606,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $50,953,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $53,130,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $51,388,000,000.
          (3) General Science, Space, and Technology (250):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $32,607,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $31,808,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $33,260,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $32,550,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $33,918,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $33,211,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $34,622,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $33,863,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $35,350,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $34,622,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $36,074,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $35,346,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $36,802,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $36,040,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $37,586,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $36,792,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $38,377,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $37,565,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $39,173,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $38,341,000,000.
          (4) Energy (270):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $4,873,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $2,963,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $5,341,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $3,411,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $5,742,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $4,074,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $5,858,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $4,334,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $5,789,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $4,346,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $4,807,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $3,471,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $4,270,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $3,003,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $4,166,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $3,021,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $6,423,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $5,297,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $6,515,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $5,459,000,000.
          (5) Natural Resources and Environment (300):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $44,095,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $44,593,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $45,009,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $45,350,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $46,746,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $46,675,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $47,696,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $47,383,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $48,734,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $48,169,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $49,784,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $49,162,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $50,694,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $50,065,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $51,759,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $51,041,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $52,789,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $52,010,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $53,904,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $53,122,000,000.
          (6) Agriculture (350):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $24,863,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $23,248,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $22,675,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $21,067,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $21,625,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $20,766,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $22,833,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $22,220,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $21,803,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $21,319,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $21,931,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $21,518,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $22,437,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $21,908,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $23,144,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $22,523,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $23,360,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $22,763,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $23,171,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $22,596,000,000.
          (7) Commerce and Housing Credit (370):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $16,417,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $2,791,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $18,159,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $9,503,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $17,785,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $9,689,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $16,235,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $7,375,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $18,376,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $8,551,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $18,843,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $8,358,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $19,316,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $7,728,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $20,264,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $7,445,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $19,953,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $7,297,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $19,880,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $7,056,000,000.
          (8) Transportation (400):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $94,127,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $94,127,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $96,208,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $95,317,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $90,834,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $96,984,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $91,720,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $98,346,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $92,632,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $99,800,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $93,551,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $101,474,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $94,477,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $103,104,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $95,468,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $105,171,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $96,468,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $107,021,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $97,481,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $108,930,000,000.
          (9) Community and Regional Development (450):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $20,342,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $24,344,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $19,877,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $24,725,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $20,707,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $23,465,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $21,132,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $22,303,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $21,592,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $21,391,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $22,028,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $20,391,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $22,475,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $20,248,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $22,957,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $20,597,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $23,443,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $20,803,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $23,579,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $21,187,000,000.
          (10) Education, Training, Employment, and Social 
        Services (500):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $106,514,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $105,100,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $109,914,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $115,689,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $112,802,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $111,590,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $116,131,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $114,730,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $118,614,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $117,458,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $120,755,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $119,721,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $122,813,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $121,720,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $124,791,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $123,693,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $126,672,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $125,661,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $128,521,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $127,646,000,000.
          (11) Health (550):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $571,431,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $579,006,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $602,781,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $603,771,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $646,929,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $636,581,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $669,489,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $668,431,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $703,074,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $701,107,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $736,459,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $734,349,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $772,672,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $770,440,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $810,846,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $807,924,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $849,794,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $846,440,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $890,523,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $887,123,000,000.
          (12) Medicare (570):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $598,530,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $597,691,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $655,963,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $655,485,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $694,178,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $693,880,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $746,379,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $746,140,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $840,893,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $840,679,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $865,420,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $865,230,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $888,496,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $888,306,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $986,770,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $986,568,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $1,070,124,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $1,069,920,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $1,152,041,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $1,151,843,000,000.
          (13) Income Security (600):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $522,623,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $504,646,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $538,200,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $525,694,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $554,091,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $542,383,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $569,091,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $558,147,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $587,643,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $583,197,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $596,563,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $587,818,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $605,530,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $591,214,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $626,210,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $612,973,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $641,786,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $635,202,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $658,210,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $650,880,000,000.
          (14) Social Security (650):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $39,801,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $39,644,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $43,342,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $43,283,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $46,606,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $46,586,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $50,055,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $50,047,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $53,680,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $53,686,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $57,643,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $57,653,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $62,003,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $62,016,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $66,598,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $66,614,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $71,052,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $71,069,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $75,625,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $75,642,000,000.
          (15) Veterans Benefits and Services (700):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $177,885,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $178,068,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $194,339,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $191,615,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $201,128,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $198,981,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $207,588,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $205,546,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $223,845,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $221,690,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $221,566,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $219,455,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $218,419,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $216,409,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $236,394,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $234,258,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $243,968,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $241,722,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $252,291,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $250,117,000,000.
          (16) Administration of Justice (750):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $72,891,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $64,801,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $64,627,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $65,986,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $66,098,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $68,832,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $67,376,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $71,409,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $68,297,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $71,222,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $69,718,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $70,772,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $71,136,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $70,946,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $72,589,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $72,215,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $80,126,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $80,500,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $82,335,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $81,878,000,000.
          (17) General Government (800):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $27,958,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $26,363,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $28,794,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $27,635,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $29,761,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $28,995,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $30,771,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $30,062,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $31,792,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $31,154,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $32,512,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $31,939,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $32,997,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $32,462,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $33,743,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $33,135,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $34,507,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $33,882,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $35,257,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $34,624,000,000.
          (18) Net Interest (900):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $376,659,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $376,659,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $408,859,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $408,859,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $451,939,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $451,939,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $500,021,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $500,021,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $547,271,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $547,271,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $592,994,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $592,994,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $633,047,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $633,047,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $670,462,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $670,462,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $707,440,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $707,440,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $737,582,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $737,707,000,000.
          (19) Allowances (920):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$22,591,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$12,395,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$17,085,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$12,371,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$15,770,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$12,336,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$13,661,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$10,553,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$11,494,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$8,900,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$6,624,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$4,666,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$2,414,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$833,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$872,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $907,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $14,641,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $13,517,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $15,832,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $16,367,000,000.
          (20) Undistributed Offsetting Receipts (950):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$82,115,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$82,115,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$85,079,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$85,079,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$84,777,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$84,777,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$86,503,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$86,503,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$88,147,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$88,147,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$88,567,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$88,567,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$92,072,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$92,072,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$100,265,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$100,265,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$98,551,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$98,551,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, -$101,256,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, -$101,256,000,000.
          (21) Overseas Contingency Operations (970):
                  Fiscal year 2018:
                  (A) New budget authority, $76,591,000,000.
                  (B) Outlays, $41,916,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2019:
                  (A) New budget authority, $0.
                  (B) Outlays, $19,381,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2020:
                  (A) New budget authority, $0.
                  (B) Outlays, $7,885,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2021:
                  (A) New budget authority, $0.
                  (B) Outlays, $3,379,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2022:
                  (A) New budget authority, $0.
                  (B) Outlays, $1,429,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2023:
                  (A) New budget authority, $0.
                  (B) Outlays, $623,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2024:
                  (A) New budget authority, $0.
                  (B) Outlays, $195,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2025:
                  (A) New budget authority, $0.
                  (B) Outlays, $64,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2026:
                  (A) New budget authority, $0.
                  (B) Outlays, $30,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2027:
                  (A) New budget authority, $0.
                  (B) Outlays, $16,000,000.

                        TITLE II--RESERVE FUNDS


SEC. 201. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR STRUGGLING FAMILIES.

  The Chair of the House Committee on the Budget may revise the 
allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this 
resolution for any bill, joint resolution, amendment, or 
conference report that improves the lives of struggling 
families by the amounts provided in such measure if such 
measure would not increase the deficit for either of the 
following time periods: fiscal year 2018 to fiscal year 2022 or 
fiscal year 2018 to fiscal year 2027. Improvements may include 
any of the following:
          (1) Ensuring that all Americans have access to good-
        paying jobs, including funding proven, effective job 
        training and employment programs, such as summer and 
        year-round youth employment programs and registered 
        apprenticeship programs, and national service 
        opportunities.
          (2) Tax reform that provides support and relief to 
        hard-working American families, including enhancements 
        to the Earned Income Tax Credit, the Child Tax Credit, 
        and the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit.
          (3) Expanded investments to ensure all working 
        families have access to high-quality childcare 
        programs.
          (4) Creation of a permanent summer child nutrition 
        Electronic Funds Transfer program to ensure children 
        receive supplemental food benefits.
          (5) Additional investment in the Affordable Housing 
        Trust Fund beyond the base levels provided by the 
        Federal National Mortgage Association (Fannie Mae) and 
        Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (Freddie Mac).
          (6) Reauthorization of the Maternal, Infant, and 
        Early Childhood Home Visiting program that ensures the 
        continuation of successful home visiting programs and 
        additional Federal support to serve a greater share of 
        at-risk families.
          (7) Changes to improve the Temporary Assistance for 
        Needy Families (TANF) program, including legislation 
        that increases funding for the base block grant, 
        increases access to education and training, or requires 
        States to spend more TANF funds on the program's core 
        purposes such as work, childcare, and assistance to 
        struggling families.
          (8) Funding for research designed to improve program 
        effectiveness in creating positive outcomes for low-
        income children and families.
          (9) Additional investments that end homelessness 
        among America's families.
          (10) Changes to improve support for at-risk families, 
        reduce child abuse and neglect, or improve 
        reunification, permanency, and post-permanency services 
        in order to reduce the need for foster care.
          (11) Changes to encourage and efficiently collect 
        increased parental support for children, including 
        legislation that results in a greater share of 
        collected child support reaching the child and policies 
        to ensure that non-custodial parents are able to pay 
        the child support they owe and maintain positive 
        relationships with their children.

SEC. 202. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR HEALTH CARE IMPROVEMENTS.

  The Chair of the House Committee on the Budget may revise the 
allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this 
resolution for any bill, joint resolution, amendment, or 
conference report that--
          (1) improves the affordability and quality of health 
        care and expands coverage;
          (2) improves access to and affordability of 
        prescription drugs;
          (3) improves the stability of the marketplaces for 
        nongroup health insurance;
          (4) advances biomedical research and development of 
        more effective treatments and cures;
          (5) extends expiring provisions of Medicare, 
        Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Program and other 
        health programs;
          (6) improves access to opioid addiction treatment and 
        prevention programs;
          (7) improves availability of long-term care services 
        and supports for senior citizens and individuals with 
        disabilities,
          (8) improves the contemporary health care workforce's 
        ability to meet emerging demands;
          (9) improves Medicare quality, efficiency, and 
        benefit design to make care more affordable and 
        accessible for people with Medicare; or
          (10) improves Medicaid quality, efficiency, and 
        benefit design to make care more affordable and 
        accessible for people with Medicaid;
by the amounts provided in such measure if such measure would 
not increase the deficit for either of the following time 
periods: fiscal year 2018 to fiscal year 2022 or fiscal year 
2018 to fiscal year 2027.

SEC. 203. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR JOB CREATION THROUGH 
                    INFRASTRUCTURE AND OTHER INVESTMENTS AND 
                    INCENTIVES.

  The Chair of the House Committee on the Budget may revise the 
allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this 
resolution for any bill, joint resolution, amendment, or 
conference report that provides for robust Federal investments 
in America's infrastructure, incentives for businesses, and 
support for communities or other measures that create jobs for 
Americans and boost the economy. Revisions may be made for 
measures that--
          (1) provide for additional investments in highways, 
        transit systems, bridges, rail, aviation, harbors 
        (including harbor maintenance dredging), seaports, 
        inland waterway systems, public housing, broadband, 
        energy, water, and other infrastructure;
          (2) provide for additional investments in other areas 
        that would help businesses and other employers create 
        new jobs; and
          (3) provide additional incentives, including tax 
        incentives, to help small businesses, nonprofits, 
        States, and communities expand investment, train, hire, 
        and retain private-sector workers and public service 
        employees;
by the amounts provided in such measure if such measure does 
not increase the deficit for either of the following time 
periods: fiscal year 2018 to fiscal year 2022 or fiscal year 
2018 to fiscal year 2027.

SEC. 204. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR EDUCATION.

  The Chair of the House Committee on the Budget may revise the 
allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this 
resolution for any bill, joint resolution, amendment, or 
conference report that supports students by the amounts 
provided in such measure if such measure would not increase the 
deficit for either of the following time periods: fiscal year 
2018 to fiscal year 2022 or fiscal year 2018 to fiscal year 
2027. Support may include any of the following:
          (1) Efforts to make higher education more affordable 
        and increase college and degree completion by 
        encouraging States and institutions of higher education 
        to improve educational outcomes and access for low- and 
        moderate-income students through support for campus-
        based aid programs; increased funding for the Pell 
        grant program; and assistance to empower borrowers in 
        lowering and managing their student loan debt through 
        refinancing and expanded repayment options.
          (2) Increases in funding for the Individuals with 
        Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) to put the Federal 
        Government on a 10-year path to fulfill its commitment 
        to America's children and schools by providing 40 
        percent of the average per pupil expenditure for 
        special education.
          (3) Increases in funding to ensure access to high-
        quality child care and early learning programs for 
        every child including investments in the Federal 
        Preschool Development Grant program, Head Start 
        program, and the Child Care and Development Block 
        Grant.
          (4) Increases in funding for formula programs 
        authorized by Congress in the Elementary and Secondary 
        Education Act, as amended by the Every Student Succeeds 
        Act, including Title I-A, Title II-A, Title III, The 
        21st Century Community Learning Center Program, and 
        Title IV-A, to support public school teachers and 
        prepare all public school students, including students 
        who are low-income, students learning to speak English, 
        minority students, and students with disabilities, for 
        success in college and their careers.
          (5) Increases in funding for STEM, including computer 
        science, and Career and Technical Education (CTE) 
        programs to close the nation's skills gap by ensuring 
        all students have access to high-quality educational 
        programming that prepares them for high-paying careers 
        in a global economy through the integration of academic 
        content and technical skills.

SEC. 205. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR AMERICA'S VETERANS AND 
                    SERVICE MEMBERS.

  The Chair of the House Committee on the Budget may revise the 
allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this 
resolution for any bill, joint resolution, amendment, or 
conference report that--
          (1) reforms or otherwise improves the ability of the 
        Department of Veterans Affairs to provide greater and 
        more timely access to quality health care and to 
        enhance the delivery of benefits to the Nation's 
        veterans, or improves the delivery of health care to 
        servicemembers;
          (2) improves the treatment of post-traumatic stress 
        disorder and other mental illnesses, and increases the 
        capacity to address health care needs unique to women 
        veterans;
          (3) makes improvements to the Post-9/11 Veterans 
        Educational Assistance Act of 2008 to ensure that 
        veterans receive the educational benefits they need to 
        maximize their employment opportunities;
          (4) improves disability benefits or evaluations for 
        wounded or disabled military personnel or veterans, 
        including measures to expedite the claims process;
          (5) expands eligibility to permit additional disabled 
        military retirees to receive both disability 
        compensation and retired pay (concurrent receipt);
          (6) eliminates the offset between Survivor Benefit 
        Plan annuities and veterans' dependency and indemnity 
        compensation; or
          (7) improves information technology at the Department 
        of Veterans Affairs, including for the purchase and 
        implementation of the same electronic health record 
        system used by the Department of Defense;
by the amounts provided in such measure if such measure would 
not increase the deficit for either of the following time 
periods: fiscal year 2018 to fiscal year 2022 or fiscal year 
2018 to fiscal year 2027.

SEC. 206. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR RETIREMENT SECURITY.

  The Chair of the House Committee on the Budget may revise the 
allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this 
resolution for any bill, joint resolution, amendment, or 
conference report that strengthens or protects retirement 
security by the amounts provided in such measure if such 
measure would not increase the deficit for either of the 
following time periods: fiscal year 2018 to fiscal year 2022 or 
fiscal year 2018 to fiscal year 2022. The revisions may be made 
for measures that--
          (1) improve the security of existing pension plans, 
        including public- and private-sector plans, single- and 
        multi-employer plans, and the Central States Pension 
        Fund;
          (2) address the impending insolvency of the coal 
        miners' pension plan (1974 United Mine Workers of 
        America Pension plan) that, if left unfunded, will 
        jeopardize the solvency of the Pension Benefit Guaranty 
        Corporation insurance fund;
          (3) improve access to and quality of existing pension 
        plans, including both defined-benefit and defined-
        contribution plans; and
          (4) create new options or incentives for employers to 
        offer pension or retirement savings plans, and/or for 
        employees to participate in them.

SEC. 207. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR INCREASING ENERGY 
                    INDEPENDENCE AND SECURITY.

  The Chair of the House Committee on the Budget may revise the 
allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this 
resolution for any bill, joint resolution, amendment, or 
conference report that--
          (1) provides tax incentives for or otherwise 
        encourages the production of renewable energy or 
        increased energy efficiency;
          (2) encourages investment in emerging clean energy or 
        vehicle technologies or carbon capture and 
        sequestration;
          (3) provides additional resources for oversight and 
        expanded enforcement activities to crack down on 
        speculation in and manipulation of oil and gas markets, 
        including derivatives markets;
          (4) limits and provides for reductions in greenhouse 
        gas emissions;
          (5) assists businesses, industries, States, 
        communities, the environment, workers, or households as 
        the United States moves toward reducing and offsetting 
        the impacts of greenhouse gas emissions; or
          (6) facilitates the training of workers for these 
        industries (``clean energy jobs'')
by the amounts provided in such measure if such measure would 
not increase the deficit for either of the following time 
periods: fiscal year 2018 to fiscal year 2022 or fiscal year 
2018 to fiscal year 2027.

                   TITLE III--ENFORCEMENT PROVISIONS


SEC. 301. POINT OF ORDER AGAINST ADVANCE APPROPRIATIONS.

  (a) In General.--In the House, except as provided in 
subsection (b), any bill, joint resolution, amendment, or 
conference report making a general appropriation or continuing 
appropriation may not provide for advance appropriations.
  (b) Exceptions.--Advance appropriations may be provided--
          (1) for fiscal year 2019 for programs, projects, 
        activities, or accounts identified in the joint 
        explanatory statement of managers to accompany this 
        resolution under the heading ``Accounts Identified for 
        Advance Appropriations'' in an aggregate amount not to 
        exceed $28,852,000,000 in new budget authority, and for 
        2020, accounts separately identified under the same 
        heading; and
          (2) for all discretionary programs administered by 
        the Department of Veterans Affairs.
  (c) Definition.--In this section, the term ``advance 
appropriation'' means any new discretionary budget authority 
provided in a bill or joint resolution, or any amendment 
thereto or conference report thereon, making general 
appropriations or continuing appropriations that first becomes 
available for any fiscal year after 2018.

SEC. 302. ADJUSTMENTS TO DISCRETIONARY SPENDING LIMITS.

  (a) Program Integrity Initiatives Under the Budget Control 
Act.--
          (1) Social security administration program integrity 
        initiatives.--In the House, prior to consideration of 
        any bill, joint resolution, amendment, or conference 
        report making appropriations for fiscal year 2018 that 
        appropriates amounts as provided under section 
        251(b)(2)(B) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
        Deficit Control Act of 1985, the allocation to the 
        House Committee on Appropriations shall be increased by 
        the amount of additional budget authority and outlays 
        resulting from that budget authority for fiscal year 
        2018.
          (2) Health care fraud and abuse control program.--In 
        the House, prior to consideration of any bill, joint 
        resolution, amendment, or conference report making 
        appropriations for fiscal year 2018 that appropriates 
        amounts as provided under section 251(b)(2)(C) of the 
        Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
        1985, the allocation to the House Committee on 
        Appropriations shall be increased by the amount of 
        additional budget authority and outlays resulting from 
        that budget authority for fiscal year 2018.
  (b) Additional Program Integrity Initiatives.--
          (1) Internal revenue service tax compliance.--In the 
        House, prior to consideration of any bill, joint 
        resolution, amendment, or conference report making 
        appropriations for fiscal year 2018 that appropriates 
        $4,860,000,000 for the Internal Revenue Service under 
        the Enforcement appropriation title to carry out tax 
        enforcement activities and provides an additional 
        appropriation of up to $514,000,000 to the Internal 
        Revenue Service that is designated for enhanced tax 
        enforcement to address the tax gap (taxes owed but not 
        paid), the Chair of the Budget Committee shall increase 
        the allocation to the House Committee on Appropriations 
        by the amount of additional budget authority and 
        outlays resulting from that budget authority for fiscal 
        year 2018.
          (2) Unemployment insurance program integrity 
        activities.--In the House, prior to consideration of 
        any bill, joint resolution, amendment, or conference 
        report making appropriations for fiscal year 2018 that 
        appropriates $151,000,000 for in-person reemployment 
        and eligibility assessments, reemployment services and 
        training referrals, and unemployment insurance improper 
        payment reviews for the Department of Labor and 
        provides an additional appropriation of up to 
        $35,000,000, and the amount is designated for in-person 
        reemployment and eligibility assessments, reemployment 
        services and training referrals, and unemployment 
        insurance improper payment reviews for the Department 
        of Labor, the allocation to the House Committee on 
        Appropriations shall be increased by the amount of 
        additional budget authority and outlays resulting from 
        that budget authority for fiscal year 2018.
  (c) Procedure for Adjustments.--In the House, prior to 
consideration of any bill, joint resolution, amendment, or 
conference report, the Chair of the House Committee on the 
Budget shall make the adjustments set forth in this subsection 
for the incremental new budget authority in that measure and 
the outlays resulting from that budget authority if that 
measure meets the requirements set forth in this section.

SEC. 303. COSTS OF EMERGENCY NEEDS, OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS, 
                    AND DISASTER RELIEF.

  (a) Emergency Needs.--If any bill, joint resolution, 
amendment, or conference report makes appropriations for 
discretionary amounts and such amounts are designated as 
necessary to meet emergency needs pursuant to this subsection, 
then new budget authority and outlays resulting from that 
budget authority shall not count for the purposes of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, or this resolution.
  (b) Overseas Contingency Operations.--In the House, if any 
bill, joint resolution, amendment, or conference report makes 
appropriations for fiscal year 2018 for Overseas Contingency 
Operations and such amounts are so designated pursuant to this 
paragraph, then the Chair of the House Committee on the Budget 
may adjust the allocation to the House Committee on 
Appropriations by the amounts provided in such legislation for 
that purpose up to, but not to exceed, the total amount of 
budget authority specified in section 102(21).
  (c) Disaster Relief.--In the House, if any bill, joint 
resolution, amendment, or conference report makes 
appropriations for discretionary amounts and such amounts are 
designated for disaster relief pursuant to this subsection, 
then the allocation to the Committee on Appropriations, and as 
necessary, the aggregates in this resolution, shall be adjusted 
by the amount of new budget authority and outlays up to the 
amounts provided under section 251(b)(2)(D) of the Balanced 
Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as adjusted 
by subsection (d).
  (d) Wildfire Suppression Operations.--
          (1) Cap adjustment.--In the House, if any bill, joint 
        resolution, amendment, or conference report making 
        appropriations for wildfire suppression operations for 
        fiscal year 2018 that appropriates a base amount equal 
        to 70 percent of the average cost of wildfire 
        suppression operations over the previous 10 years and 
        provides an additional appropriation of up to but not 
        to exceed $1,154,000,000 for wildfire suppression 
        operations and such amounts are so designated pursuant 
        to this paragraph, then the allocation to the House 
        Committee on Appropriations may be adjusted by the 
        additional amount of budget authority above the base 
        amount and the outlays resulting from that additional 
        budget authority.
          (2) Deficit-neutral adjustment.--The total allowable 
        discretionary adjustment for disaster relief pursuant 
        to section 251(b)(2)(D) of the Balanced Budget and 
        Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 shall be reduced 
        by an amount equivalent to the sum of allocation 
        increases made pursuant to paragraph (1) in the 
        previous year.
  (e) Procedure for Adjustments.--In the House, prior to 
consideration of any bill, joint resolution, amendment, or 
conference report, the Chair of the House Committee on the 
Budget shall make the adjustments set forth in subsections (b), 
(c), and (d) for the incremental new budget authority in that 
measure and the outlays resulting from that budget authority if 
that measure meets the requirements set forth in this section.

SEC. 304. BUDGETARY TREATMENT OF CERTAIN DISCRETIONARY ADMINISTRATIVE 
                    EXPENSES.

  (a) In General.--In the House, notwithstanding section 
302(a)(1) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, section 
13301 of the Budget Enforcement Act of 1990, and section 4001 
of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1989, the joint 
explanatory statement accompanying the conference report on any 
concurrent resolution on the budget shall include in its 
allocation under section 302(a) of the Congressional Budget Act 
of 1974 to the House Committee on Appropriations amounts for 
the discretionary administrative expenses of the Social 
Security Administration and of the Postal Service.
  (b) Special Rule.--For purposes of applying section 302(f) of 
the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, estimates of the level of 
total new budget authority and total outlays provided by a 
measure shall include any off-budget discretionary amounts.

SEC. 305. APPLICATION AND EFFECT OF CHANGES IN ALLOCATIONS AND 
                    AGGREGATES.

  (a) Application.--In the House, any adjustments of 
allocations and aggregates made pursuant to this resolution 
shall--
          (1) apply while that measure is under consideration;
          (2) take effect upon the enactment of that measure; 
        and
          (3) be published in the Congressional Record as soon 
        as practicable.
  (b) Effect of Changed Allocations and Aggregates.--Revised 
allocations and aggregates resulting from these adjustments 
shall be considered for the purposes of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974 as allocations and aggregates included in 
this resolution.
  (c) Adjustments.--The Chair of the House Committee on the 
Budget may adjust the aggregates, allocations, and other levels 
in this resolution for legislation which has received final 
congressional approval in the same form by the House of 
Representatives and the Senate, but has yet to be presented to 
or signed by the President at the time of final consideration 
of this resolution.

SEC. 306. ADJUSTMENTS FOR CHANGES IN THE BASELINE.

  The Chair of the House Committee on the Budget may adjust the 
allocations, aggregates, reconciliation targets, and other 
appropriate budgetary levels in this concurrent resolution to 
reflect changes resulting from the Congressional Budget 
Office's update to its baseline for fiscal years 2018 through 
2027.

SEC. 307. REINSTATEMENT OF PAY-AS-YOU-GO.

  In the House, and pursuant to section 301(b)(8) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, for the remainder of the 
115th Congress, the following shall apply in lieu of ``CUTGO'' 
rules and principles:
          (1)(A) Except as provided in paragraphs (2) and (3), 
        it shall not be in order to consider any bill, joint 
        resolution, amendment, or conference report if the 
        provisions of such measure affecting direct spending 
        and revenues have the net effect of increasing the on-
        budget deficit or reducing the on-budget surplus for 
        the period comprising either--
                  (i) the current year, the budget year, and 
                the four years following that budget year; or
                  (ii) the current year, the budget year, and 
                the nine years following that budget year.
          (B) The effect of such measure on the deficit or 
        surplus shall be determined on the basis of estimates 
        made by the Committee on the Budget.
          (C) For the purpose of this section, the terms 
        ``budget year'', ``current year'', and ``direct 
        spending'' have the meanings specified in section 250 
        of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control 
        Act of 1985, except that the term ``direct spending'' 
        shall also include provisions in appropriation Acts 
        that make outyear modifications to substantive law as 
        described in section 3(4)(C) of the Statutory Pay-As-
        You-Go Act of 2010.
          (2) If a bill, joint resolution, or amendment is 
        considered pursuant to a special order of the House 
        directing the Clerk to add as a new matter at the end 
        of such measure the provisions of a separate measure as 
        passed by the House, the provisions of such separate 
        measure as passed by the House shall be included in the 
        evaluation under paragraph (1) of the bill, joint 
        resolution, or amendment.
          (3)(A) Except as provided in subparagraph (B), the 
        evaluation under paragraph (1) shall exclude a 
        provision expressly designated as an emergency for 
        purposes of pay-as-you-go principles in the case of a 
        point of order under this clause against consideration 
        of--
                  (i) bill or joint resolution;
                  (ii) an amendment made in order as original 
                text by a special order of business;
                  (iii) a conference report; or
                  (iv) an amendment between the Houses.
          (B) In the case of an amendment (other than one 
        specified in subparagraph (A)) to a bill or joint 
        resolution, the evaluation under paragraph (1) shall 
        give no cognizance to any designation of emergency.
          (C) If a bill, a joint resolution, an amendment made 
        in order as original text by a special order of 
        business, a conference report, or an amendment between 
        the Houses includes a provision expressly designated as 
        an emergency for purposes of pay-as-you-go principles, 
        the Chair shall put the question of consideration with 
        respect thereto.

SEC. 308. EXERCISE OF RULEMAKING POWERS.

  The House adopts the provisions of this title--
          (1) as an exercise of the rulemaking power of the 
        House of Representatives and as such they shall be 
        considered as part of the rules of the House, and these 
        rules shall supersede other rules only to the extent 
        that they are inconsistent with other such rules; and
          (2) with full recognition of the constitutional right 
        of the House of Representatives to change those rules 
        at any time, in the same manner, and to the same extent 
        as in the case of any other rule of the House of 
        Representatives.

                      TITLE IV--POLICY STATEMENTS


SEC. 401. POLICY OF THE HOUSE ON AFFORDABLE HEALTH CARE COVERAGE FOR 
                    WORKING FAMILIES.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) Making health care coverage affordable and 
        accessible for all American families will improve their 
        health and financial security, which will make the 
        economy stronger.
          (2) Medicaid is the Nation's largest health insurance 
        program, providing quality, comprehensive, and 
        affordable coverage to more than 70 million vulnerable 
        Americans, including more than one in three children.
          (3) Millions of low-income seniors and people with 
        disabilities rely on Medicaid to pay for nursing home 
        care and home- and community-based services that 
        provide help with activities of daily living.
          (4) Medicaid coverage provides financial stability to 
        families struggling to escape poverty and to parents of 
        children with disabilities and special health care 
        needs.
          (5) The existing financing structure of Medicaid 
        ensures that Federal contributions keep pace with costs 
        and enables States to respond to changing needs, such 
        as increased enrollment in coverage during economic 
        downturns or an aging population that requires 
        extensive long-term care services.
          (6) Under the Affordable Care Act, 31 States and the 
        District of Columbia have expanded Medicaid eligibility 
        to low-income adults, including working parents who do 
        not receive coverage through their employers.
          (7) Roughly 20 million previously uninsured people 
        have gained health care coverage under the Affordable 
        Care Act, reducing the Nation's uninsured rate for 
        working-age adults to one of the lowest levels on 
        record.
          (8) The law provides premium tax credits that vary by 
        income and the local cost of coverage and cost-sharing 
        assistance to help low- and middle-income families 
        afford quality insurance and pay their out-of-pocket 
        costs.
          (9) The law prohibits insurers from denying coverage 
        or charging higher premiums based on pre-existing 
        conditions, requires coverage of essential health 
        benefits like maternity care and prescription drugs, 
        limits out-of-pocket costs, and prohibits lifetime and 
        annual limits on coverage.
          (10) The law put in place significant cost-saving 
        reforms to Federal health programs that have played a 
        part in slowing the rate of healthcare spending growth 
        in recent years, with 2011, 2012, and 2013 experiencing 
        the slowest growth rates in real per capita national 
        health expenditures on record.
          (11) On May 4, 2017, the House of Representatives 
        passed H.R.1628, the American Health Care Act of 2017, 
        legislation that would repeal provisions of the 
        Affordable Care Act, make deep cuts in Medicaid, and--
                  (A) result in 23 million Americans losing 
                health insurance in 2026, including 14 million 
                people losing Medicaid;
                  (B) dramatically increase costs for older 
                adults, low-income families, and people with 
                pre-existing conditions;
                  (C) reduce Medicaid spending by $834 billion 
                over ten years;
                  (D) jeopardize care for seniors in nursing 
                homes, children with disabilities, and families 
                receiving Medicaid benefits as States look to 
                reduce coverage and services;
                  (E) severely undermine access to substance 
                abuse treatment during the nationwide opioid 
                epidemic;
                  (F) shorten the life of the Medicare Hospital 
                Insurance Trust Fund; and
                  (G) provide nearly $1 trillion in tax cuts 
                that mostly benefit millionaires, billionaires, 
                and wealthy corporations.
  (b) Policy.--It is the policy of the House that--
          (1) Congress should build upon the progress of the 
        Affordable Care Act to make health care coverage more 
        affordable and accessible to all American families, and 
        reject any measures to repeal or undermine the law;
          (2) the Administration and Congress should fully 
        implement, enforce, and fund the Affordable Care Act, 
        and stop any efforts to sabotage the health insurance 
        marketplaces; and
          (3) Congress should preserve Medicaid and not 
        dismantle it by converting Medicaid into a block grant, 
        per capita cap, or other financing arrangement that 
        would limit Federal contributions and render the 
        program incapable of responding to increased need that 
        may result from trends in demographics or health care 
        costs or from economic conditions.

SEC. 402. POLICY OF THE HOUSE ON TAX REFORM THAT PROVIDES SUPPORT AND 
                    RELIEF TO HARDWORKING AMERICAN FAMILIES.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) Tax plans from House Republicans and President 
        Trump prioritize tax cuts for millionaires, 
        billionaires, and wealthy corporations, while shifting 
        more of the burden onto everyone else. Their plans fail 
        to close special interest loopholes in the tax code, 
        and even add trillions of dollars of new loopholes for 
        the wealthy. These plans reflect the failed theory of 
        ``trickle-down'' economics, which creates few jobs and 
        instead leads to massive deficits. A return to these 
        policies would--
                  (A) fail to create good paying middle-class 
                jobs;
                  (B) do nothing to help low-income or middle-
                class households with the rising costs of 
                health care, education, housing, child care, or 
                retirement; and
                  (C) widen the income gap between millionaires 
                and billionaires and the middle class.
          (2) Americans today are working harder than ever, but 
        continue to struggle to find good jobs, get ahead, and 
        stay ahead. This is part of a four-decade trend of 
        stagnant wages for middle-class and low-income 
        households, even as millionaires and billionaires 
        become richer and corporations reap massive profits.
          (3) The Obama Administration ended with 83 
        consecutive months of private-sector job growth, but 
        challenges still remain to create more good-paying jobs 
        and broadly shared prosperity. The number of long-term 
        unemployed remains elevated, and unemployment for 
        people of color continues to be higher than the rest of 
        the population. Many areas remain in need of well-
        paying jobs.
          (4) By almost any metric, the middle class has seen 
        little to no improvements in their incomes. Real median 
        household income in 2013 was only $7,000 higher than it 
        was in 1979. Median weekly real earnings for workers 
        increased less than 1 percent from 1979 to 2014. Poorer 
        workers have done even worse. For workers in the lower 
        half of the income scale, real annual wages from 1979 
        to 2014 grew only $76. And the entire lower 50 percent 
        of the United States population holds a mere 1 percent 
        of total national wealth.
          (5) All the while, millionaires and billionaires have 
        seen their incomes and wealth skyrocket. Incomes for 
        the top one percent of households grew five times as 
        fast as for middle-income workers, and now average over 
        $1 million a year. CEOs make nearly 300 times what the 
        typical worker does. Ten percent of the population owns 
        76 percent of the Nation's total wealth, and the 
        average net assets of the top one percent now exceed 
        $10 million per person.
          (6) The top one percent of households receives a 
        disproportionate share--17 percent--of the benefit of 
        major tax expenditures. This uneven distribution of 
        major tax expenditures has exacerbated income and 
        wealth inequality. The tax code treats income from 
        wealth more favorably than income from work by giving 
        preferential tax rates on unearned income, and it 
        contains numerous, wasteful tax breaks for special 
        interests.
  (b) Policy.--It is the policy of the House to responsibly 
reform the tax code to provide support and relief to low- and 
middle-income families, create good-paying jobs, and drive 
broadly-shared prosperity, while closing special-interest 
loopholes and making sure the wealthiest Americans pay their 
fair share.

SEC. 403. POLICY OF THE HOUSE ON DEFENSE AND NONDEFENSE FUNDING 
                    INCREASES.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) The current spending limits set by the Budget 
        Control Act of 2011 are too low, for both defense and 
        nondefense funding. Defense and nondefense investments 
        must be at appropriate levels to protect both national 
        security and economic security. The nondefense 
        discretionary spending limit for 2018 is $2 billion 
        less than it was in 2016, in nominal terms, 
        representing a significant cut to purchasing power. If 
        the inflation rate is what the Congressional Budget 
        Office projects, the 2018 cap represents a reduction of 
        nearly $30 billion compared with 2016. Defense spending 
        faces similar reductions.
          (2) The Budget Control Act of 2011 is based on parity 
        for defense and nondefense spending, setting up 
        separate caps for both and instituting a ``firewall'' 
        to prevent reductions in one category because of 
        increases in the other.
          (3) Bipartisan agreement has provided a solution to 
        the austerity-level caps before, and can be used again 
        to change these arbitrary spending caps to prevent the 
        harsh impact of massive, irresponsible cuts to 
        important Federal programs.
          (4) Congress must begin discussions and negotiations 
        immediately, to raise the caps to appropriate levels, 
        and maintain parity between defense and nondefense.
  (b) Policy on Defense and Nondefense Funding Increases.--It 
is the policy of the House that Congress should enact increases 
to the current defense and nondefense spending limits, in equal 
amounts, without using reductions in one category to pay for 
increases in the other.

SEC. 404. POLICY OF THE HOUSE ON IMMIGRATION REFORM.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) Fixing the country's broken immigration system 
        will mean safer communities, a stronger economy and 
        lower budget deficits.
          (2) The Congressional Budget Office estimated that 
        enacting the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and 
        Immigration Modernization Act, as introduced by House 
        Democrats in the 113th Congress, would have reduced the 
        deficit by $900 billion over the next 2 decades, 
        boosting the economy by 5.4 percent, and increasing 
        productivity by 1.0 percent.
          (3) The Social Security Actuary estimated that 
        immigration reform will reduce the Social Security 
        shortfall by 8 percent and will extend the life of the 
        Social Security Trust Fund by 2 years.
          (4) The United States is a Nation founded, built and 
        sustained by immigrants, and the Congress has a 
        responsibility to harness the power of that tradition 
        by implementing an effective and fair immigration 
        policy.
          (5) The current immigration system is broken because 
        it keeps families of legal immigrants and United States 
        citizens separated for decades, it allows for the 
        exploitation of undocumented workers to the detriment 
        of all workers, it does not meet the needs of our 
        economy and discourages legal immigration, and it keeps 
        millions of hard-working, law-abiding families who have 
        lived in our communities for decades hiding in the 
        shadows, including many thousands who came to the 
        United States as infants or young children.
          (6) Overly aggressive immigration enforcement that 
        focuses on individuals with deep ties to the United 
        States hurts State and local law enforcement efforts to 
        establish and maintain trust with immigrant 
        communities. The number of Latinos reporting crimes in 
        big cities across the country is lower than past years, 
        particularly among domestic violence and sexual assault 
        victims.
          (7) The vast majority of individuals in U.S. 
        Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) custody have 
        not been convicted of a serious crime. ICE's own 
        statistics demonstrate that arrests of people with no 
        criminal record increased 157 percent in the first 100 
        days of the Trump Administration, and only 6.5 percent 
        of those arrested were convicted of violent crimes.
          (8) The number of detained asylum seekers continues 
        to rise dramatically and detaining asylum seekers, 
        other vulnerable populations, and those who do not pose 
        risks to public safety is unnecessary and wasteful.
          (9) Increasing the use of alternatives to detention 
        rather than expanding immigration detention would be 
        more humane and cost-effective.
          (10) It has been nearly four years since the Senate 
        passed, on a bipartisan basis, its comprehensive 
        immigration reform bill.
          (11) Immigration reform is needed to secure the 
        sovereignty of the United States of America and to 
        establish a coherent and just system for integrating 
        those who seek to join American society.
          (12) A successful immigration system cannot rely on 
        border security alone. The country needs a system that 
        promotes the reunification of families, protects 
        workers and is responsive to the needs of employers, 
        and implements an inclusive legalization program for 
        those who are currently here.
  (b) Policy.--It is the policy of the House that Congress 
enact comprehensive immigration reform - such as the Border 
Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization 
Act, introduced by House Democrats in the 113th Congress - to 
boost our economy, lower deficits, establish clear and just 
rules for citizenship, and make our communities safer.

SEC. 405. POLICY OF THE HOUSE ON SOCIAL SECURITY.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) Most of the 61 million Americans who currently 
        receive earned Social Security benefits rely on these 
        benefits for the majority of their income, with nearly 
        a quarter of them relying on Social Security for at 
        least 90 percent of their income.
          (2) In the past, Social Security benefits were part 
        of a 3-legged stool where retirees relied on a 
        combination of Social Security, a private pension, and 
        personal savings to finance retirement.
          (3) Social Security benefits will be more important 
        to future retirees as few workers will receive 
        traditional pensions, and many workers cannot afford to 
        adequately fund their retirement through employer-
        sponsored savings plans or IRAs.
          (4) Social Security's Disability Insurance (DI) and 
        Old Age and Survivors Insurance (OASI) systems are 
        intertwined both in their benefit structure and in 
        their revenues - DI recipients who reach retirement age 
        receive OASI benefits and beneficiaries in each 
        category have helped finance the other category even if 
        they will never receive those benefits.
          (5) Social Security benefits are already being cut as 
        Social Security's normal retirement age is increasing 
        from 66 years for workers retiring now to 67 years for 
        those born in 1960 and later. This cut 
        disproportionately impacts low-earners because life 
        expectancy continues to increase among higher-earners 
        but not low-earners. Thus, high-earners will generally 
        receive benefits for a longer time than low-earners.
  (b) Policy.--It is the policy of the House that the House of 
Representatives will not adopt changes to Social Security that 
involve reductions in earned Social Security benefits.

SEC. 406. POLICY OF THE HOUSE ON PROTECTING THE MEDICARE GUARANTEE FOR 
                    SENIORS AND PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) Senior citizens and persons with disabilities 
        highly value the Medicare program and rely on Medicare 
        to guarantee their health and financial security.
          (2) In 2018, 60,000,000 people will rely on Medicare 
        for coverage of hospital stays, physician visits, 
        prescription drugs, and other necessary medical goods 
        and services.
          (3) The Medicare program has lower administrative 
        costs than private insurance, and Medicare costs per 
        enrollee have grown at a slower rate than private 
        insurance for a given level of benefits.
          (4) People with Medicare already have the ability to 
        choose a private insurance plan within Medicare through 
        the Medicare Advantage option, yet two-thirds of 
        Medicare beneficiaries chose the traditional fee-for-
        service program instead of a private plan in 2016.
          (5) Rising health care costs are not unique to 
        Medicare or other Federal health programs, they are 
        endemic to the entire health care system.
          (6) Converting Medicare into a voucher for the 
        purchase of health insurance will merely force seniors 
        and individuals with disabilities to pay much higher 
        premiums if they want to use their voucher to purchase 
        traditional Medicare coverage.
          (7) A voucher system in which the voucher payment 
        fails to keep pace with growth in health costs would 
        expose seniors and persons with disabilities on fixed 
        incomes to unacceptable financial risks.
          (8) Shifting more health care costs onto Medicare 
        beneficiaries would not reduce overall health care 
        costs, instead it would mean beneficiaries would face 
        higher premiums, eroding coverage, or both.
          (9) Versions of voucher policies that do not 
        immediately end the traditional Medicare program will 
        merely set it up for a death spiral as private plans 
        siphon off healthier and less expensive beneficiaries, 
        leaving the sickest beneficiaries in a program that 
        will wither away.
  (b) Policy.--It is the policy of the House that the Medicare 
guarantee for seniors and persons with disabilities should be 
preserved and strengthened, and that any legislation to end the 
Medicare guarantee, financially penalize people for choosing 
traditional Medicare, or shift rising health care costs onto 
seniors by replacing Medicare with vouchers or premium support 
for the purchase of health insurance, should be rejected.

SEC. 407. POLICY OF THE HOUSE ON FINANCIAL STABILITY AND CONSUMER 
                    PROTECTION.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer 
        Protection Act of 2010 is an important component of the 
        country's response to the financial crisis and 
        recession. It took a number of steps to protect 
        consumers of financial products and services as well as 
        protect taxpayers from the costs of another financial 
        crisis.
          (2) These steps included the creation of an orderly 
        liquidation process to allow regulators to close 
        failing institutions that some argue are ``too big to 
        fail,'' as well as a new Financial Stability Oversight 
        Council (FSOC), an Office of Financial Research to 
        monitor the stability of our financial system, and the 
        Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (the Consumer 
        Bureau).
          (3) The Consumer Bureau plays a critical role in 
        protecting older Americans, military service members, 
        student loan borrowers, and other consumers, especially 
        in minority and low-income communities. It has 
        implemented new rules for mortgage markets and prepaid 
        cards, and also successfully recovered nearly $12 
        billion on behalf of more than 29 million consumers and 
        service members.
          (4) The Consumer Bureau's funding from the Federal 
        Reserve's operations help give it important 
        independence from efforts to interfere with its vital 
        mission and activities, independence on par with every 
        other banking regulator.
          (5) The Consumer Bureau has already faced and 
        overcome efforts to obstruct its operations.
  (b) Policy.--It is the policy of the House that Congress 
should continue to support the vital work of the Consumer 
Financial Protection Bureau as well as its governing and 
financing structures and other key components of the Dodd-Frank 
legislation such as orderly liquidation authority, FSOC, and 
the Office of Financial Research.

SEC. 408. POLICY OF THE HOUSE ON WOMEN'S ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) Women's contributions are critical to the 
        economic success of hard-working families.
          (2) Not only do women play a key role in maintaining 
        healthy families, they also have unique health care 
        needs and face issues that require special focus.
          (3) Every hard-working American deserves to feel safe 
        and supported during retirement. Yet women are more 
        likely to face financial risk during retirement because 
        of their lower lifetime earnings and disproportionate 
        role as family caregivers.
  (b) Policy.--It is the policy of the House that Congress 
should economically empower women and protect their health and 
safety. Congress must enact policies that would accomplish the 
following:
          (1) Help families attain better jobs, fight pay 
        inequity, raise the minimum wage, and enable women 
        entrepreneurs and small businesses to achieve their 
        goals.
          (2) Give American families control of their own 
        lives, and help them balance the demands of work and 
        family. These policies include paid and expanded family 
        and medical leave, paid sick days, and quality, 
        affordable child care.
          (3) Strengthen the retirement security of women and 
        their families by protecting Social Security, Medicare 
        and Medicaid.
          (4) Support caregivers, many of whom sacrifice their 
        own careers to provide for family members.
          (5) Maintain health insurance protections for women, 
        increase funding for the prevention and treatment of 
        women's health issues such as breast cancer and heart 
        disease, and support access to full reproductive care.
          (6) Prevent and protect women from domestic violence 
        and sexual abuse.

SEC. 409. POLICY OF THE HOUSE ON NATIONAL SECURITY.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) The country faces many national security 
        challenges and we must continue to support a strong 
        military that is second to none.
          (2) Those who serve in uniform are our most important 
        security resource and the Administration and Congress 
        shall continue to provide the support they need to 
        successfully carry out the missions the country gives 
        them.
          (3) A growing economy is the foundation of our 
        security and enables the country to provide the 
        resources for a strong military, sound homeland 
        security agencies, and effective diplomacy and 
        international development.
          (4) Austerity-level spending caps threaten adequate 
        investment in activities critical to our economy and 
        national security, which include activities funded by 
        both the defense and nondefense portions of the 
        discretionary budget.
          (5) Diplomacy and foreign aid are essential 
        components of our security and the President's proposal 
        to cut these activities by 32 percent below current 
        levels prompted more than 120 retired admirals and 
        generals who have first-hand knowledge of their 
        effectiveness in securing our Nation to forcefully 
        object.
          (6) The Nation's projected long-term debt could have 
        serious consequences for our economy and security, and 
        that more efficient military spending has to be part of 
        an overall plan that effectively deals with this 
        problem.
          (7) Reining in wasteful spending at the Nation's 
        security agencies, including the Department of 
        Defense--the last department still unable to pass an 
        audit--such as the elimination of duplicative programs 
        and better controlling delays and cost overruns on 
        weapon systems that have been identified by the 
        Government Accountability Office (GAO) needs to 
        continue as a priority.
          (8) The Department of Defense should continue to 
        review defense plans and requirements to ensure that 
        weapons developed to counter Cold War-era threats are 
        not redundant, are affordable, and are applicable to 
        21st century threats; and such review should include, 
        with the participation of the National Nuclear Security 
        Administration, examination of requirements for, and 
        cost of, the nuclear weapons stockpile, nuclear weapons 
        delivery systems, and nuclear weapons and 
        infrastructure modernization.
          (9) Nonwar operation and maintenance costs per 
        active-duty service member have grown at a rate well 
        above inflation for decades--from $59,000 per service 
        member in 1980 to $157,000 per service member in 2015 
        (measured in constant 2017 dollars), and it is 
        imperative that unsustainable cost growth be controlled 
        in this area.
          (10) Cooperative threat reduction and other 
        nonproliferation programs (securing ``loose nukes'' and 
        other materials used in weapons of mass destruction), 
        which were highlighted as high priorities by the 9/11 
        Commission, need to be funded at a level that is 
        commensurate with the evolving threat.
  (b) Policy.--It is the policy of the House that--
          (1) the austerity-level spending caps required by the 
        Budget Control Act of 2011 for fiscal years 2018 
        through 2021 should be rescinded and replaced by a 
        fiscal plan that is balanced and takes into account a 
        comprehensive national security strategy that includes 
        careful consideration of international, defense, 
        homeland security, and law enforcement programs; and
          (2) efficiencies can be achieved in the national 
        defense budget without compromising our security 
        through greater emphasis on eliminating duplicative and 
        wasteful programs, reforming the acquisition process, 
        identifying and constraining unsustainable operating 
        costs, and through careful analysis of our national 
        security needs.

SEC. 410. POLICY OF THE HOUSE ON VETERANS AFFAIRS.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) continues 
        to face challenges meeting the needs of the next 
        generation of returning veterans, including sufficient 
        funding to provide critical services and benefits.
          (2) Access to quality health care and veterans' 
        benefits has been an ongoing challenge for the VA, 
        highlighted most recently in the ongoing claims backlog 
        and veterans waiting months for health care 
        appointments.
          (3) Providing health care where veterans live and 
        ensuring a sufficient number of health care 
        professionals, especially in the area of mental health 
        treatment, have also been challenges.
          (4) The VA has made progress in reducing the number 
        of initial benefit claims, dropping the claims backlog 
        to less than 94,000 from a peak of 611,000 claims just 
        a few years ago, but that statistic leaves out the many 
        veterans who are still waiting many months or even 
        years to have their appeals decided.
          (5) The President's budget includes a 6 percent 
        increase over current-year funding but shifts funding 
        away from critical programs that veterans rely on in 
        favor of expanded funding that pays for certain 
        veterans to get private health care at the expense of 
        care provided at VA hospitals and clinics.
          (6) The President's budget also cuts funding from 
        other Federal agencies that provide lifesaving programs 
        and services for veterans, including deep cuts to 
        Medicaid benefits veterans rely on, the elimination of 
        the Interagency Council on Homelessness, steep cuts at 
        the Department of Housing and Urban Development, 
        elimination of the Legal Services Corporation, and 
        severe cuts to entrepreneurship outreach programs 
        targeted to veterans through the Small Business 
        Administration.
          (7) The VA currently has advance appropriations for 
        approximately 85 percent of its discretionary budget. 
        The residual 15 percent, which includes funding for the 
        day-to-day operations at the Veterans Benefits 
        Administration, remains vulnerable to a Government 
        shutdown.
  (b) Policy.--It is the policy of the House that--
          (1) Congress should support a funding level no less 
        than the President's request for veterans' 
        discretionary programs so that the VA has the resources 
        it needs to ensure veterans get the health care and 
        benefits they earned in a timely fashion;
          (2) Congress should lift the austerity-level funding 
        cap on nondefense programs for 2018 and beyond to 
        ensure adequate funding for veterans' programs;
          (3) advance appropriations be expanded to cover all 
        of VA's discretionary budget to prevent delays in 
        veterans' benefits and services during a Government 
        shutdown;
          (4) the VA submit along with its annual budget a 
        ``Future-Years Veterans Program'' that projects its 
        needs over five years to help facilitate the 
        appropriations and oversight processes;
          (5) Congress should provide sufficient resources for 
        the VA's Office of the Inspector General to guarantee 
        veterans are properly served and that resources are 
        spent efficiently;
          (6) no changes be made to the Individual 
        Unemployability benefit to ensure that disabled 
        veterans, many of them severely disabled, who are 
        deemed unable to engage in substantial work as a result 
        of their service to our country, continue to receive 
        the full disability and social security benefits they 
        earned and were promised; and
          (7) Congress shall provide sufficient funding and 
        staff resources for VA hospitals and clinics, and that 
        any increased funding for private and community care 
        not provided directly by the VA should not come at the 
        expense of necessary resources for VA hospitals and 
        clinics.

SEC. 411. POLICY OF THE HOUSE ON DISASTER RESPONSE FUNDING.

  (a) Findings.--The House find the following:
          (1) Natural disasters such as hurricanes Harvey, 
        Irma, and Maria require swift congressional action to 
        help storm survivors get their lives back on track, 
        rebuild disaster-stricken communities, and prevent 
        further damage to the economy.
          (2) The Budget Control Act of 2001 provides 
        procedural tools specifically to respond to natural 
        disasters, by allowing adjustments to the spending caps 
        for disaster and emergency spending.
          (3) Mitigation and prevention is an important part of 
        disaster recovery and response, providing investments 
        that make future disasters less costly in terms of both 
        dollars and lives.
  (b) Policy on Funding for Disaster Response and Recovery.--It 
is the policy of the House that Congress should act swiftly to 
assist with recovery from hurricanes and other natural 
disasters. Such funding should be provided using the budgetary 
provisions in place for this purpose: providing adjustments to 
the spending caps for disaster and emergency response, 
recovery, and mitigation. Congress must also support efforts to 
address future disaster damage and loss, by appropriately 
funding mitigation and prevention efforts.

SEC. 412. POLICY OF THE HOUSE ON THE FEDERAL WORKFORCE.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) The Federal workforce provides vital services to 
        our Nation on a daily basis. It includes those who 
        patrol and secure our borders, protect us from 
        terrorists, take care of our veterans, help run our 
        airports, counter cyber-attacks, find cures for deadly 
        diseases, and keep our food supply safe.
          (2) Veterans make up 31 percent of the Federal 
        workforce.
          (3) Many Federal workers are paid at a rate that is 
        far below their private sector counterparts.
          (4) The Federal workforce is older than in past 
        decades and older than the private sector workforce. 
        Nearly one third of the Federal workforce is eligible 
        to retire.
          (5) Federal employee pay and benefits are not the 
        cause of the country's deficits and debt. The Federal 
        workforce has already contributed more than $180 
        billion toward reducing the country's deficits in the 
        form of pay freezes, pay raises insufficient to keep 
        pace with inflation, furloughs, and increased 
        retirement contributions. The President's budget for 
        2018 continues to unfairly target the Federal workforce 
        by proposing an additional $149 billion in compensation 
        and retirement benefit cuts.
          (6) Since 1975, the Federal workforce has declined 35 
        percent relative to the size of the population of the 
        United States.
          (7) Nearly all of the increase in the Federal 
        civilian workforce from 2001 to 2016 is due to 
        increases at security-related agencies, including the 
        Department of Defense, Department of Homeland Security, 
        and Department of Veterans Affairs.
          (8) Proposals to reduce the size of the workforce at 
        nonsecurity agencies by 10 percent have excluded an 
        assessment of their impact on government services.
  (b) Policy.--It is the policy of the House that Congress 
should not target Federal employees to achieve further 
reductions in the deficit as they have already contributed more 
than their fair share, that Federal workers should be 
compensated with pay and benefits at a level that enables the 
government to attract high quality people--which is especially 
important during this period when more workers will be 
retiring--and that no proposal to reduce the size of the 
workforce should be considered without an assessment of its 
impact on government services.

SEC. 413. POLICY OF THE HOUSE ON CLIMATE CHANGE SCIENCE.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) Global climate change is a threat to national 
        security, public health, and economic growth.
          (2) The United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on 
        Climate Change concluded that the effects of climate 
        change are occurring worldwide, stating: ``The impacts 
        of climate change have already been felt in recent 
        decades on all continents and across the oceans''.
          (3) The United States Government Accountability 
        Office described climate change as, ``a complex, 
        crosscutting issue that poses risks to many 
        environmental and economic systems--including 
        agriculture, infrastructure, ecosystems, and human 
        health--and presents a significant financial risk to 
        the Federal Government''.
          (4) In March 2017, Secretary of Defense James Mattis, 
        in written testimony to the Senate Armed Services 
        Committee, stated that ``climate change can be a driver 
        of instability and the Department of Defense must pay 
        attention to potential adverse impacts generated by 
        this phenomenon''.
          (5) The National Aeronautics and Space Administration 
        and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 
        reported that 2016 was the warmest year on record, 
        setting a new record for global average surface 
        temperatures for the third year in a row. Furthermore, 
        16 of the 17 warmest years on record have occurred 
        since 2001.
          (6) The United States National Research Council's 
        National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory 
        Committee found climate change affects ``human health, 
        water supply, agriculture, transportation, energy, 
        coastal areas, and many other sectors of society, with 
        increasingly adverse impacts on the American economy 
        and quality of life''.
          (7) The most vulnerable among us, including children, 
        the elderly, low-income individuals, and those with 
        underlying health conditions, face even greater health 
        risks as a result of climate change.
  (b) Policy.--It is the policy of the House that climate 
change presents a significant public health, environmental, and 
financial risk to the United States. The United States must 
continue to play a leadership role on climate change policy and 
should not retreat from global commitments on climate change. 
Congress must provide robust funding for climate change 
science, which provides critical information for protecting 
human health, defending the United States, and preserving 
economic and environmental systems throughout the world.

SEC. 414. POLICY OF THE HOUSE ON INCREASED EFFICIENCY AND ELIMINATING 
                    WASTE.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) The Government Accountability Office (``GAO'') 
        identifies examples of waste, duplication, and overlap 
        in Federal programs, and makes regular recommendations 
        regarding ways to reduce costs and increase revenue.
          (2) The Comptroller General has stated that 
        addressing the identified waste, duplication, and 
        overlap in Federal programs ``could lead to tens of 
        billions of dollars of additional savings, with 
        significant opportunities for improved efficiencies, 
        cost savings, or revenue enhancements in the areas of 
        defense, information technology, education and 
        training, health care, energy, and tax enforcement.''
          (3) The tax gap, the difference between taxes owed 
        and taxes paid, now averages $458 billion annually. 
        Even modest improvements in enforcing existing law 
        could yield a boost in revenue without any changes to 
        the tax code.
          (4) Tax expenditures, or spending through the tax 
        code, total $1.5 trillion per year and represent the 
        largest category of spending in the budget -- exceeding 
        Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security. However, 
        unlike other types of spending, tax expenditures are 
        not reviewed in any systematic way in the annual budget 
        process.
          (5) Improper payments, payments that should not have 
        been made or that were made in an incorrect amount, 
        totaled $144 billion for 2016. While some improper 
        payments are the result of fraud, the vast majority are 
        due to unintentional errors, such as payments to 
        eligible beneficiaries that were not properly verified, 
        or overpayments or underpayments because of a data 
        entry mistake.
          (6) Shutting down the government, arbitrarily cutting 
        agency budgets, and funding large portions of the 
        government through stop-gap appropriations do not lead 
        to efficient and effective government.
  (b) Policy.--It is the policy of the House that Congress must 
continue to root out wasteful spending, make government 
operations more efficient, pass appropriations bills on time, 
and avoid costly government shutdowns. Congress must task 
agencies with shrinking the error rate in government programs 
and provide adequate budgetary resources for agencies to 
develop new processes, review expenditures, and improve 
information technology systems.

SEC. 415. POLICY OF THE HOUSE ON THE INVESTIGATION OF RUSSIAN 
                    INTERFERENCE IN THE 2016 U.S. PRESIDENTIAL 
                    ELECTION.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds the following:
          (1) Free and fair elections are the cornerstone of 
        our democracy, and foreign interference in them 
        undermines the public trust and casts doubt on the 
        legitimacy of our government.
          (2) The country's intelligence agencies all agree 
        that Russia launched a campaign to undermine the 2016 
        U.S. presidential election, which included cyber-
        attacks, dissemination of false information, and other 
        intelligence operations to malign Secretary Hillary 
        Clinton and increase the odds of a Donald Trump 
        presidency.
          (3) Members of the Trump campaign had repeated 
        contact with Russian government officials and oligarchs 
        and then failed to report this contact in testimony to 
        Congress and in security clearance applications. One 
        such meeting reportedly included a request for a back-
        channel line of communications with the Russian 
        government using Russian facilities, which would 
        preclude U.S. Government oversight. Another involved a 
        Kremlin-linked Russian lawyer and a former Soviet 
        counterintelligence officer under the assumption that 
        they would provide politically damaging information 
        about Secretary Hillary Clinton as part of the Russian 
        government's effort to support the Trump campaign.
          (4) Under the direction of Federal Bureau of 
        Investigation Director James Comey, the FBI was 
        investigating whether members of President Trump's 
        campaign colluded with Russia to influence the 
        election.
          (5) On May 9, 2017, President Trump fired FBI 
        Director Comey and then made statements suggesting his 
        dismissal was to stop the investigation of collusion.
          (6) On May 17, 2017, the Department of Justice 
        announced the appointment of former FBI Director Robert 
        S. Mueller III to serve as Special Counsel to 
        investigate Russian interference into the 2016 
        presidential election and any coordination between the 
        Russian government and individuals associated with the 
        Trump campaign.
  (b) Policy on the Investigation of Russian Interference in 
the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election.--It is the policy of this 
concurrent resolution that to restore confidence in our 
government and to preserve the sanctity of our electoral 
process, Congress must ensure adequate funding for the Special 
Counsel appointed by the Department of Justice so that he can 
perform a thorough and nonpartisan investigation of Russia's 
campaign to affect the 2016 U.S. presidential election and any 
individuals in the United States that may have colluded in 
those efforts.

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