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115th Congress    }                                 {   Rept. 115-678
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session       }                                 {          Part 1

======================================================================



 
      PREVENTION OF PRIVATE INFORMATION DISSEMINATION ACT OF 2017

                                _______
                                

                  May 15, 2018.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Hensarling, from the Committee on Financial Services, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 4294]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Financial Services, to whom was referred 
the bill (H.R. 4294) to amend the Financial Stability Act of 
2010 to provide a criminal penalty for unauthorized disclosures 
of certain individually identifiable information by officers or 
employees of a Federal department or agency, having considered 
the same, report favorably thereon without amendment and 
recommend that the bill do pass.

                          Purpose and Summary

    Introduced by Representative David Kustoff on November 8, 
2017, H.R. 4294, the ``Prevention of Private Information 
Dissemination Act of 2017'' establishes criminal penalties for 
the unauthorized disclosure by federal officials of living will 
and stress test determinations and other individually 
identifiable information, specifically with respect to an 
officer or employee of a federal financial regulatory agency 
who willfully makes an unauthorized disclosure of certain 
individually identifiable information or a person who willfully 
requests or obtains such information under false pretenses.

                  Background and Need for Legislation

    Section 165 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and 
Consumer Protection Act (``Dodd-Frank Act'') requires bank 
holding companies (BHCs) with total consolidated assets of $50 
billion or more (also known as systemically-important financial 
institutions (SIFIs)), and nonbank financial companies 
designated by the Financial Stability Oversight Council (FSOC) 
for supervision to annually submit detailed plans to the 
Federal Reserve and the Federal Deposit Insurance Company 
(FDIC) describing the company's strategy for rapid and orderly 
resolution under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code in the event of its 
material financial distress or failure.\1\
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    \1\See Dodd-Frank Act Sec. 165.
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    As part of the submission process, BHCs and nonbank SIFIs 
must submit in-depth information about their business, 
including trade secrets and other sensitive information whose 
release could cause competitive harm to the institution. The 
Federal Reserve and FDIC are supposed to closely safeguard this 
information and treat the information as confidential.\2\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \2\See generally 12 CFR Sec. 381.8.
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    If the Federal Reserve and FDIC jointly conclude that a 
SIFI has failed to produce a ``credible'' plan for its orderly 
resolution, they can take a series of punitive measures, 
including imposing ``more stringent capital, leverage, or 
liquidity requirements, or restrictions on the growth, 
activities, or operations of the company, or any subsidiary 
thereof.''\3\ The Federal Reserve and FDIC can order an 
institution ``to divest certain assets or operations''\4\ if it 
fails to remedy the deficiencies identified by the regulators. 
Consequently, information about the results of living wills and 
stress tests can translate to information about the bank's 
financial health.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \3\Id. Sec. 165(d)(5)(A).
    \4\Id. Sec. 165(d)(5)(B).
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    As a result, the unauthorized release of information 
related to the results of living wills and stress tests were 
has the power to move markets. ``Information `moves markets' 
when it results in changes to [stock] prices upon being learned 
by certain market participants.''\5\ In short, market-moving 
information is information that will cause investors to buy, or 
more often sell, equity securities in a particular company or 
companies. When market-moving information is leaked to the 
public, it affects the market for the security in ways it would 
not otherwise have been affected. And when leaks of market-
moving information is made to an or a small group, the 
recipients of that information can use it to engage in insider 
trading where they make trades based on knowledge they have 
improperly gained that the rest of the market does not know.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \5\Kevin S. Haeberie and Todd M. Henderson, Information-
Dissemination Law: The Regulation of How Market-Moving Information Is 
Revealed, 101 Cornell Law Review 6, at 1385 n.12, http://
scholarship.law.cornell.edu/cgi/
viewcontent.cgi?article=4706&context=clr.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    On April 12, 2016, an improper disclosure of material, non-
public and confidential supervisory information occurred at 
either the Federal Reserve System or the Federal Deposit 
Insurance Corporation.\6\ The timing of this leak was 
particularly damaging as it came when financial institutions 
were preparing to present quarterly earnings reports to their 
investors. Earnings reports are important because they provide 
both immediate and longer-term financial information and in 
turn these reports can and do affect stock prices.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \6\Ryan Tracy, Regulators Set to Reject Some Big Banks' 'Living 
Wills,' WALL ST. J., (Apr. 12, 2016), available at https://www.wsj.com/
articles/regulators-set-to-find-flaws-in-big-u-s-banks-living-wills-
1460491197.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Highlighting the loss in market confidence the 2016 leak 
created, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Center for Capital 
Markets Competitiveness issued a statement:

          Recent events, including yesterday's U.S. Government 
        Accountability Office (GAO) report citing deficiencies 
        with the living wills process and last night's press 
        leak on living wills on the eve of earnings 
        announcements, provide further evidence that the system 
        is broken. If living wills are to be a productive tool 
        for financial stability, regulators must fix this 
        broken process and markets need to know how those 
        systems will improve the allocation of capital. 
        Contradictory outcomes through different tools such as 
        stress tests and living wills harm the ability of 
        regulators to achieve financial stability and for 
        market participants to understand what regulators are 
        doing.\7\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \7\Press Release, U.S. Chamber Statement on Federal Regulation of 
Banks' Living Wills, U.S. Chamber of Commerce, April 13, 1206, https://
www.uschamber.com/press-release/us-chamber-statement-federal-
regulation-banks-living-wills.

    H.R. 4294 imposes tough penalties in order to 
disincentivize the unauthorized disclosure of material, non-
public information that financial regulators possess as a 
result of the mandates in Section 165 of the Dodd-Frank Act. 
The nature of the living will and stress test documentation 
provided to the financial regulators has the power to move 
markets, give rise to illegal insider trading, damage the 
public's confidence in the capital markets, and degrade the 
public trust in the government.

                                Hearings

    The Committee on Financial Services held a hearing 
examining matters relating to H.R. 4294 on April 26, 2017 and 
April 28, 2017.

                        Committee Consideration

    The Committee on Financial Services met in open session on 
November 14, 2017, and November 15, 2017, and ordered H.R. 4294 
to be reported favorably to the House without amendment by a 
recorded vote of 60 yeas to 0 nays (Record vote no. FC-107), a 
quorum being present.

                            Committee Votes

    Clause 3(b) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives requires the Committee to list the record votes 
on the motion to report legislation and amendments thereto. The 
sole recorded vote was on a motion by Chairman Hensarling to 
report the bill favorably to the House without amendment. The 
motion was agreed to by a recorded vote of 60 yeas to 0 nays 
(Record vote no. FC-107), a quorum being present.


[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

                      Committee Oversight Findings

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the findings and recommendations of 
the Committee based on oversight activities under clause 
2(b)(1) of rule X of the Rules of the House of Representatives, 
are incorporated in the descriptive portions of this report.

                    Performance Goals and Objectives

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee states that H.R. 4294 
will provide a criminal penalty for unauthorized disclosures of 
individually identifiable information by officers or employees 
of a Federal department or agency related to living will and 
stress test determinations.

   New Budget Authority, Entitlement Authority, and Tax Expenditures

    In compliance with clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules 
of the House of Representatives, the Committee adopts as its 
own the estimate of new budget authority, entitlement 
authority, or tax expenditures or revenues contained in the 
cost estimate prepared by the Director of the Congressional 
Budget Office pursuant to section 402 of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974.

                 Congressional Budget Office Estimates

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(3) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is the cost estimate 
provided by the Congressional Budget Office pursuant to section 
402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974:

                                     U.S. Congress,
                               Congressional Budget Office,
                                  Washington, DC, December 6, 2017.
Hon. Jeb Hensarling,
Chairman, Committee on Financial Services,
House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for H.R. 4294, the 
Prevention of Private Information Dissemination Act of 2017.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Peter 
Huether.
            Sincerely,
                                                Keith Hall,
                                                          Director.
    Enclosure.

H.R. 4294--Prevention of Private Information Dissemination Act of 2017

    Large bank holding companies and certain nonbank financial 
companies are currently subject to extra supervision, capital 
requirements, and stress testing under the Dodd-Frank Wall 
Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. In connection with 
that enhanced supervision, H.R. 4294 would establish a criminal 
penalty for federal employees who willfully disclose 
individually identifiable information collected from those 
institutions and for those who obtain such information under 
false pretenses. Both penalties would be set at $5,000.
    Because people who are prosecuted and convicted under H.R. 
4294 could be subject to criminal fines, the federal government 
would probably collect additional penalties under the bill. 
Such fines are recorded as revenues, deposited in the Crime 
Victims Fund, and later spent without further appropriation 
action. However, CBO expects that any additional revenues and 
associated direct spending would not be significant because the 
bill would probably affect a small number of cases.
    Pay-as-you-go procedures apply because enacting H.R. 4294 
would affect direct spending and revenues.
    CBO estimates that enacting H.R. 4294 would not 
significantly increase net direct spending and would not 
increase on-budget deficits in any of the four consecutive 10-
year periods beginning in 2028.
    CBO has determined that the bill contains no 
intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as defined in the 
Unfunded Mandates Reform Act.
    The CBO staff contact for this estimate is Peter Huether. 
The estimate was approved by John McClelland, Assistant 
Director for Tax Analysis.

                       Federal Mandates Statement

    This information is provided in accordance with section 423 
of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995.
    The Committee has determined that the bill does not contain 
Federal mandates on the private sector. The Committee has 
determined that the bill does not impose a Federal 
intergovernmental mandate on State, local, or tribal 
governments.

                      Advisory Committee Statement

    No advisory committees within the meaning of section 5(b) 
of the Federal Advisory Committee Act were created by this 
legislation.

                  Applicability to Legislative Branch

    The Committee finds that the legislation does not relate to 
the terms and conditions of employment or access to public 
services or accommodations within the meaning of the section 
102(b)(3) of the Congressional Accountability Act.

                         Earmark Identification

    With respect to clause 9 of rule XXI of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee has carefully reviewed 
the provisions of the bill and states that the provisions of 
the bill do not contain any congressional earmarks, limited tax 
benefits, or limited tariff benefits within the meaning of the 
rule.

                    Duplication of Federal Programs

    In compliance with clause 3(c)(5) of rule XIII of the Rules 
of the House of Representatives, the Committee states that no 
provision of the bill establishes or reauthorizes: (1) a 
program of the Federal Government known to be duplicative of 
another Federal program; (2) a program included in any report 
from the Government Accountability Office to Congress pursuant 
to section 21 of Public Law 111-139; or (3) a program related 
to a program identified in the most recent Catalog of Federal 
Domestic Assistance, published pursuant to the Federal Program 
Information Act (Pub. L. No. 95-220, as amended by Pub. L. No. 
98-169).

                   Disclosure of Directed Rulemaking

    Pursuant to section 3(i) of H. Res. 5, (115th Congress), 
the following statement is made concerning directed 
rulemakings: The Committee estimates that the bill requires no 
directed rulemakings within the meaning of such section.

             Section-by-Section Analysis of the Legislation


Section 1. Short title

    This section cites H.R. 4294 as the ``Prevention of Private 
Information Dissemination Act of 2017.''

Section 2. Criminal penalty for unauthorized disclosures

    This section amends Section 165 of the Financial Stability 
Act of 2010 to create a criminal penalty for unauthorized 
disclosure of living will and stress test determinations and 
other individually identifiable information by federal 
officials, specifically with respect to an officer or employee 
of a federal financial regulatory agency. Any person who 
willfully makes an unauthorized disclosure of certain 
individually identifiable information or a person who willfully 
requests or obtains such information under false pretenses 
shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and fined not more than 
$5,000.

         Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

    In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italics, and existing law in which no 
change is proposed is shown in roman):

         Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

  In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (new matter is 
printed in italic and existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):

                    FINANCIAL STABILITY ACT OF 2010




           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
TITLE I--FINANCIAL STABILITY

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Subtitle C--Additional Board of Governors Authority for Certain Nonbank 
Financial Companies and Bank Holding Companies

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 165. ENHANCED SUPERVISION AND PRUDENTIAL STANDARDS FOR NONBANK 
                    FINANCIAL COMPANIES SUPERVISED BY THE BOARD OF 
                    GOVERNORS AND CERTAIN BANK HOLDING COMPANIES.

  (a) In General.--
          (1) Purpose.--In order to prevent or mitigate risks 
        to the financial stability of the United States that 
        could arise from the material financial distress or 
        failure, or ongoing activities, of large, 
        interconnected financial institutions, the Board of 
        Governors shall, on its own or pursuant to 
        recommendations by the Council under section 115, 
        establish prudential standards for nonbank financial 
        companies supervised by the Board of Governors and bank 
        holding companies with total consolidated assets equal 
        to or greater than $50,000,000,000 that--
                  (A) are more stringent than the standards and 
                requirements applicable to nonbank financial 
                companies and bank holding companies that do 
                not present similar risks to the financial 
                stability of the United States; and
                  (B) increase in stringency, based on the 
                considerations identified in subsection (b)(3).
          (2) Tailored application.--
                  (A) In general.--In prescribing more 
                stringent prudential standards under this 
                section, the Board of Governors may, on its own 
                or pursuant to a recommendation by the Council 
                in accordance with section 115, differentiate 
                among companies on an individual basis or by 
                category, taking into consideration their 
                capital structure, riskiness, complexity, 
                financial activities (including the financial 
                activities of their subsidiaries), size, and 
                any other risk-related factors that the Board 
                of Governors deems appropriate.
                  (B) Adjustment of threshold for application 
                of certain standards.--The Board of Governors 
                may, pursuant to a recommendation by the 
                Council in accordance with section 115, 
                establish an asset threshold above 
                $50,000,000,000 for the application of any 
                standard established under subsections (c) 
                through (g).
  (b) Development of Prudential Standards.--
          (1) In general.--
                  (A) Required standards.--The Board of 
                Governors shall establish prudential standards 
                for nonbank financial companies supervised by 
                the Board of Governors and bank holding 
                companies described in subsection (a), that 
                shall include--
                          (i) risk-based capital requirements 
                        and leverage limits, unless the Board 
                        of Governors, in consultation with the 
                        Council, determines that such 
                        requirements are not appropriate for a 
                        company subject to more stringent 
                        prudential standards because of the 
                        activities of such company (such as 
                        investment company activities or assets 
                        under management) or structure, in 
                        which case, the Board of Governors 
                        shall apply other standards that result 
                        in similarly stringent risk controls;
                          (ii) liquidity requirements;
                          (iii) overall risk management 
                        requirements;
                          (iv) resolution plan and credit 
                        exposure report requirements; and
                          (v) concentration limits.
                  (B) Additional standards authorized.--The 
                Board of Governors may establish additional 
                prudential standards for nonbank financial 
                companies supervised by the Board of Governors 
                and bank holding companies described in 
                subsection (a), that include--
                          (i) a contingent capital requirement;
                          (ii) enhanced public disclosures;
                          (iii) short-term debt limits; and
                          (iv) such other prudential standards 
                        as the Board or Governors, on its own 
                        or pursuant to a recommendation made by 
                        the Council in accordance with section 
                        115, determines are appropriate.
          (2) Standards for foreign financial companies.--In 
        applying the standards set forth in paragraph (1) to 
        any foreign nonbank financial company supervised by the 
        Board of Governors or foreign-based bank holding 
        company, the Board of Governors shall--
                  (A) give due regard to the principle of 
                national treatment and equality of competitive 
                opportunity; and
                  (B) take into account the extent to which the 
                foreign financial company is subject on a 
                consolidated basis to home country standards 
                that are comparable to those applied to 
                financial companies in the United States.
          (3) Considerations.--In prescribing prudential 
        standards under paragraph (1), the Board of Governors 
        shall--
                  (A) take into account differences among 
                nonbank financial companies supervised by the 
                Board of Governors and bank holding companies 
                described in subsection (a), based on--
                          (i) the factors described in 
                        subsections (a) and (b) of section 113;
                          (ii) whether the company owns an 
                        insured depository institution;
                          (iii) nonfinancial activities and 
                        affiliations of the company; and
                          (iv) any other risk-related factors 
                        that the Board of Governors determines 
                        appropriate;
                  (B) to the extent possible, ensure that small 
                changes in the factors listed in subsections 
                (a) and (b) of section 113 would not result in 
                sharp, discontinuous changes in the prudential 
                standards established under paragraph (1) of 
                this subsection;
                  (C) take into account any recommendations of 
                the Council under section 115; and
                  (D) adapt the required standards as 
                appropriate in light of any predominant line of 
                business of such company, including assets 
                under management or other activities for which 
                particular standards may not be appropriate.
          (4) Consultation.--Before imposing prudential 
        standards or any other requirements pursuant to this 
        section, including notices of deficiencies in 
        resolution plans and more stringent requirements or 
        divestiture orders resulting from such notices, that 
        are likely to have a significant impact on a 
        functionally regulated subsidiary or depository 
        institution subsidiary of a nonbank financial company 
        supervised by the Board of Governors or a bank holding 
        company described in subsection (a), the Board of 
        Governors shall consult with each Council member that 
        primarily supervises any such subsidiary with respect 
        to any such standard or requirement.
          (5) Report.--The Board of Governors shall submit an 
        annual report to Congress regarding the implementation 
        of the prudential standards required pursuant to 
        paragraph (1), including the use of such standards to 
        mitigate risks to the financial stability of the United 
        States.
  (c) Contingent Capital.--
          (1) In general.--Subsequent to submission by the 
        Council of a report to Congress under section 115(c), 
        the Board of Governors may issue regulations that 
        require each nonbank financial company supervised by 
        the Board of Governors and bank holding companies 
        described in subsection (a) to maintain a minimum 
        amount of contingent capital that is convertible to 
        equity in times of financial stress.
          (2) Factors to consider.--In issuing regulations 
        under this subsection, the Board of Governors shall 
        consider--
                  (A) the results of the study undertaken by 
                the Council, and any recommendations of the 
                Council, under section 115(c);
                  (B) an appropriate transition period for 
                implementation of contingent capital under this 
                subsection;
                  (C) the factors described in subsection 
                (b)(3)(A);
                  (D) capital requirements applicable to the 
                nonbank financial company supervised by the 
                Board of Governors or a bank holding company 
                described in subsection (a), and subsidiaries 
                thereof; and
                  (E) any other factor that the Board of 
                Governors deems appropriate.
  (d) Resolution Plan and Credit Exposure Reports.--
          (1) Resolution plan.--The Board of Governors shall 
        require each nonbank financial company supervised by 
        the Board of Governors and bank holding companies 
        described in subsection (a) to report periodically to 
        the Board of Governors, the Council, and the 
        Corporation the plan of such company for rapid and 
        orderly resolution in the event of material financial 
        distress or failure, which shall include--
                  (A) information regarding the manner and 
                extent to which any insured depository 
                institution affiliated with the company is 
                adequately protected from risks arising from 
                the activities of any nonbank subsidiaries of 
                the company;
                  (B) full descriptions of the ownership 
                structure, assets, liabilities, and contractual 
                obligations of the company;
                  (C) identification of the cross-guarantees 
                tied to different securities, identification of 
                major counterparties, and a process for 
                determining to whom the collateral of the 
                company is pledged; and
                  (D) any other information that the Board of 
                Governors and the Corporation jointly require 
                by rule or order.
          (2) Credit exposure report.--The Board of Governors 
        shall require each nonbank financial company supervised 
        by the Board of Governors and bank holding companies 
        described in subsection (a) to report periodically to 
        the Board of Governors, the Council, and the 
        Corporation on--
                  (A) the nature and extent to which the 
                company has credit exposure to other 
                significant nonbank financial companies and 
                significant bank holding companies; and
                  (B) the nature and extent to which other 
                significant nonbank financial companies and 
                significant bank holding companies have credit 
                exposure to that company.
          (3) Review.--The Board of Governors and the 
        Corporation shall review the information provided in 
        accordance with this subsection by each nonbank 
        financial company supervised by the Board of Governors 
        and bank holding company described in subsection (a).
          (4) Notice of deficiencies.--If the Board of 
        Governors and the Corporation jointly determine, based 
        on their review under paragraph (3), that the 
        resolution plan of a nonbank financial company 
        supervised by the Board of Governors or a bank holding 
        company described in subsection (a) is not credible or 
        would not facilitate an orderly resolution of the 
        company under title 11, United States Code--
                  (A) the Board of Governors and the 
                Corporation shall notify the company of the 
                deficiencies in the resolution plan; and
                  (B) the company shall resubmit the resolution 
                plan within a timeframe determined by the Board 
                of Governors and the Corporation, with 
                revisions demonstrating that the plan is 
                credible and would result in an orderly 
                resolution under title 11, United States Code, 
                including any proposed changes in business 
                operations and corporate structure to 
                facilitate implementation of the plan.
          (5) Failure to resubmit credible plan.--
                  (A) In general.--If a nonbank financial 
                company supervised by the Board of Governors or 
                a bank holding company described in subsection 
                (a) fails to timely resubmit the resolution 
                plan as required under paragraph (4), with such 
                revisions as are required under subparagraph 
                (B), the Board of Governors and the Corporation 
                may jointly impose more stringent capital, 
                leverage, or liquidity requirements, or 
                restrictions on the growth, activities, or 
                operations of the company, or any subsidiary 
                thereof, until such time as the company 
                resubmits a plan that remedies the 
                deficiencies.
                  (B) Divestiture.--The Board of Governors and 
                the Corporation, in consultation with the 
                Council, may jointly direct a nonbank financial 
                company supervised by the Board of Governors or 
                a bank holding company described in subsection 
                (a), by order, to divest certain assets or 
                operations identified by the Board of Governors 
                and the Corporation, to facilitate an orderly 
                resolution of such company under title 11, 
                United States Code, in the event of the failure 
                of such company, in any case in which--
                          (i) the Board of Governors and the 
                        Corporation have jointly imposed more 
                        stringent requirements on the company 
                        pursuant to subparagraph (A); and
                          (ii) the company has failed, within 
                        the 2-year period beginning on the date 
                        of the imposition of such requirements 
                        under subparagraph (A), to resubmit the 
                        resolution plan with such revisions as 
                        were required under paragraph (4)(B).
          (6) No limiting effect.--A resolution plan submitted 
        in accordance with this subsection shall not be binding 
        on a bankruptcy court, a receiver appointed under title 
        II, or any other authority that is authorized or 
        required to resolve the nonbank financial company 
        supervised by the Board, any bank holding company, or 
        any subsidiary or affiliate of the foregoing.
          (7) No private right of action.--No private right of 
        action may be based on any resolution plan submitted in 
        accordance with this subsection.
          (8) Rules.--Not later than 18 months after the date 
        of enactment of this Act, the Board of Governors and 
        the Corporation shall jointly issue final rules 
        implementing this subsection.
  (e) Concentration Limits.--
          (1) Standards.--In order to limit the risks that the 
        failure of any individual company could pose to a 
        nonbank financial company supervised by the Board of 
        Governors or a bank holding company described in 
        subsection (a), the Board of Governors, by regulation, 
        shall prescribe standards that limit such risks.
          (2) Limitation on credit exposure.--The regulations 
        prescribed by the Board of Governors under paragraph 
        (1) shall prohibit each nonbank financial company 
        supervised by the Board of Governors and bank holding 
        company described in subsection (a) from having credit 
        exposure to any unaffiliated company that exceeds 25 
        percent of the capital stock and surplus (or such lower 
        amount as the Board of Governors may determine by 
        regulation to be necessary to mitigate risks to the 
        financial stability of the United States) of the 
        company.
          (3) Credit exposure.--For purposes of paragraph (2), 
        ``credit exposure'' to a company means--
                  (A) all extensions of credit to the company, 
                including loans, deposits, and lines of credit;
                  (B) all repurchase agreements and reverse 
                repurchase agreements with the company, and all 
                securities borrowing and lending transactions 
                with the company, to the extent that such 
                transactions create credit exposure for the 
                nonbank financial company supervised by the 
                Board of Governors or a bank holding company 
                described in subsection (a);
                  (C) all guarantees, acceptances, or letters 
                of credit (including endorsement or standby 
                letters of credit) issued on behalf of the 
                company;
                  (D) all purchases of or investment in 
                securities issued by the company;
                  (E) counterparty credit exposure to the 
                company in connection with a derivative 
                transaction between the nonbank financial 
                company supervised by the Board of Governors or 
                a bank holding company described in subsection 
                (a) and the company; and
                  (F) any other similar transactions that the 
                Board of Governors, by regulation, determines 
                to be a credit exposure for purposes of this 
                section.
          (4) Attribution rule.--For purposes of this 
        subsection, any transaction by a nonbank financial 
        company supervised by the Board of Governors or a bank 
        holding company described in subsection (a) with any 
        person is a transaction with a company, to the extent 
        that the proceeds of the transaction are used for the 
        benefit of, or transferred to, that company.
          (5) Rulemaking.--The Board of Governors may issue 
        such regulations and orders, including definitions 
        consistent with this section, as may be necessary to 
        administer and carry out this subsection.
          (6) Exemptions.--This subsection shall not apply to 
        any Federal home loan bank. The Board of Governors may, 
        by regulation or order, exempt transactions, in whole 
        or in part, from the definition of the term ``credit 
        exposure'' for purposes of this subsection, if the 
        Board of Governors finds that the exemption is in the 
        public interest and is consistent with the purpose of 
        this subsection.
          (7) Transition period.--
                  (A) In general.--This subsection and any 
                regulations and orders of the Board of 
                Governors under this subsection shall not be 
                effective until 3 years after the date of 
                enactment of this Act.
                  (B) Extension authorized.--The Board of 
                Governors may extend the period specified in 
                subparagraph (A) for not longer than an 
                additional 2 years.
  (f) Enhanced Public Disclosures.--The Board of Governors may 
prescribe, by regulation, periodic public disclosures by 
nonbank financial companies supervised by the Board of 
Governors and bank holding companies described in subsection 
(a) in order to support market evaluation of the risk profile, 
capital adequacy, and risk management capabilities thereof.
  (g) Short-term Debt Limits.--
          (1) In general.--In order to mitigate the risks that 
        an over-accumulation of short-term debt could pose to 
        financial companies and to the stability of the United 
        States financial system, the Board of Governors may, by 
        regulation, prescribe a limit on the amount of short-
        term debt, including off-balance sheet exposures, that 
        may be accumulated by any bank holding company 
        described in subsection (a) and any nonbank financial 
        company supervised by the Board of Governors.
          (2) Basis of limit.--Any limit prescribed under 
        paragraph (1) shall be based on the short-term debt of 
        the company described in paragraph (1) as a percentage 
        of capital stock and surplus of the company or on such 
        other measure as the Board of Governors considers 
        appropriate.
          (3) Short-term debt defined.--For purposes of this 
        subsection, the term ``short-term debt'' means such 
        liabilities with short-dated maturity that the Board of 
        Governors identifies, by regulation, except that such 
        term does not include insured deposits.
          (4) Rulemaking authority.--In addition to prescribing 
        regulations under paragraphs (1) and (3), the Board of 
        Governors may prescribe such regulations, including 
        definitions consistent with this subsection, and issue 
        such orders, as may be necessary to carry out this 
        subsection.
          (5) Authority to issue exemptions and adjustments.--
        Notwithstanding the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 
        (12 U.S.C. 1841 et seq.), the Board of Governors may, 
        if it determines such action is necessary to ensure 
        appropriate heightened prudential supervision, with 
        respect to a company described in paragraph (1) that 
        does not control an insured depository institution, 
        issue to such company an exemption from or adjustment 
        to the limit prescribed under paragraph (1).
  (h) Risk Committee.--
          (1) Nonbank financial companies supervised by the 
        board of governors.--The Board of Governors shall 
        require each nonbank financial company supervised by 
        the Board of Governors that is a publicly traded 
        company to establish a risk committee, as set forth in 
        paragraph (3), not later than 1 year after the date of 
        receipt of a notice of final determination under 
        section 113(e)(3) with respect to such nonbank 
        financial company supervised by the Board of Governors.
          (2) Certain bank holding companies.--
                  (A) Mandatory regulations.--The Board of 
                Governors shall issue regulations requiring 
                each bank holding company that is a publicly 
                traded company and that has total consolidated 
                assets of not less than $10,000,000,000 to 
                establish a risk committee, as set forth in 
                paragraph (3).
                  (B) Permissive regulations.--The Board of 
                Governors may require each bank holding company 
                that is a publicly traded company and that has 
                total consolidated assets of less than 
                $10,000,000,000 to establish a risk committee, 
                as set forth in paragraph (3), as determined 
                necessary or appropriate by the Board of 
                Governors to promote sound risk management 
                practices.
          (3) Risk committee.--A risk committee required by 
        this subsection shall--
                  (A) be responsible for the oversight of the 
                enterprise-wide risk management practices of 
                the nonbank financial company supervised by the 
                Board of Governors or bank holding company 
                described in subsection (a), as applicable;
                  (B) include such number of independent 
                directors as the Board of Governors may 
                determine appropriate, based on the nature of 
                operations, size of assets, and other 
                appropriate criteria related to the nonbank 
                financial company supervised by the Board of 
                Governors or a bank holding company described 
                in subsection (a), as applicable; and
                  (C) include at least 1 risk management expert 
                having experience in identifying, assessing, 
                and managing risk exposures of large, complex 
                firms.
          (4) Rulemaking.--The Board of Governors shall issue 
        final rules to carry out this subsection, not later 
        than 1 year after the transfer date, to take effect not 
        later than 15 months after the transfer date.
  (i) Stress Tests.--
          (1) By the board of governors.--
                  (A) Annual tests required.--The Board of 
                Governors, in coordination with the appropriate 
                primary financial regulatory agencies and the 
                Federal Insurance Office, shall conduct annual 
                analyses in which nonbank financial companies 
                supervised by the Board of Governors and bank 
                holding companies described in subsection (a) 
                are subject to evaluation of whether such 
                companies have the capital, on a total 
                consolidated basis, necessary to absorb losses 
                as a result of adverse economic conditions.
                  (B) Test parameters and consequences.--The 
                Board of Governors--
                          (i) shall provide for at least 3 
                        different sets of conditions under 
                        which the evaluation required by this 
                        subsection shall be conducted, 
                        including baseline, adverse, and 
                        severely adverse;
                          (ii) may require the tests described 
                        in subparagraph (A) at bank holding 
                        companies and nonbank financial 
                        companies, in addition to those for 
                        which annual tests are required under 
                        subparagraph (A);
                          (iii) may develop and apply such 
                        other analytic techniques as are 
                        necessary to identify, measure, and 
                        monitor risks to the financial 
                        stability of the United States;
                          (iv) shall require the companies 
                        described in subparagraph (A) to update 
                        their resolution plans required under 
                        subsection (d)(1), as the Board of 
                        Governors determines appropriate, based 
                        on the results of the analyses; and
                          (v) shall publish a summary of the 
                        results of the tests required under 
                        subparagraph (A) or clause (ii) of this 
                        subparagraph.
          (2) By the company.--
                  (A) Requirement.--A nonbank financial company 
                supervised by the Board of Governors and a bank 
                holding company described in subsection (a) 
                shall conduct semiannual stress tests. All 
                other financial companies that have total 
                consolidated assets of more than 
                $10,000,000,000 and are regulated by a primary 
                Federal financial regulatory agency shall 
                conduct annual stress tests. The tests required 
                under this subparagraph shall be conducted in 
                accordance with the regulations prescribed 
                under subparagraph (C).
                  (B) Report.--A company required to conduct 
                stress tests under subparagraph (A) shall 
                submit a report to the Board of Governors and 
                to its primary financial regulatory agency at 
                such time, in such form, and containing such 
                information as the primary financial regulatory 
                agency shall require.
                  (C) Regulations.--Each Federal primary 
                financial regulatory agency, in coordination 
                with the Board of Governors and the Federal 
                Insurance Office, shall issue consistent and 
                comparable regulations to implement this 
                paragraph that shall--
                          (i) define the term ``stress test'' 
                        for purposes of this paragraph;
                          (ii) establish methodologies for the 
                        conduct of stress tests required by 
                        this paragraph that shall provide for 
                        at least 3 different sets of 
                        conditions, including baseline, 
                        adverse, and severely adverse;
                          (iii) establish the form and content 
                        of the report required by subparagraph 
                        (B); and
                          (iv) require companies subject to 
                        this paragraph to publish a summary of 
                        the results of the required stress 
                        tests.
  (j) Leverage Limitation.--
          (1) Requirement.--The Board of Governors shall 
        require a bank holding company with total consolidated 
        assets equal to or greater than $50,000,000,000 or a 
        nonbank financial company supervised by the Board of 
        Governors to maintain a debt to equity ratio of no more 
        than 15 to 1, upon a determination by the Council that 
        such company poses a grave threat to the financial 
        stability of the United States and that the imposition 
        of such requirement is necessary to mitigate the risk 
        that such company poses to the financial stability of 
        the United States. Nothing in this paragraph shall 
        apply to a Federal home loan bank.
          (2) Considerations.--In making a determination under 
        this subsection, the Council shall consider the factors 
        described in subsections (a) and (b) of section 113 and 
        any other risk-related factors that the Council deems 
        appropriate.
          (3) Regulations.--The Board of Governors shall 
        promulgate regulations to establish procedures and 
        timelines for complying with the requirements of this 
        subsection.
  (k) Inclusion of Off-balance-sheet Activities in Computing 
Capital Requirements.--
          (1) In general.--In the case of any bank holding 
        company described in subsection (a) or nonbank 
        financial company supervised by the Board of Governors, 
        the computation of capital for purposes of meeting 
        capital requirements shall take into account any off-
        balance-sheet activities of the company.
          (2) Exemptions.--If the Board of Governors determines 
        that an exemption from the requirement under paragraph 
        (1) is appropriate, the Board of Governors may exempt a 
        company, or any transaction or transactions engaged in 
        by such company, from the requirements of paragraph 
        (1).
          (3) Off-balance-sheet activities defined.--For 
        purposes of this subsection, the term ``off-balance-
        sheet activities'' means an existing liability of a 
        company that is not currently a balance sheet 
        liability, but may become one upon the happening of 
        some future event, including the following 
        transactions, to the extent that they may create a 
        liability:
                  (A) Direct credit substitutes in which a bank 
                substitutes its own credit for a third party, 
                including standby letters of credit.
                  (B) Irrevocable letters of credit that 
                guarantee repayment of commercial paper or tax-
                exempt securities.
                  (C) Risk participations in bankers' 
                acceptances.
                  (D) Sale and repurchase agreements.
                  (E) Asset sales with recourse against the 
                seller.
                  (F) Interest rate swaps.
                  (G) Credit swaps.
                  (H) Commodities contracts.
                  (I) Forward contracts.
                  (J) Securities contracts.
                  (K) Such other activities or transactions as 
                the Board of Governors may, by rule, define.
  (l) Criminal Penalty for Unauthorized Disclosures.--
          (1) In general.--Any officer or employee of a Federal 
        department or agency, who by virtue of such officer or 
        employee's employment or official position, has 
        possession of, or access to, agency records which 
        contain individually identifiable information submitted 
        pursuant to the requirements of this section, the 
        disclosure of which is prohibited by Federal statute, 
        rule, or regulation, and who knowing that disclosure of 
        the specific material is so prohibited, willfully 
        discloses the material in any manner to any person or 
        agency not entitled to receive it, shall be guilty of a 
        misdemeanor and fined not more than $5,000.
          (2) Obtaining records under false pretenses.--Any 
        person who knowingly and willfully requests or obtains 
        information described under paragraph (1) from a 
        Federal department or agency under false pretenses 
        shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and fined not more 
        than $5,000.
          (3) Treatment of determinations.--For purposes of 
        this subsection, a determination made under subsection 
        (d) or (i) based on individually identifiable 
        information submitted pursuant to the requirements of 
        this section shall be deemed individually identifiable 
        information, the disclosure of which is prohibited by 
        Federal statute.

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