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115th Congress }                                             { Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session   }                                             { 115-69

======================================================================

 
       AUTHORIZATION AND OVERSIGHT PLANS FOR ALL HOUSE COMMITTEES

                                _______
                                

 March 29, 2017.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

  Mr. Jason Chaffetz, from the Committee on Oversight and Government 
                    Reform, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

AUTHORIZATION AND OVERSIGHT PLANS FOR ALL HOUSE COMMITTEES IN THE 115TH 
                                CONGRESS

    [The authorization and oversight plans of all House committees follow:]

                        COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE

TO: The Honorable Jason Chaffetz, Chairman, House Committee on 
        Oversight and Government Reform and The Honorable Gregg Harper, 
        Chairman, Committee on House Administration
FROM: The Honorable K. Michael Conaway, Chairman, House Committee on 
        Agriculture
DATE:
SUBJECT: Oversight Plan for the House Committee on Agriculture for the 
        115th Congress

    This oversight plan is filed pursuant to Rule X, clause 
2(d)(1) of the Rules of the U.S. House of Representatives for 
the 115th Congress. This plan was prepared in consultation with 
the Ranking Member and was presented to the full Committee for 
its consideration.
    The Committee and its Subcommittees expect to exercise 
appropriate oversight activity with regard to the issues listed 
below. In general, the Committee intends to identify programs 
that are inefficient, duplicative, outdated or more 
appropriately administered by State or local governments for 
possible cuts or elimination. In addition to the list below, 
the Committee will conduct any other general oversight as 
appropriate and necessary. The Committee will consult, as 
appropriate, with other Committees of the House that may share 
subject matter interest.

                             OVERSIGHT PLAN

    The Committee expects to exercise appropriate oversight 
activity with regard to the following issues:
2014 FARM BILL AND CURRENT AGRICULTURAL CONDITIONS
     Review the current state of the U.S. farm economy;
     Review the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) 
implementation of the Agricultural Act of 2014;
     Review programs for waste, fraud, abuse and 
mismanagement;
     Review the state of credit conditions and 
availability in rural America;
     Review the effect of weather conditions on crop 
production;
     Review USDA's implementation of the U.S. Warehouse 
Act;
     Review of market situation, including effect of 
crop reports and projections;
     Review USDA's implementation of the U.S. Grain 
Standards Act;
     Review how Administrative Pay-Go is affecting 
Department actions; and
     Review discretionary actions by USDA that are not 
directly authorized by legislation.
ENERGY
     Assess energy programs authorized by the 
Agricultural Act of 2014;
     Review administration of the Biomass Crop 
Assistance Program (BCAP);
     Review activities funded by the Biomass Research 
and Development Act (BRDA) and input from the external BRDA 
Advisory Board;
     Review availability of agriculture and forestry 
feedstocks for renewable energy production;
     Review current status of research on energy crops 
and feedstocks;
     Review the Rural Utility Service (RUS) electric 
loan program;
     Review electricity reliability in rural America;
     Review current provisions in existing law that 
support agriculture-based energy production and use;
     Review USDA's use of Commodity Credit Corporation 
funds for the Green Fleet Initiative;
     Review implementation of the Renewable Fuels 
Standard (RFS); and
     Review renewable fuel programs and their effect on 
agriculture.
CONSERVATION AND THE ENVIRONMENT
     Review the effect of regulatory activities by the 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and its effect on 
agriculture productivity;
     Review EPA grant program activities that impact 
agriculture;
     Review the effect of regulatory activities carried 
out pursuant to the Endangered Species Act (ESA), or any 
proposed legislative changes to such Act, on agricultural 
producers;
     Review the effect of the Administration's 
regulatory activity relative to methyl bromide and glyphosate 
on production of agriculture in the U.S.;
     Review budget and program activities of the 
Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS);
     Review implementation of all of USDA's 
conservation programs;
     Review USDA's implementation of the conservation 
compliance provisions in the Agricultural Act of 2014;
     Review EPA's jurisdiction under the Clean Water 
Act (CWA) and its effect on U.S. agriculture;
     Review of potential effects of EPA's Clean Air Act 
(CAA) regulatory program on U.S. agriculture;
     Review ongoing discussions and potential 
consequences for American agriculture under the United Nations 
Climate Change Conference;
     Review EPA's implementation of the Food Quality 
Protection Act (FQPA), Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and 
Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and Pesticide Registration Improvement 
Renewal Act (PRIA III);
     Review the effect of litigation and rulemaking 
concerning FIFRA, ESA, CAA, CWA, the Comprehensive 
Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) 
and the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act 
(EPCRA) to evaluate these statutes' effects on agricultural 
operations;
     Review the EPA's regulatory actions in regard to 
pesticide evaluations;
     Review EPA's regulation of Animal Feeding 
Operations; and
     Review Total Maximum Daily Load strategies and 
effects on production agriculture.
FEDERAL CROP INSURANCE AND RISK MANAGEMENT
     Review USDA's implementation of crop insurance 
provisions of the Agricultural Act of 2014;
     Review the role and effectiveness of Federal crop 
insurance;
     Review USDA's and the Risk Management Agency's 
(RMA) administration and oversight of Federal crop insurance;
     Review the availability of crop insurance as a 
risk management tool;
     Review the adequacy and availability of risk 
management tools for the livestock and dairy industries;
     Review USDA's activities established to identify 
and reduce crop insurance waste, fraud, and abuse;
     Review USDA's crop insurance rating methodology 
and management of the Standard Reinsurance Agreement (SRA) 
process;
     Review RMA's yield and revenue protection crop 
insurance products; and
     Review RMA's progress in approving crop insurance 
products for underserved commodities.

IMPLEMENTATION OF TITLE VII OF THE DODD-FRANK WALL STREET REFORM AND 
        CONSUMER PROTECTION ACT
     In its review of rulemakings required by Title VII 
of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection 
Act (P.L. 111-203)(Dodd-Frank Act), the Committee will continue 
to ensure:
          (1) The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission 
        (CFTC) rulemaking processes are transparent and that 
        meaningful comments are accepted and appropriately 
        reviewed;
          (2) An adequate cost-benefit analysis is performed by 
        the CFTC in accordance with the requirements set forth 
        in the Commodity Exchange Act for proposed or final 
        rules;
          (3) The CFTC properly coordinates with both domestic 
        and international financial regulators;
          (4) Past exemptive relief orders, also referred to as 
        ``no action letters,'' issued by the CFTC provide the 
        proper relief for market participants; and
          (5) Any final or proposed regulations will not harm 
        or adversely affect the U.S. economy or financial 
        markets, including the effect on jobs and 
        competitiveness;
     Examine how Title VII rulemakings have affected 
U.S. market structure;
     Examine the developing effect of CFTC, SEC, and 
Prudential Regulator regulations, such as the imposition of new 
margin and capital requirements, and how they affect the 
ability of many ``end-users'' to utilize swaps to hedge against 
legitimate business risks;
     Examine the level of coordination between U.S. and 
international regulators for potential effects on U.S. 
financial institutions compared to their foreign counterparts; 
and
     Examine the feasibility of timetables established 
by the Dodd-Frank Act in building the data, technology and 
connectivity necessary to meet regulatory objectives.

THE U.S. COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION AND THE DERIVATIVES 
        MARKETS

     Review the operations of the Commodity Futures 
Trading Commission (CFTC);
     Review the growing consolidation and 
internationalization of futures exchange trading;
     Review market machinations for exchange traded 
energy and agricultural futures products;
     Review enforcement and oversight capabilities of 
the CFTC both domestically and internationally;
     Continue to examine how the CFTC and futures 
industry as a whole has addressed the MF Global and PFGBest 
bankruptcies from both an enforcement and regulatory reform 
standpoint to ensure that proper remedial action is taken to 
prevent future losses to segregated funds of customers;
     Continue to examine all sectors of the U.S. 
derivatives and futures markets, including, but not limited to: 
exchange or swap execution facility trading; the roles of 
dealers, inter-dealer brokers, data repositories, and 
clearinghouses; trade and price reporting; and proposals aimed 
at protecting the segregated funds of futures customers, 
especially in light of the Commodity Exchange Act statutory 
authorization of the CFTC which expired at the end of FY2013;
     Continue to examine the ongoing investigation and 
enforcement action by the CFTC and other federal regulators 
with respect to the manipulation of international financial 
benchmarks; and
     Review all operations of the CFTC, including, but 
not limited to: a continued examination of whether the cost-
benefit analysis required by section 15a of the CEA is adequate 
with respect to proposed and finalized rules; the efficiency of 
internal Commission actions; the Commission's use of its 
independent leasing authority; stewardship of the Customer 
Protection Fund.

AGRICULTURE TRADE AND INTERNATIONAL FOOD AID

     Review tariff and non-tariff trade barriers--
including domestic subsidies--currently applied by agricultural 
product producing countries around the world;
     Review ongoing multilateral, regional, and 
bilateral trade negotiations (including World Trade 
Organization (WTO) accession agreements) to assess their 
potential effect on U.S. agriculture;
     Review implementation of existing trade agreements 
and commitments as well as proposed trade agreements and 
commitments to determine:
          (1) whether they are consistent with current U.S. 
        law;
          (2) whether they will promote economic development in 
        rural areas of the U.S.;
          (3) their effect or potential effect on current 
        production of import sensitive agricultural 
        commodities, and on exports of U.S. agricultural 
        products;
          (4) their effect or potential effect on the overall 
        competitiveness of the U.S. agricultural sector, 
        including the production, processing and distribution 
        of agricultural products; and
          (5) whether the agreements provide adequate, 
        enforceable provisions to minimize non-tariff barriers 
        to U.S. exports;
     Monitor existing trade agreements to ensure 
trading partners are meeting obligations and enforcing trade 
commitments;
     Review agricultural export programs to determine 
how well they are promoting the interests of U.S. agriculture 
and examine proposals to improve, modify or expand such 
programs;
     Review U.S. food aid programs to determine their 
effect or potential effect on the reduction of world hunger--
particularly the potential effect of trade negotiations on the 
effectiveness of U.S. food aid programs;
     Review USDA and USAID's implementation of the 
Global Food Security Act (GFSA);
     Review the market assessments USDA and USAID use 
to evaluate the potential impact of U.S. food aid on recipient 
countries;
     Review USAID's increasing use of cash-based food 
aid, including financial controls;
     Review monitoring and evaluation activities 
carried out by USDA and USAID; and
     Review sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) barriers 
and other technical barriers to U.S. agricultural exports and 
examine efforts to eliminate such barriers.

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND PROMOTION

     Review implementation of biosecurity protocols at 
USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) laboratories;
     Review USDA's implementation of research, 
education and extension programs authorized in the Agricultural 
Act of 2014;
     Review the administration of the ARS research 
stations and worksites;
     Review USDA's continuing ability to conduct 
foreign animal disease research, training and diagnostic 
programs at the National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility 
following the transfer of the center to the Department of 
Homeland Security;
     Assess federal efforts to facilitate research and 
development of aquacultural enterprises, specifically focusing 
on the activities of the Joint Subcommittee on Aquaculture;
     Review USDA's regulation of organic standards;
     Review USDA's collection of organic production and 
market data;
     Review administration of the National Institute of 
Food and Agriculture (NIFA);
     Review the administration of the Agricultural Food 
Research Initiative and other competitive research, extension 
and education grants programs;
     Review efforts to leverage Federal research 
investment with state, local, and private sources of funding, 
including a review of the Foundation for Food and Agricultural 
Research (FFAR);
     Review coordination between ARS, the Economic 
Research Service (ERS), NIFA and action agencies in USDA--such 
as NRCS and FSA--in order to prevent duplicative research;
     Review operation of the National Agricultural 
Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board;
     Review USDA's efforts to expand research and 
development of pathogen reduction technologies;
     Evaluate the current mix of research funding 
mechanisms to ensure maximum benefits from these investments to 
producers, processors and consumers;
     Review administration of USDA's agricultural 
marketing and promotion programs;
     Review coordination between USDA and the 
Department of Energy on energy research programs;
     Review the sufficiency of research funding under 
ARS, ERS, the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) 
and NIFA;
     Review ARS, ERS, NASS and NIFA national program 
priorities;
     Conduct oversight of the research grant process, 
generally, and more specifically to coordinate and prevent 
overlapping research; and
     Review the potential for research and technology 
transfer to address the needs of both the biofuels and 
livestock industries.

BIOTECHNOLOGY

     Review current regulations and research regarding 
animal and plant biotechnology;
     Review FDA's regulatory activities regarding 
genetically engineered animals;
     Assess USDA's efforts to develop and promote 
benefits of biotechnology for increasing agricultural 
productivity and combating hunger globally;
     Review USDA's management and controls over 
biotechnology-derived material;
     Review the effect of litigation on USDA's 
timeliness in resolving petitions to deregulate products of 
biotechnology;
     Review effects of state, county, and municipal 
regulation of biotechnology on the free-flow of agricultural 
products in interstate commerce; and
     Review USDA's implementation of biotech labeling 
standard.

U.S. FOREST SERVICE ADMINISTRATION

     Review the U.S. Forest Service's (USFS) strategy 
for dealing with wildfire, including the effect of hazardous 
fuels management, forest health efforts and fire preparedness;
     Continue to monitor the effectiveness and 
efficiency of the USFS fire management program;
     Review the effect of fire expenses on other USFS 
program delivery;
     Assess the USFS strategy for timber harvesting on 
federal lands;
     Review effects of environmental regulations on 
National Forest land management;
     Review economic effects of National Forest land 
management on rural communities;
     Review USFS efforts to promote utilization of 
National Forest timber for renewable energy purposes; and
     Review USFS's management tools contained in the 
Farm Bill.

DAIRY

     Review USDA's implementation of the dairy risk 
management provisions in the Agricultural Act of 2014;
     Review options to improve the efficiency and 
effectiveness of dairy programs; and
     Review efficiency of federal milk marketing order 
system.

OUTREACH AND CIVIL RIGHTS

     Review the operations of the Office of Advocacy 
and Outreach;
     Monitor USDA's outreach efforts to beginning, 
small, and minority farmers/ranchers;
     Monitor USDA's outreach efforts to military 
veterans interested in careers in agriculture;
     Review of the operations of the office of the 
Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights;
     Review USDA's implementation of the receipt for 
service provisions in the Agricultural Act of 2014;
     Review USDA's process for settling discrimination 
claims and evaluating individual claims submitted pursuant to 
such settlements;
     Review the delivery of USDA services and outreach 
efforts on Indian reservations and tribal lands;
     Review the current status of the Agricultural 
Census and efforts to reach undercounted farmers and ranchers; 
and
     Review participation of minority farmers in FSA 
County/Local Committees as well as outreach to increase 
participation in County Committee elections.

USDA GENERAL ADMINISTRATION

     Review confidentiality of information provided to 
USDA by agricultural producers;
     Review USDA's implementation of field office 
consolidation for the purpose of effectively and efficiently 
delivering commodity, conservation, energy and rural 
development programs;
     Review USDA's efforts to modernize its Information 
Technology (IT) systems; and
     Review the administrative structure of USDA for 
effectiveness and efficiency.

FARM CREDIT, RURAL DEVELOPMENT, AND THE RURAL ECONOMY

     Review the Farm Credit Administration's (FCA) 
regulatory program and activities regarding the Farm Credit 
System (FCS) to assure its safety and soundness;
     Review the activities and programs of the Federal 
Agricultural Mortgage Corporation (also referred to as Farmer 
Mac);
     Review FSA's direct and guaranteed loan programs 
and graduation efforts;
     Review the Rural Electrification Act (REA);
     Review the farm economy and access to credit;
     Review implementation of rural development 
policies and authorities contained in the Agricultural Act of 
2014 and the Consolidated Farm and Rural Development Act;
     Conduct oversight of the USDA's Rural Broadband 
Access Loan and Loan Guarantee Program;
     Review USDA Rural Development's application 
processes and internal controls related to the Farm Bill;
     Review the administration of the Rural 
Microentrepreneur Assistance Program;
     Conduct oversight of the implementation of USDA's 
telecommunications programs;
     Review the status of the Rural Telephone Bank;
     Assess the state of rural water systems and 
effectiveness of federal funding to build and upgrade those 
systems;
     Assess the effectiveness of USDA programs targeted 
toward rural infrastructure and business needs;
     Review agricultural lending practices;
     Review public-private partnerships in lending 
through guaranteed loans;
     Review the definition of ``rural'' under rural 
development programs;
     Review rural development loan programs and default 
rates; and
     Review the success of rural development programs 
in persistent poverty areas.

USDA FOOD AND NUTRITION PROGRAMS

     Review food and nutrition programs including the 
Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), fruit and 
vegetable initiatives, the Emergency Food Assistance Program 
(TEFAP), the Food Distribution on Indian Reservations (FDPIR) 
program and other commodity distribution programs;
     Review participant eligibility criteria for SNAP;
     Review the interaction between SNAP and other low-
income assistance programs such as the Temporary Assistance for 
Needy Families (TANF) program, the Low-Income Home Energy 
Assistance Program (LIHEAP), and provisions in the Affordable 
Care Act;
     Review SNAP work pilots and the efficiency and 
accountability of the SNAP Employment & Training program;
     Review educative initiatives such as SNAP-Ed and 
the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP);
     Review efforts by USDA and the states to combat 
waste, fraud, and abuse within nutrition programs;
     Review efforts by state SNAP administrators to 
modernize and streamline their programs; and
     Review the Community Food Project Program to 
ensure cooperative grants are working.

SPECIALTY CROPS

     Review implementation of the Specialty Crop 
Competitiveness Act;
     Review the Specialty Crop Block Grant program to 
ensure that the grants awarded are enhancing the specialty crop 
industry;
     Review farmers market programs;
     Review implementation and effectiveness of 
cooperative plant health programs, including Plant Pest and 
Disease Management and Disaster Prevention and the Clean Plant 
Network; and
     Review the Specialty Crop Research Initiative.

FOOD SAFETY

     Review implementation of the FDA Food Safety 
Modernization Act;
     Review implementation of the FDA Egg Safety Rule;
     Review USDA's administration of meat and poultry 
inspection laws and the FDA's food inspection activities to 
ensure the development of scientifically sound systems for food 
safety assurance;
     Review USDA's implementation of the catfish 
inspection program;
     Review USDA's efforts to educate consumers 
regarding safe food handling practices and streamline the 
assessment and approval of food safety technologies;
     Review implementation of new protocols for meat, 
poultry, eggs, or seafood safety inspection;
     Review USDA's enforcement of the Humane Methods of 
Slaughter Act and humane handling regulations; and
     Review the mechanisms to establish scientifically 
based international food safety standards.

PLANT AND ANIMAL HEALTH

     Review enforcement of the Animal Welfare Act;
     Assess federal efforts to reduce threats to human, 
animal, and plant health due to predatory and invasive species;
     Review efforts of the Animal and Plant Health 
Inspection Service (APHIS) to manage wildlife conflicts in 
order to protect public health and safety;
     Assess USDA's Animal Disease Traceability Plan;
     Review implementation of Sec. 10201 (of the 2008 
farm bill) regarding plant pest and disease management and 
disaster prevention;
     Review USDA's regulation on horse protection; and
     Review USDA's regulation on organic livestock and 
poultry practices.

LIVESTOCK MARKETING

     Assess the effectiveness of the Grain Inspection, 
Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) in determining 
market manipulation in the livestock industry;
     Review structural changes in agribusiness and the 
potential cost and benefits for agricultural producers; and
     Review the USDA's mandatory livestock price 
reporting system.

HOMELAND AND AGRICULTURAL SECURITY

     Examine USDA's preparedness against terrorist 
threats to production agriculture;
     Review cooperative efforts between the Department 
of Homeland Security and USDA to prevent against foreign animal 
disease; and
     Review agricultural inspection activities under 
the Department of Homeland Security.

MISCELLANEOUS

     Review the effects of sequestration on USDA 
operations and programs; and
     Review the effect of transportation infrastructure 
issues on agriculture and forestry;

CONSULTATION WITH OTHER COMMITTEES TO REDUCE DUPLICATION

     With Natural Resources on forestry issues, ESA 
issues and other public land issues;
     With Science on research;
     With Ways and Means and Education and the 
Workforce on nutrition programs;
     With Ways and Means on tax and trade issues;
     With Homeland Security on importation of animal 
and plant material and on research related to agroterrorism;
     With Armed Services on global food security;
     With Judiciary on immigrant agricultural labor;
     With Energy and Commerce on food safety and 
biomass energy programs both existing and new;
     With Transportation and Infrastructure on certain 
CWA compliance issues and food aid delivery;
     With Financial Services on Dodd-Frank Act issues;
     With Foreign Affairs on food aid and trade issues;
     With Small Business on addressing economic 
opportunities for rural America; and
     Any other committee as appropriate.

AUTHORIZATION OF PROGRAMS WITHIN THE JURISDICTION OF THE HOUSE 
        COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE

    In the 115th Congress, the House Committee on Agriculture 
intends to continue to reauthorize all expiring authorities 
within its jurisdiction. In the 114th Congress, the Committee 
passed legislation to reauthorize all of the expired or 
expiring programs and authorities within its jurisdiction. At 
the end of the last Congress, only the Commodity Futures 
Trading Commission (CFTC) remained to be reauthorized. On May 
29, 2015, the Committee passed H.R. 2289, the Commodity End-
User Relief Act, which would have reauthorized the CFTC. H.R. 
2289 was subsequently passed by the House on June 9, 2015, but 
the bill was not taken up by the full Senate.
    On January 12, 2017, the House once again passed 
legislation that reauthorizes the CFTC--H.R. 238, the Commodity 
End-User Relief Act. H.R. 238 currently awaits action in the 
Senate.
    There are three items within the Committee's jurisdiction 
that are set to expire in the 115th Congress--the programs 
authorized by the Agricultural Act of 2014 (2014 Farm Bill), 
the National Forest Foundation Act, and the Pesticide 
Registration Improvement Act (PRIA).
    The Committee plans to spend considerable time examining 
the programs that were last authorized in the 2014 Farm Bill. 
The current Farm Bill expires on September 30, 2018. Farm Bill 
preparation will begin with hearings, both in Washington and in 
the field, to hear from producers and USDA about how the 
programs are working. Although dependent on timing in the 
Senate, it is the Committee's goal to reauthorize the Farm Bill 
before it expires.
    The National Forest Foundation was a lapsed authorization 
in the Committee's jurisdiction identified at the beginning of 
the 114th Congress. While the program was successfully 
reauthorized last Congress, its authority will again expire on 
September 30, 2018, and will most likely be reauthorized during 
the farm bill process.
    In addition to reauthorizing farm bill programs, during the 
first session of the 115th Congress, the Committee will 
reauthorize PRIA before it expires on September 30, 2017. This 
will be the fourth iteration of the pesticide registration 
bill. The Committee anticipates a hearing and markup for 
consideration of the bill. However, the Committee does not 
expect the need for a conference with the Senate.

AUTHORIZATION OF PROGRAMS WITHIN THE JURISDICTION OF THE HOUSE 
        COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE 116TH CONGRESS

    Going forward, the Committee intends to continue the effort 
to avoid lapsed authorizations. Accordingly, the Committee has 
identified two authorities set to expire in the 116th 
Congress--Livestock Mandatory Price Reporting and the U.S. 
Grain Standards Act. Both of these authorities were 
reauthorized in the 114th Congress and the Committee plans to 
reauthorize them during the course of the 116th Congress.

                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES

                             OVERSIGHT PLAN

    This oversight plan is filed pursuant to clause 2(d) of 
rule X of the Rules of the House of Representatives that 
requires that, not later than February 15 of the first session 
of a Congress, each standing committee of the House shall adopt 
its oversight plan for that Congress.

                           TABLE OF CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
INTRODUCTION.....................................................    16
OVERSIGHT AGENDA.................................................    17
POLICY ISSUES....................................................    20
National Defense Strategy, National Military Strategy, and 
  Related Defense................................................    20
Readiness and Posture of the Force...............................    21
Russian Federation...............................................    21
People's Republic of China.......................................    22
Democratic People's Republic of Korea............................    23
Islamic Republic of Iran.........................................    23
Countering Terrorism, At Risk and Failing States, Countering 
  Violent Extremism and Illicit Trafficking......................    24
Operation Freedom's Sentinel.....................................    25
Islamic Republic of Pakistan.....................................    25
Operation Inherent Resolve.......................................    26
Republic of Yemen................................................    26
Africa...........................................................    27
Central and South America........................................    28
Detainee Policy and Related Matters..............................    28
Cyberwarfare.....................................................    28
Technology Erosion, Technological Superiority, and the Third 
  Offset Strategy................................................    29
Addressing Emerging Threats......................................    29
Intelligence.....................................................    30
Security Cooperation.............................................    30
AGILITY, EFFICIENCY, AND FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY...................    31
Overview.........................................................    31
Organization and Management of the Department of Defense.........    31
Acquisition and Regulatory Reform................................    32
Financial Management.............................................    33
Civilian Personnel...............................................    33
READINESS........................................................    33
Manpower Sufficient in Quantity and Quality to Meet Global 
  Commitments....................................................    33
Force Readiness..................................................    34
Maintenance and Training.........................................    34
Weapon Systems Life-Cycle Sustainment and Reset..................    35
Depot, Shipyard, and Arsenal Capability..........................    35
National Guard and Reserves......................................    36
Energy and Environment...........................................    37
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION AND INFRASTRUCTURE.........................    37
Basing...........................................................    37
Military Construction Programming and Facilities Sustainment.....    37
Real Property Acquisition, Maintenance, and Disposal.............    38
MILITARY PERSONNEL AND HEALTH CARE ISSUES........................    38
Military Manpower and Force Structure............................    38
Medical Accession Standards......................................    38
Gender Integration...............................................    38
Military Benefits and Compensation...............................    39
Military Health System...........................................    39
Mental Health Services for Members of the Armed Forces...........    39
Wounded Warrior Care.............................................    39
Military Personnel Policy........................................    40
Uniform Code of Military Justice to Include Sexual Assault.......    40
Military Family Readiness........................................    40
Morale, Welfare and Recreation Programs and Military Resale 
  Programs.......................................................    41
Prisoner of War and Missing in Action............................    41
MODERNIZATION AND INVESTMENT ISSUES..............................    41
Overview.........................................................    41
Army and Marine Corps Armored Vehicle Modernization..............    42
Army and Marine Corps Tactical Wheeled Vehicles..................    42
Army and Marine Corps Rotorcraft Programs........................    43
Army Communications and Network Programs.........................    43
Organizational Clothing and Individual Equipment.................    44
Tactical Aircraft Force Structure................................    44
F-35 Joint Strike Fighter........................................    45
Bomber Force Structure...........................................    45
Aerial Refueling Aircraft........................................    46
Intertheater and Intratheater Airlift............................    46
Surface Warfare Programs.........................................    47
Undersea Warfare Programs........................................    47
Military Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Programs.    48
Emerging Advanced Weapons Capabilities...........................    48
Nuclear Deterrence...............................................    49
Missile Defense..................................................    50
National Security Space..........................................    51
EMERGING THREATS AND CAPABILITIES................................    51
Investment in Future Capabilities Science and Technology.........    51
Cyber Operations Capabilities....................................    52
Information Operations...........................................    52
Compromises of National Security Information and Insider Threats.    53
Use of Force in Counterterrorism Operations Outside the United 
  States and Areas of Active Hostilities.........................    53

                              Introduction

    The oversight responsibilities of the Committee on Armed 
Services are conducted throughout the calendar year. They are 
instrumental in the committee's consideration of the annual 
defense authorization bill, which covers the breadth of the 
operations of the Department of Defense as well as the national 
security functions of the Department of Energy and other 
related areas. The annual national defense budget involves 
millions of military and civilian personnel, thousands of 
facilities, and hundreds of agencies, departments, and commands 
located throughout the world. The complexity of the current 
threat environment will continue to expand the range of topics 
requiring committee oversight including strategic, operational, 
and budgetary issues of great scope and complexity.
    The committee has jurisdiction over laws, programs, and 
agencies under permanent authority in numerous titles of the 
United States Code, including title 10 (Armed Forces), title 32 
(National Guard), title 37 (Pay and Allowances of the Uniformed 
Services), title 41 (Public Contracts), title 42 (Atomic 
Energy), title 46 (Shipping), and title 50 (War and National 
Defense).
    The jurisdiction of the committee, pursuant to clause 1(c) 
of rule X of the Rules of the House of Representatives is as 
follows:
      1. Ammunition depots; forts; arsenals; Army, Navy, and 
Air Force reservations and establishments.
      2. Common defense generally.
      3. Conservation, development, and use of naval petroleum 
and oil shale reserves.
      4. The Department of Defense generally, including the 
Departments of the Army, Navy, and Air Force generally.
      5. Interoceanic canals generally, including measures 
relating to the maintenance, operation, and administration of 
interoceanic canals.
      6. Merchant Marine Academy, and State Merchant Marine 
Academies.
      7. Military applications of nuclear energy.
      8. Tactical intelligence and intelligence-related 
activities of the Department of Defense.
      9. National security aspects of merchant marine, 
including financial assistance for the construction and 
operation of vessels, the maintenance of the U.S. shipbuilding 
and ship repair industrial base, cabotage, cargo preference, 
and merchant marine officers and seamen as these matters relate 
to national security.
      10. Pay, promotion, retirement, and other benefits and 
privileges of members of the armed services.
      11. Scientific research and development in support of the 
armed services.
      12. Selective service.
      13. Size and composition of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, 
and Air Force.
      14. Soldiers' and sailors' homes.
      15. Strategic and critical materials necessary for the 
common defense.
      16. Cemeteries administered by the Department of Defense.
    In addition to its legislative jurisdiction and general 
oversight function, the committee has special oversight 
functions with respect to international arms control and 
disarmament and the education of military dependents in schools 
pursuant to clause 3(b) of rule X of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives.

                            Oversight Agenda

    The committee will continue its oversight and assessment of 
threats to U.S. national security as it considers the fiscal 
year 2018 and fiscal year 2019 defense budget requests. This 
effort will involve appropriate oversight hearings with the 
Secretary of Defense; the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff; the individual service secretaries and chiefs of staff; 
combatant commanders; other officials of the Department of 
Defense and the military departments; officials from the 
Intelligence Community; and the Secretary of Energy, the Under 
Secretary for Nuclear Security, and other officials of the 
Department of Energy. In addition, the committee will invite 
the views and perspectives of outside experts in academia, 
industry, associations and advocacy organizations, and those in 
private life with expertise on these matters. Finally, the 
committee will continue its aggressive outreach program to seek 
the views and perspectives of service members and their 
families to include Active Duty, National Guard, and Reserve 
members across the United States and at deployed locations 
overseas.
    The committee carries out its oversight of the Department 
of Defense and its subordinate departments and agencies as well 
as portions of the Department of Energy through activities 
involving the full committee and its standing subcommittees. 
Each subcommittee with assigned topical or programmatic 
responsibilities conducts oversight of the programs within its 
jurisdiction as specified in the committee's rules. Certain 
issues and activities requiring more extensive, lengthy, and 
in-depth review are assigned to the Subcommittee on Oversight 
and Investigations. This subcommittee works with the relevant 
subcommittees (and/or full committee) in a coordinated manner 
to undertake the necessary oversight.
    The oversight agenda below, unless otherwise noted, is 
designed to support the consideration by the committee and, 
ultimately, the House of Representatives of the annual defense 
authorization bill, as well as the committee's broader 
oversight responsibilities. The issues identified are expected 
to be ongoing areas of oversight activity throughout the 115th 
Congress. In addition, the committee will continue to pay 
particular attention to the mandates placed on executive 
departments and agencies. In this context, pursuant to clause 
2(d)(1) of rule X of the Rules of the House of Representatives, 
the committee will continue to emphasize the examination of 
relevant rules, regulations, statutes, and court decisions 
affecting the Department of Defense and the Department of 
Energy for their effects on efficiency and good management 
practices.
    Given the unique nature of national security issues and 
related oversight of the Armed Forces, the committee believes 
that a qualifier is once again necessary with regard to the 
ability to plan comprehensively and predict all oversight 
activities. Much of the committee's most demanding oversight 
will be, by definition, event-driven and not subject to prior 
planning. Such events significantly complicate the ability to 
prescribe with great accuracy or specificity the committee's 
entire oversight agenda. For instance, the oversight of defense 
activities by the committee has historically involved in-depth 
assessments of military operations and other major events that 
are generally difficult to predict in advance, such as the 
recent operations in the Republic of Iraq and the Syrian Arab 
Republic to counter the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, 
the war in the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, and responses 
to catastrophic events. These reviews can dominate committee 
and staff resources, sometimes at the expense of other planned 
activities. The committee fully expects that this type of 
event-driven oversight will continue to be required.
    The committee has a long tradition of translating oversight 
activities into legislative action as reflected in past 
comprehensive efforts such as: providing for concurrent receipt 
of retirement and disability benefits for veterans with 
qualifying combat-related disabilities; the Goldwater-Nichols 
Department of Defense Reorganization Act of 1986 (Public Law 
99-433); the Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act of 
1991 (Public Law 101-510); the Federal Acquisition Streamlining 
Act of 1994 (Public Law 103-355); the establishment of the 
National Nuclear Security Administration and related reform of 
the management of the national security programs of the 
Department of Energy; the Military Commissions Act of 2006 
(Public Law 109-366); the Wounded Warrior Assistance Act of 
2007 included in the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2008 (Public Law 110-181); the Weapon System 
Acquisition Reform Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-23); the 
Implementing Management for Performance and Related Reforms to 
Obtain Value in Every Acquisition Act of 2010 (IMPROVE 
Acquisition Act of 2010), as included in the Ike Skelton 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2011 (Public 
Law 111-383); the Small Business Innovative Research and Small 
Business Technology Transfer Reauthorization Act of 2011, as 
included in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2012 (Public Law 112-81); and the application of 
additional sanctions against the Government of the Islamic 
Republic of Iran, as included in both the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 and the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (Public Law 112-39). In 
the 113th Congress, the committee's focused oversight of the 
sensitive military operations of the Department of Defense led 
to the introduction of the bipartisan bill H.R. 1904, the 
Oversight of Sensitive Military Operations Act, in May 2013, 
much of which was included in the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014 (Public Law 113-76).
    In the 114th Congress, the committee undertook a 
significant defense reform effort aimed at improving agility 
within the Department of Defense, increasing the quality of 
care and support for service members, and getting more defense 
for the dollar. Across both the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92) and the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328), six major defense reform packages were enacted into law: 
compensation and benefits, military healthcare, commissaries, 
Uniform Code of Military Justice, acquisition, and organization 
and management of the Department. The committee will continue 
to emphasize defense reform in the 115th Congress. In general, 
the committee will continue to maintain a strong linkage 
between formal oversight efforts and legislative initiatives.
    As previously noted, the committee has dedicated 
significant oversight to the examination of the implications of 
the Budget Control Act (BCA) of 2011 (Public Law 112-25) for 
national defense and defense sequestration. The committee will 
continue to assess the effects of declining defense resources 
and sequestration on the readiness of the force and the risk 
associated with executing the national defense strategy. While 
the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013 (Public Law 113-67) and the 
Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 (Public Law 114-74) provided some 
relief to defense by increasing the BCA discretionary spending 
caps for fiscal years 2014 through 2017, fiscal year 2018 will 
see a return to the BCA caps and defense sequestration. The 
committee shares the concern of the National Defense Panel that 
the BCA, on top of previous cuts to defense dating back to 
2009, will ``lead to a high risk force in the near future,'' 
have ``caused significant shortfalls in U.S. military readiness 
and both present and future capabilities,'' and have prompted 
allies and adversaries alike ``to question our commitment and 
resolve.'' The committee continues to oppose the sequester of 
national defense funding, and will continue to conduct 
oversight in the 115th Congress to highlight the consequences 
for the military, the defense industrial base, and national 
security. While the committee will work to ensure that the 
damage to U.S. national security is mitigated to the greatest 
extent possible, it will also engage the Administration on 
opportunities to revisit Public Law 112-25.

                             Policy Issues


  NATIONAL DEFENSE STRATEGY, NATIONAL MILITARY STRATEGY, AND RELATED 
                                DEFENSE

    In the 115th Congress, the committee plans to continue its 
focus on the readiness, capability, and capacity of the U.S. 
Armed Forces to defend national interests, on supporting the 
authorities and resources necessary for ongoing military 
operations, and on improving the agility and efficiency of the 
Department of Defense. The committee will continue to fulfill 
its constitutional responsibilities through a robust and 
comprehensive oversight program and through the development and 
passage of the annual defense authorization act.
    The committee recognizes that the current threat 
environment, as characterized by Dr. Henry Kissinger in January 
2015, is ``more diverse and complex'' that at any point since 
the end of the Second World War. Terrorism, including the 
spread of violent extremism by the Islamic State of Iraq and 
the Levant, instability in the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, 
regional aggression by the Russian Federation, destabilizing 
actions by the People's Republic of China in the South and East 
China Seas, developments in nuclear and missile capabilities by 
the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and the Islamic 
Republic of Iran, and the continued spread of lethal and 
disruptive technologies, will continue to threaten U.S. 
national security interests. These events and other security 
developments across the globe also serve to highlight the 
continued need for the U.S. military to be postured and ready 
to defend national interests and address security challenges, 
wherever and whenever they may arise.
    The committee expects that the Administration will conduct 
a series of national security and defense reviews to inform its 
development of a new National Security Strategy and National 
Defense Strategy, consistent with the requirements contained in 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 
(Public Law 114-328). These new strategies may also lead to 
changes in the National Military Strategy, which was last 
updated by the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in 2016. 
The committee will review these strategies; evaluate the 
alignment of the strategies to the security environment; 
examine the assumptions underpinning them, including the force 
sizing construct; and assess the force posture, capabilities, 
and resources necessary to execute the strategies. The 
committee will also evaluate the risk associated with executing 
the strategies at current resource levels, to specifically 
include evaluating the impact that defense cuts and 
sequestration may have on strategy execution.
    The committee also plans to continue its oversight of: 
ongoing military operations where U.S. forces are in harm's 
way, including ongoing global counterterrorism operations; 
strategic reassurance and deterrence activities in Europe and 
the Indo-Asia-Pacific; and Department of Defense investments in 
readiness, capabilities, and infrastructure to ensure the U.S. 
Armed Forces remain capable of addressing current and emerging 
conventional and unconventional challenges. The committee 
intends to accomplish this oversight through the conduct of 
hearings and briefings; engagements with defense leaders, 
military commanders, diplomats, academics, and private sector 
experts; and congressional delegation visits to military 
installations and U.S. forces serving abroad.

                   READINESS AND POSTURE OF THE FORCE

    The committee believes that, as a matter of principal, the 
military should be fully ready, trained, and equipped for the 
missions it is asked to do. These missions range from 
conducting counterterrorism and low intensity operations across 
the globe to possessing a credible conventional and nuclear 
deterrent against near-peer challengers. Yet, as the committee 
found through its oversight in the 114th Congress, full 
spectrum military readiness has suffered because of a continued 
high operational mission tempo and cuts in defense spending, 
which have led to a force that is too small and is being asked 
to do more with less.
    In the 115th Congress, the committee will continue to 
prioritize its oversight of the readiness and posture of the 
U.S. Armed Forces. The committee expects the Department of 
Defense, under the new Administration, to update the National 
Defense Strategy and adjust resource levels and allocations to 
fulfill the strategy. The committee will evaluate the strategy-
resource alignment, and assess whether the U.S. military is 
sized, shaped, and postured to execute the strategy. Building 
upon its oversight in the 114th Congress, the committee will 
also seek to improve full spectrum readiness by focusing on 
specific areas such as training, equipment maintenance and 
modernization, end strength, and infrastructure.
    The committee also recognizes that, over the past 15 years 
of conducting counterterrorism operations, the U.S. military 
has largely operated uncontested in the air, sea, space, and 
cyberspace domains. However, the Russian Federation, the 
People's Republic of China, the Islamic Republic of Iran, and 
the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, all possess varying 
degrees of anti-access and area denial capabilities in those 
domains. Therefore, the committee's oversight will also include 
examination of U.S. military power projection abilities, 
operational concepts, joint training and exercises, and command 
structures, necessary to deter conflict and compete with 
potential adversaries that possess advanced military forces.

                           RUSSIAN FEDERATION

    The committee recognizes the security challenges posed by 
the Russian Federation in Europe, the Middle East, and across 
the globe. Russia possesses sufficient military and nuclear 
weapons capabilities to pose an existential threat to the 
United States. It has undertaken cyber and other unconventional 
actions against the United States and European nations. Under 
President Vladimir Putin, Russia has violated long-standing 
international rules and the preservation of territorial 
integrity and sovereignty. Russia's continued aggression 
towards Ukraine began in 2014 with the illegal annexation of 
Crimea, and it has maintained ongoing support to separatists in 
the Donbas region and shown a willingness and capability to 
engage in unacknowledged hybrid warfare there and elsewhere in 
Europe. In the greater Middle East, Russia has increased its 
influence, intervening militarily in the civil war in the 
Syrian Arab Republic to bolster the regime of President Bashar 
Assad and to conduct missions against the Islamic State of Iraq 
and the Levant located in Syria. Russia has also begun to 
engage with the Taliban in the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. 
Collectively, these examples demonstrate the global influence 
Russia seeks to wield and the threat it presents to North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) allies and other European 
partners, and to the wider global community.
    The committee will continue to examine Russia's global 
influence campaign as well as its conventional, nuclear, and 
unconventional military capabilities and capacities. In 
particular, the committee will pay close attention to Russian 
use of information operations, cyber attacks, propaganda, and 
intimidation measures against the United States and its allies 
and partners. The committee will continue to assess U.S. 
defense policy and military investments in posture, 
capabilities, and readiness to maintain a credible deterrent 
against Russia and to reassure European allies and partners. 
The committee will also examine NATO military capabilities, and 
the contribution that NATO countries make, to deter and defend 
against Russian aggression.
    The committee also recognizes that Russia has failed to 
comply with several arms control treaties important to European 
stability and security. Since December 2007, Russia has ceased 
implementing its obligations to the Treaty on Conventional 
Forces in Europe, which included annual notifications and data 
on military forces and basing. In 2014, the Administration 
formally declared Russia in violation of the Intermediate-Range 
Nuclear Forces Treaty. The committee will consider the 
implications for U.S. defense policy, planning, and investments 
resulting from this violation and from Russia's changes to its 
military doctrine.

                       PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA

    The People's Republic of China continues its unilateral 
efforts to assert regional influence, particularly in the South 
and East China Seas, while also continuing its military 
modernization in areas such as anti-access and area denial 
capabilities, power projection, nuclear forces, space, cyber, 
and other advanced technology areas. The committee will 
continue to oversee the Department of Defense's strategy, force 
posture, capability needs, and readiness in the Indo-Asia-
Pacific region, to ensure that U.S. forces are properly 
resourced and postured to protect U.S. national security 
interests and are prepared to keep pace with advancing threats, 
including China's military modernization effort.
    As the stability and security of the Indo-Asia-Pacific 
region remains a core U.S. national interest, the committee 
will continue to oversee the Department of Defense's efforts to 
implement a range of posture, force structure, and engagement 
initiatives in the region, including naval, air, and land-based 
assets; forward pre-positioning; infrastructure realignments; 
and training and exercises. The United States has many allies 
and partners in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region, and the committee 
will continue to focus on strengthening important international 
relationships and cooperative efforts in the region.

                 DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF KOREA

    The Democratic People's Republic of Korea remains a threat 
to stability on the Korean peninsula and to the United States. 
North Korea continues to advance its nuclear and ballistic 
missile capabilities, to include firing a submarine-launched 
ballistic missile and taking steps towards fielding its road-
mobile intercontinental ballistic missile that poses a direct 
threat to the United States, and expanding its asymmetric 
capabilities, as exemplified by its destructive cyber attack on 
Sony Pictures. The committee will continue to monitor and 
oversee the Department of Defense's strategy, force posture, 
capability needs, and readiness in the Indo-Asia-Pacific 
region, to ensure that U.S. forces are properly resourced and 
postured to protect U.S. national security interests, 
particularly against North Korea's increasing threat.
    As the stability and security of the Indo-Asia-Pacific 
region remains a core U.S. national interest, the committee 
will continue to closely oversee the Department of Defense's 
efforts to implement a range of posture, force structure, and 
engagement initiatives in the region, including forward pre-
positioning; infrastructure realignments; and training and 
exercises. Specific examples include: the realignment of U.S. 
forces based in Japan; key operational control transition and 
realignment initiatives between U.S. Forces Korea and the 
Republic of Korea; the U.S. deployment of a Terminal High 
Altitude Area Defense anti-ballistic missile system in South 
Korea; and trilateral defense cooperation efforts between the 
United States, South Korea, and Japan. The United States has 
many allies and partners in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region, and 
the committee will continue to focus on strengthening important 
international relationships and cooperative efforts in the 
region.

                        ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF IRAN

    The committee will examine the military-related 
capabilities, policies, and actions of the Islamic Republic of 
Iran, including those of the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps 
and Iran's Quds Force. Particular focus will be given to any 
Iranian military-related actions directed against the United 
States and U.S. forces, as well as against its allies and 
partners in the region. The committee will continue to examine 
Iran's malign activities, including its support to terrorist 
organizations, its use of proxies and Shia militant groups, and 
its facilitation of lethal aid to these groups.
    The committee will also continue to monitor Iran's nuclear 
program. Such monitoring includes close oversight of Iran's 
development of ballistic missiles, nuclear capabilities and any 
such capabilities with applicability to a nuclear weapons 
program, and any proliferation of missile and nuclear 
technology. The committee intends to continue to monitor the 
implementation of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action 
(JCPOA) between the P5+1 (the United States, the Russian 
Federation, the People's Republic of China, the United Kingdom 
of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the French Republic, and 
the Federal Republic of Germany) and Iran, including Iran's 
compliance with the commitments agreed to under the JCPOA.
    The committee's continued assessment of Iran's military-
related capabilities, intent, and strategic orientation will 
shape its oversight of U.S. defense policies, posture, 
planning, and operations in the greater Middle East, and 
support its investment decisions regarding the capabilities and 
force structure necessary to support U.S. military requirements 
in the greater Middle East.

 COUNTERING TERRORISM, AT RISK AND FAILING STATES, COUNTERING VIOLENT 
                   EXTREMISM AND ILLICIT TRAFFICKING

    Since the September 11, 2001 attacks, countering terrorism 
has been a central focus and mission of the Department of 
Defense. At great sacrifice, U.S. Armed Forces have deployed to 
the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, the Republic of Iraq, the 
Syrian Arab Republic, the Republic of Yemen, the Horn of 
Africa, and elsewhere around the globe to deal repeated and 
significant blows to Al Qaeda, the Islamic State of Iraq and 
the Levant (ISIL), and other terrorist groups. While these 
terrorist groups have been degraded, they have not been 
destroyed. They remain potent, ruthless, and continue to spread 
a radical jihadist ideology that has inspired deadly attacks in 
the United States and across Europe. The committee recognizes 
that ISIL, Al Qaeda, and their affiliates and associates will 
continue to pose a direct threat to American lives and American 
interests, and that U.S. forces will be conducting 
counterterrorism operations at varying levels of intensity, for 
the foreseeable future.
    The committee will conduct extensive oversight, often in 
classified form, over terrorism issues. The committee will 
continue to monitor terrorism threats and examine 
counterterrorism policies, strategies, and operations, 
including any changes made by the new Administration. It will 
also pay particular attention to the military force posture; 
special operations capabilities; intelligence, information 
operations, and cyber capabilities; role of allies and 
partners; and resources necessary to carry out an effective 
counterterrorism strategy.
    The committee also recognizes the need to counter the 
violent extremist ideology spread by ISIL and other terrorist 
groups, and that such a challenge requires an interagency and 
international approach. The committee plans to examine the role 
of the Department of Defense in addressing this challenge and 
how the Department engages with other U.S. departments and 
agencies and foreign partners.
    The committee also recognizes that these terrorist groups 
leverage at risk and failing states, particularly in the 
greater Middle East and Africa, to expand their presence, to 
conduct operational planning, and to serve as launch points for 
attacks against the United States, its allies and partners, and 
U.S. interests. The committee will therefore also continue to 
focus on efforts to build partner nation counterterrorism and 
conventional warfare capabilities to counter these threats at 
the regional and local level. Improving security and stability 
in volatile regions that cannot adequately govern themselves or 
secure their own territory will remain a top priority for the 
committee.
    Lastly, the committee will continue to examine the legal 
basis for the President's military actions against ISIL. To 
date, President Obama has cited his Article II authority under 
the U.S. Constitution as well as certain statuary authorities, 
including the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force 
(Public Law 107-40) and the Authorization for Use of Military 
Force Against Iraq Resolution of 2002 (Public Law 107-243). The 
committee will examine those aspects of the AUMF relevant to 
its jurisdiction to be well postured should the 115th Congress 
consider any new authorization for the use of military force 
against ISIL.

Operation Freedom's Sentinel

    The committee will conduct robust oversight of the U.S. 
military effort in the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, to 
specifically include oversight of the three U.S. military 
missions associated with Operation Freedom's Sentinel (OFS): 
conducting counterterrorism operations against Al Qaeda and 
other terrorist groups including the Islamic State of Iraq and 
the Levant (ISIL); training, advising, and assisting the Afghan 
National Defense and Security Forces (ANDSF); and providing 
force protection of U.S. personnel and facilities. The 
committee will continue to assess the authorities, resources, 
equipment, basing, and personnel to support the OFS missions 
and policy objectives. Additionally, the committee will examine 
the regional security environment, including efforts by the 
Government of Afghanistan and the Government of the Islamic 
Republic of Pakistan to deny safe havens to Al Qaeda, the 
Haqqani Network, and other jihadist organizations. The 
committee will also monitor other critical efforts in 
Afghanistan, such as the effectiveness of the ANDSF, and its 
ability to sustain operations and institutional requirements. 
Finally, the committee recognizes that the Administration is 
likely to review current U.S. policy on Afghanistan and the 
committee will be prepared to assess any changes to Department 
of Defense efforts that the Administration might make.

Islamic Republic of Pakistan

    The committee will continue its oversight of the broad 
range of security issues involving the Islamic Republic of 
Pakistan, including review of the use of Coalition Support 
Funds, which are provided to reimburse Pakistan for its support 
to U.S. military operations in the Islamic Republic of 
Afghanistan. The committee will monitor the security and 
stability of Pakistan, including the security of Pakistan's 
nuclear weapons, Pakistan's on-going and future nuclear weapon 
projects, and its willingness and operational capacity to 
combat key terrorist groups, such as Al Qaeda, the Afghan and 
Pakistani Taliban, the Haqqani network, and other terrorist 
organizations. Moreover, the committee will evaluate the 
terrorist activity emanating from the border area between 
Pakistan and Afghanistan, and will conduct oversight of the 
Department of Defense's efforts to combat that threat.

Operation Inherent Resolve

    The U.S. and coalition forces continue to conduct 
operations against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant 
(ISIL) as part of Operation Inherent Resolve (OIR). Presently, 
U.S. and coalition operations include: an air campaign that is 
focused against ISIL in the Republic of Iraq and the Syrian 
Arab Republic; training, equipping, advising, and assisting 
Iraqi Security Forces and, in a more limited role, partnered 
forces on the ground in Syria; and force protection of U.S. 
forces and facilities deployed in support of Operation Inherent 
Resolve. The committee will continue to assess the sufficiency 
of authorities, resources, equipment, basing, and personnel to 
support the Operation Inherent Resolve missions and policy 
objectives. The committee will maintain congressional oversight 
of the Iraq Train and Equip and the Syria Train and Equip 
programs, particularly given past concerns about their 
effectiveness.
    The committee recognizes that the security landscape in 
Iraq and Syria has become more complex and that the 
humanitarian crisis in those countries more dire. The committee 
will examine the presence and influence exerted by other actors 
in Syria, particularly the Russian Federation, the Islamic 
Republic of Iran, and the Republic of Turkey, and the 
implications for U.S. objectives regarding ISIL and regional 
security and stability. Furthermore, the committee will 
continue to examine the flow of foreign fighters to and from 
the region, and the linkages between ISIL and actors who 
conduct directed or inspired terrorist attacks in the U.S. and 
elsewhere. Additionally, the committee will monitor the 
political and sectarian dynamics in both Iraq and Syria, which 
have, in part, fostered the context and political climate for 
ISIL to expand and grow. It will also closely monitor the 
stability of the countries in the region of Iraq and Syria and 
any growth or expansion of ISIL in the region, and continue to 
oversee the security assistance authorities and resources 
provided through the annual defense authorization act to 
address these challenges.
    Finally, the committee recognizes that the Administration 
is undertaking a review of the current U.S. policy on defeating 
ISIL in Iraq and Syria, and the committee will be prepared to 
assess any changes to Department of Defense efforts that the 
Administration might make.

Republic of Yemen

    The security situation in the Republic of Yemen will 
continue to be a significant focus for the committee. The 
committee will maintain its oversight of the U.S. military's 
counterterrorism activities in Yemen and the status of 
coalition efforts to counter Houthi rebels in Yemen, including 
U.S. support to the coalition and compliance with the laws of 
armed conflict and other related international norms. 
Additionally, the committee will monitor any provocative 
actions by the Houthis against U.S. naval vessels in the region 
and oversee any required changes in U.S. military posture, 
capabilities, and resources to address such threats. The 
committee will also monitor the capability, capacity, and 
strategy of Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) to conduct 
transnational terrorist attacks and oversee the associated U.S. 
counterterrorism efforts against AQAP.

Africa

    The committee will maintain its oversight of Department of 
Defense activities in Africa. Additionally, the committee will 
continue to examine the Department's coordination within the 
interagency to ensure the range of the Department's activities 
occurring in Africa contribute to U.S. national security 
objectives. As the Department's efforts to train and equip 
African partners to provide regional security continue, the 
committee will increase its focus on the Department's execution 
of the programs, the development of defense institutions in 
African nations, and the ability of African partner nations to 
absorb and sustain the assistance provided. The committee will 
pay particular attention to the effect that security 
cooperation reform measures adopted in the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) 
will have on the Department's programs and activities in 
Africa. Further, the committee will continue to monitor the 
Department's efforts, in coordination with other U.S. 
Government agencies, to develop the security conditions 
necessary to advance governance and stability on the continent.
    In North Africa, the committee will continue to conduct 
oversight of the evolving security situation caused primarily 
by the tenuous political environment in the State of Libya and 
the effect of Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, the Islamic 
State, and other jihadist groups in this region. The committee 
will pay particular attention to the relationship between the 
Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant in Iraq and Syria and the 
terrorist organization's presence in the region.
    In East Africa, the committee will continue to provide 
oversight of the Department's efforts to counter threats and to 
prevent transnational attacks on the United States, its allies 
and partners, or its interests. In particular, the committee 
will remain focused on the security situation in Somalia, U.S. 
support to African Union Mission in Somalia forces, and the 
development of Somali forces to provide security. Moreover, the 
committee will continue to monitor the ideological, strategic, 
and operational coordination and conflict between Horn of 
Africa groups, such as Al Shabaab, and other terrorist 
organizations.
    In West Africa, the committee will continue its oversight 
of the Department's efforts to counter threats throughout the 
region. In particular, the committee will focus on threats 
emanating from the Republic of Mali and in the Lake Chad Basin 
region. The committee will also pay attention to the continuing 
ideological, strategic, and operational evolution of 
organizations such as Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, Boko 
Haram, and the Islamic State West Africa Province, and also 
will explore the geographic overlap and operational interaction 
with other terrorist groups on the continent.
    In Central Africa, the committee will continue its 
oversight of the Department of Defense's activities to 
transition its support of the Uganda Peoples' Defense Force and 
other national militaries to counter the Lord's Resistance Army 
and apprehend or remove Joseph Kony.

Central and South America

    The committee will examine the issues affecting U.S. 
security in Central and South America, including illicit 
trafficking, transnational organized crime, political turmoil, 
and instability that pose a potential threat to the U.S. 
homeland. The committee is particularly concerned about 
instability in Central America.
    The committee will oversee the execution of Department of 
Defense security assistance programs throughout the hemisphere, 
specifically in the Republic of Colombia, as it continues to 
improve its national security and begins implementation of the 
peace accords signed in 2016. Additionally, the committee will 
focus on the growing economies in the region, such as the 
Federative Republic of Brazil, which is the region's largest 
and fastest-growing economy, and will examine their influence 
both in the Western Hemisphere and across the globe. The 
committee will monitor any changes to U.S. policy regarding the 
relationship between the U.S. and the Republic of Cuba, and any 
potential impacts on Department of Defense policies and 
operations. The committee will also continue to monitor 
potential threats from global terrorist organizations, such as 
Al Qaeda, Hezbollah, and the Iranian Revolutionary Guards 
Corps, who have increasing influence in the region.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the United 
States' relationship with its Central and South American 
neighbors and the ability of these partners to bring safety and 
security to the hemisphere.

Detainee Policy and Related Matters

    The Department of Defense continues to be the custodian of 
law-of-war detainees held at the United States Naval Station, 
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The committee will continue to monitor 
transfer and release policies and practices pertaining to those 
detainees, as well as proceedings pursuant to the Military 
Commissions Act (Public Law 109-366; Public Law 111-84), which 
established the legal framework governing military tribunals to 
try certain detainees for alleged war crimes. The committee 
will also conduct oversight of detention policy for future 
captures and related issues.

                              CYBERWARFARE

    As cyberspace becomes increasingly important as a domain of 
warfare, the Department of Defense will need to mature its 
policies, doctrine, and capabilities to execute offensive 
operations. The committee will continue to oversee the changing 
policy and authority framework to ensure that cyberwarfare 
capabilities can be executed as a standalone capability, or 
fully integrated into an operational plan in concert with other 
conventional capabilities. That will include ensuring that 
there is a clear understanding of rules of engagement, as well 
as how international legal frameworks, like the laws of war, 
apply in these instances. In addition to developing proper 
funding authorities that may be required for offensive 
operations, the committee will also oversee interagency 
coordination and deconflicting areas of overlap. The committee 
will increase its oversight on evolving deterrence concepts and 
the ways in which cyber may be changing the traditional 
understanding of the escalation ladder. The committee will also 
monitor the development of international norms of behavior and 
international regulatory regimes.

  TECHNOLOGY EROSION, TECHNOLOGICAL SUPERIORITY, AND THE THIRD OFFSET 
                                STRATEGY

    In the 115th Congress, the committee plans to continue its 
examination of technology trends by nation-states and non-state 
actors, and the diffusion of technology, to assess the impact 
and risk to U.S. superiority in key warfare domains. The 
committee recognizes that U.S. military technological 
superiority is no longer assumed, and that investments in new 
and advanced capabilities, development of new operating 
concepts, and improvements in the agility and adaptability of 
the Department of Defense, will be required to maintain this 
superiority.
    Through its oversight at the full committee level, and 
within the Subcommittee on Emerging Threats and Capabilities, 
the committee will continue to evaluate the Department's 
technology initiatives and investments, including those within 
the Strategic Capabilities Office and the Defense Advanced 
Research Projects Agency. The committee also intends to 
continue monitoring the Department's Third Offset Strategy 
development efforts, and sees it as a useful vehicle for 
focusing the Department on how to deter and counter the Russian 
Federation and the People's Republic of China. Additionally, 
the committee will continue to make legislative improvements to 
the defense acquisition process and to the organization of the 
Department, as discussed elsewhere in this plan, to get new 
capabilities deployed to the warfighter that better match the 
speed of technological change.
    The committee will also seek opportunities to participate 
in wargames to understand the technological and operational 
challenges facing the military, and is encouraged by the 
Department's increased emphasis on wargaming and on strategic 
initiatives to better understand Russian and Chinese military 
thinking.

                      ADDRESSING EMERGING THREATS

    Terrorism, unconventional warfare, insurgency, adversarial 
use of technology, and weapons of mass destruction (WMD) 
proliferation are some of the emerging threats that challenge 
national security and global peace and stability. These threats 
require the Department of Defense to work effectively and 
efficiently with other Federal agencies and the governments of 
other nations. The committee will conduct oversight of numerous 
cross-cutting Department of Defense activities central to 
addressing these emerging and unforeseen threats, including the 
proliferation of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, 
counterinsurgency, counterterrorism, security force assistance, 
and building partnership capacity (BPC).
    The committee will focus attention on how the Department of 
Defense addresses these broad threats in its strategic planning 
processes, how resources are arrayed to meet these threats, and 
how existing authorities are consistent with operational 
requirements. As discussed below, the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) 
contained comprehensive reform of security assistance and BPC 
authorities; the committee, therefore, expects to closely 
monitor and evaluate the implementation of these reforms to 
ensure they are consistent with emerging threats and national 
security objectives.
    The committee will also focus attention on the Department 
of Defense Cooperative Threat Reduction (CTR) program and the 
National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Defense Nuclear 
Nonproliferation (DNN) activities. The CTR program has changed 
since authorized in the Soviet Nuclear Threat Reduction Act of 
1991 (Public Law 102-228; also known as the Nunn-Lugar Act). 
Originally focused on securing and dismantling weapons of mass 
destruction and their associated infrastructure in former 
Soviet Union states, the CTR mission has expanded to a global 
focus on protecting against WMD, including an increased 
emphasis on chemical and biological weapons, and improving 
detection capabilities.
    The committee, as well as the Subcommittee on Emerging 
Threats and Capabilities (given the key role special operations 
forces play in this area), will continue its oversight of the 
full range of emerging threats to national security and U.S. 
military forces, the capabilities, and the authorities needed 
to respond. Additionally, the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces 
will continue to review and assess the effectiveness of NNSA 
DNN's strategy and activities to counter the threat of the 
global proliferation of nuclear weapons.

Intelligence

    In the 115th Congress, the committee will examine the 
organization, functions, operations, intelligence collection, 
and analysis output of the defense intelligence community to 
ensure the highest possible quality intelligence support to the 
warfighter. The committee will consider the organization and 
management of the elements of the Department of Defense that 
are part of the intelligence community and their roles in the 
defense and national intelligence enterprise. In the course of 
examining defense intelligence plans, programs and policies, 
the committee will balance current threats with the need to 
rebuild intelligence capabilities to address potential threats, 
reform the defense intelligence enterprise organization to 
better meet current and future warfighter requirements, and 
restore the decisive advantage defense intelligence provides to 
commanders and the policy community.
    The committee will continue to coordinate when appropriate 
with the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence on 
intelligence and counterintelligence matters of the Department 
of Defense, and intelligence and counterintelligence activities 
of the Department of Energy in the course of oversight of the 
intelligence community and the authorization of appropriations 
for intelligence activities shared by the two committees.

Security Cooperation

    The committee will conduct thorough oversight of security 
cooperation and building partner capacity (BPC) in the 115th 
Congress. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) contained comprehensive reform 
of the authorities, funding, programs, and oversight of 
security cooperation. The committee will monitor and evaluate 
the implementation of these security cooperation provisions, 
including during the development of guidance through the 
initial congressional notification process and while the 
programs are in progress, to ensure that they are properly 
executed and consistent with national security objectives.

             Agility, Efficiency, and Fiscal Responsibility


                                OVERVIEW

    In the 115th Congress, the committee will continue to place 
a high priority on defense reform to create greater agility, 
accountability, and responsiveness within the Department of 
Defense, and to get more value for the tax payer dollar. The 
committee will continue to take legislative action to improve 
the defense acquisition system. It will also oversee the 
implementation of the significant body of legislation contained 
in both the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2016 (Public Law 114-92) and the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) covering: 
acquisition; compensation and benefits (including healthcare 
and commissaries); the Uniform Code of Military Justice; and 
personnel, organization and management.
    Throughout the 115th Congress, the committee expects to 
conduct numerous hearings and briefings; engage experts from 
across defense, academia, and the private sector; travel to 
military installations, industry facilities, and other relevant 
sites; and conduct independent research and analysis to inform 
additional legislative reforms.

        ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

    As part of the committee's emphasis on defense reform, it 
undertook significant oversight and legislative action in the 
114th Congress to improve the organization and management of 
the Department of Defense in order to ensure that it is 
properly postured to meet the complex and evolving security 
threats of the 21st century and to maintain U.S. technological 
superiority.
    In the 115th Congress, the committee plans to continue its 
oversight and legislative action in this area. A key priority 
will be monitoring the implementation of legislation contained 
in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 
(Public Law 114-92) requiring the Department to streamline its 
management headquarters and reduce headquarters activities and 
personnel, and in the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) requiring a reduction in 
military general and flag officers and in senior executive 
service personnel. Additionally, the committee plans to oversee 
the implementation of organizational changes to the Office of 
the Secretary of Defense contained in Public Law 114-328 to 
elevate research and engineering, better focus acquisition and 
sustainment activities, and improve oversight and management of 
the Department's ``fourth estate.'' This may include taking 
further legislative action to clarify authorities, 
organizational structure, and provide additional policy 
guidance. The committee will also seek opportunities to build 
upon the reforms to the Goldwater-Nichols Department of Defense 
Reorganization Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-433) that it 
undertook in the 114th Congress to provide further organization 
and management agility and adaptability necessary to address 
longer-term national security challenges.

                   ACQUISITION AND REGULATORY REFORM

    The committee will continue its ongoing effort to improve 
the agility of the Department of Defense acquisition system and 
the environment (i.e., human resources, culture, statutes, 
regulations, and processes) driving acquisition choices in the 
Department, industry, and Congress. In undertaking this effort, 
the committee solicited input from industry, academia, the 
Department, and others during the 113th Congress, and continued 
to engage these stakeholders during the 114th Congress. The 
committee also continued with a series of hearings, briefings, 
and roundtable discussions in the 114th Congress to receive 
testimony from key acquisition leaders and experts. The 
committee addressed many of the identified shortcomings in the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public 
Law 114-92) and the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328).
    The committee remains concerned that the Department's 
conventional acquisition system is not sufficiently agile to 
support warfighter demands. On average, major defense 
acquisition programs operate for 9 years before yielding new 
capabilities. Requirements determination, budgeting, and 
contracting can each take another 2 years or more before 
programs begin. Meanwhile, technological change has been 
rapidly generating new, and often unforeseeable, innovations. 
Global threats are evolving even more quickly, with adversaries 
leveraging new technologies to exploit gaps in our military 
capabilities. The conventional acquisition system simply does 
not enable capabilities to be delivered to warfighters fast 
enough. The committee has concluded that the current 
acquisition system costs too much, takes too long, and the 
troops simply do not get enough out of it.
    The committee notes that this persistent lack of agility 
derives in part from the basic incentives embedded in the 
requirements, acquisition, budget, and oversight processes. 
Weapon system requirements must be set anticipating technology 
that will be available after years of development, so 
requirements are naturally optimistic. Optimism carries with it 
substantial technical risk, which leads the acquisition system 
to make short-term, cost-savings decisions that reduce 
flexibility and increase long-term costs. Budget timelines and 
oversight committees require the military services to provide 
detailed budget justifications, even though such details then 
limit the military services' ability to pursue new 
technological innovations after funds are appropriated. Then in 
response to acquisition shortcomings, both Congress and the 
Department have imposed new layers of bureaucratic management 
and special authorities to circumvent the conventional 
acquisition process.
    While the committee recognizes that there are no ``silver 
bullet'' reform packages that can immediately fix the current 
acquisition system in a holistic manner, the committee intends 
to take the inputs it has received to facilitate its efforts in 
this area in the 115th Congress. The committee recognizes this 
effort will be an iterative process that will result in direct 
oversight and will be embedded in the committee's regular work 
throughout the 115th Congress.

                          FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

    The committee will continue to oversee military 
effectiveness in this era of declining budgets. Funding levels 
have been stagnant for national defense over the last 5 fiscal 
years, and under the Budget Control Act of 2011 (Public Law 
112-25), base funding for fiscal year 2018 will be $2.0 billion 
lower than levels provided for in fiscal year 2017 in the 
Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 (Public Law 114-74).
    The Comptroller General of the United States has 
consistently identified the Department of Defense's financial 
management as a high-risk area since 1995. The Department's 
inability to track and account for billions of dollars in 
funding and tangible assets continues to undermine its 
financial management systems. It also creates a lack of 
transparency that significantly limits congressional oversight.
    The Department's inability to produce auditable financial 
statements undermines its efforts to reform defense acquisition 
processes and to realize efficiencies. Without these objective 
tools, neither the Department nor Congress can verify that 
greater value is being created.
    The committee will continue to review efforts to implement 
the Financial Improvement and Audit Readiness (FIAR) plan as 
the Department moves to accomplish auditable financial 
statements by September 30, 2017, as mandated by the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (Public Law 111-
84). The committee will monitor the interdependencies between 
the FIAR plan and the funds being spent on business systems 
modernization programs as the Department works to correct the 
weaknesses in its financial statements.

                           CIVILIAN PERSONNEL

    The committee will continue to oversee the development of 
the Department of Defense's workforce strategy for its civilian 
personnel and other initiatives aimed at ensuring that the 
Department has the human capital required both now and in the 
future to expertly, capably, and cost-effectively achieve its 
national security missions. In particular, the committee will 
monitor the impact of several new but temporary authorities in 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 
(Public Law 114-328) designed to provide the Department with 
increased agility and flexibility in hiring and managing its 
workforce. Finally, the committee will focus extensive 
oversight on workforce sourcing decisions, transparency, and 
personnel system reform efforts.

                               Readiness


 MANPOWER SUFFICIENT IN QUANTITY AND QUALITY TO MEET GLOBAL COMMITMENTS

    During the 115th Congress, the committee will continue to 
assess the basic question: What does the Nation need in terms 
of the quantity of manpower and the quality of that manpower to 
meet its current and future global military commitments, 
without undue risk to the Nation? In this context, the fiscal 
year 2017 budget request proposed to continue the reductions to 
the end strengths of the Army, Air Force, Navy, and Marine 
Corps. At the same time the committee is concerned that the 
military services remain fully engaged in stability operations 
in the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, advisory and training 
missions in the Republic of Iraq, engaged with the Islamic 
State of Iraq and the Levant and in numerous smaller 
engagements throughout the world. Reflecting that concern, the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public 
Law 114-328) stopped the personnel reductions and sets the 
stage to reverse the trend. The committee will continue to 
provide aggressive oversight of military manpower levels and 
force structure to ensure they meet the National Military 
Strategy. This oversight will seek to provide the Active, 
Guard, and Reserve Forces sufficient manpower levels to sustain 
varying scales of activation, while maintaining deployment 
ratios at or above Department of Defense objectives. Within 
this focus, the committee will examine trends in overall total 
force structure requirements, end strength, recruiting, 
retention, morale, benefits and compensation.

                            FORCE READINESS

    The committee will hold force readiness as one of its 
highest priorities and will continue its oversight in this 
area, focusing not only on the readiness of deployed personnel 
supporting ongoing operations worldwide, but also on the 
ability of the military services to generate ready and trained 
forces for unforeseen contingencies, including full-spectrum 
combat missions, should the need arise. The continued drawdown 
of force strength in all of the military services, the ongoing 
conflict in the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, the rise of 
the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, and regional 
aggression by the Russian Federation and the People's Republic 
of China exacerbated already acute readiness challenges. For 
the military services, this meant continuous overseas 
deployments and little opportunity to conduct deferred 
maintenance on major end-items or undergo long-neglected 
training for high-end threats. Therefore, the committee will 
closely monitor the impact of end strength reductions on force 
readiness as well as the progress the military services make in 
training for full-spectrum operations. In particular, the 
committee will monitor aircraft accidents and availability, as 
emerging issues in this category of equipment could be the 
first indicators of a larger readiness crisis. This oversight 
will include identified shortages in critical specialties such 
as pilots, aircraft maintainers, and Explosive Ordnance 
Disposal personnel, among others. Further, the committee will 
continue its oversight of the Department of Defense's efforts 
to restore readiness in key combat support areas such as 
logistics, prepositioned stocks, and contracted service 
support.

Maintenance and Training

    The committee notes that continuous high operational tempo 
for current operations, as well as a lack of stable and 
adequate funding resulting from the Budget Control Act (Public 
Law 112-25), leave insufficient time and resources to 
adequately repair and refit ships, aircraft, and combat 
vehicles. The shift in training from primarily 
counterinsurgency missions to full-spectrum combat operations 
adds more requirements to already stressed units. Therefore, 
the committee will closely monitor the military services' 
training and maintenance recovery plans to ensure that they are 
realistic, adequately manned and resourced, and improve the 
Department of Defense's ability to achieve its mission 
requirements. In particular, the committee will oversee the 
readiness of just-deployed and next-to-deploy units, whose 
readiness was often sacrificed in order for deploying units to 
be properly manned, equipped, and trained. Finally, the 
committee will closely watch the recovery of the military 
services' aircraft maintenance and training plans.

            WEAPON SYSTEMS LIFE-CYCLE SUSTAINMENT AND RESET

    The committee will focus on reducing the total-ownership 
costs of weapons systems and equipment by ensuring the 
Department of Defense is developing, procuring, and modernizing 
weapons systems and equipment with consideration of life-cycle 
support and sustainment requirements and cost. The committee 
will also hold the Department accountable for improving its 
estimations of total weapon system life-cycle costs to better 
inform sustainment strategies, such as the cost effectiveness 
of acquiring technical data from original equipment 
manufacturers to allow future changes in sustainment path. 
Furthermore, the committee will continue its oversight of the 
Department's corrosion control efforts and will monitor 
resourcing of corrosion prediction and prevention efforts with 
a focus on increasing the service life of weapons systems while 
reducing long-term sustainment costs. Finally, the committee 
will continue to monitor the military services' reset 
strategies to repair, recapitalize, and replace equipment used 
in ongoing operations, and will also monitor progress toward 
complete reconstitution of prepositioned stocks.

                DEPOT, SHIPYARD, AND ARSENAL CAPABILITY

    A vital component to maintaining warfighting readiness 
across multiple domains is our Nation's organic industrial 
base. The arsenals, depots, air logistics complexes, and 
shipyards provide long-term sustainment through programmed 
maintenance as well as the critical capability to conduct 
repair and modernization upgrades as necessary. These 
facilities and associated skilled workforce provide a national-
level insurance policy against the unknown strategic operating 
environment. The committee is concerned about the future health 
of the organic industrial base during a period of fiscal 
uncertainty and increasing maintenance and sustainment 
requirements. After 15 years of sustained combat operations and 
subsequent equipment reset that resulted in peak workload 
years, the organic industrial base is beginning to see trends 
of increasing workload following steady declines since 2010. As 
the organic industrial base works to achieve workload 
stability, the committee will provide oversight into their 
process improvement initiatives to ensure ships, aircraft, and 
ground equipment return to the warfighter on-schedule. The 
committee is concerned that the Department of Defense lacks a 
comprehensive and integrated strategy to ensure U.S. military 
depots and arsenals are viably positioned for long-term 
sustainability and have the workforce, equipment, and 
facilities for efficient operations to meet the Nation's 
current requirements, as well as those through the next set of 
challenges. This includes, but is not limited to, oversight of 
how the workforce is matching capabilities and skills to 
emerging requirements as well as how they are recruiting, 
training, and preparing to retain the future workforce. The 
committee will conduct oversight into the use of new 
technologies such as additive manufacturing, robotics, and 
artificial intelligence as pathways to improve management of 
spares inventory and supply chain operations. The committee 
will continue oversight of depot, arsenal, and shipyard 
operations and management, the use of performance-based 
logistics, the role of public-private partnerships, and the 
military services' logistics enterprise resource planning 
systems. Inconsistent and unpredictable funding associated with 
the industrial base and their readiness efforts only exacerbate 
workload challenges and reduce workforce performance. The 
committee will continue its work to oversee carryover 
management at the depots and arsenals, to include the review of 
what levels should be acceptable for sufficient continuation of 
operations on an annual basis. The committee will continue 
working to ensure capital investment continues at the depots, 
arsenals, and shipyards in order to maintain a level of modern 
capability sufficient to meet the needs of the warfighter. 
Furthermore, the committee will examine how previous efficiency 
initiatives and workforce optimization continue to impact 
depot, shipyard, and arsenal capability, how more recent steps 
to increase arsenal and depot visibility among program managers 
and program offices are working, and how well programs and 
plans designed to assure the availability of critical organic 
manufacturing capabilities are being executed.

                      NATIONAL GUARD AND RESERVES

    The debate about the force structure mix of Active and 
Reserve Components, the proper roles and missions of the 
Reserve Components, be they an operational or strategic 
reserve, and the affordability of the required force to meet 
national security requirements, will continue again in the 
115th Congress. Competition among the Active and Reserve 
Components for resources will serve as a catalyst for that 
debate.
    During the 115th Congress, the committee will continue to 
review the various recommendations and proposals regarding the 
National Guard and Reserves and monitor proposed changes to 
ensure the recommendations will meet the National Military 
Strategy requirements, as well as homeland security and 
disaster requirements. The committee is especially interested 
in the Department of Defense's plan to reform the Reserve 
Component duty statuses and will scrutinize this plan. In 
addition, the oversight of military technicians will continue. 
Given the uncertainty of the current and projected fiscal 
environment, the availability of equipment needed to sustain 
and modernize the National Guard and Reserve Components as an 
operational reserve and for their domestic support missions, to 
include legacy aircraft as part of the Aerospace Control Alert 
mission, remains a concern. The committee will also focus 
oversight efforts on current equipment investment strategies 
for the National Guard and Reserve Components with particular 
emphasis on affordability and modernization of critical dual-
use equipment platforms that are essential to the National 
Guard's Title 32 mission and defense support to civil 
authorities. Furthermore, the committee will continue to 
monitor and evaluate the obligation and execution rates of 
funds provided as part of a separate procurement account, 
entitled the ``National Guard and Reserve Equipment Account,'' 
that would be used to address equipment shortfalls for the 
National Guard and Reserve Components.

                         ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT

    The committee will review the energy strategies promulgated 
by the Department of Defense and will monitor the Department's 
energy use on military installations. While reduction of energy 
demand through cost-effective investments remains a priority, 
the committee will review proposed investments that may 
demonstrate a simple return on investment but fail to 
materially enhance mission assurance, readiness, or combat 
capability.
    The committee will also continue its oversight of the 
Department of Defense and military services' environmental 
programs and will monitor Department of Defense funding and 
adherence to Federal, state, and local requirements for 
cleanup, compliance, and pollution prevention. Specifically, 
the committee will continue oversight to protect Department of 
Defense training, testing, and operations from encroachment, 
support outreach with respect to emergent issues such as the 
drinking water quality, and review progress of hazard 
remediation and mitigation across the Department in mission 
areas such as indoor firing ranges as well as maintenance and 
depot facilities.

                Military Construction and Infrastructure


                                 BASING

    The Department of Defense is undergoing a significant 
change in force structure both in the United States and 
overseas. The committee will continue to review all significant 
domestic and overseas basing and stationing proposals to ensure 
that these proposals include adequate construction funding and 
long-term sustainment resources.
    The committee will continue discussions with the Department 
of Defense and military departments on excess infrastructure 
capacity associated with military installations, but will 
expect proposed courses of action for consolidation to be 
justified and informed by the force structure required to 
fulfill the national military strategy versus current or legacy 
unit sizes, locations, and configurations.

      MILITARY CONSTRUCTION PROGRAMMING AND FACILITIES SUSTAINMENT

    The committee will review the Department of Defense's 
military construction program to manage the overall capacity of 
the Department's infrastructure and to ensure prudent long-term 
military construction investments are provided. The committee 
will also oversee the Department's investments in facility 
sustainment, restoration, and modernization, as well as the 
Department's utilization of new authorities recently provided 
by Congress related to the conversion of existing facilities 
and investments in infrastructure supporting research, 
development, test, and evaluation activities. Finally, 
recognizing the rapid change in weapon systems and missions in 
comparison to the timeline to plan, program, and execute new 
military construction, the committee will engage with the 
Department to seek more opportunities to construct flexible 
facilities rather than traditional purpose-built (i.e., single 
mission) facilities when practical and cost-effective.

          REAL PROPERTY ACQUISITION, MAINTENANCE, AND DISPOSAL

    The real property management process requires extensive 
oversight to maintain almost $879.0 billion in infrastructure 
at an annual cost of nearly $37.0 billion. The committee is 
concerned that inadequate asset visibility, poor requirements 
development, and project planning inefficiencies result in 
poorly coordinated investment decisions and sub-optimal 
facility construction. The committee will seek to apply best 
practices across the Department of Defense in order to 
efficiently develop and maintain the military services' ranges, 
facilities, and infrastructure.

               Military Personnel and Health Care Issues


                 MILITARY MANPOWER AND FORCE STRUCTURE

Medical Accession Standards

    The committee will provide robust oversight of military 
medical and behavioral health accession standards, an issue 
which directly impacts the readiness of the force. The 
Department of Defense is currently conducting an extensive 
review and re-drafting of the medical and behavioral health 
accession standards. These standards apply to all individuals 
applying for military service, and address a broad range of 
medical and mental health conditions that disqualify 
individuals from serving. The Department conducts this periodic 
review to ensure the latest medical research, analysis and 
treatments are used to inform any changes to qualifying and 
disqualifying conditions. This particular review also coincided 
with the Secretary of Defense's decision that, by July 2017, 
the military services must have policies in place to allow 
transgender individuals to enter the military. The committee 
will oversee any potential changes to the medical and 
behavioral health accession standards to ensure they are rooted 
in sound medical analysis and that the changes do not 
compromise force readiness.

Gender Integration

    The Department of Defense and the military services have 
recently opened all military occupations to women. The 
committee will continue to provide close oversight as the 
military services implement new gender neutral occupational 
standards and begin to populate previously closed military 
occupations with women. The committee will also focus on the 
policies implemented to ensure proper support, training, 
assignment, and career advancement for women entering these 
career fields.

                   MILITARY BENEFITS AND COMPENSATION

    During the 115th Congress, the committee will give close 
scrutiny to any proposals from the Department of Defense or 
other organizations, both governmental and private sector, 
calling for any funding reductions or changes to military 
compensation and other benefit programs in order to ensure any 
proposed changes assess the impact to the All-Volunteer Force. 
To that end, the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92) authorized a major change to a 
service member's retirement compensation. The new Blended 
Retirement System takes effect in January 2018, and the 
committee's oversight in this area will concentrate on the 
proper implementation of the new plan.

                         MILITARY HEALTH SYSTEM

    The committee is committed to maintaining a robust Military 
Health System whose primary responsibility is readiness of the 
force. To that end, the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) included comprehensive 
reform of the Military Health System to ensure the availability 
of trained and ready health care providers to support the 
readiness of the force and provide a sustainable, quality 
health care benefit that is valued by its beneficiaries. The 
reform is focused in three areas: medical readiness, the 
Military Health System structure, and the TRICARE benefit. 
During the 115th Congress, the committee will oversee the 
Department of Defense's progress towards implementing the 
elements of the health care reform beginning January 1, 2018.

Mental Health Services for Members of the Armed Forces

    A continued principal focus of the committee during the 
115th Congress will be to assess the adequacy and effectiveness 
of mental health services provided to members of the Armed 
Forces and their families. These efforts will include a review 
of the research related to mental health conditions undertaken 
or funded by the Department of Defense that have resulted in 
improved clinical interventions and outcomes. Particular 
attention will be given, but not limited to, the suicide 
prevention efforts undertaken by each military service and the 
consistency and comprehensiveness of the Department of Defense 
policy on prevention of suicide among members of the Armed 
Forces and their families, including methods of collecting and 
assessing suicide data. An additional focus will be the 
adequacy of suicide prevention programs for members of the 
special operational forces and their families.

Wounded Warrior Care

    The committee will continue its efforts to assess the 
adequacy of the Department of Defense policies and programs for 
wounded and disabled service members and their families. In 
this regard, the committee will continue to evaluate the 
Department of Defense's ability to integrate and coordinate the 
multitude of services and resources available to assist the 
wounded and disabled, not only from other Federal agencies, but 
also from the private sector. The committee will continue to 
monitor the military services' selection process for 
identifying individuals to work within wounded warrior programs 
and the quality of the services provided by such programs. 
Additionally, the committee will continue to monitor 
translational research and treatment advances in traumatic 
brain injury. Particular attention will be focused on the 
Integrated Disability Evaluation System with a view to ensuring 
the fairness, effectiveness, timeliness, and efficiency of the 
program and to simplify the process for service members.

                       MILITARY PERSONNEL POLICY

    During the 115th Congress, the personnel policies of the 
Department of Defense will remain under considerable scrutiny 
as the Department competes to recruit and retain the best and 
brightest men and women. The committee will give close 
examination to proposals from the Department of Defense and 
other organizations calling for any major changes to personnel 
policies including recruiting, promotions, career paths or 
changes to military retention and other policy programs in 
order to assess the impact of any proposed changes on the 
viability of the All-Volunteer Force.

       UNIFORM CODE OF MILITARY JUSTICE TO INCLUDE SEXUAL ASSAULT

    The committee will continue to provide oversight of 
military justice, with a particular emphasis on sexual assault. 
The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 
(Public Law 114-328) contained the most comprehensive overhaul 
of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) in over 30 
years. The committee will provide substantial oversight as the 
Department of Defense drafts the implementing rules for these 
changes. The committee will also continue its robust oversight 
of the Department of Defense's sexual assault prevention and 
response programs. Specifically, the committee will focus on 
the Department's recent improvements to the policy addressing 
retaliation, and the implementation of the recent National 
Defense Authorization Act provision that establishes 
retaliation as a specific UCMJ violation.

                       MILITARY FAMILY READINESS

    During the 115th Congress, the committee will continue to 
focus on the support provided to families of the members of the 
Armed Forces, particularly during deployments. In this regard, 
the committee will assess the methods utilized by the military 
services to identify the needs of military families and to 
identify the programs and policies that can be implemented or 
modified to improve their lives. As end strengths of the Armed 
Forces once again increase, after years of decline, the 
committee will closely examine the Department of Defense and 
military service family support programs to ensure the programs 
are adequately resourced to support an increase in family 
members. In addition, the committee will continue close 
oversight on the quality and availability of services at 
Department of Defense child development centers.

  MORALE, WELFARE AND RECREATION PROGRAMS AND MILITARY RESALE PROGRAMS

    The committee believes the cost efficient sustainment of 
Morale, Welfare, and Recreation (MWR) and military resale 
programs (commissaries and exchanges) is required to protect 
quality of life in military communities and maintain the combat 
readiness of the force. The committee will provide oversight 
efforts directed toward that end in conjunction with major 
reforms, begun in the 114th Congress, to maintain the viability 
of these programs.
    Additionally, the committee believes that MWR and military 
resale programs must remain competitive with private sector 
entities to ensure that service members and their families 
benefit fully from these programs. The committee must monitor 
current practices and policies to ensure that MWR and military 
resale programs are employing the full range of strategies 
available to private sector competitors to inform authorized 
patrons about the benefits associated with these programs and 
attract them to participate. This is especially true for 
commissaries that are restricted from using pricing, product, 
and advertising strategies that are common in the private 
sector because of legislative and policy barriers. These 
barriers will be addressed during the 115th Congress. The 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public 
Law 114-328) requires the Department of Defense to reform 
management, food and pricing options for the Defense Commissary 
System to assist in maintaining a competitive and effective 
commissary system in the future that requires less appropriated 
funding. During the 115th Congress, the committee will monitor 
and oversee the changes required by the commissary reform plan 
with a focus on the beneficiaries of the system maintaining 
their benefit uninterrupted.

                 PRISONER OF WAR AND MISSING IN ACTION

    During the 115th Congress, the committee will continue 
oversight of the Department of Defense's Prisoner of War/
Missing in Action activities, as the committee of jurisdiction. 
Specifically, the committee will focus on the operations of the 
Defense Personnel Accounting Agency, established by the Carl 
Levin and Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-291). In 
addition, the committee will continue to assess the progress 
towards meeting the requirement that the accounting effort 
achieve at least 200 identifications annually.

                  Modernization and Investment Issues


                                OVERVIEW

    During the 115th Congress, the committee will devote 
particular attention to the examination of military equipment 
modernization strategies and their ability to mitigate threats 
from near-peer and peer competitors, and retain technology 
superiority and overmatch, both in the near-term and long-term. 
The committee's efforts will continue to focus on ``restoring 
readiness''' through near-term incremental modernization 
efforts that utilize acquisition reform initiatives to better 
streamline the development and fielding of solutions to the 
warfighter in a timely manner. The committee will continue to 
consider ways to accelerate modernization efforts for the 
military services and encourage increased investment for 
modernization programs. The committee, through rigorous 
oversight and legislative action, will develop strategies to 
help mitigate cost growth and schedule delays among all 
categories of modernization programs. The committee will also 
assess the need for legislative action by examining causes of 
these problems, including: late determination of requirements, 
requirements growth, and failure to properly control 
requirements changes; inadequate analyses of alternatives; 
concurrency in test and evaluation; military services 
proceeding prematurely with development of immature technology; 
poor cost estimating; inadequate funding profiles; over-
estimation of potential production rates; and program 
instability. In particular, the committee will also seek to 
ensure the military services have the appropriate authorities, 
capabilities, force structure, and modernization strategies in 
place to defeat any potential challenges posed by advanced 
anti-access capabilities from near-peer or peer adversaries.

          ARMY AND MARINE CORPS ARMORED VEHICLE MODERNIZATION

    The committee will focus on oversight of the Army and 
Marine Corps' evolving plans to recapitalize, improve, and 
modernize their existing fleets of heavy and medium-weight 
armored combat vehicles over the next two decades, as well as 
focus on force structure requirements for Armor Brigade Combat 
Teams and Marine Infantry Battalions. As part of this oversight 
effort, the committee will focus particular attention on Army 
and Marine Corps efforts to continue to field combat vehicles 
that stay ahead of the evolving anti-vehicle threat posed by 
improvised explosive devices, advances in anti-tank guided 
missiles, and rocket propelled grenades. With respect to combat 
vehicle modernization programs, the committee will continue to 
focus efforts on, but not be limited to, the acceleration of 
engineering change proposals for the M1 Abrams tank and M2 
Bradley Fighting Vehicles, improving the survivability and 
lethality of the family of Stryker Combat Vehicles, the 
development and procurement of the family of Amphibious Combat 
Vehicles, specifically the Amphibious Combat Vehicle Increment 
1.1 and Increment 1.2 programs, continued survivability and 
performance upgrades for Light Armored Vehicles, the Paladin 
Integrated Management program's transition to full rate 
production, the Armored Multipurpose Vehicle (AMPV) program's 
transition from research and development to procurement, and 
the Army's mobile protected firepower program. During the 115th 
Congress, the committee will also continue to assess the 
viability and fragility of the armored combat vehicle 
industrial base, to include assessing critical sub-tier 
supplier base for items such as transmissions and forward 
looking infrared radars.

            ARMY AND MARINE CORPS TACTICAL WHEELED VEHICLES

    The committee will focus oversight efforts on the Army and 
Marine Corps' tactical wheeled vehicle (TWV) modernization 
strategies for their families of light, medium, and heavy TWVs, 
the family of mine resistant ambush protected vehicles, line 
haul tractor trailers, and construction equipment. The 
committee will monitor TWV fleet size and composition, and 
focus on developing acquisition strategies to help maintain 
competition, capacity, and capability in the TWV industrial 
base given significant decreases in overall requirements, as 
well as focus on the importance of continuing to modernize the 
current TWV fleet given the growing complex security 
environment.
    Of particular interest to the committee will be the Joint 
Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) program. The committee will 
monitor the JLTV budget, cost, schedule, and performance as the 
program transitions from development into production. 
Additionally, the committee will conduct oversight on the 
Army's efforts to improve the lethality of the JLTV. The 
committee will also monitor the Army's acquisition strategies 
in the development and procurement of the Ground Mobility 
Vehicle and Light Reconnaissance Vehicle programs that would 
``enhance the tactical mobility and lethality of Infantry 
Brigade Combat Teams.'' Finally, the committee will continue to 
coordinate with the Government Accountability Office regarding 
the Department of Defense's efforts in the long-term management 
and sustainment of the TWV fleet and its associated industrial 
base.

               ARMY AND MARINE CORPS ROTORCRAFT PROGRAMS

    During the 115th Congress, the committee will continue to 
focus oversight efforts on Army and Marine Corps rotorcraft 
modernization programs, force structure, and rotorcraft 
readiness challenges. Program areas of interest for the 
committee will focus on, but not be limited to, the following 
rotorcraft acquisition programs: UH-60 Black Hawk utility 
rotorcraft, AH-64 Apache Attack rotorcraft, CH-47 Chinook heavy 
lift rotorcraft, V-22 tiltrotor platforms, UH-1 Huey utility 
helicopters, AH-1 attack rotorcraft, the CH-53K heavy lift 
rotorcraft program, and the future vertical lift development 
program. Legacy rotorcraft platforms will likely continue to be 
operated at high operational tempos in very challenging 
environments. These high operational tempos will require 
continued upgrade and reset efforts to ensure these platforms 
have the necessary performance capability required to perform 
their missions. The committee will provide oversight on the 
requirements to upgrade and reset these critical equipment 
platforms for both the Active and Reserve Components through 
formal activities and legislative action, and continue 
oversight on the need to grow additional combat aviation 
brigades in the Army. In addition to its oversight of 
rotorcraft requirements for, and performance in, combat 
operations, the committee will conduct oversight of the 
critical need for advanced aircraft survivability equipment 
upgrades to provide warning and protection against evolving 
surface-to-air missile threats, as well as look for ways to 
accelerate the fielding of degraded visual environment 
technology on legacy platforms.

                ARMY COMMUNICATIONS AND NETWORK PROGRAMS

    Given the growing importance of tactical battlefield 
communications networks in global combat operations, the 
committee will continue to conduct oversight of the Army's 
plans for its future battlefield network and the supporting 
research and development programs now in place, to include 
oversight of the Army's Tactical Network Modernization roadmap. 
In particular, the committee will focus oversight efforts on 
the incremental development and fielding of the Warfighter 
Information Network-Tactical and other tactical radio programs. 
The committee will continue to engage with the Army to ensure 
that future tactical battlefield network capabilities result in 
a network-enabled, rather than a network-dependent Army. The 
committee, in coordination with the Department of Defense, aims 
to empower soldiers to accomplish their missions, rather than 
create an Army that is dependent on its communications network, 
so much so that it is not able to function without it. As such, 
the committee will also help direct the Army's limited 
modernization resources to investments that will have the 
greatest short-, mid-, and long-term impact for the end user.

            ORGANIZATIONAL CLOTHING AND INDIVIDUAL EQUIPMENT

    The committee will continue to devote substantial attention 
to the oversight of the research, development, and procurement 
of organizational clothing and individual equipment, as well as 
other complementary personal protective equipment (PPE) 
programs. Consistent with previous committee oversight 
activity, the committee will continue to focus on the 
importance of modernizing PPE, and encourage the military 
services to manage PPE acquisition as a weapon system, rather 
than a commodity. Focus areas will continue to include, but are 
not limited to: advances in weight reduction (``lightening the 
load'') in clothing and individual equipment; continued 
investment in advances of next generation material development, 
and development and procurement of specific PPE systems 
designed for military servicewomen; small arms and small 
caliber ammunition modernization with particular emphasis on 
the Army's modular handgun program, and procurement and 
fielding of enhanced performance small caliber rounds; improved 
combat helmets to help mitigate traumatic brain injury; 
improved combat uniforms; and the overall management of these 
associated niche, but highly critical industrial bases.

                   TACTICAL AIRCRAFT FORCE STRUCTURE

    The committee will continue to focus its oversight efforts 
on the size, composition, and capability of the Department of 
Defense's tactical aircraft force structure. The committee will 
continue efforts from the 114th Congress regarding aviation 
readiness challenges, and work with the Department to develop 
ways to accelerate procurement of 5th generation tactical 
aircraft to improve overall capability and capacity of Air 
Force and Navy tactical aircraft. The committee will continue 
to explore ways to improve capabilities of the legacy fleet, 
and continue to monitor the Navy's plans for mitigating certain 
physiological episodes being experienced by pilots operating 
certain tactical aircraft.
    With an operational requirement of 1,056 strike fighters, 
the Department of the Navy projects it can manage a strike 
fighter shortfall of 35 aircraft in 2023. The committee will 
focus on inventory objectives of F/A-18E/F and EA-18G 
procurement, and if necessary work to support additional 
funding for the procurement of F/A-18E/F aircraft across the 
Future Years Defense Program to help mitigate potential 
inventory shortfalls, the effect of delays in the procurement 
of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, F/A-18 A through D service 
life limits, and mission capability rates of the AV-8B 
aircraft.
    The Air Force has stated a strike fighter operational 
requirement of 1,900 aircraft, and, under current procurement 
and retirement plans, the Air Force projects its inventory to 
fall below that requirement as older aircraft are retired. In 
the 115th Congress, the committee will continue its oversight 
of: aircraft retirement plans; the F-22 and F-35 aircraft 
programs; and life extension and modernization programs for the 
F-15, F-16, and A-10 aircraft. The committee will engage with 
the Air Force and develop strategies to mitigate any potential 
tactical aircraft inventory shortfall that would impact the 
Department's ability to meet the objectives of the National 
Military Strategy. In addition to the above, the committee will 
have a particular interest in acquisition strategies for 
future, next generation strike fighter development.

                       F-35 JOINT STRIKE FIGHTER

    During the 115th Congress, the committee will continue 
oversight of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) Program, 
particularly with regard to issues related to program cost, 
schedule, and performance. The committee will also focus 
efforts on the F-35 follow-on modernization program. With the 
JSF approximately 90 percent through a 16-year development 
process, the committee's primary focus areas will include but 
not be limited to software development and testing, addressing 
F135 engine problems, the autonomic logistics information 
system development and integration, and accelerating the ramp-
up in production planned for 2018 and beyond. In the 115th 
Congress, the committee will continue to receive JSF annual 
reports and receive testimony and briefings from both the 
Department of Defense and an independent review from the 
Government Accountability Office.

                         BOMBER FORCE STRUCTURE

    During the 115th Congress, the committee anticipates that 
the Air Force will continue investments of significant fiscal 
resources for engineering, manufacturing, and development of 
the B-21A Raider long-range strike bomber aircraft. While many 
details regarding the specific requirements and capabilities of 
the new bomber remain classified, the committee will maintain 
oversight of the new bomber acquisition program to ensure that 
the Air Force develops an affordable aircraft to timely meet 
future requirements and recapitalize the long-range strike 
bomber fleet.
    During the engineering, manufacturing, and development 
phase of the new bomber aircraft, it will be imperative that 
the Air Force continues to maintain, modernize, and upgrade the 
existing fleet of bomber aircraft in order to preserve 
effective capabilities needed to meet current and future threat 
target sets. Furthermore, the committee will assess impacts 
associated with the bomber fleet's inability to comply with the 
Federal Aviation Administration's January 1, 2020, Next 
Generation Air Space Control mandate.
    The committee will continue to maintain oversight of 
current bomber aircraft inventory requirements and 
modernization efforts to ensure that the Air Force maintains a 
sufficient, credible, and lethal fixed-wing aircraft with 
conventional and strategic weapons delivery capability to 
support all aspects of the National Military Strategy.

                       AERIAL REFUELING AIRCRAFT

    During the 115th Congress, the committee will review the 
Air Force aerial refueling aircraft modernization and 
recapitalization programs, and the Navy's nascent refueling 
capability associated with the MQ-25 program. The committee 
notes that the Nation's ability to meet its air-refueling 
requirements must not be placed at increased risk while the 
Department of Defense executes its strategic aerial refueling 
recapitalization strategy.
    Currently, the Air Force requires 479 air refueling tankers 
to meet the National Military Strategy but only possesses 395 
KC-135 and 59 KC-10 tankers for a total of 454 tankers. KC-46A 
deliveries will grow the tanker force to 479 aircraft in fiscal 
year 2018. Subsequently, the Air Force plans to replace its 
older tankers one-for-one with 179 KC-46A aircraft. The 
remaining 300 KC-135 aircraft from the Eisenhower era will need 
to be modernized until such time they can be replaced. 
Therefore, timely and efficient recapitalization of the Air 
Force's KC-135 tanker fleet with new KC-46A aerial refueling 
aircraft is critical.
    The committee will also review the MQ-25 program as the 
Navy seeks to develop an unmanned aerial vehicle that provides 
air-refueling and intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance (ISR) capabilities. The committee is concerned 
about limiting the scope of the MQ-25 to relieve the tanking 
burden borne by the F-18 fleet and to provide a modest level of 
additional ISR capability. The committee will assess options 
for the Department of the Navy's ability to ensure that 
precision strike is also a requirement of any follow-on 
platform to increase the Navy's strike capability. The 
committee will ensure that the Navy has completed a robust 
requirement process that ensures the fleet receives the 
necessary capabilities from this new platform.

                 INTERTHEATER AND INTRATHEATER AIRLIFT

    The committee will continue to assess the risk in the Air 
Force's current plan to reduce the intertheater airlift 
aircraft inventory to 300 total aircraft. As such, the 
committee will assess the force structure results of the 
Mobility Capability Requirements Study--Next by the end of 
2017. While pleased with Air Force efforts to modernize Air 
National Guard and Reserve C-130H aircraft with Avionics 
Modernization Program increment 1 and increment 2 and engine 
upgrades, the committee will continue to review the C-130H 
modernization program to ensure it is capable of meeting inter-
theater airlift requirements.
    Regarding intratheater airlift aircraft capabilities, the 
committee will continue to provide oversight of the C-5 and C-
17 modernization programs. With regard to the C-5, the 
committee is pleased with the progress of the Reliability 
Enhancement and Re-engine Program, but remains concerned that 
the Air Force may not meet the Federal Aviation 
Administration's January 1, 2020, Next Generation Air Space 
Control mandate.
    The committee will continue oversight of Air Force 
intertheater and intratheater airlift aircraft inventories and 
capabilities during the 115th Congress to ensure that a robust 
and effective fleet of airlift aircraft is maintained to meet 
mobility airlift requirements of the Department of Defense. 
Finally, the committee will maintain vigilant oversight 
associated with all intertheater- and intratheater-airlift-
assets, to meet the Federal Aviation Administration's mandate.

                        SURFACE WARFARE PROGRAMS

    The Department of the Navy must rapidly expand the core 
capabilities of U.S. seapower to achieve a blend of peacetime 
engagement and major combat operations capabilities as part of 
the Navy's 355-ship requirement. In pursuing this goal, the 
committee will provide oversight of the composition, capacity, 
and capabilities of the surface fleet. Specifically, the 
committee will assess the President's budget request to ensure 
compliance with the aircraft carrier force structure 
requirements associated with section 5062 of title 10, United 
States Code. The committee will also assess the large and small 
surface combatant requirements to ensure oversight of the force 
structure and the associated weapons and sensors employed on 
the surface force with a specific emphasis on Frigate 
capabilities. As part of the weapons and sensors oversight, the 
committee will review the requirements associated with the 
Littoral Combat Ship mission modules and the anti-ship missile 
capabilities. Further oversight of the amphibious forces will 
also be pursued to include amphibious assault in a contested 
environment, integration of advanced data capabilities and the 
amphibious assault connectors. The committee will continue its 
oversight of the DDG-51 Arleigh Burke class Destroyer program 
and will closely follow the transition to the Flight III 
variant that will incorporate the new Air and Missile Defense 
Radar. Finally, the committee will review the combat logistics 
forces and the Maritime Security Program to ensure sufficient 
capacity is available to support national security objectives.
    As part of this oversight, the committee will continue to 
place a significant emphasis on improving affordability in 
shipbuilding programs through: ensuring stable requirements; 
the use of acquisition best practices; stability within the 
overall program; increased reliance on common systems and open 
architecture; and industrial base capacity, process, and 
facility improvements at the shipyards.

                       UNDERSEA WARFARE PROGRAMS

    The ability to operate freely at sea is one of the most 
important enablers of joint and interagency operations, and sea 
control requires capabilities in all aspects of the maritime 
domain. There are many challenges to our ability to exercise 
sea control, perhaps none as significant as the growing number 
of nations operating submarines, both advanced diesel-electric 
and nuclear propelled. Exercising sea control in the undersea 
domain is essential to maintaining the freedom of navigation in 
support of U.S. maritime interests. The committee will continue 
to review the undersea domain to ensure warfare dominance. 
Specifically, the committee will review short- and long-term 
options to reverse the decline in the attack submarine force 
structure. The committee will also assess whether sufficient 
resources and technological maturity are available for the 
recapitalization of the ballistic missile submarine forces. 
Finally, the committee will assess the weapons and sensors 
employed in the undersea domain to retain maritime dominance, 
to include the capacity and capabilities of unmanned undersea 
vehicles.
    As part of this oversight, the committee will place 
specific emphasis on the efficacy of multi-year procurements, 
rigorous assessment of requirements, and management of an 
expanding undersea industrial base capacity.

    MILITARY INTELLIGENCE, SURVEILLANCE, AND RECONNAISSANCE PROGRAMS

    Manned and unmanned intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance (ISR) system programs have come to constitute a 
significant component of the overall Department of Defense 
force structure. The capability provided by these assets is 
critical to sustaining deterrence and warfighting capability of 
U.S. forces.
    The committee will focus on the budget, cost, schedule, and 
performance outcomes of major ISR manned and unmanned aerial 
systems (UAS) programs, and examine the entire ISR enterprise 
for balance in inventory, collection, and analysis 
capabilities. Also, close examination of the Office of the 
Secretary of Defense ISR policy formulation and oversight has 
been, and will continue to be, of interest to the committee. 
Long-standing concerns of the committee remain: lack of an 
adequate long-term ISR architecture and acquisition strategy; 
lack of supporting analysis for programmatic decisions; and the 
failure to balance collection programs data output with 
adequate resources to process, exploit, and disseminate data 
and analysis. The committee expects the Joint Staff and Joint 
Requirements Oversight Council to take a more active role in 
coordinating ISR system acquisition and coordinating employment 
with the combatant commanders.
    In particular, the committee will place emphasis on, but 
not be limited to, the cost, schedule, performance, and 
procurement objectives of the following ISR programs: RQ-4 
Global Hawk UAS Block 30 and Block 40, MQ-9 Reaper UAS, MQ-1C 
Gray Eagle UAS, MQ-4C Triton UAS, MQ-8 Fire Scout, MQ-25 
Stingray, Marine Air Ground Task Force UAS Expeditionary, and 
sustainment of U-2 aircraft.

                 EMERGING ADVANCED WEAPONS CAPABILITIES

    Department of Defense investment in science and technology 
often leads to the development of new advanced weapons 
capabilities or weapons concepts that contribute to the 
technological superiority of U.S. military forces. Maintaining 
technological overmatch of current and potential adversaries is 
a significant part of the qualitative advantage of U.S. forces, 
but is increasingly difficult in an environment of globalized 
technologies and asymmetric combinations of high-tech and low-
tech capabilities. The committee will continue to monitor 
technological developments, from both Government funded labs, 
as well as commercially developed sources, and support 
transition of the most promising technological systems or 
concepts.
    In the 115th Congress, the committee will continue to 
examine doctrine, concepts of employment, and other organizing 
concepts being pursued by the military services and the Office 
of Secretary of Defense, and when matured, develop acquisition 
plans in support of fielding new advanced capabilities, such as 
directed energy capabilities, hypersonics, and autonomous 
systems. Not only will the committee oversee the development, 
but it will be equally important to monitor policies or trends 
impeding or supporting the development of new, innovative 
capabilities, as well as monitoring scientific developments 
internationally to better understand how state-of-the-art 
advancements can contribute to foreign military developments.
    Advancements in areas like directed energy, hypersonics, 
autonomy, and synthetic biology may prove to be double-edged 
swords, benefiting U.S. national security, but also exploiting 
U.S. security weaknesses when adopted by potential future 
adversaries. Additionally, the committee has expanded its focus 
to take a similar look at other emerging advanced weapons 
capabilities, such as hypersonics and autonomy, to see how they 
can contribute to new security strategies, and to ensure that 
they are supported by rigorous technical analysis and relevant 
concepts of employment.

                           NUCLEAR DETERRENCE

    The committee oversees the atomic energy defense activities 
of the Department of Energy and nuclear policies and programs 
of the Department of Defense to ensure the safety, security, 
reliability, and credibility of the U.S. nuclear deterrent. The 
committee will place particular emphasis on oversight of the 
Department of Energy and the Department of Defense's nuclear 
modernization plans, including but not limited to 
infrastructure investments, warhead life extension programs, 
stockpile stewardship programs, stockpile management programs, 
stockpile responsiveness programs, delivery system 
modernization, nuclear command and control, cost savings and 
efficiency initiatives, and security.
    The committee will oversee funding levels for the nuclear 
deterrence mission and nuclear enterprise to ensure sufficient 
resources are provided and allocated effectively and 
efficiently across Department of Energy and Department of 
Defense requirements. The committee will emphasize oversight of 
major acquisition programs that will recapitalize the U.S. 
nuclear deterrent for decades into the future, including the 
Ohio-class replacement submarine, the Ground-based Strategic 
Deterrent system, the B-21 Raider bomber, the Long-range 
Standoff cruise missile, and their associated nuclear warheads. 
Alongside overseeing and authorizing U.S. nuclear deterrence 
programs, the committee will also monitor foreign nuclear 
weapon development and modernization programs as well as arms 
control commitments around the world. The committee will ensure 
U.S. nuclear deterrence programs are postured, planned, and 
funded to address pertinent current and future threats. The 
committee will also continue oversight of implementation of 
corrective actions resulting from the Department of Defense's 
Nuclear Enterprise Review to ensure such actions result in 
meaningful and long-lasting change.
    In addition to programs, the committee will also provide 
oversight of the United States' nuclear policy and posture, 
extended deterrence policy, arms control activities, nuclear 
nonproliferation activities, and nuclear force structure 
requirements. Particular emphasis will be placed on oversight 
of nuclear weapon employment and declaratory policies, force 
structure, arms control agreements, and modernization plans. 
The committee will also review the effectiveness of the 
Department of Energy and the Department of Defense's 
organization and management of the nuclear enterprise, 
including coordination of plans and policies through the joint 
Nuclear Weapons Council and alignment of the Naval Reactors 
program with Department of Defense requirements. Finally, the 
committee will conduct oversight of, and seek continuous 
improvement in, performance, efficiency, governance, and 
management of the Department of Energy's National Nuclear 
Security Administration, laboratory and production site 
management and operations, workforce sustainment efforts, and 
defense nuclear cleanup activities.

                            MISSILE DEFENSE

    The committee oversees the Department of Defense's efforts 
to develop, test, and field layered missile defense 
capabilities to protect the United States, its deployed forces, 
and its friends and allies against ballistic and cruise missile 
threats.
    The committee will continue to place a particular emphasis 
on U.S. homeland missile defense capabilities (including the 
Missile Defense Agency's proposal and strategy for acquiring a 
Redesigned Kill Vehicle and the statutory deadline to develop 
and flight test the Multi-Object Kill Vehicle). The committee 
will also continue to oversee the European Phased Adaptive 
Approach implementation, developmental and operational testing, 
force structure and inventory requirements, continued 
development of so-called ``left-of-launch'' capabilities and 
exercises, and science and technology investments in areas such 
as directed energy.
    The committee will also monitor the development and 
subsequent execution and implementation by the Department of 
Defense of a missile defeat posture review as directed in the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public 
Law 114-328).
    The committee will continue to monitor foreign ballistic 
missile threats and identify opportunities to strengthen 
international missile defense cooperation with allies and 
partners such as the State of Israel, Japan, the Commonwealth 
of Australia, the Republic of Korea, and the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization and its member states.
    Department of Defense oversight and management of missile 
defense activities, including the roles, responsibilities, and 
acquisition policies and procedures of the Missile Defense 
Agency and military services will also be reviewed.
    The committee also intends to continue to oversee the 
Army's Lower Tier Air and Missile Defense System modernization 
efforts. The Army's plans call for significant investment over 
a long-term and the committee will ensure these plans are cost-
effective, based on proven technology, support continued 
Foreign Military Sales, and provide maximum deployable 
capability to combatant commanders and the warfighter. 
Additionally, the committee will ensure interoperability of 
Army and Ballistic Missile Defense System capabilities.
    Additionally, the committee will oversee the effort to 
develop and deploy a cruise missile defense capability to 
protect the National Capital Region and other high-value 
potential targets.

                        NATIONAL SECURITY SPACE

    The committee oversees the national security space programs 
of the Department of Defense, including combat support agencies 
and elements of the Department of Defense that are also part of 
the intelligence community. The committee will place particular 
attention on current and projected foreign space threats and 
will carefully assess the Department's space security and 
defense program to include space situational awareness, space 
protection, space control, and operationally responsive space 
activities. The committee will also focus on improving the 
organization and management of the Department's space program 
to posture the military to maintain our space advantage.
    The committee will continue oversight of national security 
space activities in support of warfighter operations and plans; 
space acquisition strategies that provide necessary warfighter 
capability, while reducing cost and technical risk and 
supporting the industrial base; maintaining assured access to 
space; efforts to address gaps in space capabilities for key 
warfighter needs; investments in science and technology to 
improve the capabilities of space systems; efforts to 
appropriately leverage commercial satellite services; 
exploitation of space sensor data to maximize effectiveness and 
efficiency; improvements of the synchronization between 
satellite, ground, and terminal acquisition programs; and 
efforts that develop and sustain an expert space workforce.

                   Emerging Threats and Capabilities


        INVESTMENT IN FUTURE CAPABILITIES SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

    The Department of Defense continues to face difficult 
choices as it balances the competing needs of capabilities for 
current operations and those projected for future conflicts. In 
order to address the latter, investments need to be made in the 
Department's Science and Technology (S&T;) programs, and aligned 
appropriately with continued development and procurement 
programs to position the Department to meet future challenges. 
S&T; investments should also be leveraged to support broader 
acquisition improvements or defense industrial base sustainment 
activities by creatively utilizing competitive or operational 
prototyping, technical transition or integration, or 
requirements maturation.
    The committee will continue to oversee the Department's S&T; 
activities to ensure the planning and execution of a balanced 
S&T; program that reflects the national security priorities of 
the military, as expressed in strategy documents and 
congressional guidance. The committee will also continue to 
examine how S&T; investments are integrated into strategic and 
operational plans to ensure that the investments being made, 
including in people and infrastructure, are properly aligned. 
The committee will focus on better understanding how S&T; 
programs integrate intelligence analyses into the S&T; planning 
cycle, as well as better cognizance of global developments and 
industry-based independent research and development.

                     CYBER OPERATIONS CAPABILITIES

    Cyber operations have taken on an increasingly important 
role in military operations, as well as overall in national 
security. Including both offensive and defensive operations, 
they offer new means for exercising military power, as well as 
new vulnerabilities to critical information systems and data. 
Recent reporting on Russian cyber intrusions to influence U.S. 
domestic politics illustrate the former, while the breach of 
data within the Office of Personnel Management that resulted in 
the loss of millions of records from military and civilian 
personnel and their families is an example of the latter.
    The committee will continue to closely scrutinize the 
Department of Defense's cyber operations, organization, 
manning, and funding to ensure that the military has the 
freedom of maneuver to conduct the range of missions in the 
Nation's defense, and when called upon, to support other 
interagency and international partners. The maturation of the 
U.S. Cyber Command as a full unified command, as well as the 
achievement of full operational capability for the cyber 
mission teams, including their readiness and participation in 
ongoing operations, will be a primary point of focus for the 
committee's oversight.
    An important oversight role for Congress regarding the 
conduct of cyber operations has been to ensure that the proper 
legal and policy frameworks are in place and followed. The 
committee has also continued to scrutinize military cyber 
operations to ensure that they are properly integrated into the 
combatant commander's operational plans, include appropriate 
rules of engagement, and ensure that adequate capabilities 
exist or are in development to employ these cyberspace 
operational tools with rigor and discretion to support a full 
range of options for the Nation's decision makers. As the 
policy framework and mission forces mature, the committee will 
also need to focus oversight on the development of training, 
exercises, doctrine, tactics, and procedures for operating in 
the cyber domain, as well as workforce development and 
retention for civilian and military personnel. Additionally, 
the committee will continue to oversee the implementation and 
utilization of the limited acquisition authority granted in the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public 
Law 114-92).
    In the course of monitoring the cybersecurity posture of 
the military, the committee will need to continue its oversight 
of the security of the global supply chain system, including 
its ability to monitor, regulate, and manage risk as a result 
of the effects of globalization on the assured integrity of 
microelectronics and software.

                         INFORMATION OPERATIONS

    Being able to operate effectively in the information 
environment, especially one saturated by official news 
channels, informal social media feeds, and other internet-
fueled sources, has demonstrated to be a challenge for the U.S. 
Government. Recent examples have been especially poignant in 
illustrating that engagement with foreign audiences, and 
nuanced understanding of the information environment, will 
increasingly be pivotal in navigating the 21st century security 
environment. Whether one is trying to influence nation-state 
actors or potential allies, counter violent extremist groups, 
or identify and counter efforts at deception or misinformation, 
strategic communication and information operations are key 
elements to success on the battlefield of the future.
    From an oversight perspective, this will require the 
committee to continue to scrutinize the programs, authorities, 
funding, and training for traditional military information 
support operations, as well as ensuring such capabilities are 
integrated into contingency planning and theater security 
cooperation plans. Additionally, emerging technologies like 
social media and big data analytics are forcing the Department 
of Defense to be more agile and adaptable in how it uses 
emerging technology, including flexible and agile policies for 
their employment, and concept exploration and development to 
determine new ways of operationalizing information influence. 
The committee will also monitor how developments in the defense 
space can be adapted and synchronized with broader interagency 
and international activities in order to exert influence from 
tactical effect to strategic effect.

    COMPROMISES OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND INSIDER THREATS

    In the 115th Congress, the committee will continue to 
monitor the Department's efforts to identify and mitigate the 
threats to military programs, plans, operations, and personnel 
stemming from the compromise of a large amount of classified 
information through unauthorized disclosures. The committee 
will monitor efforts to mitigate future compromises by 
overseeing the implementation of insider threat programs and 
other security clearance reform efforts within the executive 
branch, and the Department of Defense's compliance with the 
requirements of the Carl Levin and Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public 
Law 113-291) regarding the Department's security practices, 
audit capabilities, and information-sharing policies.

 USE OF FORCE IN COUNTERTERRORISM OPERATIONS OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES 
                    AND AREAS OF ACTIVE HOSTILITIES

    The committee will continue to conduct extensive oversight, 
often in classified form, over the use of force in 
counterterrorism operations outside of the United States and 
areas of active hostilities. While the use of force in this 
area will be overseen in all aspects, the committee will pay 
particular attention to special operations and activities and 
the interagency coordination that occurs with the U.S. 
intelligence community. In conducting this oversight, the 
committee will also review and consider presidential policy 
guidance documents and similar executive branch directives, and 
ensure that counterterrorism operations conducted outside of 
the United States and areas of active hostilities are in line 
with broader national security objectives, strategies, and 
resources. Finally, the committee will continue to coordinate 
with the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence on 
intelligence matters of the Department of Defense in the course 
of its annual oversight of the intelligence community and the 
authorization of appropriations for intelligence activities 
shared by the two committees.

                        COMMITTEE ON THE BUDGET

                             OVERSIGHT PLAN

    Resolved: That the Committee on the Budget, pursuant to 
clause 2(d) of House Rule X, adopts as the Oversight Plan of 
the Committee on the Budget for the 115th Congress the 
following:

                  COMMITTEE JURISDICTION AND OVERSIGHT

    Clause 2(d) of Rule X of the Rules of the House requires 
each Committee to adopt and submit to the Committees on 
Oversight and Government Reform, House Administration, and 
Appropriations an oversight plan by February 15 of the first 
session of each Congress. The Budget Committee's oversight 
responsibilities include both the breadth of the Federal budget 
and its legislative jurisdiction.
    Under clause 1(d)(1) of House Rule X, the primary 
responsibility of the Budget Committee is to develop a 
concurrent resolution on the budget for a fiscal year. This 
concurrent resolution sets spending and revenue levels in 
aggregate, across 21 budget functions, and provides allocations 
of spending levels for each Committee of Congress.
    Although the subject matter of the budget is inherently 
broad, in addition to oversight of the budget and the economy, 
the Committee's formal oversight responsibility includes laws 
governing the budget process and the agencies responsible for 
administering elements of those laws. Under clauses 1(d)(1)-(3) 
of House Rule X, the major laws falling within its oversight 
include the Budget and Accounting Act of 1921, the 
Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974, the 
Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, the 
Budget Enforcement Act of 1990, the Unfunded Mandates Reform 
Act of 1995, the Statutory Pay-As-You-Go Act of 2010, the 
Budget Control Act of 2011, and the Bipartisan Budget Act of 
2013. The two agencies with primary responsibility for 
administering elements of these laws, and hence which fall 
under the Committee's jurisdiction, are the Office of 
Management and Budget (OMB) and the Congressional Budget Office 
(CBO).
    In addition to these general oversight responsibilities, 
the Budget Committee has the special oversight responsibility 
under clause 3(c) of House Rule X to study the effect of budget 
outlays of existing and proposed legislation and to regularly 
report the results of such studies to the House.

                 OVERSIGHT PLAN FOR THE 115TH CONGRESS


                           Budget Priorities

    In the process of developing the annual concurrent budget 
resolution, the Committee will hold hearings and receive 
testimony from Members of Congress, Cabinet-level and other 
Federal officials, State and local officials, and expert 
witnesses to review the budget and economic outlook, the 
President's budget submissions and other budget proposals.
    The Committee will review and pursue budget process reform 
legislation and will continue its budget process reform 
initiative from the 114th Congress, which culminated in the 
release of the Committee's Discussion Draft on the ``Proposed 
Rewrite of the Congressional Budget Process.'' In continuing 
its efforts to restructure the congressional budget process, 
the Committee will focus on six main areas through hearings and 
legislation: enhancing constitutional authority, strengthening 
budget enforcement, reversing the bias toward higher spending, 
controlling automatic spending, increasing transparency, and 
ensuring fiscal sustainability.
    The Committee will assess the performance of Federal 
agencies in both administration and service delivery by 
reviewing performance data in the President's budget 
submissions and the relevant reports and audits of the 
Government Accountability Office and the Offices of the 
Inspectors General.
    The Committee will study the budgetary effects of existing 
law and proposed legislation, as well as government regulation 
on government spending, and explore ways of reducing waste, 
fraud, and abuse in government agencies.
    The Committee will draw on the authorizing Committees' 
Views and Estimates on the President's Budget, which are 
submitted to it pursuant to section 301(d) of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974, to coordinate its oversight activities with 
other Committees.
    The Committee will continue to review the budgetary 
treatment of assistance to, and ongoing operations of, the 
Federal National Mortgage Association (Fannie Mae) and the 
Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (Freddie Mac).

                           Budget Enforcement

    The Committee will provide ongoing oversight of OMB's 
implementation of budget submission, control, execution, and 
enforcement procedures under the Budget and Accounting Act of 
1921, the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the Budget 
Enforcement Act of 1990, the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
Deficit Control Act of 1985, the Statutory Pay-As-You-Go Act of 
2010, the Budget Control Act of 2011, the Bipartisan Budget Act 
of 2013, the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 and other applicable 
laws.
    The Committee will assess the extent to which both the 
President's budget submissions and the budget resolutions for 
fiscal years 2017, 2018, and 2019 comply with applicable budget 
laws. The Committee will also work to ensure compliance of the 
budget-related provisions of H. Res. 5.\1\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\H. Res. 5 (115th Congress) extended and revised the Rules of the 
House for the One Hundred Fifteenth Congress. Section 3 (Separate 
Orders) of H. Res. 5 also set forth additional budgetary controls.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    As part of these responsibilities, the Chair may provide 
authoritative guidance concerning the impact of a legislative 
proposition on the levels of new budget authority, outlays, 
direct spending, new entitlement authority and revenues.\2\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \2\This authority may be found in clause 4 of rule XXIX of the 
Rules of the House.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Committee will enforce spending limitations and improve 
accountability under the Cut-Go Rule, prohibiting consideration 
of a bill, joint resolution, amendment or conference report if 
the provisions of such measure have the net effect of 
increasing direct spending outlays.\3\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \3\Cutgo may be found in clause 10 of rule XXI of the Rules of the 
House.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    In addition, the Committee will monitor reclassifications 
of budget accounts, reestimates of the subsidies of credit 
programs, consistency in cost estimates for direct spending and 
tax bills, compliance with the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
Deficit Control Act of 1985 and other relevant laws, in the 
development of budget projections, and changes in spend-out 
rates for discretionary programs, and implementation of 
performance plans.
    The Committee will work with the Appropriations Committee 
and the authorizing Committees to ensure that spending and tax 
legislation do not breach the levels provided for in the budget 
resolution, as required under sections 302(f) and 311(a) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 or violate the budget 
provisions of the Rules of the House.

                  Direct Spending and Tax Expenditures

    The Committee will request and evaluate continuing studies 
of tax expenditures and direct spending by the Federal 
Government, and whether they are the most appropriate and 
efficient means to achieve specified public policy goals.

                            Economic Policy 

    The Committee will study how economic policies affect the 
Federal budget. The Committee will also study monetary policy 
and its effects on the Federal budget. The Committee plans to 
take testimony from the Chairman of the Federal Reserve, Janet 
L. Yellen, to review economic conditions, fiscal conditions, 
and monetary policy.

                    Exercise of Article I Authority

    The Committee, in keeping with its duties and powers under 
Article I of the Constitution of the United States, will also 
exercise authority over the executive branch of the Federal 
Government. During the transition of any new Administration, 
Agency accountability is an important component of 
congressional oversight; the Committee will maintain these 
oversight responsibilities irrespective of election results and 
governing party.

              Oversight of the Congressional Budget Office

    CBO was created under the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 
in order to provide Congress with economic and budgetary 
analysis and cost estimates for proposed legislation. CBO has 
not been reauthorized since the enactment of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974. It operates under a permanent indefinite 
authorization. In keeping with House rules and protocols, the 
Committee will consider reauthorizing CBO at a fixed amount for 
a limited period of time. The Committee also plans to exercise 
its oversight responsibility over CBO through hearings and 
other activities.

                           OVERSIGHT SCHEDULE

    The following are the Committee's initial plans for 
hearings and other oversight activities.

First Session (2017)

Winter 2017--Hearing on the Failures of Obamacare: Harmful 
Effects and Broken Promises.

Winter 2017--Hearing on CBO's Economic and Budget Outlook: 
Director of CBO.

Winter 2017--Hearing on the President's Fiscal Year 2018 
Budget: Director of OMB.

Winter 2017--Hearing on the President's Fiscal Year 2018 
Budget: Treasury Secretary.

Winter 2017--Hearing on the President's Fiscal Year 2018 
Budget: Members of Congress.

Winter 2017--Possible additional hearings on the President's 
budget and the budget outlook.

Winter 2017--Receive Views and Estimates from other Committees 
to coordinate development of the annual concurrent budget 
resolution.

Winter 2017--Possible hearing on Federal entitlement spending 
and the long-term budget outlook.

Winter-Spring--2017 Possible field hearings.

Spring 2017--Hearing on the economy: Chairman of the Federal 
Reserve Board.

Summer 2017--Hearing on the long-term budget outlook. Possible 
additional hearings to review federal spending, taxes, 
deficits, debt, the federal budget process and budget process 
reform, and the economy.

Second Session (2018)

Winter 2018--Hearing on CBO's Economic and Budget Outlook: 
Director of CBO.

Winter 2018--Hearing on the President's Fiscal Year 2019 
Budget: Director of OMB.

Winter 2018--Hearing on the economy.

Winter 2018--Hearing on the President's Fiscal Year 2019 
Budget: Treasury Secretary.

Winter 2018--Hearing on the President's Fiscal Year 2019 
Budget: Members of Congress.

Winter 2018--Receive Views and Estimates from other Committees 
to coordinate in developing the annual concurrent budget 
resolution.

Summer 2018--Hearing on the long-term budget outlook.

Possible additional hearings may include reviewing federal 
spending, taxes, deficits, debt, and the economy.

    The Committee will also conduct research, examine programs, 
and prepare analyses of fiscal and economic issues with an 
emphasis on providing for a more effective and accountable 
Federal government.

                COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION AND THE WORKFORCE

                    OVERSIGHT AND INVESTIGATION PLAN

                    1. Adoption of an Oversight Plan

    Each standing committee of the U.S. House of 
Representatives is required to formally adopt an oversight plan 
at the beginning of each Congress. Specifically, clause 2(d)(1) 
of Rule X of the Rules of the House of Representatives states 
in part:
        Not later than February 15 of the first session of a 
        Congress, each standing committee shall, in a meeting 
        that is open to the public and with a quorum present, 
        adopt its oversight plan for that Congress. Such plan 
        shall be submitted simultaneously to the Committee on 
        Oversight and Government Reform and to the Committee on 
        House Administration.

    2. Jurisdiction of the Committee on Education and the Workforce

    Rule X of the Rules of the House of Representatives vests 
in the Committee on Education and the Workforce (Committee) 
jurisdiction over issues dealing with students, education, 
workers, and workplace policy. Specifically, clause 1(e) of 
Rule X vests the Committee with jurisdiction over the following 
subject-matter:
         (1) Child labor;
         (2) Gallaudet University and Howard University and 
        Hospital;
         (3) Convict labor and the entry of goods made by 
        convicts into interstate commerce;
         (4) Food programs for children in schools;
         (5) Labor standards and statistics;
         (6) Education or labor generally;
         (7) Mediation and arbitration of labor disputes;
         (8) Regulation or prevention of importation of foreign 
        laborers under contract;
         (9) Workers' compensation;
         (10) Vocational rehabilitation;
         (11) Wages and hours of labor;
         (12) Welfare of miners; and
         (13) Work incentive programs.

                 3. General Oversight Responsibilities

    Clause 2 of Rule X of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives provides in part:
     (a) The various standing committees shall have general 
oversight responsibilities as provided in paragraph (b) in 
order to assist the House in--
         (1) its analysis, appraisal, and evaluation of--
                 (A) the application, administration, 
                execution, and effectiveness of Federal laws; 
                and
                 (B) conditions and circumstances that may 
                indicate the necessity or desirability of 
                enacting new or additional legislation; and
         (2) its formulation, consideration, and enactment of 
        changes in Federal laws, and of such additional 
        legislation as may be necessary or appropriate.
    (b)(1) In order to determine whether laws and programs 
addressing subjects within the jurisdiction of a committee are 
being implemented and carried out in accordance with the intent 
of Congress and whether they should be continued, curtailed, or 
eliminated, each standing committee (other than the Committee 
on Appropriations) shall review and study on a continuing 
basis--
                 (A) the application, administration, 
                execution, and effectiveness of laws and 
                programs addressing subjects within its 
                jurisdiction;
                 (B) the organization and operation of Federal 
                agencies and entities having responsibilities 
                for the administration and execution of laws 
                and programs addressing subjects within its 
                jurisdiction;
                 (C) any conditions or circumstances that may 
                indicate the necessity or desirability of 
                enacting new or additional legislation 
                addressing subjects within its jurisdiction 
                (whether or not a bill or resolution has been 
                introduced with respect thereto); and
                 (D) future research and forecasting on 
                subjects within its jurisdiction.
    Clause 2 of Rule XI of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives provides:
    (n)(1) Each standing committee, or a subcommittee thereof, 
shall hold at least one hearing during each 120-day period 
following the establishment of the committee on the topic of 
waste, fraud, abuse, or mismanagement in Government programs 
which that committee may authorize.
         (2) A hearing described in subparagraph (1) shall 
        include a focus on the most egregious instances of 
        waste, fraud, abuse, or mismanagement as documented by 
        any report the committee has received from a Federal 
        Office of the Inspector General or the Comptroller 
        General of the United States.
    (o) Each committee, or a subcommittee thereof, shall hold 
at least one hearing in any session in which the committee has 
received disclaimers of agency financial statements from 
auditors of any Federal agency that the committee may authorize 
to hear testimony on such disclaimers from representatives of 
any such agency.
    (p) Each standing committee, or a subcommittee thereof, 
shall hold at least one hearing on issues raised by reports 
issued by the Comptroller General of the United States 
indicating that Federal programs or operations that the 
committee may authorize are at high risk for waste, fraud, and 
mismanagement, known as the ``high-risk list'' or the ``high-
risk series.''

               4. Exercise of Oversight Responsibilities

    The American people deserve an open, accountable government 
that works efficiently and effectively. Congress must use its 
constitutional authority to ensure our laws are properly 
enforced, taxpayer money is spent wisely and not wastefully, 
and government policy does not harm the American people.
    Congressional oversight of federal programs and activities 
is a critical part of this authority. Oversight is a 
constitutional prerogative, an important responsibility of the 
Congress, a core objective of the Committee. Accordingly, the 
Committee will thoroughly oversee and investigate the various 
agencies, departments, and programs within its jurisdiction. In 
so doing, the Committee will actively consult with House 
committees that have concurrent or related jurisdiction. In its 
oversight proceedings, the Committee will make full use of 
hearings in Washington, D.C., and of regional field hearings to 
ensure all relevant voices are heard and made part of the 
official record. Among other investigative techniques, the 
Committee will visit relevant sites, correspond with affected 
parties, and review audits and investigations by the 
Congressional Research Service, the Government Accountability 
Office, the U.S. Attorney General, and the Offices of the 
Inspectors General of the U.S. departments of Labor, Education, 
and Health and Human Services, among others.
    The Committee will continue to demand and lead aggressive 
oversight in its areas of jurisdiction. Under the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee has jurisdiction over 
programs and statutes administered and enforced by the U.S. 
departments of Education, Labor, Health and Human Services, 
Agriculture, Justice, and various independent agencies. The 
Committee will continue to ensure these programs and statutes 
are administered consistent with the appropriate federal role 
and operated in an effective and efficient manner, as well as 
follow congressional intent in their scope, activities, and 
operations.
    The Committee has identified several particular areas for 
oversight and investigation in the 115th Congress. These areas 
are discussed below:
          Every Student Succeeds Act. In 2015, Congress 
        passed and the President signed a bipartisan, bicameral 
        bill to replace No Child Left Behind with commonsense 
        reforms to allow states and communities the flexibility 
        needed to provide all students an excellent education. 
        Unfortunately, the Obama administration has frequently 
        ignored both the letter and intent of the Every Student 
        Succeeds Act in its efforts to implement this 
        bipartisan law. The Committee will work with the Trump 
        administration to ensure the law is properly 
        implemented, including following the significant 
        changes made to the Preschool Development Grants.
          Student Loans. The U.S. Department of 
        Education manages $1.3 trillion in outstanding federal 
        student loans and disburses billions in grants and 
        work-study funds each year. The Committee will continue 
        to monitor the costs and performance of these programs.
          Higher Education Regulations. Institutions of 
        higher education are subject to myriad federal 
        regulations and reporting requirements that are often 
        burdensome and costly. The regulatory burden has only 
        worsened with rules that interfere with academic 
        freedom, infringe on the authorities of the states, 
        limit student choice, and unfairly target particular 
        sectors of higher education. The Committee will 
        continue its oversight of regulatory policies and 
        challenge those that enlarge the federal footprint in 
        higher education.
          Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. In 
        2014, Congress passed and the President signed a 
        bipartisan, bicameral bill to fix the nation's broken 
        workforce development system. The Workforce Innovation 
        and Opportunity Act helps workers attain skills for 
        21st century jobs, provides greater accountability to 
        taxpayers, and helps put Americans back to work. The 
        Committee will work with the new administration to 
        ensure the law is properly implemented.
          Affordable Care Act. As Congress repeals and 
        replaces the Affordable Care Act, the Committee will 
        continue oversight of the previous administration's 
        implementation of the law. In particular, the Committee 
        will focus on how the law and the previous 
        administration's regulations and sub-regulatory 
        guidance harmed employers' ability to provide quality, 
        affordable health care to employees, including 
        educators and school-staff.
          Employer and Employee Protections. The 
        Committee will conduct oversight and investigations, as 
        appropriate, to ensure employee and employer rights 
        under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) are 
        protected and applied consistently and without bias. 
        The Committee will work to ensure the National Labor 
        Relations Board properly fulfills its responsibilities, 
        giving particular scrutiny to the Board's changes to 
        union election rules and unit determinations, decisions 
        affecting joint-employer standards, and questions 
        regarding whether graduate students are employees under 
        the NLRA.
          Retirement Security. The retirement system 
        works best when workers have access to voluntary, 
        robust, portable, and secure savings options. The 
        Committee will monitor the U.S. Department of Labor's 
        activities to ensure regulations and sub-regulatory 
        guidance benefit the long-term retirement security of 
        working families and do not restrict access to 
        affordable retirement advice.
          Multiemployer Pension Reform Act of 2014. The 
        Multiemployer Pension Reform Act of 2014 (MPRA) helped 
        improve the financial outlook of the Pension Benefit 
        Guaranty Corporation (PBGC), but more work needs to be 
        done. The Committee will continue to monitor the 
        implementation of MPRA and the activities of the PBGC 
        to develop needed reforms that will both protect 
        taxpayers and workers while encouraging employer 
        participation.
          Regulatory Process. An open and transparent 
        process for revising and implementing regulations 
        benefits employers and workers alike. The Committee 
        will work to ensure that stakeholders have sufficient 
        time to review and provide public comment on regulatory 
        actions within its jurisdiction.
          Labor Laws. Various federal labor laws were 
        enacted during the past century for a very different 
        workforce than the one that exists today. The Committee 
        will continue to examine how these laws affect economic 
        growth and job creation, paying particular attention to 
        their impact on the rapidly-emerging ``sharing'' 
        economy.
          Government Spending. The Committee will 
        closely monitor all agencies under its jurisdiction to 
        determine whether the expenditure of taxpayers' money 
        is leading to high-quality outcomes for students and 
        workers.
          Union Transparency. Workers who have chosen 
        to be represented by unions want to be sure their dues 
        are being properly managed. The Committee will examine 
        the efficacy of current reporting requirements, and 
        work to ensure that employees have access to 
        information that clearly shows how their dues are being 
        spent.
          Executive Action. The Obama administration 
        took a number of executive actions that encroach on the 
        constitutional authority of Congress to write the law. 
        The Committee will continue to monitor and analyze 
        those actions and work with the current administration 
        to reign in those efforts and check executive 
        authority.
    Along with the oversight objectives already outlined, the 
Committee will examine the programs within its jurisdiction 
whose authorizations have expired or will soon expire. Based 
upon the results of that oversight, the Committee will 
determine the appropriate next steps.
    The following laws include programs within the jurisdiction 
of the Committee that currently receive funding despite having 
authorizations that are expired:
          America Creating Opportunities to 
        Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Technology, 
        Education, and Science Act;
          Assistive Technology Act of 1998;
          Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical 
        Education Act of 1998;
          Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act;
          Child Nutrition Act of 1966;
          Community Services Block Grant Act;
          Developmental Disabilities Assistance and 
        Bill of Rights Act of 2000;
          Domestic Volunteer Service Act of 1973;
          Educational Technical Assistance Act of 2002;
          Education Sciences Reform Act of 2002;
          Food and Nutrition Act of 2008;
          Head Start Act;
          Higher Education Act of 1965;
          Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;
          Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention 
        Act of 1974;
          Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Act of 
        1981;
          Morris K. Udall Scholarship and Excellence in 
        National Environmental and Native American Public 
        Policy Act;
          Museum and Library Services Act;
          National and Community Service Act of 1990;
          National Assessment of Educational Progress 
        Authorization Act;
          National Environmental Education Act;
          National Foundation for the Arts and 
        Humanities Act of 1965;
          Native American Programs Act of 1974;
          Public Health Service Act;
          Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act;
          Runaway and Homeless Youth Act;
          Second Chance Act of 2007; and
          Special Olympics Sport and Empowerment Act of 
        2004.
    The following laws include programs within the jurisdiction 
of the Committee that receive funding but have authorizations 
that will expire in the 115th Congress:
          Congressional Award Act;
          Missing Children's Assistance Act; and
          Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990.
    The following laws include programs within the jurisdiction 
of the Committee that currently receive funding but have 
authorizations that will expire in the 116th Congress:
          Child Care and Development Block Grant Act of 
        1990;
          Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 
        1965;
          Older Americans Act of 1965;
          Violence Against Women Act of 1994; and
          Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.

                    COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND COMMERCE

                    AUTHORIZATION AND OVERSIGHT PLAN

                       (Adopted January 25, 2017)

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee on Energy and 
Commerce will hold hearings and conduct rigorous oversight over 
matters within its jurisdiction. The Committee will conduct 
thorough oversight, reach conclusions based on an objective 
review of the facts, and treat witnesses fairly. The Committee 
will request information in a responsible manner that is 
calculated to be helpful to the Committee in its oversight 
responsibilities. The Committee's oversight functions will 
focus on: (1) Cutting government spending through the 
elimination of waste, fraud, and abuse and (2) ensuring laws 
are adequate to protect the public interest or are being 
implemented in a manner that protects the public interest, 
without stifling economic growth. The Committee will use the 
information it collects through its oversight to inform the 
reauthorization of certain lapsed programs within its 
jurisdiction.

                      HEALTH AND HEALTHCARE ISSUES

               Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

    To aid in legislative efforts to replace the Patient 
Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), the Committee will 
continue to examine issues related to the Department of Health 
and Human Services (HHS) implementation of PPACA, Public Law 
111-148, and the related Health Care and Education 
Reconciliation Act of 2010, Public Law 111-152. It is critical 
that the Committee understand decisions made in drafting and 
implementing PPACA so that it can replace PPACA with better 
solutions focused on helping consumers. The Committee will 
examine the continuing impact of PPACA and its implementing 
regulations on the economy, consumers, and the health care 
industry. The Committee will also examine the status and future 
of employer-sponsored health care plans as well as the effects 
of PPACA's enactment on the States. The Committee will continue 
to monitor the law's effects on individuals as well as the 
regulations and requirements imposed on small and large 
businesses.

               Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services

    The Committee will review the management, operations, and 
activity of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services 
(CMS) and the programs it administers. The Committee will 
examine and review Medicare and Medicaid management and 
activity as it relates to ongoing Committee efforts to prevent 
bias, waste, fraud, and abuse in Federal health care programs. 
The Committee will investigate the process by which CMS 
implements statutory formulas to set prices for Medicare 
payment, as well as the effectiveness of those formulas. The 
Committee will investigate the processes by which CMS prevents 
bias, waste, fraud, and abuse in the award of government 
contracts.

              Food and Drug Administration and Drug Safety

    The Committee will review whether the Food and Drug 
Administration (FDA) is ensuring that regulated drugs and 
medical devices are safe, effective, and available to American 
patients in an expeditious fashion. The Committee will also 
explore the interplay between these policies and drug and 
medical device innovation, both in the United States and 
abroad. Further, the Committee will examine FDA's enforcement 
of current drug safety laws and the issues involved in 
protecting the nation's supply chains against economically 
motivated and other forms of adulteration, including those 
posed by illegal drug supply chains and economically-motivated 
adulteration. The Committee will examine whether FDA's 
reorganization efforts are improving the effectiveness of 
product reviews, or worsening delays and inefficiency in 
decision-making. The Committee will review FDA's efforts to 
improve and modernize import-safety screening, and the 
management of its foreign inspection program.

                Public Health and Pandemic Preparedness

    The Committee will examine the roles of various Federal 
agencies involved in insuring and protecting the public health, 
including the implementation and management of these programs. 
In particular, the Committee will review Federal efforts on the 
opioid epidemic, pandemic preparedness, including influenza 
preparedness, the United States' response to the spread of the 
Zika virus, and other emerging infectious disease threats from 
abroad. The Committee will continue to evaluate the Federal 
response to the opioid epidemic, the Zika virus, and other 
public health emergencies to better understand the operation 
and efficacy of key public health programs and to address 
broader concerns about national all-hazards preparedness and 
response capacity. Further, the Committee will monitor related 
spending to ensure the appropriate and efficient use of Federal 
tax dollars.

              21st Century Cures and Mental Health Reforms

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee will examine 
implementation of the 21st Century Cures Act, landmark 
legislation that will expedite the discovery, development, and 
delivery of new treatments and cures. The legislation also 
included meaningful mental health reforms. The Committee will 
ensure that HHS and its component agencies, including FDA and 
the National Institutes of Health, and other relevant agencies 
implement the legislation in a manner that will quickly deliver 
the benefits provided by the law. The Committee will conduct 
oversight of the implementation of and work done by the newly-
created Assistant Secretary for Mental Health and Substance 
Use, an office which will be responsible for HHS mental health 
programs and policies. The Committee will also examine 
regulations drafted to implement the 21st Century Cures Act to 
ensure they comport with the intent of Congress, and will 
monitor funding provided by the legislation to ensure that it 
is appropriately spent.

                     ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT ISSUES

                         National Energy Policy

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee will examine 
issues relating to national energy policy, including U.S. 
policies that relate to the exploration, production, 
distribution, and consumption of electricity, oil and natural 
gas, coal, hydroelectric power, nuclear power, and renewable 
energy. The Committee will examine the impact of government 
policies and programs on the efficient exploration, production, 
storage, supply, marketing, pricing, and regulation of domestic 
energy resources, including issues relating to the nation's 
energy infrastructure. The Committee will continue to examine 
safety and security issues relating to energy exploration, 
production, and distribution.

            Electricity System and Electric Utility Markets

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee will undertake a 
comprehensive review of the nation's electricity system. This 
effort will include a review of the federal electricity 
policies of the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Federal 
Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to ensure that those 
policies promote competitive wholesale power markets, 
transmission, generation infrastructure upgrades, and 
compliance with relevant statutes. It will also examine the 
activities of the DOE and FERC relating to electric industry 
restructuring, protection of consumers, and the development of 
efficient and vigorous wholesale markets for electricity. It 
will also continue to examine the activities of the DOE and 
FERC with respect to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 
regulations affecting the electricity sector, including 
regulatory requirements that may impact consumer prices and 
reliability of the electricity grid.

                           Energy Efficiency

    The Committee will continue to assess federal programs 
setting energy efficiency standards for motor vehicles, crafted 
by EPA and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 
(NHTSA), and home appliances, crafted by DOE, to ensure that 
the programs are implemented in a manner that maximizes the 
benefit to consumers. In the case of motor vehicle standards, 
the Committee will also assess the merit of having two federal 
agencies operating parallel efficiency programs. The Committee 
will continue to promote energy efficiency initiatives in order 
to create jobs, save businesses and consumers money, and 
improve our nation's energy security. This may include federal 
programs setting energy efficiency standards for motor vehicles 
and appliances, to ensure that the programs are implemented in 
a manner that rewards innovation, ensures benefits for 
consumers and businesses, enhances U.S. energy security, and 
protects the environment.

  Management of the Department of Energy and Its National Laboratories

    The Committee will continue to oversee the governance, 
management, and operations issues at DOE, including oversight, 
management, and operations of the National Nuclear Security 
Administration (NNSA) and the national laboratories. The 
Committee's oversight work will include review of the 
implementation of security and safety reforms at NNSA and DOE 
facilities, ongoing safety and security matters, and the Office 
of Environmental Management's cleanup program. This work will 
also include the Committee's special oversight functions over 
programs and activities relating to nonmilitary energy research 
and development.
    The Committee will also continue to examine the findings 
and the recommendations made by the final report of the 
Congressional Advisory Panel on the Governance of the National 
Nuclear Security Enterprise as established by Section 3166 of 
the FY 2013 NDAA.

                             Yucca Mountain

    The Committee will continue to examine the actions of DOE 
and the NRC in connection with obligations of these agencies 
under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, including licensing 
activities for the Yucca Mountain repository.

                   DOE Energy Grant and Loan Programs

    The Committee will continue to review management and 
implementation of clean energy and advanced technology grant 
and loan programs authorized under the Energy Policy Act of 
2005 and other statutes; the development of new technologies, 
products, and businesses including clean energy, advanced coal, 
nuclear, and other technologies; and the impact of DOE grant, 
cost-sharing, and loan spending on the domestic supply, 
manufacture and commercial deployment of clean and advanced 
energy products and other technologies.

                   The Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    The Committee will continue to review the activities of the 
Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The Committee will examine 
NRC's budget requests and conduct oversight of the manner in 
which the Commission discharges its various responsibilities, 
including licensing activity, the safety and security of 
nuclear power facilities and nuclear materials licensees, and 
the Commission's regulatory actions.

                             Clean Air Act

    The Committee will continue to review significant 
rulemakings under the Clean Air Act and the potential economic 
and job impacts of those rulemakings on the energy, 
manufacturing, industrial, and construction industries, and 
other critical sectors of the U.S. economy, as well as any 
public health and environmental benefits of the regulations. 
The Committee's review will include oversight of the EPA's 
decisions, strategies, and actions to meet Clean Air Act 
standards, and the current role of cost, employment and 
feasibility considerations in Clean Air Act rulemakings. The 
Committee will also continue to review EPA's implementation of 
the Renewable Fuel Standard.

                             Climate Change

    The Committee will continue to monitor international 
negotiations on efforts to control greenhouse gas emissions in 
connection with concerns about global climate change. In 
addition, the Committee will examine the EPA's efforts to 
regulate domestic greenhouse gas emissions under the Clean Air 
Act based on its endangerment findings. The Committee will 
consider whether such agreements and regulatory efforts are 
scientifically well grounded. The Committee will also review 
the activities undertaken in this area by DOE, HHS, and other 
agencies within the Committee's jurisdiction, including efforts 
to prepare for and respond to weather events and natural 
disasters in the future.

                     EPA Management and Operations

    The Committee will conduct general oversight of the EPA, 
including review of the agency's funding decisions, resource 
allocation, grants, research activities, enforcement actions, 
relations with State and local governments, public 
transparency, and respect for economic, procedural, public 
health, and environmental standards in regulatory actions. In 
addition, the Committee will review the government's activities 
in hydraulic fracturing research and regulation.

            Assessment and Management of Chemical Substances

    The Committee will monitor EPA implementation of reforms 
made to title I of the Toxic Substances Control Act. These 
efforts will include program management and the use of chemical 
risk analysis in environmental assessment programs. The 
Committee will also review deadline management and consistency 
of implementation, ensure that confidential business 
information is protected from unwarranted disclosure, and make 
certain that EPA provides the appropriate consideration of 
risks and their trade-offs during the evaluation and regulatory 
process.

              Drinking Water Infrastructure and Regulation

    The Committee will conduct oversight of the operation of 
the Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund program authorized 
under section 1452 of the Safe Drinking Water Act. Included 
will be an examination of State funding uses, efficiencies that 
could be realized in managing this funding that maximize its 
effectiveness, and the use of this funding for leveraging other 
investments. In addition, the Committee will conduct oversight 
of EPA regulatory actions under section 1412 of the Safe 
Drinking Water Act and the protocol it uses to issue health 
advisories under the same section of law.

                  Solid and Hazardous Waste Management

    The Committee will review EPA implementation of various 
regulatory programs established under the most recent 
administration, including regulations regarding the definition 
of solid waste and coal ash.

                   CERCLA (Superfund) and Brownfields

    The Committee will monitor EPA implementation of the 
Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation & Liability 
Act (CERCLA). These efforts will include an examination of 
State cleanup programs and a comprehensive analysis regarding 
whether cleanup under State programs would result in greater 
efficiency in the process. The Committee will also conduct 
oversight of EPA regulatory actions under CERCLA, in particular 
the current rule making for financial assurance under CERCLA 
section 108(b). The Committee will also examine the EPA 
brownfields program, including statutory implementation, the 
challenges of program operation, and whether changes to the 
program would result in more effective and efficient cleanup 
and redevelopment of abandoned and blighted properties.

                  COMMUNICATIONS AND TECHNOLOGY ISSUES


        A Modern Communications Framework for the Innovation Age

    The Committee will continue to exercise its jurisdiction 
over wired and wireless communications to ensure our nation's 
policies governing voice, video, audio, and data services are 
promoting investment, innovation, and job creation. The 
country's current regulatory regime takes a siloed approach in 
which different technological platforms--such as wireline, 
wireless, broadcast, cable, and satellite--are regulated 
differently based on regulations that may be decades old. As we 
move deeper into the Internet era, however, providers are 
increasingly using these platforms to offer the same or similar 
services. The Committee will examine whether these regulations 
should be updated to better meet the communications needs of 
the country and to ensure its citizens enjoy cutting edge 
services and the economic benefits they bring.

                   Federal Communications Commission

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee will conduct 
oversight of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), 
including the efforts to reverse the reclassification of 
Broadband Internet Access Service as a telecommunications 
service subject to Title II of the Communications Act of 1934 
and efforts to bring transparency and accountability to the 
Commission's processes. The Committee will also continue to 
conduct oversight of the FCC's decisions and their impact on 
innovation and the U.S. economy. Among other things, the 
Committee will evaluate the impact generally of FCC actions on 
voice, video, audio, and data services, and on public safety. 
The Committee will pay particular attention to whether the FCC 
conducts cost-benefit and market analyses before imposing 
regulations.

                          Spectrum Management

    The Committee will conduct oversight of the Federal 
Communications Commission's and the National Telecommunications 
and Information Administration's (NTIA) management and 
allocation of the nation's spectrum for commercial and 
government use. Spectrum is increasingly being used to provide 
voice, video, audio, and data services to consumers and to 
serve the needs of our nation's government agencies. The 
Committee will evaluate spectrum-management policies to ensure 
efficient use of the public airwaves for innovative 
communications services. The Committee will also examine 
whether plans for allocating spectrum maximizes broadband 
deployment and encourages investment. The Committee will pay 
particular attention to FCC and NTIA implementation of the 
Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012 and the 
Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015, which included provisions 
intended to make more spectrum available for mobile broadband 
services, as well as raise billions in spectrum auction 
proceeds.

                       Availability of Broadband

    The Committee will investigate whether regulatory policies 
are helping or hindering broadband deployment. In particular, 
the Committee will examine the need for reforms to State and 
Federal permitting processes to speed the deployment of fiber 
optic systems and 5G wireless services. Additionally, the 
Committee will conduct oversight of funding mechanisms for 
broadband deployment and adoption, including the $9 billion per 
year Universal Service Fund. Specifically, the Committee will 
examine what procedures are in place to control waste, fraud, 
and abuse, whether the funds are appropriately targeted, and 
the impact of the funding on jobs and the economy.

                                Internet

    The Committee will exercise its jurisdiction over wired and 
wireless communications to ensure continued growth and 
investment in the Internet. In particular, the Committee will 
monitor efforts to employ the multi-stakeholder model of 
Internet governance--in which governmental and non-governmental 
entities develop best practices for the management of Internet 
networks and content. The Committee will also monitor 
international efforts to replace multi-stakeholder governance 
with domestic regulation and international multilateral 
institutions.

                      Public Safety Communications

    The Committee will examine whether the communications needs 
of first responders are being met. The Committee will examine 
the progress being made to ensure that first responders have 
interoperable communications capabilities with local, State, 
and Federal public safety officials. The Committee will also 
examine the progress being made by the First Responder Network 
Authority (FirstNet) in carrying out the mandates of the Middle 
Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012. Specifically, 
the progress made in finding private sector partners to develop 
an interoperable public safety broadband network and 
implementation of the network. In addition, the Committee will 
conduct oversight regarding the implementation of legacy 911 
and Next Generation 911 (NG911) services. The Committee will 
review efforts to promote deployment of these advanced systems 
and challenges to realizing ubiquitous NG911.

                DIGITAL COMMERCE AND CONSUMER PROTECTION


                          Privacy and Security

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee will examine issues 
relating to the privacy and security of methods, information 
and data collected by businesses about consumers and the 
potential for improving protection without undercutting 
innovative uses that benefit consumers and the economy. 
Further, the Committee will continue to review the manner in 
which fraud and other criminal activities affect e-commerce. 
The Committee will also explore how privacy and cybersecurity 
policies should treat the burgeoning Internet of Things.

                         Self-Driving Vehicles

    The Committee will examine the policy framework being put 
into place for self-driving vehicles. Self-driving vehicles 
hold the promise to greatly reduce traffic fatalities, while at 
the same time expanding mobility to additional subsets of 
Americans and doing so with less impact on the environment. It 
is critical that this technology is encouraged through smart 
approaches and to ensure that the potential of revolutionary 
change to the industry is not curtailed by unnecessary 
regulation.

                             Manufacturing

    The Committee will explore the state of manufacturing in 
the United States to identify factors that are hampering or 
furthering U.S. competitiveness. The Committee will review the 
issues presented by the globalization of production and 
manufacturing networks, including the integrity of products and 
components assembled overseas and the impact on national 
security.

                                 Trade

    The Committee will examine trade negotiations to ensure 
that foreign governments are not imposing non-tariff trade 
barriers, such as regulations or requirements, that harm U.S. 
businesses, their competitiveness and their ability to support 
jobs in the United States, especially as it relates to the flow 
of data across borders.

            Department of Commerce Management and Operations

    The Committee will conduct oversight of the Commerce 
Department and complementary or conflicting Federal efforts to 
promote U.S. manufacturing, exports, and trade, including 
efforts to lower or eliminate non-tariff barriers and harmonize 
regulation of products sold internationally where other 
countries share our health, safety, and consumer protection 
goals.

      Consumer Product Safety Commission Management and Operations

    The Committee will continue oversight of the Consumer 
Product Safety Commission and its implementation and 
enforcement of laws and regulations relating to the safety of 
consumer products, including the agency's implementation of 
Public Law 112-28 and determination of priorities to ensure 
that it is efficiently and effectively protecting consumers.

                    NHTSA Management and Operations

    The Committee intends to continue oversight of the National 
Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), including the 
effectiveness of the agency's structure, regulations, research 
activities, investigations, and enforcement actions pertaining 
to motor vehicle safety. The committee will be particularly 
concerned with the way the Administration processes information 
and its ability to effectively oversee ever advancing safety 
technologies.

           Federal Trade Commission Management and Operations

    The Committee will conduct oversight of the Federal Trade 
Commission's management and operations, including the impact of 
its decisions and actions on the general public and the 
business community, its determination of priorities and the 
need, if any, for refinement of its authorities. In particular, 
the Committee will explore the FTC's role relative to emerging 
sectors of the economy and its jurisdiction relative to new 
technologies.

                             MISCELLANEOUS


                             Cybersecurity

    The Committee will exercise its jurisdiction over 
cybersecurity to ensure the country is well protected while at 
the same time avoiding one-size-fits-all approaches that hinder 
the flexibility of commercial and governmental actors to combat 
the rapidly evolving threats. The Committee will also review 
the efforts of agencies within its jurisdiction to secure their 
networks consistent with the Homeland Security Act of 2002. In 
doing so, the Committee will explore current cybersecurity 
threats and strategies to address those threats. The Committee 
will also examine government initiatives to improve 
cybersecurity both in the public and private sectors, and 
review efforts at agencies within the Committee's jurisdiction 
to regulate cybersecurity. The Committee will also examine the 
security of the Internet of Things, discovery and disclosure of 
cybersecurity vulnerabilities, the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology (NIST) Cybersecurity Framework, and 
the recently released report from the Presidential Commission 
on Enhancing Cybersecurity.

                 Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response

    The Committee will continue its examination of the roles of 
HHS agencies in assisting the nation's detection, warning 
capability, and response to potential biological attacks. In 
addition, the Committee will evaluate the potential impact and 
preparedness of the nation's public health system. The 
Committee will continue to review the implementation of the 
Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and 
Response Act of 2002 by HHS, and the extent of the coordination 
between HHS and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), 
especially as it relates to Project Bioshield.

         Federal Oversight of High-Containment Bio Laboratories

    The Committee will examine issues related to high-
containment bio laboratories, which handle some of the world's 
most exotic and dangerous diseases, including anthrax, 
smallpox, foot and mouth disease, and Ebola virus. Among the 
issues under review are the adequacy of the security and 
practices of high-containment bio laboratories, Federal efforts 
to oversee the laboratories, and whether some of these efforts 
are duplicative and overlapping. The Committee will continue 
its oversight into issues raised by the improper storage and 
handling of Federal select agents at CDC, NIH, and FDA labs.

            Anti-Terrorism Security for Chemical Facilities

    The Committee will continue its oversight of DHS's 
implementation of the Chemical Facilities Anti-Terrorism 
Program, originally authorized in Section 550 of Public Law 
109-295, the Homeland Security Appropriations Act of 2007. The 
Committee will continue to examine whether taxpayer funds are 
spent prudently and the extent to which DHS is advancing the 
purpose of securing chemical facilities against terrorist 
threats.

           Government Scientific and Risk Assessment Programs

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee will examine 
issues relating to the numerous Federal science programs 
assessing public health risks, including the Integrated Risk 
Information System at the EPA, the Report on Carcinogens 
produced by the National Toxicology Program at HHS, and 
assessments proposed or ongoing in other Federal departments 
and agencies. The Committee will review programs to assess the 
objectives, transparency, and integrity of scientific 
assessments that inform regulatory and public health policies.

                          Controlling Spending

    The Committee will examine Departments and agencies under 
its jurisdiction to assure adequate and prompt implementation 
of recommendations from the Administration, the Offices of 
Inspectors General, the Government Accountability Office, and 
other sources to achieve cost savings or eliminate wasteful 
spending.

                        Critical Infrastructure

    In June 2006, the Bush Administration issued a National 
Infrastructure Protection Plan. This plan created a process by 
which DHS is to identify critical assets and assess their 
vulnerabilities and risks due to loss or natural disaster. 
During the 115th Congress, the Committee will review the 
Department's activities with respect to identifying high-
priority assets and implementing plans to protect these assets 
in areas within the Committee's jurisdiction. The Committee 
will also examine the activities of DOE, FERC, and other 
Federal agencies related the physical and cybersecurity of the 
nation's energy infrastructure. Further, the Committee will 
examine the roles and responsibilities of the private sector, 
which owns and operates the bulk of the nation's critical 
infrastructure assets.

                           Nuclear Smuggling

    The Committee will continue to monitor Federal government 
and private sector efforts at border crossings, seaports, and 
mail facilities. The Committee's review will analyze and assess 
U.S. Customs and Border Protection and the Department of 
Energy's efforts, including international efforts, aimed at 
detecting and preventing the smuggling of dangerous commerce, 
particularly nuclear and radiological weapons of mass 
destruction.

 AUTHORIZATION OF PROGRAMS WITHIN THE JURISDICTION OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
                          ENERGY AND COMMERCE

    During the 115th Congress, as part of both its oversight 
and legislative agenda, the Committee on Energy and Commerce 
will review the authorizations of agencies and programs within 
its jurisdiction and, specifically with regard to lapsed 
authorizations, determine whether the program should be 
reauthorized or terminated. Each subcommittee will conduct 
oversight of these programs and offices, including hearings, 
outreach to the Executive Branch, and requests for information 
in order to gather the necessary information to support these 
determinations.
    The Committee plans to dedicate considerable time in the 
115th Congress to examining the policies of the Patient 
Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) and then developing 
legislation to improve health care delivery and treatment and 
lower costs for families. When the PPACA was enacted in 2010, 
it authorized dozens of individual programs. Some of these 
programs received indefinite, or ``such sums'' authorizations, 
and others were authorized at a specific level. Since 2010, the 
authorizations for most of these programs have expired; some 
have continued to receive appropriations while others have not. 
The Committee expects to consider the now-lapsed programs that 
the law authorized and determine which ones should be 
reauthorized. The Committee's oversight of the PPACA, as 
described previously in this document, will necessarily inform 
how the Committee will advance alternative solutions to the 
PPACA and either reauthorize or terminate the programs first 
authorized by the that law. The Committee plans to work closely 
with the Department of Health and Human Services and the 
Executive Branch when making decisions about individual 
programs.
    In addition to examining the lapsed authorizations 
contained within the ACA, the Committee in the first session of 
the 115th Congress will work on the reauthorization of two key 
programs before they expire: the State Children's Health 
Insurance Program (SCHIP), last authorized in the Medicare 
Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 and expiring in 
2017, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) User Fees, 
including the Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) and 
Generic Drug User Fee Amendments (GDUFA). The reauthorization 
of both programs will require multiple hearings and may involve 
extensive negotiations.
    With regard to the Committee's jurisdiction over energy and 
the environment, a number of the energy and environment 
programs within the Committee's jurisdiction have lapsed but 
continue to receive appropriations. The bulk of the lapsed 
programs are within the Committee's energy jurisdiction, 
including the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (P.L. 109-58) and the 
Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (P.L. 110-140). In 
addition, there are various lapsed programs within the Clean 
Air Act; the Safe Drinking Water Act; the Toxic Substances 
Control Act; the Nuclear Waste Policy Act; the Solid Waste 
Disposal Act, also referred to as the Resource Conservation and 
Recovery Act (RCRA); the Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; the Superfund 
Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986; the Energy Act of 
2000; the Small Business Liability Relief and Brownfields 
Revitalization Act; the Pollution Prevention Act; the 
Department of Energy Organization Act; and the Energy Policy 
and Conservation Act of 1975.
    As many of the programs related to energy and environmental 
matters have lapsed for more than a decade, and as part of the 
Committee's ongoing work to modernize energy policy, it is an 
appropriate time to consider whether these programs should 
continue, be updated, or be terminated. The Committee plans to 
collect information as appropriate and to evaluate the relevant 
programs within the Department of Energy, the Environmental 
Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the 
Energy Information Administration, the Federal Energy 
Regulatory Commission, the Department of Homeland Security, and 
other relevant agencies. Such reauthorization activity will 
include consideration of programs in relation to current and 
projected U.S. economic, energy, and environmental conditions.
    In addition to the reauthorization work described 
previously in the health, environment, and energy jurisdictions 
of the Committee, and as explained in the oversight plan, the 
Committee plans to lay the groundwork for other 
reauthorizations in this Congress. Within the jurisdiction of 
the Subcommittee on Communications and Technology, the 
oversight of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and 
the NTIA that the Committee pursued in the 114th Congress will 
continue in the 115th Congress, including the examination of 
the Federal Communications Commission Authorization Act of 1990 
and the NTIA Organization Act. Finally, within the jurisdiction 
of the Subcommittee on Digital Commerce and Consumer 
Protection, the Federal Trade Commission was last reauthorized 
in 1996, with the authorization expiring at the end of Fiscal 
Year 1998. The Subcommittee on Digital Commerce and Consumer 
Protection plans to conduct continued oversight of how the FTC 
carries out its authorities relating to unfair or deceptive 
acts or practices, specifically the agency's actions with 
respect to disruptive and technology-driven markets, innovative 
products, and services that benefit consumers. The purpose of 
this oversight work is to clarify the FTC's consumer protection 
authority in areas where observed harms have plagued consumers 
and better understand the legal and economic basis for the 
agency's enforcement actions.
    The reauthorization work will require extensive Committee 
resources and member participation, particularly of the members 
of the Subcommittee on Health and Subcommittee on Energy. While 
the Committee expects that the repeal and replacement of the 
PPACA will be accomplished by the end of the 115th Congress, it 
is possible that the Committee's work to reauthorize the energy 
and environment-related programs and agencies will continue 
into the next Congress.

                    COMMITTEE ON FINANCIAL SERVICES

                    AUTHORIZATION AND OVERSIGHT PLAN

    Pursuant to clause 2(d)(1) of Rule X of the House of 
Representatives, the following agenda constitutes the 
authorization and oversight plan of the Committee on Financial 
Services for the 115th Congress. It includes areas in which the 
Committee and its subcommittees expect to conduct oversight 
during this Congress; it does not preclude oversight or 
investigation of additional matters or programs as they arise. 
The Committee will consult, as appropriate, with other 
committees of the House that may share jurisdiction on any of 
the subjects listed below.
    Pursuant to House Rules, this Authorization and Oversight 
Plan contains oversight initiatives that will be undertaken for 
the purpose of identifying cuts to or the elimination of 
programs that are inefficient, duplicative, outdated, or more 
appropriately administered by State and local government. 
Finally, the Authorization and Oversight Plan identifies 
agencies and programs with lapsed authorizations that received 
appropriations in the previous fiscal year and/or agencies or 
programs with permanent authorizations that have not been 
subject to a comprehensive review in the prior three 
Congresses.

                             OVERSIGHT PLAN

     THE DODD-FRANK WALL STREET REFORM AND CONSUMER PROTECTION ACT

    The Committee intends to continue its close examination of 
the implementation of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and 
Consumer Protection Act (P.L. 111-203) (the Dodd-Frank Act) by 
the financial regulators charged with implementing the law.
    Financial Stability Oversight Council (FSOC). The Committee 
will review the operations, activities, and initiatives of the 
FSOC.
    Office of Financial Research (OFR). The Committee will 
review the operations, activities, and initiatives of the OFR.
    Volcker Rule. The Committee will examine financial 
regulators' implementation of Section 619 of the Dodd-Frank 
Act, known as the ``Volcker Rule,'' and the effect of the 
Volcker Rule on the strength and international competitiveness 
of U.S. capital markets.
    ``Too Big to Fail.'' The Committee will examine whether 
financial regulators' implementation of Titles I and II of the 
Dodd-Frank Act, which together were designed to end the 
government's practice of bailing out financial institutions 
deemed ``too big to fail,'' is advancing or impeding that goal.

               FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS AND CONSUMER CREDIT

    Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (CFPB). The 
Committee will oversee the regulatory, supervisory, 
enforcement, and other activities of the CFPB, the effect of 
those activities on regulated entities and consumers, and the 
CFPB's collaboration with other financial regulators. The 
Committee will also examine the governance structure and 
funding mechanism of the CFPB.
    Financial Supervision. The Committee will examine financial 
regulators' safety and soundness supervision of the banking, 
thrift and credit union industries, to ensure that systemic 
risks or other structural weaknesses in the financial sector 
are identified and addressed promptly.
    Capital Standards and Basel III. The Committee will explore 
generally the twin subjects of bank capital and liquidity, and, 
in so doing, examine closely the guidelines developed by the 
international Basel Committee on Banking Supervision and how 
domestic financial regulators are implementing or planning to 
implement those guidelines in the U.S.
    Mortgages. The Committee will closely review recent 
rulemakings by the CFPB and other agencies on a variety of 
mortgage-related issues. The Committee will monitor the 
coordination and implementation of these rules and the impact 
they are having on the cost and availability of mortgage 
credit.
    Deposit Insurance. The Committee will monitor the solvency 
of the Deposit Insurance Fund administered by the Federal 
Deposit Insurance Corporation and the National Credit Union 
Share Insurance Fund administered by the National Credit Union 
Administration.
    Community Financial Institutions. The Committee will review 
issues related to the health, growth, safety, and soundness of 
community financial institutions, including the effect of 
regulations promulgated pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Act, 
individually and cumulatively, on community financial 
institutions' role in lending to small businesses, fostering 
employment, and promoting economic growth.
    Regulatory Burden Reduction. The Committee will continue to 
review the current regulatory burden on financial institutions, 
particularly community financial institutions, with the goal of 
reducing unnecessary, duplicative, or overly burdensome 
regulations, consistent with consumer protection and safety and 
soundness.
    Credit Scores and Credit Reports. The Committee will 
monitor issues related to credit scores and credit reporting.
    Access to Financial Services. The Committee will generally 
examine ways to expand access to mainstream financial services 
among traditionally underserved segments of the U.S. 
population.
    ``Operation Choke Point.'' The Committee will conduct 
oversight of the Department of Justice, financial regulators, 
and other agencies relating to the coordinated interagency 
initiative known as ``Operation Choke Point.''
    Discrimination in Lending. The Committee will examine the 
effectiveness of regulators' fair lending oversight and 
enforcement efforts to ensure that the Federal government does 
not tolerate discrimination.
    Diversity in Financial Services. The Committee will 
continue to monitor Federal regulators' efforts to implement 
the diversity requirements of the Dodd-Frank Act.
    Improper Disclosure of Personally Identifiable Information. 
The Committee will evaluate best practices for protecting the 
security and confidentiality of personally identifiable 
financial information from loss, unauthorized access, or 
misuse. The Committee will also examine how data breaches are 
disclosed to consumers.
    Payment System Innovations/Mobile Payments. The Committee 
will review government and private sector efforts to achieve 
greater innovations and efficiencies in the payments system.
    Payment Cards. The Committee will monitor payment card 
industry practices.
    Money Services Businesses and their Access to Banking 
Services. The Committee will examine the operations of Money 
Services Businesses.
    Community Development Financial Institutions Fund (CDFI 
Fund). The Committee will monitor the operations of the 
Community Development Financial Institutions Fund.
    Community Reinvestment Act (CRA). The Committee will 
monitor developments and issues related to the Community 
Reinvestment Act of 1977.
    Financial Literacy. The Committee will review efforts to 
promote greater financial literacy among investors, consumers, 
and the general public.

                            CAPITAL MARKETS

    Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). The Committee 
will monitor all aspects of the Securities and Exchange 
Commission's operations, activities, and initiatives to ensure 
that it fulfills its Congressional mandate to protect 
investors, maintain fair, orderly, and efficient markets, and 
facilitate capital formation.
    The JOBS Act. The Committee will conduct oversight of the 
SEC's implementation of the ``Jumpstart Our Business Startups'' 
or ``JOBS'' Act (P.L. 112-106) and the effect of that law on 
capital formation and investor protection.
    Derivatives. The Committee will continue to review the 
impact of Title VII of the Dodd-Frank Act on the operations, 
growth, transparency, and structure of the over-the-counter 
(OTC) derivatives market.
    Credit Rating Agencies. The Committee will examine the role 
that credit rating agencies, also known as Nationally 
Recognized Statistical Ratings Organizations (NRSROs), play in 
the U.S. capital markets including the issuer-selected model, 
and will review the effectiveness of the SEC's regulation and 
oversight of NRSROs.
    Regulation and Oversight of Broker-Dealers and Investment 
Advisers. The Committee will review the SEC's regulation and 
oversight of broker-dealers and investment advisers.
    Self-Regulatory Organizations (SROs). The Committee will 
examine the activities, operations, and initiatives of self-
regulatory organizations (SROs), including the Financial 
Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA), and the SEC's oversight 
of these SROs.
    Equity/Option Market Structure. The Committee will review 
recent developments in the U.S. equity and option markets and 
the SEC's response to those developments.
    Fixed-Income Market Structure. The Committee will review 
recent developments in the U.S. corporate and municipal bond 
markets and the SEC's response to those developments.
    Corporate Governance. The Committee will review 
developments and issues concerning corporate governance at 
public companies and the SEC's proposals that seek to modernize 
corporate governance practices.
    Employee Compensation. The Committee will monitor the 
implementation of provisions in Title IX of the Dodd-Frank Act 
governing the compensation practices at public companies and 
financial institutions.
    Securities Investor Protection Corporation (SIPC). The 
Committee will review the operations, initiatives, and 
activities of the Securities Investor Protection Corporation, 
as well as the application of the Securities Investor 
Protection Act (SIPA).
    Asset Managers. The Committee will continue to examine the 
SEC's regulation and oversight of asset managers and investment 
companies, including their impact on capital formation and 
investor protection.
    Advisers to Private Funds. The Committee will examine the 
functions served by advisers to private funds in the U.S. 
financial marketplace and their interaction with investors, 
financial intermediaries, and public companies.
    Securitization and Risk Retention. The Committee will 
monitor the implementation of joint agency risk retention 
rulemaking mandated by Section 941 of the Dodd-Frank Act.
    Covered Bonds. The Committee will examine the potential for 
covered bonds to increase mortgage and broader asset class 
financing, improve underwriting standards, and strengthen U.S. 
financial institutions.
    Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board (MSRB). The Committee 
will review the operations, initiatives, and activities of the 
Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board.
    Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB). The 
Committee will review the operations, initiatives and 
activities of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board.
    Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB). The Committee 
will review the initiatives of the Financial Accounting 
Standards Board.
    Government Accounting Standards Board (GASB). The Committee 
will review the initiatives of the Government Accounting 
Standards Board.
    Convergence of International Accounting Standards. The 
Committee will review efforts by the SEC, the FASB, and the 
International Accounting Standards Board to achieve robust, 
uniform international accounting standards.
    Securities Litigation. The Committee will examine the 
effectiveness of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act 
of 1995 in protecting securities issuers from frivolous 
lawsuits while preserving the ability of investors to pursue 
legitimate actions.
    Securities Arbitration. The Committee will examine 
developments in securities arbitration, including the impact of 
the arbitration-related provisions contained in Section 921 of 
the Dodd-Frank Act.

                                HOUSING

    Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The Committee will examine 
proposals affecting the operations of Fannie Mae and Freddie 
Mac, including consolidating their business operations, winding 
down their legacy business commitments, and repealing their 
statutory charters. The Committee will also examine the overall 
size of the Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac's footprint in various 
aspects of the housing finance system and ways to reduce or 
constrain their large market share and develop a vibrant, 
innovative, and competitive private mortgage market.
    Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB) System. The Committee will 
monitor the capital requirements and financial stability of the 
Federal Home Loan Bank System, as well as the FHLB System's 
ability to fulfill its housing and community economic 
development mission and provide liquidity to member banks in a 
safe and sound manner.
    Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA). The Committee will 
monitor the activities and initiatives of the Federal Housing 
Finance Agency.
    Government National Mortgage Association (Ginnie Mae). The 
Committee will examine Ginnie Mae to ensure that the agency has 
the proper resources, procedures and oversight necessary to 
manage the $1.7 trillion in outstanding mortgage-backed 
securities it currently guarantees.
    Federal Housing Administration (FHA). The Committee will 
examine the operations of the Federal Housing Administration in 
our housing finance system, including FHA's appropriate role, 
market share, and ability to manage its mortgage portfolio and 
mitigate taxpayer risk.
    Mortgage Insurance. The Committee will continue to examine 
the role private mortgage insurance plays in increasing 
consumer choice and protection, and furthering the goal of 
robust private sector participation in our housing finance 
system.
    Housing and Urban Development, Rural Housing Service, and 
the National Reinvestment Corporation. The Committee will 
conduct oversight of the mission, operations, and budgets of 
the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the 
Rural Housing Service (RHS), and NeighborWorks America. The 
Committee will review current HUD, RHS, and NeighborWorks 
America programs with the goal of identifying inefficient and 
duplicative programs.
    Public Housing. The Committee will conduct oversight of 
HUD's public housing programs and the subsidies they provide 
for the operations, management and capital development for 
public housing agencies. The Committee will also investigate 
the impact of funding of Public Housing Authorities and seek 
ways to ensure capital repairs are made to improve the health 
and well-being of residents.
    Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher Program and Affordable 
Housing. The Committee will monitor and review HUD's rental 
assistance programs and the government's role in the future of 
affordable rental housing. As part of its review, the Committee 
will examine the conduct of landlords participating in the 
Section 8 program and investigate HUD's oversight of landlord 
participants to ensure rules and regulations are being 
followed.
    Homelessness. The Committee will examine progress towards 
the nation's goals to end homelessness in America, including 
successful strategies and best practices where local 
communities have effectively ended homelessness for certain 
populations.
    Fair Housing. The Committee will conduct oversight to 
ensure the enforcement of fair housing practices. The Committee 
will seek to ensure that the principles of the Fair Housing Act 
of 1968 are upheld so that no person is subject to illegal 
discrimination in housing practices.
    Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination 
Act (NAHASDA). The Committee will conduct oversight of the 
grants and other programs under the NAHASDA block grant 
program, the authorization for which expired on October 1, 
2013.
    Settlement Procedures. The Committee will conduct oversight 
of the regulation of real estate settlement procedures, 
including appraisals and disclosures involving closing costs 
and the settlement process.

                               INSURANCE

    National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). The Committee will 
conduct oversight of the National Flood Insurance Program, the 
authorization for which is set to expire on October 1, 2017. In 
particular, the Committee will examine proposals to limit 
taxpayer exposure under the NFIP, improve the efficiency and 
transparency associated with the processing of claims submitted 
by policy holders, and increase the participation of the 
private sector in the flood insurance market. The Committee 
will also examine proposals to address the National Flood 
Insurance Program's debt, and other proposals to ensure the 
affordability and availability of flood insurance.
    Federal Insurance Office (FIO). The Committee will examine 
the Treasury Department's Federal Insurance Office and the 
conduct of its statutory functions under the Dodd-Frank Act 
regarding domestic and international insurance policy issues.
    Impact of Dodd-Frank Act Implementation on the Insurance 
Sector. The Committee will monitor implementation of various 
provisions in the Dodd-Frank Act and various international 
regulatory initiatives for their potential impact on the 
insurance sector, including FIO's efforts to enter into a 
covered agreement with the European Union.

                       MONETARY POLICY AND TRADE

    The Federal Reserve System. The Committee will exercise 
oversight of the operations and activities of the Federal 
Reserve System, including its conduct of monetary policy, its 
regulation and supervision of the financial services sector, 
its role in the payment system, and its susceptibility to 
cybersecurity threats and other security risks.
    Defense Production Act. The Committee will continue to 
monitor the effectiveness of the Defense Production Act, which 
was reauthorized in 2014, and its individual authorities in 
promoting national security and recovery from natural 
disasters.
    Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States 
(CFIUS). The Committee will continue to monitor the 
implementation of the Foreign Investment and National Security 
Act of 2007 and actions taken by CFIUS to identify and address 
foreign investments that pose threats to national security.
    Coins and Currency. The Committee will conduct oversight of 
the printing and minting of U.S. currency and coins, and of the 
operation of programs administered by the U.S. Mint for 
producing congressionally authorized commemorative coins, 
bullion coins for investors, and Congressional gold medals. The 
Committee will continue its review of efforts to detect and 
combat the counterfeiting of U.S. coins and currency in the 
United States and abroad. Finally, the Committee will examine 
commemorative coins and medals, including potential reforms 
related to the process for funding the production of such 
items.
    Economic Sanctions. The Committee will monitor the 
implementation of financial sanctions as well as any proposals 
to expand such sanctions or impose new ones. As part of this 
oversight, the Committee will monitor the efforts of Treasury's 
Office of Foreign Assets Control, which administers such 
sanctions.
    International Monetary Fund (IMF). The Committee will 
consider the policies of the IMF to ensure effective use of 
resources and appropriate alignment with U.S. interests to 
promote economic growth and stability, including through 
technical assistance that strengthens the capacity of Fund 
members to prevent money laundering and the financing of 
terrorism. The Committee will review the statutorily required 
annual report to Congress by the Secretary of the Treasury on 
the state of the international financial system and the IMF.
    U.S. Oversight over the Multilateral Development Banks 
(MDBs) and Possible U.S. Contributions. The Committee will 
consider any Administration request that the U.S. contribute to 
the replenishment of the concessional lending windows at the 
World Bank and other multilateral development banks, which 
provide grants and below market-rate financing to the world's 
poorest nations.
    Export-Import Bank of the United States (Ex-Im Bank). The 
Committee will examine the operations of the Ex-Im Bank, the 
authorization for which expires in September 2019.
    International Trade. The Committee will oversee existing 
and proposed trade programs and consider policies within the 
Committee's jurisdiction to promote U.S. international trade so 
that U.S. companies retain access to foreign markets and remain 
globally competitive.
    Exchange Rates. The Committee will review and assess the 
semi-annual report to Congress from the Secretary of the 
Treasury on International Economic and Exchange Rate Policies 
pursuant to the Omnibus Trade Act of 1988.
    Global Economic Conditions. The Committee will monitor 
economic developments overseas--particularly in those countries 
experiencing severe economic stress or dislocation--and assess 
the effect of those developments on the U.S. economy.
    Extractive Industries and Conflict Minerals. The Committee 
will monitor the implementation of provisions in Title XV of 
the Dodd-Frank Act imposing disclosure requirements relating to 
so-called extractive industries and conflict minerals.

                           ILLICIT FINANCING

    Terrorist and Illicit Financing. The Committee will monitor 
the extent to which individuals or groups may fund terrorist or 
other criminal acts by transmitting funds through the financial 
system, including through the use of anonymous shell companies, 
and will additionally monitor methods to detect and inhibit 
illicit uses such as cyber extortion and cyber threats.
    Office of Terrorism and Financial Intelligence (TFI). The 
Committee will conduct oversight of TFI's development and 
implementation of U.S. government strategies to combat 
terrorist financing, including on matters relating to the 
National Money Laundering Strategy.
    Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC). The Committee will 
monitor activities of OFAC, which is housed within TFI, on 
matters relating to countering terrorist financing and illicit 
financial flows.
    Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN). The 
Committee will examine the operations of the FinCEN, which is 
housed within TFI, and its ongoing efforts to implement its 
regulatory mandates.
    Information Sharing. The Committee will examine the extent 
to which government agencies and financial institutions have 
adequate capacity under current law to share information 
concerning terrorist financing threats.
    Anti-Money Laundering (AML) and Countering Terrorist 
Financing (CFT). The Committee will review the application and 
enforcement of anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist 
financing laws and regulations, and whether such laws and 
regulations are sufficient to counter threats posed by 
terrorist organizations and international criminal syndicates.

                       AUTHORIZATION OF PROGRAMS

    With respect to capital markets matters, several lapsed 
programs received appropriations in Fiscal Year 2016. The 
Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) received $1.605 
billion in appropriations in FY 2016, though its authorization 
lapsed in the prior fiscal year. Additionally, the SEC Office 
of the Inspector General's authorization lapsed after FY 2011; 
it received over $11.3 million in FY 2016 as part of the SEC's 
appropriation. The Committee will perform oversight as 
necessary to support activities related to the reauthorization 
of the SEC and the Office of Inspector General.
    With respect to financial institution matters, the 
Community Development Financial Institutions Fund received FY 
2016 appropriations without authorization. The Committee will 
take appropriate action on matters relating to oversight and 
authorization of this program.
    With respect to housing and insurance matters, virtually 
all Department of Housing and Urban Development programs within 
the Committee's jurisdiction have lapsed authorizations but 
received FY 2016 appropriations. The bulk of the lapsed 
programs are within the Committee's housing assistance 
jurisdiction and include the Housing Choice Voucher and Public 
Housing programs authorized by the U.S. Housing Act of 1937 
(P.L. 75-412). These programs represent the largest portion of 
HUD's annual budget authority.
    In addition, there are several programs created through the 
Cranston-Gonzales National Affordable Housing Act, the Housing 
and Community Development Act of 1974, and the Native American 
Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Act of 1992 that have 
lapsed authorizations. The Committee will evaluate the efficacy 
of these programs in alleviating poverty and increasing housing 
affordability and how reforms can increase individual choice 
and self-sufficiency.
    Finally, the Department of the Treasury's Office of 
Terrorism and Financial Intelligence and the Financial Crimes 
Enforcement Network received FY 2016 appropriations without 
authorization. During the 115th Congress, the Committee will 
hold hearings and conduct oversight as appropriate to support 
activities related to the reauthorization of these two 
programs. In addition, certain headquarters functions of the 
Treasury Department received FY 2016 appropriations despite 
having lapsed authorizations. The Committee will take 
appropriate actions relating to the oversight and authorization 
of these functions.

                      COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS

                    AUTHORIZATION AND OVERSIGHT PLAN

                        Adopted January 24, 2017

                            1. INTRODUCTION

    Pursuant to the requirements of clause 2(d) of House Rule 
X, the Committee on Foreign Affairs (``the Committee'') has 
adopted this authorization and oversight plan for the 115th 
Congress, which will be shared with the Committee on Oversight 
and Government Reform, the Committee on House Administration, 
and the Committee on Appropriations. This plan summarizes the 
Committee's authorization and oversight priorities for the next 
two years, subject to the understanding that new developments 
will undoubtedly affect priorities and work assignments in the 
months ahead.
    Budget authorization and agency oversight remain key 
responsibilities of the legislative branch. Committee Rule 15 
requires each Subcommittee to hold regular oversight hearings 
that, according to usual practice, include an annual hearing on 
the portions of the Administration's budget request within that 
Subcommittee's jurisdiction. Oversight activities will thus be 
coordinated between the Committee and the Subcommittees, in 
order to facilitate comprehensive and strategic review of the 
programs and agencies within the Committee's jurisdiction.
    These Committee activities may include hearings, briefings, 
investigations, Member or staff-level meetings, correspondence, 
fact-finding travel, reports, and public statements. They may 
also include effective use and review of reports by the 
Government Accountability Office and by statutory Inspectors 
General, as well as Congressional Notifications submitted by 
executive branch agencies. The Committee also will consult, as 
appropriate, with other committees of the House that may share 
jurisdiction over relevant issues and activities.
    The Committee's authorization and oversight activities will 
emphasize:
           effectiveness of U.S. foreign policy;
           effective implementation of U.S. law;
           the review of agencies and programs 
        operating under permanent statutory authority;
           the elimination of programs and expenditures 
        that are inefficient, duplicative, or outdated; and
           institutional reform, efficiency, and fiscal 
        discipline.

                        2. FUNDING AUTHORIZATION

    a. Legislative Context: The agencies and programs within 
the jurisdiction of the Foreign Affairs Committee are funded by 
discretionary appropriations.\1\ Notwithstanding the 
Committee's extensive authorization work, almost all of the 
funding authorities within its legislative jurisdiction have 
been lapsed for more than 13 years. The last enacted Foreign 
Relations Authorization Act (P.L. 107-228) was passed in 2002, 
and provided funding authority through fiscal year 2003.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\A relatively minor amount of mandatory spending is involved with 
the Foreign Service Retirement and Disability Fund.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    This lapse is not due to a lack of action by the Committee 
or the House of Representatives: The Committee produced and the 
House passed Foreign Relations Authorization bills in five of 
the six Congresses that followed, under both Republican and 
Democratic control, usually with overwhelming bipartisan 
support.\2\ Unfortunately, the Senate did not act on any of 
those bills.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \2\Un-enacted, House-passed foreign relations funding authorization 
bills include: H.R. 1950 in the 108th Congress; H.R. 2601 in the 109th 
Congress; H.R. 2410 in the 111th Congress; H.R. 6018 in the 112th 
Congress; and H.R. 2848 in the 113th Congress.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Notwithstanding these challenges, during the 114th Congress 
the Committee succeeded in authorizing, modernizing, and 
reforming the $2.8 billion International Disaster Assistance 
account for the first time since 1987 (P.L. 114-195), 
reauthorizing and reforming the U.S. Commission on 
International Religious Freedom (P.L. 114-71), fundamentally 
restructuring and reforming the Broadcasting Board of Governors 
(sec. 1288 of P.L. 114-328), and working with the Senate to 
successfully enact a fiscal year 2017 Department of State 
Authorities Act that provided authority for important embassy 
security enhancements and personnel reforms (P.L. 114-323).
    b. Funding Without Current Authorization: As mentioned, 
nearly all of the agencies and entities within the Committee's 
legislative jurisdiction are operating without current funding 
authorizations, including:
           The Department of State
           United States Agency for International 
        Development
           The Millennium Challenge Corporation
           Broadcasting Board of Governors
           International Border, Water, and Fisheries 
        Commissions
           National Endowment for Democracy
           United States Trade and Development Agency
           Peace Corps
           Inter-American Foundation
           United States African Development Foundation
           Overseas Private Investment Corporation
           United States Institute of Peace
           East-West Center
           The Asia Foundation
           International Center for Middle Eastern-
        Western Dialogue
    c. Authorization Plans: During the 115th Congress, the 
Committee plans to build on the reforms of the FY17 Department 
of State Authorities Act and again attempt to remedy the 14-
year authorization lapse by enacting a Foreign Relations 
Authorization Act. That Act provides funding authorization for 
the operating expenses, programs, and assessed treaty 
contributions of the Department of State and related agencies, 
which traditionally also include the Broadcasting Board of 
Governors, the Budget Function 300 international commissions 
(International Boundary and Water Commission; International 
Joint Commission; Border Environment Cooperation Commission; 
and the International Fisheries Commissions), and related 
programs and agencies (National Endowment for Democracy, U.S. 
Institute of Peace, Asia Foundation, and the East-West Center). 
This Act will not only address authorization levels, but also 
will include important reforms and modifications of 
authorities, based on the oversight activities conducted 
pursuant to the plan outlined below, and in prior congresses.

                     3. PRIORITY OVERSIGHT MATTERS

    a. ISIS, Iraq and Syria: The Committee will scrutinize U.S. 
efforts to combat the terrorist group known as ISIS, as well as 
the larger crisis unfolding in Iraq and Syria, including the 
latter country's ongoing civil war, the war crimes associated 
with it and the role of Iran and Russia. Particular attention 
will be paid to U.S. military and diplomatic efforts to fight 
ISIS and other terrorist groups, including their funding and 
recruitment, international efforts to eliminate the presence 
and use of chemical weapons in Syria, and efforts to document 
potential war crimes by parties to the conflict. The Committee 
will continue to review economic and diplomatic means by which 
to influence events in Syria.
    b. International Terrorism and Transnational Organized 
Crime: The Committee will examine the current status of al-
Qaeda and its affiliates, with a specific focus on recruitment 
efforts, evolving save havens, and efforts to obtain WMDs. The 
Committee will conduct oversight of the State Department's 
various counterterrorism programs, including those designed to 
counter violent extremism (CVE), as well as agreements with 
foreign governments relating to the transfer of detainees from 
Guantanamo Bay. The Committee will also examine the links 
between organized crime, illicit drugs, and global terrorism. 
Other transnational criminal issues of interest include 
maritime piracy, human, arms and wildlife trafficking, money 
laundering and intellectual property piracy issues.
    c. Iran: The Committee will continue to closely review U.S. 
policy toward Iran, with special focus on the implementation of 
the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action between the prior 
Administration and Iran and subsequent developments. The 
Committee will also review and work to address the threat posed 
by Iran's ballistic missile development, state sponsorship of 
terrorism and growing influence in Iraq and the region, as well 
as the regime's ongoing human rights abuses.
    d. Middle East and North Africa: In addition to the 
conflict in Iraq and Syria and its impact on regional states 
including Jordan and Lebanon, the Committee will carefully 
review U.S. policy toward the Middle East and North Africa, to 
include: the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the overall 
status of the Middle East peace process; the democratic 
transition in Tunisia; the collapse and conversion of the 
Libyan state into a terrorist haven and principal route for 
human trafficking; the continuation of the civil war in Yemen; 
the impact of Iranian aggression on regional stability; the 
consequences of low oil prices for various oil-producing 
states; human rights and challenges to the rule of law 
throughout the region; and United States policies, programs, 
authorities and funding to address these challenges.
    e. Russia: The Committee will address the impact of 
Russia's foreign policy on U.S. security, political, and 
economic interests, especially as a result of its aggression 
and related hostile actions regarding NATO, Ukraine, Georgia, 
and other countries. It will also examine Kremlin-driven 
efforts to undermine the government, democratic and other 
institutions of the U.S. and other countries through cyber 
intrusions, propaganda and other tools. The Committee will 
examine the range of options available to the U.S. to respond 
to these actions, including legislation to impose additional 
sanctions on Russia and provide assistance to vulnerable 
countries. In addition, the Committee will assess the impact of 
Russia's global propaganda campaign, with special attention to 
Russian-speaking communities along the Russian frontier and 
European countries with upcoming elections. The Committee will 
also review the deteriorating domestic situation in Russia 
regarding democracy, civil society, the rule of law, and human 
rights. In addition, it will examine ways to reduce Russia's 
ability to use its energy exports for political and economic 
coercion. The Committee will consult widely on the appropriate 
response by the U.S. government and other partners.
    f. Ukraine: The Committee will closely monitor Russian-
supported separatist activity and other aggressive actions 
aimed at undermining Ukraine's sovereignty, including the 
forcible and illegal annexation of Crimea. The Committee will 
continue to examine the U.S. response in light of the long-
standing U.S. foreign policy doctrine of non-recognition of 
territorial changes effected by force alone. In addition, it 
will actively oversee efforts to work with Ukraine to 
strengthen its military and security services, promote economic 
growth, combat corruption, and promote an effective and 
democratic government.
    g. Europe/Eurasia: The Committee will review U.S. relations 
with European countries, with an emphasis on the European Union 
and NATO. Key issues include the potential for trade agreements 
with the EU and the UK; continued support for our NATO allies, 
particularly in Central and Eastern Europe; rule of law, border 
security, and European integration issues in the Balkans; U.S.-
European cooperative efforts to combat terrorism and extremism; 
and diversification of energy sources to reduce reliance on 
Russian energy. The Committee will also examine, Turkey's 
evolving foreign policy orientation and domestic political 
trends, including efforts to combat ISIS and the spread of 
extremism, the impact of the refugee crisis on European and 
Turkish foreign policy priorities, as well as reviewing their 
general support for U.S. priorities. The Committee will also 
continue oversight of U.S. political, security and economic 
policy in Central Asia, with a particular focus on 
strengthening partnerships to advance mutual security 
interests, including countering violent extremism, as well as 
efforts to promote economic development, human rights, and good 
governance.
    h. Afghanistan: The Committee will comprehensively review 
U.S. policy toward Afghanistan. Particular focus will be paid 
to efforts to support the national unity government, tackle 
corruption, improve governance, and strengthen security. This 
review will assess the effectiveness of international aid and 
U.S. assistance programs, the broader political-military and 
associated counterterrorism strategies, and the full range of 
policies related to the post-2014 transition, including 
programs and budgeting processes.
    i. Pakistan: The Committee will review all elements of U.S. 
policy toward Pakistan, including efforts to eliminate safe 
havens for violent extremists and establish a stable, 
democratic country. This review will encompass both U.S. 
civilian and security assistance to Pakistan, in order to 
assess the extent to which such programs effectively advance 
U.S. national interests. The Committee will also conduct 
ongoing oversight of matters relating to Pakistan's nuclear 
program, including issues relating to nonproliferation, such as 
the legacy of the A.Q. Khan network.
    j. North Korea: The Committee will review and work to 
address the threat posed by North Korea. Particular focus will 
be paid to North Korea's nuclear and missile proliferation, 
weapon sales, illicit activities, cyber-attacks, human rights 
violations, and U.S. efforts to assist North Korean refugees. 
The Committee will review U.S. diplomatic efforts, the 
implementation of U.S. and international sanctions, and 
consider next steps in U.S. policy to address the North Korean 
threat.
    k. State Department Oversight, Authorization, and Reform: 
The Committee will seek to advance far-reaching reforms, 
building on the 2016 enactment of the first State Authorization 
bill in more than 14 years. In particular, the Committee will 
focus on reforming how the Department uses foreign and security 
sector assistance, ensuring that projects and programs are 
strategically planned and coordinated. Emphasis will also be 
placed on reforming the Department's personnel systems, 
increasing workforce flexibility and modernizing recruitment 
and retention processes. The Committee will continue to monitor 
and examine the operations, budget, programs, planning, human 
resources, building, and security policies of the Department of 
State, with an eye toward authorization and reform legislation 
for Fiscal Year 2018. In addition to hearings with the 
Secretary of State and other Administration officials regarding 
their budget proposals for the upcoming year, such efforts may 
include: revisions to the Foreign Service Act; the introduction 
of merit based pay and promotion; consideration of reforms to 
Executive Branch reporting requirements; and a reduction or 
consolidation of offices with duplicative mandates and 
overlapping responsibilities. In the wake of increasing threats 
to U.S. personnel serving overseas, the Committee will continue 
to evaluate the security of our embassies and consulates, along 
with proposed reforms to the State Department's diplomatic 
security service.
    l. Asia-Pacific Region: The Committee will review the 
U.S.'s significant political, economic, and security interests 
in the Asia-Pacific, including East and Southeast Asia, South 
Asia, and the Pacific Islands. The Committee will conduct 
oversight of U.S. relations with the Asia-Pacific, including 
foreign policy, foreign assistance, security cooperation, 
territorial disputes, and trade relations. The Committee will 
examine the State Department's participation in multilateral 
organizations such as the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation 
(APEC) forum and the East Asia Summit, and closely monitor any 
discussion of future trade agreements in Asia. The Committee 
will monitor the needs of Taiwan for defensive weapons systems 
as provided for in the Taiwan Relations Act.
    m. India: The Committee will review U.S. policy towards 
India and the continued expansion of bilateral cooperation. 
Particular attention will be paid to the U.S.-India security 
relationship, including cooperation on counterterrorism efforts 
and developments since the 2015 defense framework agreement and 
India's designation as a ``Major Defense Partner.'' The 
Committee will also focus on efforts to enhance U.S.-India 
economic relations, including discussions surrounding a 
possible bilateral investment treaty. Stalled efforts to 
initiate civil nuclear cooperation and the implications of 
India's rapidly growing energy demands will also be subject to 
review.
    n. U.S. International Broadcasting: The Committee will 
continue to actively monitor and review the operations and 
organization of U.S. government-supported, civilian 
international broadcasting to respond more effectively to the 
challenges presented by state and non-state actors using modern 
communication platforms. The Committee will closely oversee the 
implementation of the reforms enacted in the 114th Congress, 
and seek further improvements in this critical area.
    o. China: The Committee will examine China's role in the 
Asia-Pacific region and beyond. Particular focus will be placed 
on China's assertiveness in territorial disputes, rapid 
military modernization, and human rights abuses, including 
treatment of Tibetans, Uyghurs and other religious and ethnic 
minorities. The Committee will also consider China's adherence 
to agreements made with Hong Kong under the ``one country, two 
systems'' principle enshrined in the Basic Law. In addition, 
the Committee will examine China's role in the global economy, 
including trade, technology, its strong growth in energy 
demand, and currency issues that affect the American workforce. 
The Committee will review China's cooperation on international 
nonproliferation efforts against North Korea. The Committee 
will investigate China's increasing use of cyber and economic 
espionage to affect foreign trade, and other policy outcomes.
    p. Economic Policy and Trade: The Committee will play a 
vigorous role in overseeing international economic policy, 
including U.S. leadership in trade, finance, energy, 
technology, and development policy to promote economic 
prosperity and national security.
    q. Export Control Reform: The Committee will oversee the 
implementation of Executive Branch reforms to U.S. strategic 
export controls. In particular, the Committee will assess the 
extent to which recent and any proposed new changes to the U.S. 
Munitions List and the Commerce Control List effectively 
safeguard critical technologies and national security, while 
supporting the defense industrial base and advancing U.S. 
commercial interests.
    r. U.S. Nonproliferation Policy. The Committee will examine 
the effectiveness of U.S. nonproliferation policy and the 
international nonproliferation regime in preventing the spread 
of weapons of mass destruction. The Committee will address 
opportunities to strengthen existing nonproliferation 
organizations, especially the International Atomic Energy 
Agency, increase cooperation with other countries, and enhance 
international nonproliferation agreements and mechanisms. 
Prominent issues will include the global expansion of civil 
nuclear power and the potential spread of technology, equipment 
and material useful in the development of nuclear weapons 
capabilities. The Committee will closely examine proposed and 
existing bilateral nuclear cooperation agreements with other 
countries, including their potential to promote U.S. 
nonproliferation objectives and commercial interests.
    s. Africa. The Committee will review political, economic 
and security developments on the African continent. Key issues 
will include efforts to eliminate safe havens for violent 
extremists, economic development--including implementation of 
the African Growth and Opportunity Act and the Electrify Africa 
Act--effective use of aid, human rights and democracy 
promotion. Particular attention is to be paid to the 
developments in Mali, Nigeria, Sudan and South Sudan, the 
Central African Republic, the Great Lakes region and the Horn 
of Africa.
    t. Western Hemisphere: The Committee will conduct oversight 
regarding the content and effectiveness of U.S. political, 
security and economic policy toward the countries of the 
Western Hemisphere. The Committee will address continuing 
threats from drug trafficking organizations, transnational 
criminal organizations, gangs, and terrorist organizations. 
Threats to democracy and press freedom throughout the Americas 
also will be examined. Attention will also be paid to new and 
important supplies of energy coming online from places like 
Brazil, Canada, and Mexico, and the implications of Iran, 
Russia and China's increasing presence and influence in the 
region. The Committee will continue to closely monitor the 
stability of, and cooperation between, the governments in 
Venezuela, Nicaragua, Bolivia, Ecuador and Cuba. The Committee 
will also closely monitor the significant developments in U.S.-
Cuba relations, as well as the ongoing political and economic 
crisis in Venezuela and the implementation of sanctions against 
human rights violators in that country. The Committee will 
continue its oversight of State Department and USAID assistance 
for reconstruction efforts in Haiti, as well as U.S. energy, 
security and diplomatic cooperation with the countries of the 
Caribbean. The Committee also will continue to assess the 
impact of U.S. assistance to Central America to address the 
increase in unaccompanied minors from the subregion. Special 
emphasis will be placed on any developments in political, 
security and economic cooperation with our partners in Canada 
and Mexico.
    u. Security Assistance and Arms Transfer Policy: The 
Committee will assess the effectiveness of security assistance 
programs authorized under the Foreign Assistance Act and the 
Arms Export Control Act in advancing U.S. national interests. 
In addition, the Committee will review those security 
cooperation programs funded by the Department of Defense but 
which require concurrence of the Secretary of State, or 
otherwise give rise to the Committee's jurisdiction. The 
Committee will also review law and policy relating to U.S. arms 
transfers and related end-use monitoring, as well as various 
counterterrorism tools that impact foreign policy. The 
Committee will also continue to carefully review proposed arms 
sales to ensure they comport with U.S. foreign and national 
security policy and benefit the legitimate defense needs of the 
recipient countries, as well as the process by which the 
Administration consults with the Committee and the Congress on 
such sales to ensure proper oversight.
    v. Foreign Assistance: The Committee will review the 
underlying authorities for U.S. foreign assistance with an eye 
towards reducing duplication, increasing transparency and 
effectiveness, and modernizing the foreign assistance 
workforce. It will also review issues related to the 
implementation of U.S. foreign assistance programs and 
projects, including the role of U.S. missions and embassies in 
overseeing grants, contracts, and cooperative agreements. In 
addition, the Committee will review issues related to 
coordination between the U.S. Agency for International 
Development (USAID), other U.S. Government agencies and 
departments involved in carrying out U.S. foreign assistance, 
and the private sector to ensure programs and projects are 
strategically planned and coordinated. Among a broad range of 
issues, the Committee will review U.S. foreign assistance 
initiatives aimed at catalyzing economic growth, reducing aid 
dependence, and addressing food security and global health 
challenges, including food aid reform, maternal health and 
child survival, infectious disease surveillance and control, 
and the implementation of the PEPFAR Stewardship and Oversight 
Act of 2013. Assistance provided through the Millennium 
Challenge Corporation will also receive close scrutiny.
    w. Human Rights and Democracy: The Committee will examine 
U.S. activities to promote democracy and protect human rights 
around the world, including in post-transition environments. 
The Committee will critically assess U.S. involvement with 
multilateral human rights organizations, to ensure that U.S. 
diplomacy serves to promote fundamental human rights and 
freedoms.
    x. United Nations and International Organizations: The 
Committee will closely review all aspects of U.S. funding of, 
and participation in, international organizations. Close 
attention will be paid to the extent to which such funding and 
participation advances U.S. interests and values, protects the 
integrity of U.S. taxpayer dollars, counters unwarranted bias 
against Israel, and leads to increased transparency, 
accountability, and reform of those organizations. The 
Committee will closely monitor the work of the United Nations 
Department of Peacekeeping Operations and Department of Field 
Support, and particularly efforts to improve performance, 
enhance accountability, and combat waste, fraud and abuse in 
United Nations Peacekeeping Missions.

                4. GENERAL REVIEW OF U.S. FOREIGN POLICY

    The Committee intends to exercise its oversight 
jurisdiction concerning the relations of the United States with 
foreign nations to the fullest extent allowed by House Rule 
X(1)(i). This means taking cognizance of events and 
circumstances in every region of the world outside of U.S. 
national borders, as well as U.S. foreign policy responses 
thereto, as developments warrant.
    According to Committee Rules, those responsibilities are 
divided among the Full Committee, its one functional 
subcommittee, and its five regional subcommittees, as follows:
    Full Committee. The full Committee is responsible for 
oversight and legislation relating to: foreign assistance 
(including development assistance, Millennium Challenge 
Corporation, the Millennium Challenge Account, HIV/AIDS in 
foreign countries, security assistance, and Public Law 480 
programs abroad); national security developments affecting 
foreign policy; strategic planning and agreements; war powers, 
treaties, executive agreements, and the deployment and use of 
United States Armed Forces; peacekeeping, peace enforcement, 
and enforcement of United Nations or other international 
sanctions; arms control and disarmament issues; the United 
States Agency for International Development; activities and 
policies of the State, Commerce, and Defense Departments and 
other agencies related to the Arms Export Control Act and the 
Foreign Assistance Act, including export and licensing policy 
for munitions items and technology and dual-use equipment and 
technology; international law; promotion of democracy; 
international law enforcement issues, including narcotics 
control programs and activities; Broadcasting Board of 
Governors; embassy security; international broadcasting; public 
diplomacy, including international communication and 
information policy, and international education and exchange 
programs; and all other matters not specifically assigned to a 
subcommittee. The full Committee will have jurisdiction over 
legislation with respect to the administration of the Export 
Administration Act, including the export and licensing of dual-
use equipment and technology and other matters related to 
international economic policy and trade not otherwise assigned 
to a subcommittee, and with respect to the United Nations, its 
affiliated agencies, and other international organizations, 
including assessed and voluntary contributions to such 
organizations. The full Committee may conduct oversight and 
investigations with respect to any matter within the 
jurisdiction of the Committee as defined in the Rules of the 
House of Representatives.
    Subcommittee on Terrorism, Nonproliferation, and Trade. 
This subcommittee has oversight and legislative 
responsibilities over the United States' efforts to manage and 
coordinate international programs to combat terrorism as 
coordinated by the Department of State and other agencies, and 
efforts to bring international terrorists to justice. With the 
concurrence of the Chairman of the full Committee, it has 
oversight of, and legislation pertaining to, nonproliferation 
matters involving nuclear, chemical, biological and other 
weapons of mass destruction, except for legislation involving 
the Foreign Assistance Act, the Arms Export Control Act, the 
Export Administration Act, and sanctions laws pertaining to 
individual countries and the provision of foreign assistance 
(which is reserved to the full Committee). It has oversight of 
matters relating to international economic and trade policy; 
commerce with foreign countries; international investment 
policy; the Overseas Private Investment Corporation and the 
Trade and Development Agency; commodity agreements; and special 
oversight of international financial and monetary institutions; 
the Export-Import Bank, and customs. With the concurrence of 
the Chairman of the full Committee, it also has legislative 
jurisdiction over measures related to export promotion and 
measures related to the Overseas Private Investment Corporation 
and the Trade and Development Agency.
    Regional Subcommittees. The five subcommittees with 
regional jurisdiction are:
           The Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, 
        Global Human Rights, and International Organizations
           The Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific
           The Subcommittee on Europe, Eurasia, and 
        Emerging Threats
           The Subcommittee on the Middle East and 
        North Africa
           The Subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere
    As detailed below, two of the regional subcommittees also 
have functional jurisdiction. Each of the regional 
subcommittees has jurisdiction over the following within their 
respective regions:
           (1) Matters affecting the political 
        relations between the United States and other countries 
        and regions, including resolutions or other legislative 
        measures directed to such relations.
           (2) Legislation with respect to disaster 
        assistance outside the Foreign Assistance Act, boundary 
        issues, and international claims.
           (3) Legislation with respect to region- or 
        country-specific loans or other financial relations 
        outside the Foreign Assistance Act.
           (4) Legislation and oversight regarding 
        human rights practices in particular countries.
           (5) Oversight of regional lending 
        institutions.
           (6) Oversight of matters related to the 
        regional activities of the United Nations, of its 
        affiliated agencies, and of other multilateral 
        institutions.
           (7) Identification and development of 
        options for meeting future problems and issues relating 
        to U.S. interests in the region.
           (8) Oversight of base rights and other 
        facilities access agreements and regional security 
        pacts.
           (9) Concurrent oversight jurisdiction with 
        respect to matters assigned to the functional 
        subcommittees insofar as they may affect the region.
           (10) Oversight of foreign assistance 
        activities affecting the region, with the concurrence 
        of the Chairman of the full Committee.
           (11) Such other matters as the Chairman of 
        the full Committee may determine.
    The Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human 
Rights, and International Organizations. In addition to its 
regional jurisdiction, this subcommittee has oversight of: 
international health issues, including transboundary infectious 
diseases, maternal health and child survival, and programs 
related to the global ability to address health issues; 
population issues; the United Nations and its affiliated 
agencies (excluding peacekeeping and enforcement of United 
Nations or other international sanctions); international 
cultural and educational programs and exchanges; the American 
Red Cross; and the Peace Corps. In addition, it has legislative 
and oversight jurisdiction pertaining to: implementation of the 
Universal Declaration of Human Rights; other matters relating 
to internationally-recognized human rights, including 
legislation aimed at the promotion of human rights and 
democracy generally; and the Hague Convention on the Civil 
Aspects of International Child Abduction, and related issues.
    The Subcommittee on Europe, Eurasia, and Emerging Threats. 
In addition to its regional jurisdiction, with the concurrence 
of the Chairman of the full Committee, this subcommittee has 
oversight jurisdiction related to emerging foreign threats to 
the national security and interests of the United States.

                     COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY

                    AUTHORIZATION AND OVERSIGHT PLAN

    Clause 2(d), Rule X of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives for the 115th Congress requires each standing 
Committee to adopt an authorization and oversight plan for the 
two-year period of the Congress and to submit the plan to the 
Committees on Oversight and Government Reform, House 
Administration, and Appropriations not later than February 15th 
of the first session of the Congress.
    This is the oversight plan for the Committee on Homeland 
Security for the 115th Congress. It includes the areas in which 
the Committee expects to conduct oversight during the 115th 
Congress, but does not preclude oversight or investigation of 
additional matters as needs arise. The Full Committee will 
examine the following key priorities, among other issues.

                        Secure America's Borders

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee will conduct 
rigorous oversight on the Department's efforts to secure land 
and maritime borders of the United States, including but not 
limited to personnel, technology, infrastructure, and 
coordination between components. The Committee will monitor the 
extent to which the Department can measure its performance in 
securing the borders and how these measures reflect the state 
of border security. The Committee will also examine the 
technologies used to secure the borders and the Department's 
acquisitions efforts regarding border security technologies. 
The Committee will address the illegal flow at our ports of 
entry, between our ports of entry, and in the maritime 
environment.

      Ensure the Department of Homeland Security Runs Effectively

    Previous leadership of the Department undertook a number of 
reviews and reforms to address a series of well-documented 
management challenges, many of which harken back to the days 
when twenty-two agencies were brought together to form this 
Federal agency in 2003. Key management challenges include 
acquisitions management and chronically low morale. In the 
115th Congress, the Committee will continue to conduct 
oversight to ensure that DHS effectively conducts its 
operations, which guard against waste, fraud, abuse and 
duplication. Also, close scrutiny will be given to the 
Department's efforts to improve acquisition and procurement 
outcome, bolster employee morale and effectively address 
instances of employee corruption. Moreover, the Committee will 
examine various programs related to the Department of Homeland 
Security to determine whether such programs should be 
reauthorized, including those included in the Homeland Security 
Act of 2002 and those programs with expiring authorizations in 
the ``Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act 
of 2007''.

Prevent Terrorist Attacks on the Homeland and Shut Down Terror Pathways 
                              into America

    The Committee will continue to conduct rigorous oversight 
of the Federal government's counterterrorism efforts, including 
monitoring ongoing and emerging terror threats to the United 
States, both foreign and domestic. The Committee will also 
continue its focused oversight of Federal efforts to prevent 
terrorist travel to the United States. In particular, the 
Committee will give keen attention to U.S. activities to deny 
terrorists entry into the United States and will consider 
designating a panel to focus on the matter.

                     Protect Against Cyber Attacks

    Everything from the banking system to the electrical grid 
remains susceptible to cyber attacks. Terrorist organizations 
and state-sponsored cyber attackers continue to target 
America's personal information in addition to sensitive 
national security information on a daily basis. The Committee 
will focus on the oversight of the landmark cyber laws enacted 
during the 113th and 114th Congress as well as on fostering 
private sector information sharing and better protecting 
federal networks.
    Additionally, the Committee will conduct oversight to 
elevate and strengthen the cybersecurity mission at DHS and how 
it can most effectively align to carry out its cybersecurity 
mission.
    Finally, the Committee will continue to conduct oversight 
on the intricacies of encryption. It has become well known that 
terrorists have successfully begun to communicate via platforms 
that U.S. law enforcement are unable to shine a light on. 
Unfortunately, there are no simple answers to this terrorism 
and law enforcement problem. The Committee believes that in 
order to examine the issue of encryption, it will take 
collaboration between the best technical, legal and policy 
minds from the technology sector, the privacy and civil 
liberties community, academia, computer science and 
cryptography, economics, law enforcement and intelligence.

                   Support America's First Responders

    First responders and those who support their efforts with 
information and intelligence are on the front lines of our 
efforts to secure the homeland. Through oversight of 
information sharing, grants and other DHS programs, the 
Committee will continue to support the community of first 
responders in their vital homeland security mission.

          SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND MANAGEMENT EFFICIENCY


    Departmental Efficiency and Waste, Fraud, Abuse, and Duplication

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee will oversee the 
Department of Homeland Security's day-to-day operations to 
ensure that it is operating in the most efficient and effective 
manner possible. Pursuant to Rule X, clause 2(d)(1)(F) of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives, the Committee will work 
to identify potential opportunities to eliminate duplicative or 
unnecessary programs, find efficiencies that will contribute to 
the Department's ability to meet its vital missions, and 
identify areas for cost savings. The Committee will investigate 
homeland security programs and practices, as warranted. The 
Committee will also conduct rigorous oversight to ensure the 
Department conducts effective outreach to the private sector 
and utilize commercial best practices, as appropriate.

                         Acquisition Management

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee will review the 
efforts of the Department of Homeland Security to improve 
acquisition outcomes, and to ensure that effective management 
controls are put in place to prevent contract waste, fraud, and 
abuse while promoting efficiency and effectiveness. The 
Committee will review the authorities and activities of the 
Undersecretary for Management and Chief Procurement Officer to 
ensure the effective management of these key functions. The 
Committee will monitor the cost, schedule, and performance 
status of major Department acquisition programs. The Committee 
will also examine the impact of the Department's acquisition 
initiatives to enhance processes and improve outcomes related 
to its major acquisition programs.
    Moreover, the Committee will review the Department's 
implementation of Section 831(a) of the Homeland Security Act 
of 2002 (Pub. L. 107-296), which grants the Secretary authority 
with respect to research and development projects to use more 
flexible contracting mechanisms in an effort to attract 
``nontraditional government contractors'' for needed homeland 
security technologies, as well as the Secretary's use of other 
streamlined acquisition practices. The Committee will continue 
to monitor the Department's efforts to leverage strategic 
sourcing, as outlined in Federal guidance, to increase 
efficiencies.

                          Financial Management

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee will continue its 
oversight of the Department of Homeland Security's progress to 
properly manage financial systems and data to minimize 
inefficient and wasteful spending, make more informed decisions 
to manage its programs, and implement Department policies. The 
Committee will also review the Department's efforts to enhance 
its managerial cost accounting, address internal control 
weaknesses in financial reporting, achieve a clean audit 
opinion on its financial statements, and reduce the reliance on 
manual data calls to collect cost information from the various 
components and compile consolidated, reliable data.

                   Information Technology Management

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee will review the 
Department's efforts to address information technology (IT) 
challenges, including the management and integration of the 
Department's IT systems. The Committee will review the 
authorities and activities of the Chief Information Officer 
(CIO) and component CIOs to ensure the effective management, 
oversight, and coordination of these key functions. The 
Committee will monitor the Department's progress in IT 
architectural planning, investment management, cloud computing, 
policy development, operations, and related personnel 
management. The Committee will also continue its oversight of 
the Department's efforts to establish centralized and 
modernized human resources IT program.

                         Departmental Workforce

    Throughout the 115th Congress, the Committee will monitor 
the Department's efforts to recruit and retain personnel and to 
address employee concerns set forth in the Office of Personnel 
Management's Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey and the 
Department's own personnel surveys, which have indicated morale 
problems across the Department. The Committee will also examine 
the Department's fairness in hiring and promotion practices. In 
addition, the Committee will continue to examine the 
Department's efforts to ensure an appropriate balance is struck 
between Federal employees and private contracts and guard 
against any unnecessary elimination of private sector jobs.
    The Committee will continue to monitor the Department's 
efforts to effectively and efficiently consolidate its 
headquarters from more than 40 locations throughout the 
National Capital Region, known as the St. Elizabeths 
Headquarters Consolidation Project. Additionally, the Committee 
will continue to examine the Department's efforts to 
consolidate the Department's real property footprint to better 
achieve administrative, logistical, and operational 
efficiencies in the field.

                           Employee Integrity

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee will examine employee 
corruption and misconduct issues and their effect on homeland 
security. Although the vast majority of Department employees 
reflect the agency's core values, even one corrupt employee 
represents a significant management challenge. The Committee 
will review Department statistics and case studies associated 
with employee integrity issues, as well as, the effectiveness 
of policies, procedures, and practices the Department utilizes 
to address such employee integrity issues.

                      Privacy and Civil Liberties

    Section 222 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 
107-296) created a Privacy Officer for the Department of 
Homeland Security to ensure that the Department's information 
gathering and analysis functions and other programs across its 
components adhere to established standards for the protection 
of privacy. Section 705 of the Act also established an Officer 
for Civil Rights and Liberties to review and assess information 
alleging abuses of civil rights or civil liberties by employees 
and officials of the Department of Homeland Security. During 
the 115th Congress, the Committee will continue to monitor the 
Department's efforts under such laws to strike an appropriate 
balance between the need to combat terrorist attacks against 
the United States with the privacy expectations and civil 
rights of US citizens. Also, the Committee will examine the 
extent to which the Department is transparent with the American 
people, including its process for managing Freedom of 
Information Act (FOIA) requests.

  SUBCOMMITTEE ON EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS, RESPONSE, AND COMMUNICATIONS


                       Preparedness and Response

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee will examine the 
Administration's efforts to accomplish the National 
Preparedness Goal through the National Preparedness System and 
its various frameworks. Additionally, the Committee will review 
the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA) response and 
recovery efforts for declared disasters to ensure capabilities 
are enhanced by lessons learned and Federal resources are used 
appropriately. The Committee will investigate issues, if any, 
of waste, fraud, and abuse associated with FEMA's disaster 
response efforts.

     Assistance to State and Local Governments and First Responders

    Throughout the 115th Congress, the Committee will examine 
FEMA's allocation and administration of grants to enhance the 
ability of state and local governments and emergency response 
providers to prevent, prepare for, respond to, mitigate, and 
recover from a terrorist attack. The Committee will review the 
coordination of grant programs within the Department of 
Homeland Security in developing guidance and administering 
grants; the ability of state and local governments to access, 
obligate, and expend funds; the strength of regional 
partnerships developed through grants; and the risk-based 
distribution and expenditure of such grants at the state and 
local levels. The Committee will examine options to increase 
the efficiency and effectiveness of grant programs. The 
Committee will also review ongoing efforts to comprehensively 
assess these investments and the impact on preparedness 
capabilities through the lens of the National Preparedness 
Goal, National Preparedness Report, State Preparedness Reports, 
and other related assessments.

Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Planning, Preparedness, 
                              and Response

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee will examine the 
significant challenges posed by chemical, biological, 
radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) agents to homeland security 
and will assess the Department's progress in implementing 
security strategies to reduce the likelihood and impact of CBRN 
attacks, and, thus, the CBRN risk to the Nation. The Committee 
will assess the Department's organization to respond to these 
threats. In addition, the Committee will oversee the 
Department's efforts to predict and respond to the evolving 
CBRN threat landscape, and ensure that CBRN expenditures are 
risk-based, coordinated, and, in general, represent the wise 
use of taxpayer dollars.

                             Communications

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee will examine the 
coordination of various communications programs and offices 
within the Department of Homeland Security, including the 
achievement and maintenance of interoperable communications 
capabilities among the Department's components, as required by 
the Department of Homeland Security Interoperable 
Communications Act (Pub. Law 114-29). The Committee will 
monitor activities of the First Responder Network Authority 
(FirstNet) and the development of the public safety 
interoperable wireless broadband network. In addition, the 
Committee will review the Department's Integrated Public Alert 
and Warning System to ensure timely and effective alerts and 
warnings are provided to the public in the event of an 
emergency and the Department fully implements the requirements 
of the Integrated Public Alert and Warning System Modernization 
Act of 2015 (Pub. Law 114-143).

                         Training and Exercises

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee will review the 
Department's training and exercise programs, including 
awareness of these resources among first responders and state 
and local governments. The Committee will review existing 
training centers and determine whether the Department is 
optimally utilizing these facilities to enhance first responder 
terrorism preparedness. The Committee will also examine the 
Department's efforts to streamline and improve the National 
Exercise Program to ensure the program enhances the 
preparedness of the Nation. The Committee will monitor the 
extent to which FEMA is incorporating lessons learned from 
national exercises into future training, planning, and 
response, recovery, and mitigation activities.

                        Research and Development

    Throughout the 115th Congress, the Committee will focus on 
the Science and Technology Directorate (S&T;) and its ability to 
provide DHS components with the technology advancements needed 
to effectively carry out their respective missions. The 
Committee will also examine S&T;'s collaboration with the 
Federally Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDC) and 
the transparency with which S&T; reports this work to Congress. 
During the 115th Congress, the Committee will also examine the 
effectiveness of the S&T; Centers of Excellence to provide the 
DHS components with advanced technologies that help them carry 
out their respective missions. The Committee will also provide 
oversight on the effectiveness of the Integrated Product Teams 
(IPT) and the process established to ensure the most urgent 
needs of the DHS components are met in a timely fashion.

         SUBCOMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION AND PROTECTIVE SECURITY


                     Advancing Risk-Based Security

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee will continue to 
examine TSA's long-term goals for TSA PreTM 
and assess the effectiveness of TSA's passenger, baggage and 
cargo screening operations. The Committee will evaluate TSA's 
successes and challenges in expanding enrollment in TSA 
PreTM, including through contracts with 
private sector entities, and examine TSA's methodology to 
decide which passengers are eligible for TSA 
PreTM. Additionally, the Committee will 
monitor TSA's efforts to protect passenger privacy.
    The Committee will also examine how TSA is ensuring that 
passengers that are designated high-risk are receiving enhanced 
screening at the checkpoint. Finally, the Committee will assess 
whether there are additional ways for TSA to enhance security 
and implement risk-based strategies at the screening checkpoint 
or in other areas of security, such as checked baggage 
screening operations, cargo security, and aviation access 
control points at domestic airports.

                  Enhancing Private Sector Engagement

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee will conduct oversight 
to ensure that TSA is effectively engaging the private sector 
to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of its operations. 
Specifically, the Committee will evaluate the contracting 
process and management of TSA's Screening Partnership Program 
(SPP) and the use of third party canine teams. The Committee 
will work to ensure that stakeholders are properly consulted on 
major security policy decisions and airport staffing 
allocations, through the Aviation Security Advisory Committee 
or other means. The Committee will encourage TSA to find new 
ways to leverage private sector expertise, innovation, and 
technologies in its mission to secure the Nation's critical 
transportation systems in the most effective and efficient 
manner possible.

                   Targeting Waste, Fraud, and Abuse

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee will conduct 
oversight to identify and prevent waste, fraud, or abuse within 
TSA. As part of this overall effort, the Committee will 
continue to conduct oversight on the implementation of the 
Transportation Security Acquisition Reform Act (Pub. Law 113-
245), and monitor whether TSA is complying with the provisions 
outlined in the Act. This includes, among other things, better 
private sector engagement, strategic planning, and utilizing 
innovation opportunities within the private sector from small 
businesses, and transparency in how tax dollars are spent to 
avoid wasteful spending on technologies that do not perform as 
intended. The Committee will also look at instances of employee 
misconduct and agency retaliation against whistleblowers. 
Finally, the Committee will also examine TSA's process of 
designating information as Sensitive Security Information to 
determine if the designation is being abused.

       Streamlining and Improving Surface Transportation Security

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee will review TSA's 
efforts to secure surface transit systems, including the 
highest-risk mass transit and rail systems. The Committee's 
oversight will include a review of the Visible Intermodal 
Prevention and Response Program, the Surface Transportation 
Security Inspection Program, and TSA's surface transportation 
security regulations. The Committee will review the extent to 
which TSA effectively coordinates with its Federal, State, 
local, and private sector partners to secure our Nation's 
transportation systems and to help prevent conflicting or 
unnecessarily redundant regulations. The Committee will also 
assess the effectiveness of TSA's efforts to secure the 
Nation's pipeline systems through TSA's oversight and 
inspection activities.

                      United States Secret Service

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee will examine the 
homeland security operations of the United States Secret 
Service. The Committee will conduct oversight on the Secret 
Service's complete integrated mission, including protecting the 
President of the United States and other Executive branch 
officials and investigating financial and cybercrime. The 
Committee will also examine the Secret Service's lead role in 
planning and executing security operations for National Special 
Security Events, such as the 2017 Presidential Inauguration. 
The Committee will also examine the agency's staffing model, 
including whether it has adequate resources to meet its current 
and projected needs as well as the agency's flexibility to 
handle unanticipated events. The Committee will also give 
robust oversight to the steps the agency is taking to address 
its longstanding concerns with hiring practices, promotion 
policies and morale. Finally, the Committee will monitor the 
ongoing efforts to reform the management of the agency and 
implement the recommendations from the 2014 Protective Mission 
Panel.

      SUBCOMMITTEE ON CYBERSECURITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee will conduct 
oversight of all the cybersecurity activities of the Department 
of Homeland Security (DHS) and, in particular, on activities 
within the National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD), 
the U.S Secret Service, and the Science and Technology 
Directorate. Areas of examination will include the President's 
Executive Orders 13636, Improving Critical Infrastructure 
Cybersecurity, and the Presidential Policy Directive 41 (PPD-
41), United States Cyber Incident Coordination, and operations 
of NPPD's EINSTEIN and Continuous Diagnostics and Mitigation 
(CDM) programs for securing Federal networks.
    The Committee will also consider the organization of NPPD 
to ensure that the component is properly structured to carry 
out the Cybersecurity and Information Sharing Act of 2015 as 
efficiently as possible. The Committee will also examine ways 
to further build the Department's cybersecurity capability and 
capacity, in order to implement newly assigned cyber statutory 
authorities.
    Finally, the Committee will examine the implementation of 
cybersecurity legislation enacted during the 113th Congress 
including the National Cybersecurity Protection Act of 2014, 
(Pub. L. 113-282) (authorizing the National Cybersecurity 
Communications and Integration Center, or NCCIC); the Federal 
Information Security Modernization Act of 2014, Pub. L. 113-283 
(authorizing DHS to carry out federal information security 
activities); the Cybersecurity Enhancement Act of 2014, (Pub. 
L. 113-274) (providing for improvements to cybersecurity 
through public-private partnerships, education, awareness, and 
development of standards and best practices); and the 
Cybersecurity Workforce Assessment Act, (Pub. L. 113-246) 
(calling for a comprehensive cyber workforce strategy with 
workforce assessments every three years) to, among other 
things, authorize the National Cybersecurity Communications and 
Integration Center (NCCIC), help improve the cybersecurity 
workforce, and grant DHS the authority to carry out protection 
of Federal civilian networks (Pub. Laws 113-246, 113-274, 113-
277, 113-282, and 113-283).
    During the 115th Congress the Committee will conduct 
oversight into DHS' engagement with the private sector on cyber 
risks to the Internet of Things.
    The Committee will continue to monitor the security of 
Federal buildings and facilities, including the role and 
effectiveness of the Federal Protective Service (FPS). The 
Committee will also examine the general management of FPS, 
including its vehicle fleet, personnel policies, and training 
program. Additionally, the Committee will monitor FPS's 
oversight and management of federal facility contract guard 
personnel.

                 Protection of Critical Infrastructure

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee will examine NPPD's 
programs to protect critical infrastructure, with key focus on 
internal coordination mechanisms to ensure that expertise from 
both the cyber and physical `sides of the house' can be 
leveraged efficiently and effectively, specifically with 
respect to the work of the Office of Cyber and Infrastructure 
Analysis (OCIA). The Committee will also review how DHS, 
through NPPD, works with the various critical infrastructure 
sectors pursuant to Presidential Policy Directive 21, Critical 
Infrastructure Security and Resilience (PPD-21).
    During the 115th Congress the Committee will continue to 
oversee the Department's implementation of the Chemical 
Facility Anti-Terrorism Standard (CFATS) program, which 
requires high risk chemical facility owners and operators to 
report chemical holdings, perform vulnerability assessments, 
and adopt risk-based security measures to protect against the 
threat of a terrorist attack. The Protecting and Securing 
Chemical Facilities from Terrorism Act of 2014, (Pub. L. 113-
254), conveys CFATS statutory authority until December 18, 
2018, at which point the Committee will rely on these oversight 
activities and findings to consider improvements or 
modifications to the CFATS program which can be achieved 
through reauthorization.
    Further the Committee will continue to monitor the 
Department's efforts to establish a program to secure the sale 
and transfer of ammonium nitrate, as required by the Secure 
Handling of Ammonium Nitrate Act of 2008 (563, Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, Pub. L. 110-161). After being unable to 
implement a program for several years, the Department is 
currently reviewing how common Improvised Explosive Device 
(IED) chemical precursors move through commerce to better 
inform a solution that considers many IED precursors of 
concern. DHS is also continuing to develop a program to secure 
ammonium nitrate against the threat of terrorist misuse.

              SUBCOMMITTEE ON BORDER AND MARITIME SECURITY


                 Border Security Between Ports of Entry

    During the 115th Congress, the Committee will examine the 
Department's efforts to secure land and maritime borders of the 
United States, including but not limited to personnel, 
technology, infrastructure, and coordination between 
components. The Committee will also assess the status of 
programs and international agreements to secure US borders from 
illegal entry by persons or contraband. The Committee will 
monitor the extent to which the Department can measure its 
performance in securing the borders and how these measures 
reflect the state of border security. The Committee will also 
examine the technologies used to secure the borders and the 
Department's acquisitions efforts regarding border security 
technologies.
    Finally, the Committee will examine the Department's 
efforts to identify, detain, prioritize, and remove criminal 
aliens from the United States, including those apprehended at 
or near US borders and ports of entry who are subject to 
removal, and particularly those from special interest 
countries.

                   Border Security at Ports of Entry

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee will examine the 
integration and effectiveness of transportation and border 
security screening systems at ports of entry for detecting 
high-risk passengers and cargo transported within the United 
States and across our borders, including efforts to better 
facilitate travel and trade such as implementation of ``trusted 
traveler'' programs, expansion of CBP Preclearance locations 
and the Beyond the Border Agreement with Canada.
    The Committee will continue its rigorous oversight of the 
Department of Homeland Security's biometric programs including 
the accuracy and completeness of databases and the development 
and implementing of a biometric exit system in the air, sea and 
land environments. The biometric entry system was a 9/11 
Commission recommendation and was first implemented in 2003 
with the creation of US-VISIT. The recommendation to support a 
biometric exit system has not been completed, and, for the 
first time, Congress has provided the Department with a 
dedicated funding stream to complete an exit system at the 
nation's largest airports by 2018.
    The Committee will examine the technology and 
infrastructure needs at ports of entry to better facilitate 
trade and travel while also strengthening border security. 
Congress recently authorized U.S. Customs and Border Protection 
to enter into Public Private Partnership agreements that 
leverage private dollars to enhance services at the nation's 
air, land and sea ports of entry, which will also be a key area 
of oversight.

                             Visa Security

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee intends to review 
efforts to ensure the deployment and implementation of training 
and infrastructure enhancements to assist border and consular 
officials in identifying, intercepting, and disrupting 
terrorists or others who would do the Nation harm by attempting 
to enter the United States. The Committee will address any 
security-related deficiencies in the immigration and 
naturalization process that terrorists could use to gain entry 
to or remain in the country for illegitimate purposes.
    The Committee will continue to review visa security 
programs and policies to ensure adequate screening and vetting 
by DHS law enforcement including the Visa Security Program, the 
Preadjudicated Threat Recognition and Intelligence Operations 
Teams (PATRIOT), as well as reviewing the criteria for 
admission under the Visa Waiver Program's Electronic System for 
Travel Authorization (ESTA). These programs are critical to 
countering the growing threat of foreign fighters, including 
Americans and Europeans, who may attempt to join ISIS or its 
affiliates in Syria or Iraq, and who may return or travel to 
the United States to commit acts of terrorism.
    The Committee will also examine the integration, security, 
and reliability of criminal immigration and terrorist databases 
used to screen persons seeking to enter and exit this country, 
to include advanced passenger information, and will assess the 
development of secure travel documents.

                       Port and Maritime Security

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee will examine various 
aspects of port and maritime security, including the security 
of port facilities; the screening of vessels, passengers, 
cargo, and crew, for potential terrorists, terrorist weapons, 
and contraband. Specifically, the Committee will examine 
nuclear detection efforts and the development of international 
security standards for shipping and containers. The Committee 
will also analyze and conduct oversight on the statutorily 
required security assessment of the Transportation Worker 
Identification Credential (TWIC) program.
    The Committee also plans to review how the Department 
manages risks emerging from maritime threats and 
vulnerabilities such as small ``go-fast'' boats, panga vessels, 
yola boats, and semi-submersible vessels. The Committee will 
continue its oversight of the increasing maritime smuggling 
threat along the California coast and the impact of fewer 
interdiction assets and holding platforms in the source and 
transit zones.
    The Committee plans to review the efficiency and 
effectiveness of the Department's supply chain security 
programs, such as the Customs Trade Partnership Against 
Terrorism (C-TPAT), the Container Security Initiative (CSI), 
and the need to utilize a risk-based methodology and the future 
of the Radiation Portal Monitor program to ensure a proper 
balance between the facilitation of lawful trade and the 
security of the homeland. This will include an assessment of 
implementation of certain provisions of the Maritime and 
Transportation Security Act of 2002 (Pub. L. 107-295), the 
Security and Accountability for Every (SAFE) Port Act of 2006 
(Pub. L. 109-347), relevant provisions of the Intelligence 
Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (Pub. L. 108-458), 
and the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act 
of 2007 (Pub. L. 110-53).
    The Committee will examine the operations and procedures of 
U.S. Customs and Border Protection's Air and Marine Operations 
(AMO), specifically looking at AMO's interagency working 
relationships with law enforcement and Department partners and 
its specific capabilities and authorities. The Committee will 
review AMO's operational platforms and future acquisition 
programs to ensure both aviation and maritime assets are 
capable of meeting future mission needs and service 
requirements.
    The Committee plans to review the Coast Guard's statutorily 
defined homeland security missions, to include ports, 
waterways, and coastal security; drug interdiction; migrant 
interdiction; law enforcement; and defense readiness. The 
Committee will examine Coast Guard operations to ensure that 
the service is using a risk-based, layered strategy to enforce 
laws and keep America's waters secure. This will include a 
specific assessment of the Coast Guard's counter terrorism 
capabilities, including the Maritime Safety and Security Teams 
(MSST), Port Security Units, Tactical Law Enforcement Teams, 
and the Maritime Security Response Team (MSRT).
    The Committee will review resource and asset needs within 
the Coast Guard to determine whether the service is 
operationally ready to address the varied threats to America's 
ports and waterways while pursuing a long-term sustainable path 
of fleet recapitalization.
    Finally, the Committee will investigate the Coast Guard's 
specific maritime security operations and initiatives, such as 
the International Port Security Program and the inspection of 
vessels originating from ports with inadequate anti-terrorism 
measures. The Committee will examine these and other programs 
to ensure that the service is improving its maritime domain 
awareness and executing all of its missions in the most 
effective manner possible to keep America secure.

           SUBCOMMITTEE ON COUNTERTERRORISM AND INTELLIGENCE

    The security of the United States is undeniably linked to 
international security. Vulnerabilities in one part of the 
world can quickly become security threats in another; to 
include the U.S. Homeland. During the 115th Congress, the 
Committee will examine the capabilities and efforts of the 
Federal government, particularly the Department of Homeland 
Security (DHS), to identify, prevent, deter, and respond to 
threats to the Homeland.

       Emerging Threats and Homeland Counterterrorism Activities

    The Committee will examine worldwide threats to the U.S. 
Homeland from terrorist groups, including the Islamic State of 
Iraq and Syria (ISIS), al Qaeda core, al Qaeda in the Arabian 
Peninsula (AQAP), al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), al 
Shabaab, Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), Lashkar-e-Taiba 
(LeT), Boko Haram, and other emerging groups that seek to 
establish safe havens or plot attacks against U.S. citizens and 
the Homeland. The Committee will also examine the threat from 
homegrown violent extremists and terrorist networks in the 
United States. Additionally, the Committee will monitor issues 
related to foreign fighter travel and trends, economic threats, 
and terrorist financing.

              International Counterterrorism Partnerships

    The Committee will review U.S. counterterrorism cooperation 
with major foreign partners, with the goal of improving the 
efficiency and effectiveness of international information 
sharing, training and best practices, and coordination. The 
Committee will examine international counterterrorism 
agreements and gather data from Departments and Agencies, as 
well as foreign partners.

               Radicalization, Propaganda, and Influence

    The Committee will examine the security implications of 
foreign influence and propaganda directed at the Homeland, 
including the recruiting and radicalization by terrorist 
networks and propaganda developed and distributed by foreign 
adversaries. The Committee will assess homegrown terror threats 
and Federal, State and local efforts to address those threats. 
The Committee will continue to review Federal efforts to combat 
radicalization, particularly in prisons, to include how Federal 
agencies share information on potentially radicalized inmates 
with other appropriate entities.

               Homeland Security Intelligence Enterprise

    The Committee will conduct oversight of DHS's Intelligence 
Enterprise (DHS IE), including intelligence activities 
throughout the Department and component agencies. This will 
include a focus on the coordination and collaboration across 
intelligence offices and personnel within the Headquarters' 
elements and component agencies. Additionally, the Committee 
will review efforts to build the intelligence, analytical, and 
assessment capabilities of the Department and to ensure its 
full participation in the Intelligence Community as part of its 
homeland security mission. This will include an examination of 
the hiring authorities, practices, and career-development of 
intelligence analysts and professionals within Headquarters 
elements and component agencies.
    The Committee will examine the Department's role in 
managing, distributing, and using terrorist threat information 
in furtherance of its homeland security mission. The Committee 
will monitor the extent to which DHS effectively coordinates 
and collaborates with other Federal, State, and local agencies 
to mitigate threats to the Homeland. The Committee will also 
review how DHS agencies collect and share information, 
including through vital security vetting programs.
    The Committee will continue to assess the development of 
DHS counterintelligence and insider threat programs, including 
Departmental organizational changes, resources, monitoring 
programs, and training initiatives. DHS's counterintelligence 
efforts are intended to prevent adversaries from penetrating 
the Department to exploit sensitive information, operations, 
programs, personnel, and resources.

                          Information Sharing

    The Committee will examine the Department's efforts to 
improve homeland security and terrorism information sharing 
among Federal, state, and local governments; law enforcement 
entities; first responders and emergency management personnel; 
and the private sector. The Committee will examine the 
Department's initiatives to coordinate information sharing to 
and from state and local fusion centers throughout the country, 
and will continue to evaluate the efficacy and efficiency of 
the National Network of Fusion Centers to determine their 
impact on securing the homeland. The Committee will also review 
coordination and information sharing procedures between state 
and local fusion centers and Joint Terrorism Task Forces.
    The Committee will examine the Department's role in 
managing, distributing, and otherwise using terrorist threat 
information in furtherance of its homeland security mission. 
The Committee will also examine how the Department's component 
agencies conduct outreach to state and local law enforcement 
agencies, as well as other emergency response agencies, to 
identify best practices as well as address ongoing 
deficiencies.

                   COMMITTEE ON HOUSE ADMINISTRATION

                      COMMITTEE RESOLUTION 115-__

    Resolved, that the Oversight and Authorization Plan of the 
Committee on House Administration for the 115th Congress, as 
required pursuant to clause 2(d)(1) of Rule X, is hereby 
adopted, as follows:

                    OVERSIGHT AND AUTHORIZATION PLAN

                            MEMBER SERVICES

Member Services
     Oversee Members' allowance amounts, including 
structure and regulations.
     Provide guidance and outreach to congressional 
offices to ensure compliance with Committee regulations.
     Review and revise as necessary the Guide to 
Outfitting and Maintaining an Office of the U.S. House of 
Representatives, a set of regulations governing the 
acquisition, transfer, and disposal of furnishings, equipment, 
software, and related services.8Review and update as 
appropriate the calculation of the Members' Representational 
Allowances to ensure Members have adequate resources to carry 
out their responsibilities.
     Oversee the process by which vouchers and direct 
payments are conducted, including those for payroll. Continue 
to monitor the migration to an electronic voucher system.
New Member Orientation
     Review successes and areas of improvement from 
previous New Member Orientations. Plan, implement, and oversee 
the New Member Orientation Program for newly-elected Members of 
Congress.
     Oversee the planning and implementation of the 
Congressional Research Service New Member Issues Seminar.
Intern Program
     In coordination with the Senate Committee on Rules 
and Administration, organize, administer, and oversee the 
Intern Lecture Series.
     Review and revise, as appropriate, the Intern 
Handbook and other publications and communication materials 
used in support of the Intern Program.
     Continue and expand the Congressional Internship 
Program for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities.

                    COMMITTEE FUNDING AND OVERSIGHT

     Review Monthly Reports on committee activities and 
expenditures.
     Review the Committees' Congressional Handbook 
regulations governing expenditure of committee funds and update 
regulations as needed.
     Review Primary and any Secondary Expense 
Resolutions and approve authorization of committee-funding 
levels in committee and by House Resolution.
     Review Committees' Franking expenditures.
     Monitor continued implementation of the Committee 
hearing room modernization program.

                CONGRESSIONAL ACCOUNTABILITY ACT OF 1995

     Monitor application of the Congressional 
Accountability Act of 1995 (CAA) (PL 104-1).
     Review regulations, and proposed regulations, 
adopted by the Office of Compliance.
     Evaluate resources available to the Office of 
Compliance and House employing offices to facilitate 
implementation of the Act.
     Conduct general oversight of the Office of 
Compliance.
     Monitor ongoing judicial proceedings to determine 
the impact on the CAA.

                          FRANKING COMMISSION

     Oversee the Members' use of the congressional 
frank by providing guidance, advice, and counsel through 
consultation or advisory opinion on the frankability of 
congressional mail.
     Review proposals to reform mass mailing practices 
of Members, and regulations governing such mailings, and 
monitor current prohibition on mass mailings 90 days before a 
primary or general election.
     Review previously implemented rules to increase 
disclosure and improve the accounting of franked mail costs.
     Review and update the Regulations on the Use of 
the Congressional Frank and Rules on Practice in Proceedings 
Before the House Commission on Congressional Mailing Standards.

                  HOUSE OFFICERS AND HOUSE OPERATIONS

     Work with House Officers and Officials to identify 
and achieve long term goals for the administrative, financial 
and operational functions of the House.
     Work with House Officers to streamline operations 
within the House.
     Review proposals and other initiatives submitted 
by the House Officers, the Inspector General, the Capitol 
Police Board, the Architect of the Capitol, the Library of 
Congress, and other legislative branch agencies to improve 
management and operations and monitor implementation of 
respective proposals.
     Coordinate with the Subcommittee on Legislative 
Appropriations on areas of concurrent jurisdiction.
     Provide policy guidance to the House Officers, 
Inspector General and the joint entities, as appropriate.
     Oversee compliance with the House Employee 
Classification Act (2 U.S.C. 291 et seq.).
     Oversee coordination among officers and joint 
entities on administrative and technology matters.
     Review and update security and safety protocols in 
the House, monitor congressional entities charged with 
implementing protocols and provide policy guidance where 
appropriate.
Chief Administrative Officer
     Oversee the functions of the Chief Administrative 
Officer and provide policy guidance where appropriate.
     Review the development and implementation of the 
Chief Administrative Officer's strategic plan.
     Review Chief Administrative Officer's efforts to 
strengthen cybersecurity in the House.
     Monitor House procurement policies, including the 
effectiveness of the Chief Administrative Officer's procurement 
and contract management functions.
     Review procedures for processing contracts with 
the House that exceed the threshold of $350,000.
     Monitor implementation of food services contract 
with Sodexo.
     Oversee the House financial management system, 
including financial counseling.
     Oversee House Information Resource operations, 
including services provided, maintained or hosted by HIR, steps 
taken to improve HIR services to Members, as well as steps 
taken by HIR to strengthen vulnerabilities related to 
continuity of operations.
     Review semi-annual financial and operational 
status reports; oversee implementation of changes in operations 
to improve services and increase efficiencies.
     Monitor the operations of the House gift shop and 
its management.
     Monitor CAO communications efforts, including but 
not limited to HouseNet and Dear Colleagues.
     Monitor transition efforts from the 114th to the 
115th Congress, including leases, phones, and technology.
     Oversee CAO Human Resource Office, including 
panels compiled and review processes followed to hire new 
employees.
     Monitor House Learning Center and Wounded Warrior 
programs.
     Review furniture policies, including inventory and 
selection.
     Review alternatives to the current mail delivery 
process in order to strengthen the services and tools available 
to Members and staff.
     Oversee the Cannon House Office Building 
renovations.
     Monitor efforts to strengthen the CAO Asset 
Management program.
     Monitor Chief Administrative Officer's role in 
assuring accessibility to the House wing of the Capitol, the 
House Office Buildings and other House facilities consistent 
with the Americans with Disabilities Act.
Clerk of the House
     Monitor Clerk's operations, including procurement 
policies.
     Review and approve contracts and requests for 
proposals by the Clerk that exceed the $350,000 spending 
threshold.
     Monitor implementation of improvements to the 
electronic voting system.
     Oversee the House Document Repository.
     Review standards for the electronic exchange of 
legislative information among the Houses of Congress and 
legislative-branch agencies.
     Coordinate on matters under the jurisdiction of 
the House Fine Arts Board.
     Continue review of functions and administrative 
operations assigned to the Clerk.
     Review semi-annual financial and operational 
status reports; recommend changes in operations to improve 
services and increase efficiencies.
     Review the printing needs of the Clerk to evaluate 
the potential for eliminating duplication.
     Oversee preparation of congressionally-authorized 
publications.
     Oversee efforts to improve transparency including 
monitor bulk data and digital transformation.
Sergeant-at-Arms
     Review and oversee security operations in the 
House, including the House chamber, the galleries, the Capitol, 
House Office Buildings, Capitol Grounds, and District offices.
     Review and oversee initiatives designed to 
increase security and security awareness for Members and staff 
in district offices.
     Review semi-annual financial and operational 
status reports; recommend changes in operations to improve 
services and increase efficiencies.
     Review impact of electronic access to controlled 
spaces.
     Continue review of functions and administrative 
operations assigned to the Sergeant-at-Arms.
     Review the security operation of House parking 
facilities, regulations, and allocation of parking spaces.
     Consult with the Sergeant-at-Arms on policies 
adopted by the Capitol Police Board.
     Review the policies and procedures for visitor 
access to the Capitol.
     Review the printing needs of the Sergeant-at-Arms 
and the Capitol Police Board to identify the potential for 
eliminating duplication.
     Examine Sergeant-at-Arms' role in assuring 
accessibility to the House wing of the Capitol, the House 
Office Buildings, and other House facilities consistent with 
the Americans with Disabilities Act.
     Review the use of technology generally in the 
protection of the House of Representatives.
     Oversee the Office of Emergency Management, 
including the implementation of coordinated plans for emergency 
evacuation and response.

House Inspector General

     Review proposed audit plan and audit reports, 
including the annual financial statements audit.
     Review comprehensive financial and operational 
audits of the House, investigate any irregularities uncovered, 
and monitor necessary improvements.
     Monitor progress of House audits.
     Monitor Inspector General's internal operations.
     Direct Inspector General to conduct management 
advisories to improve House operations.

           OVERSIGHT OF LEGISLATIVE BRANCH AND OTHER ENTITIES

Information and Technology Coordination

     Oversee, in conjunction with the Senate, forums to 
share technology plans and capabilities among the legislative 
branch agencies.
     Oversee, in conjunction with the Senate, the 
Legislative Branch Telecommunications group.
     Oversee management of the Congress.gov website.
     Oversee work of the Legislative Branch Financial 
Managers' Council.
     Oversee, in conjunction with the Senate, proposals 
to reduce technology costs through consolidation and use of 
internet-based resources.

Library of Congress

     Monitor Library of Congress' management 
operations, services and planning initiatives.
     Monitor progress made related to providing public 
access to government information, especially in electronic 
form.
     Oversee Library of Congress' operations, including 
inventory and cataloguing systems, and the Library's 
information technology services.
     Continue oversight of Law Library operations.
     Continue oversight of Congressional Research 
Service operations, and consider any need to modify management 
of the Service.
     Review implementation of the Library of Congress 
Fiscal Operations Improvement Act of 2000 (Public Law 106-481), 
the Veterans' Oral History Project Act (Public Law 106-380), 
the National Recording Preservation Act of 2000 (Public Law No: 
106-474), the Gold Star Families Voices Act (Public Law 114-
246) and the History of the House Awareness and Preservation 
Act (Public Law 106-99).
     Consider human-resources legislation proposed by 
the Library.
     Review the use of technology generally in Library 
of Congress operations.
     Review printing policies of the Library of 
Congress to assure compliance with Title 44 of the U.S. Code.
     Review reports by Library of Congress Inspector 
General and implementation of audit recommendations. Examine 
options to improve operation and structure of the Library of 
Congress Inspector General's office.
     Oversee management of Copyright Office.
     Monitor efforts to modernize and streamline 
Copyright Office's information technology systems.

United States Capitol Police

     Monitor administrative operations of the agency, 
including budgetary management, civilian component, attrition 
rates, recruitment efforts and incentive programs for officers 
and civilian employees.
     Review proposals for additional USCP facilities 
and equipment.
     Monitor efforts to improve safety at firing range.
     Review analysis of uniformed officer post/duty 
assignments to determine and authorize force levels to meet the 
agency's security requirements within the Capitol complex to 
include the Capitol Visitor Center, the Library of Congress and 
U.S. Botanic Garden.
     Review and consider proposals to improve USCP 
training program for new recruits, and in-service training.
     Authorize and oversee the installation and 
maintenance of new security systems and devices proposed by the 
Police Board.
     Review and authorize regulations prescribed by the 
Police Board for use of law enforcement authority by the 
Capitol Police.
     Examine Capitol Police role in assuring 
accessibility to the House wing of the Capitol, House Office 
Buildings and other facilities consistent with the Americans 
with Disabilities Act.
     Monitor the ongoing implementation of the Radio 
Modernization Project.
     Review reports by USCP Inspector General and 
implementation of audit recommendations. Examine options to 
improve operation and structure of the USCP Inspector General's 
office.

Government Publishing Office

     Oversee operations of the Government Publishing 
Office, including the Superintendent of Documents.
     Review and adopt legislative proposals to reform 
government printing by eliminating redundancies and unnecessary 
printing, increasing efficiency, and enhancing public access to 
government publications.
     Monitor implementation of remedial actions taken 
by management to address audit issues identified by the GPO 
Inspector General.
     Review the printing needs of the House of 
Representatives to identify the potential for eliminating 
duplication.
     Examine current GPO printing and binding 
regulations to determine advisability of change.
     Oversee Superintendent of Documents' Sales and 
Depository Library Programs.
     Review GPO labor practices and labor agreements.
     Review use of GPO facilities and other assets to 
identify possible alternatives enhancing value to the Congress 
and the public.

Architect of the Capitol

     Review the operations of the office of the 
Architect.
     Review the electronic and procured services 
provided by the Architect.
     Oversee Architect of the Capitol's maintenance of 
House buildings and the House side of the Capitol, and review 
plans for rehabilitation of House buildings, including 
oversight over the Cannon House Office Building renovation.
     Continue oversight of life safety measures, 
accessibility measures, and improved evacuation mechanisms in 
House buildings.
     Review the AOC Office of Sustainability's efforts 
to reduce energy consumption by the Capitol complex.
     Oversee operations of the Capitol Visitors Center, 
in conjunction with the Senate Committee on Rules and 
Administration.
     Review reports by Architect of the Capitol 
Inspector General and implementation of audit recommendations. 
Examine options to improve operation and structure of the 
Architect of the Capitol Inspector General's office.
     Monitor activities and operations of the House 
Superintendent, including Rayburn Garage closure and re-
construction.

Office of Congressional Accessibility Services

     Oversee management and operations of Office of 
Congressional Accessibility Services, such as the 
implementation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), in 
conjunction with Senate Committee on Rules and Administration.

Smithsonian Institution

     Review the Smithsonian Inspector General's reports 
on the status of the Smithsonian.
     Oversee general museum and research facility 
operations of the Smithsonian Institution.
     Review and evaluate the Smithsonian Institution's 
use of authorized public funds.
     Review proposed appointments of Citizen Regents to 
the Smithsonian Institution's Board of Regents.
     Review proposals for authorization of new 
Smithsonian facilities. Review Smithsonian policies regarding 
initiation of planning, design and construction of projects.
     Review operations of the National Zoo.
     Review operations and conduct oversight of 
Smithsonian Enterprises.
     Review the use of technology generally in 
Smithsonian operations.
     Review any proposals to charge fees for admission 
to any Smithsonian exhibits.
     Monitor Air and Space Museum Renovations

                      TECHNOLOGY USE BY THE HOUSE

     Continue oversight of House Information Resources 
and other technology functions of the House to improve 
technology governance, services and the electronic 
dissemination of information.
     Oversee implementation of House Rule XI 2(e)(4) 
requiring committee documentation to be made available 
electronically, to the maximum extent feasible.
     Review and improve cybersecurity measures as 
necessary.
     Review technology standards for hearing rooms as 
they relate to the Committee broadcast program.
     Oversee and continue to implement an enterprise 
House Disaster Recovery Program for House offices, standing and 
select committees and Member offices.
     Oversee implementation of the House Office of 
Legislative Counsel & Law Revision Counsel's Modernization 
Project.
     Oversee and coordinate the House strategic 
technology plan.
     Oversee continuation of House technology 
assessment in both new media and cloud services.

            OVERSIGHT OF FEDERAL ELECTION LAW AND PROCEDURES

     Recommend disposition of House election contests 
pending before the Committee; monitor any disputed election 
counts.
     Review operations of the Federal Election 
Commission (FEC) and evaluate possible changes to improve 
efficiency, improve enforcement of the Federal Election 
Campaign Act, and improve procedures for the disclosure of 
contributions and expenditures. Consider authorization issues 
and make recommendations on the FEC's budget.
     Review federal campaign-finance laws and 
regulations, including Presidential public financing, and 
consider potential reforms.
     Examine the role and impact of political 
organizations on federal elections.
     Eliminate the Election Assistance Commission (EAC) 
and evaluate other possible changes to improve efficiency and 
improve implementation of the Help America Vote Act (HAVA). 
Consider authorization issues and make recommendations on the 
EAC's budget.
     Examine the impact of amendments made by HAVA and 
the Military and Overseas Voter Empowerment Act (MOVE Act) to 
the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act 
(UOCAVA), and consider proposals to improve voting methods for 
those serving and living abroad.
     Review state and federal activities under the 
National Voter Registration Act to identify potential for 
improvement to voter registration and education programs and 
reducing costs of compliance for state and local government.
     Review all aspects of registration and voting 
practices in federal elections. Monitor allegations of fraud 
and misconduct during all phases of federal elections and 
evaluate measures to improve the integrity of the electoral 
process.
                       COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY

                   AUTHORIZATION AND OVERSIGHT PLANS


                           February 15, 2017

    In accordance with Rule X of the House of Representatives, 
the Committee on the Judiciary is responsible for determining 
whether the laws and programs within its jurisdiction are 
implemented and carried out in accordance with the intent of 
Congress and whether they should be continued, curtailed, 
eliminated, or enhanced. Accordingly, in the 115th Congress the 
Committee will review all laws and programs within its 
jurisdiction to assess their application, administration, 
execution, and effectiveness. The Committee will also review 
the organization and operation of Federal agencies and entities 
within its jurisdiction for the administration and execution of 
laws and programs within its jurisdiction.
    The Committee will review the mission and operations of all 
agencies and programs within its jurisdiction as it prepares to 
reauthorize the components of the Departments of Justice and 
Homeland Security and other agencies as appropriate. In doing 
so, the Committee will identify wasteful, inefficient, or 
duplicative programs that should be streamlined or eliminated, 
as well as those that could be enhanced. Through such 
oversight, the Committee seeks to determine how these agencies 
and entities can achieve more impactful and effective programs 
with an eye toward improving the efficiency and effectiveness 
of Federal programs and agencies. The Committee also seeks to 
eliminate fraud, abuse, and mismanagement. As a result of this 
oversight, the Committee anticipates streamlining and 
eliminating spending on agencies and programs within its 
jurisdiction, if appropriate.
    This document outlines the current plans of the Committee 
on the Judiciary for authorization and oversight activities in 
the 115th Congress. Part I includes a description of programs 
and agencies the Committee intends to reauthorize in the 115th 
Congress and notes which such programs and agencies received 
funding in fiscal year 2016 despite having lapsed 
authorizations. Part II includes oversight to be conducted by 
the Committee to help determine whether to authorize certain 
programs and agencies or eliminate them.

                                 PART I

    The following programs and agencies will be considered for 
reauthorization in the 115th Congress. Programs or agencies 
designated with an asterisk received funding during fiscal year 
2016 despite having no current authorization for appropriation.

                  Administrative Office of the Courts


EXTENSION OF TEMPORARY OFFICE OF BANKRUPTCY JUDGES IN CERTAIN JUDICIAL 
                               DISTRICTS

    The volume of bankruptcy cases commenced in the U.S. 
continues to grow as individuals and businesses attempt to cope 
with the effects of the recent recession. . . The lapse date 
for these temporary judgeships is May 25, 2017.

    AUTHORITY TO REDACT CERTAIN LIMITED INFORMATION FROM FINANCIAL 
                           DISCLOSURE REPORTS

    The Judiciary seeks continued authority for judges and 
judicial employees to redact certain limited information from 
their financial disclosure reports in order to protect their 
safety and the safety of their families pursuant to the Ethics 
in Government Act (5 U.S.C. app. Sec. (b)(3)(A)-(E)). The 
current authority expires December 31, 2017.

                         Department of Justice


                         GENERAL ADMINISTRATION

    General Administration (GA) supports the Attorney General 
and the Department of Justice's senior policy level officials 
in managing Department resources and developing policies for 
legal, law enforcement, and criminal justice activities. GA 
consists of four decision units: Department Leadership, 
Intergovernmental Relations and External Affairs, Executive 
Support and Professional Responsibility, and the Justice 
Management Division.
    The Department Leadership decision unit includes the 
Offices of the Attorney General, Deputy Attorney General, 
Associate Attorney General, Privacy and Civil Liberties, Rule 
of Law, and Access to Justice. Intergovernmental Relations and 
External Affairs includes the Offices of Public Affairs, 
Legislative Affairs, and Tribal Justice. Executive Support and 
Professional Responsibility includes the Offices of Legal 
Policy, Professional Responsibility, Information Policy, and 
the Professional Responsibility Advisory Office. Finally, the 
Justice Management Division provides advice to senior DOJ 
officials and develops departmental policies in the areas of 
management and administration, ensures compliance by DOJ 
components with departmental and other federal policies and 
regulations, and provides a full range of management and 
administration support services.

Justice Information Sharing Technology

    Justice Information Sharing Technology (JIST) programs fund 
DOJ's enterprise investments in information technology (IT). As 
a centralized fund under the control of the Department of 
Justice Chief Information Officer (DOJ CIO), it ensures that 
investments in IT systems, cyber security, and information 
sharing technology are well planned and aligned with the 
Department's overall IT strategy and enterprise architecture.

Administrative Review and Appeals

    The Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) contains 
the corps of Immigration Judges, the Board of Immigration 
Appeals, and the Office of the Chief Administrative Hearing 
Officer. EOIR presides over administrative immigration hearings 
such as benefits adjudications, removal, bond, and employer 
sanctions proceedings. Timely and fair adjudication of cases in 
immigration courts is an essential part of effective 
immigration enforcement as well as benefits adjudications. 
Funding for EOIR personnel and programs must keep pace with 
other immigration enforcement activities in order for the 
entire immigration enforcement system to function properly.

Office of the Inspector General

    The Office of the Inspector General (OIG) is an independent 
office within the Department of Justice that is charged with 
investigating allegations of fraud, waste, abuse, and 
misconduct by DOJ employees, contractors, and grantees and 
promoting economy and efficiency in DOJ operations.

                        GENERAL LEGAL ACTIVITIES

Office of the Solicitor General

    The Office of the Solicitor General supervises and 
processes all appellate matters and represents the U.S. and 
federal agencies in the Supreme Court.

Tax Division

    The Tax Division represents the U.S. in virtually all 
litigation arising under the internal revenue laws. This work 
includes both a civil component as well as assistance to U.S. 
Attorneys in prosecuting criminal tax violations. In addition, 
the Division's attorneys lend their financial crimes expertise 
to the enforcement of other laws with financial aspects.

Criminal Division

    The Criminal Division is responsible for supervising the 
application of all federal criminal laws except those 
specifically assigned to other divisions. Its mission is to 
identify and respond to critical and emerging national and 
international criminal threats, and to lead the enforcement, 
regulatory, and intelligence communities in a coordinated, 
nationwide response to reduce those threats. The Division 
provides expert guidance and advice to U.S. Attorneys and other 
federal, state, and local prosecutors and investigative 
agencies, as well as foreign criminal justice systems. It also 
oversees the use of the most sophisticated investigative tools 
available to federal law enforcement, including all federal 
electronic surveillance requests in criminal cases, and secures 
the return of fugitives and other assistance from foreign 
countries.
    In addition to other initiatives, the Criminal Division 
uses its resources to prosecute the most significant financial 
crimes, including mortgage fraud, corporate fraud, and 
sophisticated investment fraud; coordinate multi-district 
financial crime cases; and assist U.S. Attorneys' Offices in 
financial crime cases with significant money laundering and 
asset forfeiture components.

Civil Division

    The Civil Division represents the United States, its 
departments and agencies, Members of Congress, Cabinet 
officers, and other federal employees in litigation in federal 
and state courts. Each year, it successfully defends the United 
States against billions of dollars in unmeritorious claims. In 
its affirmative litigation, the Division brings suits on behalf 
of the United States, primarily to recoup money lost through 
fraud, loan defaults, and the abuse of federal funds. As a 
result of the work of the Civil Division, hundreds of millions 
of dollars are returned to the Treasury, Medicare, and other 
programs annually.

Environment and Natural Resources Division

    The Environment and Natural Resources Division (ENRD) 
enforces the Nation's civil and criminal environmental laws; 
defends environmental challenges to federal laws and actions; 
and performs a variety of other important legal activities 
related to the environment and our nation's natural resources. 
ENRD's responsibilities include litigating disputes under the 
Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Comprehensive 
Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act 
(Superfund), the Endangered Species Act, and other federal 
environmental statutes; defending against environmental 
challenges to federal programs and activities; representing the 
United States in matters concerning the protection, use, and 
development of national natural resources and public lands; and 
litigating on behalf of individual Indians and Indian tribes.

Civil Rights Division

    The Civil Rights Division is responsible for enforcing 
federal statutes that guarantee the civil rights of all 
Americans and prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, 
sex, disability, religion, and national origin. The Division 
enforces federal laws that protect Americans' civil rights and 
freedom from discrimination in education, employment, credit, 
housing, certain federally funded and conducted programs, and 
voting.
    The Division has eleven sections: Appellate, Coordination 
and Compliance, Criminal, Disability Rights, Educational 
Opportunities, Employment Litigation, Housing and Civil 
Enforcement, Office of Special Counsel for Immigration Related 
Unfair Employment Practices, Special Litigation, Policy and 
Strategy, and Voting.

INTERPOL Washington

    INTERPOL Washington facilitates cooperation and information 
sharing among police agencies in different countries. It is the 
link between more than 18,000 federal, state, and local law 
enforcement authorities and the 187 other member countries for 
INTERPOL-related matters. The main goals of INTERPOL Washington 
are facilitating international law enforcement cooperation; 
transmitting information of a criminal justice, humanitarian or 
other law enforcement related nature between law enforcement 
agencies; responding to law enforcement requests; coordinating 
and integrating information for investigations of an 
international nature, and identifying patterns and trends in 
criminal activities. INTERPOL Washington also actively screens 
all inbound international flights for passports that are 
reported as lost or stolen to INTERPOL and generates over 200 
hits monthly that require human analysis.

                           ANTITRUST DIVISION

    The mission of the Antitrust Division is to promote 
economic competition through enforcing and providing guidance 
on antitrust laws and principles. In addition to enforcing the 
antitrust laws, the Antitrust Division also acts as an advocate 
for competition, seeking to promote competition in sectors of 
the economy that are or may be subject to government 
regulation.

                  EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR U.S. ATTORNEYS

    There are 94 U.S. Attorneys located throughout the United 
States, the District of Columbia, Guam, the Northern Mariana 
Islands, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. The U.S. 
Attorneys who lead each office are the chief law enforcement 
representatives of the Attorney General. Each enforces federal 
criminal law, handles most of the civil litigation in which the 
United States is involved, and initiates proceedings for the 
collection of fines, penalties, and forfeitures owed to the 
United States.

                  FOREIGN CLAIMS SETTLEMENT COMMISSION

    The Foreign Claims Settlement Commission of the United 
States (FCSC) is a quasi-judicial, independent agency within 
the Department of Justice which adjudicates claims of U.S. 
nationals against foreign governments, under specific 
jurisdiction conferred by Congress, pursuant to international 
claims settlement agreements, or at the request of the 
Secretary of State.

                     FEES AND EXPENSES OF WITNESSES

    The mission of the Fees and Expenses of Witnesses (FEW) 
appropriation is to provide funding for all fees and expenses 
associated with the provision of testimony on behalf of the 
Federal Government. Funding is also provided to pay for private 
and foreign counsel. The FEW appropriation is centrally managed 
by the Justice Management Division's Budget Staff, and funds 
are allocated to the General Legal Activities and the Executive 
Office for U.S. Attorneys for administration of expert 
witnesses that provide technical or scientific testimony and 
are compensated based on negotiations with the respective 
federal government attorney.

                      COMMUNITY RELATIONS SERVICE

    The Community Relations Service's mission is to assist 
state and local governments, private and public organizations, 
community groups and law enforcement in quelling conflicts and 
tensions arising from differences of race, color, and national 
origin. The Community Relations Service is also authorized to 
work with state and local governments and groups to restore 
community stability and harmony while preventing, resolving, 
and responding to alleged violent hate crimes.

                         ASSETS FORFEITURE FUND

    The Assets Forfeiture Fund (AFF) was established pursuant 
to the Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984. The U.S. 
Marshals Service (USMS) administers the program by managing and 
disposing of properties seized by and forfeited to federal law 
enforcement agencies and U.S. Attorneys nationwide, and the 
Attorney General is authorized to use the AFF to pay necessary 
expenses associated with forfeitures. The Fund may also be used 
to finance certain general investigative expenses, as those 
enumerated in 28 U.S.C. Sec. 524(c).
    The Asset Forfeiture Fund, first and foremost, is used to 
pay victims of specific crimes for which the proceeds were 
subject to forfeiture. After those costs, the Department of 
Justice (DOJ) uses the funds to pay for the management costs 
associated with disposing and forfeiting property. Finally, the 
Fund is used to fund law enforcement at the state and local 
level who assist with federal law enforcement priorities. The 
Fund is also vital to ensuring that state and local law 
enforcement continue to participate in the numerous joint task 
forces established by the Federal government.

                         U.S. MARSHALS SERVICE

    The U.S. Marshals Service (USMS) administers the Asset 
Forfeiture Program of the Justice Department; conducts 
investigations involving escaped federal prisoners, 
unregistered sex offenders, and other fugitives; ensures safety 
at Federal judicial proceedings; assumes custody of individuals 
arrested by all federal agencies; houses and transports 
prisoners; and manages the Witness Security Program.

                       NATIONAL SECURITY DIVISION

    The National Security Division (NSD) was first authorized 
by Congress in the USA PATRIOT Improvement and Reauthorization 
Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-177). The NSD consists of the 
elements of DOJ (other than the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation) engaged primarily in support of the intelligence 
and intelligence-related activities of the Federal government, 
including: (1) the Assistant Attorney General for National 
Security, (2) the Office of Intelligence Policy and Review, (3) 
the counterterrorism section, (4) the counterespionage section, 
and (5) any other offices designated by the Attorney General.

     ORGANIZED CRIME DRUG ENFORCEMENT TASK FORCES (OCDETF) PROGRAM

    The OCDETF program is a centerpiece of DOJ's intra- and 
inter-agency drug enforcement strategy. It coordinates and 
channels all elements of federal law enforcement--including 
components of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the 
Department of the Treasury--in its efforts against the most 
powerful and dangerous national and transnational criminal 
organizations engaged in drug trafficking and money laundering, 
and those organizations primarily responsible for the nation's 
illegal drug supply.

                    FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION

    The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is the Nation's 
largest federal law enforcement agency, charged with 
investigating terrorism, cybercrimes, public corruption, white-
collar crime, organized crime, civil rights violations, and 
other federal offenses. The FBI is also the primary federal 
domestic counter-terrorism and counter-intelligence agency.

                    DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION

    The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is the lead 
federal agency tasked with reducing the illicit supply and 
abuse of narcotics and drugs through drug interdiction and 
seizing of illicit revenues and assets from drug trafficking 
organizations.

          BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS AND EXPLOSIVES

    The mission of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, 
and Explosives (ATF) is to reduce violent crime, prevent 
terrorism, and protect the United States through enforcing laws 
and regulating the firearms and explosives industries. ATF 
plays an important role in addressing the gaps in information 
available to the National Instant Criminal Background Check 
System (NICS) regarding mental health adjudications, 
commitments and other prohibiting backgrounds.

                         FEDERAL PRISON SYSTEM

    The Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) is responsible for the 
custody and care of federal offenders in prisons and community-
based facilities. BOP is currently responsible for housing 
approximately 196,000 federal offenders, which includes 
sentenced inmates as well as persons awaiting trial and/or 
sentencing.

         STATE AND LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE ACTIVITIES

    DOJ's three State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance 
components administer billions of dollars' worth of federal 
grants every year. The Committee will review each office and 
the programs it administers in order to authorize programs and 
activities, or adjust authority, as necessary.
    Created in 1994, the Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) 
provides federal leadership in developing the nation's capacity 
to reduce violence against women and to administer and 
strengthen services to victims of domestic violence, dating 
violence, sexual assault, and stalking. The Office of Community 
Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office), which was created in 
1994, is responsible for advancing the practice of community 
policing by the nation's state, local, territorial, and tribal 
law enforcement agencies through information and grant 
resources.
    Finally, the Office of Justice Programs (OJP), which was 
established in 1984, oversees the majority of grant resources 
at DOJ. It works in partnership with the justice community to 
identify crime-related challenges confronting the justice 
system and to provide information, training, coordination, and 
strategies and approaches for addressing such challenges. OJP 
is comprised of five bureaus: the Bureau of Justice Assistance 
(BJA), the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the Office of 
Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, the Bureau of 
Justice Statistics (BJS), and the Office of Victims of Crime 
(OVC). OJP works in partnership with the justice community to 
identify crime-related challenges confronting the justice 
system and to provide information, training, coordination, and 
strategies and approaches for addressing such challenges. OJP 
administers grant funding in the areas of Research, Evaluation 
and Statistics; Juvenile Justice Programs; and State and Local 
Law Enforcement Assistance.

                    Department of Homeland Security


                U.S. CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION SERVICE

    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) oversees 
lawful immigration to the United States. USCIS is funded 
primarily by immigration and naturalization benefit fees 
charged to applicants and petitioners.

E-Verify Pilot Program

    Section 401 of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant 
Responsibility Act of 1996 authorizes the Department of 
Homeland Security (DHS) to ``conduct 3 pilot programs of 
employment eligibility confirmation'' including the E-Verify 
program, which allows employers to electronically check the 
employment eligibility of potential employees. Section 401(b) 
of that Act, as amended, currently provides that ``[u]nless the 
Congress otherwise provides, the Secretary of Homeland Security 
shall terminate a pilot program on April 28, 2017.''

EB-5 Regional Center Program

    The EB-5 Regional Center Program was established in Section 
610 of P.L. 102-395, and reserves certain immigrant investor 
visas for those who invest in certain targeted employment 
areas. Section 610(b), as amended, provides that 3,000 visas 
shall be annually set aside for the EB-5 Regional Center 
Program until April 28, 2017.

Conrad 30 Waiver Program

    Section 220 of the Immigration and Nationality Technical 
Corrections Act of 1994 established the Conrad 30 Waiver 
Program 
for J-1 visa holders, which describes individuals that have 
come to the United States to receive graduate medical education 
or training. Under this program, a limited number of J-1 
visitors may receive a waiver of the 2-year residency 
requirement that would normally apply before such individuals 
could seek an immigrant visa, permanent residence, or a non-
immigrant work visa. Section 220(c), as amended, provides that 
an individual must have received a J-1 visa before April 28, 
2017, in order to be eligible for such waiver.

Non-minister Special Immigrant Religious Worker Program

    Section 101(a)(27)(C) of the Immigration and Nationality 
Act (INA) is sometimes referred to as the non-minister special 
immigrant religious worker program. The INA defines a ``special 
immigrant'' to include certain immigrants, and such immigrants' 
spouses and children, who are affiliated with a religious 
denomination. For such individuals who are not entering the 
United States to carry on the vocation of a minister, the 
individual must seek entry before April 28, 2017.

                U.S. IMMIGRATION AND CUSTOMS ENFORCEMENT

    Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is the largest 
investigative arm of DHS. Comprised of several components from 
the former Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) and the 
U.S. Customs Service, the agency combines the investigative, 
detention and removal, and intelligence functions of the former 
INS with the investigative and intelligence functions of the 
former Customs Service. ICE's mission is to promote homeland 
security and public safety through the criminal and civil 
enforcement of federal laws governing immigration, customs, and 
trade.

                   U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION

    U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has extended a 
zone of security beyond U.S. physical borders. Aspects of CBP 
under the jurisdiction of the House Judiciary Committee include 
CBP's non-border immigration enforcement functions, 
intellectual property enforcement functions, the Entry/Exit 
Transformation Office (EXT) and the Arrival and Departure 
Information System (ADIS), and the visa waiver program.

                OFFICE OF BIOMETRIC IDENTITY MANAGEMENT

    The Office of Biometric Identity Management (OBIM) 
(formerly United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator 
Technology, or US-VISIT) supports DHS's responsibility to 
protect the nation by providing biometric identification 
services that help federal, state, and local government 
decision makers accurately identify the people they encounter 
and determine whether those people pose a risk to the U.S. OBIM 
supplies the technology for collecting and storing biometric 
data, provides analysis, updates its watchlist, and ensures the 
integrity of the data. The Committee has long supported 
sufficient funding to meet the entry-exit requirements mandated 
first by Congress in 1996 in order to identify who is entering 
and exiting the U.S. and how long they stay in the country. 
OBIM is part of the National Protection and Programs 
Directorate.

                FEDERAL LAW ENFORCEMENT TRAINING CENTER

    The Federal Law Enforcement Training Centers (FLETC) 
provides training to law enforcement professionals to help them 
fulfill their responsibilities safely and proficiently. FLETC's 
mission is to train all those who protect the homeland, and 
therefore, its training audience also includes state, local, 
and tribal departments throughout the U.S. Additionally, 
FLETC's impact extends outside our Nation's borders through 
international training and capacity-building activities.

                          U.S. SECRET SERVICE

    The Secret Service is tasked with dual law enforcement 
missions: protection of national and visiting foreign leaders 
and conducting criminal investigations. Criminal investigation 
activities encompass financial crimes, bank fraud, mortgage 
fraud, identity theft, counterfeiting, and computer fraud. 
Secret Service protection extends to the President, Vice 
President, and their families, among others.

                 Department of Health & Human Services


                  OFFICE OF REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT (HHS)

    The Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) within the 
Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) provides 
assistance and services to refugees, asylees, unaccompanied 
alien minors, victims of human trafficking, and certain 
Amerasian, Iraqi, Afghan, Cuban, and Haitian immigrants. ORR 
assists these populations by providing a range of services, 
including cash and medical assistance, housing assistance, and 
economic and social integration services.

                     Office of Management & Budget


 U.S. OFFICE OF THE INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY ENFORCEMENT COORDINATOR (US-
                                 IPEC)

    Intellectual property theft presents a substantial threat 
and imposes significant harm, including major economic damage, 
to the U.S. To address this problem, the Committee authorized, 
through the Prioritizing Resources and Organization for 
Intellectual Property (PRO-IP) Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-403), the 
creation of an Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator 
(IPEC) within the Executive Office of the President. The IPEC 
chairs an interagency intellectual property enforcement 
advisory committee, coordinates the development of the Joint 
Strategic Plan against counterfeiting and infringement and 
provides other assistance in the coordination of intellectual 
property enforcement efforts.

              OFFICE OF INFORMATION AND REGULATORY AFFAIRS

    The Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) 
implements executive regulatory oversight activities under 
Executive Order 12866 (Regulatory Planning and Review), 
Executive Order 13563 (Improving Regulation and Regulatory 
Review), among other authorities; reviews collections of 
information from the public; provides guidance concerning the 
acquisition, use and management of Federal information 
resources; and, coordinates policy direction on Federal 
statistical activities.

                        Federal Trade Commission


                         BUREAU OF COMPETITION

    The Federal Trade Commission's Bureau of Competition shares 
jurisdiction to enforce the nation's antitrust laws with the 
Antitrust Division of DOJ.

                             Other Entities


             ADMINISTRATIVE CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED STATES

    The Administrative Conference of the United States (ACUS) 
is an independent, nonpartisan agency that was created to 
analyze the federal administrative law process and to provide 
Congress, the President, the Judicial Conference of the United 
States, and federal agencies with recommendations and guidance.

                       COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS

    The Commission on Civil Rights was established by the Civil 
Rights Act of 1957 (P.L. 85-315), to serve as a bipartisan, 
fact-finding agency to investigate and report on the status of 
civil rights, and inform the development of national civil 
rights policy.

                      OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS

    The Office of Government Ethics (OGE) is responsible for 
providing the overall direction of executive branch policies 
designed to prevent conflicts of interest and to ensure high 
ethical standards. In partnership with executive branch 
agencies and departments, OGE develops ethics training courses 
and other educational materials for government employees, 
conducts on-site reviews of existing ethics programs, and 
provides advice and guidance on the Standards of Ethical 
Conduct for Employees of the Executive Branch.

              PRIVACY AND CIVIL LIBERTIES OVERSIGHT BOARD

    The Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board (PCLOB) is 
an independent agency within the executive branch established 
by the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act 
to analyze and review actions the executive branch takes to 
protect the U.S. from terrorism, ensuring that the need for 
such actions is balanced with the need to protect privacy and 
civil liberties, and to ensure that liberty concerns are 
appropriately considered in the development and implementation 
of laws, regulations, and policies related to efforts to 
protect the Nation against terrorism. The continued role of the 
Board includes the review of various government surveillance 
programs and the related activities of the Intelligence 
Community.

                        STATE JUSTICE INSTITUTE

    The State Justice Institute was established by federal law 
in 1984 to award grants to improve the quality of justice in 
State courts, facilitate better coordination between State and 
Federal courts, and foster innovative, efficient solutions to 
common issues faced by all courts.

                    U.S. Patent and Trademark Office


                         FEE SETTING AUTHORITY

    The authority of the Under Secretary of Commerce for 
Intellectual Property and Director of the U.S. Patent and 
Trademark Office (Director) to set or adjust any fee to recover 
the aggregate estimated costs to the Office for processing, 
activities, services, and materials relating to patents 
terminates on September 16, 2018.

                                PART II

    The Committee's oversight and investigative activities will 
be coordinated between the Full Committee and the Subcommittees 
in order to facilitate comprehensive and strategic oversight of 
the programs and agencies within its jurisdiction. Oversight 
activities will include hearings, briefings, correspondence, 
reports, public statements and site visits.

                             FULL COMMITTEE

    U.S. Department of Justice: In conjunction with the 
Subcommittees, the Committee will conduct oversight of the U.S. 
Department of Justice, including all Department components and 
agencies.
    Budget Oversight and Management Performance: The Committee 
will conduct oversight and identify U.S. Department of Justice 
grant programs that should be streamlined or eliminated, as 
well as those that could be enhanced. The Committee will also 
conduct oversight of all agencies and programs within its 
jurisdiction to uncover waste, fraud, or abuse and to identify 
programs that are inefficient, duplicative, or outdated, or 
that are more appropriately administered by State or local 
governments. The Committee will also consider the extent to 
which federally funded or administered agencies and activities 
can more efficiently handle certain tasks on a national level 
and whether they save, reduce, or render more effective State 
or local government expenditures or activities. In addition, 
the Committee will consider whether any federal programs within 
its jurisdiction should be enhanced, concomitant with cuts to 
or the elimination of less effective programs.
    Protecting Congress' Constitutional Powers: The committee 
will conduct oversight to examine the separation of powers 
between the branches of government and to consider ways to 
restore and reestablish the powers and authorities granted to 
Congress in Article I of the Constitution.
    The U.S. Copyright Office: The Committee will continue to 
conduct oversight of the Copyright Office as it completes its 
transition to a digital environment. Oversight will include 
review of its recordation system, public access to its 
registration records, and the process by which the Register of 
Copyrights should be selected.
    Copyright Law and Policy: The Committee will examine the 
provisions of the Copyright Act to ensure it addresses the 
challenges faced by copyright owners, users, and consumers in 
the digital environment.
    Office of the U.S. Intellectual Property Enforcement 
Coordinator (IPEC): The Committee will examine how the IPEC is 
functioning and whether it has the authority and resources 
necessary for it to be effective. To the extent this involves 
non-copyright-related intellectual property issues, this will 
be coordinated closely with the Subcommittee on the Courts, 
Intellectual Property, and the Internet Subcommittee.
    Intellectual Property Enforcement Agencies: The Committee 
will review the intellectual property enforcement efforts of 
the Department of Homeland Security's U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection division and the Department of Justice. To the 
extent this involves non-copyright-related intellectual 
property issues, these will be primarily handled by the 
Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property, and the 
Internet.

  SUBCOMMITTEE ON CRIME, TERRORISM, HOMELAND SECURITY & INVESTIGATIONS

    U.S. Department of Justice: The Subcommittee will conduct 
oversight of the law enforcement agencies of the U.S. 
Department of Justice.
    A. The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI): The 
Subcommittee will conduct oversight of the FBI. In addition to 
its traditional criminal investigatory jurisdiction, the 
Subcommittee will also conduct oversight of the FBI's counter-
terrorism and counter-intelligence authorities.
    B. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA): The Subcommittee 
will review the operations of the DEA, including domestic and 
international drug enforcement, money laundering and narco-
terrorism investigations.
    C. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives 
(ATF): The Subcommittee will review the mission and operations 
of the ATF, including federal firearms enforcement, explosives 
investigations, and tobacco and alcohol trafficking operations.
    D. U.S. Marshals Service (USMS)/Office of the Federal 
Detention Trustee (OFDT): The Subcommittee will review the 
mission and operations of the USMS, including fugitive 
apprehensions, court and witness security, and its 
responsibilities under the Sex Offender Registration and 
Notification Act (SORNA). The Subcommittee will also conduct 
oversight on the operations of OFDT.
    E. The Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP): The Subcommittee 
will review the mission and operation of the federal prison 
system, including prisoner rehabilitation, reentry programs, 
and management of a growing offender population.
    F. Federal Prison Industries, Inc.: The Subcommittee will 
also conduct oversight of the Federal Prison Industries (FPI), 
a government corporation that employs offenders incarcerated in 
federal prisons and provides job training opportunities to 
prisoners by producing goods and services for federal agencies.
    Criminal Division: The Subcommittee will conduct oversight 
of the Justice Department's Criminal Division.
    National Security Division: The Subcommittee will conduct 
oversight of the Justice Department's National Security 
Division.
    Office of Justice Programs (OJP): The Subcommittee will 
review the mission and operations of OJP and its component 
organizations and the administration of law enforcement 
assistance grants in order to identify programs that should be 
streamlined or eliminated, and those that could be enhanced.
    Office on Violence Against Women (OVW): The Subcommittee 
will review the mission and operations of OVW and the 
administration of Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) grants.
    Community Oriented Policing Services Office (COPS): The 
Subcommittee will review the mission and operations of COPS and 
the administration of community policing grants.
    Federal Grants: The Subcommittee will conduct oversight on 
the receipt of federal grants by state and local jurisdictions 
found to be in violation of section 1373 of title 8, United 
States Code.
    Executive Office of U.S. Attorneys (EOUSA): The 
Subcommittee will conduct oversight on the operations of EOUSA.
    Office of the Pardon Attorney: The Subcommittee will 
conduct oversight of the Office of the Pardon Attorney.
    U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS): The 
Subcommittee will conduct oversight of DHS law enforcement 
components, including the U.S. Secret Service, U.S. Immigration 
and Customs Enforcement, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, 
the U.S. Coast Guard, and the Federal Air Marshals Service.
    U.S. Sentencing Commission: The Subcommittee will review 
the mission and operations of the U.S. Sentencing Commission 
with particular attention to the role of the Commission 
following the Supreme Court's decision in U.S. v. Booker, 543 
U.S. 220 (2005) and its progeny. The Subcommittee will also 
examine the extent to which federal courts are imposing 
sentences that diverge from those recommended by the sentencing 
guidelines.
    National Security: The Subcommittee will review the use of 
Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) and U.S. PATRIOT 
Act authorities by Intelligence Community (IC) agencies, and 
the reauthorization of section 702 of FISA.
    Terrorism: The Subcommittee will review the threat to our 
national security from terrorist activity including the 
recruitment and training or self-radicalization of home-grown 
terrorists. The Subcommittee will examine the adequacy of 
federal criminal laws that deter and punish terrorism.
    GAO Report on DOJ Funding Sources: The Subcommittee will 
review the alternative sources of funding at DOJ, including 
fines, fees, and penalties, that make up approximately 15 
percent of DOJ's budgetary resources.
    Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention 
(OJJDP): The Subcommittee will review the mission and 
operations of OJJDP.
    Criminal Division--Asset Forfeiture and Money Laundering 
Section: The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of the Asset 
Forfeiture and Money Laundering section of the Justice 
Department's Criminal Division.
    Encryption and Handheld Electronic Devices: The 
Subcommittee will conduct oversight on both the benefits of 
strong encryption and concerns expressed by law enforcement 
that encryption hinders their efforts to investigate crime.
    Crimes against Children: The Subcommittee will review laws 
and law enforcement tools designed to combat child 
exploitation, including reauthorization of the Adam Walsh Act, 
and the proliferation of child pornography on the Internet.
    Protection of U.S. Citizens' Constitutional Rights: The 
Subcommittee, along with the Subcommittee on the Constitution 
and Civil Justice, will examine the adequacy of current 
protections for U.S. citizens' Constitutional rights vis-a-vis 
law enforcement and national security efforts.
    Mens Rea: The Subcommittee will continue working to ensure 
federal criminal statutes have appropriate criminal intent, or 
mens rea, requirements. This will remain a significant part of 
the committee's effort to enact reform to the federal criminal 
justice system.
    Forensics: The Subcommittee will continue working to ensure 
federal prosecutors, law enforcement, and the defense bar have 
the ability to fully investigate their cases, exclude innocent 
suspects, implicate the guilty, and achieve true justice at 
trial, through the Rapid DNA Act and other initiatives.
    Policing Strategies: The Subcommittee, through the 
Committee's Policing Strategies Working Group, will continue 
working with state and local governments and groups to foster 
positive police-community relations, and ensure law enforcement 
has the tools it needs to do its job.
    Electronic Communications Privacy Act: The Subcommittee 
expects to continue its work to update this decades-old statute 
in light of the digital revolution that has taken place since 
the statute's enactment.
    International Data Issues: The subcommittee will continue 
to conduct oversight on the issue of law enforcement access to 
data stored overseas, including the needs of law enforcement, 
Americans' civil liberties, and pending litigation.
    Cybersecurity: The Subcommittee will review the laws and 
law enforcement tools designed to combat and prevent cyber-
attacks.
    Firearms: The Subcommittee will continue to examine ways to 
reduce firearms-related violence, including examining current 
federal law and state compliance with requirements to post 
information to the NICS database.
    Criminal Code: The Subcommittee will examine issues related 
to Criminal Code reform, including improving and streamlining 
Title 18 and whether all criminal statutes in the U.S. Code 
should be consolidated and/or listed in Title 18.
    Over-criminalization: The Subcommittee will continue to 
examine ways to address the problem of over-criminalization and 
over-federalization.
    Criminal Street Gangs: The Subcommittee may consider 
enforcement and prevention issues concerning criminal street 
gangs, and the issue of how gang affiliations may be broken to 
reduce the number of both street and prison gangs.
    Crime Prevention: The Subcommittee may examine the extent 
to which federal policies and funding are adequate to support 
crime prevention strategies at the Federal, State, local, and 
tribal levels.
    International and Domestic Human Trafficking: The 
Subcommittee will review law enforcement and other activities 
within its jurisdiction that address international and domestic 
trafficking in human beings, including reauthorization of the 
Trafficking Victims Protection Act.
    Misconduct by Executive Branch Officials: The Committee 
will continue to conduct oversight into allegations of 
misconduct by Executive Branch officials. The Committee will 
also continue to conduct oversight into allegations of leaks of 
classified information as well as allegations of improper 
interference with our democratic institutions or efforts to 
improperly or illegally interfere with our elections.

           SUBCOMMITTEE ON THE CONSTITUTION AND CIVIL JUSTICE

    Protection of U.S. Citizens' Constitutional and Civil 
Rights: In general, the Subcommittee will examine the adequacy 
of current protections for U.S. citizens' constitutional and 
civil rights.
    Civil Rights Division, U.S. Department of Justice: The 
Subcommittee will examine the enforcement record and priorities 
of the Civil Rights Division. The Subcommittee will focus on 
the Division's activities in the areas of education, 
employment, credit, fair housing, public accommodations, law 
enforcement practices, voting rights and the integrity of 
federal elections, and federally funded and conducted programs.
    Fiscal Responsibility: The Subcommittee will examine 
constitutional reforms to address government spending.
    Federalism/Congressional Authority: The Subcommittee plans 
to examine the proper balance between the finite powers 
allocated to the federal government in the U.S. Constitution 
and the powers reserved to the states.
    Exercise of Constitutional Authority: The Subcommittee will 
conduct oversight of the exercise of constitutional authority 
by the legislative, judicial, and executive branches.
    Civil Justice: The Subcommittee will review the policies 
and practices of the civil justice system and consider whether 
reform is needed.
    Community Relations Service: The Subcommittee will conduct 
oversight of the operations of the Community Relations Service.
    Office of Government Ethics: The Subcommittee will consider 
the priorities and operation of the Office of Government 
Ethics. The Subcommittee will also investigate any threat to 
the independence or efficacy of the Office of Government 
Ethics.
    Property Rights: The Subcommittee will consider whether 
there is a need to address existing protections for citizens' 
private property rights.
    Religious Liberty: The Subcommittee will consider the 
federal role in the protection of Americans' rights under the 
Free Exercise and Establishment Clauses.
    Free Speech: The Subcommittee will examine restraints on 
free speech, including efforts by some colleges and 
universities to limit protests, speeches, distribution of 
literature, petitions, and other expressive activities to 
``free speech zones.''
    Life Issues: The Subcommittee will examine the 
constitutionality and enforcement of federal and state statutes 
that relate to abortion.
    War on Terrorism: The Subcommittee will consider 
constitutional issues associated with the War on Terrorism.
    Detention of Suspected Terrorists: The Subcommittee will 
conduct oversight on matters related to the long-term detention 
of suspected terrorists, including the protection of the 
related constitutional rights of U.S. citizens.
    United States Commission on Civil Rights: The Subcommittee 
will review the work of the Commission, its management, and its 
implementation.
    The Judgment Fund: The Subcommittee will examine payments 
made from the Judgment Fund, its management, and how it is 
administered.

            SUBCOMMITTEE ON IMMIGRATION AND BORDER SECURITY

    Deportation of Child Trafficking Victims: The Subcommittee 
will conduct oversight on the number of child trafficking 
victims that are summarily returned to Mexico after a flawed 
screening by U.S. Customs and Border Patrol.
    Executive Orders Signed by President Trump: The 
Subcommittee will conduct oversight of Executive Orders 
regarding immigration and border security signed by President 
Trump, including constitutional and policy issues.
    U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS): The 
Subcommittee will conduct oversight of the components within 
DHS that are responsible for enforcing and ensuring the 
integrity of United States immigration laws, including ICE and 
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).
    Immigrant Investor Program: The Subcommittee will conduct 
oversight of the immigrant investor program, including its 
adherence to the intent of Congress and the impact of new 
proposed regulations.
    H-1B Nonimmigrant Visa Program: The Subcommittee will 
conduct oversight of the H-1B visa program, including on its 
effect on American workers and students.
    H-2A/H-2B Nonimmigrant Visa Program: The Subcommittee will 
conduct oversight of the H-2A and H-2B visa programs, including 
on the quality and timeliness of processing by USCIS and the 
Department of Labor.
    Detainers: The Subcommittee will conduct oversight on the 
constitutional and policy questions surrounding the issuance of 
ICE detainers.
    Budgetary Resources: The Subcommittee expects to conduct 
oversight of the sufficiency of budgetary resources with regard 
to immigration functions at USCIS and ICE.
    Legal Immigration: The Subcommittee expects to conduct 
oversight over our current legal immigration laws and programs, 
including whether relevant federal agencies are efficiently 
administering and enforcing these laws and programs, issues 
relating to backlogs, family reunification, whether excessive 
regulations are stifling the use of these programs, the impact 
on U.S. citizens, comparisons with our global competitors, and 
related issues.
    Illegal Immigration: The Subcommittee will conduct 
oversight of the causes and methods of illegal immigration and 
how to better prevent it in the future.
    Refugee Program: The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of 
the refugee program.
    Visa Security: The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of 
the sufficiency of the screening of visa applicants.
    Fiscal Impacts of Immigration: The Subcommittee expects to 
conduct hearings on the fiscal effects of legal and illegal 
immigration, including their impact on the Social Security 
system and other federal programs.
    Immigration Enforcement: The Subcommittee intends to 
examine the sufficiency of current immigration enforcement laws 
and programs, including whether relevant federal agencies' 
policies and enforcement records are sufficient and consistent 
with current federal statutes, the level of cooperation with 
other countries, the proper roles for the federal government, 
states and localities in enforcing our immigration laws, and 
the status of implementation of the congressionally-mandated 
exit tracking system.
    Fraud: The Subcommittee expects to conduct hearings on 
fraud associated with petitions for visas and other immigration 
benefits, including allegations of fraud in the asylum and 
credible fear determination processes. The Subcommittee also 
intends to conduct oversight of identity fraud and identity 
theft in the immigration context.
    Influx of Unaccompanied Alien Children and Family Units: 
The Subcommittee expects to conduct oversight of the 
Administration's handling of the influx of unaccompanied alien 
children and family units along our southern border and 
proposed legislative changes.
    Criminal Issues: The Subcommittee expects to conduct 
hearings on the impact of crimes committed by immigrants, 
trends in gang violence among immigrant communities, and the 
sufficiency of efforts to remove violent criminals.
    Executive Office for Immigration Review: The Subcommittee 
will conduct oversight of the Department of Justice's 
adjudication of immigration cases.
    Federal Grants: The Subcommittee will conduct oversight on 
the receipt of federal grants by state and local jurisdictions 
found to be in violation of section 1373 of title 8, United 
States Code.

    SUBCOMMITTEE ON COURTS, INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY, AND THE INTERNET

    U.S. Patent and Trademark Office: The Subcommittee will 
conduct oversight of the USPTO, including the status of pending 
patent and trademark applications and developments with patent 
and trademark quality. The Subcommittee will also continue to 
exercise oversight to ensure that the USPTO has full access to 
the fees it collects from applicants and appropriately 
exercises its fee-setting authority.
    U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and Implementation of the 
America Invents Act: The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of 
the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office's implementation of the 
America Invents Act, which contained numerous changes to our 
nation's patent system.
    U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Global Intellectual 
Property Rights Attache Program: The Subcommittee will conduct 
oversight on the Global Intellectual Property Rights Attache 
program's efforts to promote high standards of IP protection 
and enforcement internationally for the benefit of U.S. 
stakeholders.
    International Intellectual Property Laws: The Subcommittee 
will conduct oversight of the impact of international 
intellectual property laws, regulations, and policies upon 
American interests. In addition, the Subcommittee will conduct 
oversight of international trade agreements and their 
negotiations, especially as they relate to potential trademark 
issues. To the extent this involves copyright-related 
intellectual property issues, this will be coordinated closely 
with the Full Committee.
    Federal Judiciary: The Subcommittee will conduct oversight 
of the federal judiciary, including judicial ethics and 
disclosure, the PACER system, and operation of the federal 
court system. In addition, the Subcommittee will examine the 
resources available to Article III courts, including judicial 
salaries and security for federal judges.
    The Service of Judicial Process on Foreign Entities: The 
Subcommittee will examine the difficulty of serving judicial 
process on foreign entities in order to ensure that the rights 
of all U.S. citizens can be protected in an increasingly global 
economy.
    Technology Issues: The Subcommittee will examine 
developments in technology and the Internet affecting public 
policy, including issues surrounding Internet governance.
    Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers 
(ICANN): The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of ICANN, 
including the functions that the U.S. conveyed to the global 
multi-stakeholder community in 2016, and the impacts this 
system will have on intellectual property rights holders.
    State Justice Institute: The State Justice Institute (SJI) 
provides matching grants to state courts that allow them to 
develop methods to work more efficiently and productively. The 
Subcommittee intends to review SJI operations.

    SUBCOMMITTEE ON REGULATORY REFORM, COMMERCIAL AND ANTITRUST LAW

    Administrative Process and Procedure: The Subcommittee will 
conduct oversight on the topic of regulatory reform in general, 
including examining specific regulations, as well as issues 
related to the Administrative Procedure Act, the Congressional 
Review Act, the Regulatory Flexibility Act, the Small Business 
Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act, trends in regulatory 
citizen suits, regulatory litigation, judicial doctrines of 
deference to agency determinations, the overall costs and 
benefits of federal regulation in general and their impact on 
specific communities, regulatory budgeting, the extent to which 
agencies compete for policymaking primacy with the Legislative 
Branch, and the role that the Office of Information and 
Regulatory Affairs within the Office of Management and Budget 
plays in the federal rulemaking process. In addition, the 
Subcommittee will examine regulatory litigation and 
enforcement.
    Executive Orders: The Subcommittee will conduct oversight 
of Executive Orders regarding administrative law and agency 
practice, including constitutional and policy issues.
    Bankruptcy: The Subcommittee expects to conduct oversight 
of the Bankruptcy Code and bankruptcy system, including their 
responsiveness to the needs of financially troubled businesses, 
individuals and municipalities. The Subcommittee may conduct 
oversight of bankruptcy judgeship needs, asbestos trusts and 
U.S. Trustee fees.
    State Taxation Affecting Interstate Commerce: The 
Subcommittee will conduct oversight of issues related to state 
taxation that affect interstate commerce, particularly with 
respect to appropriate nexus standards.
    Agencies: The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of the 
Justice Department's Civil Division, Environment and Natural 
Resources Division, Antitrust Division, Tax Division, Executive 
Office for United States Trustees and U.S. Trustee Program, and 
Office of the Solicitor General and their respective budgets. 
It will also conduct oversight of the Department's compliance 
with the Freedom of Information Act and the Office of 
Management and Budget's Office of Information and Regulatory 
Affairs.
    Administrative Conference of the United States: The 
Subcommittee expects to conduct oversight of the Administrative 
Conference of the United States.
    Arbitration: The Subcommittee may conduct oversight of 
issues arising under the Federal Arbitration Act.
    Legal Services Corporation: The Subcommittee will review 
the mission and operations of the Legal Services Corporation.
    Interstate Compacts: The Subcommittee may conduct oversight 
to determine the extent of compliance with the constitutional 
process by which States seek Congressional approval of 
interstate compacts.
    Divergence in U.S. Merger Review and Enforcement: The 
Subcommittee may examine disparities in the tools available to 
the Federal Trade Commission and the Department of Justice with 
regard to mergers and whether these disparities result in 
different substantive standards.
    International Divergence in Antitrust Enforcement: The 
Subcommittee may conduct oversight of international competition 
laws.
    Antitrust Exemptions: The Subcommittee may conduct 
oversight of industry antitrust exemptions to determine whether 
such exemptions continue to serve the public interest.
    Net Neutrality: The Subcommittee may examine Federal 
Communications Commission (FCC) regulations regarding net 
neutrality and the role of antitrust laws in enforcing the 
principles of net neutrality.
    Effects on Competition Caused by Government Participation 
in Markets as a Provider of Goods and Services: The 
Subcommittee may examine instances where government 
participates in a particular market and whether such 
participation impacts competition.
    China and Antitrust Enforcement Policies: The Subcommittee 
may examine China's anti-competitive enforcement actions and 
how the antitrust enforcement agencies are coordinating with 
other federal government agencies and their Chinese 
counterparts regarding such enforcement efforts.
    Section 5 of the Federal Trade Communications Act: The 
Subcommittee may examine the Federal Trade Commission's use of 
its authority under section 5 of the Federal Trade 
Communications Act.
    Telecommunications Act of 1996: The Subcommittee may 
conduct a review of the Telecommunications Act of 1996.
    Mergers: The Subcommittee will examine mergers on a case-
by-case basis.
    Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB): The 
Subcommittee may examine the CFPB, including with regard to its 
activities concerning arbitration.
    Process Reforms for Congressional Review and Approval of 
Interstate Compacts: The Subcommittee may examine the process 
by which interstate compacts are approved by Congress.
    Settlements Requiring Payments to Nongovernmental Entities: 
The Subcommittee will continue its oversight of Justice 
Department settlements requiring payments to non-victim third 
parties.

                     COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES

                    AUTHORIZATION AND OVERSIGHT PLAN

                              INTRODUCTION

    Under clause 2 of Rule X of the House of Representatives, 
each standing committee of the House has general oversight 
responsibilities to determine whether laws and programs 
addressing subjects within its jurisdiction are being 
implemented in accordance with the intent of Congress to 
determine whether they should be continued, reformed, 
curtailed, or eliminated.
    Congress has a responsibility to keep the Executive Branch 
accountable to the American people and ensure that decisions by 
agencies are open and transparent. During the 114th Congress, 
the Committee on Natural Resources conducted thoughtful 
oversight on a number of specific issues and policies 
administered by the U.S. Department of the Interior and other 
agencies under the Committee's jurisdiction--seeking answers to 
how and why policy decisions are made, who made the decision, 
and how it affects people, our economy and the environment.
    In the 114th Congress, the Committee pursued aggressive 
oversight of the Executive Branch and formed a new subcommittee 
entirely dedicated to oversight and investigation of each 
federal agency within its jurisdiction. For the 115th Congress, 
through oversight hearings and investigations, the Committee 
and its subcommittees will continue to focus oversight efforts 
on promoting job creation and economic growth, reducing 
spending and ensuring responsible use of taxpayer resources, 
and protecting public access to public lands and waters for 
recreation and economic development. Furthermore, the Committee 
will work with federal oversight entities to identify and 
address instances of waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement in 
the federal government to ensure the most efficient use of 
taxpayer dollars.
    Moreover, in the 115th Congress, the Committee will review 
and assess the authorizations of both agencies and programs 
within its jurisdiction and carefully consider whether programs 
with lapsed authorizations should be reauthorized, updated, or 
terminated.
    This authorization and oversight plan outlines the initial, 
primary focuses of the Committee, though additional oversight 
activities are expected to be generated throughout the first 
and second sessions of the 115th Congress.

                             FEDERAL LANDS

    The Committee will focus on four primary objectives for 
federal land management in the 115th Congress: restoring access 
to public lands; promoting sound management of public lands; 
making the Federal Government a good neighbor to local 
communities; and creating new jobs in rural communities.
    Budget and Spending Review--The Committee will review the 
Fiscal Year 2018 and 2019 budget requests for programs under 
its jurisdiction including the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), 
the National Park Service (NPS), the U.S. Forest Service 
(USFS), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). 
Furthermore, to enable these agencies to operate more 
efficiently and effectively, the Committee will review agency 
programs with lapsed authorizations and determine whether such 
programs should be reauthorized, updated, or terminated.
    Local Input in Federal Lands Decision-Making--The Committee 
will explore ways for locally elected officials to have more 
input into federal land management decisions in their 
communities.
    National Park Management--The Committee will explore new 
and innovative ways to reduce the substantial and growing 
maintenance backlog (estimated at over $12 billion for FY 2017) 
and enhance public enjoyment of the parks. In order to innovate 
and modernize the management of National Parks, the Committee 
will examine expired programs under NPS to determine if such 
programs should be reauthorized, updated, or terminated.
    National Park Service Sexual Harassment--The Committee will 
continue to examine allegations of sexual harassment occurring 
within the NPS, and NPS's failure to take appropriate 
disciplinary action. In recent years, the Committee and the 
Department of the Interior Inspector General have uncovered 
numerous cases of sexual harassment occurring within the NPS, 
including at some of the nation's most well-known parks.
    Cultural and Historic Resources Management--The Committee 
will continue to conduct oversight of the National Park 
Service's compliance with various federal statutes, such as the 
National Historic Preservation Act, and accountability for 
officials who fail to adhere to federal laws.
    Forest Health and Wildfires--The Committee will conduct 
oversight hearings on forest health, wildfire prevention and 
suppression, and the need for more active management of our 
national forests. The Committee will focus on western forests, 
particularly in California, where recent USFS reports estimate 
a total loss of more than 100 million trees.
    Recreation Enhancement--The committee will conduct 
oversight on ways to strengthen public access to public lands 
for a wide range of family recreational and sporting 
activities, and ensure that fees for use of developed sites are 
not excessive.
    Multiple Use and Sustained Yield for the Bureau of Land 
Management and the Forest Service--The Committee will conduct 
oversight on ways to ensure the BLM and USFS follow their 
multiple use and sustained yield mandate.
    Economic Growth, National Security, and Sound Conservation 
on Bureau of Land Management and Forest Service Lands--The 
Committee will conduct oversight on ways to ensure our federal 
lands provide secure domestic sources of energy, food, fiber, 
minerals, and jobs while protecting the environment.
    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Refuge Oversight--According to FWS, 
the backlog for their 560 refuges now exceeds $3.4 billion with 
12,000 deferred projects left outstanding. The Committee will 
resume its oversight of this growing backlog.

                                WILDLIFE

    Invasive Species--Thousands of acres of public land in the 
United States are adversely impacted by invasive species. The 
Committee intends to examine ways to effectively address this 
problem.
    Lacey Act--The Committee will conduct oversight hearings on 
various provisions that have been added to this federal law 
since its original enactment in 1900. Among the issues to be 
examined are: why are American citizens required to comply with 
foreign laws; why individuals are denied ``innocent owner'' 
protections under the Lacey Act; and what has been the impact 
of the Legal Timber Protection Act of 2008.
    In addition, the Committee will continue to examine how 
Lacey Act restrictions can impact interstate water supply 
issues.
    Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species--
The Committee will continue its oversight role in monitoring 
the Administration's implementation of proposals adopted by the 
Convention at the 17th Conference of the Parties.
    Voluntary Compensatory Mitigation--The Committee will 
continue to conduct oversight of the FWS' use of voluntary 
payments by energy developers to mitigate impacts on migratory 
bird habitats.

                          ENERGY AND MINERALS

    Expanding Domestic Energy Production--The Committee will 
focus on the importance of increasing American-made energy in 
order to create more new high-paying jobs, increase our 
economic competitiveness, and to improve national security 
through energy independence. In June 2016, the Department of 
the Interior released a jobs report that showed that 1.8 
million Americans were employed in jobs related to programs and 
activities of the Department. Nearly half the jobs identified 
in the report were related to oil, natural gas, and mining 
activities on federal lands, and yet those activities only 
occupy a small fraction of the total lands managed by the 
Department.
    Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Natural Gas--The 
Committee has jurisdiction over the administration of the Outer 
Continental Shelf Lands Act (OCSLA) and will work to ensure 
safe and responsible production of America's offshore oil and 
natural gas resources. The Obama Administration's 2016 ban on 
offshore acreage in the Arctic and the Atlantic prohibits 
drilling in over 100 million acres of federally owned Arctic 
waters, despite the extensive resources in the OCS and the 
industry jobs at stake. This is one of many critical 
considerations moving into the 115th Congress. The Committee 
will build upon oversight and legislative efforts to reform the 
Offshore Planning Process, direct specific offshore lease 
sales, codify the reorganization of the former Minerals 
Management Service (MMS), provide fair and equitable revenue 
sharing for all coastal states, and promote new safety efforts.
    Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA)--The Committee will 
examine and conduct oversight of the Coastal Zone Management 
Act and its implementation and impacts on OCS oil and gas 
exploration and development. Furthermore, the Committee will 
review coastal zone management programs with expired 
authorizations and determine if such programs need to be 
reauthorized, updated, or terminated.
    Onshore Oil and Natural Gas Programs--In the 115th Congress 
the Committee will focus on the state of oil and natural gas 
leasing on federal lands in the western United States. This 
will include leasing delays and declines in production from 
federal lands, reforms to streamline onshore energy leasing and 
permitting, development of oil shale resources, access and 
leasing in the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska (NPRA), and 
access to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). This 
Congress will include additional oversight on Alaskan oil and 
natural gas development by reviewing NPRA administrative 
reforms and an in-depth review of the previous Administration's 
regulation of hydraulic fracturing. Moreover, the Committee 
will examine federal oil and gas leasing programs with lapsed 
authorizations to determine if such programs should be 
reauthorized, updated, or terminated. The United States is the 
world's leading producer of petroleum and natural gas, and a 
new look at regulations could ease access to gas and oil 
reserves throughout the country.
    Renewable and Alternative Energy--In the 115th Congress, 
the Committee will conduct oversight over current solar, 
geothermal, and wind programs operated by the Bureau of Ocean 
and Energy Management (BOEM), the BLM, and the USFS. The 
Committee will examine ways to streamline the leasing and 
permitting of these renewable and alternative energy forms. The 
Committee will also review lapsed programs under these agencies 
to determine if the expired programs should be reauthorized, 
modified, or terminated.
    National Mineral Security Strategy--The Committee will 
conduct oversight on domestic mineral resources, current and 
planned production, and possible future production 
opportunities, including critical minerals.
    Coal Mining Regulations and Leasing--The previous 
Administration through the Department of the Interior waged a 
consistent war on coal. The Committee has conducted and will 
continue extensive oversight of the job-destroying regulatory 
changes, such as the Stream Protection Rule, proposed by the 
Obama Administration to stifle coal mining, production, and 
use. The Committee will focus on this issue through both 
legislative relief and aggressive oversight. The subcommittee 
will begin discussions concerning the reauthorization of the 
AML fee structure, and the future of a Good Samaritan program 
to remediate abandoned mine lands.
    United States Geological Survey--For several years, the 
Committee has had growing concerns about the path taken and the 
programs operated by the United States Geological Survey 
(USGS). Particularly of concern are the growing non-resource or 
hazard programs at USGS and other Department programs, USGS 
data quality dependence on outside data, USGS data 
manipulation, mineral and energy programs focused on stopping 
mineral development not promoting it, and the current state of 
mapping programs. The Committee intends to closely examine the 
operations of USGS and may consider legislation to consolidate 
and streamline the focus of the agency to reduce waste and 
duplication, not only in the USGS, but across agencies. 
Moreover, the Committee will review expired programs under the 
Department to determine if such programs need to be 
reauthorized, updated, or terminated.
    Federal Mapping Programs--The federal government has spent 
billions each year on new geospatial data. This spending, 
including tens of billions in the stimulus act, is frequently 
wasteful, duplicative, and uncoordinated. During hearings in 
previous Congresses, witnesses were clear that multiple 
Administrations have had this problem with little control, 
central oversight, or effective management. Going forward with 
the new Administration, the Committee intends to reexamine this 
issue and may consider legislation to simplify the Department's 
geospatial programs for greater efficiency. Furthermore, the 
Committee intends to conduct oversight of federal agencies and 
how they track and monitor their land management 
responsibilities and purposes.

                            WATER AND POWER

    Budget and Spending Review--At a time of growing water 
supply needs, water-use conflicts, curtailment of water and 
power deliveries due to federal regulation and a spiraling 
national debt, the Committee intends to examine the Bureau of 
Reclamation's and the U.S. Geological Survey's annual budget 
requests and ongoing spending. The goal of this oversight is to 
determine whether the agencies are accountable to the American 
taxpayers, water and power ratepayers and other beneficiaries 
and to ascertain whether they are fulfilling their core 
missions. Furthermore, the Committee will review agency 
programs with lapsed authorizations, to determine if such 
programs need to be reauthorized, updated, or terminated.
    Oversight of the Power Marketing Administration Budgets--
The Committee will continue budget oversight of the four Power 
Marketing Administrations that sell hydropower generated at 
federal dams and reservoirs to wholesale customers that serve 
millions of retail electricity customers with a particular 
focus on rate and budget transparency.
    Protecting and Promoting Hydropower as a Clean, Renewable 
Energy Source--Litigating interests and regulatory efforts 
undermine existing hydropower resources and curtail the growth 
of new hydropower. The Committee will examine these efforts and 
ways to protect and promote large-scale and small-scale 
hydropower generation at existing and potential facilities.
    Increasing Traditional Water Supplies--Visionary leaders 
developed much of the western water supply infrastructure that 
urban and rural communities have depended upon for generations. 
These existing water storage and delivery projects continue to 
serve millions of ratepayers and food consumers nationwide, but 
their operations are being curtailed by endless litigation. The 
Committee will focus on the need to protect existing water 
storage/conveyance facilities and also examine and overcome 
regulatory, financial and other barriers to building new ones 
as a way of returning to a policy of abundance. The Committee 
will focus on the implementation of Public Law 114-322 as part 
of these oversight efforts. In addition, the Committee will 
review and examine water supply programs with lapsed 
authorizations to assess if such programs need to be 
reauthorized, updated, or terminated.
    Maintaining Electricity Transmission/Distribution Service 
on Federal Lands--Energy rights of way on federal lands have a 
direct impact on electricity transmission and distribution 
systems. Vegetative management on these rights-of-way is an 
issue in some areas of the western United States. The Committee 
will continue examining these matters as it relates to 
electricity reliability and catastrophic forest fire 
prevention.

                                 OCEANS

    Budget and Spending Review--The Committee will conduct 
oversight of the budgets of the National Marine Fisheries 
Service and certain ``wet'' programs of National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), within the Department of 
Commerce. In addition, programs under NOAA that have lapsed 
authorizations will need to be examined to determine if such 
programs ought to be reauthorized, updated, or terminated.
    Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act 
Reauthorization--The Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and 
Management Reauthorization Act of 2006 (P.L. 109-479) is the 
primary statute regulating commercial and recreational fishing 
in federal waters. The Act was last reauthorized in the 109th 
Congress and a number of issues related to the reauthorization 
were examined by the Committee in the 114th Congress. In the 
115th Congress, the Committee will look closely at the Act and 
how the Executive branch has implemented its authorities. 
Furthermore, the Committee will review programs with expired 
authorizations under the statute to determine if such programs 
should be reauthorized, updated, or terminated.
    National Ocean Council and Ocean Zoning--Through an 
Executive Order, the previous Administration created a new 
National Ocean Council (NOC) and a structure for a new Coastal 
and Marine Spatial Planning initiative, otherwise known as 
ocean zoning. The Committee will continue to examine the 
authority used to create this entity and initiative, what 
sources of funding it has used, and what effect any new policy 
initiatives from the NOC will have on other departments and 
agencies.
    Ensuring Access--The Committee focused extensively on 
legislative and oversight efforts aimed at ensuring fishing 
access to our oceans' resources in the 114th Congress. With the 
recent expansion and designation of marine national monuments, 
the Committee will focus on the impacts of such Executive 
branch declarations have on access as well as other actions 
that have hindered commercial and recreational fishing in 
federal waters.

                    INDIAN AND ALASKA NATIVE AFFAIRS

    Budget and Spending Review--The Committee will review the 
budget request and staffing levels for the Bureau of Indian 
Affairs (BIA), the Indian Health Service (IHS), Office of the 
Special Trustee for American Indians, and other Departments, 
offices and functions relating to Indian and Alaska Native 
affairs. Furthermore, the Committee will review agency programs 
with expired authorizations, to determine if such programs need 
to be reauthorized, updated, or terminated.
    Federal Barriers to Economic and Energy Development on 
Indian lands--Certain federal laws and policies governing 
public lands are applied to lands held in trust or restricted 
status for tribes and individual Indians. For example, the 
Interior Department promulgated a rule to regulate hydraulic 
fracturing on federal lands. The Department, through the rule, 
treats land held in trust for Indians as federal land even 
though under federal law, the beneficial interest in trust land 
is vested exclusively in the Indian beneficiaries. The 
Committee will continue to examine how best to remove federal 
restrictions on Indian lands so that tribes may have greater 
control over their own affairs. Tribes have and continue to 
demonstrate that they are better suited to manage their lands 
and resources.
    Land Buyback--The Claims Resolution Act of 2010 provided 
for a one-time direct appropriation of $1.9 billion to the 
Department of the Interior for the consolidation of highly 
fractionated Indian land, pursuant to the Indian Lands 
Consolidation Act. The Committee will exercise its duty to 
review the operation of the land consolidation program and work 
with the Administration to ensure the expenditure of funds for 
this program is used efficiently.
    Fee-to-Trust Issues--The 2009 Supreme Court decision in 
Carcieri v. Salazar was one of the most significant judicial 
actions concerning Indian lands and tribal recognition since 
1934. To date, the Department of the Interior has failed to 
cooperate with the Committee in identifying a potential 
resolution. For example, the Department refuses to divulge 
which tribes and lands are affected by Carcieri. This has 
obstructed potential bipartisan legislative action to reform 
and improve the process of acquiring lands for Indians in a 
balanced manner that reflects contemporary land use and 
ownership among tribal and non-Indian communities in 21st 
century America. In the 115th Congress, the Committee will 
conduct oversight to determine an appropriate course of action 
on the Department's fee-to-trust policy.
    Alaska Natives--The Committee will review the 
implementation of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act and 
other laws pertaining to Alaska Natives (including the Alaska 
National Interest Lands Conservation Act of 1980).
    Natural Resources Management on Indian Reservations--The 
Department of the Interior holds approximately 56 million acres 
of land in trust or restricted status for tribes and individual 
Indians. The Committee will review current law, policy, and 
agency action concerning these resources in furtherance of the 
goal of increasing tribal self-governance and economic 
development opportunities for the benefit of Native Americans. 
The Committee may conduct oversight focusing on the 
implementation of the Indian Trust Asset Reform Act, continued 
implementation of the HEARTH Act, and on the Department's 
recent revision of surface leasing rules affecting Indian trust 
and restricted lands. Both public laws are intended to give 
tribes greater control over their own trust assets.
    Indian Country Law and Order--The Committee plans to review 
the implementation and impact of the provisions included in the 
Tribal Law and Order Act, and the tribal jurisdiction 
provisions included in the Violence Against Women 
reauthorization. In addition, the Committee will examine 
federal policies and programs concerning safety, crime 
prevention, and law enforcement in Indian Country, and 
determine whether such programs with lapsed authorizations 
should be reauthorized, updated, or terminated.
    Indian Health Care Improvement Act Implementation/Indian 
Health Service--In the 115th Congress the Committee intends to 
review implementation of the Indian Health Care Improvement 
Act, with a focus on the delivery of medical services to Indian 
people, particularly those in remote reservations where access 
to health care is difficult and costly. Congress has increased 
Indian health funding almost each year since FY 2010, and it 
continues to increase. In FY 2014 and FY 2015, Congress 
exceeded President's budget requests for the agency. Since 
2008, funding for the IHS has increased by more than 50 
percent. The House's FY 2017 proposed appropriation sits at 
approximately $1 billion over FY 2010 levels. Despite these 
funding increases, reports from the U.S. Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) continue to reveal that standards 
for the quality of care in federally operated facilities are 
absent. Additionally, the dangerous situation in the Great 
Plains Area and the staffing shortage problem throughout the 
twelve IHS areas continues to exist if not worsen. To allocate 
funds more efficiently and modernize Indian Health Policy, the 
Committee will review Indian Health programs.
    Tribal Recognition--Since the 1960s the Secretary of the 
Interior has granted recognition to tribes even though some 
experts and tribes have noted that such recognition was made 
without authorization from Congress. For example, the BIA 
regulatory process for extending recognition to new tribes, 
found in Part 83 of the Code of Federal Regulations, was 
established by the Department without authorization from 
Congress. Recent Departmental actions concerning the 
recognition of tribes have stirred controversy. The Department 
administratively ``reaffirmed'' the recognition of a tribe that 
had not been named on any list of tribes recognized pursuant to 
treaty or statute. The Department has refused to invoke any 
legal defense on behalf of the United States in lawsuits filed 
by certain groups seeking tribal recognition where new casinos 
appear to be at stake. Because the power to recognize a tribe 
is a solemn action that grants special political status on the 
tribe's members, the Committee will continue to conduct a 
thorough overview of recognizing new tribes and the 
controversial rule promulgated by the Department to lower the 
standards for the recognition of new tribes.
    Indian Gaming--According to the National Indian Gaming 
Commission, in FY 2015 the Indian gaming industry generated 
$29.9 billion in revenues from 474 casinos operated by 238 
tribes pursuant to the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988. 
Indian gaming is inextricably linked with fee-to-trust and 
recognition and therefore it may be addressed in the context of 
the Committee's continued review of recognition and fee-to-
trust (including Carcieri) issues described above. In addition, 
the Committee in the 115th Congress may conduct hearings 
specifically on gaming to ensure that appropriate enforcement 
and oversight by the National Indian Gaming Commission, 
Department of the Interior, and Department of Justice is being 
conducted.
    Tribal Trust Settlements--The Committee may review the 
negotiation and settlement of lawsuits against the United 
States filed by more than 100 Indian tribes. The basis of the 
lawsuits, filed under previous Administrations, was that the 
United States mismanaged trust lands and trust accounts of 
Indian tribes were in violation of the government's statutory 
obligations. As of October 2014, lawsuits filed by 82 tribes 
have been settled with the last Administration for $2.74 
billion, and dozens more have been settled since. The Committee 
is interested in ensuring that the settlements are fair and 
just for tribes and taxpayers.

                             INSULAR ISSUES

    Budget and Spending Review--The Committee will conduct 
oversight of the budget of the Office of Insular Affairs, 
within the Department of the Interior.
    General Oversight of the Office of Insular Affairs--The 
Committee expects to review the fundamental issues facing each 
of the territories and freely associated states such as: 
support and development of self-government and self-
determination; economic development and self-sufficiency 
through the private sector; accountability of federal funds; 
implementation and enforcement of federal laws; implementation 
and funding for the Compacts of Free Association; and 
management of limited land and water resources.
    Puerto Rico--The Committee shall conduct oversight over the 
implementation of Pub. L. 114-187, Puerto Rico Oversight, 
Management and Economic Stability Act (PROMESA), and anticipate 
reviewing any actions conducted by the Oversight Board 
established under the act. The Committee will continue to 
monitor the results of any plebiscites held expressing the 
preference of the populace as it relates to the relationship 
status between the territory and the United States.

                          REGULATORY OVERSIGHT

    Endangered Species Act (ESA)--Following House passage in 
2014 of Committee-led legislation, the Committee will continue 
to examine ways to update and improve the ESA, which has not 
been authorized since 1988. The Committee will also continue to 
examine the impacts of litigation-settlement driven listings, 
critical habitat designations, and other executive branch 
regulations to ensure transparency, sound science and state, 
local, landowner, and tribal involvement.
    National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)--The Committee 
will conduct oversight on the implementation and effectiveness 
of the law and on NEPA's effectiveness in achieving the 
purposes for which it was enacted more than 45 years ago in 
1969.

                   FEDERAL BUDGET AND SPENDING REVIEW

    The Committee's jurisdiction covers the Department of the 
Interior, the Council on Environmental Quality, the IHS, and 
certain programs of NOAA, and USFS. The Committee will examine 
each of these agencies for opportunities to streamline, reduce 
costs, and either close or consolidate outdated programs. In 
particular, the Committee will focus on programs that have seen 
significant growth over the last few budget cycles or sudden 
significant spikes in funding as a result of agency decisions. 
The Committee will also review agency programs with lapsed 
authorizations to assess if such programs need to be 
reauthorized, updated, or terminated. Furthermore, the 
Committee will look at the growing number of executive branch 
regulations, executive orders, and other actions from those 
agencies that are adversely impacting private property owners, 
local governments, tribes, states, and private industry.

                         GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE

    The Committee will conduct oversight of climate change and 
related policies and programs and the related impacts including 
impacts on federal lands, oceans, and other resources.

       ETHICS AND TRANSPARENCY AT THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

    The Committee will conduct oversight of ethics operations 
at the Department of the Interior and its agencies and bureaus 
within the Committee's jurisdiction. The Committee intends to 
review ethics training, points of contact, rules, and resources 
in order to facilitate ethical decision-making at all levels. 
Furthermore, the Committee intends to ensure that ethics 
operations and agency managers hold federal employees who 
violate ethics rules and/or the law accountable.

              COMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND GOVERNMENT REFORM

                    AUTHORIZATION AND OVERSIGHT PLAN

    Rule X, Clause 2(d) of the Rules of the House requires each 
standing committee of the House to adopt and submit a two-year 
authorization and oversight plan to the Committee on Oversight 
and Government Reform, the Committee on House Administration, 
and the Committee on Appropriations by February 15 of the first 
session of each Congress.
    The following is the authorization and oversight plan for 
the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform and its 
subcommittees for the 115th Congress. The Committee will 
conduct oversight and investigations pursuant to its 
legislative jurisdiction and its broad oversight jurisdiction 
under Rule X.
    This plan contains a detailed list of matters for oversight 
and investigation that will advance the Committee's mission to 
ensure the economy, efficiency, effectiveness, and 
accountability of the federal government and all its agencies. 
The list is not exhaustive. The Committee will retain the 
flexibility to investigate instances of waste, fraud, abuse, 
and mismanagement as they emerge, and to conduct oversight of 
other issues as appropriate.

                         LAPSED AUTHORIZATIONS

    The Committee will consider lapsed authorizations in its 
jurisdiction in the 115th Congress, and work to enact necessary 
authorizations and reforms. These include the Unfunded Mandates 
Reform Act; the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP); 
the Opportunity Scholarship Program and DC Tuition Assistance 
Grant program; the National Historical Publications and Records 
Commission; the Paperwork Reduction Act; the Merit Systems 
Protection Board; the E-Government Act; the Office of 
Government Ethics; and the Office of Special Counsel.

                 WASTE, FRAUD, ABUSE, AND MISMANAGEMENT

    The Committee will continue to examine instances of waste, 
fraud, abuse, and mismanagement of the activities of the 
federal government, with an emphasis on spending. Although the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO), inspectors general, and 
whistleblowers raise concerns about waste in federal spending, 
the executive branch and Congress often fail to adequately 
address such issues. The Committee's oversight will cover all 
federal government departments, agencies, and programs with an 
eye toward solutions for eliminating wasteful spending and 
abuse of authority. The following sections address specific 
areas in which the Committee has an opportunity to address 
wasteful spending. Furthermore, the Committee will offer 
targeted legislative proposals that proactively address 
identified waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement.

                    OPEN GOVERNMENT AND TRANSPARENCY

    The Committee will continue to advocate for technological 
solutions to increase transparency throughout the government. 
The Committee will seek to ensure that the federal government's 
information--with a few well-defined exceptions, such as 
national security information--is available online and 
formatted in ways that facilitate easy access and analysis. The 
Committee will evaluate possible legislation to set policy 
goals for technology-driven transparency for program 
performance, regulatory materials, and legislative documents.
    In 2016, Congress passed S. 337, the FOIA Improvement Act 
of 2016, Pub. L. 114-185. In the 115th Congress, the Committee 
will work to oversee implementation of this Act, and to ensure 
timely and effective implementation.
    The Committee will also examine the implementation of other 
open government laws, such as the Presidential Records Act, the 
Federal Records Act, and the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 
and consider whether any statutory mandates may impede public 
access to information.
    The Committee will continue to investigate the persistent 
challenges and failures associated with the preservation of 
presidential and federal records, as required by law. Dating 
back to the Clinton Administration, changes in technology have 
challenged each subsequent administration's ability to capture, 
manage, and preserve the growing and diverse volume of 
electronic records. Despite new policies intended to improve 
transparency, concerns have been raised that problems remain. 
The Committee intends to examine the challenges created by the 
changing landscape of digital communication, including the use 
of personal email and social media for government business.
    In 2014, the Digital Accountability and Transparency Act 
(DATA Act) was signed into law. The DATA Act, if effectively 
implemented, will transform federal spending transparency by 
providing program and activity level spending information. The 
Committee will continue oversight conducted in the 114th 
Congress and oversee implementation efforts by the Office of 
Management and Budget and the Department of Treasury.
    The Committee will continue to monitor implementation of 
the Evidence-Based Policymaking Commission Act, Pub. L. 114-40, 
including transmission of the Commission's final report which 
is due in Fall 2017.

                             CYBERSECURITY

    Under the Federal Information Security Management Act of 
2002 (FISMA), which Congress updated in December 2014, and the 
Federal Cybersecurity Enhancement Act of 2015 (FCEA), federal 
agencies are required to implement a number of security 
controls on their information systems.
    In July 2016 the Committee sent a letter to 26 of the 
largest federal agencies and the White House inquiring about 
their compliance with FISMA and FCEA, including overdue reports 
on cybersecurity. The Committee will continue to focus its 
oversight efforts on the state of cybersecurity at federal 
agencies, contractors, and other entities in the 115th 
Congress.
    The Committee will also continue its oversight of federal 
agencies' policies and regulations affecting cybersecurity 
technologies and practices. This includes federal and state law 
enforcement policy towards the use of strong-encryption in and 
on information technology devices and applications.
    Additionally, the Committee will examine the role and 
responsibility of the federal government in global internet 
governance, specifically regarding the effect of data 
protection laws on U.S. economic interests. The Committee will 
continue its oversight of the development of U.S. policy 
towards deterring international actors from engaging in 
unlawful hacking or other cyber activities that fall outside 
international norms of behavior.
    After a year-long investigation into the data breaches at 
the Office of Personnel Management in 2014 and 2015, majority 
staff of the Committee produced a report that included findings 
and recommendations to improve federal cybersecurity, incident 
response, and IT acquisition. The minority staff of the 
Committee also produced a memorandum to minority members of the 
Committee that included findings and recommendations on the 
data breaches. The Committee's oversight of IT management and 
cybersecurity will include an emphasis on the report's 
recommendations, specifically, a zero-trust cybersecurity 
posture, the role of the Chief Information Officer in IT 
security, and the transition of background investigations to 
the new National Background Investigations Bureau and IT 
security responsibility for background investigation data to 
the Department of Defense.

     SECURITY CLEARANCES/NATIONAL BACKGROUND INVESTIGATIONS BUREAU

    On January 22, 2016, the White House announced the creation 
of the National Background Investigations Bureau (NBIB), which 
absorbs the Office of Personnel Management's (OPM) existing 
Federal Investigative Services, and transfers to the Department 
of Defense (DOD) responsibility for the design, development, 
security, and operation of the background investigations 
information technology systems.\3\ NBIB officially began 
operating on October 1, 2016, with a mandate to make the 
security clearance process run more efficiently and securely. 
However, the most recent progress report since then, issued in 
December by the Performance Accountability Council, showed 
background investigation times increasing, a trend consistent 
throughout 2016. In addition, President Obama issued Executive 
Order 13764 on January 17, 2017, regarding background 
investigations for federal employees and contractors. 
Structural concerns also remain regarding communications 
between the DOD, NBIB, DOJ, FBI, and OPM. DOD is charged with 
protecting and administering NBIB's information technology 
systems, but the precise lines of authority and responsibility 
between the various agencies is not always clear. In the 115th 
Congress, the Committee will continue its examination of the 
security clearance and suitability review process and NBIB, 
including the effectiveness of operations during transition, 
plans for reforming the background investigations system, and 
cybersecurity at NBIB.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \3\White House, Press Release, The Way Forward for Federal 
Background Investigations (Jan. 22, 2016), available at https://
www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2016/01/22/way-forward-federal-background-
investigations.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                   INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT

    Federal agencies spent over $81 billion in Fiscal Year (FY) 
2016 buying, operating, and maintaining information technology 
(IT) products, services, and systems. Many of these systems 
fail to deliver the productivity gains expected, or worse, 
simply fail. In addition, the federal government spends over 75 
percent of this IT funding on Operations & Maintenance (O&M;) in 
part because of the substantial amount of legacy IT on which 
federal agencies rely. Legacy IT is a significant area of both 
wasteful spending and security vulnerabilities.
    The Committee will review the federal government's IT 
acquisition and management policies to ensure that taxpayers 
are getting the maximum return for their money. The Committee 
will closely monitor the executive branch's efforts to stop IT 
projects that are not on target, streamline those that are 
wasteful, and work to ensure that inefficient legacy systems 
are decommissioned.
    The Committee will conduct IT acquisition oversight and 
specifically monitor agencies' implementation of the Federal 
Information Technology Acquisition Reform Act (FITARA). The Act 
provides an important tool to help agencies manage and acquire 
IT. As part of this oversight effort, the Committee will 
continue to issue FITARA Scorecards approximately every six 
months to assess agencies' implementation of the law. The 
Scorecard measures performance of FITARA-related activities, 
such as agencies efforts to assess risk in IT investments, IT 
budget savings, use of incremental development in software 
acquisition and consolidation of data centers.
    The Committee will look broadly at ways technology can 
improve governmental processes. In particular, the Committee 
will focus on the need to transition from outdated legacy 
systems to newer and more efficient systems--such as those that 
utilize cloud computing and other technologies--to drive 
savings. The Committee will be reviewing the status of agency 
modernization efforts by continuing inquiries related to 
inventory of legacy IT systems and outdated and unsupported 
operating systems and software. In addition, the Committee will 
consider legislative options to incentivize agencies to 
modernize IT by allowing agencies to reinvest savings realized 
through modernization. The Committee will also continue to 
assess the progress of federal IT investments and shine light 
on underperforming programs and assets.
    Changes in technology present government agencies with new 
possibilities and new challenges. The Committee will continue 
to monitor for agency misuse of technology and identify areas 
for improved oversight. For example, given the prominence of 
cloud computing in efforts to modernize federal IT systems, the 
Committee will continue its oversight of the Federal Risk and 
Authorization Management Program (FedRAMP) to ensure federal 
agencies are able to quickly adopt secure cloud based 
solutions.
    The Committee will review the effect of federal IT mandates 
under laws such as the Federal Information Security Management 
Act (FISMA), the E-Government Act of 2002, and the Clinger-
Cohen Act. The Committee will seek input from government 
employees on the front lines of acquisition and implementation 
to determine whether these mandates have improved data 
security, public access, and IT enterprise planning, and at 
what cost.
    The Committee will also closely follow the implementation 
of the Digital Accountability and Transparency Act of 2014 
(DATA Act).

                            E-GOVERNMENT ACT

    In the 115th Congress, the Committee will work to enact 
needed authorizations and reforms for programs in its 
jurisdiction with lapsed authorizations. Included in the 
Committee's list of expired authorizations are portions of the 
E-Government Act of 2002, Pub. L. 107-347:
           General Services Administration (GSA) E-
        Government Fund;
           GSA programs to maintain, improve, and 
        promote an integrated federal internet portal for 
        public access to government information and services;
           OMB coordinated program to develop and 
        maintain a government-wide repository and website about 
        federal government research and development;
           GSA program to study best practices at 
        community technology centers, to develop and 
        disseminate online tutorials, and promote community 
        technology centers generally;
           GSA program to develop and maintain common 
        protocols for geographic information systems;
           OMB coordinated program to ensure 
        government-wide information security; and
           OMB, Office of Electronic Government, for 
        management and promotion of electronic government 
        services.
    The Committee will also consider:
           Section 834, Federal Data Center 
        Consolidation Initiative (expires October 1, 2018);
           Section 832, Enhanced Transparency and 
        Improved Risk Management (expires December 19, 2019); 
        and
           Section 833, Portfolio Review (expires 
        December 19, 2019).

                        PRIVACY IN A DIGITAL AGE

    Technological innovations are supplying federal agencies 
with increasing information about the lives of individual 
citizens. The Committee will broadly investigate whether the 
protections provided by privacy laws and the Fourth Amendment 
are sufficient to protect an individual's privacy in the 
digital age, with an emphasis on access to geolocation data.
    The FBI currently keeps its own database with approximately 
21 million photographs, as well as having access to millions of 
state driver's license photos. The Committee will monitor and 
conduct oversight of the FBI's use of facial recognition 
technology and the use of facial recognition technology by 
other law enforcement agencies.
    The increasing use of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) 
presents concerns over the current regulations establishing 
authority over the airspace above a person's property. The 
Committee will examine the privacy and regulatory issues 
surrounding the intersection of UAS and airspace rights and 
law.
    In 2016, OMB issued a memo to heads of executive 
departments and agencies to reassess the structure and 
resources of its privacy programs. The Committee will conduct 
oversight of federal agency chief privacy officers to assess 
the structure and resources of agencies' privacy programs.
    The Committee will also examine and evaluate agency privacy 
and security practices to ensure protection of confidential 
data including personally identifiable information.

                          EMERGING TECHNOLOGY

    The Committee, which is responsible for oversight across 
the government, is uniquely situated to bring together multiple 
federal agencies that have (or claim to have) regulatory 
authority over a particular field or technology. Generally, the 
Committee's goal is ensuring regulators do not place undue or 
impractical burdens on new technologies, such as conflicting or 
duplicative regulations.
    The Committee will examine the 20th-century regulatory 
state and structure to identify potential ways of either 
adjusting or abandoning laws and regulations that are outdated, 
unnecessary, or ineffective in the digital age.
    The Committee will also examine specific new technologies 
and their potential benefits and risks, such as augmented 
reality, artificial intelligence, facial recognition, 
autonomous delivery vehicles, and quantum computing.

             FEDERAL REGULATION AND THE REGULATORY PROCESS

    While some federal regulations are necessary to effectively 
implement the laws that Congress passes to protect health, 
consumers, and the environment, federal regulations can also 
impose significant and unnecessary burdens on regulated 
industry. The Committee will place special emphasis on 
oversight of the federal regulatory process to ensure that 
federal regulators work to minimize unnecessary burdens on 
small businesses, job creation, economic growth, and 
competitiveness in the global marketplace while maintaining 
protections for the American people.
    The Committee will evaluate rulemakings to ensure that they 
do not exceed their authority and adhere to the requirements 
embodied in statutes. Regulators have an obligation to develop 
rules in an open and transparent manner and provide adequate 
time for the public to participate in a meaningful way. 
Therefore, the Committee will scrutinize practices not subject 
to typical rulemaking requirements, such as the issuance of 
guidance documents, interim final rulemakings, and settlement 
agreements, as well as local, state, and federal taxes, fines, 
fees, and penalties.
    In addition, the Committee will focus on the role of the 
Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) in agency 
rulemakings to ensure that it carries out its regulatory duties 
in a timely and transparent manner. The Committee will also 
evaluate OIRA's statutory role relating to the lapsed 
authorization of the Paperwork Reduction Act. The Committee 
will seek to define OIRA's role regarding oversight and 
approval of the agency information collections processes.
    Finally, the Committee will examine the effect of unfunded 
mandates on state and local governments and private entities, 
and explore ways to potentially enhance the effectiveness of 
the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995.

                      HEALTH CARE AND ENTITLEMENTS

    The Committee will identify waste, fraud, abuse, and 
mismanagement in government entitlement programs. The Committee 
will conduct oversight related to the budgetary and economic 
effect of America's entitlement programs as well as options 
that would increase choice, access, and quality in health care 
markets and lower the cost of health care. The Committee will 
also examine the increase in federal entitlement programs, with 
a focus on waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement within those 
programs.
    The Committee will continue to conduct oversight of the 
implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care 
Act (PPACA). Specifically, the Committee will focus on bringing 
transparency to the federal government's increased role in 
health care markets, with a focus on determining the effect of 
policies on consumer choice and insurance premiums. The 
Committee will continue to closely examine regulations 
promulgated under new PPACA authorities, and other executive 
branch actions, to ensure that they are consistent with the 
text and intent of the law. The Committee will continue to 
review health care policy, procedures, and practices at the 
federal, state, and local level, in particular potential new 
policies that could change the PPACA. Specifically, the 
Committee will examine the potential effects of partial or 
complete PPACA repeal on the employer-sponsored insurance 
market, the individual and small group insurance markets, and 
other federal health care programs, including Medicare and 
Medicaid. The Committee will also conduct oversight of any 
plans or proposals to replace the PPACA and will oversee 
implementation of any replacement to the legislation. The 
Committee will focus on how partial or complete repeal of the 
PPACA, and the implementation of any proposed replacement 
plans, will affect the availability, cost, and quality of 
insurance coverage for all Americans. The Committee will remain 
vigilant to recover misallocated or unused funds under 
remaining PPACA authorities.
    The Committee will also conduct oversight of the Food and 
Drug Administration (FDA) with a focus on ensuring that FDA 
properly evaluates the safety of drugs and medical devices 
while also promoting competition and enhancing transparency. 
The Committee will examine the causes and effects of critical 
pharmaceutical drug shortages, recent increases in the price of 
drugs, and the policies and procedures in place to protect the 
public from the outbreak of dangerous or deadly diseases.

                         DRUG POLICY AND SAFETY

    The Committee will continue to work toward the 
reauthorization of the Office of National Drug Control Policy 
(ONDCP). Congress last authorized ONDCP in 2006, and the 
authorization expired at the end of 2010. Since its 
authorization lapsed, ONDCP has continued to receive 
appropriations each year. The Committee held a reauthorization 
hearing in December 2015, which examined potential obstacles to 
reauthorization. ONDCP's proposed statutory changes for its 
reauthorization center on expanding ONDCP's work in demand 
reduction. For example, the High Intensity Drug Trafficking 
Areas or ``HIDTA'' program currently focuses more on drug 
supply reduction, seeking to eliminate both drug trafficking 
and production throughout the United States.

                  THE GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE

    As the authorizer of the Government Accountability Office 
(GAO), the Committee will continue to support its mission. In 
addition, and as required by House Rule X, clause 4(c)(1)(A), 
the Committee will continue to receive and examine GAO reports 
and submit to the House such recommendations as it considers 
necessary or desirable in connection with the subject matter of 
the reports.
    In February 2017, the GAO will issue its biennial ``High 
Risk List'' report, which identifies government programs that 
are particularly vulnerable to waste, fraud, abuse, and 
mismanagement. The Committee will provide ongoing oversight of 
agencies and programs included on the High Risk List by holding 
hearings, meeting with agency officials responsible for 
included programs, and monitoring agencies' corrective plans 
and actions.
    In April 2017, the GAO will issue its annual report on 
opportunities to reduce fragmentation, overlap, and duplication 
and realize financial benefits in the federal government. The 
Committee will hold hearings on the report and will continue to 
monitor GAO's findings to determine areas of federal activity 
that are duplicative and inefficient. The Committee will also 
provide particular attention to duplicative items that GAO also 
includes on its ``high priority recommendations'' list.
    The Committee will consider reforms related to GAO's 
function of providing legal opinions to Congress on agency 
Anti-Deficiency Act (ADA) allegations. Generally, the ADA 
prohibits federal agencies from accepting gratuitous services 
from contractors.
    Finally, the Committee will monitor implementation of GAO 
congressional protocols and propose revisions as appropriate.

                FINANCIAL SECTOR AND CONSUMER PROTECTION

    The Committee will conduct oversight of the financial 
sector, focusing on those regulatory agencies at the heart of 
the financial crisis and those agencies created, or that saw 
their powers expanded by the Dodd-Frank Act of 2010. The 
Committee will monitor financial regulators' management, 
technological initiatives, and rulemaking, with a view towards 
promoting capital formation, predictable and efficient markets, 
and investor and consumer protection.
    The Committee will monitor the work of the Financial 
Stability Oversight Council (FSOC) and the Office of Financial 
Research (OFR), including the ``systemically important 
financial institution'' designation process.
    Key topics for oversight include the need for technology-
driven transparency in financial regulatory filings so that 
markets can quickly digest crucial information, management, and 
communications challenges at key agencies, including the 
Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), and the continued 
implementation of the Dodd-Frank Act.
    The Committee will conduct oversight of Fannie Mae, Freddie 
Mac, and their regulator, the Federal Housing Finance Agency 
(FHFA). The Committee will further explore potential risks to 
taxpayers associated with Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and 
government housing policies, and will work to ensure that 
additional taxpayer money is spent efficiently and effectively. 
The Committee will also conduct oversight to ensure that FHFA 
is implementing policies that protect homeowners from abusive 
mortgage origination and servicing practices and that maximize 
assistance to homeowners, in accordance with federal statutes.
    The Committee will conduct oversight of the Federal 
Reserve, including its use of non-traditional quantitative 
easing techniques, potential financial risks associated with 
its growing portfolio of assets, and the effectiveness of its 
regulatory procedures.
    The Committee will continue to monitor the SEC's 
implementation of the JOBS Act and Dodd-Frank Act. The 
Committee will examine the effects of proposed changes to the 
Dodd-Frank Act.
    The Committee will continue to conduct oversight of the 
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, focusing on the Bureau's 
management, budget, operations, rulemakings, enforcement 
actions, and its success in protecting consumers from improper 
and abusive financial products. The Committee will examine any 
proposals to change operational structure, funding mechanisms, 
or enforcement authorities of the Bureau.
    The Committee will continue to conduct oversight of the 
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and review the actions it 
took in monitoring financial fraud with respect to third-party 
payment processors.
    The Committee will examine consumer protection efforts 
across the federal government. As a part of this oversight, the 
Committee will examine the regulatory and enforcement actions 
of the Federal Trade Commission, the Consumer Financial 
Protection Bureau, and the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

                           INSPECTORS GENERAL

    On December 16, 2016, the Inspector General Empowerment Act 
of 2016, Pub. L. 114-317, was signed into law. The bipartisan 
bill clarifies that inspectors general have complete and timely 
access to agency documents and creates a number of structural 
reforms to coordinate and oversee the activities of the various 
inspectors general. The bill also mandates reporting by the 
inspectors general to Congress regarding their unimplemented 
recommendations to agencies and the number of criminal 
referrals made to the Department of Justice.
    The Committee will continue to work closely with the 
inspectors general to ensure they have the tools needed to 
perform their important oversight work. With the new reporting 
requirements on unimplemented recommendations, the Committee 
intends to help inspectors general demand accountability from 
their respective agencies. The new reporting requirements will 
also allow the Committee to have better oversight of how the 
Department of Justice is choosing to respond to criminal 
referrals from offices of inspectors general.
    The Committee will continue to encourage that inspector 
general vacancies be filled and work to highlight the 
importance of filling these positions.
    As in previous congresses, the Committee will send a survey 
to all 70-plus inspectors general to obtain data on their 
operations.

                        WHISTLEBLOWER PROTECTION

    The Committee will maintain its efforts related to the 
protection of whistleblowers in the federal government. This 
focus has widespread bipartisan support in Congress, and the 
Committee considers it a significant priority.
    The Committee has legislative jurisdiction over federal 
workforce measures, including those to protect whistleblowers 
and prevent retaliation. In addition to legislation already 
passed out of the House this Congress to reauthorize the U.S. 
Office of Special Counsel (OSC) and improve its effectiveness, 
the Committee will pursue further legislation to ensure the 
ability of OSC, the Merit Systems Protection Board, and the 
U.S. court system to protect whistleblowers. The Committee will 
also continue to pursue legislation to improve the Department 
of Justice's processes for responding to complaints of 
whistleblower retaliation in the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation.
    The Committee is committed to encouraging a culture 
throughout the federal government of protecting whistleblowers, 
and will work to encourage best practices to prevent 
retaliation. To that end, the Committee will continue to work 
closely with OSC, the agency tasked with policing whistleblower 
retaliation in the federal government. The Committee will also 
work closely with Council of Inspectors General on Integrity 
and Efficiency's Whistleblower Ombudsman Working Group, created 
as a result of the Whistleblower Protection Enhancement Act of 
2012's requirement that each inspector general appoint a 
whistleblower ombudsman. In addition to supporting these 
entities, the Committee will also conduct oversight of them 
when necessary to ensure they are working as effectively as 
possible.
    The Committee will continue to work directly with 
whistleblowers in the federal government, including those who 
make disclosures of waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement to 
the Committee. The Committee considers such disclosures an 
extremely important source for Congressional oversight, aiding 
the Committee's efforts to ensure transparency and 
accountability in the federal government. The Committee will 
continue to advance policies that protect federal employees' 
rights to communicate directly with Congress and to ensure 
federal employees are aware of these rights, encouraging other 
whistleblowers to come forward.
    The Committee will examine directives restricting federal 
employees from communicating freely with Congress, as well as 
allegations of retaliation or reprisal for communicating with 
Congress. Numerous laws protect the rights of federal employees 
and whistleblowers to provide information to Congress, 
including the Whistleblower Protection Enhancement Act, section 
744 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2016, section 713 
of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2016, and 5 U.S.C. 
section 7211. For more than a century, Congress has protected 
the rights of federal employees to communicate with Congress 
about waste, fraud, and abuse in the executive branch.

          U.S. OFFICE OF SPECIAL COUNSEL (OSC) REAUTHORIZATION

    The mission of the U.S. Office of Special Counsel (OSC) is 
to: (1) safeguard the merit system by protecting federal 
employees from prohibited personnel practices, especially 
reprisal from whistleblowing; (2) provide employees a mechanism 
for disclosing wrongdoing in government agencies; (3) enforce 
and provide advice on the Hatch Act, which restricts political 
activity by government employees; and (4) enforce employment 
rights under the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment 
Rights Act of 1994 for federal employees who serve or have 
served in the uniformed services. The Committee conducts 
ongoing oversight of OSC, and also interacts with the agency 
frequently in the protection of whistleblowers.
    OSC's last reauthorization, passed in 2002, covered FY 2003 
through FY 2007, and lapsed at the end of that period. In the 
114th Congress, the Committee approved and the House passed 
H.R. 4639, the Thoroughly Investigating Retaliation Against 
Whistleblowers Act. Introduced by Representative Rod Blum (R-
IA), the bill would have reauthorized OSC for a period of five 
years. In the 115th Congress, Representative Blum reintroduced 
the bill as H.R. 69, which the House voted to approve on 
January 4, 2017. H.R. 69 would reauthorize OSC from FY 2017 to 
FY 2021.

                      OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS

    The Committee will continue its oversight and support of 
the Office of Government Ethics (OGE). The agency's mandate is 
to ensure uniformity across executive branch ethics programs by 
advising on and interpreting ethics laws, policies, and 
training. Last Congress, the Committee examined public comments 
by OGE regarding ongoing ethics issues which OGE had yet to 
fully investigate. The Committee will continue to ensure OGE 
operates in a manner consistent with its mission of providing 
clear, impartial ethics guidance to federal agencies.
    The Committee will also consider reauthorization of OGE, as 
well as substantive and procedural reforms to improve its 
effectiveness. OGE's statutory authorization lapsed in 2007, 
and it has asked the Committee to begin the reauthorization 
process.

                      FEDERAL FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

    The Committee will examine federal financial management. 
This review will include compliance with financial management 
and accounting laws, as well as the security and reliability of 
federal financial systems. The Committee will also focus on 
agency efforts to reduce improper payments and achieve an 
unqualified audit opinion for the federal government.
    Financial management reforms in 1990 required all federal 
agencies to conduct financial audits and for GAO to audit the 
consolidated financial statements of the federal government. To 
date, GAO has not been able to issue an audit opinion. In the 
2016 statement which included the financial statements as of 
and for FY 2015 and FY 2016, GAO identified three reasons for 
not issuing an opinion: (1) the federal government cannot 
account for and reconcile intra-governmental financial activity 
between federal entities; (2) the Department of the Treasury 
has not developed an effective process for preparing the 
consolidated statements; and (3) the Department of Defense has 
yet to produce auditable financial statements.
    The size of DOD's budget accounts for a significant portion 
of government spending and, as a result, the United States has 
never produced an audit of its financial statements. The 
Committee will focus on overseeing DOD's financial management 
processes and its progress towards becoming auditable.
    The Committee will also continue to investigate improper 
payments distributed by federal agencies. Under the 2002 
Improper Payments Information Act (IPIA), federal agencies are 
required to annually review all programs and activities to 
identify those entities susceptible to significant improper 
payments. For FY 2015, improper payments totaled $137 billion.

                         GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING

    Controlling federal government contract spending is 
critically important. The federal government buys a wide 
variety of goods and services, from pens to sophisticated 
weapons systems to cybersecurity tools and services. In FY 
2016, the federal government spent $464 billion on contracting, 
and in FY 2015, the government spent $431 billion. More than 
half of federal contract spending is on services. While more 
recently contract spending has declined--compared to $540 
billion in contract spending in FY 2008--there is much 
oversight work to do in this area. Consequently, the Committee 
will investigate waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement and 
consider opportunities for acquisition reform.
    The Committee will conduct oversight of agency contracting 
to ensure there is appropriate management of taxpayer funds and 
agencies are effectively using acquisition strategies to 
achieve policy goals. Such policy goals include effective 
deployment of cyber tools, timely processing of disability 
benefits, and accurate and timely provision of citizen 
services. Further, the Committee will conduct oversight that 
includes a focus on contract management and identify areas 
where the government has not effectively optimized commercial 
best practices. The Committee will also monitor the 
Administration's use of civil and criminal remedies to address 
wrongdoing and will promote transparency at the point of 
contract award and throughout the life cycle of federal 
contracts to prevent waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement.
    The Committee will also focus on oversight of IT 
acquisition because far too many federal IT investments fail or 
incur cost overruns and schedule slippages and do not 
contribute to mission objectives. As a result of these failures 
in IT acquisition, the GAO designated ``Improving the 
Management of IT Acquisitions and Operations'' as high risk in 
February 2015.
    The Committee oversight and acquisition reform objectives 
will be focused on: (1) ensuring the federal government 
acquisition process reflects commercial best practices, to the 
extent practicable; (2) leveraging public and private sector 
capacity to provide goods and services efficiently; and (3) 
encouraging innovation and modernization of goods and services 
with streamlined contract processes and limited government-
unique requirements.

                        SUSPENSION AND DEBARMENT

    The federal government spends almost $1 trillion on 
contracts and grants annually. Despite congressional oversight 
efforts, GAO has determined that there are serious weaknesses 
in the suspension and debarment programs of numerous agencies. 
This has resulted in the awarding of federal funds to 
companies, organizations and individuals barred from receiving 
such funds, including those with criminal convictions, federal 
tax liabilities, or ties to terrorist organizations. The 
Committee will continue to conduct oversight to promote 
efficiency, transparency, and accountability related to 
suspension and debarment, to include improvements to managing 
the government-wide database of suspended and disbarred 
contractors.

                      GOVERNMENTAL REORGANIZATIONS

    As required by House Rule X, clause 4(c)(1)(B), the 
Committee will continue to evaluate the effects of laws enacted 
to reorganize the legislative and executive branches of the 
Government.

                              GRANT REFORM

    The Committee will continue to conduct oversight of federal 
grants, including grant programs and activities. The Committee 
will examine the efficiency, fairness, and transparency of the 
grant making process, and evaluate opportunities to reform and 
streamline the grant making process across the federal 
government. The Committee's review will extend to emergency and 
non-emergency grant making, including disaster grant making and 
processes employed to coordinate recovery between the federal 
government and states. The Committee will also examine 
Department of Justice grants and other law enforcement 
assistance programs, such as the Department of Defense's 1033 
program.

                 GOVERNMENT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

    The Committee will review the District of Columbia's use of 
federal dollars to fund programs such as school choice, as well 
as other District initiatives. The Committee will work to 
reauthorize both the Tuition Assistance Grant (TAG) program, 
which provides grants to District residents attending colleges 
and universities across the country, and the Opportunity 
Scholarship Program (OSP), which provides grants to District 
students to expand school choice. In addition, the Committee 
will review District expenditures on local programs to ensure 
that the expenditures are in line with Congressional mandates 
and federal law. The Committee will also work to strengthen 
Congress's oversight of the District and exercise its plenary 
legislative authority granted by the Constitution.

         METRO--WASHINGTON METROPOLITAN AREA TRANSIT AUTHORITY

    The Committee will continue its oversight of the Washington 
Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA). Despite a number 
of programs aimed at bringing the transit system back into a 
state of good repair, the system continues to experience delays 
and infrastructure breakdowns. The Committee will continue to 
hold WMATA accountable for operational effectiveness and 
safety. The Committee will also continue to conduct oversight 
of WMATA's financial status to ensure good stewardship of 
federal funds.

                         2020 DECENNIAL CENSUS

    The cost of the decennial census has continued to rise 
decade after decade. For example, the total cost for the 2000 
census was $9.4 billion. By the time of the 2010 census, the 
cost for administering the census had risen to $12.3 billion. 
For the 2020 census, the Bureau estimates a cost of more than 
$17 billion.\4\ The Committee is closely monitoring the 
development of the Census--including its content, technology 
development (including effectiveness and related security), and 
eventual deployment.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \4\2020 Census Operational Plan (Nov. 2015).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Notably, beginning in August 2017, the Census Bureau will 
conduct its End-to-End Test to verify and validate the 
operations, procedures, systems, and field infrastructure it 
will use in the 2020 decennial census. This is a key milestone 
in the eventual deployment of the 2020 decennial census. 
Subsequently, the Committee will hold hearings, meet with 
Bureau officials, and monitor developments to help ensure the 
Bureau meets data accuracy goals while holding down costs.

                 NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND FEDERAL RECORDS

    The Committee will continue its oversight and support of 
the National Archives and Records Administration's (NARA) 
management of government records and the procedures NARA is 
putting in place to ensure government-wide implementation of 
the Presidential and Federal Records Act Amendments of 2014, 
Pub. L. 113-187, including the treatment of records generated 
by new technologies, including social media. The Committee will 
also examine NARA's recommended procedures and agency adoption 
of those procedures to ensure the electronic capture and 
archival of records created electronically.
    The Committee will examine the Presidential Library system, 
specifically looking at the governance of the Presidential 
Libraries, how the foundations interact with NARA, and how the 
foundations and NARA coordinate to fulfill the mission of the 
Presidential Library system.
    The Committee will also examine the National Historical 
Publications and Records Commission, housed within NARA. The 
Commission, which provides grants to organizations to support 
the preservation and dissemination of historical publications 
and records, still receives dedicated funding. The Commission 
has operated without authorization since FY 2009.

                         THE FEDERAL WORKFORCE

    As the authorizer of civil service rules under Title 5 of 
the United States Code, the Committee will conduct oversight to 
ensure the federal workforce is operating efficiently and 
effectively and as Congress intended. As part of these standing 
efforts, the Committee will continue oversight of federal 
employee morale and issues contributing to such morale, as 
informed by the annual Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey. The 
Committee will also continue work initiated in the 114th 
Congress to examine agencies' tables of penalties to help 
identify areas that agency disciplinary guidelines could be 
improved.
    In addition, as the nation nears the 40th anniversary of 
the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978, Pub. L. 95-454, the 
Committee will also undertake a comprehensive review of the 
civil service system reform. Modernizing the civil service 
system is critical to better serving the federal workforce and 
the American taxpayers it serves. The hiring process must be 
competitive, merit-based, technology-based, and conducted in a 
cost-effective manner. In addition, a review of the General 
Schedule and occupational families and job series should be 
conducted to determine whether and how it can be improved and 
overhauled to better entice talented young people into the 
government and reward high performers. The Committee will 
examine other areas for potential improvement, including the 
federal retirement system, skills gaps, accountability and 
removal processes, labor management, and reform of the Senior 
Executive Service (SES).

                      UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE

    The United States Postal Service (USPS) lost $5.6 billion 
in FY 2016 and continues to face systemic liquidity challenges 
as mail volume continues to decline. Additionally, USPS 
currently stands in default on $33.9 billion in payments to the 
U.S. Treasury to fund the costs of retiree health care. GAO 
added USPS's financial condition to its high-risk list in 2009 
and, since then, has been a major proponent of reform. GAO 
believes that major restructuring is necessary and not doing so 
will increase the risk that taxpayers and the U.S. Treasury 
will have to provide financial relief.
    Since FY 2006, USPS mail volume has declined by 28 percent, 
with the greatest decline in its most profitable product, 
First-Class Mail. Persistent, ongoing declines in mail volume 
are now projected for the near future as electronic 
communication increasingly supplants paper-based communication. 
While some of these losses are offset by growth in package 
delivery, including 14 percent growth during FY 2016, the 
Committee plans to continue examining near-term risks to USPS 
of the possible diversion of significant portions of package 
volume to new competitors and whether USPS's financial systems 
properly account for package delivery cost.
    The Committee will examine actions and plans USPS is taking 
to preserve universal service, avoid insolvency, improve 
financial management, and prevent a taxpayer bailout. The 
Committee will also pursue the enactment of substantive postal 
reform legislation, building on reform bills the Committee 
reported during the 114th Congress.
    Additionally, the Committee will continue to examine the 
security of international mail coming into the United States 
through USPS. Currently, inbound international mail transported 
by private carriers is held to heightened security standards 
when compared to inbound international mail transported by 
USPS. As a result, international drug traffickers and other 
criminal enterprises have targeted USPS as a preferred option 
to transport contraband into the United States. Specifically, 
the Committee will seek to identify means to improve the 
security of incoming mail within the framework of the Universal 
Postal Union treaty governing the international exchange of 
mail.

                           HOMELAND SECURITY

    The creation of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) 
required one of the largest consolidations of federal agencies 
in history. The Department brought together 22 different 
government offices, agencies, and components. Though the 
Department has made progress in integrating these various 
agencies, there is still room to improve efficiency and 
responsiveness. The Committee's wide oversight jurisdiction and 
legislative jurisdiction over executive branch reorganizations 
uniquely positions it to conduct oversight across the 
Department. The Committee will review the operations, 
management, and decision-making at DHS. The Committee will 
evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of homeland security 
strategy, laws, initiatives, and technology. In particular, the 
Committee will focus on aviation, rail, port, and transit 
infrastructure; immigration and border security; federal law 
enforcement agencies; facilities at risk; federal funding 
interaction with local responders; and efforts to strengthen 
the U.S. public health system.
    The Committee will also review the issuance of visas and 
passports and the operations of U.S. consulates, as well as 
other border control and security identification issues.
    The Committee will conduct oversight of the federal 
government's emergency management capabilities to ensure that 
lessons learned from previous disasters--such as the need for 
improved planning and execution, communications operability, 
and coordination between all levels of government and within 
the federal government--are part of federal agency reform 
efforts.
    The Committee will also conduct oversight of the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to ensure it is prepared to 
handle domestic emergencies.
    The Committee will conduct oversight of DHS's federal law 
enforcement agencies, including the U.S. Secret Service. The 
Committee will examine whether funding is adequate to support 
the Secret Service in restoring staffing to required levels in 
all categories of employment. The Committee will continue to 
monitor the effect of excessive unpaid overtime on hiring, 
attrition, and morale.
    The Committee will conduct oversight of Executive Branch 
directives and Executive Orders to ensure that they do not 
exceed their legal authority and that they adhere to the 
requirements of the U.S. Constitution and federal law. The 
Committee will also examine directives and executive orders to 
assess their effects.
    The Committee will closely examine the effect of any 
federal action. The Committee will conduct oversight to ensure 
federal law upholds the U.S. Constitution. The Committee will 
monitor the enforcement of the nation's immigration laws for 
instances of abuse and mismanagement.

                NATIONAL SECURITY AND FOREIGN OPERATIONS

    The Committee's interagency jurisdiction allows for the 
examination of the effectiveness, efficiency, and cooperation 
of all U.S. government agencies and departments with a role in 
national security and foreign operations. The Committee will 
conduct oversight of policies, procedures, and programs 
affecting the safety and security of U.S. government personnel 
and facilities abroad. The Committee's oversight will include, 
but not be limited to, U.S. Department of State and U.S. 
Department of Defense efforts to protect embassy personnel and 
property. In addition, the Committee will study the 
relationship between the United States and international 
organizations of which the United States is a member, as 
required by House Rule X, clause 4 (c)(1)(C).
    The Committee's oversight of U.S. diplomatic, military, and 
development efforts within the CENTCOM area of responsibility 
will include investigations of the training and equipping of 
the Afghan National Security Forces; the efficiency and 
accountability of a variety of development and reconstruction 
efforts, including the use of private contractors; the capacity 
of various U.S. Government agencies and departments to carry on 
activities in Afghanistan; and the State Department's 
diplomatic mission in Iraq and Afghanistan.
    The Committee will identify ways to reform the interagency 
process and eliminate waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement 
among the various U.S. national security agencies, departments, 
and foreign aid organizations. The Committee's oversight will 
include, but not be limited to a review of U.S. military 
combatant commands, especially AFRICOM, SOUTHCOM, U.S. Agency 
for International Development, U.S. Institute of Peace, and the 
State Department. In particular, the Committee will monitor the 
status of reconstruction efforts in Haiti.
    The Committee will conduct oversight of U.S. diplomatic, 
military, and development efforts to address the issue of 
global terrorism both in the short-term and long-term. The 
Committee's oversight will include whether the United States is 
maximizing the use of all elements of the national security 
power and how anti-terror efforts, such as the detention and 
trial of unlawful enemy combatants, are coordinated with other 
important U.S. national security interests and the rule of law. 
The Committee's review will include the international standing 
of the United States, humanitarian assistance, development 
programs, and public diplomacy efforts.
    The Committee will evaluate U.S. vulnerability to global 
energy supply disruptions. The scope of the Committee's 
oversight will include the extent to which supply 
diversification through the production of domestic renewable 
and non-renewable resources is an adequate and cost-effective 
solution for the Defense Department's national security 
objectives.
    The Committee will continue oversight of the U.S. 
Department of Veterans Affairs' care and management of 
veterans' needs. The Committee will examine the large backlog 
of veterans' benefit claims and efforts to streamline the 
claims process, as well as veteran transitional issues.
    The Committee will continue to oversee and assess the 
efforts of the United States to secure and protect human rights 
and religious freedom throughout the world. The Committee will 
continue to review whether the executive branch is acting in 
accordance with U.S. national security interests, 
constitutional parameters, international treaty obligations, 
and human rights standards.
    The Committee will identify ways to eliminate waste and 
promote accountability and effectiveness in U.S. Department of 
Defense efforts, including in its use of private contractors.

                   TRANSPORTATION AND INFRASTRUCTURE

    The Committee will examine the country's aging 
infrastructure. It will address ways to modernize the way 
Americans move by reviewing the efficiency of national 
transportation and infrastructure projects and by identifying 
and preventing waste. Oversight in this area will include 
highway and airport redevelopment projects, and fixed rail 
system improvements.
    Additionally, the Committee will examine high speed rail 
developments and concepts throughout the country, as well as 
overseas, to help determine the most feasible and cost-
effective way to improve mass transit.
    The Committee will also consider the role technology plays 
in advancing commercial and private travel. Oversight in this 
area will include looking into laws, regulations, and policies 
related to unmanned aerial vehicles and self-driving cars, for 
example. The Committee will also examine the status of our 
nation's merchant marine, including the current condition of 
the ocean-going fleet in the foreign trade.

                   TRANSPORTATION SAFETY AND SECURITY

    The Committee will continue its oversight of the 
Transportation Security Administration (TSA) this Congress. In 
the 114th Congress, the Committee's investigative efforts 
highlighted systemic management challenges, sexual misconduct, 
abuse of directed reassignments, whistleblower retaliation, and 
various security-related concerns. Moving forward, the 
Committee will also evaluate TSA's internal reorganization and 
workforce issues to identify potential areas for reform.

                                 ENERGY

    The United States continues to be a world leader in energy 
production. It is crucial that the executive branch foster 
economic growth and security in this industry. With this goal 
in mind, the Committee will continue to examine the state of 
U.S. energy production and how it intersects with the 
administrative regulatory regime.
    This will include looking at the treatment of advanced 
production techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, that have 
led to this boon. In addition, the Committee will examine the 
transportation infrastructure used for these supplies, such as 
oil and gas pipelines and coal export facilities. Insufficient 
capacity has led to bottlenecks, forcing producers to transport 
domestic oil and gas by inefficient means, such as rail and 
truck. The Committee will examine the pipeline permitting 
process, which involves agencies as varied as the U.S. Army 
Corps of Engineers, the Department of State, and the Federal 
Energy Regulatory Commission. The Committee will also consider 
the development of coal export facilities.
    The Committee will also continue its broad investigation of 
the Department of Energy. This includes the Department's loan 
guarantee programs, the Office of Environmental Management, the 
National Nuclear Security Administration, and the agency's 
grants program for renewable energy.

                              ENVIRONMENT

    The Committee will continue to take an active role in 
overseeing the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 
specifically its implementation of the Clean Air Act and Clean 
Water Act. The Committee will conduct this oversight with a 
focus on the effects on the consumer, federal interaction with 
state management processes, constitutionality, agency process, 
adequate economic analysis of proposed rules, and cumulative 
impact analysis. Further, the Committee will examine the 
effects these rules have on the health, safety, and economic 
well-being of American families, job creation, energy security, 
electricity generation, and the environment.
    The Committee will carry on its oversight of the EPA's 
implementation of the Renewable Fuel Standard and its effect on 
consumers and businesses.
    Additionally, the Committee will continue to monitor the 
Chemical Safety & Hazards Investigation Board, specifically its 
management, information sharing with other agencies, ability to 
retain employees, and investigative capabilities. It will also 
examine ideas for reform to ensure that the federal government 
is best able to carry out the goals and functions charged to 
the board.

                  PUBLIC LANDS & PUBLIC LAND AGENCIES

    The federal government owns roughly 28 percent of the 2.27 
billion acres of land in the United States, with the vast 
majority concentrated in western states. The Committee will 
continue its broad study of federal land management, 
maintaining its focus on maintenance priorities, effects on 
states, return on investment, and the effect of litigation.
    As part of this oversight of land management, the Committee 
will examine opportunities for reform of the Antiquities Act of 
1906. The Committee will consider options to increase local and 
state authority in the monument designation process. The 
Committee will also review the suitability and selection 
procedure for previous designations.
    The Committee will also continue oversight of the 
Department of the Interior's regulatory responsibilities. The 
focus will be the effect of the Department's regulatory and 
policy agenda and how these laws affect private landowners, 
small businesses, public land users, and the environment.
    The Committee will also generally review the public land 
agencies' permitting and leasing programs to ensure fair 
application and that federal lands are open to multiple uses. 
This will focus on energy leasing projects, recreational 
permits, and the commercial permitting process.
    Additionally, the Committee will conduct further 
examination of the Department of the Interior's implementation 
of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) to ensure that listings are 
made with the goal of recovering species and removing them from 
the list. Areas of ESA focus will include the litigation 
process, scientific independence and integrity, cost of 
compliance, and transparency of the listing process, including 
data used in decision making.

                         FEDERAL REAL PROPERTY

    The Committee will oversee implementation of the Federal 
Assets Sale and Transfer Act of 2016, Pub. L. 114-287, which 
was enacted on December 16, 2016. This key law establishes the 
Public Buildings Reform Board, a six-year board for identifying 
opportunities for cost savings and deficit reduction by 
reducing the federal government's inventory of civilian real 
property.
    The Committee will also work to oversee implementation of 
the Federal Property Management Reform Act of 2016, Pub. L. 
114-318, which codifies the Federal Real Property Council and 
increases reporting requirements related to real property for 
federal agencies.

                             PUBLIC HOUSING

    The Committee will examine overall costs associated with 
public housing throughout the country and territories, as well 
as the significant unmet need for public housing in the United 
States. Addressing management concerns within the U.S. 
Department of Housing and Urban Development's public housing 
and low-income rental assistance programs is a priority for the 
Committee.

                        STATE AND LOCAL AFFAIRS

    The Committee will conduct oversight of the relationship 
between the federal government and states and municipalities, 
as required by House Rule X, clause 4 (c)(1)(C). Key issues 
involve unfunded mandates, grants, and consultation with state 
and local governments in the federal policy- and rule-making 
process. The Committee will evaluate how the federal government 
collects and utilizes information from the state and local 
level to improve the routine consideration of specialized 
knowledge, interests, and input of stakeholders.
    The Committee will seek to reauthorize the Unfunded 
Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (UMRA), which was designed to 
eliminate the imposition of unfunded federal mandates on state 
and local governments and strengthen the partnership between 
the federal government and state, local, and tribal 
governments. The law directs the Congressional Budget Office to 
estimate the compliance costs and effect on appropriations for 
financial assistance programs for certain unfunded mandates on 
both the public and private sector. The law also directs 
agencies to produce a written statement analyzing the effects 
of any rules likely to result in expenditure of $100 million or 
more by state, local, or tribal governments, or the private 
sector, in any single year. Since its lapse in 2005, the 
Committee has conducted oversight of UMRA's effectiveness and 
proposals to strengthen the law to help achieve its original 
goals. To support its reauthorization, the Committee will 
continue to examine unfunded mandates and their effect on state 
and local governments, including an evaluation of specific laws 
and regulations that place particular weight and strain on 
state and local resources, as well as proposals to strengthen 
the underlying law.
    The Committee will look to reauthorize the Paperwork 
Reduction Act (PRA) to address the increasing administrative 
burden of compliance with federal paperwork and regulatory 
requirements. The PRA governs the process of information 
collection and management by the federal government, and 
provides the public with the opportunity to comment on 
information collections. To facilitate this review and the 
reduction of the information collection burden, the PRA created 
the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA), which 
also conducts review of significant regulations. The Committee 
will continue to evaluate ways to improve information 
collection by agencies and examine how such information would 
support meaningful analysis and evidence-based rulemaking while 
ensuring that federal activities do not place an undue burden 
on innovation and growth. The Committee will also examine how 
agencies safeguard and manage information.

                           HUMAN TRAFFICKING

    Trafficking in persons, or human trafficking, is a multi-
billion dollar criminal industry that victimizes millions of 
people annually--both at home and abroad. In the 115th 
Congress, the Committee will initiate an investigation to move 
forward the global effort to combat this modern form of 
slavery. The Committee will work to better understand and 
expose the processes by which perpetrators facilitate their 
crimes, and subsequently ensure that federal programs, cutting 
across multiple agencies and aimed at deterring such activity, 
are sufficiently effective.

                       FEDERAL TAX ACCOUNTABILITY

    In Fiscal Year 2016, the federal government spent $656 
billion on grants and $464 billion on contracts, for a combined 
total of $1.12 trillion. Oversight of these funds is critical. 
The Committee will also focus on accountability for tax 
obligations by federal employees, contractors, and grant 
applicants. This effort will include increased oversight and 
focus on legislative reform. Oversight will include working 
with the GAO and inspectors general, and targeted requests to 
agencies to update the data and statistics highlighting the 
need for action. Legislative options include requiring 
contractors, grant applicants, and federal employees to certify 
they do not have delinquent tax debt and require agencies to 
refer contractors or grant applicants with delinquent tax debt 
to agency suspension and debarment officials.

                            FEDERAL FIREARMS

    The Committee will continue oversight of federal firearms 
and ammunition inventory accounting and security. In recent 
years, a number of media reports highlighted instances whereby 
federal agencies lost firearms or failed to accurately secure 
them against theft or loss. The Committee will continue to 
review agency inventory accounting practices, and to hold 
accountable agencies that inadequately protect their firearms 
and ammunition inventories. The Committee will also review 
agency firearms, munitions, and related equipment purchasing. 
During the 114th Congress, the Committee held a hearing, which 
revealed agencies that were incorrectly coding purchases of 
items as firearms and ammunition. As a result, agencies could 
not accurately determine the amount spent on firearms, 
ammunition, and related equipment. Failure to account for the 
initial purchase of firearms and ammunition can lead to later 
difficulties in accurately accounting for agency-held 
inventories of firearms and ammunition.

               RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD DISABILITY FRAUD

    The Committee will continue to investigate the disability 
program at the Railroad Retirement Board (RRB) for potential 
fraud. The Committee will also work to ensure the RRB is 
implementing recommendations set forth by its Office of 
Inspector General.

                     TROUBLED ASSET RELIEF PROGRAM

    The Committee will continue its investigation into the 
Troubled Asset Relief Program's (TARP) Hardest Hit Fund (HHF). 
In December 2015, the Office of the Special Inspector General 
for the Troubled Asset Relief Program (SIGTARP) raised of a 
variety of concerns regarding Treasury's management of the HHF 
Blight Elimination Program. SIGTARP expressed that the HHF 
Blight Elimination Program is vulnerable to substantial risks 
of unfair competitive practices and overcharging, potentially 
leading to fraud, waste and abuse. The Committee will continue 
its analysis into the management and effectiveness of the HHF 
Blight Elimination Program.

                        CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORM

    The Committee will examine the criminal justice system, 
including arrest and sentencing, incarceration, reentry 
programming, and support for formerly-incarcerated individuals 
returning to their communities. The Committee will explore ways 
the criminal justice system can be improved so that it is 
targeted, effective, and efficient in its pursuit of public 
safety while removing unnecessary burdens on individuals 
returning to their communities after incarceration. The 
Committee will seek to identify and remove inherent 
institutional biases, including biases on the basis of race, 
sex, gender, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, and 
other categories.
    On August 18, 2016, the Department of Justice announced its 
decision to no longer contract with private prisons. The 
Committee will monitor adherence to this new rule and work to 
ensure that the Bureau of Prisons better allocates federal 
resources to the safety of facilities and inmate access to 
quality rehabilitative services.

              COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY

                    AUTHORIZATION AND OVERSIGHT PLAN

    House Rule X sets forth the legislative jurisdiction of the 
House Science, Space, and Technology Committee while also 
assigning broad general oversight responsibilities (Appendix 
A). Rule X also assigns the Committee special oversight 
responsibility for ``reviewing and studying, on a continuing 
basis, all laws, programs, and Government activities dealing 
with or involving non-military research and development.'' The 
Committee appreciates the special function entrusted to it and 
will continue to tackle troubled programs and search for waste, 
fraud, abuse, and mismanagement in non-military research and 
development programs regardless of where they may be found.
    Much of the oversight work of the Committee is carried out 
by and through the Oversight Subcommittee. However, oversight 
is conducted by every Subcommittee and the full Committee. All 
components of the Committee take their oversight mandate 
seriously and work cooperatively to meet the Committee's 
oversight responsibilities.
    The following agenda constitutes the authorization and 
oversight plan of the Science Committee for the 115th Congress. 
It includes areas which the full committees and the 
subcommittees expect to conduct reviews, oversight, and 
investigations. The Committee will address additional issues, 
events, and plans as they arise. The Committee will consult 
with other standing committees of the House as necessary.

                             AUTHORIZATIONS

    The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology oversees 
agency budgets totaling over $40 billion, most of which is 
focused on research and development (R&D;). During the 115th 
Congress, the Science Committee will review the authorizations 
of agencies and programs within its jurisdiction and, 
specifically with regard to lapsed authorizations, determine 
whether programs should be reauthorized or terminated. Each 
subcommittee will conduct oversight of the programs and offices 
within their jurisdiction, including holding hearings and 
requesting information from the Executive Branch in order to 
gather the necessary information to support these 
determinations.
    The Committee expects to reauthorize key federal science 
agencies, including the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration (NASA), the Department of Energy's (DOE's) 
Office of Science, the National Science Foundation (NSF), the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's research, 
data, and weather programs, science and technology at the 
Department of Homeland Security, and Federal Aviation 
Administration research and development, through which much of 
the research benefitting America's economic and national 
security is performed. The Committee will reauthorize these 
agencies in a pro-science, fiscally responsible manner.
    The Committee began this effort in the 114th Congress with 
the passage of both H.R. 1806, the ``America COMPETES 
Reauthorization Act of 2015,'' which authorized NIST, NSF, and 
the DOE's Office of Science, and H.R. 810, the ``National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration Authorization Act of 
2015.''
    The America COMPETES Reauthorization Act was not signed 
into law but is one of 11 Science Committee bills of which 
various provisions were included in S. 3084, the ``American 
Innovation and Competitiveness Act,'' which was signed into law 
on January 6, 2017. The American Innovation and Competitiveness 
Act authorized the activities but not spending at NSF, NIST, 
the Office of Science and Technology Policy, and other federal 
interagency science programs.
    In reauthorizing the agencies within the Science 
Committee's jurisdiction, the Committee seeks to improve 
accountability and transparency, reduce administrative burdens 
on researchers, enhance agency oversight, improve research 
coordination, and reform federal science agency programs to 
increase the impact of taxpayer-funded research. The Committee 
will continue its ongoing legislative efforts to reduce the 
cost of research through efficiency, and eliminate bureaucratic 
overhead, red-tape, and costly regulations. The Committee also 
will make certain that research across the federal agencies is 
not duplicative and that taxpayer resources are used in an 
efficient and effective manner.
    The Committee will ensure that federally funded research 
conducted through NSF, and all agencies, is in the national 
interest. Unfortunately, NSF has funded a number of projects 
that do not meet the highest standards of scientific merit--
from climate change musicals to evaluating animal photographs 
in National Geographic. To make the agency more accountable, 
the Committee will enforce the original intent of the 1950 NSF 
Act to require that all grants serve the ``national interest.''
    Last Congress, the president signed into law H.R. 1020, the 
``STEM Education Act of 2015.'' The Committee will build off of 
this progress and will continue its work to improve 
coordination of science, technology, engineering, mathematics, 
and cyber (STEM) education activities across the Federal 
government and ensure the American workforce consists of 
experts in STEM fields. A well-educated and trained high-tech 
workforce ensures our future economic prosperity. This means 
motivating more American students to study science, math, 
computing, and engineering so they will want to pursue these 
careers.
    The Committee seeks to increase support for basic research 
in the physical sciences. These are the areas with the greatest 
potential for breakthroughs to new industries and U.S. jobs. 
America's universities and research institutions carry out 
federally-funded basic and fundamental scientific research that 
drives new discoveries and innovations--creating new companies, 
new industries, more private sector jobs, and economic growth 
and security.
    The Committee also seeks to allow contractor operators at 
DOE national laboratories to work with the private sector more 
efficiently. The Committee seeks to enable researchers in all 
50 states to have access to world-class user facilities, 
including supercomputers and high intensity light sources.
    In regard to the Committee's jurisdiction over NASA, the 
Science Committee will reignite America's pioneering spirit for 
exploration of new frontiers and worlds through reinvigoration 
of our space science program with the entrepreneurial drive of 
commercial incentives and ideas. This includes ensuring that 
the Space Launch System and Orion programs receive adequate 
funding to ensure that NASA astronauts are able to explore the 
cosmos as opposed to having their eyes and feet tied to earth. 
The Committee will also continue to support the James Webb 
Space Telescope, the Transitioning Exoplanet Survey Satellite, 
and the Wide Field Infrared Space Telescope.

                               Oversight

                                 ENERGY

Department of Energy (DOE)
     Review and conduct oversight of all energy 
research, development, and demonstration conducted by the 
federal government, included but not limited to Department of 
Energy (``the Department'' or DOE) research, development, 
demonstration and commercial application of energy technology.
     Conduct oversight of all federally owned or 
operated non-military national laboratories, including but not 
limited to laboratory management, facilities and research 
infrastructure, and research priorities.
     Conduct oversight of all federally-sponsored 
research, development (R&D;), demonstration, and commercial 
application activities that contribute to international 
agreements entered into by the federal government.
     Review and conduct oversight of all Department of 
Energy Office of Science activities. For example, the Committee 
will conduct oversight of the Office of Science programs and 
will review prioritization across, and management within, its 
major areas of research. Special attention will also be given 
to the cost, operation, and maintenance of DOE's existing and 
planned major facilities.
     Review and conduct oversight of all research, 
development, demonstration, and commercial application of 
energy technology conducted by the Office of Energy Efficiency 
and Renewable Energy (EERE). Specifically, the Committee will 
undertake efforts to improve focus, prioritization, and 
transparency of EERE programs, and provide close oversight to 
ensure that programs are managed efficiently, duplication is 
limited, and funding is allocated appropriately and 
effectively.
     Review and conduct oversight of all research, 
development, demonstration, and commercial application of 
energy technology conducted by the Office of Nuclear Energy 
(NE). Specifically, the Committee will provide oversight of the 
nation's nuclear R&D; activities, and will examine efforts by 
DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and industry 
stakeholders to research, develop, construct, and license 
advance reactor technology. The Committee will examine how NE 
can prioritize groundbreaking research and ensure the 
Department maintains continuing focus on R&D; programs that 
cannot be undertaken by the private sector.
     Review and conduct oversight of all research, 
development, demonstration, and commercial application of 
energy technology conducted by the Office of Fossil Energy 
(FE). For example, the Committee will undertake efforts to 
improve focus, prioritization, and transparency of FE programs, 
and provide close oversight to ensure that programs are managed 
efficiently, duplication is limited, and funding is allocated 
appropriately and effectively. The Committee will also examine 
the Office of Fossil laboratory, the National Energy Technology 
Laboratory, which requires additional oversight due to the 
unique government owned, government operated management 
structure at the lab.
     Review and conduct oversight of all research, 
development, demonstration, and commercial application of 
energy technology conducted by the Office of Electricity 
Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE). Among other efforts, the 
Committee will undertake efforts to improve focus, 
prioritization, and transparency of OE programs, and provide 
close oversight to ensure that programs are managed 
efficiently, duplication is limited, and funding is allocated 
appropriately and effectively. The Committee will also focus 
oversight on the Department's collaborative work with industry 
in the areas of cybersecurity, smart grid technology, and 
energy storage.
     Review and conduct oversight of all Advanced 
Research Projects Agency--Energy (ARPA-E) programs. Chief among 
other efforts, the Committee will undertake oversight of ARPA-E 
program funding and management, examining the appropriate role 
for and focus of ARPA-E in the context of DOE's numerous other 
clean energy-focused programs and activities.
     Review and conduct continuing oversight of the DOE 
Loan Guarantee Program. The Committee will, among other 
efforts, focus its oversight on program management challenges 
and ensuring the Department conducts thorough reviews and 
rigorous financial analysis of the existing loan guarantee 
portfolio. Oversight will include, but is not limited to, 
maintaining transparency before Congress, minimizing risk to 
taxpayers, addressing management problems previously identified 
by non-partisan organizations, and implementing key 
recommendations made by the Government Accountability Office 
(GAO) to improve program management and reduce risk.
     The Committee will continue to examine DOE 
Contract management practices, including but not limited to 
potential areas of waste, fraud, and abuse in DOE's contract 
management.

                              ENVIRONMENT

     Review and conduct oversight of the broad array of 
programs, both government and private sector, engaged in 
environmental research and development.
     Conduct oversight and review all activities and 
functions of the National Weather Service (NWS).

United States Global Change Research Program (USGCRP)

     Review and conduct oversight of the broad array of 
programs addressing climate change issues across the Federal 
government to ensure that existing programs are necessary, 
appropriately focused, effectively coordinated, and properly 
organized to prevent duplication of efforts and waste taxpayer 
resources.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

     Review and conduct oversight of the funding 
prioritization and program management challenges related to the 
NOAA's mission to understand and predict changes in weather, 
particularly as they relate to severe weather events that 
threaten life and property.
     Review and conduct oversight of NOAA's satellite 
programs. These satellites have been plagued with cost 
overruns, delays, and mismanagement that endanger American 
lives and property with degraded weather data. The Committee 
will also continue oversight of NOAA's commercial satellite 
priorities to ensure that the Agency is taking all necessary 
steps to protect public safety in the face of government 
program failures.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

     Review and conduct oversight of NASA's efforts to 
prioritize, plan, and implement Earth science missions within 
cost and schedule. Particular attention will be paid to 
programs that exceed cost estimates to ensure they do not 
adversely impact the development and launch of other NASA 
priorities. The Committee will also examine the impact of large 
increases in funding for the Earth Science Directorate relative 
to funding requested for other science disciplines.

United States Geological Survey (USGS)

     Review and conduct oversight of the satellite 
activities of the USGS, with an emphasis on its LANDSAT 
program, to ensure continuity of services and implementation of 
best technologies and commercial partnering.

Science and R&D; at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

     Review and conduct oversight of EPA's management 
of science and its use of science in the decision making 
process, including lab management, regulatory science, 
transparency, and risk assessment. In particular, the Committee 
will examine how to better integrate science into the 
Administration's regulatory decision-making process. This 
includes how EPA uses and manages scientific data to reach its 
regulatory conclusions.

Climate Research Activities

     Review and conduct oversight of the broad array of 
programs addressing climate change issues across the Federal 
government to ensure that existing programs are necessary, 
appropriately focused, effectively coordinated, and properly 
organized to prevent duplication of efforts and waste taxpayer 
resources.

                               OVERSIGHT

     Conduct oversight to ensure that the Departments 
and agencies within its jurisdiction follow all applicable 
authorization acts, appropriation acts, and other congressional 
directives.
     Conduct oversight of agency efforts to protect 
information technology systems.
     Coordinate with the GAO and the various Inspectors 
General (IGs) to ensure Departments and agencies are being 
transparent and implementing recommendations of GAO and the 
IGs.
     Continue to oversee risk assessments development 
in conjunction with the regulatory process to ensure that 
policies are based on the best science available. Continue to 
collect and examine allegations of intimidation of scientists 
and science specialists in federal agencies, including but not 
limited to investigating allegation of suppression or revisions 
of scientific finding, and mischaracterization of scientific 
findings because of political or other pressures.
     Monitor the development and implementation of 
scientific integrity principles within the executive branch.
     Continue to evaluate DOE's decision to close the 
Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository.
     Continue providing oversight of materials, 
minerals, and isotopes that are critical to U.S. national 
interests.
     Review and study on a continuing basis laws, 
programs and Government activities throughout the government 
relating to non-military research and development.
     Conduct oversight of additional matters as the 
need arises and as provided for under House Rule X, 3(k).
     Work closely and collaboratively with other 
federal oversight bodies to identify and address instances of 
waste, fraud, abuse and mismanagement in the federal government 
to ensure the most efficient use of taxpayer dollars.

                        RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY

    The Subcommittee on Research and Technology (R/T) has 
legislative jurisdiction and general oversight and 
investigative authority on all matters relating to science 
policy and science education.
    The R/T Subcommittee will continue to oversee all 
activities of the agencies and programs in its jurisdiction, 
including the National Science Foundation (NSF), National 
Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and White House 
Office of Science and Technology Programs. The Committee will 
conduct ongoing review of the entire portfolio of taxpayer 
investments through civilian science agencies in basic research 
and advanced technologies in order to ensure that public 
resources are focused on the most promising new areas of 
science and technology. Among these areas are artificial 
intelligence, additive manufacturing, bio-engineering, 
nanotechnology, energy, computer and information science, and 
photonics.

National Science Foundation (NSF)

     Review all activities of the National Science 
Foundation (NSF) conducted pursuant to appropriations for 
Research and Related Activities, including but not limited to 
funding through NSF's seven directorates that support science 
and engineering research and STEM education and research. (The 
seven directorates are: Biological Sciences, Computer and 
Information Science and Engineering, Engineering, Geosciences, 
Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Social/Behavioral/Economic 
Sciences, and Education and Human Resources.)
     Review all non-research activities of NSF 
conducted through NSF's Office of the Director and the Office 
of Integrative Activities, as well as financial management, 
award processing and monitoring, legal affairs, outreach and 
other functions. For 2017, this will include monitoring 
development and moving costs and actions related to NSF's 
planned September 2017 move to a new headquarters facility.
     Review NSF compliance with and the effects of 
provisions of the STEM Education Act of 2015, including but not 
limited to the addition of computer science to the definition 
of STEM education.
     Review NSF implementation of the American 
Innovation and Competitiveness Act (see below for additional 
information).

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

     Review all NIST programs and activities as well as 
other programs under the Department of Commerce, with special 
attention to the evaluation of their alignment with and impact 
on industry and assurance that the programs do not encroach on 
areas better served by the private sector. These include:
          Manufacturing Extension Partnerships
          National Network of Manufacturing Innovation
     Review cyber security coordination among NIST, NSF 
and the Department of Homeland Security, NIST responsibilities 
and federal agencies' compliance with cyber security regimes 
authorized by the Federal Information Security Management Act 
(FISMA), and how federal agencies balance security mandates 
with the ability to allow technological development through 
innovation.
     Continue to hold cybersecurity oversight hearings, 
building on a series of hearings conducted during the 114th 
Congress, in order to review agencies' compliance with federal 
information security standards and guidelines and to identify 
and understand reasons for inconsistencies in their respective 
cybersecurity postures.
     Review NIST performance of its critical role in 
helping to develop standards and conformance testing processes 
that will protect privacy, minimize private sector waste, and 
advance US economic competitiveness and technological 
leadership.
     Continue to monitor and review NIST physical 
security at its two campuses.
     Review NIST actions to support the development of 
the smart grid, the management of cross-agency information 
technology (NITRD) and nanotechnology (NNI) research programs.

Department of Transportation

     Review research, development, and demonstration 
activities of the Department of Transportation, including 
safety, cybersecurity and autonomous vehicle systems 
development programs authorized by the most recent surface 
transportation reauthorization, the 2015 Fixing America's 
Surface Transportation Act (FAST Act).
     Review advances in autonomous vehicle 
technologies, including vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-
to-infrastructure (V2I) technologies, with an eye toward the 
privacy and security concerns (among others) raised by such 
increased connectivity features.
     Review DOT administration and results research, 
development, technology and education programs authorized under 
the FAST Act, including but not limited to the following:
          Highway Research and Development
          University Transportation Centers
          Intelligent Highway Systems
          Advanced Transportation and Congestion Management 
        Technologies

Department of Homeland Security

     Review all activities, focusing on the 
effectiveness and organization, direction and priorities, of 
the DHS Science and Technology Directorate.
     Review the effectiveness and organization, 
direction and priorities of the research and technology 
programs associated with the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office.

US Fire Administration (USFA)

     Review administration of grant programs that 
support local career and volunteer firefighting and first-
responder capabilities, and consider improvements to the 
functionality of the USFA.

Natural Hazards

     Review interagency research programs to mitigate 
the damage caused by natural disasters such as earthquakes, 
windstorms, and fires by developing early warning systems and 
improved building and infrastructure design. Evaluate programs 
to protect Americans from these and other hazards.

Economic Competitiveness

     Review the technology transfer incentives of the 
Bayh-Dole Act, the Stevenson-Wydler Act, and the Small Business 
Innovative Research and Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) 
programs to improve America's competitiveness and innovative 
capacity.
     Review GAO study, required by COMPETES Act of 
2010, of SBIR/STTR waste, fraud and abuse.
     Review the effectiveness and efficiency of SBIR/
STTR in increasing the pace of commercializing technology 
developed from federally-supported basic research.

National Technical Information Service

     Review the performance, efficiency and taxpayer 
costs of maintaining the National Technical Information Service 
in current form.

Implementation of the American Innovation and Competitiveness Act 
        (AICA)

    As a result of the enactment of the American Innovation and 
Competitiveness Act (AICA) during the 114th Congress, special 
attention will be paid to the implementation, execution and 
effectiveness of all provisions of the new law, including but 
not limited to provisions that strengthen basic research; seek 
rationalization of unnecessary administrative and regulatory 
burdens on federally-supported research; improve coordination 
of science, technology, engineering and math education; and 
efforts to leverage the private sector. Among other matters the 
Subcommittee will examine the following:
     Review compliance with the AICA provision that 
increases transparency and accountability in NSF grant-making 
by adding ``national interest'' to the broader impacts criteria 
of NSF's merit selection process, and review this provision's 
effects on NSF's portfolio of research grants.
     Review compliance with the requirement that 
increases transparency and accountability by requiring NSF to 
publish a non-technical justification of each grant award.
     Review compliance with the AICA provisions that 
require stronger NSF cost control and management during the 
development of major research facilities, including calculation 
of project life-cycle costs, mandated cost review and auditing 
during construction, and statutory prohibitions against 
expenditures of project funds or ``management fees'' (or 
successors to management fees) for liquor, parties, lobbying, 
unnecessary foreign travel, and other abuses.
     Review implementation of the changes and 
improvements in the Established Program to Stimulate 
Competitive Research (formerly ``Experimental''), or EPSCoR 
program, prescribed in the AICA, including authorization for 
the agency, States, and jurisdictions to experiment with new 
research and development funding models.
     Review AICA-required NSF briefing to Congress 
about management of the U.S. Antarctic program.
     Review compliance with AICA provisions that 
address NSF use of ``rotator'' personnel pursuant to the 
Intergovernmental Personnel Act, including compensation and 
potential conflicts of interest.
     Review progress toward the cybersecurity research 
and development priorities set forth in the AICA, including 
security of election-dedicated voting system software and 
hardware.
     Review implementation of AICA provisions that 
update and strengthen the Networking and Information Technology 
Research and Development program.
     Evaluate NIST progress toward AICA-required 
development of a long-range plan for its laboratory program 
improvements.
     Evaluate the AICA-required NSF review of ongoing 
mid-scale project investments.
     Review implementation of the AICA's NIST campus 
security provisions that transfer to the Department of Commerce 
Office of Security direct management of NIST law enforcement 
and site security programs.
     Review compliance with AICA provisions that 
strengthen investigations and penalties for research 
falsification.
     Review NSF progress in identifying and eliminating 
unreproducible and duplicative research projects.
     Review NSF participation in the Brain Research 
through Advancing Innovative Neuro-technologies (BRAIN) 
Initiative.
     Review implementation of the AICA provision which 
directs the Director of the Office of Management and Budget, in 
coordination with OSTP, to establish an interagency working 
group for reducing administrative burdens on federally funded 
researchers.
     Review the AICA-required NSF Inspector General 
audit of grant sub-recipient transparency and oversight.
     Review AICA updates to the Robert Noyce Teacher 
Scholarship Program which increase flexibility and bolster 
eligibility requirements.
     Review implementation of the AICA provisions which 
require the NSF Director, Secretary of Education, Administrator 
of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and 
Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration to jointly establish an advisory panel to advise 
the Committee on STEM Education of the National Science and 
Technology Council.
     Review implementation of changes to the Committee 
on STEM Education, including an emphasis of bringing forward 
objective outcomes metrics for all STEM programs.
     Review progress of NSF programs intended to expand 
STEM opportunities for traditionally under-represented 
populations (biennial report to Congress).
     Review NIST efforts to support, promote, and 
coordinate activities and efforts to enhance public awareness 
and understanding of measurement sciences, standards and 
technology.
     Review progress of the AICA provision that 
requires OSTP to consider progress on inclusion in STEM fields 
and improved undergraduate STEM experiences.
     Review results of AICA-required NSF study of 
computer science education.
     Review NSF performance of AICA provision to 
strengthen informal STEM education.
     Review NSF implementation of Section 7033(a) of 
the America COMPETES Act (42 U.S.C. 1862o-12(a)), which updates 
Hispanic-serving institutions undergraduate programs.
     Review implementation of AICA updates to federal 
agencies' scientific prize competition authority.
     Review implementation the AICA provisions for 
crowdsourcing and citizen science.
     Review NIST implementation of AICA improvements to 
the Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership improvements, 
including increase emphasis on providing assistance to small 
manufacturing concerns.
     Review NSF implementation of AICA provisions to 
strengthen the Innovation Corps program and continue to support 
translational research grants.
     Review implementation of the AICA provision which 
authorizes the President to designate one of the OSTP Associate 
Directors as United States Chief Technology Officer.
     Review results of AICA-required study by the 
National Research Council study on technology for emergency 
notifications on campuses.

                                 SPACE

     Astronautical research and development, including 
resources, personnel, equipment, and facilities;
     Civil aviation research and development; National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration;
     National Space Council;
     Outer space, including exploration and control 
thereof;
     Scientific research, development, and 
demonstration, and projects therefor.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

     Review and conduct oversight of all activities 
contemplated and authorized by the National Aeronautics and 
Space Act of 1958, as amended, as well as all other laws 
pertaining to the Committee's jurisdiction under House Rule X.
     Review, monitor, and conduct oversight of public 
and private initiatives related to the aeronautical and space 
activities.
     Review all activities of NASA.
     Monitor and conduct oversight of the activities of 
the National Space Council.
     Review all activities conducted by the NASA 
Science Mission Directorate.
     Review all activities of the NASA Aeronautics 
Mission Directorate.
     Review all activities of the NASA Space Technology 
Mission Directorate.
     Review all activities of the Human Exploration and 
Operations Mission Directorate.
     Review, monitor, and conduct oversight of any and 
all activities of NASA housed outside of one of the four 
directorates listed above, including, but not limited to, cyber 
security; information technology; environmental remediation; 
construction or facilities; grant, contract, and agreement 
management; and international coordination.
     Review all activities of the NASA Space Launch 
System vehicle development.
     Review all activities of the Orion vehicle 
development.
     Review all activities of Commercial Crew 
development.
     Review all activities of Commercial Orbital 
Transportation Service contracts.
     Review all activities of the NASA Office of 
Education.
     Review funding, management, and spending of the 
James Webb Space Telescope program.
     Assess and review NASA's Human Space Flight 
program focusing particular attention on NASA's plans and 
priorities relative to the agency's resources and requirements.
     Monitor and review NASA's space science efforts to 
prioritize, plan, launch, and operate space science missions 
within cost and schedule.
     Review any and all NASA space science programs 
that exceed cost estimates to ensure they do not adversely 
impact the development and launch of other missions.
     Evaluate, monitor, and review the ability of 
commercial providers to, affordably, safely, and reliably 
deliver cargo and crew to the International Space Station 
(ISS).
     Review and monitor plans and operation and 
utilization of the ISS to ensure NASA fully utilizes the unique 
research opportunities that the facility offers, while 
exclusively relying on logistical services from commercial and 
foreign providers.
     Review costs associated with cancellation of the 
Constellation program, NASA's approach to develop and fund a 
successor to the Space Shuttle, and investment in NASA launch 
infrastructure. NASA has not clearly articulated what types of 
future human space flight missions it wishes to pursue, or its 
rationale.

Department of Transportation

     Review and conduct oversight of all activities of 
the FAA's Office of Commercial Space Transportation (AST), 
which licenses commercial launch vehicles.
     Review and monitor the emergence of a number of 
fledgling commercial human suborbital space flight ventures.
     Examine and review the progress of the emerging 
personal space flight industry, as well focus on the challenges 
it faces.
     Review and assess efforts related to control of 
outer space, including international obligations, space 
situational awareness, space traffic management, and 
regulations pertaining to space activities.
     Oversee and review all of the FAA's R&D; activities 
to ensure that they lead to improvements in the U.S. Aerospace 
sector, focusing with particular interest on the FAA's 
management of its Next Generation Air Transportation System 
(NextGen) program.

Department of Commerce

     Examine and review the regulation of commercial 
remote sensing activities.
     Conduct oversight of the transition of earth 
science research to operations.
     Assess and conduct oversight of space spectrum 
allocations, including, but not limited to, impacts on weather 
forecasting, and position navigation and timing services.
     Review the impact and management of U.S. export 
control policy on the space industry.

Additional Information related to certain subject matters

            Aeronautics Research
    An important area for oversight will be NASA's aeronautics 
research and development program. The Committee plans to 
examine NASA's ability to support the interagency effort to 
modernize the nation's air traffic management system, the 
development of unmanned aviation systems (UAS), as well as its 
ability to undertake important long-term R&D; on aircraft 
safety, emissions, noise, and energy consumption--R&D; that will 
have a significant impact on the quality of life and U.S. 
competitiveness in aviation.
            NASA Contract and Financial Management
    A perennial topic on GAO's high risk series, NASA financial 
management will continue to receive attention from the 
Committee. The Committee will also monitor NASA's contract 
management to ensure acquisitions are handled appropriately.
            Near Earth Objects
    Congress has provided guidance to NASA relating to Near 
Earth Objects. The Committee will continue to monitor NASA's 
compliance with that direction, as well as determine whether 
additional oversight is necessary.

                               APPENDIX A


                              House Rule X


                       ORGANIZATION OF COMMITTEES

Committees and their legislative jurisdictions

    1. There shall be in the House the following standing 
committees, each of which shall have the jurisdiction and 
related functions assigned by this clause and clauses 2, 3, and 
4. All bills, resolutions, and other matters relating to 
subjects within the jurisdiction of the standing committees 
listed in this clause shall be referred to those committees, in 
accordance with clause 2 of rule XII, as follows:
    (p) Committee on Science, Space, and Technology.
    (1) All energy research, development, and demonstration, 
and projects therefor, and all federally owned or operated 
nonmilitary energy laboratories.
    (2) Astronautical research and development, including 
resources, personnel, equipment, and facilities.
    (3) Civil aviation research and development.
    (4) Environmental research and development.
    (5) Marine research.
    (6) Commercial application of energy technology.
    (7) National Institute of Standards and Technology, 
standardization of weights and measures, and the metric system.
    (8) National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
    (9) National Space Council.
    (10) National Science Foundation.
    (11) National Weather Service.
    (12) Outer space, including exploration and control 
thereof.
    (13) Science scholarships.
    (14) Scientific research, development, and demonstration, 
and projects therefor.

Special oversight functions

    3(k) The Committee on Science, Space, and Technology shall 
review and study on a continuing basis laws, programs, and 
Government activities relating to nonmilitary research and 
development.

                      COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS

                         LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

                              ----------                              

                                                  February 1, 2017.
Hon. Jason Chaffetz,
Chairman, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform,
House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
Hon. Gregg Harper,
Chairman, Committee on House Administration,
House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
Hon. Rodney Frelinghuysen,
Chairman, Committee on Appropriations,
The Capitol, Washington, DC.
    Dear Chairman Chaffetz, Chairman Harper and Chairman 
Frelinghuysen: Pursuant to House Rule X (2)(d)(1), I am pleased 
to enclose a copy of the Authorization and Oversight Plan of 
the Committee on Small Business. The enclosed document was 
drafted in consultation with the Ranking Minority Member of 
this Committee and was approved, a quorum being present, by 
voice vote without amendment during the Committee's 
organizational meeting on February 1, 2017.
            Sincerely,
                                              Steve Chabot,
                                                          Chairman.

                    AUTHORIZATION AND OVERSIGHT PLAN

    Mr. Chabot, from the Committee on Small Business, submitted 
to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, the 
Committee on House Administration and the Committee on 
Appropriations the following:

                                 Report

    Rule X, cl. 2(d)(1) of the Rules of the House requires each 
standing Committee to adopt an authorization and oversight plan 
for the two-year period of the Congress and to submit the plan 
to the Committees on Government Reform and House Administration 
not later than February 15 of the first session of the 
Congress. Under Rule X, the Committee has oversight authority 
to investigate and examine any matter affecting small business. 
This Report reflects that broad oversight jurisdiction.
    Pursuant to Rule X, cl. 2(d)(1)(F), this Plan also includes 
proposals to cut or eliminate programs that are inefficient, 
duplicative, outdated, or more appropriately administered by 
State or local governments.
    House Rule X, cl. 2(d)(2) requires that committee oversight 
plans include a list of programs or agencies within each 
committee's jurisdiction with lapsed authorizations that 
received funding in the prior fiscal year, or a program or 
agency with a permanent authorization which has not been 
subject to review by the Committee in the prior three 
Congresses. The Committee has found no Small Business 
Administration (SBA) programs that fit these parameters. Rule 
X, cl. 2(d)(2) also requires a description of the programs or 
agencies to be authorized in the current Congress or the next 
Congress, and any oversight to support the authorization of 
those programs or agencies, and recommendations for moving such 
programs or agencies from mandatory funding to discretionary 
appropriations where appropriate. The Committee may consider 
reforms and improvements to various SBA programs as noted 
throughout this Authorization and Oversight Plan, including the 
need for SBA to create appropriate metrics to measure efficacy.

              OVERSIGHT OF FEDERAL CAPITAL ACCESS PROGRAMS

    The Committee will conduct hearings and investigations of 
SBA and other federal agencies that provide capital to 
America's entrepreneurs that may include any or all of the 
following, as well as matters brought to the attention of the 
Committee subsequent to the filing of this Report:
           Effectiveness of the capital access programs 
        to generate jobs in the fastest growing small 
        businesses.
           Whether lenders are meeting their goals to 
        lend to small businesses and create jobs.
           Risk to the taxpayers of the capital access 
        programs.
           Adequacy of SBA oversight of its lending 
        partners to ensure that federal taxpayers are properly 
        protected.
           Capabilities of the SBA information 
        technology to manage the loan portfolio.
           Whether SBA rules, regulations and guidance 
        result in transparent and reasoned decision making with 
        respect to capital access programs.
           Assessment of credit-scoring algorithms as a 
        replacement for individual credit assessment by SBA and 
        its lending partners.
           The exercise of discretion by SBA to create 
        pilot programs and the risk they pose to the taxpayer 
        and whether such authority should be curtailed or 
        eliminated.
           Whether SBA disaster loan program and its 
        oversight ensures that small businesses are able to 
        revive and rebuild communities without unduly placing 
        the federal taxpayer at risk.
           Efficacy and duplication of federal capital 
        access programs offered by the Department of 
        Agriculture to small businesses in rural areas.
           Utilization by small businesses of export 
        capital programs at the Export-Import Bank and the 
        Overseas Private Investment Corporation.
           Continued examination of the Small Business 
        Lending Fund and State Small Business Credit Initiative 
        established by Pub. L. No. 111-240, the Small Business 
        Jobs Act of 2010, in creating jobs and providing 
        capital to small businesses.
           Impact of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform 
        and Consumer Protection Act, Pub. L. No. 111-203, on 
        small business access to capital.
           Implementation of crowdfunding and other 
        provisions of the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act, 
        Pub. L. No. 112-106.
    In performing oversight, the Committee will focus on risky 
aspects of financial assistance programs including, but not 
limited to, commercial real estate refinancing, premier 
certified lenders, participating security small business 
investment companies, small business lending companies, express 
lenders, and loan programs utilizing simplified lending 
applications.

OVERSIGHT OF SBA AND OTHER FEDERAL ENTREPRENEURIAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS

    The Committee will conduct hearings and investigations into 
the SBA programs that provide training and advice to small 
businesses that may include any or all of the following, as 
well as matters brought to the attention of the Committee 
subsequent to the filing of this Report:
           Examining effectiveness of SBA 
        entrepreneurial development programs, including 
        programs for veterans, in creating jobs at startups and 
        traditional firms.
           Determining whether certain programs should 
        be eliminated as a result of their ineffectiveness or 
        duplication of programs provided by other agencies or 
        by the private sector.
           Suggesting methods for enhancing 
        coordination among federal agencies in providing 
        assistance to entrepreneurs, including, but not limited 
        to, businesses located in rural areas and those seeking 
        to provide goods and services in the federal 
        procurement marketplace.
           Enhancing the efficacy and utilization of 
        the Manufacturing Extension Partnership at the 
        Department of Commerce, including developments in 
        renewable energy.
           Recommending improvements in assistance to 
        small businesses in rural areas, including those 
        involved in agriculture, forestry, and energy 
        production.

          OVERSIGHT OF FEDERAL GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING MATTERS

    The Committee will conduct hearings and investigations into 
the federal procurement system that may include any or all of 
the following, as well as matters brought to the attention of 
the Committee subsequent to the filing of this Report:
           Whether fraud or other problems exist in the 
        federal government contracting programs overseen by the 
        SBA including the 8(a), HUBZone, service-disabled 
        veteran, women-owned contracting, and Small Business 
        Innovation Research programs.
           Effectiveness of SBA contracting programs to 
        increase participation by small businesses in federal 
        procurement.
           Effectiveness of federal agency protections 
        against contract bundling and consolidation.
           The accuracy and utility of SBA size 
        standards and federal procurement databases.
           Operation and effectiveness of federal 
        agency assistance provided to small businesses 
        interested in federal procurement, including that 
        provided by the SBA, Offices of Small and Disadvantaged 
        Business Utilization and Procurement Technical 
        Assistance Centers.
           Development of federal acquisition policies 
        and whether small businesses have sufficiently 
        effective voice in development of such policies.
           Cost-effectiveness of outsourcing government 
        work to private enterprise rather than expanding the 
        government to provide the good or service internally 
        (i.e., government insourcing).
           Implementation and efficacy of changes made 
        in small business federal procurement programs arising 
        from the enactment of the National Defense 
        Authorization Acts for FYs 2012-2016.
           Examination of the Small Business Innovation 
        Research Program as modified by the National Defense 
        Authorization Act for FY 2012, Pub. L. No. 112-81, 
        including, but not limited to, increased efforts at 
        commercializing federally-funded technology.
    In performing oversight, the Committee will focus its 
efforts on uncovering abuse and misuse of the small business 
designation to obtain federal government contracts.

                      OVERSIGHT OF SBA MANAGEMENT

    The Committee will conduct the hearings and investigations 
into the management of the SBA that may include any or all of 
the following, as well as matters brought to the attention of 
the Committee subsequent to the filing of this Report:
           The appropriate mission of the SBA.
           Whether agency employees in the field are 
        empowered to assist small businesses.
           Duplication of offices and missions at SBA 
        headquarters.
           Effectiveness of personnel management to 
        ensure that employees are rewarded for assisting small 
        businesses.
           Capabilities of SBA employees to provide 
        proper assistance to small business owners.
           Agency personnel capabilities to properly 
        manage loan defaults to maximize recovery of 
        collateral.
           Whether SBA improperly utilizes statutory 
        authority to create untested initiatives and the 
        procedures by which the agency develops such programs.
    In carrying out this oversight, the Committee will focus 
particularly on streamlining and reorganizing of the agency's 
operations to provide maximum assistance to small business 
owners. Offices that primarily provide assistance or advice to 
headquarters staff that do not promote the interests of small 
businesses or protect the federal government as a guarantor of 
loans will be recommended for cuts or elimination. For some 
potential offices that the Committee will examine, refer to the 
section titled ``Reductions in Programs and Spending.''

         OVERSIGHT OF FEDERAL REGULATORY AND PAPERWORK BURDENS

    The Committee will conduct hearings and investigations into 
unnecessary, burdensome, and duplicative federal rules, 
reporting and recordkeeping requirements affecting small 
businesses that may include any or all of the following, as 
well as matters brought to the attention of the Committee 
subsequent to the filing of this Report:
           Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.
           Consumer Safety Products Commission.
           Department of Agriculture.
           Department of Commerce.
           Department of Energy, particularly the 
        Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.
           Department of Health and Human Services, 
        particularly the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid 
        Services and Food and Drug Administration.
           Department of Interior, particularly the 
        Bureau of Land Management and Fish and Wildlife 
        Service.
           Department of Homeland Security, 
        particularly the Transportation Security 
        Administration.
           Department of Labor, particularly the 
        Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the 
        Wage and Hour Division.
           Department of Transportation, particularly 
        the Federal Aviation Administration and Federal Motor 
        Carrier Safety Administration.
           Department of the Treasury, particularly the 
        Internal Revenue Service.
           Environmental Protection Agency.
           Federal Communications Commission.
           Federal Financial Institutions Examination 
        Council and its constituent agencies.
           Office of Management and Budget, 
        particularly the Office of Federal Procurement Policy.
           Securities and Exchange Commission.
    The Committee will identify specific rules and regulations 
already issued or at the proposed rule stage to assess the 
impact on small businesses. In addition, the Committee will 
examine agency compliance with the Regulatory Flexibility Act 
and Paperwork Reduction Act. The Committee will pay close 
attention to the effect that regulations have on startups. 
Oversight of the regulatory process also will, to the extent 
relevant, examine the work of the Office of Information and 
Regulatory Affairs at the Office of Management and Budget. 
Special attention will be paid to the work performed by the 
Chief Counsel for Advocacy at the Small Business Administration 
to ensure that Office is fulfilling its mission to advocate 
vigorously on behalf of America's small business owners in 
regulatory matters at federal agencies. Finally, this oversight 
will entail an examination of compliance by federal agencies 
with amendments to Executive Order 12,866 and memoranda on 
regulatory flexibility and regulatory compliance issued by the 
President on January 18, 2011 and still in effect as of the 
approval of this Oversight Plan.

                    OVERSIGHT OF FEDERAL TAX POLICY

    The Committee will conduct hearings and investigations into 
the federal tax code, its impact on small business, and 
Internal Revenue Service's (IRS) collection of taxes that may 
include any or all of the following, as well as matters brought 
to the attention of the Committee subsequent to the filing of 
this Report:
           Identification of tax code provisions and 
        proposed rules that hinder the ability of small 
        businesses to create jobs and recommendations for 
        modifying those provisions to boost small business job 
        growth.
           Examination of the structure of the tax code 
        in order to simplify compliance for small businesses.
           Assessment of the recordkeeping and 
        reporting requirements associated with tax compliance 
        and suggestions for reducing such burdens on small 
        businesses.
           Evaluation of the estate tax provisions to 
        determine whether they inhibit the ability of 
        successive generations to maintain successful job 
        creating enterprises.
           Efficiencies at the IRS that improve the 
        interaction between the government and small business 
        owners.
           Inefficiencies at the IRS that force small 
        businesses to divert capital from job growth to tax 
        compliance.

                    OVERSIGHT OF HEALTH CARE POLICY

    The Committee will conduct hearings and investigations into 
federal health care policy (such as Medicare and Medicaid) and 
the continued implementation of the Patient Protection and 
Affordable Care Act that may include any or all of the 
following, as well as matters brought to the attention of the 
Committee subsequent to the filing of this Report:
           The cost of the Patient Protection and 
        Affordable Care Act to small businesses, including the 
        self-employed.
           The availability of health insurance in the 
        federal marketplaces established by the Patient 
        Protection and Affordable Care Act.
           The impact of the Patient Protection and 
        Affordable Care Act, Medicare and Medicaid on the 
        ability of physicians, pharmacists, and allied health 
        care providers to offer the best care possible to 
        patients.
           The impact of state tort and insurance laws 
        on the cost of medical care.
           Examination of increases in efficiencies 
        that will improve the provision of health care while 
        reducing costs to small businesses that offer their 
        workers health insurance.

                       OVERSIGHT OF ENERGY POLICY

    The Committee will conduct hearings and investigations into 
energy policy to reduce the cost of energy and increase energy 
independence that may include any or all of the following, as 
well as matters brought to the attention of the Committee 
subsequent to the filing of this Report:
           Innovations developed by small businesses 
        that create greater energy independence.
           Federal regulatory policies that increase 
        dependence on foreign sources of energy.
           Policies needed to incentivize production of 
        energy in the United States.
           Examination of commercialization of research 
        in renewable energy.
           Federal regulations or policies that 
        increase energy costs for small businesses.
    The primary thrust of the Committee's efforts will focus on 
efforts to use the innovation of America's entrepreneurs to 
fuel the drive for greater energy independence, including the 
development of renewable energy products.

          OVERSIGHT OF TRADE AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY POLICY

    The Committee will conduct hearings and investigations into 
international trade and intellectual property policies of 
America and its trading partners that may include any or all of 
the following, as well as matters brought to the attention of 
the Committee subsequent to the filing of this Report:
           Impact of free trade agreements to increase 
        exports by American small businesses.
           Oversight of SBA's Office of International 
        Trade and the agency's efforts to promote small 
        business exports.
           Examination of the impact of illicit actions 
        by foreign entities on small businesses and whether the 
        federal government is doing enough to protect their 
        interests.
           Whether the federal government is doing 
        enough to protect the intellectual property rights of 
        small businesses by foreign competitors.
           The impact of federal intellectual property 
        policies, particularly patents and copyrights, to 
        protect the innovations of American entrepreneurs.
           Efforts to increase exports by small 
        businesses.
           Whether the United States Trade 
        Representative and Department of Commerce sufficiently 
        protect the interests of small businesses in the 
        negotiation of free trade agreements.
           Whether the United States Trade 
        Representative takes positions at the World Trade 
        Organization that sufficiently promote the interests of 
        American small businesses.
    The focus of oversight will emphasize the best mechanisms 
to promote and protect advanced technology innovations of small 
businesses.

                  REDUCTIONS IN PROGRAMS AND SPENDING

    In addition to the programs and policies already cited, the 
Committee will examine any and all offices and programs that 
fall within the Committee's legislative jurisdiction to find 
areas that could lead to reduction in the federal deficit. Some 
programs and offices may include:
           State Small Business Credit Initiative 
        operated by Department of Treasury.
           Express Loan Program overseen by SBA.
           Emerging Leaders Initiative started by SBA.
           Clusters Program initiated by the SBA.
           Innovation and Impact Fund Pilot Programs 
        operated by the SBA.
           SBA Office of Policy.
           SBA Regional Administrators.
           Office of Advocacy Regional Advocates.
           SBA Deputy District Directors.
           SBA Office of International Trade.
           SBA Office of Native American Affairs.
    In particular, the Committee will assess whether 
reorganization and reassignment of employees to more critical 
functions at the SBA, such as positions in the Office of 
Government Contracting and Business Development will provide a 
more effective agency at helping small businesses to generate 
growth.

                        PROGRAMMATIC DUPLICATION

    The Committee notes that Sec. 18 of the Small Business Act 
prohibits duplication of any effort by the Small Business 
Administration if a program is already offered by another 
federal agency unless the Small Business Administration 
expressly authorizes the duplication. The Committee will 
continue to monitor the Small Business Administration for 
programs that duplicate the efforts of other federal agencies.

             COMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION AND INFRASTRUCTURE

                    AUTHORIZATION AND OVERSIGHT PLAN

    In accordance with Rule X of the House of Representatives, 
the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure is 
responsible for determining whether laws and programs within 
its jurisdiction are being implemented according to 
Congressional intent and whether they should be continued, 
changed, or eliminated. In the 115th Congress, the Committee 
will review the activities of government agencies and entities 
within its jurisdiction and the public and private interests 
they affect or regulate. As appropriate, the Committee will 
investigate ways to improve the overall performance and 
operation of the agencies and entities it oversees, promote 
reform and cost savings, and eliminate fraud, wasteful 
spending, abuse and mismanagement where possible.
    The oversight and investigation functions are vested at the 
Full Committee level. Oversight and investigation activities 
will be coordinated between the Full Committee and the 
Subcommittees. This structure will facilitate oversight of 
issues that cut across the jurisdiction of several 
Subcommittees. The Committee will continue to exercise its 
oversight duties through its own staff, as well as through work 
performed at the Committee's request by the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) and the various Inspectors General 
(IG) within their respective agencies and departments. 
Oversight activities will include hearings, briefings, 
correspondence, reports, media releases, and public statements.
    The GAO provides Congress a biennial update on high-risk 
programs, which are Federal programs and operations that the 
GAO considers to be at high risk for waste, fraud, abuse, 
mismanagement, or in need of broad reform. Consistent with the 
Rules of the House of Representatives, the Committee will hold 
hearings on the programs within the Committee's jurisdiction on 
GAO's ``high-risk'' list. The rules also require the Committee 
to hold at least one hearing every 120 days on ``waste, fraud, 
abuse, or mismanagement in Government programs which that 
committee may authorize.'' These hearings will focus on ``the 
most egregious instances of waste, fraud, abuse, or 
mismanagement,'' as documented by any report that the Committee 
has received from an IG or GAO. Finally, the Committee will 
hold hearings if any agency has received disclaimers on its 
agency financial statements.
    The Committee has identified several particular areas for 
oversight and investigation in the 115th Congress. These areas 
are organized by Subcommittee and discussed below:

                        SUBCOMMITTEE ON AVIATION

    1. Implementation of the FAA Extension, Safety, and 
Security Act of 2016. The FAA Extension, Safety, and Security 
Act of 2016 (P.L. 114-190) was signed into law on July 15, 
2016. This Act authorizes funding for the Federal Aviation 
Administration (FAA) through fiscal year 2017, and contains a 
number of safety-critical and time-sensitive reforms. The 
Subcommittee will closely oversee the FAA's efforts to 
implement the provisions of this Act.
    2. Safety Programs. The Subcommittee has held numerous 
safety hearings and will continue its oversight. Maintaining a 
safe and efficient aviation system is critical to the aviation 
industry, passengers, the U.S. economy, job creation, and U.S. 
competitiveness in the global marketplace. Issues to be 
addressed include: general aviation safety, key safety 
agreements, the safe integration of unmanned aircraft systems, 
pilot and controller training, losses of separation between 
aircraft, the FAA's enforcement and certification activities, 
commercial airline safety, and the FAA's voluntary reporting 
and data-sharing and assessment programs.
    3. National Transportation Safety Board. Authorization for 
the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) expired in 
2008. A reauthorization bill passed the House in 2010 but was 
not enacted.
    4. Airline Financial Position and Customer Service. The 
aviation marketplace has gone through many changes and over the 
next decade, the FAA predicts that air traffic operations will 
increase. The Office of the Secretary within the Department of 
Transportation (DOT) is responsible for economic oversight of 
the airline industry, including ensuring that air carriers do 
not engage in unfair and deceptive practices that could harm 
consumers and ensuring that business agreements among air 
carriers do not result in harmful effects. The DOT's actions in 
this regard may have a dramatic impact on the industry, 
competition, job creation, and airlines' obligations to their 
passengers. The Subcommittee will continue to examine 
opportunities to improve the airline industry's 
competitiveness, review recently established regulations to 
ensure the aviation system remains safe and accessible to the 
traveling public, and provide oversight of standards for 
passenger service.
    5. Oversight of the Commercial Space Industry. The mission 
of the FAA's Office of Commercial Space Transportation is to 
ensure protection of the public, property, and the national 
security and foreign policy interests of the United States 
during commercial launch or reentry activities, and to 
encourage, facilitate, and promote U.S. commercial space 
transportation. The Subcommittee will continue to monitor the 
status and future of the U.S. commercial space transportation 
industry and the role of the FAA in providing safety oversight 
of the industry.
    6. Evaluation of FAA's NextGen Air Traffic Control 
Modernization. Since the early 1980s, the FAA has been working 
to modernize the air traffic control system, and its most 
current effort is the Next Generation Air Transportation System 
(NextGen). The FAA describes NextGen as ``a monumental, 
historic shift forward in the modernization of our air 
transportation system'' and as ``[i]ntegrating NextGen 
capabilities to transform the National Airspace System''. The 
FAA has stated that NextGen will result in greater airspace 
system efficiency; reduced noise exposure; reduced emissions 
and fuel burn; improved safety; increased accuracy and 
reliability in equipment and software used for navigation and 
air traffic control; and the capability for future computer 
enhancements. Over the years, the FAA's NextGen efforts have 
been behind schedule and over budget. The Subcommittee will 
continue to monitor and examine the FAA's efforts to establish 
performance metrics, meet deadlines, stay within budget, ensure 
an appropriate level of aircraft equipage with NextGen 
avionics, and pursue solutions to identified challenges.
    7. Cybersecurity of the National Airspace System. As the 
FAA modernizes air traffic control technology, and the aviation 
industry modernizes the aircraft fleet, concerns about the 
robustness and resiliency of these systems have arisen. 
Ensuring the cybersecurity of these systems is of critical 
importance. The FAA Extension, Safety, and Security Act of 2016 
directs the FAA to implement a strategic framework for 
cybersecurity. The Subcommittee will continue its oversight of 
the cybersecurity activities of the FAA and relevant 
stakeholders to ensure appropriate steps are being taken by the 
FAA to address cyber-threats and complete the strategic 
framework for cybersecurity.
    8. Implementation of the FAA Modernization and Reform Act 
of 2012. The FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 (P.L. 
112-95) (FMRA) was signed into law on February 14, 2012. The 
FMRA authorized funding for, and reformed and revised the 
safety programs, air traffic control modernization (NextGen) 
efforts, and operations of the FAA through fiscal year 2015. 
The Subcommittee will continue to closely oversee the FAA's 
efforts to implement the remaining mandates contained in the 
FMRA and to improve aviation safety.
    9. Investment in Aviation Infrastructure. America's 
airports are part of a global aviation system, and as such they 
must remain safe and efficient in order to compete with global 
hubs of air commerce. Over the next five years, the FAA 
estimates a need for $32.5 billion in projects eligible for 
Airport Improvement Program (AIP) grants. Airports rely on AIP 
funding, supplemented with revenue from the statutorily-
authorized passenger facility charge, which is capped at $4.50 
per segment and $18 per round trip. The Subcommittee will 
conduct oversight as appropriate regarding airport financing 
and the FAA's administration of the AIP.

        SUBCOMMITTEE ON COAST GUARD AND MARITIME TRANSPORTATION

    1. Coast Guard Budget. H.R. 4188, the Coast Guard 
Authorization Act of 2016, authorized $6.98 billion for the 
Service in each of fiscal years 2016 and 2017, was signed into 
law on February 8, 2016.
    In the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee will hold hearings 
on the President's fiscal year 2018 and 2019 budget requests 
and consider legislation to authorize the Coast Guard. The 
Subcommittee will explore ways to improve Coast Guard 
operations, and improvements to laws governing maritime 
transportation.
    2. Coast Guard Acquisition. The Coast Guard is currently 
undergoing a major recapitalization of its oceangoing assets. 
The recapitalization will replace or modernize more than 90 
ships and 200 aircraft used to carry out the Service's missions 
beyond near coastal waters. It will also replace antiquated 
command, control, and communications systems. The program faces 
serious challenges related to schedule and budget. The longer 
the acquisition program drags out, the more resources are 
siphoned off to maintain existing assets. In many cases, those 
assets are at or beyond projected service life and are more 
difficult and expensive to maintain. The Subcommittee is 
concerned that delays in new asset acquisition, competing 
demands from shoreside infrastructure and other Coast Guard 
cutter capital needs, and the cost of legacy asset maintenance 
threaten the ability of the Service to complete this 
recapitalization and avoid gaps in operational capability.
    In the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee will continue to 
closely review the programs of record, as well as any changes 
to those programs which may be advisable or necessary to ensure 
the men and women of the Coast Guard who risk their lives for 
our Nation have the best equipment possible at the best price 
for the taxpayer.
    3. Mission Balance. The Subcommittee continues to have 
concerns with the Coast Guard's ability to balance funding and 
focus among the Service's many distinct and competing missions. 
Since September 11, 2001, significant additional resources have 
gone to the Service's homeland security activities. Security-
related missions such as ports, waterways, and coastal security 
and migrant interdiction have seen dramatic increases from pre-
September 11, 2001 funding levels. Other traditional Coast 
Guard missions have not seen such increases. Resources and man-
hours devoted to missions such as drug interdiction and 
fisheries law enforcement are well below pre-September 11, 2001 
funding levels.
    In the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee will continue its 
oversight of the Coast Guard's mission balance to ensure the 
Service qualitatively and quantitatively reviews its many 
missions, makes and justifies decisions about which missions it 
cannot afford to meet performance measures, identifies and 
responds to exigencies that divert resources between missions, 
and plans how it allocates resources appropriately among its 
many missions.
    4. Maritime Domain Awareness. The effort to know what is 
happening at all times on the ocean, coastal and interior 
waters of the United States, and aboard the vessels that 
transit in or through waters under U.S. jurisdiction is known 
as Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA). The successful 
implementation of MDA is critical to maritime safety, homeland 
security, and the efficiency and reliability of the U.S. 
maritime supply chain.
    The Coast Guard relies on several new and developing 
technologies to acquire, manage, and disseminate interoperable 
MDA information. The Subcommittee is concerned with the Coast 
Guard's apparent inability or disinterest to assess new 
technologies, such as unmanned, autonomous aerial and 
underwater vehicles, in order to acquire MDA information in a 
more cost-effective manner with greater accuracy and 
efficiency.
    In the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee will continue its 
oversight of the Service's ongoing efforts to assess, develop, 
and implement new MDA technologies to ensure that Coast Guard 
operations are informed by the best MDA information possible 
that is gathered in a timely, reliable manner, and provides 
high value for the taxpayer. The Subcommittee will also examine 
the costs imposed on maritime stakeholders as part of the MDA 
program, and examine methods to reduce those costs without 
negative impacts to the quality and quantity of MDA 
information.
    5. Coast Guard Prevention and Response Activities. The 
Coast Guard plays major roles in response to oil spills (i.e. 
DEEPWATER HORIZON) and natural disasters (i.e. hurricanes and 
flood events). The Service was the Federal On-Scene Coordinator 
and National Incident Commander for the 2010 DEEPWATER HORIZON 
spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The Coast Guard was a first 
responder to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita which devastated New 
Orleans and the Mississippi River Delta in 2005, and in 2016, 
the Coast Guard responded to severe flood events in Louisiana 
and North Carolina. In addition, the Coast Guard enforces 
domestically the implementation of the National Invasive 
Species Act, and internationally, U.S. compliance with a 
convention to prevent invasive species from being introduced 
into U.S. waters through the discharge of ballast water. Due to 
a 2008 federal court decision, the discharge of ballast water 
and other ``discharges incidental to the normal operation of 
vessels'' such as bilge water, deck wash, and air conditioning 
condensate are now regulated by the Environmental Protection 
Agency (EPA) under the Clean Water Act. A number of states have 
adopted ballast water standards. Thus far, these standards have 
been waived because they have proven unenforceable. However, if 
implemented these standards would severely complicate vessel 
operations and impede the flow of commerce along our coast, 
Great Lakes, and inland rivers.
    In the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee will conduct 
oversight on the Coast Guard's crisis prevention and response 
capabilities. Oil spills, natural disasters, and mass migration 
events can each over-extend the Coast Guard's prevention and 
response systems and capabilities. The Subcommittee will 
conduct oversight on Coast Guard prevention and response 
programs, including its existing regulations authorizing the 
use of Alternative Planning Criteria. The Subcommittee will 
also work with the Water Resources and Environment Subcommittee 
to conduct oversight of the Coast Guard's implementation of its 
ballast water regulation, including the status of the Coast 
Guard's type approval process for ballast water treatment 
systems, and EPA's implementation of its Vessel General Permit 
program for vessel incidental discharges. The Subcommittee will 
work to set a single nationwide ballast water standard that 
ensures the efficient movement of maritime commerce, defends 
seafaring and port jobs, and protects the environment.
    6. Short Sea Shipping. Short sea shipping is the waterborne 
movement of commercial freight between two ports in the United 
States or between ports in the United States and Canada. At the 
present time, the most highly developed water freight 
transportation systems in the United States operate on the 
Mississippi River, the Great Lakes, and the St. Lawrence 
Seaway, most often carrying agricultural products and other raw 
materials. However, the Maritime Administration has found these 
routes are underutilized, carrying approximately 13% of total 
freight tonnage in the United States. By comparison, nearly 70% 
of the freight tonnage transported in the United States is 
moved by trucks travelling across our Nation's roadways.
    Revitalization of our marine highways has the potential to 
reduce congestion on our highways, improve air quality, and 
create new maritime industry jobs for Americans. The 
Subcommittee will examine potential options for increasing the 
cost-competitiveness and expanded use of short sea shipping in 
the 115th Congress.
    7. FMC and MARAD Budget. The Subcommittee has jurisdiction 
over the Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) and the non-defense 
related programs of the Maritime Administration (MARAD). The 
FMC is responsible for the economic regulation of U.S. 
waterborne foreign commerce and unfair shipping practices. 
MARAD oversees several programs related to defense readiness, 
as well as programs designed to promote and develop the 
domestic merchant marine and shipbuilding industries.
    The Subcommittee will continue to conduct oversight of the 
FMC and MARAD in the 115th Congress. The Subcommittee will 
explore ways to promote job growth in the domestic fleet while 
reducing costs at both agencies.
    8. National Maritime Strategy. Section 603 of the Howard 
Coble Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2014 
directed the Secretary of Transportation, in consultation with 
the Commandant of the Coast Guard, to develop and transmit to 
the Congress a National Maritime Strategy no later than 60 days 
after the date of enactment. This comprehensive strategy was to 
include recommendations to increase the competitiveness and use 
of U.S.-flag vessels in the U.S. foreign trade, enhance 
shipbuilding, ensure federal agency compliance with cargo 
preference requirements, and increase the use of short sea 
shipping in the United States. Congress is still waiting to 
receive the Strategy.
    The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of the Maritime 
Administration and the Coast Guard to determine the status of 
the development of this strategy to promote and expand economic 
opportunities for U.S.-flag carriers and related marine 
industries and the future of the U.S. Merchant Marine.
    9. Ports Safety and Security. The Subcommittee will 
continue oversight of U.S. ports and potential vulnerabilities 
with respect to dirty bombs and fissile materials and the 
adequacy of the existing multi-layered, risk-based security 
strategy. U.S. ports are a critical component in an efficient 
U.S. marine transportation system since they are the primary 
portals through which cargo and other goods enter and exit the 
United States. In 2014, 23.1 million jobs in the United States 
were supported by the cargo moving through U.S. seaports. 
Furthermore, marine cargo activity generated around $4.6 
trillion of total economic activity or about 26% of the United 
States' $17.4 trillion Gross Domestic Product in 2014. Any 
incident occurring in U.S. ports will impact the U.S. economy 
and the flow of goods into and out of the United States.

 SUBCOMMITTEE ON ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, PUBLIC BUILDINGS, AND EMERGENCY 
                               MANAGEMENT

    1. Emergency Management. The Subcommittee will continue to 
examine and evaluate the Nation's ability to prevent, prepare 
for, mitigate against, respond to, and recover from disasters 
and emergencies of all types including terrorism. In the 115th 
Congress, continued oversight will be needed as states continue 
to be impacted by and recover from prior disasters, such as 
Hurricane Sandy, Hurricane Matthew, and the Louisiana Floods. 
In addition, the Subcommittee will continue its oversight of 
FEMA's implementation of reforms and additional authorities 
from the Sandy Recovery Improvement Act of 2013 and the Post-
Katrina Emergency Management Reform Act of 2006.
    The Subcommittee intends to continue its comprehensive 
review and assessment of how federal disaster assistance has 
evolved over the past several decades and its continued 
effectiveness. The purpose is to examine how and why disaster 
costs and losses have continued to increase, which agencies 
provide assistance and how that money is spent, what guidance 
or controls are in place for the effective use of assistance, 
and the appropriate role for the Federal Government.
    2. Border Security. During the 114th Congress, the 
Subcommittee conducted oversight of land ports of entry (LPOEs) 
construction and the implementation of a Public Private 
Partnership program created as part of the Fiscal Year 2014 
Consolidated Appropriations Act. Additional legislation was 
moved to make changes and modifications of that program in the 
114th Congress. The Subcommittee will continue its oversight of 
LPOE construction projects, the implementation of the Public 
Private Partnership program and examine additional ways in 
which private dollars could be leveraged.
    3. Leasing. During the 113th and 114th congresses, the 
Subcommittee held hearings and roundtables identifying the 
large number of GSA leases expiring in the next five years and 
examining GSA's process for addressing them. GSA currently 
leases 195 million rentable square feet--more than half of the 
GSA's total space inventory. The cost of leasing space accounts 
for more than half of the GSA's Federal Buildings Fund (FBF) 
annual expenses, totaling more than $5.4 billion annually. Over 
the next five years, more than 50% of GSA's leased space will 
expire, creating an opportunity to significantly reduce leasing 
costs to the taxpayer. The Subcommittee will continue its 
oversight of GSA leasing and how it is managing the replacement 
of expiring leases with good deals for the taxpayer.
    In addition, in the 112th and 113th Congresses, problems 
with independent leasing authorities of agencies outside of GSA 
were made apparent. In 2010, the Securities and Exchange 
Commission (SEC), which has its own independent leasing 
authority, signed a sole-source 10-year lease for a state of 
the art building it later determined it did not need, binding 
the taxpayer to more than $500 million. The Subcommittee 
conducted an investigation and held hearings that revealed 
serious questions about SEC's management of its space and its 
leasing authority. In the 114th Congress, the Subcommittee 
continued its oversight by requesting a GAO review of agencies 
with independent leasing authorities and holding a hearing 
focusing on how agencies with such authorities were managing 
them. In addition, questions about how the Department of 
Veterans Affairs (VA) has used its leasing authority resulted 
in VA procurement of leases for its outpatient clinics and 
centers through GSA's leasing authorities. Because of these 
ongoing issues surrounding independent leasing authorities, the 
Subcommittee will continue its oversight of leases outside of 
GSA.
    4. Real Property Management. The management of Federal Real 
Property has been on the GAO's High Risk list since 2003 due to 
a number of mismanagement issues including the overreliance on 
costly leasing to meet long-term space needs and underused or 
vacant space. In addition, with nearly half of GSA's assets 
over 50 years old, GSA has faced challenges maintaining a 
balanced inventory, draining Federal resources and costing more 
to maintain old buildings that are often inefficient. While 
commercial leasing may be advisable in many cases, GSA is often 
driven to costly operating leases when ownership may be less 
costly to the taxpayer. The Office of Management and Budget's 
budget scorekeeping rules are key drivers on ``own vs. lease'' 
asset decision-making. Current budget scorekeeping rules 
generally leave GSA with only two options for meeting the 
Federal Government's general purpose space needs: direct 
appropriations for new construction or long-term leases. In 
addition, with tight budget constraints and the lack of funds 
for new construction, GSA has begun exploring alternative 
arrangements for space acquisition and redevelopment.
    During the 113th and 114th congresses, the Subcommittee 
held roundtables and hearings on how Public-Private 
Partnerships could be used as alternative methods of financing 
space. In addition, the Committee established a Public Private 
Partnership Panel that explored the use of P3's across various 
types of infrastructure, including public buildings. The P3 
Panel recommended, among other things: (1) review and modify 
budgetary scoring rules for commercially leased office space to 
enable operating lease treatment of long-term leases and fixed-
priced, below market purchase options; and (2) fully utilize 
existing lease authorities and Office of Management and Budget 
(OMB) budgetary scoring procedures to proceed with long-term 
ground lease/lease back arrangements where the federal 
government retains ownership of leasehold improvements at the 
end of the ground-lease term.
    In 2013, OMB issued a directive to agencies called ``Freeze 
the Footprint'' and later modified the directive in 2015 to 
shrink the space footprint. That directive requires agencies to 
reduce their amount of office and warehouse space to FY2012 
levels. The Subcommittee will continue to conduct 
investigations and oversight of GSA's management of its real 
property portfolio and examine ways to ensure cost-effective 
choices are made. In addition, the Subcommittee will work to 
ensure GSA maximizes the utilization of existing space, 
renegotiates existing leases to reduce costs, and sells under-
used or vacant properties which will generate revenue. Finally, 
the Subcommittee will work to ensure GSA fully utilizes its 
enhanced property management authority to make better use of 
space it retains, such as out-leasing empty Federal space to 
generate income for the Federal Buildings Fund and help offset 
costs. The Subcommittee will conduct close oversight of GSA's 
use of these authorities to ensure they are managed and used 
appropriately.
    5. Capital Investment and Leasing Program (CILP). As part 
of the Committee's annual work to review and authorize GSA's 
requests for authority to repair, alter, construct and lease 
property for use by Federal agencies, the Subcommittee will 
review each prospectus presented to the Committee and recommend 
approval only after the Subcommittee is satisfied that the 
requests are cost-effective and in the best interest of the 
government. The Subcommittee will work aggressively with GSA 
and tenant agencies to shrink the space footprint where 
appropriate.
    6. Federal Courthouses. In June of 2010, GAO issued a 
report on the Federal courthouse program and found that of the 
33 courthouses built since 2000, there was 3.56 million square 
feet of extra space, costing the taxpayer $835 million plus $51 
million annually to operate and maintain. Since that time, the 
Judiciary developed a new review process to identify the need 
for new courthouses. In 2013, the Committee requested the 
Judiciary apply the new process to the courthouses on its 5-
Year Courthouse Plan. The Judiciary completed the process in 
late 2014 and issued an updated Plan in 2015. The Judiciary 
received funding for courthouse construction in Fiscal Year 
2016. The Subcommittee will closely oversee the progress made 
on courthouses authorized to ensure they are constructed within 
the limitations placed upon them by the Committee and to ensure 
they stay below or within budget.
    7. Federal Protective Service (FPS). As a part of the 
Homeland Security Act of 2002, the Federal Protective Service 
was transferred from the Public Buildings Service of GSA to the 
Department of Homeland Security. However, responsibility for 
the protection of federal buildings, generally, remains with 
FPS within DHS. The Subcommittee will continue to monitor and 
review the policies, procedures, and requirements of security 
at public buildings.
    8. Major Development Projects. The Federal Bureau of 
Investigation headquarters consolidation project was authorized 
in the 114th Congress. The Committee refused to provide GSA and 
the FBI a blank check, but set a clear limitation to the costs 
and other parameters to ensure the project would meet the needs 
of the FBI, shrink its space by 33 percent, and minimize costs 
to the taxpayer. Should the project receive funding in the 
115th Congress, the Subcommittee plans to conduct aggressive 
oversight of the project to ensure it stays on time and within 
budget.
    In addition, there are a number of other proposed major 
construction and development projects that utilize alternative 
methods of acquiring space, such as GSA's exchange authority. 
This includes the Department of Labor headquarters building. 
The Subcommittee plans to conduct close review and oversight of 
these major development projects, particularly examining how 
GSA is utilizing its exchange authority in this context.
    9. Architect of the Capitol. The subcommittee will continue 
ongoing oversight of projects being undertaken by the Architect 
of the Capitol pursuant to the Master Plan for the Capitol 
Complex. Consistent oversight will ensure proper prioritization 
and cost savings.
    10. Smithsonian Institution Facilities. The Subcommittee 
will continue its oversight of projects undertaken by the 
Smithsonian Institution including the acquisition, construction 
and use of local and remote museums, research and storage 
facilities of the Institution. The Subcommittee will continue 
to ensure cost-effective solutions to the Smithsonian's space 
needs such as leveraging private dollars and disposal or 
effective reuse of underused assets.
    11. John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. As a 
part of its ongoing oversight of the Kennedy Center's programs, 
the Subcommittee will regularly review the construction, 
alteration, and modernization activities of the Kennedy Center 
that are conducted using federal funds to ensure appropriate 
management and cost savings.
    12. Economic Development. In the 114th Congress, the 
Subcommittee worked to ensure economic development programs 
focused on their core missions of leveraging private dollars 
through infrastructure improvements to attract new jobs to 
distressed communities. The Subcommittee will continue to work 
to ensure these programs are targeted, effective, and remain 
focused on their core missions.

                  SUBCOMMITTEE ON HIGHWAYS AND TRANSIT

    1. FAST Act Implementation. The Fixing America's Surface 
Transportation Act (P.L. 114-94; FAST Act) reauthorized Federal 
surface transportation programs through fiscal year 2020. 
Enacted on December 4, 2015, the FAST Act improves the Nation's 
transportation infrastructure, reforms Federal surface 
transportation programs, refocuses those programs on addressing 
national priorities, and encourages innovation to make the 
surface transportation system safer and more efficient. A large 
part of the Subcommittee's oversight activities in the 115th 
Congress will focus on the implementation of the FAST Act, 
including the areas of: streamlining project delivery; freight 
mobility; competitive grant programs; federal credit assistance 
programs; safety programs and regulations; transit program 
requirements; and research and transportation technologies 
activities.
    2. MAP-21 Implementation. Enacted in July 2012, the Moving 
Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (P.L. 112-141; MAP-
21) reauthorized Federal surface transportation programs 
through fiscal year 2014. While there has been progress made on 
the implementation of MAP-21, there are still significant 
provisions that are not fully implemented. As a result, the 
Subcommittee will continue its oversight of the implementation 
of MAP-21, specifically in the following areas: streamlining 
project delivery; performance management; transportation 
planning; motor carrier safety regulations; and transit safety 
oversight.
    3. Sustainability of Surface Transportation Programs. The 
Federal highway, highway safety, and public transportation 
programs are user-fee financed through Federal excise taxes 
levied on motor fuels and on various highway-related products 
such as tires and heavy trucks. Revenues from these user fees 
are deposited into the Highway Trust Fund (HTF) and may be used 
only for eligible transportation projects and activities. By 
fiscal year 2021, revenues credited to the Highway Account and 
Mass Transit Account of the HTF will be insufficient to meet 
its obligations, according to projections by Congressional 
Budget Office. The Subcommittee will monitor the status and 
solvency of the HTF, and its ability to fully fund the programs 
authorized under the FAST Act and to meet future surface 
transportation investment needs.
    4. Fiscal Year 2018 and 2019 Budget Requests. The 
Subcommittee will review and evaluate the Administration's 
fiscal year 2018 and fiscal year 2019 budget requests for the 
Office of the Secretary of Transportation, Federal Highway 
Administration, Federal Transit Administration, Federal Motor 
Carrier Safety Administration, and National Highway Traffic 
Safety Administration.

     SUBCOMMITTEE ON RAILROADS, PIPELINES, AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS

    1. Fiscal Year 2018 and 2019 Budget Requests. The 
Subcommittee will review and evaluate the fiscal year 2018 and 
fiscal year 2019 budget proposals for the Federal Railroad 
Administration (FRA), Amtrak, the Surface Transportation Board 
(STB), the Railroad Retirement Board, the National Mediation 
Board, and the Pipelines and Hazardous Materials Safety 
Administration (PHMSA).
    2. Rail Infrastructure and Safety Programs. The Passenger 
Rail Reform and Investment Act of 2015 (PRRIA), enacted as 
Title XI of the FAST Act, reauthorized Amtrak and programs 
administered by the FRA. PRRIA restructured and consolidated 
the grant programs administered by FRA to include: Consolidated 
Rail Infrastructure and Safety Improvement Grants, authorizing 
grants for passenger and freight rail projects that improve 
safety, reliability or efficiency; Federal Partnership for 
State of Good Repair Grants, authorizing capital grants to 
reduce the state-of-good-repair backlog for assets used to 
provide intercity passenger rail service; and Restoration and 
Enhancement Grants, authorizing operating assistance grants to 
initiate, restore, or enhance intercity passenger rail service. 
PRRIA authorized a total of $2.2 billion for these programs for 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020. PRRIA also made several 
improvements to the Railroad Rehabilitation and Improvement 
Financing (RRIF) program, which provides long-term, low-
interest loans and loan guarantees for railroad-related 
improvements. While this program is authorized to provide up to 
$35 billion in lending, FRA has executed only about $5.2 
billion in loans; $30.5 billion is currently available in 
credit authority. The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of 
the grant and loan programs and the ongoing construction of 
projects throughout the country as grantees build-out their 
projects.
    PRRIA also addressed the safety, efficiency, and 
reliability of the rail industry. The Act included several 
provisions to improve safety at highway-rail grade crossings, 
including a requirement that all states develop highway-rail 
grade crossing safety action plans. The Act emphasized the 
safety of intercity passenger and commuter rail operations, 
with requirements that carriers develop action plans to ensure 
compliance with speed limits on curves and in bridges and 
tunnels; that the Secretary evaluate track inspection 
regulations on high-density commuter railroad lines; and that 
audio and image recording devices be installed in passenger 
train locomotives. The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of 
FRA's safety programs and the changes enacted as part of the 
Act.
    The work at FRA to implement the Rail Safety Improvement 
Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-432) continues, in particular the Act's 
requirement for the installation of Positive Train Control 
(PTC) systems by December 31, 2015, on rail routes carrying 
passengers or poisonous or toxic-by-inhalation hazardous 
materials.
    In October 2015, the Positive Train Control Enforcement and 
Implementation Act of 2015, enacted as part of the Surface 
Transportation Extension Act of 2015 (P.L. 114-73), extended 
the deadline for installation of PTC to December 31, 2018. At 
the discretion of the Secretary of Transportation, the deadline 
may be extended for individual railroads for up to two 
additional years. The Act requires each railroad carrier to 
report annually to DOT on its progress toward implementing PTC 
systems. PRRIA also made available $199 million from the Mass 
Transit Account of the Highway Trust Fund for discretionary 
grants to public transit agencies and state and local 
governments to assist them with the costs of installing PTC.
    The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of FRA's safety 
programs, grants issued for implementation of PTC, and 
continued efforts to implement the 2008 and 2015 Acts.
    3. Amtrak. PRRIA reauthorized Amtrak, Amtrak's Office of 
the Inspector General, and the Northeast Corridor Commission 
through fiscal year 2020. The Act fundamentally changed the 
authorization structure of Amtrak by providing funding by 
``lines of business'', (specifically the Northeast Corridor and 
the National Network) rather than providing separate grants for 
operating and capital/debt service activities. All costs and 
revenues of the company must be allocated to the newly created 
accounts. The Act also reformed Amtrak's operations, budgeting, 
and planning processes to reflect the lines-of-business 
approach. Further, the Act allowed for more private sector 
participation in stations, rights-of-way, and operations. PRRIA 
established a State-Supported Route Advisory Committee to help 
remedy issues pertaining to cost allocation on state-supported 
routes, and required Amtrak to contract with a third party 
entity to develop and recommend objective methodologies for 
Amtrak to use in evaluating intercity passenger rail routes and 
services. The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of Amtrak, 
Amtrak's Office of the Inspector General, and the Northeast 
Corridor Commission, as well as implementation of the 2008 and 
2015 Acts.
    4. Surface Transportation Board. The Surface Transportation 
Board Reauthorization Act of 2015 reauthorized the STB for the 
first time since the agency was created in 1995. The Act 
expanded the Board from three to five members; set expedited 
timetables for consideration of rate complaints; authorized the 
STB to initiate investigations on its own initiative; modified 
the voluntary arbitration process for small rate disputes; and 
made other changes to improve the STB's efficiency and 
responsiveness. The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of the 
STB and its implementation of the reauthorization Act.
    5. California High-Speed Rail Program. The California high-
speed rail project involves the construction of a new high-
speed rail line connecting the San Francisco Bay Area, Los 
Angeles, and San Diego. To date, federal funding for the 
project has totaled approximately $3.9 billion, most of which 
was made available by the American Recovery and Reinvestment 
Act of 2009 (ARRA). The project is the largest recipient of 
FRA's High Speed and Intercity Passenger Rail Program and the 
Federal ARRA funds must be expended before September 2017. 
Construction has begun in the Central Valley, but funding to 
complete the project remains uncertain. The Subcommittee will 
continue to provide oversight of the project and protect 
taxpayer funding.
    6. Pipeline Safety Programs. Congress reauthorized PHMSA's 
pipeline safety program in the 114th Congress by enacting the 
Protecting our Infrastructure of Pipelines and Enhancing Safety 
Act of 2016 (PIPES). The PIPES Act will ensure the agency 
completes its responsibilities under the Pipeline Safety, 
Regulatory Certainty, and Job Creation Act of 2011; provided 
for a number of assessments of the current safety program; 
included the establishment of minimum standards for underground 
natural gas storage systems and liquefied natural gas 
facilities; provided PHMSA with emergency order authority to 
impose emergency restrictions, prohibitions, and safety 
measures on owners and operators of pipeline facilities to 
abate imminent hazards; and reformed PHMSA to be a more 
dynamic, data-driven regulator. The Subcommittee will conduct 
oversight of the Office of Pipeline Safety at PHMSA and its 
implementation of the Act.
    7. Hazardous Materials Safety Programs. The Hazardous 
Material Transportation Safety Improvement Act of 2015, enacted 
as Title VII of the FAST Act, reauthorized the hazardous 
materials safety program administered by PHMSA. The Act 
included a number of provisions to enhance the safety of 
hazardous materials transportation, with a significant focus on 
the transportation of flammable liquids, including crude oil 
and ethanol, by rail. The Act requires all new tank cars to be 
equipped with thermal blankets and protection for top fittings; 
mandates that all DOT-111 tank cars in flammable liquids 
service be retrofitted in accordance with new DOT standards; 
requires railroads to provide states and local responders with 
advanced notification and information on high-hazard flammable 
trains; and authorizes grant funding to assist communities in 
preparing for and responding to hazardous materials accidents. 
The Act also directs the GAO to conduct an evaluation of 
Electronic Controlled Pneumatic (ECP) brake systems and directs 
the Department of Transportation, through the National Academy 
of Sciences, to conduct tests of ECP brake systems. The 
Subcommittee will continue oversight of PHMSA's hazardous 
materials safety program.

            SUBCOMMITTEE ON WATER RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT

    1. Clean Water Act and Water Infrastructure Programs. 
Continued improvement of water quality will likely require a 
combination of regulatory and non-regulatory approaches, as 
well as continued investment in the implementation of water 
quality-related and water infrastructure programs. The 
Subcommittee's oversight will focus on issues related to these 
regulatory and non-regulatory approaches and water 
infrastructure investment.
    The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of the 
implementation of various regulatory and non-regulatory 
programs under the Clean Water Act (CWA), including how the 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Army Corps of 
Engineers (Corps) implement these programs in conjunction with 
the states, and trends on the effectiveness of the CWA on water 
quality. This includes oversight of issues involving the 
establishment and implementation of water quality standards, 
total maximum daily loads, and effluent limitations, dealing 
with discharges of oil or hazardous substances, permitting of 
point source discharges of pollutants under the National 
Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit program, 
permitting of discharges of dredged or fill materials under the 
CWA section 404 permit program, and how the EPA and Corps 
assert federal jurisdiction and make jurisdictional 
determinations under the CWA. Oversight also will include an 
examination of Federal and state policies and efforts to 
address the presence of nutrients and other contaminants in 
waters under the CWA and other Federal statutes, science and 
data quality issues, the impact of CWA-associated releases on 
waters that may be used as a source of drinking water, and 
continued efforts to improve the management of combined and 
sanitary sewer overflows, stormwater, and nonpoint sources of 
pollution.
    Continued investments in our Nation's water-related 
infrastructure should prioritize the creation of American jobs 
and support a healthy economy. In furtherance of this point, 
the Subcommittee will conduct oversight of wastewater treatment 
and water pollution control funding issues, including levels 
and sources of funding and management of grant and loan 
programs; opportunities for utilities to increase their overall 
efficiency and resiliency; wastewater security; and 
infrastructure needs.
    The Subcommittee also will pursue and examine finding 
innovative ways to finance new and replacement of old water 
infrastructure projects; providing states, counties, and towns 
with additional tools and flexibility to address local 
environmental challenges; and address local affordability 
concerns. As part of this, oversight may include a review of 
the effectiveness of watershed, market, and performance-based 
approaches to addressing local water pollution concerns.
    Further, the Subcommittee's oversight will include a review 
of the EPA's implementation of integrated approaches to 
municipal stormwater and wastewater management through EPA's 
integrated planning approach framework. The Subcommittee may 
investigate whether non-regulatory approaches, such as water 
quality trading and other market-based approaches, and other 
innovative approaches undertaken by state and local 
governments, could result in improvements to the environment.
    Moreover, the Subcommittee may review the implications of 
addressing, through traditional CWA permitting requirements, 
certain pollutant discharges, including discharges of 
pesticides, ballast water and incidental discharges from 
vessels, stormwater, and water transfers.
    2. Army Corps of Engineers Water Resources Program. The 
Subcommittee will review efforts to improve the efficiency and 
effectiveness of the organization, management, and missions of 
the civil works program of the Corps, including the selection, 
planning, and implementation of water resources projects; 
financing and maintenance of harbor and inland waterways 
infrastructure, and utilization of large, medium, and small 
harbors; the backlog of uninitiated Corps construction projects 
or deferred Corps maintenance projects, including 
prioritization of projects; asset management of projects in its 
operation and maintenance account, including existing and 
future levels of service; and efforts to improve the 
efficiency, effectiveness, transparency, and consistent 
implementation of the Agency's regulatory programs, including 
those pertaining to wetlands (including the jurisdictional 
scope and procedural and substantive requirements of the 
permitting programs) and dredging activities. The Subcommittee 
will review the Corps' implementation of provisions of the 
Water Resources Reform and Development Act of 2014 and the 
Water Resources Development Act of 2016, including those that 
were intended to improve the efficiency of the project planning 
and project delivery process.
    Continued investments in our Nation's infrastructure should 
prioritize the creation of American jobs and support a healthy 
economy. The Subcommittee will focus on getting projects for 
the Nation built more efficiently and cost effectively, thereby 
more quickly delivering project benefits to the public, while 
ensuring compliance with existing planning and environmental 
laws. In addition, the Subcommittee will review Corps' 
activities under the authority of Section 14 of the Rivers and 
Harbors Act of 1899 to ensure that Corps review of proposed 
non-federal sponsor modifications to federal projects are 
carried out in an effective manner.
    The Subcommittee has initiated a study to be carried out by 
GAO to review water storage pricing at Corps facilities.
    3. EPA--Superfund/Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act and Brownfields. The Superfund 
program under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) is aimed at cleaning 
up land in the United States that has been contaminated by 
hazardous waste and poses a risk to human health and/or the 
environment. The Brownfields program was authorized under the 
Brownfields Revitalization and Environmental Restoration Act 
(which amended CERCLA). The Brownfields program is aimed at 
enhancing state, local, and private-sector cleanups of 
properties, the redevelopment or reuse of which may be 
complicated by the presence or potential presence of a 
contaminant. Unaddressed brownfields and Superfund sites drive 
down property values and tax revenues, pose potential human 
health concerns, and can deter reinvestment in cities and 
towns. The Brownfields program protects from Superfund 
liability many parties engaged in voluntary brownfields 
cleanups, and supports state and local brownfields assessment 
and cleanup activities, and state voluntary cleanup programs. 
The Subcommittee's oversight will focus on issues related to 
implementation of the Superfund and Brownfields programs.
    The Subcommittee will review efforts to improve the 
efficiency and effectiveness of the contaminated site cleanup 
process, the process of assessing natural resources damages, 
and the efforts to hold responsible parties accountable, 
consistent with Federal law. In addition, the Subcommittee will 
review the liability, financing, and settlement mechanisms and 
procedures under the current Superfund program, including the 
relation of funding sources and levels for the Superfund and 
Brownfields programs to current demands and needs. The 
Subcommittee will continue to review implementation of the 
Small Business Liability Relief and Brownfields Revitalization 
Act. This includes evaluating whether there is a need to amend 
the liability provisions associated with brownfields sites, 
including those providing protections for innocent parties.
    The Subcommittee also will review the role of the states in 
conducting and financing cleanups, and review the relationships 
among the states, EPA, and other Federal entities in 
implementing the Superfund and Brownfields programs. Further, 
the Subcommittee's oversight will include a review of ongoing 
Federal, state, and local efforts to revitalize brownfields, 
including through the implementation of the Small Business 
Liability Relief and Brownfields Revitalization Act. Finally, 
the Subcommittee will work to promote state, local, and private 
efforts to clean up and redevelop Superfund and brownfields 
sites.
    4. Tennessee Valley Authority. The Subcommittee will review 
the management of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and its 
programs, including its energy program, operations in the 
current marketplace, its long-term management of TVA assets, 
properties, and byproducts of energy generation, and the impact 
of TVA debt on its long-term goals.
    Until mid-2006, the TVA had made significant payments on 
its long-term debt in an attempt to reduce its total financing 
obligations. Since 2006, however, TVA's debt has begun to 
steadily climb to levels that may place the taxpayer at risk. 
TVA's debt is statutorily capped at $30 billion and at the end 
of fiscal year 2014 carried $23.6 billion in total debt. The 
Subcommittee may initiate a review of TVA's commitment to long-
term financial sustainability to lessen the risk posed to 
bondholders, ratepayers, and the taxpayer. The Subcommittee may 
also examine issues related to its management of the TVA 
workforce.
    The 115th Congress may be an appropriate time to revisit 
TVA's debt reduction activities and variables that impact their 
debt reduction strategies.
    5. International Boundary and Water Commission. The 
International Boundary and Water Commission (IBWC) was 
established in 1889 with the responsibility for applying the 
boundary and water treaties between the United States and 
Mexico and settling any disputes over their application. The 
body is comprised of both US and Mexican sections, headed by an 
Engineer-Commissioner who is appointed by the president. The 
U.S. Section is headquartered in El Paso, TX and operates under 
the guidance of the State Department. The IBWC carries out, in 
accordance with their governing treaties, the distribution, 
regulation, and conservation of water in the Rio Grande and 
Colorado Rivers for use by both countries; joint construction, 
operations, and maintenance of international storage dams and 
reservoirs and hydroelectric plants, flood protection, and 
sanitation projects for border water quality problems, as well 
as demarcating the boundary between the U.S. and Mexico.
    The Subcommittee will continue to monitor the Amistad Dam 
in Del Rio, TX. The dam is currently being assessed by a bi-
national panel of experts to address a sinkhole that has 
developed under the dam and is causing seepage. The 
Subcommittee will also continue to monitor the ongoing 
situation in Nogales, AZ at the International Outfall 
Interceptor (IOI), a binational sewer line that carries 
millions of gallons of waste each day from Ambos Nogales, 
Mexico to a treatment plant in Rio Rico, AZ. The IOI runs 
underneath and adjacent to a storm drain/tunnel which is 
deteriorating. The entire project is in need of major 
structural repairs, but the parties involved have yet to come 
to agreement on funding.

 AUTHORIZATION OF PROGRAMS WITHIN THE JURISDICTION OF THE COMMITTEE ON 
                   TRANSPORTATION AND INFRASTRUCTURE

    In the 113th and 114th Congresses, as discussed above, the 
Transportation and Infrastructure Committee was responsible for 
moving major pieces of legislation that were enacted into law, 
including bills to address our highways, bridges, and transit 
systems; the passenger rail network; our ports, waterways, 
locks, and dams; pipeline safety programs; the freight rail 
economic regulatory agency; the U.S. Coast Guard; the aviation 
system; and more.
    More work remains, and during the 115th Congress, as part 
of both its oversight and legislative agenda, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure will review the 
authorizations of agencies and programs within its 
jurisdiction. In addition to the efforts outlined above, the 
reauthorization activities of the Committee will include 
legislation regarding the Federal Aviation Administration, the 
U.S. Coast Guard, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the 
General Services Administration, and a bill to authorize water 
resources development projects.
    In addition, under the Committee's jurisdiction a number of 
programs have lapsed authorizations, but continue to receive 
appropriations. These programs span across each Subcommittee. 
To the extent not addressed above, the following measures 
within the Committee's jurisdiction contain programs or 
agencies with lapsed authorizations that received funding in 
Fiscal Year 2016: National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act of 
2004; National Transportation Safety Board Reauthorization Act 
of 2006; Marine Debris Act; Predisaster Hazard Mitigation Act 
of 2010; Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act, 
2007; Estuaries and Clean Waters Act of 2000; National 
Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program Reauthorization Act of 
2004; Economic Development Administration Reauthorization Act 
of 2004; Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission 
Act of 2007; Railroad Safety Improvement Act of 2008; Pipeline 
Safety, Regulatory Certainty, and Job Creation Act of 2011; 
Water Quality Act of 1987; An act to amend the Federal Water 
Pollution Control Act to extend authorization of appropriations 
for Long Island Sound; Great Lakes and Lake Champlain Act of 
2002; Beaches Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act 
of 2000; Small Business Liability Relief and Brownfields 
Revitalization Act (2002); and Superfund Amendments and 
Reauthorization Act of 1986. The Committee intends to conduct 
or continue oversight of these programs in the form of 
hearings, roundtables, site visits, GAO investigations, IG 
Audits, briefings and meetings with the relevant agency, or 
oversight letters to the relevant agency, as appropriate. After 
conducting the necessary oversight, the Committee will work to 
determine whether these programs should continue, be updated or 
reformed, or be terminated in the 115th Congress or 116th 
Congress, as appropriate.
    Further, within the Committee's jurisdiction are several 
programs contained within the Railroad Retirement Act, the 
Railroad Retirement and Survivors' Improvement Act, and the 
Railway Labor Act that are permanently authorized. These 
programs under the Committee's jurisdiction have not 
necessarily been subject to a comprehensive review by the 
Committee in the prior three Congresses. As such, the Committee 
will work to conduct the necessary reviews of these programs 
over this and next Congress. Such oversight may include 
hearings, roundtables, site visits, GAO investigations, IG 
Audits, briefings and meetings with the relevant agency, and 
oversight letters to the relevant agency, as appropriate. Upon 
completion of such review and oversight, the Committee will 
determine the appropriate next steps with regard to these 
permanent authorizations.

                     COMMITTEE ON VETERANS' AFFAIRS

                             OVERSIGHT PLAN

    The Committee on Veterans' Affairs conducts its oversight 
with the help of four Subcommittees: the Subcommittee on 
Disability Assistance and Memorial Affairs, the Subcommittee on 
Economic Opportunity, the Subcommittee on Health, and the 
Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations. It is expected 
that oversight of the issues outlined below will be a shared 
responsibility of both the full Committee and the appropriate 
subcommittees.

            Subcommittee on Disability and Memorial Affairs

     Appeals Reform--The Board of Veterans Appeals 
(BVA) reviews benefits claims submitted by veterans who 
disagree with the decision made on their claim by a VA Regional 
Office. It currently takes almost three years for BVA to reach 
a decision due to the backlog of claims. The process often 
involves a remand by BVA to the Regional Office for additional 
information which further lengthens the time to a final 
decision. As VA has reduced the claims backlog, the number of 
appeals has skyrocketed. Committee staff will continue to 
pursue options for appeals reform, such as the proposal 
developed by VA in 2016. That proposal would reform the appeals 
process by allowing veterans to choose an expedited process in 
certain circumstances. Under the 2016 proposal, veterans could 
waive the right to offer additional evidence and have a hearing 
in exchange for an expedited decision on his or her appeal. 
However, the proposal noted that those veterans who wish to 
retain the right to have a hearing or submit supplemental 
evidence may still do so if the appropriate elections are made 
within the process.
     VBA Quality Review--VA employs a variety of 
mechanisms to review the quality of initial claims decisions. 
One of Veterans Benefits Administration's (VBA) main tools to 
review the accuracy of claim decisions is the Systematic 
Technical Accuracy Review (STAR) checklist. The checklist has a 
very restrictive category of what constitutes as an ``error,'' 
and a more expansive category of what would be considered a 
``comment,'' which is why the VA claims a 98% accuracy rating 
despite many complaints by veterans and Congress as to the 
quality of decisions. Moreover, by allowing quality reviewers 
to simply comment on many errors, VA can sidestep actually 
holding employees accountable for inaccuracies. The Committee 
will investigate how VBA has designed its quality review 
measures and to what extent that design yields accurate 
results.
     VBA Training--Veterans Benefits Administration's 
(VBA) training is generally ineffective, resulting in many 
errors. VBA's challenge training is poor quality and does not 
adequately prepare examiners to process claims. Furthermore, 
the VBA manual is frequently updated and employees are not 
required to undergo new training or even open the email that 
explains the changes. The Committee will conduct oversight into 
how VBA implements training and look for ways to improve 
training to ensure veterans receive the benefits to which they 
are entitled.
     Information Technology--VBA has mismanaged IT 
development, particularly the development and implementation of 
Veterans Benefits Management System (VBMS). The cost of VBMS 
has doubled from the original estimate ($560 million to $1.3 
billion), yet VBMS is still unable to handle appeals or non-
rating claims. VA also has not established a timeline to 
complete implementation of VBMS. This is particularly troubling 
as the effective functioning of NWQ is premised on the 
assumption that VBMS is operating properly. VA continues to 
develop IT systems intended to help improve quality and 
consistency, however, without proper training, the technology 
often becomes a crutch, encouraging employees to rely on the 
system rather than their own knowledge. The Committee will 
continue to receive briefings and updates on the 
implementation, usage, and costs of VBA IT systems.
     National Work Queue (NWQ)--NWQ is a new process of 
distributing workload and assigning claims to whichever 
Regional Office has the capacity to handle it first, rather 
than the more traditional model of having the Regional Office 
in a veteran's home state handle the claim. However, VA 
employees have expressed frustration with how the process is 
being implemented, and it further obscures the true quality of 
a given Regional Office. The Committee will conduct rigorous 
oversight to ensure NWQ improves time of adjudication, 
accuracy, and transparency.
     Fiduciary Reform--The Committee will review the 
performance of the VBA Fiduciary Program. The program is 
designed to provide financial security to veterans who have 
been determined unable to manage their VA benefit payments. 
Fiduciaries are designated by VA and can be a family member, a 
close friend, or a professional fiduciary. The review will 
include oversight of how fiduciaries are appointed, the 
Department's compliance with provisions in the Brady Handgun 
Violence Prevention Act (Pub. L. 103-159, 107 Stat. 1536, 
enacted November 30, 1993) that can effectively deny veterans 
in the fiduciary program of the Second Amendment rights as well 
as fraud associated with the program. Moreover, in January 
2014, the Department issued a proposed rule to provide more 
oversight of fiduciaries; however, three years later, VA has 
not yet finalized the rule. Even as VA fails to act to protect 
veterans, the Office of Inspector General continues to 
investigate additional cases of fiduciary abuse, such as a 
fiduciary who served 80 veterans and was indicted for criminal 
mistreatment and theft of $211,000. The Committee will review 
legislation that would better enable VBA to protect and serve 
veterans in need of fiduciary and ensure their rights of appeal 
in cases where they have been declared mentally incompetent.
     National Cemeteries--The Subcommittee will 
continue oversight over the National Cemetery Administration 
(NCA), Arlington National Cemetery (ANC), the American Battle 
Monuments Commission (ABMC), to include each organization's 
mission, operations, and inquiries into matters of unclaimed 
remains, access, and the methodology for determining veteran 
satisfaction. Each of the above organizations provides a 
hallowed resting place for veterans. VA alone operates over 150 
National Cemeteries to provide an honorable resting place for 
veterans and certain dependents. The Committee will look into a 
number of issues including poor cemetery maintenance, 
destruction of and misplaced grave markers, and overall 
management issues.
     Contract Physicians--Some veterans require a VA 
medical examination as part of the adjudication of a claim for 
disability benefits. Unfortunately, there are not enough VA 
examiners to perform these evaluations in a timely manner, and 
some veterans experience lengthy delays before VA is able to 
schedule such examinations. It may be especially difficult for 
VA to timely schedule these examinations if the veteran needs 
to see a specialist, such as a cardiologist or orthopedic 
surgeon. Moreover, veterans who live in rural areas may have to 
travel many miles to a VA facility in order to see a VA 
examiner for a disability examination. To provide veterans with 
more timely examinations, VA has authority to contract with 
independent physicians to conduct disability examinations. 
However, such authority expires on December 31, 2017. The 
Committee will look into whether this program is functioning as 
intended.
     Equitable Relief for Administrative Errors--The 
Secretary has the authority to provide equitable relief in 
cases when a veteran has been harmed by a mistake made by VA. 
For example, a veteran may be asked by the Department to 
reimburse VA for an overpayment even when the overpayment is 
due to an error made by the Department. In such cases, the 
Secretary may exercise equitable relief and cancel some or all 
of the veteran's debt. The law that requires VA to submit an 
annual report to Congress regarding cases where the Secretary 
has exercised equitable relief will expire on December 31, 
2017. The Committee plans to assess whether such reports assist 
Congress in overseeing the Department.
     Effects of Agent Orange--VA's authority to 
contract with the Health and Medicine Division (HMD) (formally 
known as the Institute of Medicine) of the National Academy of 
Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, a non-governmental 
organization, to scientifically review evidence on the long-
term health effects of Agent Orange expires on December 31, 
2017. The Committee will review this authority for this and 
other VA programs to ensure that veterans who were exposed to 
Agent Orange receive all the benefits they have earned.
     Manila Regional Office--The authorization for the 
Manila Regional Office expires on September 30, 2017. The 
Committee will look at whether the Manila Regional Office is 
providing effective, efficient services to World War II 
veterans who reside in the Philippines.
     The Advisory Committee on Minority Veterans--The 
Advisory Committee on Minority Veterans provides advice to the 
Secretary on the administration of VA benefits for veterans who 
are minority group members on the topics of health care, 
compensation, and other services. The authorization for the 
Advisory Committee on Minority Veterans expires on December 31, 
2017. The Committee will conduct oversight to ensure that this 
program is ensuring that all veterans receive the respect and 
services to which they are entitled.

                  Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity

     Effectiveness of the Transition Assistance Program 
(TAP)--The Committee continues to be concerned about the 
effectiveness of the TAP program which is intended to prepare 
servicemembers for their return to civilian life. The 
Departments of Defense (DoD), Veterans Affairs (VA), and Labor 
(DoL) jointly manage and provide content to the five-day course 
that focuses on skills needed to obtain gainful employment as 
well as an understanding of the benefits that are available to 
them from VA and DoL. The U.S. Government Accountability Office 
is currently undergoing a review of the most recent iteration 
of TAP, at the request of this Committee, which will be 
complete by this summer. The Committee will conduct an 
oversight hearing with GAO, DoD, VA, and DoL to discuss the 
outcomes of the review, as well as discuss how TAP can be 
enhanced for transitioning servicemembers and their families. 
Further, the Committee plans to attend TAP classes to review 
the curriculum that TAP counselors are teaching at the local 
levels. Finally, the Committee will work with the Committees on 
Armed Services and Education and the Workforce to address 
cross-jurisdictional issues as we make improvements to the TAP 
program.
     Accountability and Civil Service Reform--The 
Committee will continue to look for ways to increase the number 
of veterans employed at VA and will examine ways to streamline 
the hiring process for all VA employees. In addition, the 
Committee will continue its oversight of disciplinary actions 
taken against VA employees. Further, the Committee will 
continue its existing efforts to reform VA's antiquated civil 
service system. Recent reports from the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) have found that it can take six 
months to a year (and sometimes significantly longer) to 
dismiss an employee. This system while well intended, is 
clearly broken and not serving veterans. The Committee will 
continue its oversight of disciplinary actions at VA and will 
examine ways to provide true accountability to poor performing 
employees.
     Effectiveness and outcomes of Education and 
Training Programs for Returning Veterans--The Post-9/11 GI 
bill, which is administered by VA, is the most generous 
education program for veterans since the original WWII GI Bill. 
Based on the length of service, the program funds up to full 
tuition and fees at public institutions of higher learning and 
about $22,000 per year at private institutions as well as a 
monthly living stipend based on the housing allowance paid to 
servicemembers at the rank of E-5 (with dependents) and the zip 
code of the institution. Recent changes to the program have 
expanded eligibility for surviving dependents and the Committee 
intends to determine how VA is implementing those changes as 
well as the performance and value of the Veteran Success on 
Campus program, which currently stations VA Vocational 
Rehabilitation staff on 94 campuses. Further, as avenues for 
learning and training continue to evolve and modernize, the 
Committee will examine these new programs and how they may fit 
into the construct and requirements of the Post 9/11 G.I. Bill 
program. In addition, the Committee will examine outcome 
measures for users of the Post-9/11 GI Bill, including 
graduation rates and job placement data, to ensure the 
effectiveness of taxpayers' investment in our veterans' 
education benefits. Finally, the Committee will work with the 
State Approving Agencies to put in place policies that protect 
student veterans against predatory or deceitful recruiting 
practices of some schools, such as providing misinformation 
about student outcomes or encouraging veterans to take out 
unnecessary private student loans.
     Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR&E;) 
program--VA's VR&E; program provides education and training 
benefits for disabled veterans with barriers to employment. The 
program will fund all costs related to long and short-term 
education and training as well as immediate job placement 
services. VR&E; also manages the Independent Living (IL) program 
designed to enable the most severely injured veterans to live 
as independently as possible. The Committee continues to be 
concerned about counselor caseloads and outcomes of VR&E; 
programs as well as the administration of the self-employment 
track of the VR&E; program, which can often result in high 
costs. The Committee will also conduct oversight over 
management and overall effectiveness of the VR&E; program.
     Loan Guaranty Service--VA's Loan Guaranty Service 
provides a loan guaranty benefit to eligible veterans and 
servicemembers, which enables them to purchase a home at a 
competitive interest rate often without requiring a down 
payment or private mortgage insurance. This benefit is highly 
beneficial to veterans, servicemembers, and their families, 
therefore the Committee plans to conduct oversight of the home 
loan program with a focus on their appraisal process as well as 
a continued focus on the need for an increased, or eliminated, 
cap on the loan limits for a VA-backed loan. The Loan Guaranty 
Service also administers grants under the Specially Adapted 
Housing (SAH) program and the Special Housing Adaptation (SHA) 
program. These grants, provided to eligible veterans with 
permanent and total service-connected disabilities, enables the 
veteran to adapt their home or construct a new home that allows 
them to live in a home that is not obstructive to them due to 
their disabilities. Grants under SAH and SHA for FY 17 may not 
be more than $77,307 and $15,462, respectively. These grants 
are beneficial for the most severely injured veterans, and the 
Committee intends to examine if it would be best for veterans 
to consolidate these two different grants into a single grant, 
as well as evaluate the overall grant amounts and what is 
needed to adapt a home. The Committee will also examine whether 
VA can better interact with and track the contractors that 
veterans use to make adaptations to their homes. There is also 
a smaller grant under the SAH program, the SAH Assistive 
Technology (SAHAT) grant program, which is authorized to award 
grants up to $200,000 per fiscal year per grantee to make 
certain technical adaptations to the veteran's home, such as 
voice recognition operations and adaptive feeding equipment. 
SAHAT is authorized $1 million and the authorization expires on 
September 30, 2017. The Committee will examine the SAHAT 
program and how it is administered.
     Adaptive Sports Program--This is a program 
administered by VA, which provides grants to qualifying 
organizations who provide adaptive sports activities and 
opportunities at the local, regional and national levels, 
including Paralympic activities, to disabled veterans and 
servicemembers. This program is authorized at $8 million. The 
authorization for the Adaptive Sports Program expires on 
September 30, 2017. The Committee will continue to examine how 
VA awards grants under this program and the organizations who 
are receiving funding, as well as how VA is working with local 
communities and the Paralympic community to promote and enhance 
adaptive sports programs for disabled veterans and 
servicemembers.
     Center for Veterans Enterprise (CVE)--VA's CVE is 
responsible for vetting the applications of veteran and 
service-disabled veteran-owned small businesses wanting to 
participate in the program designed to increase the amount of 
procurement dollars spent with veteran and disabled veteran-
owned small businesses. CVE's vetting program continues to 
approve companies that are not qualified for multiple reasons 
as well as disapprove qualified companies. The Committee will 
hold an oversight hearing to review CVE's performance and 
coordinate with the Small Business Committee to determine 
appropriate alternatives.
     Licensing and Credentialing Issues--DoD spends 
billions of tax dollars to provide servicemembers with the 
skills needed to complete DoD's mission. The vast majority of 
those skills translate well to civilian jobs. Unfortunately, 
few states recognize and give credit for military training to 
qualify for state-licensed positions and therefore, the 
training provided by DoD is essentially wasted. The Committee 
will review efforts by states and other entities to provide 
appropriate licenses and credentials to qualified veterans 
whose military training make them eligible for such credentials 
or licenses, as well as the progress that states are making to 
make certain licenses and credentials transferable across state 
lines.
     Homeless Veteran Reintegration Program (HVRP)--
HVRP is a program administered by DoL's Veteran Employment and 
Training Service (VETS), which provides grants to state and 
local workforce investment boards, local public agencies and 
nonprofit organizations, and tribal governments, including 
faith-based and community organizations. The organizations that 
compete and receive these grants provide homeless veterans with 
occupational, classroom and on-the-job training as well as job 
search and placement assistance. The authorization for HVRP 
expires on September 30, 2017. The Committee will conduct an 
oversight hearing to examine the organizations that are 
receiving these grants as well as conduct oversight of VETS 
awarding of these grants, and how the program can be enhanced 
at the federal and state levels to place more homeless veterans 
in careers. Further, the Committee will evaluate whether any 
duplication exists among homeless programs both at the 
Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Labor. The 
Committee will also work with the Committee on Education and 
Workforce to examine how HVRP harmonizes with other areas of 
the Department of Labor, including the Employment and Training 
Administration, and the legislative changes made in the 
Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.
     Performance of the VETS State Grant program 
including performance of the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program 
Specialist/Local Veterans Employment Representative (DVOPS and 
LVERs) use of employment outcome measures--The DVOPS/LVER 
program is administered by DoL VETS and funds state employment 
service staffs who are dedicated to placing veterans in good-
paying jobs. There are significant issues surrounding the 
inconsistent performance of this program across the states and 
the outcome measures used to determine performance continue to 
be inadequate. The Committee will continue to review this 
program and the performance outcomes of DVOPS and LVERs as well 
as conduct oversight of the National Veterans' Training 
Institute (NVTI), which trains DVOPS and LVERs on job placement 
and training skills for veterans.
     Veterans' Advisory Committee on Education--The 
Veterans' Advisory Committee on Education provides advice to 
the VA Secretary on the administration of education and 
training programs for veterans, servicemembers, reservists, and 
dependents of veterans under Chapters 30, 32, 35, and 36 of 
title 38, and Chapter 1606 of title 10. The authorization for 
the Veterans' Advisory Committee on Education expires on 
September 30, 2017. The Committee will examine the 
effectiveness of this advisory Committee and the advice it 
provides to the Secretary to better the administration and 
effectiveness of these education programs.

                         Subcommittee on Health

     Choice, Community Care Consolidation, and Health 
Care Reform--The Committee will consider needed actions to 
improve the Choice program, consolidate the Department of 
Veterans Affairs' (VA's) disparate community care programs and 
authorities, and reform the VA healthcare system to ensure the 
timely, efficient delivery of high-quality care to veteran 
patients both inside VA medical facilities and in the 
community. Community care is a critical component of the VA 
health care system as, without effective partnerships with 
community providers, VA would be unable to provide timely, 
accessible care to veteran patients. As part of this effort, 
the Committee will examine how to organize a high-performing 
network of primary care providers in the community, per the 
recommendation of the Commission on Care, as well as other 
means of empowering veteran patients to control their own care. 
The Committee will also examine how to modernize VA's claims 
processing system to ensure that community providers receive 
prompt, accurate reimbursement for the services they provide to 
veteran patients on VA's behalf.
     Capital Asset Review--The Committee will continue 
aggressive oversight of VA's major medical facility 
construction and leasing program and consider needed actions to 
address VA's vast and aging capital asset portfolio. It has 
been well-established that VA major medical facility 
construction projects are consistently over-budget and behind 
schedule. The Committee will also address ways to move forward 
with VA major medical facility lease authorizations, which have 
been prevented from moving forward due to Congressional 
budgeting rules.
     Mental Health and Suicide Prevention--The 
Committee will continue to closely oversee VA's mental health 
and suicide prevention efforts. In 2016, VA released the most 
comprehensive analysis of veteran suicide data to date. That 
report found that the suicide rate among veterans is 
approximately twenty percent higher than the rate among 
civilians and that about two-thirds of veterans who commit 
suicide do not use VA services. In light of these findings, the 
Committee will continue aggressive oversight of VA's mental 
health programming and outreach efforts, to include the 
Readjustment Counseling Service. As part of this effort, the 
Committee will address a number of recent concerns that have 
arisen around the operations of the Veterans Crisis Line and 
evaluate the effectiveness of actions VA has taken to rectify 
those concerns. The Committee will also continue overseeing 
VA's implementation of Public Law 114-2, the Clay Hunt Suicide 
Prevention for American Veterans Act, which--among other 
things--requires VA to partner with community organizations to 
improve the transition process for veterans.
     Organizational and Management Structure--The 
Committee will closely examine the organizational and 
management structure of the Veterans Health Administration 
(VHA), which manages the VA healthcare system. Several recent 
analyses of the VA healthcare system have found fault with 
VHA's current governance structure. For example, the Commission 
on Care found weak governance on the part of VHA to be a 
contributing factor of recent VA health care scandals, 
including the 2014 access and accountability crisis. According 
to the Commission on Care, ``VHA currently lacks effective 
national policies, a rational organizational structure, and 
clear role definitions that would support effective leadership 
of the organization.'' This sentiment was echoed in a 2016 
Government Accountability Office report on VHA's organizational 
structure, which recommended significant restructuring of VHA. 
Accordingly, the Committee will thoroughly evaluate any and all 
organizational impediments to care throughout VHA and assess 
structural changes needed to improve the provision of timely, 
quality care to veteran patients.
     Staffing, Recruitment, and Retention--The 
Committee will closely examine VA's staffing, recruitment, and 
retention programs and take action to correct deficiencies 
within VA's overly bureaucratic and lengthy hiring processes 
that hinder VA's ability to efficiently and effectively recruit 
and retain high-quality employees to treat veteran patients. A 
2016 Government Accountability Office report on VA's human 
capital management found that VHA suffers from limited human 
resources capacity and weak internal control practices, both of 
which have undermined VA's ability to improve the delivery of 
care to veteran patients. As part of this effort, the Committee 
will assess how VA identifies staffing needs at the local 
level, prioritizes recruitment and retention in high-need 
areas, and addresses existing staffing shortages as well as if 
and how the significant increase in the total number of VA 
employees over the last several years has led to improvements 
in care and benefits for the veterans VA serves.
     Pain and Medication Management and Complementary 
and Integrative Health--The Committee will examine the 
increasing use of prescription medications to treat veterans 
experiencing acute and chronic pain. The effective management 
of pain is a critical issue for the veteran population as data 
suggests that veterans are a particularly high-risk population 
for prescription misuse, substance use disorder, accidental 
overdose, accidents, and/or self-inflicted injury and recent 
studies have shown that those veterans with the highest-risk 
conditions are also the most likely to receive the highest-
dose, highest-risk opioid therapies. Public Law 114-198, the 
Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016, makes a 
number of changes to VA pain management programs and protocols. 
Accordingly, the Committee will examine VA's implementation of 
P.L. 114-198 and evaluate further actions needed to improve 
pain and medication management for veteran patients. The 
Committee will also assess the use and efficacy of 
complementary and integrative health treatments and techniques 
for veterans with pain or other conditions.
     Caregiver Correction, Eligibility, and Expansion--
The Committee will continue to address issues with the Family 
Caregiver Program to ensure an efficient delivery of benefits 
and services to eligible veterans and their caregivers. VA's 
authority to provide assistance and support to caregivers 
expires on September 30, 2017. The Committee continues to 
receive anecdotal reports from veterans, caregivers, VA 
employees, and veterans service organizations indicating that 
the Family Caregiver Program is overburdened and not 
effectively serving those it aims to. As part of this effort, 
the Committee will also examine eligibility for the Family 
Caregiver Program and whether and how to expand eligibility to 
pre-9/11 veterans and caregivers. The Committee has been 
encouraged by early reports of success with the Veteran-
Directed Home and Community Based Services and will continue to 
examine the availability of geriatric home health programs that 
rely on and support critical aspects of family caregiver 
support.
     Telehealth--The Committee will assess the 
effectiveness of VA's telehealth programs. Telehealth is an 
increasingly important tool to increasing access to care for 
veteran patients. In fiscal year 2015 alone, VA completed two 
million telehealth appointments, many of those to rural 
veterans. The Committee will assess the effectiveness of VA's 
telehealth program as well as VA's response to challenges such 
as a lack of reimbursement structure for telehealth 
appointments and ambiguity surrounding VA providers' ability to 
practice telehealth across state lines and evaluate the need 
for further actions in those areas.
     Long Term Care--The Committee will conduct 
oversight over the myriad of VA long-term care programs. VA's 
authority to provide nursing home care to certain veterans with 
service-connected disabilities expires on December 31, 2017. 
The aging veteran population increasingly requires a plethora 
of long-term and geriatric care resources and interventions. VA 
currently provides long-term care through a variety of programs 
in both institutional and non-institutional settings and the 
Committee will assess those programs.
     Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Long Term 
Rehabilitation--The Committee will continue to examine the 
treatment provided to veterans with TBI and actions needed to 
ensure the availability of long-term, age-appropriate 
rehabilitation for veterans with TBI or other conditions. 
Identifying and implementing innovative treatments to aid 
wounded veterans in their recovery and allow them to regain 
functionality and quality of life has been a long-standing 
Committee priority and will continue to be. As part of this 
effort, the Committee will conduct continued oversight 
regarding the ongoing community-based brain injury residential 
rehabilitative care pilot program.
     Rural Veterans--The Committee will assess VA's 
efforts to provide timely and accessible care to veterans in 
rural and hard-to-reach areas through tools like telehealth, 
community partnerships, and other means. Of the over eight 
million veterans enrolled in VA healthcare system, more than 
three million of those veterans live in rural areas and, as 
such, face unique challenges to accessing VA care.
     Homeless Veterans--The Committee will thoroughly 
examine the actions VA has taken to reduce veteran homelessness 
by providing homeless and at-risk veterans with appropriate 
housing, healthcare, and supportive services. Since the 
implementation of the Five-Year Plan to End Veteran 
Homelessness in 2010, veteran homelessness has decreased by 47 
percent and VA funding for homeless veteran programs has grown 
to over $1.5 billion. In addition, VA's authority to provide 
referral and counseling services for veterans at risk of 
homelessness transitioning from certain institutions, to 
provide housing assistance to homeless veterans, to provide 
financial assistance for supportive services for very low 
income veteran families in permanent housing, to operate a 
grant program for homeless veterans with special needs, to 
provide treatment and rehabilitation for seriously mentally ill 
and homeless veterans, and to operate an Advisory Committee on 
Homeless Veterans expires in 2017. The Committee will conduct 
oversight of these authorities and will work to ensure that the 
progress that VA has made in lessening the number of veterans 
who are homeless continues to be successful and sustainable and 
that VA efforts address the myriad factors that underlie 
veteran homelessness, rather than just increased housing 
opportunities. The Committee will also continue to oversee VA's 
efforts to support vulnerable veterans by facilitating access 
to benefits, care, and services for eligible veterans through 
the Veterans Justice Outreach program.
     Toxic Exposure--The Committee will examine VA's 
efforts to improve research and treatment for veterans who may 
be experiencing negative health effects due to toxic exposure 
during military service. Public Law 114-315, the Jeff Miller 
and Richard Blumenthal Veterans Health Care and Benefits 
Improvement Act of 2016, requires VA to improve research 
regarding the descendants of individuals with toxic exposure. 
Subsequently, the Committee will evaluate the implementation of 
that law as well as further action needed to improve care and 
services to veterans who may have been impacted by toxic 
exposure during military service.
     Third Party Revenue Collection--VA's authority to 
recover the cost of care and services provided for non-service 
connected conditions to veterans with health plan contracts 
from third parties expires on October 1, 2017. The Committee 
will assess the effectiveness of VA's revenue collection 
programs and the potential need for an extension of authority.
     Child Care Pilot Program--VA's authority to carry 
out a pilot program on child care for certain veterans 
receiving VA care expires on December 31, 2017. The Committee 
will assess the effectiveness of this pilot program in 
increasing access to care for veterans with small children and 
the potential need for an extension of authority.
     Transportation Grants--VA's authority to make 
grants to veteran service organizations for transportation for 
highly rural veterans expires on September 30, 2017, and VA's 
authority to transport individuals to and from VA facilities 
expires on December 31, 2017. The Committee will assess the 
effectiveness of these authorities in increasing access to care 
for veteran patients and the potential need for an extension of 
authority.
     Pilot Program on Counseling in Retreat Settings--
VA's authority to carry out a pilot program on counseling in 
retreat setting for women veterans newly separated from service 
expires on December 31, 2017. The Committee will assess the 
effectiveness of this pilot program in addressing transition 
issues among women veterans and the potential need for an 
extension of authority.
     VA Research--The Committee will aggressively 
oversee the totality of VA's medical and prosthetic research 
program to identify and eliminate redundancies and ensure the 
dissemination of best practices and a veteran-centric research 
focus. VA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) conducts 
an extensive research program that is tasked with conducting 
research to advance the health care provided by VA and to the 
nation. Outside of ORD, VA also operates a number of Centers of 
Excellence across the country that conduct research on specific 
issues concerning veteran patients.

              Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations

     Whistleblowers--Whistleblowers continue to be a 
vital source of accurate and timely information. Protecting an 
employee's legal right to communicate with Congress, and report 
to the Inspector General alleged violations of laws, rules or 
regulations, waste, abuse, mismanagement, and safety issues is 
essential for investigations and effective oversight of the 
executive branch. This Committee looks to protect 
whistleblowers from reprisal by developing legislation in 
addition to existing federal whistleblower protections.
     Financial Management Systems--VA's financial and 
accounting systems are antiquated, disconnected, reliant on 
manual processes, and do not meet basic standards. This creates 
a risk of malfeasance, and contributes to inaccurate budgeting, 
and emergency appropriations requests. In 2016, VA selected the 
Department of Agriculture as a Federal Shared Service Provider 
to implement a replacement IT system to better address VA's 
financial management needs. Although a replacement IT solution 
is necessary, concerns exist regarding the concurrent 
replacement of VA's contract writing system with implementation 
of the new VA financial management system, and whether adequate 
planning has occurred to implement both systems and train the 
VA workforce. In the 115th Congress, the Committee will monitor 
VA's implementation of the financial management IT system and 
continue to review the level of fiscal responsibility 
demonstrated by VA.
     VistA Replacement--The Commission on Care 
recommended replacing the Veterans Health Information Security 
and Technology Architecture (VistA), VA's health information 
system, with commercial software because it is several 
generations behind the state-of-the-art or industry standard. 
VA estimates replacement would cost significantly more than 
carrying out another internal modernization effort that seeks 
to create a uniform national version of VistA. This VA-
developed modernization would add new functionality, but not 
substantially transform its capabilities. Due to VA's history 
of failed internal IT modernizations, the Committee will 
continue to monitor this effort and seek to prevent additional 
wastes of taxpayer dollars, and examine whether commercial 
replacement options would result in cost savings, improved 
capabilities and functionality, interoperability with 
Department of Defense electronic health records and community 
providers, and efficient scheduling for patients. A key 
decision point comes in 2018 when the current VistA 
modernization effort is scheduled to be completed, and the 
Department of Defense reports progress in its effort to replace 
its own health information system with commercial software.
     Fully Interoperable Electronic Personal Health 
Information between VA & DoD--Congress has mandated VA-DoD 
development of interoperable health records or systems. The 
Committee will continue to evaluate new initiatives, timelines, 
costs, and progress in this effort, following numerous failed 
attempts for the agencies to achieve full interoperability. 
VA's authority to provide an annual report on the DoD-VA 
Interagency Program Office expires on December 31, 2017. The 
Committee will assess this report and the potential need for an 
extension of authority.
     Veterans Benefits Management System (VBMS)--VA 
continues to characterize VBMS as the panacea to solving the 
claims backlog. This IT and business process redesign project 
has expended over $1 billion to date and achieved mixed 
results, with no clear indication that the system has increased 
claims processing efficiency or contributed to a reduction in 
the claims backlog. The Committee will continue to monitor 
implementation, as VA carries out incremental fixes to problems 
created by its lack of a sound implementation plan and 
indefinite project scope.
     VA Information Technology Programs and 
Organization--The Committee will continue its oversight of VA's 
IT programs to review progress being made with implementation 
of its integrated enterprise architecture plan, a large scale 
structural reorganization, a new ``Buy First'' strategy, data 
center consolidation, and efforts to improve its internal and 
external cyber security.
     VA's Acquisition Process--VA continues to spend 
more than $20 billion annually for the procurement of 
pharmaceuticals, medical and surgical supplies, prosthetic 
devices, information technology, construction, and services. VA 
still faces major challenges implementing a more efficient, 
effective, and coordinated acquisition function. The Committee 
will continue to scrutinize VA's procurement practices and 
pursue possible legislative remedies. The Committee will give 
particular scrutiny to recent reorganization efforts that risk 
entrenching existing problems.
     Next Generation-Medical Surgical Prime Vendor 
Program--NG-MSPV is the largest procurement program in VA. It 
is an effort to reduce and standardize the catalog of medical 
and surgical products used by VHA clinicians and achieve major 
cost savings by buying in bulk. This program, which is coming 
online, has been hampered by a lack of clinician involvement 
and inability to award the necessary contracts in a timely 
fashion. The Committee will continue examining this effort as 
it moves from design to implementation.
     Construction--During the last Congress, the 
Committee led the effort to strip VA of construction management 
authority, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers now performs 
this function. The Committee will closely monitor remaining 
construction projects designed or commenced before the Army 
Corps' involvement through completion. The Committee will also 
monitor the relationship between the VA and the Army Corps to 
ensure cooperation and coordination between the agencies, and 
improve VA's activation of newly built hospitals.
     Leasing--Leasing land and buildings for new VHA 
facilities is fraught with delays and bureaucratic roadblocks. 
Leasing is carried out through a complicated interplay of the 
VA Central Office, local offices, and real estate broker 
contractors. Jurisdictional battles within VA and poor 
management of broker contracts have contributed to 
inefficiencies and delays in the system. The Committee will 
work to uncover the root causes of these problems.
     Payment of Community Providers--VA continues to 
struggle with its failure to promptly pay community providers. 
This is caused in part by a failure to implement updates to its 
software and a reliance on dozens of decentralized claims 
processing centers. VA has similar challenges reimbursing 
Choice Program Third Party Administrators for claims payments 
because VA relies on inefficient manual adjudication processes. 
The Committee will continue to evaluate the root causes of VA's 
payment deficiencies and consider remedial actions to improve 
efficiency.
     Credentialing and Screening of VA Healthcare 
Employees--The Committee will continue to scrutinize VA's 
implementation of Government Accountability Office (GAO) 
recommendations that indicated serious flaws in screening the 
professional credentials of VA health care practitioners. 
Additionally, the Committee will examine VHA's peer review 
process and provider competency reviews.
     Affiliations Agreements--The Committee will 
investigate the relationship of VA medical facilities and 
personnel with affiliated medical institutions, especially 
academic centers and those involved in research. The Committee 
will also evaluate the extent to which agreements between these 
entities promote an efficient allocation of VA resources for 
the welfare and health care of veterans. Further, the Committee 
will analyze VA's contracted care with academic affiliates in 
order to monitor the negotiation of costs for services and 
payment amounts to affiliates for medical and dental services.
     Technology Transfer Program (TTP)--Questions arose 
during the 114th Congress regarding the invention of the 
Hepatitis-C cure, Sofosbuvir, and whether it was invented in 
part through the use of (or related to the use of) VA 
resources. The Committee will continue to monitor VA's 
assertions of ownership regarding inventions developed by VA 
employees or with VA resources, and investigate VA's procedures 
and policies both centrally and locally for disclosing 
inventions and determining ownership rights.
     Medications and Suicide--The Committee will 
scrutinize VA's medication prescription program to determine 
what medications are being over-prescribed, what efforts VA is 
undertaking to reduce the prescription of opioids and other 
medications, and whether the over-prescription of some 
medications is related to the veteran suicide epidemic. 
Further, the Committee will continue to monitor VHA 
participation in states' prescription drug monitoring programs 
and VA's ongoing policy changes regarding suicide prevention.
     VHA Controlled Substance Program--Improved 
oversight to prevent drug diversion within VHA facilities is 
needed. The Committee will examine VHA's controlled substance 
program, including the review of VHA's policies for tracking 
and managing controlled substances within inpatient units.
     Alternative Treatment--The Committee will continue 
to review VHA options for alternative treatment for substance 
abuse, pain management, and mental health disorders. This work 
will also include funding for VHA research into these areas.
     Recovery Support Programs--The Committee will 
examine recovery support programs within VHA. Some of these 
programs are provided via contract by community providers. The 
Committee will monitor VHA's oversight of these contracted 
residential homes for drug and alcohol dependency and abuse.
     Vet Center Program--The Committee will examine 
staffing, documentation standards, utilization, and outcome 
measures for Vet Centers.
     VA Inspector General & Budget and Performance--The 
Committee will review the budget of the VA Inspector General 
(IG) and review how VA uses the recommendations of the IG to 
increase efficiency and effectiveness in providing services to 
veterans. The Committee will further scrutinize the annual 
audit of VA's financial statements, occurring under IG 
supervision, which has revealed a degenerating financial state 
in recent years.
     Unauthorized or Expiring Authorities--The 
Committee will conduct oversight regarding unauthorized 
appropriations and expiring authorizations under the 
Committee's jurisdiction to identify those in need of 
authorization.

                      COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS

                     II. OVERSIGHT ACTIVITY REVIEW

                          A. Oversight Agenda

                         LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

                              ----------                              

                       Committee on Ways and Means,
                             U.S. House of Representatives,
                                  Washington, DC, January 21, 2015.
Hon. Jason Chaffetz,
Chairman, Committee on Oversight & Government Reform,
Washington, DC.
Hon. Candice S. Miller,
Chairman, Committee on House Administration,
Washington, DC.
    Dear Chairman Chaffetz and Chairman Miller: In accordance 
with the requirements of clause 2 of rule X of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is a list of oversight 
hearings and oversight-related activities that the Committee on 
Ways and Means and its Subcommittees plan to conduct during the 
114th Congress.
Matters under the Committee's Federal Budget Jurisdiction
     Economic and Budget Outlook. Oversight hearings 
with various Administration officials to discuss current 
economic and budget conditions, including the long-term 
outlook, the state of the economy, prospects for short- and 
long-term growth, our economic competitiveness, private sector 
job creation, and limits on the public debt.
Matters under the Committee's Tax Jurisdiction
     Tax Reform. Hearings and other activities related 
to tax reform.
     Priorities of the Department of the Treasury. 
Hearings with the Treasury Secretary and other Administration 
officials to receive information regarding the Administration's 
tax-related priorities for the 114th Congress. Specifically, 
discuss and consider legislative and administrative proposals 
contained in the President's fiscal year 2016 and 2017 budgets.
     Appropriate Tax Relief for Individuals, Families, 
and Employers. Hearings and other activities regarding 
appropriate tax relief measures for individual taxpayers, 
families, and employers of all sizes.
     Highway Trust Fund (HTF). Oversight of the HTF and 
its financial condition, as well as the revenue streams that 
finance expenditures out of the HTF.
     Tax Provisions Contained in the ``Affordable Care 
Act'' (ACA). Hearings and other activities regarding various 
tax provisions contained in the Patient Protection and 
Affordable Care Act (P.L. 111-148) and the Health Care and 
Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (P.L. 111-152), known 
collectively as the ACA. Continued oversight and other 
activities related to ACA tax provisions, including especially 
those scheduled for implementation in 2014, such as the 
individual mandate, the employer mandate, the Exchange 
subsidies, the medical device tax, and the 3.8 percent surtax 
on capital gains, dividends, and other investment income.
     Internal Revenue Service Operations/Administration 
of Tax Laws. Oversight of the major Internal Revenue Service 
programs, including enforcement, collection, taxpayer services, 
returns processing, and information systems. Continue 
enforcement of major operating areas of the agency to ensure 
the nation's tax laws are being administered in a fair and 
impartial manner. Consider analyses and reports provided to the 
Congress by the IRS National Taxpayer Advocate, Treasury 
Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA), and the GAO. 
Oversight of IRS funding and staffing levels needed to provide 
taxpayer assistance and enforce the tax law effectively and 
efficiently. Evaluate tax return filing seasons, including 
electronic filing, and improper payments levels and fraud 
prevention efforts. Discuss proposed funding and staffing 
levels for the IRS, and legislative proposals and 
administrative proposals contained in the President's fiscal 
year 2016 and 2017 budgets. Continue investigation related to 
the TIGTA audit report ``Inappropriate Criteria Were Used to 
Identify Tax-Exempt Applications for Review.''
     IRS Audit Selection Procedures. Oversight of the 
processes the IRS uses to select individuals and groups for 
audit. Continue coordination with GAO regarding ongoing audit 
work assessing IRS audit selection procedures and safeguards 
across all IRS business units.
     Tax-Exempt Organizations. Oversight of Federal tax 
laws, regulations, and filing requirements that affect tax-
exempt organizations, particularly charities and foundations. 
Evaluate overall IRS efforts to monitor tax-exempt 
organizations, identify areas of non-compliance, prevent abuse, 
and ensure timely disclosure to the public about tax-exempt 
organization activities and finances. Review IRS tax-exempt 
application process and agency oversight of new exempt 
organizations.
     Tax Code and Tax Form Simplification. Oversight of 
tax code and tax form complexity, particularly for individuals, 
with the goal of simplification. Review areas where taxpayers 
and professional return preparers have difficulty, including 
areas where they make the most errors, and consider solutions. 
Evaluate simplification of information returns to assist 
taxpayers in determining taxable income. Examine proposals to 
close the ``tax gap'' by simplifying compliance with our tax 
laws.
     Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). Oversight of the 
refundable federal income tax credit designed to assist low to 
moderate income working individuals and families. Evaluate the 
participation and improper payment rates within the program, 
and IRS efforts to eliminate EITC abuse.
     Tax Scams and Improper Payments. Oversight of the 
latest tax scams and tax fraud activities with a goal of 
protecting taxpayers and preventing identity theft. Examine IRS 
initiatives and efforts to curb tax fraud and the abuse of tax 
credits, specifically improper payments in the administration 
of tax credits. Review IRS processes designed to identify and 
remedy identity theft.
     Federal Excise Taxes. Oversight review of Federal 
excise taxes, credits, and refunds, including the trust funds 
financed by these taxes.
     Pensions and Retirement Security. Oversight review 
of the financial condition, operations, and governance of the 
Pension Benefit Corporation (``PBGC''), including financial 
exposure of the PBGC.
Matters under the Committee's Health Jurisdiction
     Priorities of the Department of Health and Human 
Services. Oversight hearing with the Health and Human Services 
Secretary to discuss priorities for the 114th Congress and 
concerns related to the delivery of health services and 
reimbursement under Medicare. Specifically, discuss and 
consider legislative and administrative proposals contained in 
the President's fiscal year 2016 and 2017 budgets.
     Health Provisions Contained in the ``Affordable 
Care Act'' (ACA). Hearings and other activities regarding 
various health provisions contained in the Patient Protection 
and Affordable Care Act (P.L. 111-148) and the Health Care and 
Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (P.L. 111-152), known 
collectively as the ACA. Continued oversight and other 
activities related to ACA health provisions, including its 
changes to the annual updates to Medicare Fee-For-Service's 
payment rates, changes to Medicare Advantage's payment rates, 
benefit changes to fee-for-service and Medicare Advantage, and 
creation of the Independent Payment Advisory Board.
     Medicare Part A and Part B (Fee-for-Service 
Providers). Oversight of the major Medicare programs to ensure 
efficient use of resources, quality of care, and access to 
providers for Medicare beneficiaries. Specific topics include: 
adequacy and appropriateness of provider reimbursements, 
including incentive payments and reforming physician payment 
systems; program benefits; cost sharing; workforce supply; the 
doctor-patient relationship; treatment of specific populations 
such as people with disabilities and low-income beneficiaries; 
quality improvement efforts; and waste, fraud, and abuse 
activities.
     Medicare Advantage. Oversight of Medicare health 
plans, including: enrollment; reimbursements; benefit packages; 
quality; beneficiary choice; and recent statutory and 
regulatory changes affecting Medicare health plans and their 
enrollees.
     Medicare Part D (Prescription Drug Plans). 
Oversight of the Medicare prescription drug program, including: 
drug pricing; benefits; beneficiary premiums and cost-sharing; 
beneficiary choice; impacts of recently enacted legislation and 
regulations and their impact on the Part D program; and access 
to retiree prescription drug coverage.
     Medicare Entitlement. Oversight of program changes 
on the Medicare Trust Funds; premium and copay levels; provider 
payments; and benefit design, and improving the program's long-
term sustainability
     CMS Administration. Oversight of CMS, including 
issuance of regulations and their impact on Medicare 
beneficiaries and providers; the adequacy and use of CMS' 
budget and staff; contracting activities; communications with 
beneficiaries; adherence to the Administrative Procedures Act; 
and general agency accountability.
     Private Health Insurance Coverage. Oversight and 
review of private health coverage, including: cost, access, 
subsidies to purchase insurance, benefit design, coverage 
options, pooling mechanisms, and employer-sponsored benefits; 
COBRA; HCTC; health savings accounts and flexible spending 
arrangements; options to reduce the cost of health coverage, 
expand coverage, and address the rate of increase in health 
care costs; the impact of the ACA and related regulations on 
those with private insurance, the uninsured, employers, the 
economy, and state budgets; and adherence to the Administrative 
Procedures Act.
Matters under the Committee's Human Resources Jurisdiction
     Welfare Reform. Review proposals designed to 
better assist low-income families in increasing their work and 
earnings so they can escape poverty, including by developing 
innovative efforts to improve cooperation between and the 
performance of TANF, child care, social services and multiple 
other benefit programs. As part of this process, ensure that 
programs are rigorously evaluated and held accountable for 
achieving measurable performance goals, including substantive 
work and activity requirements for adult recipients, such as 
the TANF program has applied since 1996 reforms. Also review 
opportunities to prevent duplication, overlap, and 
fragmentation, in order to improve the overall effectiveness of 
efforts to serve low-income individuals. Examine associated 
barriers to increasing self-sufficiency among low-income 
families with children, and how changes may better address the 
needs of adult beneficiaries who face barriers to employment.
     Unemployment Compensation. Provide oversight of 
the nation's unemployment compensation benefits and employment 
security systems, especially those designed to accelerate 
returns to work, prevent inappropriate benefit payments, and 
improve overpayment recovery.
     Child Welfare. Provide oversight of the nation's 
child welfare programs, including foster care, adoption 
assistance, and child and family service programs under Titles 
IV-B and IV-E of the Social Security Act. Review State efforts 
to promote adoption, strengthen family connections, and 
successfully address the health and educational needs of foster 
children, including through the implementation of the 
Preventing Sex Trafficking and Strengthening Families Act of 
2014.
     Low-Income Disabled and Aged Individuals. Provide 
oversight of the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program to 
examine trends in the program, agency program integrity 
efforts, the implementation of the ABLE Act of 2014, and 
options to improve recipient outcomes and reduce administrative 
complexities in order to target program resources to those most 
in need. Review SSI interactions with the Social Security 
Disability Insurance program, as reforms required to restore 
the solvency of that program are considered.
Matters under the Committee's Social Security Jurisdiction
     Securing the Future of Social Security. Examine 
the role of Social Security benefits in ensuring retirement 
security for today's and future retirees, financing challenges 
facing Social Security, the cost to taxpayers and beneficiaries 
of delay in addressing those challenges, and options to 
strengthen Social Security, including how the program is 
meeting the needs of today's and tomorrow's beneficiaries.
     Strengthening the Disability Insurance (DI) 
program. Examine the effectiveness of DI benefits in meeting 
the needs of individuals with disabilities today and the 
process for both determining eligibility for benefits and 
appealing denied applications, along with options to strengthen 
the program and examine how best to improve work incentives in 
the DI program. Additionally, examine the interactions between 
the DI program and the Supplemental Security Income and 
Medicare programs.
     Stewardship of Social Security programs. Provide 
oversight of the management performance, and long-range 
strategic planning related to Social Security programs.
     Deployment of Resources. Oversight of the SSA's 
deployment of tight resources to serve the public and 
taxpayers, including evolving service delivery approaches, 
policy administration and program implementation impacts, and 
the SSA's role in supporting other Federal programs through 
interagency and data sharing agreements.
Matters under the Committee's Trade Jurisdiction
     Trade Promotion Authority (TPA). Consideration of 
legislation to renew Trade Promotion Authority, strengthening 
the role of Congress in trade negotiations by specifying 
Congressional negotiating objectives and directions for the 
Administration, establishing requirements for consultation with 
Congress, mandating transparency, and providing a clear 
framework for Congressional consideration and implementation of 
trade agreements.
     Role of Trade in U.S. Job Creation. Oversight of 
the role of trade in creating U.S. jobs and how to create new 
market access for U.S. manufactured goods, agriculture, and 
services.
     Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) Negotiations. 
Continued consultation with the Administration and U.S. 
stakeholders concerning the negotiations and specifying Member 
views on U.S. negotiating positions, with the goal of 
concluding a comprehensive and high-ambition agreement.
     Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership 
(TTIP) Negotiations. Continued consultation with the 
Administration and U.S. stakeholders concerning the 
negotiations and specifying Member views on U.S. negotiating 
positions, with the goal of concluding a comprehensive and 
high-ambition agreement.
     Other Bilateral, Regional, and Plurilateral 
Negotiations. Continued consultation with the Administration 
and U.S. stakeholders concerning the Trade in Services 
Agreement (TiSA) negotiations, bilateral investment treaty 
negotiations, and other potential negotiations.
     World Trade Organization (WTO). Oversight of 
implementation of the Trade Facilitation Agreement (TFA), 
expansion of the Information Technology Agreement (ITA), and 
negotiations for the Environmental Goods Agreement (EGA). 
Oversight of U.S. goals in the WTO, dispute settlement, and WTO 
accessions.
     Preference Programs. Oversight and renewal of 
major U.S. trade preference programs, including the Generalized 
System of Preferences (expired July 2013) and the African 
Growth and Opportunity Act (expiring September 30, 2015).
     Miscellaneous Tariff Bill (MTB). Consideration of 
legislation concerning noncontroversial bills to eliminate or 
reduce duties on products not made in the United States, in 
accordance with bipartisan transparency guidelines and House 
Rules.
     Enforcement. Oversight of enforcement of U.S. 
rights and rights under trade agreements, including the WTO 
Agreements and bilateral and regional free trade agreements, to 
hold U.S. trading partners accountable. Particular oversight of 
continuing barriers imposed by China and India. Oversight of 
administration of U.S. trade remedy laws, including border 
enforcement. Oversight of whether the United States is in 
compliance with its obligations, particularly where the United 
States is facing retaliation.
     Trade Sanctions. Oversight concerning import 
sanctions with, among others, Iran, Russia, Cuba, North Korea, 
Syria, and Burma.
     Implemented Trade Agreements. Oversight of 
implemented agreements with Colombia; Panama; Korea; Peru; 
Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, and 
Honduras (CAFTA-DR); Oman; Bahrain; Singapore; Chile; 
Australia; Morocco; Jordan; Canada and Mexico (NAFTA); and 
Israel.
     Trade Adjustment Assistance. Oversight concerning 
the Trade Adjustment Assistance programs for workers, firms, 
communities, and farmers.
     Priorities of the Office of the United States 
Trade Representative (USTR). Oversight over USTR to evaluate 
priorities for the 114th Congress and the trade agenda.
     Priorities of the United States International 
Trade Commission. Oversight over the Commission concerning 
overall priorities and operations.
    This list is not intended to be exclusive. The Committee 
anticipates that additional oversight hearings and activities 
will be scheduled as issues arise and as time permits. Also, 
the Committee's oversight priorities and particular concerns 
may change as the 114th Congress progresses over the coming two 
years.
            Sincerely,
                                               Kevin Brady,
                                                          Chairman.

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