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115th Congress   }                                    {        Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session      }                                    {       115-704

======================================================================



 
 COMMERCE, JUSTICE, SCIENCE, AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 
                                  2019

                                _______
                                

  May 24, 2018.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

         Mr. Culberson, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                             MINORITY VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 5952]

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report in explanation of the accompanying bill making 
appropriations for Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related 
Agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2019, and for 
other purposes.

                        INDEX TO BILL AND REPORT

                                                            Page number

                                                            Bill Report
Title I--Department of Commerce............................     2     6
Title II--Department of Justice............................    23    30
Title III--Science.........................................    61    58
        Office of Science and Technology Policy............    61    58
        National Space Council.............................    62    59
        National Aeronautics and Space Administration......    62    59
        National Science Foundation........................    71    76
Title IV--Related Agencies.................................    75    81
        Commission on Civil Rights.........................    75    81
        Equal Employment Opportunity Commission............    76    81
        International Trade Commission.....................    77    81
        Legal Services Corporation.........................    77    82
        Marine Mammal Commission...........................    78    82
        Office of the United States Trade Representative...    79    82
        State Justice Institute............................    80    83
Title V--General Provisions................................    80    83
House of Representatives Reporting Requirements............  ....    87
Minority Views.............................................         136

                         Highlights of the Bill

    The Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies 
Subcommittee has jurisdiction over a diverse group of agencies 
responsible for combating gangs, violent crime, drug 
trafficking, financial fraud, terrorism, espionage, and 
cybercrime; enforcing trade laws; conducting periodic censuses; 
forecasting the weather; managing fisheries; exploring space; 
and advancing science. The activities of these agencies impact 
nearly every American and are integral to the operations of our 
government.
    The bill provides a total of $62,520,000,000 in 
discretionary budget authority for fiscal year 2019. Within the 
level of funds provided, the bill prioritizes funding for 
Federal law enforcement, national security, space exploration, 
science and the Constitutionally required 2020 Decennial 
Census.
    The bill provides substantial resources to address the 
opioid epidemic. To assist State and local governments, the 
bill provides $380,000,000, which is an increase of $50,000,000 
over fiscal year 2018 and $277,000,000 above fiscal year 2017, 
for grants authorized by the Comprehensive Addiction and 
Recovery Act. For Federal law enforcement, the bill provides 
funding increases for U.S. Attorneys, the U.S. Marshals 
Service, Federal Prisoner Detention, the Drug Enforcement 
Administration, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and 
Interagency Crime and Drug Enforcement to enhance Federal law 
enforcement's ability to investigate and prosecute traffickers 
in opioids and other dangerous drugs.
    For school safety, the bill provides $100,000,000, a 
$25,000,000 increase over the current year, to fully fund the 
STOP School Violence Act of 2018. In addition, the bill 
increases funding for other activities that will address school 
violence such as active shooter training for police, youth 
mentoring, and violent crime and gang reduction programs. The 
bill also fully funds the FBI's National Instant Criminal 
Background Check System and increases funding for U.S. 
Attorneys and the U.S. Marshals to address violent crime.
    For human trafficking, the bill provides $100,000,000, an 
increase of $23,000,000 above the current year, for grants to 
State and local communities to provide services to victims and 
enhance enforcement initiatives. In addition, the bill provides 
a $5,000,000 increase for U.S. Attorneys and a $25,000,000 
increase for the FBI for Federal law enforcement to increase 
investigations and prosecutions of human traffickers.
    The bill provides an increase of $125,500,000 for the 
Executive Office of Immigration Review to annualize the 100 
additional immigration judge teams funded in fiscal year 2018 
and provide for an additional 100 new immigration judge teams 
in fiscal year 2019. This addition of 200 new immigration judge 
teams over a two year period should have a dramatic impact on 
reducing the immigration case backlog.
    For NASA, the bill includes $21,545,740,000, which is an 
increase of $809,600,000 above fiscal year 2018. The Committee 
believes that additional investment is needed to maintain 
American leadership in space exploration and science, and for 
NASA to successfully execute all of its activities and 
missions. A bold space exploration program that engages the 
nation will inspire new generations of scientists and engineers 
and contribute to the economic success and space leadership of 
the country. The bill advances space exploration and ensures 
our nation remains the world's leader in space exploration and 
technology, aeronautics research, and discovery in space and 
science. The bill provides for the continued development of the 
Orion crew vehicle, the Space Launch System, and Exploration 
Ground Systems that will one day send astronauts beyond low 
Earth orbit. The bill continues funding for critical scientific 
missions and fully funds the requested new lunar programs.
    For the National Science Foundation, the bill provides 
$8,174,890,000, increasing funding for both research grants and 
critical scientific infrastructure.
    Funding for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration prioritizes weather forecasting, ocean 
exploration, weather research, and fisheries management.
    For the Census Bureau to conduct the Constitutionally 
required 2020 Decennial Census, the bill fully funds fiscal 
year 2019 requirements and provides for the first quarter of 
required costs in fiscal year 2020.

                      Oversight and Budget Review

    In furtherance of the Committee's oversight 
responsibilities and to protect hard-earned taxpayer dollars, 
the Committee has included language that:
           Withholds funds for information technology 
        related to the 2020 census until a comprehensive 
        investment plan is provided to the Committee and the 
        Government Accountability Office.
           Caps total life-cycle costs for programs 
        that have a record of poor performance, including 
        weather satellites and the James Webb Space Telescope.
           Prohibits funding for the National Technical 
        Information Service to charge customers for a copy of a 
        document generated by the Legislative Branch unless the 
        customer is informed how to receive an electronic copy 
        free online.
           Requires monthly reporting on Immigration 
        Judge performance.
           Maintains limitations on the Department of 
        Justice's use of non-appropriated funds, including the 
        Working Capital Fund and the Assets Forfeiture Fund.
           Requires quarterly reporting of unobligated 
        balances.
           Requires agencies procuring sensitive 
        information technology systems to conduct supply chain 
        risk assessments.
           Requires contractors and grantees receiving 
        more than $5,000,000 to certify that they are not 
        delinquent on their Federal taxes.
           Prohibits funds from being used to purchase 
        first class and premium airline travel.
           Limits the number of agency staff who can 
        attend overseas conferences.
           Requires agencies to track undisbursed grant 
        balances.
           Requires agencies to submit spending plans 
        for the Committee's review.
           Requires agencies to notify the Committee of 
        project cost overruns and mitigation plans.
           Limits certain NASA funds until long-term 
        plans are formulated and adopted.
           Requires agency computer networks to block 
        pornography.
    Paper Reduction Efforts.--The Committee urges the 
Departments of Commerce and Justice, the National Science 
Foundation, and NASA to work with the Office of Management and 
Budget to reduce printing and reproduction costs and directs 
each agency to report to the Committee within 60 days of 
enactment of this Act on the steps it has taken to achieve this 
goal. The report should specifically identify how much funding 
each agency expects to save by implementing these measures.
    Performance Measures.--The Committee directs each of the 
agencies funded by this Act to comply with title 31 of the 
United States Code, including the development of their 
organizational priority goals and outcomes such as performance 
outcome measures, output measures, efficiency measures, and 
customer service measures. Each of the agencies funded in this 
Act shall report on their plans to comply with the requirements 
of title 31 of the United States Code within 90 days of 
enactment of the Act.
    Federal Employee Conduct.--Public service is a public trust 
that requires Federal employees to place ethical principles 
above private gain. The Code of Federal Regulations (5 CFR 
2635.101) specifies the basic obligation of public service. 
Each of the agencies funded in the Act shall ensure their 
employees understand and are in compliance with this 
obligation.
    Fix NICS Act of 2018.--The Fix NICS Act of 2018 requires 
the head of each Federal department or agency to certify to the 
Attorney General their compliance with their responsibility to 
report appropriate information to the National Instant Criminal 
Background Check System. The Act also requires the Attorney 
General to work with agencies in the development of plans that 
ensure the maximum coordination with the Department of Justice. 
The Act prohibits bonus pay for political appointees at Federal 
agencies that are not in compliance with record submission 
requirements. Each agency funded in this Act shall make 
compliance with the Fix NICS Act of 2018 a priority and report 
to the Committee on their compliance as part of the spending 
plan required by section 531 of this Act.

                        Reprogramming Procedures

    Section 505 of the bill contains language concerning the 
reprogramming of funds between programs, projects, and 
activities. The Committee reminds the departments and agencies 
funded in this bill that the reprogramming process is based on 
comity between the Congress and the Executive Branch. This 
process is intended to provide departments and agencies 
sufficient flexibility to meet changing circumstances and 
emergent requirements not known at the time of congressional 
review of the budget while preserving congressional priorities 
and intent. In the absence of comity and respect for the 
prerogatives of the Appropriations Committees and the Congress 
in general, the Committee may opt to include specific program 
limitations and details in legislation and remove language 
providing the flexibility to reallocate funds. Under these 
circumstances, programs, projects, and activities become 
absolutes and the Executive Branch shall lose the ability to 
propose changes in the use of appropriated funds except through 
legislative action.
    Each department and agency funded in this bill shall follow 
the directions set forth in this bill and the accompanying 
report, and shall not reallocate resources or reorganize 
activities except as provided herein. Reprogramming procedures 
shall apply to funds provided in this bill, unobligated 
balances from previous appropriations Acts that are available 
for obligation or expenditure in fiscal year 2019, and non-
appropriated resources such as fee collections that are used to 
meet program requirements in fiscal year 2019. As specified in 
section 505, the Committee expects that the Appropriations 
Subcommittees on Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related 
Agencies of the House and Senate will be notified by letter a 
minimum of 15 days prior to any reprogramming of funds that--
    (1) creates or initiates a new program, project, or 
activity;
    (2) eliminates a program, project, or activity;
    (3) increases funds or personnel by any means for any 
project or activity for which funds have been denied or 
restricted;
    (4) relocates an office or employees;
    (5) reorganizes or renames offices, programs, or 
activities;
    (6) contracts out or privatizes any functions or activities 
presently performed by Federal employees;
    (7) augments existing programs, projects, or activities in 
excess of $500,000 or 10 percent, whichever is less, or reduces 
by 10 percent funding for any program, project, or activity, or 
numbers of personnel by 10 percent; or
    (8) results from any general savings, including savings 
from a reduction in personnel, which would result in a change 
in existing programs, projects, or activities as approved by 
Congress.
    Any reprogramming request shall include any out-year 
budgetary impacts and a separate accounting of program or 
mission impacts on estimated carryover funds. The Committee 
further expects any department or agency funded in this bill 
that plans a reduction-in-force to notify the Committee by 
letter at least 30 days in advance of the date of any such 
planned personnel action.

            Relationship With Budget and Comptroller Offices

    Through the years the Appropriations Committee has 
channeled most of its inquiries and requests for information 
and assistance through the budget offices or comptroller 
organizations of the various departments, agencies, and 
commissions. Such relationships are necessary to accomplish the 
work of the Committee. While the Committee reserves the right 
to call upon all organizations in the departments, agencies and 
commissions for information and assistance, the primary contact 
between the Committee and these entities must be through the 
budget offices and comptroller organizations, or through a 
legislative affairs unit designated by the Committee to work on 
appropriations and budget matters.
    The workload generated in the budget process is large and 
growing; therefore, a positive, responsive relationship between 
the Committee and the budget and/or comptroller offices is 
essential for the Committee to fulfill the Constitutional 
appropriations responsibilities of Congress.

                                TITLE I


                         DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE


                   International Trade Administration


                     OPERATIONS AND ADMINISTRATION

    The Committee recommends $491,000,000 in total resources 
for the programs of the International Trade Administration 
(ITA), which is $4,000,000 below fiscal year 2018 and 
$39,853,000 above the request. This amount is offset by 
$11,000,000 in estimated fee collections, resulting in a direct 
appropriation of $480,000,000.
    Trade enforcement.--The recommendation funds Enforcement 
and Compliance at the requested level of $88,500,000. The ITA 
shall make enforcement of antidumping and countervailing duties 
a priority, including by thoroughly investigating the extent of 
the harm caused to domestic industries and reducing case 
backlogs.
    Global Markets.--The recommendation provides $319,000,000 
for Global Markets. The recommendation does not adopt the 
proposal to reduce U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service staff or 
close overseas offices or U.S. Export Assistance Centers.
    Industry and Analysis.--The recommendation provides 
$52,000,000 for Industry and Analysis.
    Executive Direction and Administration.--The recommendation 
provides $20,500,000 for Executive Direction and 
Administration.
    Business-to-Business Networks.--The Committee directs the 
ITA to conduct Business-to-Business Networks for industry 
clusters in Northern Mexico and Southern United States to 
promote regionally-driven economic development strategies that 
support advanced manufacturing and exports of American goods 
and services.
    Human rights.--The Committee is concerned with violence and 
threats shown towards human rights activists around the world, 
but particularly in nations with which we have trade agreements 
with enforceable protections. The Committee encourages the ITA 
to more actively engage with trade partner nations to end these 
human rights violations.

                    Bureau of Industry and Security


                     OPERATIONS AND ADMINISTRATION

    The Committee recommends $113,500,000 for the Bureau of 
Industry and Security, which is the same as fiscal year 2018. 
The recommendation provides $6,000,000 for Management and 
Policy Coordination; $56,000,000 for Export Administration; and 
$51,500,000 for Export Enforcement.

                  Economic Development Administration

    The Committee does not adopt the proposal to terminate the 
Economic Development Administration (EDA) and recommends 
$301,500,000 for the programs and administrative expenses of 
the EDA.

                ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS

    The Committee provides $262,500,000 for the Economic 
Development Assistance Programs for grants to economically 
distressed areas. The Committee expects EDA to work more 
closely with communities that are underserved. Funds are to be 
distributed as follows; any deviation of funds shall be subject 
to the procedures set forth in section 505 of this Act:

 
 
 
Public Works..........................................      $117,500,000
Partnership Planning..................................        33,000,000
Technical Assistance..................................         9,500,000
Research and Evaluation...............................         1,500,000
Trade Adjustment and Assistance.......................        13,000,000
Economic Adjustment Assistance........................        37,000,000
Assistance to Coal Communities........................        30,000,000
Regional Innovation Program...........................        21,000,000
                                                       -----------------
    Total.............................................      $262,500,000
 

    Assistance to coal mining communities.--The Committee 
appreciates that EDA is collaborating with local leaders and 
stakeholders, along with other Federal agencies, to develop 
comprehensive strategies to promote economic growth in coal 
mining communities. The Committee expects this effort to 
continue. Within the funds provided, the Committee directs EDA 
to continue assisting communities that have yet to develop an 
economic development strategy to begin the planning process. 
For communities that have economic development strategies, EDA 
shall continue providing assistance to implement the 
strategies, including by funding economic development projects. 
EDA shall continue to report to the Committee on its efforts to 
assist coal communities. The report shall include detailed 
information on how EDA and other Federal agencies have assisted 
coal mining communities to date and how the Federal government 
plans to assist them in the future.
    Regional Innovation Program.--The Committee encourages EDA 
to support the development of regional innovation clusters that 
focus on advanced wood products.
    Nuclear Power Plant Closures.--Recent closures of nuclear 
power plants throughout the United States have had a negative 
impact on the economic foundations of surrounding communities, 
and there is potential for additional plant closures in the 
coming years. The Committee urges EDA to increase its 
assistance to communities affected by nuclear power plant 
closures, including communities facing both significant job 
losses and significant loss to the local tax base.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The recommendation provides $39,000,000 for EDA salaries 
and expenses.

                  Minority Business Development Agency


                     MINORITY BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee provides $40,000,000 for the Minority 
Business Development Agency. At least 50 percent of funds 
provided shall be awarded through cooperative agreements, 
external awards, and grants.

                   Economic and Statistical Analysis


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $99,000,000 for the Economics and 
Statistics Administration, which is the same as fiscal year 
2018 and $1,987,000 below the request.
    Within available resources, the Committee urges the 
Department to continue the Outdoor Recreation Satellite 
Account.

                          Bureau of the Census

    The Committee recommends a total of $4,799,698,000 for the 
Bureau of the Census, which is $1,985,698,000 above fiscal year 
2018 and $999,185,000 above the request.
    Puerto Rico and U.S. territories.--The Committee strongly 
urges the Census Bureau to include all citizens of the United 
States, including those in Puerto Rico and other offshore 
jurisdictions, in its estimates of U.S. resident population and 
other national statistics.
    The Committee notes that it awaits a report on the 
feasibility of expanding all decennial Census surveys to Guam, 
American Samoa, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. 
Virgin Islands. The Committee directs Census to provide this 
report expeditiously.
    The Committee directs Census to report, not later than 180 
days after enactment of this Act, on the feasibility of 
including Puerto Rico in the following Census surveys: the 
Current Population Survey; the Economic Census; the American 
Housing Survey; the Construction Progress Reporting Survey; the 
Housing Vacancy Survey; the Manufactured Housing Survey; the 
Value of Construction Put in Place Survey; the Census of 
Governments (including associated annual and quarterly 
surveys); the Survey of Business Owners and Self-Employed 
Persons; the monthly Building Permits Survey; and the Quarterly 
Workforce Indicators.
    The Census Bureau shall coordinate with the Bureau of 
Justice Statistics (BJS) on this study, which shall also 
include the feasibility of inclusion of Puerto Rico in BJS data 
products. The Committee also notes concerns regarding the 
Census Bureau's data collection capacity in Puerto Rico and 
directs this study to include a discussion of plans to improve 
this. Further direction on this matter is included under the 
Department of Justice, Research, Evaluation and Statistics 
section of this report.

                      CURRENT SURVEYS AND PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends $270,000,000 for the Current 
Surveys and Programs, which is the same as fiscal year 2018 and 
$20,875,000 above the request.
    Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP).--Within 
the amounts provided, Census shall continue the level of effort 
for the SIPP at no less than the fiscal year 2018 level.

                     PERIODIC CENSUSES AND PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends a total of $4,529,698,000 for 
Periodic Censuses and Programs, which is $1,985,698,000 above 
the fiscal year 2018 level and $978,310,000 above the request.
    In October 2017, the Secretary of Commerce submitted an 
updated 2020 Census lifecycle cost estimate totaling 
$15,625,000,000, an increase of over $3,000,000,000 above the 
prior estimate. Given the magnitude of this overrun--and that 
the new estimate assumes a $1,182,000,000 contingency for 
unexpected costs--further cost overruns are unacceptable.
    Since the enactment of the Congressional Budget Act of 
1974, emergency funding has been provided to every census, 
either as a bailout for cost overruns or to provide needed 
increases to execute the decennial census. The Committee 
challenges the Census Bureau and the Administration to ensure 
this practice does not continue. Since around 70 percent of 
census costs will occur in fiscal years 2019 and 2020, stable 
funding will help reduce risk in executing the count.
    The fiscal year 2018 appropriations Act provided the Census 
Bureau with full funding for fiscal year 2018 and partial 
funding for fiscal year 2019. The recommendation provides for 
the remaining funding required in fiscal year 2019 and funding 
for a quarter of fiscal year 2020. The Census Bureau shall 
provide the Committees with notification 15 days before any 
spending it intends to incur in fiscal year 2019 that is above 
the amounts included in the October 2017 lifecycle cost 
estimate for fiscal year 2019.
    The recommendation also provides for a transfer of 
$3,556,000 to the Department of Commerce Office of Inspector 
General (OIG) for oversight of the Census Bureau. The Census 
Bureau is directed to ensure that its fiscal year 2019 
partnership and communications activities in support of the 
2020 Census are conducted at a level of effort no less than 
that conducted during fiscal year 2009 in preparation for the 
2010 Decennial Census.
    Census risks.--The Committee is concerned that the 2020 
Census is a Government Accountability Office (GAO) high-risk 
area. With limited time remaining until Census Day, the Census 
Bureau needs to: (1) ensure key innovations will function as 
planned; (2) strengthen the management and oversight of all IT 
programs, systems, and contractors supporting the decennial; 
and (3) develop reliable cost estimates.
    The Committee appreciates that Census leadership meets with 
GAO staff monthly to discuss the progress the Bureau is making 
toward the 2020 Census, including how it is addressing GAO's 
open recommendations, and encourages these meetings to 
continue. To aid the Committee in its oversight function, the 
Bureau shall update the Committee quarterly on the status of 
implementing GAO recommendations regarding the 2020 Census.
    American Community Survey (ACS).--The Committee is very 
concerned about the burdensome nature of the ACS and directs 
Census to focus on its core, constitutionally mandated 
decennial Census activities. The Bureau shall continue to 
provide quarterly briefings to the Committee on efforts to 
ensure the necessity of all the questions on the ACS; on 
efforts to ensure that non-response follow-up is conducted in 
the least intrusive manner; and on congressional outreach 
conducted by the Respondent Advocate.
    Census Enterprise Data Collection and Processing 
(CEDCaP).--The Committee supports the Bureau's efforts to 
develop a more flexible, automated and secure enterprise 
architecture that will enable Census to realize economies of 
scale to support data collection efforts. The Bureau shall 
continue to provide quarterly briefings regarding the status of 
these efforts. Information in these briefings shall include, 
but not be limited to, the current system's costs to maintain, 
the surveys supported, FTE associated with those systems, and 
the anticipated dates that various IT systems will be retired 
and data merged onto the larger enterprise architecture. Census 
shall provide these reports concurrently to the OIG and GAO.
    The recommendation also continues bill language withholding 
50 percent of the funds for information technology related to 
2020 census delivery, including the CEDCaP program, until the 
Secretary submits to the Committees on Appropriations and the 
GAO an expenditure plan for CEDCaP.
    Language assistance and data on small population groups.--
The Committee is concerned about the availability of data on 
small population groups and the availability of language 
assistance for respondents to the Census surveys, including 
those who speak Asian languages, Pacific Islander languages, 
American Indian and Alaska Native languages, African languages, 
Spanish, and other languages. The Committee directs Census to 
provide an updated report identifying the languages spoken by 
respondent populations most in need of language assistance, 
along with the availability of interviewers and materials for 
persons speaking these languages, and the steps the Bureau will 
take to reach these respondents and otherwise ensure the 
availability and accuracy of data for small population groups. 
The Bureau is directed to communicate this information on a 
regular basis to Census Telephone Centers and regional offices 
to address emerging needs.
    The Committee also directs Census to increase outreach 
activities to historically undercounted communities, including 
colonias.

       National Telecommunications and Information Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $39,500,000 for the National 
Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA).

 
 
 
Domestic and International Policy.....................        $8,000,000
Spectrum Management...................................         7,600,000
Advanced Communications Research......................         8,200,000
Broadband Programs....................................         8,200,000
National Broadband Map Augmentation...................         7,500,000
                                                       -----------------
    Total.............................................       $39,500,000
 

    National Broadband Map Augmentation.--The recommendation 
provides $7,500,000 to continue the broadband mapping effort 
started in fiscal year 2018. Thirty-nine percent of Americans 
living in rural areas lack sufficient access to broadband 
internet. An updated map will help identify regions with 
insufficient service for policy makers and providers.
    Rural Broadband Coordination.--The Committee directs NTIA 
to continue coordinating with the Rural Utilities Service, the 
Federal Communications Commission, and other appropriate 
Federal agencies to ensure that policies tied to one Federal 
program do not undermine the objectives and functionality of 
another. The Committee encourages NTIA to continue working with 
the rural communications industry to identify and pursue ways 
to continue broadband deployment and adoption.
    Outcome-Based Measures.--The Committee directs NTIA to 
include outcome-based goals and performance measures for its 
broadband adoption and availability work in its performance 
plan as soon as practicable.
    First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet).--NTIA is 
encouraged to place equal priority on deploying the Nationwide 
Public Safety Broadband Network (NPSBN) in rural communities as 
it does on deploying the NPSBN in urban communities.
    FirstNet Satellite Technology.--The Committee encourages 
NTIA, in cooperation with FirstNet, to leverage advanced 
satellite technology to enable emergency communications in 
environments where traditional infrastructure does not exist or 
where it has been compromised. NTIA shall report to the 
Committee within one year of enactment of this Act on how the 
advancement of satellite technology can be leveraged to provide 
additional benefits for the nation's emergency preparedness and 
first responders.
    5G Strategy.--The Committee recognizes the importance of a 
robust, efficient and secure 5G network. The Committee 
encourages NTIA and other relevant agencies to promote policies 
to spur innovation and the next generation secured 
communications network, including developing a comprehensive 
strategy to achieve 5G and beyond.

               United States Patent and Trademark Office


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends $3,370,000,000 for the United 
States Patent and Trademark Office (PTO), the full amount of 
fiscal year 2019 fee collections estimated by the Congressional 
Budget Office. The bill continues language making available any 
fee collections above the estimated level and the amounts 
appropriated in this Act. PTO shall continue to provide monthly 
reports on its actual and projected fee collections, 
application volumes, performance, and staffing.
    Patent and Trademark Fee Reserve Fund.--The recommendation 
includes bill language regarding excess fees deposited in the 
Patent and Trademark Fee Reserve Fund. The Committee reminds 
PTO that prior to obligating reserve funds, PTO shall submit to 
the Committee a reprogramming notification with a detailed 
spending plan. The Committee expects that any such 
reprogramming will describe how spending reserve funds will 
improve patent quality, reduce the backlog of pending 
applications and appeals, improve the PTO's information 
technology infrastructure, or otherwise improve the efficiency 
and effectiveness of PTO.
    Patents End-2-End (PE2E).--PTO shall continue to provide 
quarterly reports to the Committee on the status of PE2E, 
including the proposed retirement of legacy systems, cost 
savings associated with those retirements, and any efficiencies 
achieved in patent processing as a result of these investments.
    Patent quality and reliability.--Within 90 days of 
enactment of this Act, PTO shall submit a report to the 
Committee on steps taken to improve patent quality and 
reliability in fiscal year 2018, and planned actions for fiscal 
year 2019.
    Intellectual Property Attaches.--The Committee supports the 
important work of the Intellectual Property Attache Program.

             National Institute of Standards and Technology

    The Committee recommends $985,000,000 for NIST, which is 
$213,500,000 below fiscal year 2018 and $355,928,000 above the 
request.

             SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL RESEARCH AND SERVICES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends $720,000,000 for NIST's scientific 
and technical programs, which is $4,500,000 below fiscal year 
2018 and $146,571,000 above the request.
    Laboratory programs.--The recommendation includes no less 
than the fiscal year 2018 amount for NIST Laboratory programs.
    Corporate services.--The recommendation includes 
$17,250,000 for corporate services.
    Standards Coordination and Special Programs.--The 
recommendation includes $55,000,000 for standards coordination 
and special programs. The recommendation does not adopt the 
proposed reduction to forensic science. The recommendation 
terminates Urban Dome and Lab-to-Market.
    National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program.--The Committee 
supports NIST's increased focus on post-impact disaster studies 
and pre-impact mitigation to protect against multi-hazard risk. 
As NIST moves forward with efforts to expand the resiliency of 
buildings, facilities, and communities in the face of multi-
hazard risks, the Committee encourages the agency to fund 
extramural research and designate NIST testing partners from 
existing nationally designated windstorm testing facilities 
located at U.S. academic research institutions that are capable 
of testing large, holistic, multi-hazard structures and models. 
As recent disasters illustrate, the U.S. needs more focused 
research and development on how to make buildings, 
infrastructure, and communities more resistant and resilient to 
hurricane impacts, from both wind and storm surge. The 
Committee directs the agency to prioritize funding for 
extramural grants within the Engineering Division for these 
types of studies.
    Textile research.--The Committee recognizes the importance 
of the U.S. textile industry and encourages NIST to pursue 
advanced textile and apparel research and manufacturing 
activities.
    Internet of Things.--The Committee recognizes the 
importance of United States' leadership in addressing security 
concerns for users and data within the Internet of Things and 
appreciates NIST's ongoing work in this area. The Committee 
encourages NIST to continue strengthening its cybersecurity 
standard-setting efforts related to the Internet of Things.

                     INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY SERVICES

    The Committee recommends $145,000,000 for Industrial 
Technology Services, which is $10,000,000 below fiscal year 
2018 and $129,906,000 above the request. This amount includes 
$140,000,000 for the Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) 
and $5,000,000 for the National Network for Manufacturing 
Innovation.
    Program efficiencies.--The Committee is aware of efforts by 
MEP to examine ways to reduce administrative costs and provide 
more direct assistance to the centers. Accordingly, MEP shall 
provide to the Committee an updated report within 60 days of 
enactment of this Act detailing the amount of funds to be 
maintained at headquarters and the uses of those funds. NIST 
shall also provide the Committee with updates on the status of 
recompetition of the centers.

                  CONSTRUCTION OF RESEARCH FACILITIES

    The Committee recommends $120,000,000 for NIST 
construction, which is $199,000,000 below fiscal year 2018 and 
$79,451,000 above the request. NIST shall continue to provide 
updates on the projects funded within this account, to include 
milestones and total amount of funding necessary for 
completion.

            National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    The Committee recommends a total of $5,158,616,000 in 
discretionary funds for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration (NOAA).
    Extramural research.--The Committee continues to believe 
that NOAA benefits from collaboration with academia and the 
private sector through cooperative institutes and competitive 
research. These relationships build broad community engagement, 
leverage external funding for mission-oriented research, 
strengthen the science within NOAA, and advance scientific 
knowledge.
    Shellfish genetics.--The Committee includes up to 
$10,000,000 to improve shellfish survival and growth rates and 
to classify and preserve the natural genetic variation of 
shellfish. NOAA is encouraged to support regional partnerships 
to classify and preserve natural genetic variation in 
shellfish.
    Regional biosecurity plan for Micronesia and Hawaii.--The 
Committee looks forward to receiving the report required in the 
fiscal year 2018 appropriations Act and requires an update in 
fiscal year 2019.
    NOAA Environmental Security Computing Center.--The 
Committee supports the NOAA Environmental Security Computing 
Center and expects it to be adequately funded.
    Disaster Funding.--The Committee expects the funds provided 
in fiscal year 2018 for disaster recovery efforts, including: 
repair and replacement of observing assets, Federal real 
property, and equipment; marine debris assessment and removal; 
mapping, charting and geodesy services; improving weather 
forecasting, hurricane intensity forecasting and flood 
forecasting and mitigation capabilities; improving operational 
and research supercomputing infrastructure; and repair and 
replacement of National Estuarine Research Reserves real 
property and observing assets to be used expeditiously.

                  OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends a total program level of 
$3,645,154,000 under this account for the coastal, fisheries, 
marine, weather, satellite, and other programs of NOAA. This 
total funding consists of $3,473,654,000 in direct 
appropriations, a transfer of $144,000,000 from balances in the 
``Promote and Develop Fishery Products and Research Pertaining 
to American Fisheries'' account and $27,500,000 derived from 
recoveries of prior year obligations. The direct appropriation 
of $3,473,654,000 is $62,677,000 below fiscal year 2018 and 
$535,901,000 above the request.
    The following narrative and tables identify the specific 
activities and funding levels included in this Act.
    National Ocean Service (NOS).--The recommendation provides 
$552,679,000 for National Ocean Service, operations, research, 
and facilities. The recommendation supports the proposed 
increase for Disaster Preparedness programs to bolster NOS' 
emergency response to coastal storms and other disasters. The 
recommendation does not adopt the proposed reduction for 
Integrated Water Prediction and funds it at the enacted level.

                         NATIONAL OCEAN SERVICE
                  Operations, Research, and Facilities
                        (in thousands of dollars)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Program                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Navigation, Observations and Positioning
  Navigation, Observations and Positioning............        $154,179
  Integrated Ocean Observing System Regional                    37,500
   Observations.......................................
  Hydrographic Survey Priorities/Contracts............          32,000
                                                       -----------------
Navigation, Observations and Positioning..............         223,679
                                                       =================
Coastal Science and Assessment
  Coastal Science, Assessment, Response and                     78,500
   Restoration........................................
  Competitive External Research.......................          20,000
                                                       -----------------
Coastal Science and Assessment........................          98,500
                                                       =================
Ocean and Coastal Management and Services
  Coastal Zone Management and Services................          44,000
  Coastal Zone Grants.................................          75,000
  Coral Reef Program..................................          27,000
  Sanctuaries and Marine Protected Areas..............          57,500
  National Estuarine Research Reserve System..........          27,000
                                                       -----------------
Ocean and Coastal Management and Services.............         230,500
                                                       =================
Total, National Ocean Service, Operations, Research,          $552,679
 and Facilities.......................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Navigation, Observations and Positioning.--The 
recommendation provides $223,679,000 for Navigation, 
Observations and Positioning. Within this amount, the Committee 
expects NOAA to prioritize its mission-critical 
responsibilities including mapping and charting, geodesy, 
tides, and current data activities. The Committee does not 
adopt the proposed reductions for the Regional Geospatial 
Modeling Grant program or Joint Ocean and Coastal Mapping 
Centers.
    National Geodetic Survey.--The Committee provides 
$1,000,000 above the requested level to support continued 
development and advancement of geospatial analytical and 
mapping techniques to precisely update shorelines in a common 
data format.
    Hydrographic Surveys and Contracts.--NOAA has a substantial 
backlog of hydrographic survey work in navigationally 
significant areas in the U.S. Within the amount provided for 
Hydrographic Survey Priorities/Contracts, NOAA is directed to 
accelerate the acquisition of survey data.
    Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS).--The 
recommendation includes $37,500,000 for IOOS regional 
observations. The Committee supports IOOS' efforts to expand 
its use of underwater gliders.
    Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs).--The Committee directs NOAA to 
prioritize Harmful Algal Bloom Research within the funds 
provided above the enacted level for Competitive External 
Research. The Committee remains concerned about the increasing 
prevalence of HABs and the effect of the related toxins. NOAA 
should prioritize research to determine and mitigate the impact 
of HABs on human health and wellbeing as authorized by the 
Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Act. 
Within additional funds provided for Coastal Science, 
Assessment, Response and Restoration, the Committee encourages 
NOAA to prioritize operational monitoring, modeling and 
forecasting. The Committee encourages NOAA to coordinate with 
the Department of Homeland Security on Harmful Algal Blooms as 
appropriate.
    Marine Sanctuaries.--$3,500,000 is provided for NOAA to 
continue research using tele-presence technology to explore 
deep-water and uncharted regions of the National Marine 
Sanctuaries. This research should continue to explore the 
oceanography, marine habitats, cultural sites and living and 
non-living marine resources of these sanctuaries to better 
understand their biology, geology and potential cultural 
resources with a secondary emphasis on educational outreach.
    National Estuarine Research Reserve System (NERRS).--The 
Committee recommends $27,000,000 for NERRS, which is an 
important partnership between NOAA and the coastal States that 
protects and studies estuarine systems.
    National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS).--The Committee 
recommends $875,260,000 for National Marine Fisheries Service 
operations, research, and facilities.

                    NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE
                  Operations, Research, and Facilities
                        (in thousands of dollars)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Program                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Protected Resources Science and Management
  Marine Mammals, Sea Turtles and Other Species.......        $113,500
  Species Recovery Grants.............................           5,993
  Atlantic Salmon.....................................           6,224
  Pacific Salmon......................................          67,000
                                                       -----------------
Protected Resources Science and Management............         192,717
                                                       =================
Fisheries Science and Management
  Fisheries and Ecosystem Science Programs and                 144,196
   Services...........................................
  Fisheries Data Collections, Surveys and Assessments.         165,249
  Observers and Training..............................          43,955
  Fisheries Management Programs and Services..........         112,643
  Aquaculture.........................................          15,000
  Salmon Management Activities........................          37,000
  Regional Councils and Fisheries Commissions.........          37,000
  Interjurisdictional Fisheries Grants................           3,500
                                                       -----------------
Fisheries Science and Management......................         558,543
                                                       =================
Enforcement...........................................          70,000
                                                       =================
Habitat Conservation and Restoration..................          54,000
                                                       =================
Total, National Marine Fisheries Service, Operations,         $875,260
 Research, and Facilities.............................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Protected Resources Science and Management.--The Committee 
recommends $192,717,000 for Protected Resources Science and 
Management programs. Within available resources, the Committee 
encourages NOAA to maintain marine mammal stranding grants.
    Permitting consultations.--The Committee is aware of 
sometimes significant delays associated with consultations 
requests received by NMFS from the Army Corps of Engineers. The 
Committee urges NMFS to work with the Army Corps of Engineers 
to improve this process.
    Skimmer trawl rule.--The Committee understands NMFS is 
considering issuing a new rule to require all skimmer trawls, 
pusher-head trawls, and wing nets rigged for fishing to use 
turtle excluder devices in their nets. The Committee expects 
NMFS to ensure any potential rule on this issue is based in 
meritorious, evidence-based science. Further, the Committee 
understands NOAA states in its Draft Economic Impact Statement 
that these potential changes will have a significant negative 
impact on small fishing businesses. The Committee requests a 
report on specific steps NMFS would consider in any potential 
rule to eliminate the negative economic impact at least 90 days 
prior to the release of a rule.
    Hatchery and Genetic Management Plans.--Within the funds 
provided for Pacific Salmon, $5,000,000 is included to 
implement the Service's comprehensive plan to address the 
backlog of Hatchery and Genetic Management Plans. The Committee 
remains concerned by the backlog of these plans and encourages 
NOAA to continue contracting with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service, State agencies, Tribes, and the Hatchery Scientific 
Review Group, as appropriate, to expedite approval.
    Marine Recreational Information Program.--The Committee 
encourages NOAA to take into consideration the recommendations 
of the National Academy of Sciences report entitled Marine 
Recreational Information Program (2017).
    Stock assessments.--The Committee recognizes that NOAA 
fisheries stock assessments are the cornerstone of fishery 
conservation and management measurements, but the current stock 
assessment data inputs must be improved. The Committee 
continues to provide significant funding to NOAA for fishery 
surveys and other activities in support of stock assessments, 
yet problems persist with the frequency of surveys, adequacy of 
the data, and the use of independent research in developing 
stock assessments. The Committee encourages NOAA to work to 
improve accuracy of population estimates of Gray Triggerfish, 
Greater Amberjack and Gag Grouper.
    Red Snapper.--The Committee commends the five Gulf States 
for developing Exempted Fishing Permits (EFP) that will allow 
for improved recreational fishing access and directs NOAA to 
continue to work with the States to manage Red Snapper. Within 
Fisheries Data Collections, Surveys and Assessments, up to 
$10,000,000 is provided for the development, implementation and 
validation of electronic logbooks for the Federally permitted 
charter-for-hire sector in the Gulf of Mexico. NOAA shall 
provide quarterly updates to the Committee on Red Snapper 
management on: the EFPs; the implementation of the electronic 
logbooks; the independent study to estimate Red Snapper 
abundance; NOAA's plans to integrate the independent study into 
fishery management; and other appropriate items.
    Fish Information Networks.--The Committee supports the Fish 
Information Networks, the State-Federal cooperative programs 
that coordinate data collection, data management, and 
informational management essential for accurate monitoring of 
commercial and recreational fishing impacts. The recommendation 
includes $500,000 above the enacted level, and $613,000 above 
the request, for Fish Information Networks.
    Cooperative research.--The recommendation does not adopt 
the proposed reduction for this activity, and funds it at the 
enacted level. Cooperative research shall be used to support 
external, independent data collection and other research. The 
Committee expects that all funding provided shall be used for 
cooperative fisheries research and not for NOAA activities or 
administrative overhead costs. NOAA shall ensure that this 
research is ingested into fishery stock assessments in a timely 
manner.
    Lionfish.--The Committee encourages NOAA to award 
competitive grants to address Lionfish in the Atlantic Ocean 
and Gulf of Mexico.
    Highly Migratory Species.--NOAA is encouraged to continue 
its efforts to competitively award studies of highly migratory 
fish species. Additional research is needed to continue to 
improve management of these species.
    Southeast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program 
(SEAMAP).--SEAMAP is designed to collect, manage, and 
disseminate fishery-independent data in the southeastern U.S. 
to better inform management decisions. The Committee supports 
SEAMAP, and encourages NOAA to ensure it has adequate resources 
to complete its mission.
    Horseshoe Crabs.--Adequate data is required to ensure 
States and interstate managers can effectively manage the 
Horseshoe Crab population, which is important to the biomedical 
and commercial fishing industries, as well as to the ecology of 
the Mid-Atlantic region. The Committee directs NMFS to continue 
the Horseshoe Crab survey to generate the data necessary to 
ensure that the Horseshoe Crab stock remains on a sustainable 
path.
    Atlantic Striped Bass.--The Committee continues to direct 
the Secretary of Commerce to review the Federal moratorium on 
Atlantic Striped Bass. The Department shall report to the 
Committee on the outcome of this review within one year of 
enactment of this Act.
    Oyster restoration.--The Committee encourages NOAA to seek 
to competitively select external partners to research 
alternative substrates for oyster restoration. NOAA shall 
consider survivability as part of the oyster restoration 
program in the Chesapeake Bay. The Committee includes 
$2,000,000 within Habitat Conservation and Restoration to 
support oyster restoration in the Chesapeake Bay.
    California operations.--The Committee is aware of the 
catastrophic drought in the State of California over the past 
several years and believes that impacted communities must have 
access to life-giving water. Section 4001(a) of the Water 
Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act (WIIN Act; 
Public Law 114-322) directs the Secretary of Commerce to 
provide maximum water supplies to the Central Valley Project 
and the California State Water Project. Furthermore, Section 
4003 of the law directs the Secretary, in conjunction with the 
Secretary of the Interior, to increase water deliveries from 
the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta above the maximum rate 
allowed under the applicable biological opinion to capture high 
flows during storm events for South-of-the-Delta water 
contractors. Accordingly, the Committee directs the Secretary, 
acting through the NOAA Administrator, to consult with the 
Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner and U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service Director to immediately implement the authorities 
provided under Sections 4001, 4002, 4003 of Public Law 114-322 
to provide the maximum water supply possible under those 
sections.
    Furthermore, the Committee is concerned NMFS is requiring 
water to be held in the Shasta Reservoir, thereby reducing the 
ability of the Bureau of Reclamation to make deliveries to 
water contractors. Specifically, the Bureau of Reclamation 
notes that North-of-the-Delta contractors have not been 
provided an initial water allocation due in part to 
``uncertainty in the ability to manage Shasta Reservoir in a 
way that will provide adequate temperatures for the protection 
of endangered salmon species in the Sacramento River.'' NMFS 
plays a key role in Shasta Reservoir operations. Consistent 
with the requirements of Section 4001(a) of Public Law 114-322, 
the Committee directs the Secretary, acting through the NOAA 
Administrator and the director of NMFS, to maximize water 
supplies to Federal and State water project contractors, in 
consultation and coordination with the Bureau of Reclamation, 
in the development and implementation of the Shasta Reservoir 
Temperature Management Plan for the 2018 and 2019 water years.
    In addition, the Committee requests that the Secretary, 
acting through the NOAA administrator and the director of NMFS, 
provide the Committee with a quarterly update, during the 2018 
and 2019 water years, on the progress of maximizing water 
supplies to Federal and State water project contractors 
consistent with the requirements of Section 4001(a) of Public 
Law 114-322.
    Biological Opinion Prioritization.--The Committee is aware 
of the ongoing reconsultation by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation 
with NMFS, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), the State of 
California, and local public agencies identified in Section 
4004 of Public Law 114-322, on coordinated operations of the 
Central Valley Project and the California State Water Project. 
The Committee directs the Secretary of Commerce, acting through 
the NMFS Administrator, in conjunction with the Secretary of 
the Interior, to ensure completion of the biological opinions 
by May 31, 2020, consistent with Section 4004 of the WIIN Act. 
Furthermore, the Committee requests the Secretary of Commerce 
to submit to Congress a timeline and plan for the deployment of 
resources and staff to ensure the biological opinions are 
completed by the above date, as well as regular subsequent 
updates until the biological opinions are finalized. In 
addition, given the complexities surrounding this issue, the 
Committee strongly encourages the Secretary of Commerce to work 
with the Secretary of the Interior to develop a joint 
biological opinion, to the extent practicable, to minimize 
conflicts between potential reasonable and prudent 
alternatives/measures imposed by a biological opinion issued by 
NMFS and a biological opinion imposed by FWS.
    In its notice of intent dated December 29, 2017, the Bureau 
of Reclamation stated the purpose of this reconsultation is 
``to evaluate alternatives that maximize water deliveries and 
optimize marketable power generation consistent with applicable 
laws, contractual obligations, and agreements; and to augment 
operational flexibility by addressing the status of listed 
species.'' The Committee supports these objectives.
    Enforcement.--The Committee does not adopt the proposals to 
decrease the Cooperative Enforcement Program or to eliminate 
the funding for Joint Enforcement Agreements with State and 
territory partners.
    Tribal support.--The Committee encourages NOAA to support 
mitigation and relocation efforts of coastal tribal communities 
that are seeking to mitigate the threat of severe weather 
storms and promote public safety.
    Fishery Science Centers.--The President's Budget did not 
request, nor does this recommendation include, any funds to 
permanently relocate any NMFS science centers to a new city. 
The Committee understands, however, that multiple fisheries 
science centers require substantial recapitalization or 
replacement. The Committee provides $10,000,000 in the NOAA 
construction account to partially address these needs. In 
developing proposals and plans for recapitalization, the 
Committee expects NMFS to pursue the most feasible options.
    Offshore Wind Impacts.--NOAA shall study the effects of 
offshore wind farm construction and operation on marine mammals 
and fish, including the need for any mitigation measures. NOAA 
should work with other appropriate agencies when completing 
this research. NOAA shall report to the Committee on this 
matter within two years of enactment of this Act.
    Oceanic and Atmospheric Research.--The Committee recommends 
$462,339,000 for Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) 
operations, research, and facilities. It is incumbent on NOAA 
to ensure that its research programs support the operational 
mission of each NOAA line office and that research efforts are 
an integral component in meeting line office program goals and 
milestones.

               OFFICE OF OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH
                  Operations, Research, and Facilities
                        (in thousands of dollars)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Program                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Climate Research
  Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes.............         $72,972
  Regional Climate Data and Information...............          25,671
                                                       -----------------
Climate Research......................................          98,643
                                                       =================
Weather and Air Chemistry Research
  Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes.............          85,758
  U.S. Weather Research Program.......................          13,136
  Tornado Severe Storm Research/Phased Array Radar....          12,622
  Joint Technology Transfer Initiative................          20,000
                                                       -----------------
Weather and Air Chemistry Research....................         131,516
                                                       =================
Ocean, Coastal and Great Lakes Research
  Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes.............          36,000
  National Sea Grant College Program..................          68,500
  Marine Aquaculture Program..........................          11,500
  Ocean Exploration and Research......................          48,000
  Integrated Ocean Acidification......................          13,000
  Sustained Ocean Observations and Monitoring.........          43,000
                                                       -----------------
Ocean, Coastal and Great Lakes Research...............         220,000
                                                       =================
Information Technology Research and Development
High Performance Computing Initiatives................          12,180
                                                       =================
Total, Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research,            $462,339
 Operations, Research, and Facilities.................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS).--
The recommendation includes $13,500,000 to support competitive 
research grants, maintain existing NIDIS activities, and 
develop and expand the Regional Drought Early Warning 
Information System.
    Weather and Air Chemistry Research.--The Committee includes 
$131,516,000 for Weather and Air Chemistry Research, which is 
$39,786,000 above the request.
    Infrasonic Weather Monitoring Research.--The Committee 
believes that advanced infrasound signal processing 
methodologies and studies have the potential to improve 
forecast accuracy and encourages NOAA to continue research in 
this area.
    Joint Technology Transfer Initiative.--The recommendation 
rejects the proposed termination of this program and funds it 
at $20,000,000.
    Severe weather studies.--The Southeastern United States 
commonly experiences devastating tornadoes under variables and 
conditions that differ considerably from conditions in other 
areas. OAR shall continue the VORTEX-SE initiative at the 
enacted level to better understand how environmental factors 
that are characteristic of the Southeast United States affect 
the formation, intensity and storm path of tornadoes.
    Cooperative Institutes.--The Committee has heard concerns 
that NOAA's current Cooperative Institutes, labs and science 
centers do not fulfill NOAA's needs for advanced monitoring and 
predictive modeling to explore deep water issues and their 
effect on the U.S. coastline. The NOAA Research Council shall, 
within 180 days of enactment of this Act, submit to the 
Committee a report that includes an assessment of NOAA's 
requirements and capabilities for research in these areas and a 
proposal on how NOAA could leverage external partners to meet 
any identified gaps.
    Coral Reefs.--The Committee supports collaboration between 
NOAA and external academic institutions that conduct scientific 
research for the conservation of corals and coral reef 
ecosystems within U.S. waters. The Committee recognizes that 
the science sponsored through such collaboration is important 
for management of these coral reefs and for effective 
implementation of the National Coral Reef Action Strategy, 
especially with regard to the identification of local action 
strategies for addressing key threats in each of the 
jurisdictions that have coral reefs within their boundaries.
    Ocean Exploration and Research.--The Committee recommends 
$48,000,000 for Ocean Exploration and Research. The Committee 
encourages NOAA to use not less than $7,000,000 to partner with 
non-government organizations, academic institutions, and other 
government agencies including the National Science Foundation, 
to fund ocean-going ships of exploration and support associated 
science through peer-reviewed processes for ocean exploration 
in unknown regions. The Committee supports using existing tele-
presence technology, and applied exploration, to map critically 
important mineral deposits within America's EEZ and sites of 
submerged human history, particularly in the Western Pacific. 
The Committee expects NOAA to expand exploration workshops. The 
Committee encourages NOAA to use a portion of the additional 
funds above the enacted level to leverage partnerships with 
universities to increase capacity for deep-water Autonomous 
Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) as a means to sustain utility of AUV 
assets. The Committee also encourages NOAA to work with the 
Department of Defense, especially the Naval Meteorology and 
Oceanography Command, to leverage assets and facilities to 
support deep-water AUV program development.
    Priority Vessel Assessments.--Many of the 87 wrecks 
identified as priority vessels in NOAA's Risk Assessment for 
Potentially Polluting Wrecks in U.S. Waters have not been 
directly surveyed and have unknown or unconfirmed locations, 
conditions, orientation, and remaining contents. The Committee 
provides $1,000,000 within Ocean Exploration and Research for 
NOAA to work with government and private sector partners to 
fund additional surveys, and surveys of opportunity, to perform 
site inspections to refine assessments of the potential risk 
for pollution posed by these vessels, as recommended in the 
Risk Assessment.
    Integrated Ocean Acidification Research.--The Committee 
encourages NOAA, in coordination with the Office of Science and 
Technology Policy, to implement a program to competitively 
award prizes under the Stevenson-Wydler Technology Innovation 
Act of 1980 (15 U.S.C. 3719) to stimulate innovation to advance 
the understanding, research, or monitoring of ocean 
acidification or its impacts or to develop management or 
adaptation options for responding to ocean acidification. In 
prize competitions, the Committee encourages NOAA to prioritize 
communities, environments, or industries that are currently in 
distress due to the impacts of ocean acidification.
    National Weather Service (NWS).--The Committee recommends 
$1,015,000,000 for NWS operations, research, and facilities, 
which is $79,804,000 above the President's Budget request.

                        NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
                  Operations, Research, and Facilities
                        (in thousands of dollars)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Program                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Observations..........................................        $236,000
Central Processing....................................          90,000
Analyze, Forecast and Support.........................         500,000
Dissemination.........................................          52,000
Science and Technology Integration....................         137,000
                                                       =================
Total, National Weather Service, Operations, Research,      $1,015,000
 and Facilities.......................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    NWS staffing.--The recommendation provides not less than 
$625,000,000 for salaries and benefits of NWS employees, which 
fully funds the annualized civilian pay raise from fiscal year 
2018. The Committee expects the National Weather Service to 
continue to hire in fiscal year 2019, and to have additional 
FTEs on board by the end of the fiscal year. The Committee 
expects that budget requests from the National Weather Service 
include all funds necessary to pay for staff, yet the Committee 
consistently hears of staffing and management challenges within 
NWS. NOAA and the Department of Commerce are directed to ensure 
that NWS fulfills its critical mission to protect the lives and 
property of our nation's citizens. In its fiscal year 2019 
spend plan, the NWS shall include a separate accounting of all 
NWS funded positions. In fiscal year 2019, the Committee 
directs the NWS to continue the quarterly management, staffing 
and budget briefings first required in fiscal year 2018.
    Observations.--The recommendation provides $236,000,000 for 
observation activities. The recommendation includes $22,000,000 
for the National Mesonet Program, $14,500,000 above the 
request. The recommendation does not adopt the proposed 
reduction to the TAO array, and funds it at the enacted level. 
The recommendation assumes that the fiscal year 2018 requested 
technical adjustment to move the Observation Program Leads and 
the Port Meteorological Officers from Analyze, Forecast and 
Support to Observations was executed in fiscal year 2018 and is 
continued in fiscal year 2019.
    Central Processing.--The recommendation includes 
$90,000,000 for Central Processing. The recommendation fully 
funds the requested increase for Advanced Weather Interactive 
Processing System cyclical replacement. The recommendation does 
not adopt the proposal to slow the Advanced Hydrologic 
Prediction Services Expansion.
    Analyze, Forecast, and Support.--The recommendation 
includes $500,000,000 for Analyze, Forecast, and Support 
activities. The recommendation does not adopt the proposed NWS 
workforce savings; nor does it adopt the proposed reduction in 
developing and implementing aviation tools and capabilities. 
This level includes $5,000,000 to address the backlog in 
facilities maintenance requirements. The recommendation assumes 
that the technical transfers proposed in fiscal year 2018 were 
both executed in fiscal year 2018 and continue in fiscal year 
2019.
    Tsunamis.--As required in the Tsunami, Warning, Education 
and Research Act of 2017 (Public Law 115-25), this 
recommendation funds both the National Tsunami Warning Center 
and the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center. It fully supports the 
responsibilities for these centers enumerated in Section 
504(d)(2) of that Act.
    Dissemination.--The recommendation provides $52,000,000 for 
Dissemination. The recommendation supports the proposed 
increase to fund upgrades and enhancements to the Integrated 
Dissemination Program systems.
    Science and Technology Integration.--The recommendation 
includes $137,000,000 for Science and Technology Integration 
activities. The Committee does not adopt the proposed decreases 
for numerical weather prediction modeling; the national water 
model; or Operations and Workforce Analysis testing and 
evaluation. This recommendation assumes that the technical 
transfer proposed in fiscal year 2018, to move misaligned Space 
Weather forecasters from Science Technology Integration to 
Analyze, Forecast and Support, was executed in fiscal year 2018 
and continues in fiscal year 2019.
    Hydrology and Water Resource Programs.--The recommendation 
continues to provide $6,000,000 for research activities to 
improve fine and large-scale measurements of snow depth and 
soil moisture data that can be used to expand and improve the 
National Water Model and contribute directly to the mission of 
NOAA's National Water Center. These funds shall be executed in 
coordination with OAR to collaborate with external academic 
partners.
    Storm Surge Modeling Technology.--The Committee encourages 
NOAA to continue to pursue collaborations that will improve 
upon NOAA's current Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from 
Hurricanes model; and encourages NOAA to consider integrating 
improved technologies into standard modeling operations for 
storm surge, inland flooding, and the combination.
    National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information 
Service (NESDIS).--The Committee recommends $247,000,000 for 
NESDIS operations, research, and facilities. The recommendation 
does not adopt the proposed reduction to the regional centers.

     NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE, DATA AND INFORMATION SERVICE
                  Operations, Research, and Facilities
                        (in thousands of dollars)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Program                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Environmental Satellite Observing Systems
  Satellite and Product Operations....................        $135,000
  NSOF operations.....................................          15,000
                                                       -----------------
Office of Satellite and Product Operations............         150,000
                                                       =================
Product Development, Readiness and Application........          36,500
                                                       =================
  Group on Earth Observations.........................             500
                                                       -----------------
Environmental Satellite Observing Systems.............         187,000
                                                       =================
National Centers for Environmental Information........          60,000
                                                       =================
Total, National Environmental Satellite, Data and             $247,000
 Information Service, Operations, Research, and
 Facilities...........................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Office of Satellite and Product Operations.--The 
recommendation includes $150,000,000 for the Office of 
Satellite and Product Operations. This activity funds the 
command and control of NOAA's operational satellites. The 
recommendation supports the proposed increase for IT security. 
It is paramount that NOAA identify and mitigate vulnerabilities 
affecting the availability, integrity, security and delivery of 
NOAA's data. The Committee expects the Comprehensive Large 
Array data Stewardship System to be adequately funded in order 
to support the long-term preservation of and access to data 
from NOAA's observing systems.
    NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture (NSOSA).--The 
Committee notes that the fiscal year 2017 Appropriations Act 
required NOAA to brief the Committee on the results of the 
NSOSA in fiscal year 2017 and yet the Committee has not 
received this briefing midway through fiscal year 2018. This is 
unacceptable.
    Mission Support.--The recommendation includes $265,626,000 
for Mission Support operations, research, and facilities.

                             MISSION SUPPORT
                  Operations, Research, and Facilities
                        (in thousands of dollars)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Program                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mission Support
  Executive Leadership................................         $27,500
  Mission Services and Management.....................         144,327
  IT Security.........................................          10,050
  Payment to DOC Working Capital Fund.................          55,249
                                                       -----------------
Mission Support Services..............................         237,126
                                                       =================
Office of Education
  BWET Regional Programs..............................           7,500
  Education Partnership Program/Minority Serving                16,000
   Institutions.......................................
  NOAA Education Program Base.........................           5,000
                                                       -----------------
Office of Education...................................          28,500
                                                       =================
Total, Mission Support, Operations, Research and              $265,626
 Facilities...........................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Management and administrative costs.--The Committee notes 
that in addition to Mission Services, each line office includes 
its own ``headquarters program support'' costs. NOAA shall 
bolster efforts to standardize the treatment of management and 
administrative costs in each line office to maximize 
transparency and accountability, and reduce or eliminate 
unnecessary non-mission costs.
    Office of Education.--The Committee includes $28,500,000 
for NOAA's Office of Education. Of this amount, $16,000,000 is 
provided to continue the Educational Partnership Program with 
Minority Serving Institutions, and $7,500,000 is provided to 
continue the Bay-Watershed Education and Training (B-WET) 
regional programs.
    Office of Marine and Aviation Operations.--The 
recommendation includes $227,250,000 for the Office of Marine 
and Aviation Operations, operations, research, and facilities.

                OFFICE OF MARINE AND AVIATION OPERATIONS
                  Operations, Research, and Facilities
                        (in thousands of dollars)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Program                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Office of Marine and Aviation Operations
  Marine Operations and Maintenance...................        $190,000
  Aviation Operations and Aircraft Services...........          37,250
                                                       =================
Total, Office of Marine and Aviation Operations.......        $227,250
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Unmanned Surface Vehicles.--The recommendation includes no 
less than the enacted level for a competitive data acquisition 
program that uses Unmanned Surface Vehicles to augment NOAA's 
observational suite.
    Increased Winter Storm Observations.--Atmospheric rivers 
are responsible for more than 40 percent of the precipitation 
on the West Coast. Improving the understanding and forecasting 
of atmospheric rivers is critical to improving water management 
and flood control on the West Coast. The recommendation 
includes $3,000,000 for increased winter storm observations to 
better observe and predict these extreme storm events.
    Fleet Deferred Maintenance.--The recommendations provides 
$6,785,000 above the request in Operations, Research, and 
Facilities, and $9,122,000 above the request in Procurement, 
Acquisition and Construction to address deferred maintenance of 
NOAA's fleet. The Committee looks forward to receiving the 
briefing required in the fiscal year 2018 Appropriations Act 
regarding vessel maintenance requirements, and requires an 
updated report within 60 days of enactment of this Act.

               PROCUREMENT, ACQUISITION AND CONSTRUCTION

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends a total program level of 
$1,620,613,000 under this heading, of which $1,607,613,000 is 
appropriated from the general fund and $13,000,000 is derived 
from recoveries of prior year obligations.
    The following narrative descriptions and tables identify 
the specific activities and funding levels included in this 
Act.

                PROCUREMENT, ACQUISITION AND CONSTRUCTION
                        (in thousands of dollars)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Program                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
National Ocean Service
  National Estuarine Research Reserve Construction....          $1,900
  Marine Sanctuaries Construction.....................           3,000
                                                       -----------------
Total, NOS - PAC......................................           4,900
                                                       =================
Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research
    Research Supercomputing/CCRI......................          41,000
                                                       =================
National Weather Service
    Observations......................................          16,250
    Central Processing................................          67,500
    Dissemination.....................................          35,500
                                                       -----------------
  Subtotal, NWS, Systems Acquisition..................         119,250
                                                       -----------------
    Weather Forecast Office Construction..............           8,750
                                                       -----------------
Total, NWS - PAC......................................         128,000
                                                       =================
National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information
 Service
    GOES-R............................................         408,380
    Space Weather Follow-on...........................          10,000
    Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS)...............         572,240
    Polar Follow-on...................................         305,751
    CDARS.............................................             500
    COSMIC 2/GNSS-RO..................................           5,892
    Satellite Ground Services.........................          58,000
    System Architecture and Advanced Planning.........           5,500
    Projects, Planning, and Analysis..................          40,000
    Commercial Weather Data Pilot.....................           6,000
                                                       -----------------
  Subtotal, NESDIS Systems Acquisition................       1,412,263
                                                       -----------------
    Satellite CDA Facility............................           2,450
                                                       -----------------
Total, NESDIS - PAC...................................       1,414,713
                                                       =================
Mission Support
  NOAA Construction...................................          10,000
                                                       =================
Office of Marine and Aviation Operations
  Fleet Capital Improvements and Technology Infusion..          22,000
                                                       -----------------
Total, OMAO - PAC.....................................          22,000
                                                       =================
Total, Procurement, Acquisition, and Construction.....      $1,620,613
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    National Weather Service (NWS).--The recommendation 
supports the completion of the Automated Surface Observing 
System Service Life Extension Project (SLEP) by 2024 and the 
completion of the NEXRAD SLEP by 2022. The recommendation 
rejects the requested reduction for high performance computing 
and instead funds this effort at the enacted levels.
    NWS Facilities.--The recommendation includes $8,750,000, to 
construct and provide for major repairs to Forecast Offices and 
other government-owned weather facilities, including Weather 
Forecast Offices, River Forecast Centers, Weather Service 
Offices, National Centers and Tsunami Warning Centers.
    National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information 
Service.--The recommendation includes $1,414,713,000 for NESDIS 
procurement, acquisition and construction.
    Quarterly Reports.--The Committee expects the Department of 
Commerce to ensure that NOAA's satellite programs are 
proceeding within the cost estimates and meeting program 
milestones. The Committee expects to be notified promptly if 
any issues arise that could jeopardize the current launch 
schedules. The Department of Commerce shall remain engaged in 
the overall management of Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS), 
Polar Follow-On, and Geostationary Operational Environmental 
Satellite-R (GOES-R). NOAA shall provide quarterly briefings to 
the Committee on all NOAA satellite programs not later than 30 
days after the end of each quarter. These briefings shall 
include the status of obligations for each program, including 
spacecraft, launch, sensor, integration, and ground components, 
and proposed changes to the fly out charts. NOAA shall also 
include in these briefings updates on all of its operational 
satellite systems.
    Oversight.--The Committee reiterates its desire that OIG 
and GAO staff be permitted at NOAA's monthly satellites 
meetings. To further aid the Committee in its oversight 
function, NOAA shall provide biannual updates to the Committee 
regarding the status of implementing OIG, GAO, and Independent 
Review Team recommendations for NOAA's satellite programs.
    Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS).--The recommendation 
includes $572,240,000, the requested amount, for JPSS. The 
Committee commends NOAA on the successful launch of JPSS-1, and 
expects NOAA to incorporate lessons learned from JPSS-1 into 
the planning and execution of the remaining JPSS satellites.
    Polar Follow-On (PFO).--The Committee provides 
$305,751,000, the requested amount, for PFO. The Committee is 
pleased that NOAA has found savings and efficiencies to reduce 
the cost of this program in fiscal year 2019, and expects NOAA 
to continue to seek and achieve savings in future years of the 
PFO program. As requested, this recommendation supports 
procuring spacecraft for JPSS 3 and JPSS 4 in fiscal year 2019. 
The Committee understands that PFO is planned to complete KDP-C 
in fiscal year 2019, and expects to receive the program 
baseline in fiscal year 2019.
    Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R Series 
(GOES-R).--The recommendation includes $408,380,000 for the 
GOES-R program, as requested.
    Commercial satellite weather data.--The Committee provides 
$6,000,000 to ensure NOAA has the resources necessary to 
thoroughly assess commercial data opportunities. If NOAA 
determines that data or services licensed and evaluated through 
the Commercial Weather Data Pilot Program are cost effective 
and operationally viable for meeting a NOAA observation 
requirement, NOAA is directed to pursue the potential of the 
commercial system to provide an ongoing operational service as 
part of the NOAA observation architecture.
    Construction and Facilities Maintenance.--The Committee 
looks forward to receiving the report required in the fiscal 
year 2018 Appropriations Act and requires an updated report 
containing the same information be provided 30 days prior to 
obligating the funds provided in 2019. NOAA funds and manages 
facility maintenance requirements out of nearly every line 
office and out of Mission Support. In fiscal year 2019, NOAA 
shall submit to the Committees a report that includes: (1) an 
assessment of whether this is the most efficient means to fund 
and manage NOAA's construction and facilities requirements, (2) 
potential options to more effectively and efficiently manage 
and fund NOAA's facilities and construction requirements; and 
(3) a proposal about how to improve and streamline NOAA's 
facilities management process.
    Aircraft Recapitalization.--The fiscal year 2018 
Appropriations Act funded both a Hurricane Hunter and a jet 
propeller aircraft to conduct soil moisture, water resources, 
and gravity-based vertical datum survey missions. The Act also 
required that NOAA submit an updated NOAA Aircraft 
Recapitalization Business Case and Timeline within 120 days of 
enactment of that Act. The Committee looks forward to promptly 
receiving the Business Case and Timeline.

                    PACIFIC COASTAL SALMON RECOVERY

    The Committee rejects the proposed termination of Pacific 
Coastal Salmon Recovery and recommends $65,000,000 for this 
program. In addition, the accompanying bill includes language 
that requires all funds to be allocated based on scientific and 
merit principles and prohibits the availability of funds for 
marketing activities. Bill language is included requiring a 33 
percent match from States.

                      FISHERMEN'S CONTINGENCY FUND

    The Committee recommends $349,000 for the Fishermen's 
Contingency Fund, which is the same as fiscal year 2018. This 
Fund is available to compensate U.S. commercial fishermen for 
damage or loss caused by obstructions related to oil and gas 
exploration, and is derived from fees collected by the 
Secretary of the Interior.

                      FISHERY DISASTER ASSISTANCE

    The bill provides $20,000,000 for Fishery Disaster 
Assistance to address fisheries disasters declared by the 
Secretary of Commerce.
    Report.--The Committee is concerned by the sometimes years 
long delay between when fishery disasters occur, when disaster 
determinations are made, and when funding is delivered to 
affected communities. The Secretary of Commerce shall, within 
90 days of enactment of this Act, submit a report to the 
Committee that evaluates the performance of existing disaster 
assistance programs with particular attention paid to: 
coordination with State and Tribal agencies, evaluation of 
fisheries disaster requests, and timeliness of determinations. 
This report shall include recommendations for reforms to 
expedite delivering assistance to fishing dependent communities 
impacted by disasters.

                   FISHERIES FINANCE PROGRAM ACCOUNT

    The Committee recommends language under this heading 
limiting obligations of direct loans to $24,000,000 for 
Individual Fishing Quota loans and $100,000,000 for traditional 
direct loans.

                        Departmental Management


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $56,500,000 for Departmental 
Management, of which $5,000,000 is for the Office of Space 
Commerce.
    Cybersecurity.--The Secretary is directed to submit 
quarterly reports to the Committee on the Department's 
activities to improve its cybersecurity, including updates on 
addressing the Inspector General's cybersecurity concerns.
    Modernizing economic statistics in Puerto Rico.--The 
Committee urges the Department to continue its efforts to help 
the government of Puerto Rico to modernize its economic 
statistics programs, and directs the Department, through the 
Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), to initiate efforts to 
calculate gross domestic product (GDP) for Puerto Rico, just as 
BEA currently does for every other U.S. jurisdiction. The 
Committee additionally urges the Department to work toward the 
inclusion of all U.S. territories alongside the 50 states and 
the District of Columbia in BEA's national-level GDP estimates, 
which will require the territory-level GDP data to meet all of 
BEA's quality standards. The Department shall report to the 
Committee on these efforts, both of which were recommended by 
the Congressional Task Force on Economic Growth in Puerto Rico, 
within 90 days of enactment of this Act.
    Interstate Commerce.--The Committee has heard concerns 
about the Electronic Export Information (EEI) requirement 
located in 15 CFR Part 30, which mandates reporting for certain 
goods shipped between the States and Puerto Rico and the U.S. 
Virgin Islands. The Committee urges the Department to work in 
coordination with the governments of Puerto Rico and the U.S. 
Virgin Islands, as well as other Federal agencies and 
stakeholders, to identify alternative data sources that provide 
equivalent statistics on the shipments of goods among the 
territories and the States to achieve the same statistical 
objectives, while reducing the impact on commerce.
    Contract impediments.--The Secretary shall work to ensure 
that unnecessary obstacles do not prevent companies located in 
the territories from being able to compete for the Federal 
contracts administered by the Department of Commerce and other 
Federal agencies.
    Made in America Website.--The Department of Commerce shall, 
within 180 days of enactment of this Act, provide a report to 
the Committee that details how the Department would develop, 
manage, and maintain a website that provides consumers with 
information about products that are made in America. This 
report shall include the projected costs of such an effort.
    Native American Business Development.--The recommendation 
provides up to $2,000,000 for the Secretary to carry out the 
duties assigned to him in the Native American Business 
Development, Trade Promotion, and Tourism Act of 2000 (Public 
Law 106-464).

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee recommends $34,744,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General (OIG) of which $2,000,000 is a transfer from 
FirstNet. The recommendation also includes transfers of 
$3,556,000 from the Census Bureau, $1,302,000 from NOAA, and 
$2,000,000 from PTO for OIG oversight of those activities. The 
Committee expects the OIG to continue its oversight work on 
cybersecurity, satellite procurements, telework, patent 
quality, and the decennial census.

               General Provisions--Department of Commerce


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions 
for the Department of Commerce:
    Section 101 makes funds available for advanced payments 
only upon certification of officials designated by the 
Secretary that such payments are considered to be in the public 
interest.
    Section 102 makes appropriations for the Department 
available for hire of passenger motor vehicles, for services, 
and for uniforms and allowances as authorized by law.
    Section 103 provides the authority to transfer funds 
between Department of Commerce appropriation accounts and 
requires notification to the Committee of certain actions. The 
Committee expects notifications for all capital asset disposals 
with an initial purchase price greater than $2,000,000.
    Section 104 extends congressional notification requirements 
for NOAA satellite programs.
    Section 105 provides for reimbursement for services within 
Department of Commerce buildings.
    Section 106 clarifies that grant recipients under the 
Department of Commerce may continue to deter child pornography, 
copyright infringement, or any other unlawful activity over 
their networks.
    Section 107 provides the NOAA Administrator with the 
authority to avail NOAA of needed resources, with the consent 
of those supplying the resources, to carry out responsibilities 
of any statute administered by NOAA.
    Section 108 prohibits the National Technical Information 
Service from charging for certain activities.
    Section 109 authorizes NOAA to receive payments from other 
entities to defray some costs of permitting and regulatory 
activities.

                                TITLE II


                         DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE


                         General Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $102,500,000 for Department of 
Justice, General Administration, Salaries and Expenses, which 
is $11,500,000 below fiscal year 2018 and $11,707,000 below the 
request.
    Human trafficking.--The destructive toll of human 
trafficking is intolerable, and expanding. It is international 
in scale and affects every part of the United States, both 
rural and urban. The ease of access to modern communication and 
transportation channels has enabled traffickers to operate 
everywhere, to include threatening our homes and communities. 
The Committee has included increased funding for services for 
victims, the investigation and prosecution of human 
traffickers, and the eradication of trafficking organizations. 
The bill includes $100,000,000 in grant funding assistance to 
State, local and tribal governments, and has provided 
substantial increases in resources and personnel to the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the U.S. Attorneys, and the U.S. 
Marshals Service to aid in this mission.
    Opioid and heroin epidemic.--The number of fatal overdoses 
resulting from the nationwide crisis of opioid abuse continues 
to rise. Addressing this issue remains a core Federal law 
enforcement mission. The Committee applauds the Department's 
willingness to prioritize investigating and prosecuting 
criminals who profit from drug trafficking and expects the 
Department to exercise its full authority to eliminate 
fraudulent or reckless distribution of controlled substances as 
well. The Committee notes this epidemic has grown worse with 
the rise of fentanyl trafficking and associated overdose 
fatalities. Fentanyl has also been found to be connected with 
overdoses connected with abuse of cocaine and 
methamphetamines--both of which are seeing a resurgence in 
trafficking. The bill provides $380,000,000 for grants 
authorized by the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 
2016. The bill also provides increases for Federal law 
enforcement to address opioid and other drug trafficking, 
including increases for Drug Enforcement Administration 
operations and their diversion control program, Organized Crime 
and Drug Enforcement Task Forces to dismantle international 
drug cartels, and U.S. Attorneys to focus additional resources 
on opioids trafficking prosecutions.
    Working capital fund and non-appropriated fund budget 
requests and spending plans.--The Committee directs the 
Department to continue to include with their budget submissions 
and expenditure plans detailed breakouts of non-appropriated 
funding sources, as directed in the fiscal year 2018 
appropriations Act, and continue quarterly reports on the 
collections, balances, and obligations of such funds.
    Cyber-stalking and threat crimes.--The Committee remains 
concerned about cyber-stalking and threat crimes, and notes 
that the fiscal year 2018 Appropriations Act required the 
Department to report on its actions to address such crime, with 
recommendations on improving criminal reporting systems to more 
accurately track the incidence of cybercrimes against 
individuals. The Department is directed to submit the report in 
a timely manner to ensure Congress has the necessary 
information to assess and deal with this problem.
    Conferences.--The Committee understands that OMB Memorandum 
M-12-12 called for agencies to reduce travel expenses by 30 
percent compared to the fiscal year 2010 level, and limit 
conference spending. The Committee expects the Department to 
minimize conferences and limit conference expenses to those 
necessary to carry out the mission of the Department. The 
Committee expects the Department to make conference location 
decisions based on transparency, accountability and best value 
in the use of appropriated funds.
    Female genital mutilation.--The Committee expects the 
Department to implement section 1088 of Public Law 112-239, 
regarding female genital mutilation (FGM), and looks forward to 
the Department's expeditious completion of the report required 
by the fiscal year 2018 Appropriations Act on implementation 
and enforcement. The Department is encouraged to expand its 
efforts, including through the FBI and the Civil Rights 
Division, to investigate and prosecute FGM crimes, assist 
victims, and other actions to reduce the incidence of FGM and 
to meet the needs of women and girls affected by FGM.
    First aid kit enhancements.--The Committee is aware that 
first aid products endorsed by the Department of Defense 
Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care (CoTCCC) help to 
reduce death or trauma as a result of bleeding. To improve 
outcomes in crisis situations, the Committee encourages the 
Department to incorporate CoTCCC-supported dressings in first 
aid kits in Department buildings and law enforcement vehicles.
    Third-party settlement payments.--The Committee understands 
a multi-year congressional investigation revealed that in some 
cases the Department of Justice required settling defendants to 
donate money to third-party advocacy or activist groups. These 
payments occurred entirely outside of the congressional 
appropriations and oversight process. Accordingly, section 539 
prohibits the Department from entering into a civil settlement 
agreement in which a defendant is required to make a donation 
to a third-party that is not a victim of the defendant's 
alleged unlawful activity. For the purposes of section 539, the 
term ``donation'' shall not be construed to prohibit any 
payment by a party to provide restitution for or otherwise 
remedy the actual harm, directly and proximately caused by the 
alleged conduct of the party, which is the basis for the 
agreement. The prohibition does not bar payments, upon invoice, 
to an organization or individual for services rendered to 
redress, mitigate or otherwise remediate the actual harm 
directly and proximately caused by a defendant's allegedly 
unlawful conduct. The Committee applauds the policy change set 
forth in the Attorney General's June 5, 2017 memorandum, 
``Prohibition on Settlement Payments to Third Parties''.
    Opioids.--The Committee supports the Department of 
Justice's (DOJ) efforts to curb and ultimately end the opioid 
epidemic, including efforts that will lead to a reduction in 
prescription drug abuse, such as prevention programs, and will 
ensure victims are able to access the resources they need to 
prevent further abuse. The Committee expects that to the extent 
that the DOJ participates in opioid litigation it will do so in 
a manner that ensures potential settlement funds go primarily 
towards victim recovery and drug abuse prevention programs.
    Identity theft.--The Committee remains highly concerned 
about the issue of identity theft, and expects the Department 
to increase significantly its investigation and prosecution of 
such crimes through the additional enforcement resources 
provided in this bill. The Committee directs the Attorney 
General to submit a report not later than 180 days after the 
date of enactment on the number of prosecutions and 
convictions, by judicial district, during fiscal years 2014-
2018, for violations of 18 U.S.C. 1028(a) or 18 U.S.C. 
1028A(a). The report should also include analysis of trends in 
commission of such offenses, and recommendations for improving 
deterrence and prevention of identity theft.

                 JUSTICE INFORMATION SHARING TECHNOLOGY

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends $40,000,000 for Justice 
Information Sharing Technology, which is $5,000,000 above 
fiscal year 2018 and $8,287,000 above the request. The 
Committee provides the increase to support the Department's 
cybersecurity programs, and continues to include bill language 
providing the Department discretion and flexibility to transfer 
available Departmental funds to meet needs for information 
technology transformation and cybersecurity, subject to the 
reprogramming procedures included in this Act.

                EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends $630,000,000 for the Executive 
Office for Immigration Review (EOIR), of which $4,000,000 is 
from immigration examination fees. The recommendation is 
$125,500,000 above fiscal year 2018 and $66,593,000 above the 
request. The recommendation will support a total of 584 
Immigration Judge teams, 100 more than funded in fiscal year 
2018. Funding is also provided to annualize costs associated 
with the new teams funded in fiscal year 2018, provide 
additional law clerks to assist Immigration Judges and reduce 
case processing time, and upgrade information technology and 
facilities. The recommendation includes funding to sustain the 
current Legal Orientation Program and related assistance, such 
as the information desk pilot, at no less than current levels. 
The recommendation does not include any funding to establish or 
fund a legal representation program.
    EOIR performance.--For several years the Committee has been 
concerned with the slow pace of hiring Immigration Judges and 
the unacceptable amount of time it takes to resolve immigration 
cases. The Committee understands that the Department is working 
to accelerate the hiring process and is deploying additional 
resources to those areas with the highest workload such as the 
Southwest Border. The Committee directs this effort to continue 
and that the Department coordinate with the Department of 
Homeland Security (DHS) to develop metrics, practices, and 
pilot programs to institute rapid court proceedings at holding 
facilities along the Southwest Border where individuals are 
detained for immigration violations to ensure their court 
appearance. The Committee notes with approval that EOIR has set 
new prioritization standards and court-based performance 
measures, as the Committees on Appropriations had directed. The 
Committee looks forward to seeing those efforts bear fruit in 
the form of more timely adjudication and reduced backlog, while 
ensuring due process is observed. The Committee directs EOIR to 
continue reporting monthly on performance and Immigration Judge 
hiring in the manner and level of detail as provided in fiscal 
year 2018. Such reports should also include information on the 
number of cases where visa overstay is the sole or primary 
factor for adjudication.
    Efficiency initiatives.--The Committee understands that 
EOIR is considering approaches that could result in savings in 
time and resources, such as modifying the procedure for 
Immigration Judges to issue oral decisions, which currently may 
involve lengthy and detailed recitations of legal authorities 
and case analysis. Other potential approaches to streamlining 
operations include use of preliminary hearings or similar 
approaches to screening cases to address frivolous filings and 
reduce court time required to process them. The Committee 
encourages EOIR to actively explore and, if appropriate, pilot 
approaches that hold promise of improving the efficiency of the 
EOIR court system.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee recommends $102,000,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General (OIG), $4,750,000 above fiscal year 2018 and 
$6,134,000 above the request. The increase supports additional 
workload associated with expanded whistleblower and cyber 
investigations.
    Profiling.--The Committee continues to hear concerns that 
Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have been profiled by 
Department of Justice investigators and prosecutors on the 
basis of race and national origin, including in espionage and 
trade secret cases. The Committee expects OIG to assess whether 
there exists a pattern or practice of using race, national 
origin, and other civil rights classifications to target 
Federal employees and other Americans; report on any 
allegations of civil rights or civil liberties violations 
committed by Department employees in its semiannual reports to 
Congress as required by Section 1001 of the USA PATRIOT Act 
(Public Law 107-56); and if such patterns or practices are 
found to exist, to describe steps the Department has taken to 
address them.
    The Committee has heard concerns that the FBI's Domestic 
Terrorism program may be conducting surveillance on U.S. 
citizens lawfully exercising their 1st Amendment rights, based 
on their race. The Committee directs the OIG to review the 
FBI's Domestic Terrorism program including an assessment of how 
the FBI ensures that resources are allocated based on threats 
such as the number of fatalities and injuries caused by the 
groups or individuals represented in the FBI's various domestic 
terrorism programs.

                    United States Parole Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $12,672,000 for the United States 
Parole Commission.

                            Legal Activities


            SALARIES AND EXPENSES, GENERAL LEGAL ACTIVITIES

    The Committee recommends $897,500,000 for General Legal 
Activities.
    The Committee understands that the Department's failure to 
defend the legal status of congressional records has affected 
some congressional committees. The Committee expects the 
Department and the Administration to be responsive to 
congressional committees and to implement and defend D.C. 
Circuit Court decisions regarding congressional records.
    Human trafficking.--The Civil Rights Division shall 
prioritize funding for the Human Trafficking Prosecution Unit 
and the Department's Anti-Trafficking Coordination Teams to 
investigate and prosecute human traffickers. The Committee 
directs the Department to work with victim service providers 
and non-governmental organizations assisting trafficking 
victims in the United States.
    Deinstitutionalization.--The Committee notes the nationwide 
trends towards deinstitutionalization of patients with 
intellectual or developmental disabilities in favor of 
community-based settings. The Committee also notes that in 
Olmstead v. L.C. (1999), a majority of the Supreme Court held 
that the Americans with Disabilities Act does not condone or 
require removing individuals from institutional settings when 
they are unable to handle or benefit from a community-based 
setting, and that Federal law does not require the imposition 
of community-based treatment on patients who do not desire it. 
The Committee notes that Division H of Public Law 115-141 
requires notification of affected individuals of their legal 
rights in this regard.
    Civil Rights Division, Voting Section.--The Committee looks 
forward to receiving the report required in the fiscal year 
2018 Appropriations Act about Section 203 cases investigated in 
fiscal year 2018. When the fiscal year 2020 budget request is 
submitted, the Department of Justice shall submit to the 
Committee the following information about section 203 cases 
investigated in fiscal year 2019, including: the number of 
cases, broken out by languages included; the number of such 
investigations opened and the number closed, by reason closed 
(e.g. not enough evidence of non-compliance; no evidence of 
non-compliance); the average number of investigations per 
attorney and the average length per investigation.
    Website Accessibility.--The Committee expects the 
Department to clarify standards for website accessibility 
requirements pursuant to the Americans with Disabilities Act in 
fiscal year 2019. The Committee recognizes the confusion caused 
by a lack of uniform website accessibility standards. The lack 
of clear requirements disadvantages small businesses that 
provide essential services for our communities.

                 VACCINE INJURY COMPENSATION TRUST FUND

    The recommendation includes $10,000,000 as a reimbursement 
from the Vaccine Injury Compensation Trust Fund for costs of 
litigating cases under the National Childhood Vaccine Injury 
Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-660).

               SALARIES AND EXPENSES, ANTITRUST DIVISION

    The Committee recommends $164,977,000 for salaries and 
expenses of the Antitrust Division. The recommended funding 
level is offset by $136,000,000 in estimated fee collections 
for a net direct appropriation of $28,977,000.

             SALARIES AND EXPENSES, UNITED STATES ATTORNEYS

    The Committee recommends $2,250,000,000 for the Executive 
Office for United States Attorneys and the 94 United States 
Attorneys' offices, which is $113,250,000 above fiscal year 
2018 and $144,818,000 above the request. This increase is 
provided to sustain hiring and program operations funded in 
fiscal year 2018, and provide additional prosecutors to meet 
rising workload for the investigation and prosecution of 
terrorism, violent crime and other serious crime such as drug 
trafficking and cybercrime. Of the increase provided, not less 
than $5,000,000 is for additional investigative and prosecution 
costs associated with human trafficking.
    The Committee recommendation includes $1,680,000,000 for 
criminal litigation; $541,000,000 for civil litigation; and 
$29,000,000 for legal education.
    Human trafficking.--The recommendation continues bill 
language requiring that each U.S. Attorney participate in human 
trafficking task forces, and the Department shall continue to 
submit semiannual reports on the performance of these task 
forces.
    Prescription drug abuse.--The number of fatal overdoses 
resulting from the nationwide crisis of prescription drug abuse 
continues to increase. Addressing this issue remains a core 
Federal law enforcement mission. The Committee applauds the 
Department's willingness to prioritize investigating and 
prosecuting criminals who profit from trafficking and expects 
the Department will exercise its full authority to eliminate 
fraudulent or reckless distribution of controlled substances as 
well.
    Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) enforcement.--The 
Committee expects the Department to continue to make IPR 
enforcement an investigative and prosecutorial priority for 
Federal prosecutors, to include thwarting a new wave of digital 
copyright piracy.
    Trafficking and money laundering enforcement.--The 
Committee expects the Department to continue to make drug 
trafficking and money laundering enforcement an investigative 
and prosecutorial priority for Federal prosecutors.

                   UNITED STATES TRUSTEE SYSTEM FUND

    The Committee recommends $230,000,000 for the United States 
Trustee Program.

      SALARIES AND EXPENSES, FOREIGN CLAIMS SETTLEMENT COMMISSION

    The Committee recommends $2,409,000 for the Foreign Claims 
Settlement Commission, which is equal to the current level and 
the request.

                     FEES AND EXPENSES OF WITNESSES

    The Committee recommends $270,000,000, which is the same as 
fiscal year 2018 and the request, for fees and expenses of 
witnesses who appear on behalf of the Government in cases in 
which the United States is a party. This appropriation is 
considered mandatory for scorekeeping purposes.

           SALARIES AND EXPENSES, COMMUNITY RELATIONS SERVICE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends $15,500,000 for the Community 
Relations Service.

                         ASSETS FORFEITURE FUND

    The Committee recommends $20,514,000 for expenses 
authorized by subparagraphs (B), (F), and (G) of section 
524(c)(1) of title 28, United States Code. This amount is the 
same as the fiscal year 2018 amount and the budget request.
    Section 522 rescinds $674,000,000 from the Assets 
Forfeiture Fund (Fund). The Department reports that Fund 
balances will be sufficient to allow the Department to rescind 
$674,000,000 with no delays in equitable sharing payments. The 
Committee directs the Department to refrain from suspending or 
delaying equitable sharing payments in fiscal year 2019.
    Section 531 of the bill requires the Department to submit a 
spending plan for fiscal year 2019. The Committee directs the 
Department to include in this plan proposed spending from the 
Fund, to include estimates of: Fund balances; equitable sharing 
payments; Joint Law Enforcement Operations obligations; and 
obligations by component.

                     United States Marshals Service


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $1,392,400,000 for the salaries 
and expenses of the United States Marshals Service (USMS), 
which is $80,908,000 above fiscal year 2018 and $122,029,000 
above the request. The recommendation sustains the initiatives 
funded in fiscal year 2018; provides for 100 additional Deputy 
U.S. Marshals for priority court security, prisoner 
transportation and violent crime and gang initiatives; provides 
for the establishment of a new regional fugitive task force; 
provides for the competitive lease or procurement of aircraft 
for fugitive investigation and apprehensions; and funds the 
request for the Capture initiative.
    The Committee has provided separate funding recommendations 
by decision unit as follows:

 
 
 
Judicial and Courthouse Security......................      $470,000,000
Fugitive Apprehension.................................       550,000,000
Prisoner Security and Transportation..................       250,000,000
Protection of Witnesses...............................        57,400,000
Tactical Operations...................................        65,000,000
                                                       -----------------
    Total, Salaries and Expenses......................    $1,392,400,000
 

                              CONSTRUCTION

    The Committee recommends $25,000,000, which is $28,400,000 
below fiscal year 2018, and $10,029,000 above the request, for 
construction and related expenses in space controlled, occupied 
or used by USMS for prisoner holding and related support. The 
Committee expects USMS to apply this funding to its top 
priority projects.

                       FEDERAL PRISONER DETENTION

    The Committee recommends $1,568,793,000 for Federal 
Prisoner Detention, which is $32,793,000 above fiscal year 2018 
and the request. The increase in funding is required to ensure 
the USMS can fully support anticipated housing, medical, and 
transportation cost increases of the USMS detainee population. 
With increased resources being dedicated to prosecutions of 
violent crimes, drug and human trafficking, the detainee 
population is anticipated to increase.

                       National Security Division


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends $101,369,000 for the National 
Security Division (NSD), which is $338,000 above fiscal year 
2018 and the same as the request. This amount will help NSD 
address its national security and counterterrorism workload, 
including its Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act 
responsibilities.
    Foreign Agents Registration Act.--The Committee understands 
that NSD is developing a strategic plan for its enforcement of 
the Foreign Agents Registration Act (FARA). The strategy will 
focus on identification of actors obliged to register under 
FARA; increasing FARA outreach and training; and improving the 
eFile system and the FARA website. The Committee looks forward 
to completion of the plan.

                      Interagency Law Enforcement


                 INTERAGENCY CRIME AND DRUG ENFORCEMENT

    The Committee recommends $570,000,000 for Interagency Crime 
and Drug Enforcement, which is $27,150,000 above fiscal year 
2018 and $48,437,000 above the request. Funds are included 
under this heading to support interagency Organized Crime Drug 
Enforcement Task Forces (OCDETF), which target high-level drug 
trafficking organizations through coordinated, multi-
jurisdictional investigations.
    Decision unit subtotals.--The recommendation includes 
$394,750,000 for investigations and $175,250,000 for 
prosecutions. The Committee expects OCDETF to enhance its 
investigative, intelligence and prosecutorial efforts through 
OCDETF-led activities, including the OCDETF Fusion Center, 
OCDETF Co-located Strike Forces and the International Organized 
Crime Intelligence and Operations Center, and direct 
collaboration with State and local law enforcement, United 
States Attorneys' offices and the Criminal Division. The 
Committee expects OCDETF to focus additional resources on 
targeting opioid trafficking organizations.
    Full-Time Equivalents (FTE).--The Committee directs the 
Department to continue to submit with its fiscal year 2020 
budget request an updated report on FTE devoted to OCDETF cases 
at the level of detail provided in its September 9, 2015, 
report to the Committee. The report should include actual and 
projected investigative and prosecutorial FTE devoted to OCDETF 
cases for fiscal years 2018-2020, broken out by agency and 
funding source.

                    Federal Bureau of Investigation


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $9,254,347,000 for the salaries 
and expenses of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), 
which is $224,145,000 above fiscal year 2018 and $382,267,000 
above the request. The increase reflects funding necessary to 
sustain and continue programs carried out in fiscal year 2018. 
Additional funding is provided to further the FBI's critical 
missions to counter terrorism and protect national security, 
including for: additional counterterror analysts and technical 
personnel; critical counterintelligence priorities, such as 
supply chain and insider threat programs; extending the Render 
Safe program; enhancing surveillance programs and upgrading 
aviation assets; and shared expenses for operations of the 
National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center.
    The funding increase supports continued work on the FBI 
Next Generation Cyber program, and related systems to improve 
data analysis and investigative tools to target challenges such 
as the use of DarkNet anonymizing services by transnational 
organized criminals and opioid traffickers to communicate 
covertly and operate via illicit online marketplaces. In 
addition, additional funding is provided to build on fiscal 
year 2018 human trafficking efforts and increase the number of 
squads dedicated to such work.
    Finally, the recommendation supports the programs of the 
Criminal Justice Information Services Division, including but 
not limited to the Biometric Technology Center, Next Generation 
Identification, the National Crime Information Center, and the 
National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS). The 
recommendation fully funds the FBI's NICS operations. The FBI 
is directed to consult with and provide technical guidance to 
Federal agencies to help them fulfill their obligation to enter 
all relevant records into the NICS database.
    The Committee continues its direction to the FBI to 
allocate its agents and support staff based on unique threats 
and workload of each of the FBI's field offices to ensure that 
resources are effectively deployed to address the agency's 
highest priorities.
    The Committee has provided separate funding recommendations 
by decision unit as follows:

 
 
 
Intelligence..........................................    $1,785,000,000
Counterintelligence and National Security.............     3,755,000,000
Criminal Enterprise and Federal Crimes................     3,154,847,000
Criminal Justice Services.............................       559,500,000
                                                       -----------------
    Total, Salaries and Expenses......................    $9,254,347,000
 

    Human trafficking investigations.--The bill includes an 
increase of $25,000,000 to expand human trafficking 
investigations, and to establish and coordinate human 
trafficking intelligence collection, analysis, and sharing. 
These additional resources will help the FBI combat sex 
trafficking and forced labor, to include boosting criminal 
investigations and working with victims of such crimes.
    Aviation modernization.--The Committee directs the FBI to 
provide as soon as possible the briefing on its aviation 
modernization program required by the fiscal year 2017 and 2018 
appropriations Acts.
    Integrated medical support for tactical operations.--The 
Committee supports the Bureau's actions to formalize its 
existing external partnerships in the Operational Medicine 
Program in order to support medical contingency planning and 
improve medical care delivery for high risk law enforcement 
missions. Through this partnership, the FBI can leverage the 
strengths of an academic medical center partner to develop the 
methods, standards and research necessary to determine the 
optimal level of medical support for critical missions. The 
Committee expects the FBI to continue its work in this area, 
with the goal of further integration across mission areas where 
medical support needs are identified.
    Intellectual property rights (IPR) enforcement.--The 
Committee expects the FBI to prioritize the investigation of 
IPR cases, and coordinate with IPR units at the U.S. Attorneys 
and the Criminal Division to investigate U.S.-based sites and 
apps engaged in such criminal activity. The Committee looks 
forward to receiving the report on IPR enforcement required by 
the fiscal year 2018 Appropriations Act and directs the FBI to 
provide an updated report not later than 120 days after 
enactment on its IPR investigation activities, particularly in 
the area of creative content theft.
    Gang activity.--The Committee remains concerned about the 
rise in gang activity across the country. The Committee directs 
the FBI to continue to expand its task force activity, 
including its Violent Gang Safe Streets task forces, in order 
to undermine these organizations and reverse the criminal 
trends associated with their resurgence.
    Canine detection assets.--The Committee supports the FBI 
Weapons of Mass Destruction Directorate's efforts to more 
efficiently and effectively disseminate critical threat 
information to the explosives detection canine community and, 
in conjunction with government and academic partners, equip the 
community with the resources necessary to mitigate those risks 
through discovery, innovation, and advancement of technologies 
to support this national security mandate.
    Public Access Line.--In the fiscal year 2018 Appropriations 
Act, the FBI was directed to review protocols associated with 
communication and information sharing between the Public Access 
Line and FBI field offices. The Committee looks forward to the 
timely submission of this report and improvements to the Public 
Access Line operations.
    Biomedical technology threats.--The Committee is aware that 
new, sophisticated biomedical technologies can be used by state 
and non-state actors in weapons of mass destruction. The 
Committee is encouraged by the efforts of the FBI's Weapons of 
Mass Destruction Directorate in collaboration with other 
Federal partners to identify emerging threats related to 
chemical and biological weapons. The Committee directs the FBI 
to provide a briefing not later than 180 days after the 
enactment of this Act on biotechnologies and FBI efforts to 
safeguard the bioeconomy.

                              CONSTRUCTION

    The Committee recommends $65,000,000, which is $13,105,000 
above the request, for the construction of FBI facilities and 
related activities. Funding in this account will facilitate and 
expedite work on current design and construction projects at 
Quantico, and address necessary secure work environment (SWE) 
building and modifications. Funding above the request is 
provided to address the highest priority SWE requirements.
    FBI Headquarters.--The recommendation includes no funding 
for the revised Headquarters consolidation plan released on 
February 12, 2018, because many questions regarding the new 
plan remain unanswered, including the revision of longstanding 
security requirements and changes to headquarters capacity in 
the national capital region. Until these concerns are addressed 
and the appropriate authorizing Committees approve a 
prospectus, the Committee is reluctant to appropriate 
additional funds for this activity.

                    Drug Enforcement Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends total budget authority of 
$2,740,395,000 for Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) 
salaries and expenses, of which $420,703,000 is derived from 
fees deposited in the Diversion Control Fund, and 
$2,319,692,000 is provided by direct appropriation. The 
recommended appropriation is $129,366,000 above fiscal year 
2018 and $132,233,000 above the request. The funding sustains 
activities funded in fiscal year 2018 and provides additional 
funds for at least four new heroin enforcement teams; fentanyl 
profiling; additional agents and analysts for the locations 
with the highest workload, to include associated move and 
incentive costs; law enforcement safety; international 
programs; technical and communication equipment refresh; and to 
support DEA cyber and language workforce capabilities.
    The Committee has provided separate funding recommendations 
by decision unit for salaries and expenses as follows:

 
 
 
International Enforcement.............................      $480,000,000
Domestic Enforcement..................................     1,825,000,000
State and Local Assistance............................        14,692,000
                                                       -----------------
    Total, Salaries and Expenses......................    $2,319,692,000
 

    The Committee urges the Drug Enforcement Administration to 
expeditiously process any pending applications for 
authorization to produce marijuana exlclusively for use in 
medical research.
    Diversion control.--The recommendation includes 
$420,703,000 for the regulatory and enforcement activities of 
DEA's Diversion Control Program. The Diversion Control Program 
is funded by fee collections.
    Methamphetamine lab cleanup.--The funding recommendation 
includes $10,000,000 to assist State, local and tribal law 
enforcement agencies in efforts to remove and dispose of 
hazardous materials at methamphetamine labs, to include 
training, technical assistance, purchase of equipment and a 
container program.
    Prescription drug and heroin abuse.--The Committee 
continues to regard with deep concern the harm of prescription 
drug abuse, and crisis levels of heroin abuse and overdoses. 
DEA reported in its 2016 National Drug Threat Assessment that 
drug poisoning deaths are at their highest ever recorded level, 
and since 2009 annual deaths from drugs have outnumbered deaths 
by firearms, vehicle crashes, suicide, and homicide. The 
assessment also notes the continuing rise in smuggling across 
the borders and the continued role of international, especially 
Mexican, trafficking cartels in moving heroin and other drugs 
into U.S. communities, as well as the growing flow of fentanyl 
from China and Mexico. The Committee directs DEA to brief the 
Committee no later than 90 days after enactment of this Act on 
the number of heroin and prescription drug diversion 
investigations for fiscal years 2017 and 2018, and estimated 
for fiscal year 2019; the amounts and street value of drugs 
associated with such investigations; and prosecutions resulting 
from investigations. The Committee also encourages DEA to work 
with partner agencies, to include the Department of Health and 
Human Services, on outcome measures of success, in the 
incidence and severity of abuse, which reflect the impact of 
multi-agency efforts.
    Aviation program.--The Committee recognizes the need for 
the DEA Aviation Division to modernize its fleet, as over a 
third of the Division's aircraft are far older than industry 
standards. The Aviation Division supports drug interdiction and 
eradication efforts with Intelligence, Surveillance, and 
Reconnaissance purposed aircraft, as well as aircraft for 
fugitive and cargo transport. Aircraft are essential to 
countering opioid and other illegal drug trafficking. The 
Committee expects DEA to apply funding included in the bill to 
its most critical aviation asset refresh requirements. DEA 
shall submit promptly the aviation fleet and modernization plan 
report required by the fiscal year 2018 Appropriations Act.

          Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $1,316,678,000 for the salaries 
and expenses of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and 
Explosives (ATF), which is $22,902,000 above fiscal year 2018 
and the same as the request. ATF's highest priority shall be to 
address violent crime and promote public safety.
    The recommendation fully funds the request, including 
increases for the National Integrated Ballistics Information 
Network (NIBIN), the National Firearms Act (NFA), and the 
National Public Safety Partnership.
    Investigative Support Services.--The Committee 
recommendation includes a $13,200,000 increase, as requested, 
for the activities of the NFA Division to continue improvements 
in processing NFA applications. The Committee notes that an 
increase of not less than $10,000,000 was provided in the 
fiscal year 2018 Appropriations Act for these activities, and 
expects that resources provided for fiscal year 2019 will 
complement and accelerate activities begun in 2018 to expedite 
the handling of an unprecedented volume of applications, while 
employing technology to enhance processing capabilities. 
Funding provided should support progress in developing and 
implementing ATF's next generation eForms system.
    NIBIN.--The Committee is encouraged by the promise of 
improved crime gun intelligence and information sharing, and 
expects funding provided in this bill will aid in interdicting 
crime guns and preventing gun trafficking through the NIBIN. 
The Committee encourages ATF to establish a NIBIN presence on 
the Southwest Border, and directs the Department to update the 
Committee on its efforts not later than 90 days after 
enactment.
    Counter-improvised explosive devices.--The Committee 
supports the work of the National Center for Explosives 
Training and Research on countering advanced improvised 
explosive devices.
    Explosives storage.--Current ATF explosive storage 
regulations are based on the American Table of Distances (ATD) 
that was developed from a review of accidents at the turn of 
the nineteenth century. One proposed alternative to the ATD 
would be standards based on quantitative risk methodologies, 
such as those developed and used by some in industry. To better 
assess the potential for such standards, ATF is directed to 
evaluate available alternatives to the current ATD standards 
and report to the Committee not later than six months after 
enactment on the potential costs and benefits, to include 
implementation.

                         Federal Prison System


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends $7,152,400,000 for salaries and 
expenses of the Bureau of Prisons (BOP), which is $38,400,000 
above fiscal year 2018 and $110,072,000 above the request.
    Contract confinement.--The Committee continues to view 
contract confinement as an effective and essential tool to help 
BOP meet low security facility requirements to alleviate 
overcrowding. The Committee believes BOP should increase its 
use of contract confinement to more effectively meet its 
housing requirements.
    In fiscal year 2017, the Committee directed BOP to review 
its security classifications and propose a capacity realignment 
plan that encompassed both U.S. citizens and non-citizen 
inmates to determine whether they were housed in the most cost-
effective facilities. The Committee understands that BOP 
continues to review its security classification procedures, and 
has convened a Classification Work Group to review current 
policy. The Committee directs BOP to update the Committee not 
later than 90 days after enactment on the status of the Work 
Group review, in particular with regard to making most 
effective use of contract facilities for all its low and 
minimum security inmates.
    Land Mobile Radio Communications.--The Committee considers 
Land Mobile Radio (LMR) communications equipment used by BOP to 
be critical to officer safety and security. This is especially 
true in correctional facilities where alternative means of 
communication pose a threat to officer safety, and LMR is the 
only safe and secure communication method. The Committee is 
concerned that the age of BOP LMR and other radios make them 
increasingly unreliable and difficult to maintain. The 
Committee directs BOP, from within funding provided, to begin 
to refresh LMR systems in facilities where aging communications 
infrastructure poses a threat to officer safety. BOP shall 
report on the status of these efforts, and include funding for 
such refreshment and replacement, in future budget submissions 
and associated spending plans.
    Contraband cell phones.--The Committee encourages the 
Department to continue to work with the Federal Communications 
Commission to address the issue of contraband cell phones and 
other devices. These devices are being used nationwide by 
inmates to plan attacks, promote the distribution of controlled 
substances and weapons, engage in gang activity, and intimidate 
victims, witnesses, and correctional staff. The Committee 
directs BOP to follow up on the efforts described in its 2016 
report to Congress on cell phone detection and signal blocking 
technology approaches to thwart such devices. BOP must ensure 
that incarcerated individuals, who use these illicit devices, 
will no longer have access to the networks and spectrum to 
direct activities in or beyond the prison.
    Medication assisted treatment.--The Committee encourages 
BOP to make abstinence-based relapse prevention treatment 
options available to inmates with a history of opioid 
dependence.
    Personal firearms.--The Committee recognizes the Bureau's 
responsibility to control the use of firearms on BOP 
facilities. At the same time, it understands that BOP does not 
have a policy that would ensure officers who are legally 
authorized to carry a concealed firearm for self-protection can 
have an on-site, secure gun locker, or alternatively, lock 
weapons securely in their personal vehicles. The Committee 
encourages the Bureau to review this issue and implement a 
policy that enables officers to secure their personal firearms 
while on duty in a fashion that preserves security on Bureau 
sites but also facilitates officers' legal rights to keep and 
bear arms.
    Augmentation.--Overcrowding remains a serious threat to 
officer safety, particularly at high and medium security 
facilities. To meet staffing needs, the BOP has used a process 
called augmentation, whereby a non-custody employee is assigned 
custody responsibilities. The Committee directs the BOP to 
curtail its overreliance on augmentation and instead hire 
additional full-time correctional staff before continuing to 
augment existing staff. BOP is further directed to submit 
quarterly reports on the inmate-to-correctional officer ratio 
at each facility, using OPM's definition of a corrections 
officer, broken out by security level and shift.
    Rapid testing for infectious diseases.--The Committee notes 
the healthcare challenges posed by infectious diseases like 
HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis C, and acknowledges that such challenges 
are likely to grow as opioid epidemic-related infection rates 
continue to increase. BOP is encouraged to examine 
opportunities to increase rapid testing for these diseases and 
ensure affected individuals are aware of their health status.
    Educational programs.--The Committee supports the 
Department's coordination and collaboration with Historically 
Black Colleges and Universities to provide educational programs 
for recently released and soon to be released criminal 
offenders to assist them in obtaining skills that will help 
them successfully transition back into their communities and 
reduce recidivism rates.
    Prisoner re-entry.--BOP shall evaluate the effectiveness of 
its community reintegration programs and community confinement 
facilities and develop best practices, guidelines and policies 
for effective reintegration.

                        BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES

    The Committee recommends $150,000,000 for the construction, 
acquisition, modernization, maintenance, and repair of prison 
and detention facilities housing Federal inmates. This amount 
is $11,571,000 below fiscal year 2018, and $51,000,000 above 
the request.
    The Committee directs the Bureau to apply the funding 
provided to reduce its longstanding backlog in overdue 
maintenance and repair projects. BOP shall continue to provide 
monthly status of construction reports and notify the Committee 
of any changes reflected in those reports.

   LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES, FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, 
                              INCORPORATED

    The Committee recommends a limitation on administrative 
expenses of $2,700,000 for Federal Prison Industries, 
Incorporated, which is the same as fiscal year 2018.

               State and Local Law Enforcement Activities

    In total, the Committee recommends $2,946,300,000 for State 
and local law enforcement and crime prevention grant programs, 
including $2,842,300,000 in discretionary appropriations.
    Management and administrative expenses.--The Committee 
encourages grant offices to minimize administrative spending to 
maximize funding for grants or training and technical 
assistance. The Committee also directs the Department to ensure 
that the methodology for assessing management and 
administration costs is equitable and reflects a fair 
representation of the share of common management and 
administrative costs associated with each program. The 
Committee notes that an across-the-board percentage assessment 
may not be the most appropriate solution. The Committee is 
aware that, in general, the Department's grant offices for 
State and Local Law Enforcement Activities have authority to 
allocate certain expenses administratively to activities that 
are ancillary to the core purposes of the appropriation (e.g., 
peer review for a competitive program, training and technical 
assistance, and research and statistical activities).
    Streamlining grant administration.--The recommendation 
adopts the Administration's proposal to streamline grant 
administration to reduce duplication and leverage synergies 
among the Department's grantmaking components. Under the State 
and Local Law Enforcement Assistance heading, the 
recommendation funds the COPS Hiring Program at $225,500,000, 
which is the same as fiscal year 2018 and $126,500,000 above 
the request.
    The recommendation also includes funding under the Drug 
Enforcement Administration heading to assist State, local and 
tribal law enforcement agencies with the removal and disposal 
of hazardous materials at methamphetamine labs, including funds 
for training, technical assistance, the purchase of equipment, 
and a container program.
    Office of Victims of Crime (OVC).--The recommendation 
provides $2,600,000,000 for the Crime Victims Fund. Within 
available resources, OVC may implement Vision 21, which seeks 
to bring better technology, planning, research and data into 
the crime victims services field.
    The Committee directs OVC to provide an updated report to 
the Committee, not later than 90 days after the enactment of 
this Act, on the actions they are taking to ensure Crime 
Victims Fund resources are reaching communities most affected 
by violence.
    The Committee is aware that hospital-based violence 
intervention has shown effective results in preventing injury 
recidivism for victims of violent injury, and encourages States 
to consider utilizing funding provided through the Crime 
Victims Fund to establish or expand hospital-based intervention 
programs.
    Tribal assistance.--The Committee expects the Office of 
Justice Programs (OJP) to continue to consult closely with 
tribes to determine how tribal assistance funds will be 
allocated among grant programs that improve public safety in 
tribal communities, such as grants for detention facilities 
under section 20109 of subtitle A of title II of the Violent 
Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (Public Law 103-
322), civil and criminal legal assistance as authorized by 
title I of Public Law 106-559, tribal courts, and alcohol and 
substance abuse reduction assistance programs. The Committee 
directs OJP to use such consultation to inform the allocation 
of funds it submits as part of its spending plan. The Committee 
notes that the recommendation also includes grant funding for 
tribal law enforcement programs through the Office on Violence 
Against Women (OVW).
    The Committee urges the Department to provide technical 
assistance, including equipment, to tribal governments to 
enable such governments to access, enter information into, and 
obtain information from, Federal criminal information 
databases, as authorized under section 534(d) of title 28, 
United States Code.

                    Office on Violence Against Women


       VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN PREVENTION AND PROSECUTION PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends $493,000,000 for OVW, which is 
$1,000,000 above fiscal year 2018. The recommendation does not 
use funds from the Crime Victims Fund to pay for these 
discretionary programs. Funds are distributed as follows:

       VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN PREVENTION AND PROSECUTION PROGRAMS
                        (in thousands of dollars)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Program                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
STOP Grants...........................................        $215,000
Transitional Housing Assistance.......................          35,500
Research and Evaluation on Violence Against Women.....           3,500
Consolidated Youth-Oriented Program...................          11,000
Grants to Encourage Arrest Policies...................          53,000
  Homicide Reduction Initiative.......................          (4,000)
Sexual Assault Victims Services.......................          35,500
Rural Domestic Violence and Child Abuse Enforcement...          40,000
Violence on College Campuses..........................          20,000
Civil Legal Assistance................................          45,000
Elder Abuse Grant Program.............................           5,000
Family Civil Justice..................................          16,000
Education and Training for Disabled Female Victims....           6,000
National Resource Center on Workplace Responses.......             500
Research on Violence Against Indian Women.............           1,000
Indian Country--Sexual Assault Clearinghouse..........             500
Tribal Special Domestic Violence Criminal Jurisdiction           4,000
Rape Survivor Child Custody Act.......................           1,500
                                                       =================
  TOTAL, Violence Against Women Prevention and                $493,000
   Prosecution Programs...............................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Human trafficking.--The Committee encourages OVW to ensure 
that the Transitional Housing Program can assist victims of 
human trafficking, and the Committee urges the DOJ to take 
these victims into consideration when distributing OVW funds.
    Safe visitation and exchange.--The Committee encourages the 
Office on Violence Against Women to consider proposals that 
help growing communities adapt their court-based programs to 
support safe visitation and exchange and related services, with 
a focus on communities that are outgrowing their existing 
facilities and considering new alternatives to address 
population growth.

                       Office of Justice Programs


                  RESEARCH, EVALUATION AND STATISTICS

    The Committee recommends $94,000,000 for Research, 
Evaluation and Statistics, which is $4,000,000 above fiscal 
year 2018 and $17,000,000 above the request. Funds are 
distributed as follows:

                   RESEARCH, EVALUATION AND STATISTICS
                        (in thousands of dollars)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Program                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Bureau of Justice Statistics..........................         $50,000
  NCS-X Implementation Program........................          (5,000)
National Institute of Justice.........................          44,000
  Domestic Radicalization Research....................          (4,000)
                                                       =================
  TOTAL, Research, Evaluation and Statistics..........         $94,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Human trafficking research.--The Committee acknowledges the 
difficulty in estimating the prevalence of human trafficking, 
and the corresponding difficulty in gauging the effectiveness 
of the criminal justice system's response to the problem. 
Research can play an invaluable role in understanding 
prevalence and effectiveness through improved data collection 
and analysis. The Committee encourages the National Institute 
of Justice (NIJ) to increase funding for research into human 
trafficking.
    Campus sexual assault.--The Committee supports the 
Department's continued development and testing of a pilot 
campus climate survey. Preliminary results of the pilot suggest 
the vast majority of campus sexual assaults are not reported to 
authorities, do not come to the attention of university 
officials and, therefore, are not represented in official 
Federal statistics. The Committee encourages the Department to 
examine expanding the pilot survey and developing a cost-
effective, standardized, and methodologically rigorous 
nationwide research program on campus sexual assault.
    The Committee also encourages NIJ to use funding to expand 
Federal research projects at institutions of higher education 
on campus sexual assault prevention interventions and advance 
the dissemination of best practices.
    Opioid research.--The Committee recognizes that in-depth 
examination of fatal opioid overdoses, including fatalities 
following prior non-fatal overdoses, and trends in the 
evolution, trafficking, and use of illegally manufactured 
opioid analogues, in combination with existing illegal drugs, 
can yield valuable information for law enforcement, hospitals, 
treatment providers, and prosecutors as they identify effective 
policy, interventions, and prevention strategies. The Committee 
urges the Department to support regional efforts to undertake 
such comprehensive opioid fatality research.
    Cybercrime.--The Committee is concerned by the lack of 
information on crimes committed against individuals and 
facilitated by the interstate telecommunications communications 
system. The Committee directs the NIJ to submit a report, not 
later than 180 days after the enactment of this Act, that 
analyzes cybercrimes against individuals. This report should 
address hate crimes, severe harassment, cyberstalking, 
threatening communications, hoaxes perpetrated against law 
enforcement (known as ``swatting''), sexual coercion (known as 
``sextortion''), the intentional release of personally 
identifiable information (known as ``doxing''), the 
nonconsensual release of intimate images (known as ``revenge 
porn''), and any other related crimes that are committed 
against an individual and facilitated by the interstate 
telecommunications system. The report should include an 
analysis of the economic impact of these crimes, their effect 
on women and ethnic, religious, and racial minorities, and an 
examination of their frequency.
    High-risk vehicle events.--The Committee encourages the 
Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) to develop a data collection 
process to accurately capture the number of deaths and injuries 
from police pursuit and high-risk vehicle events.
    Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.--The Committee notes 
that the National Crime Victimization Survey collects data on 
race and ethnicity per Office and Management and Budget 
guidance on this matter, and the survey includes an Asian 
American and Pacific Islander category. The Committee, however, 
is concerned that BJS often aggregates these data into an 
``other'' category. The Committee directs BJS to disaggregate 
these data to the maximum extent practicable and to examine 
ways to improve statistics on victimization of Asian Americans 
and Pacific Islanders.
    Puerto Rico.--The Committee is concerned that Puerto Rico 
is not included in many BJS data products and recommends BJS 
work to improve statistics for Puerto Rico. The Committee 
directs BJS to coordinate with the Census Bureau in the 
feasibility study directed under the Bureau of the Census 
heading in the Department of Commerce section of this report.
    School safety research.--The Committee directs the National 
Institute of Justice and the Bureau of Justice Statistics to 
examine the current role of School Resource Offices (SROs) in 
schools, and provide recommendations on how SROs can better 
serve the needs of the students. This report should include, 
but is not limited to, an examination of the roles and duties 
of SROs in schools and SRO's effects on student outcomes and 
school safety, crime rates, and an examination of the instances 
of disciplinary actions including demographic characteristics 
of the student, and the details and severity of the infraction. 
The Committee directs the Department to submit this report not 
later than 180 days after enactment of this Act, and to include 
the Department's plan for disseminating this information to the 
public and relevant government entities.

               STATE AND LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE

    The Committee recommends $2,018,500,000 for State and Local 
Law Enforcement Assistance programs, which is $338,500,000 
above fiscal year 2018 and $886,000,000 above the request. 
Funds are distributed as follows:

               STATE AND LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE
                        (in thousands of dollars)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Program                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grants..............        $441,500
  Officer Robert Wilson III VALOR Initiative..........         (15,000)
  Missing Alzheimer's Patients Grants.................          (2,000)
  Juvenile Indigent Defense...........................          (2,500)
  NamUS...............................................          (2,400)
  Violent Gang and Gun Crime Reduction................         (50,000)
  Capital Litigation and Wrongful Conviction Review...          (3,000)
  Prison Rape Prevention and Prosecution..............         (15,500)
  Emergency Federal Law Enforcement Assistance........         (10,000)
  Managed Access......................................          (2,000)
State Criminal Alien Assistance Program...............         255,000
Victims of Trafficking Grants.........................         100,000
Economic, High-tech, White Collar and Cybercrime                11,000
 Prevention...........................................
Adam Walsh Act Implementation.........................          20,000
Bulletproof Vests Partnerships........................          22,500
National Sex Offender Public Website..................           1,000
National Instant Criminal Background Check System               75,000
 (NICS) Initiative....................................
  NICS Act Record Improvement Program.................         (25,000)
DNA Initiative........................................         130,000
  Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grants.....................        (120,000)
  Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grants.          (6,000)
  Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program Grants.........          (4,000)
Community Teams to Reduce the Sexual Assault Kit (SAK)          47,500
 Backlog..............................................
CASA--Special Advocates...............................          12,000
Tribal Assistance.....................................          40,000
Second Chance Act/Offender Reentry....................          85,000
  Children of Incarcerated Parents Demo Grants........          (5,000)
STOP School Violence Act..............................         100,000
Community trust initiative............................          70,000
  Body Worn Camera Partnership Program................         (22,500)
  Justice Reinvestment Initiative.....................         (30,000)
  Research and statistics on community trust..........          (2,500)
  Byrne Criminal Justice Innovation Program...........         (15,000)
Opioid initiative.....................................         380,000
  Drug Courts.........................................         (75,000)
  Veterans Treatment Courts...........................         (20,000)
  Residential Substance Abuse Treatment...............         (30,000)
  Prescription Drug Monitoring........................         (30,000)
  Mentally Ill Offender Act...........................         (30,000)
  Other Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act              (195,000)
   activities.........................................
COPS Hiring Program...................................         225,500
  Smart Policing......................................          (5,000)
  Smart Prosecution...................................          (2,500)
  Regional Information Sharing Activities.............         (40,000)
  Tribal Resources Grant Program......................         (35,000)
  Community Policing Development/Training and                  (10,000)
   Technical Assistance...............................
  POLICE Act..........................................         (20,000)
Keep Young Athletes Safe Act of 2018..................           2,500
                                                       =================
  TOTAL, State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance...      $2,018,500
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    STOP School Violence Act.--The recommendation provides 
$100,000,000 for the STOP School Violence Act grant program, 
which is equal to authorized amount and is $25,000,000 above 
the fiscal year 2018 level. Through the STOP School Violence 
Act program, school districts should consider using funds for 
security hardening measures, such as reporting systems for 
threats of school violence; locks, lighting, and other 
deterrent measures; and technology for expedited notification 
of local law enforcement during an emergency.
    The Committee reminds the Department of Justice that the 
COPS Hiring Program may include grant award categories for 
School Resource Officers and directs the Department to provide 
a preference for hiring such officers.
    Opioid abuse.--The recommendation includes $380,000,000 for 
programs to reduce opioid abuse, authorized by the 
Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016 (CARA; Public 
Law 114-198). Within this amount is $75,000,000 for drug 
courts; $20,000,000 for veterans treatment courts; $30,000,000 
for Residential Substance Abuse Treatment; $30,000,000 for 
prescription drug monitoring; $30,000,000 for the Mentally Ill 
Offender Act; and $195,000,000 for the Comprehensive Opioid 
Abuse Program (COAP). Of the amount made available for COAP no 
less than $2,500,000 shall be made available for additional 
replication sites employing the Law Enforcement Assisted 
Diversion (LEAD) model, with applicants demonstrating a plan 
for sustainability of LEAD-model diversion programs.
    The Committee believes that communities must address opioid 
abuse through comprehensive strategies that incorporate 
enhanced enforcement, education and treatment. The Committee 
directs OJP to work with DEA, the Department of Health and 
Human Services, and the NIJ to develop, and help communities 
implement, best practices to address opioid abuse.
    The Committee encourages OJP to develop and apply metrics 
that incentivize stronger linkages between the responsible 
agencies, including but not limited to law enforcement, 
prosecutors, community-based treatment centers, hospitals, 
medical examiners, and public health departments. The Committee 
also encourages OJP to prioritize comprehensive, real-time, 
regional information collection, analysis, and dissemination.
    The Committee notes that COAP funding may be used to 
provide law enforcement with overdose reversal drugs, such as 
naloxone.
    The Committee urges the Department to provide $3,000,000 to 
support training and continuing education for forensics 
services to rural law enforcement through recognized 
university-based programs that offer solutions-driven 
approaches to train local law enforcement to reduce drug court 
backlogs.
    The Committee believes it is essential to any comprehensive 
opioid prevention strategy to include a vigorous program 
designed to strengthen the ability of States and tribes to 
develop identifiable and accessible take-back program for 
unused controlled substances found in the home and used by 
hospitals and long-term care facilities. Of the amount 
available for COAP, at least $10,000,000 is for pilot programs 
in States and on tribal lands to demonstrate effective drug 
collection programs for local communities. The Committee 
expects that funds will be used for the purchase and 
distribution of tamper proof drug collection boxes and other 
Federally approved control substance collection and permanent 
disposal programs as defined in subpart B of part 1317 of title 
21, Code of Federal Regulations.
    National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) 
Initiative grants.--The recommendation includes $75,000,000 for 
grants to improve records in NICS. The Committee directs that 
the grants made under the broader NCHIP authorities be made 
available only for efforts to improve records added to NICS. 
Additionally, the Department shall prioritize funding under the 
NICS Act Records Improvement Program (NARIP) authorities with 
the goal of making all States NICS Improvement Amendments Act 
of 2007 (NIAA) compliant. The Department also shall apply 
penalties to noncompliant States to the fullest extent of the 
law.
    The Committee understands that ATF is willing to provide 
technical assistance to all States seeking to establish 
programs that meet the NIAA requirements for NARIP grants. Even 
in the absence of funding exclusively for NARIP, the Committee 
directs the Department to continue these efforts. The Committee 
again urges OJP, ATF and FBI to assist States that are not 
currently eligible for NARIP grants in meeting the eligibility 
requirements.
    The Committee encourages OJP to provide technical 
assistance and training services for current and future NCHIP 
and NARIP grantees.
    The Committee also reiterates existing legal requirements 
that data in the NICS be deleted after a check is completed.
    The Committee also encourages the Attorney General to 
prioritize NARIP grants to states whose implementation plan 
includes an effort to identify domestic violence abusers and 
others disqualified under section 922 of title 18, United 
States Code, who are ineligible to possess firearms under law 
and which will use a larger proportion of these grants for that 
purpose.
    Project Safe Neighborhoods Grant Program.--The 
recommendation includes $50,000,000 for programs authorized by 
the Project Safe Neighborhoods Grant Program Authorization Act 
of 2017 (H.R. 3249, as passed by the House of Representatives 
on March 14, 2018). This amount is $30,000,000 above the fiscal 
year 2018 level and the same as the proposed authorized level. 
These funds will help communities work with their local U.S. 
Attorneys to develop and implement gun crime and gang violence 
reduction programs.
    Gang violence.--The Committee recognizes the threat posed 
by foreign influenced gangs and the need for coordination among 
Federal, State and local law enforcement agencies to address 
this problem. Such gang activity has the potential to overwhelm 
local law enforcement resources in rural areas, particularly in 
communities with populations under 25,000. The Committee urges 
the Department to prioritize grant funding within existing 
State and local assistance programs targeted for reducing 
criminal gang activity in rural communities.
    The Committee also notes the effectiveness of regional gang 
task forces in addressing transnational gangs. The Committee 
urges the Department to prioritize grant funding within 
existing State and local assistance programs for reducing 
criminal gang activity using regional gang task forces.
    Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (Byrne/JAG) 
program.--The recommendation includes $441,500,000 for the 
Byrne/JAG program. Funding under this formula program is 
authorized for law enforcement programs including those that 
promote data interoperability between disparate law enforcement 
entities; prosecution and court programs; prevention and 
education programs; corrections programs; drug treatment and 
enforcement programs; planning, evaluation, and technology 
improvement programs; and crime victim and witness programs, 
other than compensation. Within the amount provided, 
$15,000,000 is for the Officer Robert Wilson III Preventing 
Violence Against Law Enforcement and Ensuring Officer 
Resilience and Survivability (VALOR) Initiative; $2,000,000 is 
for Missing Alzheimer's Patient Grants; $2,500,000 is for 
juvenile indigent defense; $2,400,000 is for the National 
Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUS); $50,000,000 is 
for Project Safe Neighborhoods; $3,000,000 is for the capital 
litigation and wrongful conviction review; $15,500,000 is for 
prison rape prevention and prosecution; $10,000,000 is for 
Emergency Federal Law Enforcement Assistance; and $2,000,000 is 
for managed access systems. Excluding carveouts, the 
recommendation for Byrne/JAG is $500,000 below fiscal year 2018 
and $8,500,000 above the request.
    The Committee is concerned by the impact on law enforcement 
of the growing epidemic of prescription drug and heroin abuse, 
and notes that funds within this account may be used for the 
implementation of medication-assisted treatment to maintain 
abstinence from all opioids and heroin. The Committee notes 
that Byrne/JAG funding can be used for law enforcement 
purposes, such as the hiring of law enforcement officers, 
including School Resource Officers or other ``non-enforcement'' 
officers. The Committee notes that Byrne/JAG funding can be 
used for pursuit technology and training to reduce deaths and 
injuries during high-risk vehicle events. The Committee 
recognizes the importance of de-escalation training and 
cultural sensitivity training and diversity in hiring in local 
law enforcement to ensure that law enforcement reflects the 
communities they serve. The Committee notes that Byrne/JAG 
funds may be used for these purposes, and encourages the 
Department to award funds for this purpose. The Committee 
encourages the Byrne/JAG program to provide additional 
resources to those communities that are taking part in programs 
that seek to lower homicide rates through data and performance 
measurement analysis. The Committee notes that Byrne/JAG 
funding may be used for mindfulness training for police 
officers. The Committee advises that some Byrne/JAG funds be 
directed to provide newer, more efficient forensics testing 
tools for rural jurisdictions. The Committee requests 
additional consideration be given to applicants who seek to 
hire service-connected disabled veterans. The Committee 
encourages the Department to support the use of these grant 
funds for the purchase of fentanyl detection equipment. The 
Committee supports awarding School Resource Officer grants to 
communities that are experiencing high levels of youth suicide, 
especially in smaller towns with limited resources.
    Extreme Risk Protection Orders (ERPO).--The Committee notes 
that these flexible funds can be used by law enforcement 
agencies, states and localities, and other eligible grantees to 
implement and administer ERPO or similar laws, which have been 
enacted in several states and authorize law enforcement 
officers, medical and mental health professionals, school 
officials, family members, or household members to obtain court 
orders for the temporary removal of firearms from persons 
shown, by clear and convincing evidence and with front-end due 
process, to be a threat to themselves or others.
    Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA).--The Committee supports 
the Bureau of Justice Assistance's (BJA) ongoing efforts to 
improve the PREA audit program. Facility audits are a key 
component in helping agencies move their sexual abuse 
prevention and response policies from written documents to 
everyday practices. BJA has outlined a meaningful Quality 
Improvement Initiative and the Committee supports the 
Department providing the necessary resources to carry out this 
work.
    State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP).--The 
recommendation includes $255,000,000 for SCAAP, which is 
$15,000,000 above fiscal year 2018. SCAAP provides grants that 
reimburse States and localities for the costs incurred in 
incarcerating undocumented criminal aliens. The President's 
request proposed terminating this program.
    Forensics and cybercrime training.--The Committee is aware 
of a number of programs surrounding trafficking offenses, sex 
crimes and domestic violence that provide support to State and 
local law enforcement and prosecutors. The Committee encourages 
OJP to increase efforts to provide State and local prosecutors 
with training, particularly train the trainer, and trial 
experience in cybercrimes and digital evidence.
    The Committee is also encouraged by efforts to expand the 
ability of academic forensic technology programs to assist the 
Department in identifying online crime, hate and terror groups.
    DNA initiative.--The recommendation includes $130,000,000 
for DNA-related and forensic programs and activities, an 
increase of $25,000,000 above the request and the same as the 
fiscal year 2018 level. Within the funds provided, the 
Committee provides $6,000,000 for Post-Conviction DNA Testing 
grants and $4,000,000 for Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program 
grants. The Committee expects that OJP will make funding for 
DNA analysis and capacity enhancement a priority to meet the 
purposes of the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program. The 
Committee directs the Department to submit, as part of its 
spending plan, a plan for the use of all funds appropriated for 
DNA-related and forensic programs and a report on the alignment 
of appropriated funds with the authorized purposes of the 
Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program.
    Victims of trafficking grants.--The recommendation includes 
$100,000,000 for human trafficking task force activities and 
for services for victims. These funds may also be used to 
develop, expand and strengthen assistance programs for child 
victims of sex and labor trafficking. The Committee notes that 
the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act established a 
Domestic Trafficking Victims Fund, which will provide 
additional resources for these programs. The Committee directs 
DOJ to support the victim-centered approach to recognizing and 
responding to human trafficking, especially across partnerships 
between Federal and local law enforcement agencies and victim 
service providers. The Department shall include a planned 
allocation of these funds in its spending plan. The Committee 
encourages the Department to increase the number of human 
trafficking task forces funded by this program.
    Preventing trafficking of girls.--The Committee encourages 
the Office for Victims of Crime and the Office of Juvenile 
Justice and Delinquency Prevention to examine ways to assist 
nonprofits and other nongovernmental entities with a proven 
track record of administering successful prevention and early 
intervention programs for girls vulnerable to trafficking.
    Pre-trial risk assessment.--The Committee continues its 
support for Bureau of Justice Assistance programs widespread 
adoption of evidence-based screening and assessment tools 
across the criminal justice system and believes further 
improvements are needed at the earliest stage of the process, 
or the pretrial period, to make the system fairer and less 
costly. The Committee is encouraged by States' development of 
Risk-Needs-Responsivity (RNR) models and encourages OJP to 
examine if funding should be made available for grants to 
assist States in the development and implementation of RNR 
tools for determining pretrial detention, sentencing, probation 
or post-release supervision, prison classification systems, and 
offender re-entry.
    Strategic Mobile and Response Teams.--The Committee 
encourages DOJ to investigate the opportunity to conduct pilot 
programs to implement Strategic Mobile and Response Teams 
(SMART) at the Southwest Border. Border SMART Pilot programs 
should combine the use of officers and technology, including 
ground sensors and drones. The pilot programs should have 
inter-agency partnership and multi-layered security efforts, 
including marine, air and terrestrial components, with the goal 
of increasing border security while reducing cost. The 
Department should brief the Committee on its plans within 180 
days.
    Wrongful conviction review.--The Committee directs the 
Department to follow the direction in the fiscal year 2018 
explanatory statement with respect to the Capital Litigation 
and Wrongful Conviction Review Program.
    Community trust initiative.--The recommendation includes 
$70,000,000 for a program to improve police-community 
relations. Included in this initiative is $15,000,000 for the 
Byrne Criminal Justice Innovation Program, $30,000,000 for 
justice reinvestment, $22,500,000 for a body-worn camera 
partnership initiative, and $2,500,000 for research and 
statistics on community trust.
    The body-worn camera partnership initiative includes pilot 
and demonstration grants for purchase of body-worn cameras for 
police. This initiative will also establish baseline procedures 
for the use of body-worn cameras, support State and local 
efforts regarding the use of such equipment, and provide 
necessary research into the use of this technology. The 
demonstration grants shall require a 1:1 match by the grantee 
and shall not be used to pay for the ongoing costs or data 
storage costs associated with body-worn camera footage. The 
demonstration grants shall only be provided to States with laws 
governing the use of body-worn cameras and shall not interfere 
with State laws and requirements.
    As the Committee believes that improving police-community 
relations will require more than just equipment procurement, 
the recommendation provides $30,000,000 for the justice 
reinvestment initiative, which provides assistance to 
jurisdictions to implement data-driven strategies to improve 
public safety by reducing corrections spending and reinvesting 
those savings in efforts to decrease crime and strengthen 
neighborhoods. The Committee recognizes the tremendous 
potential of justice reinvestment efforts, noting that 
successful efforts in States, such as Texas, Kansas, North 
Carolina, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, which have saved millions of 
dollars and serve as models for criminal justice reform in the 
Nation. Funding may be used to provide technical assistance to 
States with existing reinvestment programs, expand the 
initiative to additional States, or provide additional funding 
for existing sites.
    The Committee notes concerns regarding trial delays and 
bail conditions for incarcerated youth. Of the funds for 
Justice Reinvestment, $5,000,000 is for innovative efforts 
among States and localities to reduce trial delays, ensure 
speedy bond consideration, guarantee that a juvenile's ability 
to pay is considered in setting any bond amount, provide mental 
health services for youth who are incarcerated, and reduce the 
use of solitary confinement on youth.
    The Committee believes that comprehensive, career-long 
leadership education for all local law enforcement officers 
remains critical to reducing crime and strengthening 
relationships between law enforcement agencies and the 
communities they serve, and the Committee notes that funds in 
the community trust initiative can be used for leadership 
training programs that provide measurable improvements in local 
law enforcement officer performance, adaptive decision-making 
skills, civic involvement, and officer-community relations.
    Second Chance Act/offender reentry programs.--The 
recommendation includes $85,000,000 for Second Chance Act 
grants. Excluding carveouts, the recommendation is $27,500,000 
above fiscal year 2018 and $45,500,000 above the request.
    The Committee remains concerned that despite a dramatic 
increase in corrections spending over the past two decades, 
recidivism and re-incarceration rates are largely unchanged. 
The Committee is aware that case studies of innovative, 
evidence-based practices provide strong indication that this 
pattern can be reversed. The Committee expects that Second 
Chance Act grants will foster the implementation of strategies 
that have been proven to reduce recidivism and ensure safe and 
successful reentry back to their communities of adults released 
from prisons and jails. The Committee expects DOJ to designate 
funds for proven, evidenced-based programs that will further 
the goal of maximizing public safety.
    To ensure the most effective use of Second Chance Act 
funds, the Committee encourages the prioritization of funding 
to communities where the largest populations of formerly 
incarcerated people return and requests a report from the 
Bureau of Justice Statistics within 90 days of the enactment of 
this Act analyzing what the Bureau is doing to ensure funding 
is reaching these communities.
    Sexual assault kit backlog grants.--The recommendation 
includes $47,500,000 for grants to address the sexual assault 
kit (SAK) backlog. The Committee encourages stakeholders and 
local law enforcement to continue working with Federal law 
enforcement to resolve this important issue. The Committee also 
directs the Department to do everything in its power to bring 
perpetrators to justice. The Committee also encourages OJP to 
increase its efforts to ensure that strong research and program 
evaluations are undertaken utilizing independent evaluators 
with the experience and skills to provide necessary feedback 
and improve the efficiency of SAK processing. The Committee 
further encourages OJP to prioritize funding to underserved 
regions, such as Appalachia.
    Human trafficking intelligence.--The Committee encourages 
programs funded under the regional information sharing 
activities to hire criminal intelligence analysts to compile 
information, reports, and other intelligence on human 
trafficking into, out of, and within the borders of the United 
States.
    Active shooter response.--The recommendation includes 
$20,000,000 for the POLICE Act of 2016 (Public Law 114-199). 
The Committee notes the importance of training partnerships 
that offer nationwide dynamic force-on-force scenario-based 
training. The Committee understands the training has been 
adopted by numerous States and agencies as their standard 
active shooter training and that the FBI has adopted this 
program as its national training standard for active shooter 
response.
    Datacasting.--The Committee is aware of a recent 
datacasting pilot program and is encouraged by the novel 
application of existing technology to provide both new 
communications capacity for law enforcement as well as 
redundancy to existing networks. The Committee encourages the 
Department of Justice, through the Community Oriented Policing 
Services program, to consider proposals that would further 
expand the technology with a focus on projects that create 
statewide networks.

                       JUVENILE JUSTICE PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends $212,000,000 for Juvenile Justice 
programs, which is $70,500,000 below fiscal year 2018 and 
$17,500,000 below the request. Funds are distributed as 
follows:

                        JUVENILE JUSTICE PROGRAMS
                        (in thousands of dollars)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Program                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Youth Mentoring Grants................................        $100,000
Victims of Child Abuse Programs.......................          21,000
Missing and Exploited Children Programs...............          84,000
Training for Judicial Personnel.......................           2,000
Tribal Youth Program..................................           5,000
                                                       =================
  TOTAL, Juvenile Justice.............................        $212,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Youth mentoring grants.--The recommendation includes 
$100,000,000 for youth mentoring grants, which is $6,000,000 
above fiscal year 2018 and $42,000,000 above the request.
    The Committee recognizes the success of the Youth Mentoring 
program. Through trusted peer-to-peer mentoring relationships, 
in the community and in schools, Youth Mentoring grantees are 
able to provide needed attention and support to at-risk 
children. Mentoring relationships enhance a child's overall 
well-being by improving their emotional, social, and 
educational development.
    The Committee directs that OJP provide at least $17,000,000 
for mentoring programs that assist at-risk juveniles and their 
families who have been impacted by the opioid crisis and drug 
addiction.
    The Committee also urges that funds be made available for 
all activities that support the social challenges of youth, 
such as for educators, social workers, therapists, law 
enforcement, youth organizations, and community leaders that 
work with at-risk children.
    Missing and exploited children programs.--The 
recommendation includes $84,000,000 for missing and exploited 
children programs, which is $8,000,000 above fiscal year 2018 
and $12,000,000 above the request. The Committee expects the 
Department to allocate $37,500,000 for task force grants, 
training and technical assistance, research and statistics, and 
administrative costs for the Internet Crimes Against Children 
program. The Committee expects the Department to allocate 
$1,000,000 to be used to hire and equip wounded, ill or injured 
veterans as digital forensic analysts or investigators to 
support child exploitation investigations.
    The Department is encouraged to support the development, 
refinement, and technological advancement of widely used tools, 
methods and technologies that address child sexual exploitation 
and trafficking.
    The recommendation provides $2,400,000 for AMBER alert 
activities to create and augment tribal systems.
    Partnerships with community organizations.--The Committee 
encourages the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency 
Prevention (OJJDP) to examine ways to partner with community 
groups or nongovernmental entities that undertake initiatives 
to provide parents and guardians with inkless, in-home 
fingerprinting kits, which help families maintain current 
photos, fingerprints, and descriptions of their children, and 
such information can be vital for police during searches for 
missing children.
    Youth violence prevention.--OJJDP should examine the 
possibility that additional funds are directed toward evidence-
based youth violence prevention programs and programs that 
reduce recidivism that can be scaled locally and nationally.

                     PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICER BENEFITS

    The Committee recommends a total of $128,800,000 for the 
Public Safety Officer Benefits program, which is $12,000,000 
above fiscal year 2018 and the $8,500,000 above the request. 
Within the funds provided, $104,000,000 is for death benefits 
for survivors, an amount estimated by the Congressional Budget 
Office that is considered mandatory for scorekeeping purposes. 
Also within the total, $24,800,000 is recommended for 
disability benefits for public safety officers who are 
permanently and totally disabled as a result of a catastrophic 
injury sustained in the line of duty, and for education 
benefits for the spouses and children of officers who are 
killed in the line of duty or who are permanently and totally 
disabled as a result of a catastrophic injury sustained in the 
line of duty.

               General Provisions--Department of Justice


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee has included the following general provisions 
for the Department of Justice:
    Section 201 makes available additional reception and 
representation funding for the Attorney General from the 
amounts provided in this title.
    Section 202 prohibits the use of funds to pay for an 
abortion, except in the case of rape, incest, or to preserve 
the life of the mother.
    Section 203 prohibits the use of funds to require any 
person to perform or facilitate the performance of an abortion.
    Section 204 establishes the obligation of the Director of 
the Bureau of Prisons to provide escort services to an inmate 
receiving an abortion outside of a Federal facility, except 
where this obligation conflicts with the preceding section.
    Section 205 establishes the Committee's requirements and 
procedures for transfer proposals.
    Section 206 prohibits the use of certain funds for 
transporting prisoners classified as maximum or high security, 
other than to a facility certified by the Bureau of Prisons as 
appropriately secure.
    Section 207 prohibits the use of funds for the purchase or 
rental by Federal prisons of audiovisual equipment, services 
and materials used primarily for recreational purposes, except 
for those items and services needed for inmate training, 
religious, or educational purposes.
    Section 208 requires review by the Deputy Attorney General 
and the Department Investment Review Board prior to the 
obligation or expenditure of funds for major information 
technology projects.
    Section 209 requires the Department to follow reprogramming 
procedures for any deviation from the program amounts specified 
in this title or the accompanying report, or the reuse of 
deobligated funds provided in previous years.
    Section 210 prohibits U.S. Attorneys from holding 
additional responsibilities that exempt U.S. Attorneys from 
statutory residency requirements.
    Section 211 permits up to 3 percent of grant and 
reimbursement program funds made available to the Office of 
Justice Programs to be used for training and technical 
assistance, and permits up to 2 percent of grant funds made 
available to that office to be used for criminal justice 
research, evaluation and statistics by the National Institute 
of Justice and the Bureau of Justice Statistics.
    Section 212 waives the requirement that the Attorney 
General reserve certain funds from amounts provided for 
offender incarceration.
    Section 213 permanently prohibits funds, other than funds 
for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System 
established under the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, 
from being used to facilitate the transfer of an operable 
firearm to a known or suspected agent of a drug cartel where 
law enforcement personnel do not continuously monitor or 
control such firearm.
    Section 214 places limitations on the obligation of funds 
from certain Department of Justice accounts and funding 
sources.

                               TITLE III


                                SCIENCE


                Office of Science and Technology Policy

    The Committee recommends $5,544,000 for the Office of 
Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), which is the same as 
fiscal year 2018 and the same as the request.
    Public access to Federally funded research.--The Committee 
appreciates the progress that OSTP has made to increase access 
to the results of Federally funded scientific research. OSTP 
shall continue efforts to coordinate implementation of public 
access policies across Federal departments and agencies and 
identify additional opportunities to enhance access to the 
results of Federally funded research. OSTP shall continue to 
report, on an annual basis, on the progress of departments and 
agencies in implementing their public access plans, including 
relevant measures of progress, and on additional steps being 
taken to improve access to the results of Federally funded 
research. OSTP shall brief the Committee within 90 days of 
enactment on the status of these efforts.

                         National Space Council

    The Committee recommends $1,965,000 for the National Space 
Council, which is the same as fiscal year 2018 and the same as 
the request.

             National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    The Committee recommends $21,545,740,000 for the National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which is 
$809,600,000 above fiscal year 2018. The level of interest in 
NASA human spaceflight programs and robotic missions continues 
to grow, and the funding recommendations described below 
support current robotic and future human exploration programs, 
and the science, research, technology development, and advanced 
manufacturing activities necessary to send robotic missions and 
humans safely beyond low Earth orbit and on to Mars. The 
funding in this bill also provides NASA with a balanced 
portfolio to realize advances in safe and efficient air travel, 
partner with industry, and engage with academia. The Committee 
is concerned that despite record investments in NASA, 
significant slips in both human and robotic missions are 
occurring. These slips are intolerable and must not continue. 
The Committee expects NASA and its industry and academic 
partners to redouble efforts to enhance oversight and 
commitment to success in order to ensure that programs come in 
on time and within budget.
    Moon exploration.--The recommendation fully funds the Moon 
exploration initiatives requested throughout NASA but includes 
bill language limiting obligation of these funds until a multi-
year plan, with specific goals and funding requirements by 
fiscal year, is submitted to the Committee. The Committee 
believes that without firm goals and specific years by which to 
achieve those goals, programs could drift and languish. The 
Committee notes how clear mission goals and deadlines can 
galvanize an agency and a nation behind that mission. The 
Committee supports additional lunar exploration and 
partnerships with industry and academia that will ensue as a 
result of these new missions and believes that efforts focused 
on the Moon will serve as risk reduction activities toward 
human exploration of Mars. The Committee believes that human 
and robotic exploration of Mars and other destinations in our 
Solar System and beyond must be the goals of NASA--that 
striving to go farther into space pushes NASA and its academic 
and industry partners to be bold and aggressive. While the 
Committee is supportive of renewed focus on the Moon, these 
programs must not exhaust funding for other science priorities 
recommended by the National Academies Decadal Survey process.
    Long-term planning.--The request includes significant new 
funding to support NASA's proposed Moon program. However, 
notional outyear budgets to implement this new initiative and 
the wide range of other ongoing and anticipated future decadal 
missions are unrealistic. The Committee is supportive of 
efforts focused on the Moon as well as current robotic missions 
to Europa and Mars; moving forward with a refocused WFIRST; and 
building a hypersonic research aircraft. These and many other 
NASA missions and programs inspire the nation and spur the next 
generation of scientists and explorers. The Committee directs 
NASA to submit realistic outyear budgets that show the level of 
investment required in future years to accomplish the variety 
of NASA missions and refrain from submitting budgets that are 
not executable in a timely fashion, as they serve only to 
hinder effective long-term planning which in turn results in 
higher overall program costs.
    Program and project totals.--The Committee's program and 
project recommendations for NASA are included in the 
consolidated funding table below and in narrative direction 
throughout this report. The Committee reminds NASA that any 
deviations from the amounts included in the table below are 
subject to section 505 requirements of this Act. When executing 
its budget for fiscal year 2019, NASA shall incorporate the 
funding levels established in both the table and the narrative 
direction. NASA is reminded that comity has existed between the 
Congress and the Executive Branch with respect to abiding by 
language included in this report and in the accompanying bill. 
The Committee expects NASA to respect this long-standing 
practice.

              NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
                        (in thousands of dollars)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Program                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Science:
    Earth Science.....................................      $1,900,000
    Planetary Science.................................       2,758,500
    Astrophysics......................................       1,029,000
    James Webb Space Telescope........................         304,600
    Heliophysics......................................         688,500
                                                       -----------------
Total, Science........................................       6,680,600
                                                       =================
Aeronautics...........................................         715,000
                                                       =================
Exploration Research and Technology...................         900,000
                                                       =================
Deep Space Exploration Systems:
    Orion Multi-purpose Crew Vehicle..................       1,350,000
    Space Launch System (SLS) Vehicle Development.....       2,150,000
    Exploration Ground Systems........................         545,000
    Advanced Exploration Systems......................       1,038,900
        Lunar Orbital Platform........................        (504,000)
                                                       -----------------
Total, Deep Space Exploration Systems.................       5,083,900
                                                       =================
LEO and Spaceflight Operations........................       4,624,700
                                                       =================
Education.............................................          90,000
                                                       =================
Safety, Security and Mission Services.................       2,850,000
                                                       =================
Construction and Environmental Compliance and                  562,240
 Restoration..........................................
                                                       =================
Office of Inspector General...........................          39,300
                                                       =================
Total, NASA...........................................     $21,545,740
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                SCIENCE

    The Committee recommends $6,680,600,000 for Science, which 
is $459,100,000 above fiscal year 2018 and $785,600,000 above 
the request.
    Decadal surveys.--The Committee directs that the priorities 
outlined in the decadal surveys for Earth Science, Planetary 
Science, Astrophysics, and Heliophysics shall drive NASA 
mission priorities.
    Earth Science.--The recommendation includes $1,900,000,000 
for Earth Science programs. Within amounts provided is 
$131,900,000, as requested, for the NASA-ISRO Synthetic 
Aperture Radar mission.
    Earth Science Decadal.--The Committee supports the release 
and recommendations of the National Academy of Sciences Earth 
Science and Applications from Space Decadal Survey report and 
directs NASA to implement its findings to the extent 
practicable. As articulated by the report, NASA should seek 
when appropriate to competitively select future missions that 
address Designated and Earth System Explorer target 
observables. The Committee believes an increase in competition 
will further encourage responsible cost and schedule 
constraints, develop novel remote sensing technologies, and 
leverage the talents and expertise of scientists at 
universities and research institutions.
    Climate Monitoring System.--Within the funds provided for 
Earth Science, not less than $10,000,000 shall be for a Climate 
Monitoring program, including competitive grants to help 
develop the capabilities necessary for monitoring, reporting, 
and verification of biogeochemical processes to better 
understand the major factors driving short and long term 
climate change.
    Space geodesy and geodynamics.--The recommendation includes 
up to $5,000,000 within NASA's Crustal Dynamics Data 
Information System to collaborate with academic partners to 
integrate multi-global navigation satellite system observations 
and make such data available to researchers. NASA is encouraged 
to partner, as appropriate, with NOAA on these matters.
    Small Satellite Constellation Initiative.--The 
recommendation includes the requested amount of $25,000,000 for 
NASA's Small Satellite Constellation Initiative. The Small 
Satellite Constellation Initiative is designed to encourage 
spaceflight solutions for Earth science missions that involve 
the use of multiple, instrumented small satellites flying in 
various formations, to achieve the quality and quantity of data 
required by the research and applications communities. The 
Committee believes that small satellites can exponentially 
expand the data available to scientists and researchers at 
lower costs and in shorter timeframes than traditional, more 
expensive large satellite programs.
    Land imaging requirements.--NASA is encouraged to examine 
its portfolio and seek reimbursement, where appropriate, from 
Federal partner agencies on future land imaging requirements 
and examine how commercial partners may support NASA's future 
land imaging requirements.
    Planetary Science.--The recommendation includes 
$2,758,500,000 for Planetary Science. One of the primary 
recommendations of the National Academies' 2012 Decadal Survey 
for Planetary Science was for NASA to achieve a balanced 
program through a mix of Discovery, New Frontiers, and flagship 
missions, and an appropriate balance among the many potential 
targets in the Solar System. The Committee continues to urge 
NASA, in subsequent budgets, to ensure that it requests 
sufficient funds to support such a balanced, steady cadence of 
missions. Further, the Committee expects NASA to request 
sufficient funds for Research and Analysis to ensure that 
science data collected by NASA can be fully exploited by 
scientists and researchers.
    Planetary protection.--The Committee is aware that 
planetary protection requirements for each NASA mission and 
target body are determined based on scientific advice from the 
Space Studies Board (SSB), National Academies of Sciences, 
Engineering, and Medicine, and on NASA policy, which is guided 
by international technical standards established by the 
international Committee on Space Research. In general, the 
Committee understands that if the target body has the potential 
to provide clues about life or prebiotic chemical evolution, a 
spacecraft will be required to meet a high standard of 
biological and chemical cleanliness and/or some operating 
restrictions will be imposed. The Committee is aware that the 
SSB issued an interim report on these matters and looks forward 
to the publication of the final report. NASA and its academic 
and industry partners must take all necessary precautions with 
respect to ensuring planetary protection.
    Planetary Defense.--The recommendation includes 
$160,000,000 for Planetary Defense activities. NASA shall 
maintain no less than current funding levels for its use of 
NSF's ground-based telescopes to fulfill its planetary 
protection mission and determine if additional funds are 
required. The recommendation includes not less than the request 
for NASA's Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission. The 
Committee directs NASA to continue the development of the DART 
technology demonstration mission toward a June 2021 launch. 
NASA shall keep the Committee informed of these activities. 
NASA is urged to conduct research into directed energy as a 
means of asteroid deflection.
    Near Earth Object Camera (NEOCam).--The Committee remains 
supportive of the NEOCam mission, which follows a 2010 National 
Academy of Sciences report regarding the use of space-based 
infrared survey telescopes to discover asteroids that pose a 
hazard to Earth. The recommendation includes an increase of 
$10,000,000 above current levels for NEOCam; the Committee 
understands that NASA is working with its partners to develop a 
more cost-effective mission focused on NEO search requirements. 
The Committee anticipates receiving the report requested in the 
fiscal year 2018 Appropriations Act regarding NEOCam.
    Near-Earth Object Survey Act.--The Committee appreciates 
that an asteroid strike is a low-probability event, but the 
consequences of an impact could be enormous, or even 
catastrophic. The target date for completion of the George E. 
Brown, Jr. Near-Earth Object Survey Act quickly approaches. 
NASA's activities towards meeting these requirements, while 
impressive, could be further enhanced by an in-space telescope 
that can detect objects approaching our planet from the 
direction of the Sun. While such a telescope might provide 
slightly less scientific data than other proposed projects, the 
Committee believes the trade-off for the defense of the planet 
is worthwhile.
    Lunar Discovery and Exploration.--The Committee supports 
the requested level of $218,000,000 for the Lunar Discovery and 
Exploration program, including $18,000,000 for the Lunar 
Reconnaissance Orbiter and $200,000,000 for the new Lunar 
Future initiative. The Committee directs that the new Lunar 
Future initiative follow the lunar science priorities 
established by decadal surveys and the National Research 
Council's Scientific Context for the Exploration of the Moon 
and collect data to address the strategic knowledge gaps 
important for human exploration of the Moon. The Committee 
anticipates additional reports from the Academies regarding 
NASA's plans for lunar science and exploration. The funds 
provided for moon exploration are intended to support a mix of 
commercial lunar payload services; science instrument 
development; small satellite development; and long-duration 
lunar rover development. These funds will support science 
payloads and instruments for Lunar lander missions such as 
those developed in partnership with the private sector as part 
of NASA's Lunar CATALYST program. These robotic missions will 
provide NASA with access to the lunar surface and allow for an 
affordable procurement of a variety of science and exploration 
payloads to prepare for future science and crewed Exploration 
Missions.
    Public-private partnerships.--The Committee notes that 
Lunar Future funding is intended to support, in part, public-
private partnerships to send exploration and science payloads 
to the Moon and will serve as an architecture foundation for 
both lunar surface and lunar orbit operations. The Committee 
understands that the commercial landers supported by this 
program will provide the first opportunity since the Apollo 17 
mission in 1972 to directly investigate the surface of the 
Moon. As part of this initiative and in concert with expertise 
within the Exploration Research and Technology account, NASA 
shall undertake risk reduction activities in support of large 
lunar lander technology maturation. Development of these 
landers is essential for human exploration of the Moon and 
beyond. The Committee notes that there is a robust private 
space industry with companies engaging in development of 
technologies that support NASA in its human and robotic 
exploration missions. The Committee expects NASA to engage in 
these public-private partnerships with U.S. commercial space 
companies to initiate the most expeditious possible development 
of a lunar lander for both the Moon and extensible applications 
to Mars missions. This includes development of hardware, 
propulsion, communications, and software necessary for lunar 
landing vehicles with the ability to deliver various amounts of 
payload to the lunar surface. To the greatest extent 
practicable, NASA shall offer existing capabilities and assets 
at NASA Centers with lander expertise to support these 
partnerships. As part of the report directed in the 
administrative provisions of this bill, NASA shall provide an 
outline of missions and their intended launch cadence. NASA is 
encouraged to ensure that industry partners under the Lunar 
Future program exhibit in-kind or other cost share investments 
so the program can meet its intended goals on time and within 
budget.
    Discovery.--The recommendation includes $381,200,000, as 
requested, for the Discovery program. This program supports 
innovative, relatively low-cost, competitively selected 
Planetary Science missions. Funding provided supports the Lucy 
and Psyche missions, as requested. NASA shall keep the 
Committee informed of these programs. Given continued robust 
funding provided by the Committee for the Discovery program, 
NASA shall make every effort to follow the cadence recommended 
in the Decadal Survey.
    New Frontiers.--The recommendation includes $130,200,000 
for New Frontiers, as requested. New Frontiers missions explore 
the Solar System with frequent, medium-class spacecraft 
missions. The program includes three missions in operations: 
New Horizons, Juno, and OSIRIS-Rex. Given continued robust 
funding provided by the Committee for New Frontiers, NASA shall 
make every effort to follow the cadence recommended in the 
Decadal Survey.
    Juno.--The recommendation includes no less than 
$25,000,000, as requested, for Juno, a mission to Jupiter 
launched in 2011 to help NASA understand the formation of 
planets and the origins of the Solar System. The Committee is 
aware that the original Juno flight plan has been modified and 
that additional operational funds may be required in future 
years.
    Mars Exploration.--The Committee remains supportive of 
NASA's ongoing Mars missions that continue to gather data about 
our nearest neighbor, which may have once supported microbial 
life. These missions and the Mars 2020 mission will provide 
NASA with valuable data about future landing sites for the Mars 
2020 rover and eventually American astronauts. The 
recommendation includes $650,000,000 to support a Mars 2020 
mission that meets scientific objectives for the most recent 
Planetary Science decadal survey, including the Mars sample 
return mission. Funding for the Mars helicopter technology 
demonstration is included within the Planetary Technology 
program described below. NASA shall provide quarterly briefings 
on all aspects of the Mars program. Finally, NASA shall provide 
a report within 180 days regarding the status and reliability 
of Mars data relay capability and how any potential future 
architecture upgrades are being incorporated into the overall 
Mars 2020 and sample return missions.
    Outer Planets and Ocean Worlds.--The primary goal of the 
Ocean Worlds Exploration Program is to discover extant life on 
another planet using a mix of Discovery, New Frontiers and 
flagship or strategic missions. The recommendation includes 
$760,900,000 for Outer Planets and Ocean Worlds, of which 
$545,000,000 is for the Jupiter Europa Clipper mission and 
$195,000,000 is for the Europa Lander mission to fulfill the 
requirements of recent Planetary Science decadal surveys. To 
support progress on these programs, NASA shall ensure that 
future funding requests are consistent with achieving a Europa 
Clipper launch no later than 2022 and a Europa Lander launch no 
later than 2024. The Committee appreciates that NASA has 
published a Research Announcement for Draft Instruments 
Concepts for Europa Exploration. NASA shall keep the Committee 
informed of the status of the Announcement of Opportunity (AO) 
for the Lander to ensure progress toward a 2024 launch. The 
Committee expects that this AO shall be published during fiscal 
year 2019. While the Committee remains very supportive of the 
Europa mission, the Committee expects this program to meet 
development milestones on time and within budget.
    Future Europa funding requirements.--The Committee includes 
specific bill language regarding the Europa missions, directing 
that NASA launch the Europa Clipper mission in 2022 and the 
Europa Lander mission in 2024. Further, the Committee includes 
language directing NASA to include five year budget profiles 
necessary to achieve these goals. The Committee clarifies that 
this information shall include separate amounts for the yearly 
funding requirements for the Clipper mission to ensure it 
launches in 2022 and a separate funding amount required for the 
Lander mission to launch in 2024. These amounts shall also 
include yearly vehicle launch costs for each mission. As noted 
elsewhere in this report, NASA shall request budgets sufficient 
to ensure that the Europa missions launch according to the 
years established by law.
    Technology.--The recommendation includes $210,200,000 for 
Technology. Within these amounts, no less than $35,000,000 is 
for icy satellites surface technology and test-bed activities 
and no less than $10,000,000 is for the Mars helicopter 
technology demonstration mission that will be flown on the Mars 
2020 mission. The recommendation also includes no less than 
$81,800,000, as requested, for NASA to continue its 
collaboration with the Department of Energy to produce 
plutonium-238 domestically for use as a source of energy in 
deep space missions. Finally, the recommendation includes 
$3,000,000 for NASA to conduct a joint effort with NOAA's 
Office of Ocean Exploration and Research and its exploration 
research vessels and existing tele-presence capabilities as 
well as new mobile systems, through the SUBSEA program, to 
examine potential parallels between possible systems that might 
support life in outer space to ones known to exist on Earth.
    Impact craters.--Impact craters in the U.S. that are well 
preserved and accessible provide researchers and educators with 
the opportunity to expand our understanding of the Earth's and 
the Solar System's history and show students research in action 
as a part of their STEM education. NASA is encouraged to make 
funds available for external competitive funding to conduct 
further scientific investigation of well-preserved and easily 
accessible impact craters, and provide education and outreach 
on Earth's erosion processes and the scientific method of 
research.
    Astrophysics.--The recommendation includes $1,029,000,000 
for Astrophysics. The recommendation includes $83,400,000, as 
requested, for Astrophysics Research and Analysis. The 
Committee recognizes that exciting scientific discoveries often 
come from data evaluated after a mission's initial surveys are 
complete. This funding enables maximum scientific value to be 
derived from these missions and leverages existing data sets 
that inspire new discoveries.
    Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA).--
The recommendation includes $85,200,000 for SOFIA. SOFIA was 
first recommended in the 1991 Decadal Survey, The Decade of 
Discovery in Astronomy and Astrophysics. The New Worlds, New 
Horizons 2010 Decadal Survey noted that with SOFIA, ``we have 
the opportunity to study fundamentals of chemistry under 
conditions we cannot create here on Earth.'' Following that, 
the New Worlds, New Horizons: A Midterm Assessment noted that, 
``. . . (SOFIA) reached full operational capacity in February 
2014 and provides unique capabilities for mid-to-far infrared 
spectroscopy.'' Pursuant to 51 U.S.C. 30504, NASA conducts 
``triennial reviews'' of ``missions that exceed their planned 
missions' lifetime.'' The Committee is concerned with NASA's 
proposed inclusion of SOFIA in the 2019 Senior Review, given it 
began its prime mission in 2014 and has 15 years of prime 
mission lifetime remaining. Accordingly, the Committee directs 
NASA to only undertake a Senior Review of SOFIA at the time 
SOFIA completes its planned mission lifetime. For the purposes 
of this section, announcing, scheduling, or undertaking a 
Senior Review is deemed preparation for shutdown.
    Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST).--The 
recommendation includes $150,000,000 for WFIRST, which was 
included as the first priority in the 2010 Astrophysics Decadal 
Survey. The Committee is concerned about the growing cost of 
the prime mission as noted by a recent independent examination. 
To reduce mission costs and ensure that overlap with James Webb 
Space Telescope is maximized, NASA should implement the most 
efficient development program for the telescope and its 
instruments. Further, to enhance the cost effectiveness of 
science operations, NASA shall leverage more extensively the 
experience acquired on Hubble, Spitzer, and Wise. The 
recommended amount shall include continued development of the 
chronograph as a technology demonstration mission. Further, 
within amounts provided for WFIRST, $20,000,000 is for 
continued development of the Starshade technology demonstration 
effort. The Committee understands that WFIRST is already 
``Starshade-ready'' within the $3,200,000,000 cost cap. The 
Starshade, in tandem with WFIRST, will enable NASA to identify 
the nearest Earth-like planet around the nearest star, and 
thereby identify a target or multiple targets for the 
interstellar mission NASA has been developing.
    Astrophysics observatories.--The Committee commends NASA 
for providing the science community with observations of 
astrophysical objects conducted simultaneously over a broad 
range of wavelengths. The Committee looks forward to receiving 
the report directed in the fiscal year 2018 appropriations Act 
that summarizes NASA's plans for maintaining U.S. leadership in 
obtaining astrophysical observations in the x-ray and gamma-ray 
wavelengths following the completion of the Chandra X-ray 
Observatory and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope missions.
    Technosignatures.--The recommendation includes $10,000,000 
for NASA to partner with the private sector and philanthropic 
organizations, to the maximum extent practicable, to search for 
technosignatures, such as radio transmissions, in order to meet 
the NASA objective to search for life's origin, evolution, 
distribution, and future in the universe.
    James Webb Space Telescope (JWST).--The recommendation 
includes $304,600,000 for JWST, which is the same as the 
request and $229,100,000 below fiscal year 2018. The Committee 
notes that NASA notified the Committee about an anticipated 
schedule breach and potential cost breach for the JWST program. 
Given continued problems with JWST, the Committee retains a 
separate line item for this program to ensure visibility. The 
Committee is very concerned about the issues that are emerging 
at this late stage of JWST development and expects NASA to 
report to the Committee on a regular basis regarding efforts to 
ensure that this launch does not slip further. The Committee 
expects NASA to increase its level of oversight and expects 
private sector partners to be diligent in ensuring that all 
proper procedures are followed. The Committee reminds NASA that 
this program was rebaselined in 2011 and provided with a robust 
$8,000,000,000 development cost cap that acknowledged how 
ambitious and difficult JWST is as a mission. These slips in 
the launch schedule are an enormous disappointment to the 
Committee. The Committee understands that NASA has commissioned 
an independent review of JWST and expects to receive the 
results of this review as soon as possible.
    Heliophysics.--The recommendation includes $688,500,000 for 
Heliophysics. This amount includes $26,000,000 to continue 
science operations and data archiving for the Magnetospheric 
Multiscale mission.
    Education and Public Outreach (EPO).--The recommendation 
includes $44,000,000 for Science Mission Directorate (SMD)-wide 
EPO activities. NASA shall, in the fiscal year 2019 spending 
plan, allocate these funds proportionally among the SMD 
divisions, resulting in a dedicated budget line for each 
division's EPO activities.

                              AERONAUTICS

    The recommendation includes $715,000,000 for Aeronautics. 
This amount, which is $30,000,000 above fiscal year 2018 and 
$81,100,000 above the request, reflects that an efficient and 
safe transportation system is fundamental to the U.S. economy.
    Low Boom Flight Demonstrator.--Within amounts provided for 
Aeronautics, $88,300,000 is included, as requested, to continue 
development of the Low Boom Flight Demonstrator. NASA shall 
request sufficient funds in subsequent budgets to build and fly 
the Low Boom Flight Demonstrator as proposed and ensure that 
related infrastructure facilities are sufficient to support 
this demonstration project. Finally, NASA shall ensure that 
research resulting from the Flight Demonstrator is shared with 
the private sector for use in commercial aviation applications.
    Hypersonic research.--Within amounts provided, no less than 
$60,000,000 is for NASA's ongoing hypersonic research 
activities. The Committee is pleased to see NASA's renewed 
commitment to hypersonics, which has tremendous potential to 
revolutionize exploration. NASA is encouraged to support 
extramural fundamental research to solve remaining challenges 
such as propulsion, advanced materials, thermal management, and 
entry, descent, and landing. Universities have unique 
experimental and computational research capabilities to address 
these challenges and NASA should take full advantage of its 
partnership mechanisms to enable this research.
    Air Mobility and Automation Initiative.--The Committee 
supports NASA research and development efforts designed to 
further new innovations in propulsion, simplify vehicle 
operations, increase automation, and integrate these operations 
into controlled airspace. The Committee believes these 
technologies can address critical mobility challenges. The 
Committee expects NASA to develop a roadmap with industry 
stakeholders and coordinate with the Federal Aviation 
Administration (FAA) to expedite technology introduction and 
maximize improvements in safety and affordability as well as 
facilitate environmental benefits like noise and emissions 
reduction. In the roadmap, NASA should consider leveraging 
other internal directorates' research efforts where applicable, 
evaluate whether test sites would enable valuable operational 
experience with increasingly automated manned and self-operated 
aircraft, leverage industry partnerships to accelerate the 
progress of these critical mobility initiatives, and consider 
the capabilities of NASA test facilities for supporting this 
and other critical activities. This roadmap shall be submitted 
to the Committee by March 2019.
    Electric air flight.--The Committee encourages and supports 
strengthening collaborations between NASA and the Department of 
Energy national laboratories to overcome energy storage 
challenges for novel modes of mobility like electric air 
flight. While NASA has unprecedented aeronautics expertise, the 
Department of Energy national laboratories are leading efforts 
to develop next generation battery technologies for vehicle 
applications and enhancing modeling and simulation capabilities 
with advances in deep learning and machine learning. Therefore, 
the Committee encourages increased cooperation between NASA and 
the Department of Energy national laboratories to overcome 
technological barriers in demonstrating the capability of 
electrified aircraft, such as higher energy density batteries, 
development of new, lower-cost materials, and the establishment 
of testing methods and protocols.
    Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) safety.--The recommendation 
includes no less than the requested amount for the Airspace 
Operations and Safety Program and directs NASA to help ensure 
the safe integration of UAS into the national airspace system 
as expeditiously as possible. NASA shall brief the Committee 
within 120 days of enactment regarding the UAS Traffic 
Management Pilot.
    Air traffic safety.--NASA is encouraged to coordinate with 
the FAA and leverage the six test ranges established under 
section 332 of the FAA Modernization and Reform Act (Public Law 
112-95) to research solutions for sense and avoid, command and 
control, ground control station standards and human factors, 
airworthiness, lost link procedures, and interoperability 
within the air traffic control system.

                  EXPLORATION RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY

    The Committee recommends $900,000,000 for Exploration 
Research and Technology. This amount fully funds the request 
except for the Human Research Program, which remains in the 
Deep Space Exploration Systems account. The Committee 
recognizes and supports that the presently independent status 
and separation from specific missions enables this account to 
support the development of a wide array of various technologies 
across NASA's portfolio. This diverse portfolio contains 
technology development activities that have broad applications 
beyond human exploration and that help to meet the agency's 
science objectives, establish new commercial and academic 
partnerships, and stimulate the growth of the nation's 
technology sector.
    Interstellar roadmap.--The Committee appreciates that NASA 
has submitted the propulsion technology assessment to enable an 
interstellar mission to identify the nearest Earth-like planet 
that shows signs of extant life. The Committee notes that the 
challenges of interstellar travel are immense and will require 
monumental advancements in many technology areas. The roadmap 
proposed by NASA begins with a series of workshops to assess 
candidate technologies and establish specific technology 
development milestones. Within amounts provided, NASA shall 
initiate these workshops immediately and provide a report on 
their proceedings no later than 180 days following enactment of 
this Act. NASA must stay true to its heritage by being bold and 
pushing the limits of science, engineering, and technology. The 
Committee looks forward to working with NASA to ensure the 
roadmap is implemented. As noted elsewhere, NASA shall ensure 
that it requests sufficient funds in future budgets to develop 
and implement this mission.
    Nuclear thermal propulsion technology.--Within amounts 
provided, $150,000,000 is for continued development and 
demonstration of a nuclear thermal propulsion system. Within 
180 days of the enactment of this Act, NASA shall submit a 
multi-year plan that enables a nuclear thermal propulsion 
demonstration by no later than 2024 and describes future 
missions and propulsion and power systems enabled by this 
capability. NASA shall take into consideration the use of 
nuclear thermal propulsion as it drafts the multi-year 
exploration roadmap directed in this bill. Further, of the 
funds provided for nuclear thermal propulsion, not less than 
$10,000,000 is for development of digital twin technology to 
support the cost effective development, manufacturing and 
operation of nuclear thermal propulsion technologies.
    Solar electric propulsion.--The recommendation includes 
$52,000,000 to continue work on solar electric propulsion 
activities. According to NASA, high-powered solar electric 
propulsion can efficiently propel more ambitious robotic 
science and human exploration missions beyond the Earth and 
into deep space. Furthermore, solar electric propulsion will 
enable more efficient orbit transfer of spacecraft and 
accommodate the increasing power demands for government and 
commercial satellites.
    Small launch technology platform.--The recommendation 
includes no less than $20,000,000, as requested, for the Flight 
Opportunities Program to enable NASA to continue to partner 
with commercial industry to advance technologies for sub-
orbital and orbital launch vehicles for small payloads, with 
the aim to increase affordability of those technologies and to 
allow for more frequent access to relevant launch environments, 
including low-Earth orbit. This funding fills a research gap by 
offering several minutes of microgravity research at a 
relatively low price.
    Additive manufacturing.--The recommendation includes 
$35,000,000 to support NASA's additive manufacturing efforts 
focused on enhancing space vehicle design and reducing overall 
production costs, engineering advanced propulsion processes and 
sub-scale work including development of a digital twin directly 
applicable to upper stage engine production, RS-25 engine 
affordability and sustainability, as well as liquid boosters 
for the 130 metric ton Space Launch System (SLS).
    RESTORE-L.--Given the substantial cost to design, develop, 
and launch satellites and continued reliance on the data they 
gather, NASA shall ensure that all future satellites, including 
those in formulation, should be maneuverable, re-fuelable and 
otherwise serviceable. The Committee strongly supports 
satellite servicing and expects NASA to continue developing 
these capabilities in collaboration with its public and private 
sector and academic partners. The Committee recommends 
$130,000,000 for the RESTORE-L program to support a flight 
demonstration by no later than 2021. NASA shall provide a 
schedule and yearly funding requirements to execute the flight 
demonstration of RESTORE-L not later than 180 days after the 
enactment of this Act.
    Orbital debris.--The Committee notes the successful launch 
in December 2017 of the Space Debris Sensor to the 
International Space Station. Consistent with this mission, NASA 
is encouraged to take steps to develop or acquire technologies 
that will enable the Administration to remove orbital debris 
and to provide a report on these matters within 180 days of 
enactment of this Act.
    Regional economic development.--The recommendation includes 
$7,500,000 for NASA's regional economic development program 
which focuses on partnerships with State and regional economic 
development organizations as they expand space-related 
commercial opportunities designed to address NASA mission 
needs.
    Small satellites.--The recommendation includes $25,000,000 
to enable NASA to work with its private sector and academic 
partners to address the technical challenges associated with 
designing, fabricating, and testing capable satellites and 
constellations of satellites that meet certain size, weight, 
and power requirements. Also included is up to $2,000,000 to 
address technical challenges associated with high speed 
crosslink and downlink communications for low Earth orbit small 
satellite constellations.

                     DEEP SPACE EXPLORATION SYSTEMS

    The Committee recommends $5,083,900,000 for Deep Space 
Exploration Systems, which is $293,900,000 above fiscal year 
2018 and $525,100,000 above the request. The Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) shall continue its review of NASA's 
human exploration programs, specifically the SLS program, the 
Orion program, and Exploration Ground Systems, to include the 
mobile launch platforms, and including integration and software 
development issues that cut across these programs. GAO shall 
provide periodic updates to the Committee. In addition, the 
Committee expects GAO to begin evaluating NASA's proposed 
lunar-focused programs--including the Lunar Orbital Platform--
as part of its semi-annual assessment of NASA major projects 
when a lunar-focused project is expected to have an estimated 
life-cycle cost over $250 million. Separately, GAO shall also 
evaluate all of the new lunar-focused programs in-depth as 
appropriate--similar to how GAO has reviewed the James Webb 
Space Telescope and Human Space Exploration programs--to ensure 
that they are following best practices in terms of program 
management, defined missions and goals, and executable and 
affordable budgets. GAO and the NASA Office of Inspector 
General (OIG) should coordinate their in-depth reviews of the 
lunar programs to ensure there is an ongoing review by either 
the GAO or IG of the exploration, planetary, and space 
operations lunar programs.
    Human spaceflight safety.--The Committee reiterates that 
nothing in this report or accompanying Act shall be construed 
as directing NASA to proceed with any human spaceflight unless 
or until NASA has concluded that the mission meets safety 
requirements.
    Orion.--The recommendation includes $1,350,000,000, which 
is $186,500,000 above the request, for Orion. GAO, in its May 
2017 assessment, noted the late delivery of the European 
Service Module (ESM). NASA shall keep the Committee informed of 
the status of activities related to Orion and the ESM and 
ongoing activities related to integration of Orion with SLS and 
associated ground infrastructure.
    Space Launch System.--The recommendation includes 
$2,150,000,000, which is $71,900,000 above the request, for 
SLS, and includes not less than $300,000,000 for continued work 
on the Exploration Upper Stage (EUS). The Committee is aware 
that Critical Design Review for the EUS is scheduled to occur 
in summer 2018. NASA shall keep the Committee informed of the 
status of these efforts. The Committee notes that it is 
awaiting a comprehensive report on funds necessary to complete 
EUS and to build subsequent EUSs. Finally, NASA shall continue 
submitting quarterly reports on SLS spending by major program 
element, as first required in the statement accompanying Public 
Law 112-55.
    Exploration Ground Systems (EGS).--The recommendation 
includes $545,000,000, which is $116,800,000 above the request, 
for EGS. This funding level ensures that exploration ground 
systems, including hardware and software, are keeping pace with 
development of SLS and the Orion crew capsule. The fiscal year 
2018 Appropriations Act included $350,000,000 to begin 
procuring a second mobile launch platform (MLP) and associated 
infrastructure to launch Exploration Mission-2 earlier than 
currently envisioned. NASA shall expeditiously implement 
processes necessary to construct the second MLP so it is 
completed by 2022. A second mobile launch platform dramatically 
changes the mission profile for NASA and will allow NASA to 
launch human and robotic missions at a cadence to ensure the 
Lunar Orbital Platform is built more quickly and to ensure that 
the Europa Clipper and Lander missions are not delayed by the 
overall launch cadence profile. The Committee understands that 
NASA is still evaluating the impacts to the program given the 
addition of funding for a second mobile launch platform. NASA 
shall report to the Committee within 90 days of enactment of 
this Act regarding the optimal cadence of missions. Further, 
NASA shall incorporate this planning in the long-term planning 
document directed in this bill.
    Advanced Exploration Systems.--The recommendation includes 
$1,038,900,000 for Advanced Exploration Systems. Within these 
amounts, $504,200,000 is for the Lunar Orbital Platform. The 
Committee understands that the Lunar Orbital Platform, to be 
assembled in orbit around the Moon, will be used as a staging 
point for exploration, science, commercial and international 
partner missions to the lunar surface and to destinations in 
deep space. This funding in part will support a launch, no 
later than 2022, of a power and propulsion element. Within this 
amount is $176,200,000, as requested, for habitation, airlock 
for docking vehicles, and logistics capabilities associated 
with supporting the Platform. As noted elsewhere in this 
report, while the Committee is supportive of these efforts, 
NASA shall submit a long-term plan, with yearly milestones and 
required budgets, to ensure that the program is executable with 
clear goals to gauge progress and improve adherence to budgets. 
The Committee expects NASA to examine how the Commercial Crew 
and Commercial Cargo programs can support the Platform.
    Advanced Cislunar and Surface Capabilities.--The 
recommendation includes $116,500,000, as requested, for the 
Advanced Cislunar and Surface Capabilities programs included as 
part of the Lunar Exploration Campaign. This funding will 
support lander risk reduction activities in partnership with 
industry, and include robotic demonstration missions. As noted 
earlier, the Committee remains supportive of NASA's ongoing 
Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown (Lunar 
CATALYST) initiative with the private sector to develop robotic 
lunar landers that can be integrated with U.S. commercial 
launch capabilities to deliver payloads to the lunar surface.
    Human Research Program.--The recommendation includes 
$150,000,000 in this account for the Human Research Program. 
The Committee believes that the current synergies in this 
account among the Orion crew capsule, SLS, associated ground 
programs and the Human Research Program should be sustained. 
The Committee believes that moving human research to another 
directorate at this point may introduce unnecessary risk. NASA 
shall continue research on human health risks associated with 
Mars surface operations. The Committee reiterates its support 
of NASA's collaboration with academia to research ways to 
ameliorate the impacts of space travel on humans. The Committee 
also directs increased efforts to advance medical technologies 
on the International Space Station (ISS) which can be used to 
improve medical care on Earth.

                     LEO AND SPACEFLIGHT OPERATIONS

    The Committee recommends $4,624,700,000 for LEO and 
Spaceflight Operations.
    International Space Station (ISS).--The Committee 
reiterates that the International Space Station shall remain 
operational as long as it remains safe and operable. The 
Committee is supportive of the Administration's efforts to find 
partners to pay for the future costs of the ISS. NASA's March 
2018 International Space Station Transition Report stated that, 
``From a structural integrity analysis standpoint, the ISS 
platform is expected to have significant structural life well 
beyond 2028 (based on the current assessment period). Many of 
the ISS modules, particularly the modules launched in the later 
years of ISS assembly, are likely to have structural life well 
into the 2030s . . .'' As NASA embarks on an ambitious plan to 
once again send robotic and human exploration missions to the 
Moon, it is crucial that NASA and its private sector partners 
continue to have the ability to conduct experiments in a 
microgravity environment such as that provided by the ISS. The 
Committee continues to encourage NASA to implement cost savings 
measures to reduce NASA's investment in the ISS operations 
budget while maximizing research opportunities. In particular, 
the Committee is concerned that NASA is not maximizing human 
research opportunities on the ISS that will contribute to 
advances for improved human health on Earth and during deep 
space exploration missions.
    Commercial LEO Development.--The recommendation includes 
$150,000,000, as requested, for Commercial LEO Development. 
This funding will establish the foundation for future 
commercial options in LEO to meet NASA's research and 
technology development requirements beyond the ISS. The 
Committee is supportive of enhancing collaboration with the 
private sector, including efforts to add additional modules to 
the ISS and support new technologies such as in-space 
manufacturing. As noted elsewhere, funding obligations for the 
Commercial LEO Development program are limited until NASA 
submits a multi-year, detailed plan for these activities.
    Commercial Crew.--According to GAO's January 2018 report, 
NASA COMMERCIAL CREW PROGRAM Continued Delays Pose Risks for 
Uninterrupted Access to the International Space Station, while 
the contractors have made progress developing their crew 
transportation systems, both programs continue to experience 
schedule delays. NASA is examining a range of options to ensure 
uninterrupted U.S. access to the ISS, including extending 
missions. The Committee remains concerned about the overall 
status of each of the programs and the number of top risks that 
remain as outlined by GAO, the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel, 
and the NASA Advisory Council-Human Exploration and Operations 
committee. NASA shall notify the Committee immediately if 
either of the providers is unlikely to meet uncrewed and crewed 
flights as currently planned in 2018 and 2019, respectively. 
NASA shall continue submitting quarterly reports on the status 
of the Commercial Crew Integrated Capability and Commercial 
Crew Transportation Capability contracts.
    Space and Flight Support.--The recommendation includes no 
less than the fiscal year 2018 levels to modernize and upgrade 
both the Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) and Kennedy Space Center 
(KSC) launch and range complexes. The Committee supports 
maintaining launch sites serving the ISS at both the WFF and 
KSC to ensure uninterrupted domestic cargo access to the ISS.
    Rocket Propulsion Test activities.--The recommendation 
includes $60,000,000 to develop and improve test facilities and 
test stands for new engine systems at all NASA test facilities. 
The Committee is concerned that NASA funding requests for this 
program have not kept pace with NASA's launch requirements and 
expects NASA to ensure that future budget requests are scaled 
appropriately across the exploration enterprise.
    Venture Class missions.--The recommendation supports the 
requested amount of $86,600,000 for NASA's Launch Services 
Program. The recommendation includes $25,000,000 for NASA, 
through the appropriate program office, to continue its work 
with the private sector on launch vehicles for smaller payloads 
to low Earth orbit to enable NASA to accomplish its mission in 
a more cost-effective manner with frequent and responsive 
access to space for small satellites. These next-generation 
launch capabilities will advance America's leadership in space 
and provide new and flexible capabilities for the U.S. 
government. NASA is encouraged to pursue these commercial 
services whenever they can meet NASA's goals.
    International collaboration.--The Committee supports joint 
projects between NASA and the Israel Space Agency and directs a 
report from NASA within 180 days of enactment of this Act 
detailing current and planned projects between the two 
agencies.

                               EDUCATION

    The Committee recommends $90,000,000 for Education, which 
is $10,000,000 below fiscal year 2018 and $90,000,000 above the 
request. The Committee expects NASA to continue implementing 
the programs below and to ensure that overhead costs to support 
these programs do not exceed five percent.
    National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program.--The 
recommendation includes $40,000,000 for the Space Grant 
program. This amount shall be allocated to State consortia for 
competitively awarded grants in support of local, regional, and 
national STEM needs.
    Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research 
(EPSCoR).--The recommendation includes $18,000,000 for EPSCoR.
    Minority University Research and Education Project 
(MUREP).--The recommendation includes $32,000,000 for MUREP.

                 SAFETY, SECURITY AND MISSION SERVICES

    The Committee recommends $2,850,000,000 for Safety, 
Security and Mission Services, which is $23,100,000 above 
fiscal year 2018 and $100,300,000 above the request.
    University Affiliated Research Centers (UARCs).--The 
Committee looks forward to receiving a report from NASA 
regarding current UARC activities and how NASA may look to 
establish additional such partnerships.
    Security.--NASA shall continue to submit reports on the 
agency's progress in implementing the corrective actions 
recommended by the National Academy of Public Administration, 
the GAO, NASA IG and the NASA ASAP with respect to security 
compliance protocols and foreign national access management.
    Bilateral activities.--The recommendation maintains bill 
language directing that NASA, in consultation with the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation, shall confirm or otherwise certify 
that NASA bilateral activities with China are in compliance 
with section 528 of this bill.
    Cloud computing.--NASA shall provide a report within 120 
days of enactment describing the use of cloud computing 
services, to include examples of how cloud computing has 
enhanced services; an examination of the benefits of utilizing 
hybrid cloud technologies to maximize functionality and 
analysis of data in disconnected, deep space environments; and 
any plans for expanding cloud computing. This report shall also 
examine any security impacts of transitioning to cloud 
computing, any factors delaying or inhibiting the expansion of 
cloud computing usage, and the cost savings achieved in the 
past three fiscal years through the use of commercial cloud 
computing services.
    Virtual Institute for Aerospace Systems Engineering.--The 
Committee is concerned about the extent to which new technology 
is utilized in NASA programs and the need for more accurate 
predictions of the cost and schedules necessary to mature 
technologies to a point sufficient for inclusion in mission 
system architectures. The Committee also sees a need to reduce 
uncertainty associated with new technology infusion through 
early identification of the systems integration implications of 
new technologies within the context of mission system 
architectures. For these reasons the Committee encourages NASA 
to establish a ``virtual institute'' focused on advancing 
systems engineering. This institute would include government, 
academic, and industry partners with the goal of improving 
safety, mission success and affordability, and preparing the 
next generation of aerospace systems engineers.
    GAO assessments of large-scale projects.--NASA shall 
continue to cooperate fully and provide timely information to 
the GAO so that it may fulfill its congressional mandate to 
report on the status of large-scale projects at NASA. Such 
information includes, but is not limited to, copies of 
preliminary cost estimates; access to online agency 
applications, databases, and web portals; and access to 
contractor and agency personnel. These assessments shall 
include any technology demonstration activities or 
communications and tracking services and related infrastructure 
refreshment activities with life cycle costs that exceed 
$250,000,000.
    Cost breach reporting.--NASA shall submit to the Committee 
any notifications and reports on cost overruns required by 
section 103 of the NASA Authorization Act of 2005, Public Law 
109-155.
    Working Capital Fund (WCF) reporting.--NASA shall continue 
to submit quarterly reports to the Committee on the 
expenditures and unobligated balances of NASA's WCF.
    Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V;).--The 
recommendation includes no less than the fiscal year 2018 
operating level for the IV&V; program. If necessary, NASA shall 
fund additional IV&V; activities from within the mission 
directorates that make use of IV&V; services.
    Quality assurance.--The Committee renews its direction to 
NASA regarding quality control following a 2017 NASA IG audit, 
NASA's Parts Quality Control Process, which found that NASA 
Centers generally manage their parts quality and supplier 
assessment data unilaterally rather than collaborating through 
a comprehensive, integrated, Agency-wide parts and supplier 
information system. The Committee continues to encourage NASA 
to examine the potential benefits of a quality management 
policy, to include requiring contractors and suppliers to adopt 
electronic quality management platforms.

       CONSTRUCTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE AND RESTORATION

    The Committee recommends $562,240,000 for Construction and 
Environmental Compliance and Restoration, which is the same as 
fiscal year 2018 and $174,040,000 above request. This robust 
level of funding will enable NASA to modernize critical assets, 
improve mission assurance, reduce mission risk, and maintain 
mission essential capabilities.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee recommends $39,300,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General, which is the same as the request.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    The Committee has included the following administrative 
provisions for NASA:
    The bill includes a provision that makes funds for any 
announced prize available without fiscal year limitation until 
the prize is claimed or the offer is withdrawn.
    The bill includes a provision that establishes terms and 
conditions for the transfer of funds.
    The bill includes a provision that requires NASA to submit 
its agency spending plan at the activity level and subjects 
both the spending plan and specified changes to that plan to 
reprogramming procedures under section 505 of this Act.
    The bill includes a new provision that allows the transfer 
of balances from the ``Space Technology'' account to the 
``Exploration Research and Technology'' account; from the 
``Exploration'' account to the ``Deep Space Exploration 
Systems'' account; and from the ``Space Operations'' account to 
the ``Low-Earth Orbit and Spaceflight Operations'' account.
    The bill includes a new general provision limiting 
obligation of certain funds until certain materials are 
provided to the Committee.

                      National Science Foundation

    The Committee recommends $8,174,890,000 for the National 
Science Foundation. This significant investment, which is 
$407,534,000 above fiscal year 2018, shows the Committee's 
support of science, the academic community, and the next 
generation of scientists, mathematicians, astronomers, and 
engineers across the country. The Committee underscores the 
importance of basic research that both improves the lives of 
Americans and expands our understanding of the Earth, the 
depths of our oceans, our Solar System, the Universe, and 
oceans on other planets. NSF must redouble its important 
efforts thus far to ensure that this funding is invested wisely 
to improve our way of life and expand our knowledge base.
    The Committee supports infrastructure investments that 
expand our understanding of the universe and inspire students 
to pursue careers in the sciences. The Committee recognizes 
that current and future large scientific facilities represent 
an enormous investment of Federal resources that must be 
administered wisely. Within amounts provided, NSF shall 
allocate no less than fiscal year 2018 levels to support its 
existing research laboratories, observational networks, and 
other research infrastructure assets, including the astronomy 
assets, the current academic research fleet, Federally funded 
research and development centers, and the national high 
performance computing centers, so they may provide the support 
needed for cutting edge research.
    Abstracts and the national interest.--The Committee 
underscores the American Innovation and Competitiveness Act 
(Public Law 114-329), which directs NSF to issue and 
periodically update, as appropriate, policy guidance for both 
Foundation staff and other Foundation merit review process 
participants on the importance of transparency and 
accountability to the outcomes made through the merit review 
process. Further, this law directs that each public notice of a 
Foundation-funded research project justify the expenditure of 
Federal funds by describing how the project reflects the 
statutory mission of the Foundation, as established in the 
National Science Foundation Act of 1950 (42 U.S.C. 1861 et 
seq.); addresses the Foundation's intellectual merit and 
broader impacts criteria; and clearly identifies the research 
goals of the project in a manner that can be easily understood 
by both technical and non-technical audiences. Further, this 
legislation directs NSF to apply a broader impacts review 
criterion to identify and demonstrate project support of the 
following goals: increasing the economic competitiveness of the 
United States; advancing of the health and welfare of the 
American public; supporting the national defense of the United 
States; enhancing partnerships between academia and industry in 
the United States; developing an American STEM workforce that 
is globally competitive through improved pre-kindergarten 
through grade 12 STEM education and teacher development, and 
improved undergraduate STEM education and instruction; 
improving public scientific literacy and engagement with 
science and technology in the United States; or expanding 
participation of women and individuals from underrepresented 
groups in STEM.

                    RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES

    The Committee recommends $6,651,500,000 for Research and 
Related Activities, which is $317,024,000 above fiscal year 
2018 and $500,820,000 above the request. The Committee believes 
that strategic investments in the physical sciences are vitally 
important for the United States to remain the global leader in 
innovation, productivity, economic growth, and good-paying jobs 
for the future.
    Antarctic program.--The Committee supports the Antarctic 
Infrastructure Modernization for Science program and the 
recommendations for increased efficiencies included in the U.S. 
Antarctic Program Blue Ribbon Panel report, More and Better 
Science in Antarctica through Increased Logistical 
Effectiveness. NSF shall allocate resources necessary to 
modernize the Antarctic infrastructure and keep the Committee 
informed regarding the status of this activity.
    Ocean Exploration.--The Committee directs NSF's Geosciences 
Program to continue to support and enhance its new program with 
NOAA's Office of Exploration and Research.
    Neuroscience research.--The Committee continues to support 
funding for neuroscience research.
    Steel research.--The Committee encourages NSF to use its 
Industrial Innovation and Partnerships program to continue 
research into the U.S. steel industry.
    Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research 
(EPSCoR).--Within amounts provided, $170,690,000 is for EPSCoR.
    Marine research.--The recommendation maintains current 
funding levels for existing marine research facilities and 
directs NSF to accept new proposals from the academic research 
community for research supported by these facilities. The 
Committee further directs NSF to develop a plan, in 
coordination with the academic research community, to ensure 
the science community's continued access to capabilities 
comparable to those currently provided by existing NSF marine 
research facilities.
    Existing astronomy assets.--The Committee underscores that 
a critical component of the nation's scientific enterprise is 
the infrastructure that supports researchers in discovery 
science, including planetary protection. Investments to advance 
the frontiers of research and education in science and 
engineering are critical to the nation's innovation enterprise. 
U.S.-based astronomy facilities continue to make groundbreaking 
discoveries and maintain excellent world-class scientific 
research. The Committee expects NSF to sustain support for the 
programs and scientific facilities funded by the Astronomical 
Sciences Division at no less than the fiscal year 2018 levels 
to maintain full scientific and educational operations. The 
Committee is aware that NSF is working with Federal, academic 
and private sector partners to develop plans to share future 
operations and maintenance costs of NSF astronomical 
infrastructure. NSF shall keep the Committee informed of these 
activities. Further, any proposal by NSF to divest the 
Foundation of these facilities shall be proposed as part of any 
future NSF budget request and is subject to NSF administrative 
provisions included in the accompanying bill.
    Future astrophysics.--With the recent discoveries enabled 
by NSF facilities, such as the Laser Interferometer 
Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) detection of 
gravitational waves, a new opportunity for astronomy has been 
created. Multi-messenger astrophysics will depend upon both 
existing and newly developed ground and space-based facilities. 
In order to pursue NSF's new Big Idea, Windows on the Universe: 
The Era of Multi-Messenger Astrophysics, NSF is encouraged to 
support the recommendations of recent decadal surveys from the 
community. It is important that NSF continues to robustly 
support both ongoing operations of existing astronomy and 
physics facilities and articulate a plan to ensure public 
access in future large optical observatories.
    Computer Information Science and Engineering (CISE).--The 
Committee supports CISE efforts to work with the Division of 
Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings within 
Education and Human Resources to build on current efforts to 
support computer science education in Pre-K-12 classrooms.
    High-performance computing planning.--The Committee 
believes it is strategically important to preserve U.S. 
leadership in quantum computing and urges NSF to make 
significant investments in this area. The Committee commends 
NSF on its commitment to high-performance computing and data 
analysis capabilities and urges NSF to make timely and 
significant investments in high-performance computing. NSF 
should remain committed to enabling leaps in computational 
simulation and data analyses for the broad range of research 
the Nation requires and as recommended by the recent National 
Research Council (NRC) report, Future Directions for NSF 
Advanced Computing Infrastructure to Support U.S. Science and 
Engineering in 2017-2020. Within 180 days of enactment of this 
Act, NSF shall provide the Committee with an update on its 
high-performance computing investment plans as well as a 
response to the NRC report and its plans to incorporate, to the 
extent practicable, the NRC's recommendations regarding NSF's 
approach for maintaining and modernizing its supercomputing 
capabilities at existing or future facilities.
    International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP).--The 
recommendation provides $48,000,000, as requested, for the 
IODP. The Committee notes that in addition to this funding, the 
IODP program derives funding from international and/or industry 
partners to maximize operating time on the JOIDES Resolution 
ocean research vessel. The Committee supports the goal of 
operating five research missions a year on the JOIDES 
Resolution.
    Major Research Instrumentation.--The recommendation 
includes not less than the budget request for the Major 
Research Instrumentation program to ensure NSF has sufficient 
resources to support instrumentation across all fields of NSF-
supported research.
    Plant Genome Research Program (PGRP).--The Committee finds 
that NSF's PGRP has been successful at advancing research into 
crop-based genomics and phenomics that address challenging 
economic and societal questions and directs NSF to continue to 
fund the PGRP program and continue to focus the program on 
research related to crops of economic importance.
    High energy lasers.--The Committee commends NSF's Big Ideas 
initiative to identify long-term research and process ideas 
that identify areas for future investment at the frontiers of 
science and engineering. In further pursuit of these goals, the 
Committee recommends that NSF support experimental research 
capabilities in the mid-scale range for potential experiments 
and facilities that fill current research gaps, including 
research to support high energy laser (HEL) technologies. The 
expansion of HEL technologies such as propagation, propulsion, 
generation, communication, metrology, and energy transfer is 
vital to national defense, space exploration, and economic 
competitiveness.

          MAJOR RESEARCH EQUIPMENT AND FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION

    The Committee recommends $268,040,000 for Major Research 
Equipment and Facilities Construction. The recommendation 
includes $1,000,000, as requested, for enhanced oversight. NSF 
shall provide quarterly briefings to the Committee on the 
activities funded in this account.
    Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST).--The recommendation 
includes $123,820,000 for LSST. LSST, which was ranked as the 
top large ground-based astronomy project by the National 
Research Council 2010 Decadal Survey, will produce the deepest, 
widest-field sky image ever and issue alerts for moving and 
transient objects within 60 seconds of discovery.
    Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST).--The 
recommendation includes the requested amount of $16,130,000 for 
DKIST, which when complete will be the most powerful solar 
observatory on Earth. Completion of construction is planned for 
no later than June 2020.
    Regional Class Research Vessels (RCRVs).--The 
recommendation includes $127,090,000 for the construction of 
three RCRVs required to replace aging academic research 
vessels.

                     EDUCATION AND HUMAN RESOURCES

    The Committee recommends $902,000,000 for Education and 
Human Resources, which is the same as fiscal year 2018 and 
$28,630,000 above the request. The Committee encourages NSF to 
support, as appropriate, University Centers for Excellence in 
Developmental Disabilities.
    Advanced Technological Education (ATE).--The recommendation 
provides no less than the fiscal year 2018 level for the ATE 
program.
    STEM education.--NSF shall continue to award competitive, 
merit-reviewed grants to support STEM education as authorized 
by the STEM Education Act of 2015 (Public Law 114-59). In 
addition, the Committee expects NSF to provide grants for 
research about STEM education approaches and the STEM-related 
workforce in order to develop innovations in mentoring, 
training and apprenticeships.
    Early Childhood STEM Education.--The Committee urges NSF, 
in awarding grants under its Discovery Research PreK-12 
program, to consider age distribution in order to more 
equitably allocate funding for research studies with a focus on 
early childhood.
    Broadening participation programs.--To broaden the 
participation of underrepresented populations in STEM education 
programs and, ultimately, the STEM workforce, the 
recommendation provides no less than $35,000,000 for the 
Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate 
Program; $46,000,000 for the Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority 
Participation; $64,500,000 for the Robert Noyce Teacher 
Scholarship Program; and $14,000,000 for the Tribal Colleges 
and Universities Program.
    Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs).--Hispanic Serving 
Institutions and the HSI grant program play an important role 
in increasing the recruitment, retention and graduation rates 
of Hispanic students pursuing STEM degrees. The Committee 
directs NSF to fund the HSI-specific program and demonstrate a 
$50,000,000 investment no later than September 30, 2019.
    Innovation Corps.--The recommendation includes no less than 
the fiscal year 2018 level for the NSF Innovation Corps program 
to support new and existing I-Corps Teams, Sites, and Nodes.
    Cybersecurity research.--The Committee encourages NSF to 
form partnerships with Hispanic Serving Institutions and 
Historically Black Colleges and Universities with respect to 
cybersecurity research.

                 AGENCY OPERATIONS AND AWARD MANAGEMENT

    The Committee recommends $333,630,000 for Agency Operations 
and Award Management, which is $5,120,000 above fiscal year 
2018 and the same as the request.
    Safeguarding U.S. research advances.--The Committee directs 
the National Science Foundation, in consultation with the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation and the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology and other agencies as needed, to work 
with the academic community, through workshops or other 
mechanisms as appropriate, to identify best practices for 
universities and institutions of higher education so that they 
may be aware of and can address data security concerns, 
including intellectual property protection in NSF-funded 
research projects or at NSF-funded facilities. NSF shall report 
to the Committee within 180 days of enactment of this Act 
regarding how it plans to implement this direction.

                  OFFICE OF THE NATIONAL SCIENCE BOARD

    The Committee recommends $4,370,000, which is the same as 
fiscal year 2018, for the National Science Board.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee recommends $15,350,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General, which is $150,000 above fiscal year 2018 and 
the same as the request.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The bill includes a provision that establishes thresholds 
for the transfer of funds.
    The bill includes a provision regarding notification prior 
to acquisition or disposal of certain assets.

                                TITLE IV


                            RELATED AGENCIES


                       Commission on Civil Rights


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $9,700,000 for the Commission on 
Civil Rights, which is the same as fiscal year 2018 and 
$500,000 above the request.

                Equal Employment Opportunity Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $379,500,000 for the Equal 
Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), which is the same as 
fiscal year 2018 and $15,692,914 above the request. The 
recommendation continues the increase provided in fiscal year 
2018 to address sexual harassment claims.
    Backlog reduction.--The Committee expects the EEOC to 
prioritize inventory reduction rather than allocate resources 
for systematic changes in which no complaint was filed by an 
actual/former employee or applicant. EEOC shall provide an 
annual report on the backlog, to include data on the number and 
pendency of charges, on any changes to EEOC's priority charge 
handling procedures, and the effect of such changes on 
inventory reduction.
    Conciliation.--The Committee is concerned with the EEOC's 
pursuit of litigation absent good faith conciliation efforts. 
The Committee directs the EEOC to engage in such efforts before 
undertaking litigation.
    State and Local Enforcement Assistance.--The Committee 
recommends up to $29,500,000 to assist State and local 
enforcement agencies. The Committee continues to believe that 
none of these funds should be used for tester programs.

                     International Trade Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $95,000,000 for the International 
Trade Commission (ITC), which is $1,300,000 above fiscal year 
2018 and $7,385,000 above the request.
    Cybersecurity.--ITC handles sensitive and proprietary data 
and therefore is a potential target for cyber attacks. The 
Committee expects ITC to prioritize efforts to improve its 
cybersecurity posture. The Committee also encourages ITC to 
work with other relevant Federal agencies to inform its 
actions.

                       Legal Services Corporation


               PAYMENT TO THE LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION

    The Committee recommends $410,000,000 for the Legal 
Services Corporation (LSC), which is equal to fiscal year 2018 
and $391,800,000 above the request.

          ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISION--LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION

    The bill continues restrictions on the uses of LSC funding. 
None of the funds appropriated in this Act to the LSC shall be 
expended for any purpose prohibited or limited by, or contrary 
to any of the provisions of, sections 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, 
and 506 of Public Law 105-119, and all funds appropriated in 
this Act to the LSC shall be subject to the same terms and 
conditions set forth in such sections, except that all 
references in sections 502 and 503 to 1997 and 1998 shall be 
deemed to refer instead to 2018 and 2019, respectively.
    Unauthorized uses of funds.--The Inspector General (IG) of 
the LSC is encouraged to conduct annual audits of LSC grantees 
to ensure that funds are not used in contravention of the 
restrictions on engaging in political activities, representing 
illegal immigrants, or any of the other restrictions by which 
LSC grantees are required to abide. The Committee recommends 
the removal of funds from any LSC grantee determined by the IG 
to have engaged in unauthorized activity.

                        Marine Mammal Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $3,431,000 for the Marine Mammal 
Commission, which is the same as fiscal year 2018 and $982,000 
above the request.

            Office of the United States Trade Representative

    The Committee recommends $72,600,000 for the Office of the 
U.S. Trade Representative (USTR), which is the same as fiscal 
year 2018 and $9,600,000 above the request.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $57,600,000 for the salaries and 
expenses of USTR, which is the same as fiscal year 2018 and 
$5,400,000 below the request.
    China.--The Committee expects that USTR will coordinate and 
implement a comprehensive and vigorous strategy to address the 
United States' trade imbalance with China. Within the amounts 
provided, the USTR is encouraged to maintain staff who can 
translate trade documents that USTR receives from China. The 
Committee believes that USTR should have its own translators on 
staff given the challenges associated with enforcing existing 
U.S. trade laws with China.
    U.S.-India bilateral trade.--The Committee notes the 
importance of U.S.-India bilateral trade and investment. 
However, the Committee is concerned that India, while striving 
to improve its economic growth, has been enacting a series of 
policies to increase domestic manufacturing and protect 
domestic industries and agricultural production that 
discriminate against U.S. exports and investment. The Committee 
is concerned about the standards of intellectual property 
protection and forced localization measures, as well as the 
unfair treatment by India of U.S. exports of American-produced 
boric acid, the illegal rebranding and smuggling of U.S.-grown 
almonds into India, and many other market access issues. In 
April 2018, USTR announced it is conducting a review of India's 
eligibility in the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) 
based on concerns regarding its compliance with program 
requirements, primarily market access. Accordingly, the 
Committee supports this effort and encourages USTR to review 
whether India is meeting the statutory eligibility criteria of 
the GSP program and commends the Trade Representative for 
continuing to work to address the aforementioned unfair trade 
practices and market access issues with the Indian government.
    Free trade agreements.--The Committee directs USTR to 
continue to pursue free trade agreements with additional 
countries and trading blocs to continue advancing trade to and 
from the United States.
    The Committee also directs USTR to report the status of 
negotiations of all bilateral trade agreements. Reports shall 
include the number of times representatives met and details of 
substantive discussions. The first report shall be submitted 90 
days after enactment of this Act and subsequent reports every 
90 days thereafter.

                      TRADE ENFORCEMENT TRUST FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends $15,000,000, which is to be 
derived from the Trade Enforcement Trust Fund, for trade 
enforcement activities authorized by the Trade Facilitation and 
Trade Enforcement Act of 2015. No funds were requested from 
this Fund.

                        State Justice Institute


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $5,821,000 for the State Justice 
Institute, which is $700,000 more than fiscal year 2018 and 
$1,100,000 less than the request.
    The additional funding is provided to enhance the 
Institute's efforts to help State courts address the opioid 
epidemic. The Committee expects the Institute to make 
addressing the opioid epidemic a priority.

                                TITLE V


                           GENERAL PROVISIONS


                        (INCLUDING RESCISSIONS)

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    Section 501 prohibits the use of funds for publicity or 
propaganda purposes unless expressly authorized by law.
    Section 502 prohibits any appropriation contained in this 
Act from remaining available for obligation beyond the current 
fiscal year unless expressly authorized.
    Section 503 provides that the expenditure of any 
appropriation contained in this Act for any consulting service 
through procurement contracts shall be limited to those 
contracts where such expenditures are a matter of public record 
and available for public inspection, except where otherwise 
provided under existing law or under existing Executive order 
issued pursuant to existing law.
    Section 504 provides that if any provision of this Act or 
the application of such provision to any person or circumstance 
shall be held invalid, the remainder of the Act and the 
application of other provisions shall not be affected.
    Section 505 prohibits a reprogramming of funds that: (1) 
creates or initiates a new program, project, or activity; (2) 
eliminates a program, project, or activity; (3) increases funds 
or personnel by any means for any project or activity for which 
funds have been denied or restricted; (4) relocates an office 
or employees; (5) reorganizes or renames offices, programs, or 
activities; (6) contracts out or privatizes any function or 
activity presently performed by Federal employees; (7) augments 
funds for existing programs, projects, or activities in excess 
of $500,000 or 10 percent, whichever is less, or reduces by 10 
percent funding for any program, project, or activity, or 
numbers of personnel by 10 percent; or (8) results from any 
general savings, including savings from a reduction in 
personnel, which would result in a change in existing programs, 
projects, or activities as approved by Congress, unless the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations are notified 15 
days in advance of such reprogramming of funds.
    Section 506 provides that if it is determined that any 
person intentionally affixes a ``Made in America'' label to any 
product that was not made in America that person shall not be 
eligible to receive any contract or subcontract made with funds 
made available in this Act. The section further provides that 
to the extent practicable, with respect to purchases of 
promotional items, funds made available under this Act shall be 
used to purchase items manufactured, produced, or assembled in 
the United States or its territories or possessions.
    Section 507 requires quarterly reporting on the status of 
balances of appropriations.
    Section 508 provides that any costs incurred by a 
department or agency funded under this Act resulting from, or 
to prevent, personnel actions taken in response to funding 
reductions in this Act, or, for the Department of Commerce, 
from actions taken for the care and protection of loan 
collateral or grant property, shall be absorbed within the 
budgetary resources available to the department or agency, and 
provides transfer authority between appropriation accounts to 
carry out this provision, subject to reprogramming procedures.
    Section 509 prohibits funds made available in this Act from 
being used to promote the sale or export of tobacco or tobacco 
products or to seek the reduction or removal of foreign 
restrictions on the marketing of tobacco products, except for 
restrictions which are not applied equally to all tobacco or 
tobacco products of the same type. This provision is not 
intended to impact routine international trade services to all 
U.S. citizens, including the processing of applications to 
establish foreign trade zones.
    Section 510 limits the obligation of receipts deposited 
into the Crime Victims Fund to $2,600,000,000 during fiscal 
year 2019. The language also provides for a tribal set-aside.
    Section 511 prohibits the use of Department of Justice 
funds for programs that discriminate against or denigrate the 
religious or moral beliefs of students participating in such 
programs.
    Section 512 prohibits the transfer of funds made available 
in this Act to any department, agency or instrumentality of the 
United States Government, except for transfers made by, or 
pursuant to authorities provided in, this Act or any other 
appropriations Act.
    Section 513 prohibits funds for acquisition of certain 
information systems unless the acquiring department or agency 
has reviewed and assessed certain risks. Any acquisition of 
such an information system is contingent upon the development 
of a risk mitigation strategy and a determination that the 
acquisition is in the national interest. Each department or 
agency covered by this section shall consult with the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and other relevant agencies when 
reviewing supply chain risks and making a determination that 
the acquisition is in the national interest. Each department or 
agency covered by this section is directed to ensure it is 
following the criteria established by the FBI and the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology when acquiring or 
renewing certain information systems. Each department or agency 
covered under this section shall submit a quarterly report to 
the Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate 
describing reviews and assessments of risk made pursuant to 
this section and any associated findings or determinations.
    Section 514 prohibits the use of funds made available in 
this Act to support or justify the use of torture by any 
official or contract employee of the United States Government.
    Section 515 permanently prohibits the use of funds to 
require certain export licenses.
    Section 516 permanently prohibits the use of funds to deny 
certain import applications regarding ``curios or relics'' 
firearms, parts, or ammunition.
    Section 517 prohibits the use of funds made available in 
this Act to include certain language in trade agreements.
    Section 518 prohibits the use of funds made available in 
this Act to authorize or issue a national security letter (NSL) 
in contravention of certain laws authorizing the FBI to issue 
NSLs.
    Section 519 requires congressional notification regarding 
any project within the Departments of Commerce or Justice, the 
National Science Foundation or the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration totaling more than $75,000,000 that has 
cost increases of 10 percent or more.
    Section 520 deems funds for intelligence or intelligence 
related activities as authorized by Congress during fiscal year 
2019 until the enactment of the Intelligence Authorization Act 
for fiscal year 2019.
    Section 521 prohibits contracts or grant awards in excess 
of $5,000,000 unless the prospective contractor or grantee 
certifies that the organization has filed all Federal tax 
returns, has not been convicted of a criminal offense under the 
Internal Revenue Code of 1986, and has no unpaid Federal tax 
assessment.

                             (RESCISSIONS)

    Section 522 provides for rescissions of unobligated 
balances from the Departments of Commerce and Justice.
    Section 523 prohibits the use of funds made available in 
this Act for the purchase of first class or premium air travel 
in contravention of certain Federal regulations.
    Section 524 prohibits the use of funds made available in 
this Act to pay for the attendance of more than 50 department 
or agency employees, who are stationed in the United States, at 
any single conference outside the United States, unless the 
conference is a law enforcement training or operational event 
where the majority of Federal attendees are law enforcement 
personnel stationed outside the United States.
    Section 525 prohibits the use of funds in this or any other 
Act for the transfer or release of certain individuals detained 
at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to or 
within the United States, its territories, or possessions.
    Section 526 prohibits the use of funds in this or any other 
Act to construct, acquire, or modify any facility in the United 
States, its territories, or possessions to house certain 
individuals who, as of June 24, 2009, were located at United 
States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for the purposes of 
detention or imprisonment in the custody or control of the 
Department of Defense.
    Section 527 requires tracking and reporting of undisbursed 
balances in expired grant accounts.
    Section 528 prohibits the use of funds made available in 
this Act by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration 
(NASA), the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) or 
the National Space Council (NSC) to engage in bilateral 
activities with China or a Chinese-owned company unless the 
activities are authorized by subsequent legislation or NASA, 
OSTP or NSC after consultation with the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation have made a certification pursuant to subsections 
(c) and (d) of this section.
    Section 529 permanently prohibits funds from being used to 
deny the importation of shotgun models if no application for 
the importation of such models, in the same configuration, had 
been denied prior to January 1, 2011, on the basis that the 
shotgun was not particularly suitable for or readily adaptable 
to sporting purposes.
    Section 530 prohibits the use of funds made available in 
this Act to establish or maintain a computer network that does 
not block pornography, except for law enforcement or victim 
assistance purposes.
    Section 531 requires each department and agency funded in 
the bill to submit spending plans.
    Section 532 prohibits funds made available by this Act to 
implement the Arms Trade Treaty until the Senate approves a 
resolution of ratification.
    Section 533 requires a quarterly report from the Department 
of Commerce, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 
and the National Science Foundation on official travel to 
China.
    Section 534 requires not less than 10 percent of the funds 
provided for certain programs be provided to persistent poverty 
counties.
    Section 535 prohibits funds to approve the registration, 
renewal, or maintenance of the registration of a mark, trade 
mark, trade name, or commercial name when the mark, trade mark, 
trade name, or commercial name was unlawfully confiscated in 
Cuba.
    Section 536 prohibits funds from being used to require a 
person licensed under section 923 of title 18, United States 
Code, to report information to the Department of Justice 
regarding the sale of multiple rifles or shotguns to the same 
person.
    Section 537 allows States to bring a civil action against 
the United States to restore the sovereignty reserved for the 
States by the Constitution.
    Section 538 prohibits funds to move a Bureau of Alcohol, 
Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives facility.
    Section 539 prohibits funds to enter into a civil 
settlement agreement on behalf of the United States that 
includes certain donations.
    Section 540 prohibits funds to prepare for the shutdown of 
the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy.
    Section 541 prohibits certain National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration actions regarding certain 
hydroelectric projects.
    Section 542 prohibits the Department of Justice from 
preventing certain States from implementing State laws 
regarding the use of medical marijuana.
    Section 543 prohibits funding to be used in contravention 
of the ``Order Activating Suspended Denial Order Relating to 
Zhongxing Telecommunications Equipment Corporation and ZTE 
Kangxun Telecommunications Ltd.'' published on April 23, 2018.

                       SPENDING REDUCTION ACCOUNT

    Section 544 establishes a Spending Reduction Account.

            House of Representatives Reporting Requirements

    The following materials are submitted in accordance with 
various requirements of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives:

                          Full Committee Votes



         Statement of General Performance Goals and Objectives

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is a statement of 
general performance goals and objectives for which this measure 
authorizes funding: The Committee on Appropriations considers 
program performance, including a program's success in 
developing and attaining outcome-related goals and objectives, 
in developing funding recommendations.

                          Rescission of Funds

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table is submitted 
describing the rescissions recommended in the accompanying 
bill:

 
 
 
Department of Commerce:
    Economic Development Assistance Programs..........       $10,000,000
    National Institute of Standards and Technologies,          2,000,000
     Industrial Technology Services...................
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,          10,000,000
     Operations, Research, and Facilities.............
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,          10,000,000
     Procurement, Acquisition and Constr..............
Department of Justice:
    Working Capital Fund..............................        75,000,000
    Federal Bureau of Investigation, Salaries and             25,000,000
     Expenses.........................................
    State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance........
    Office on Violence Against Women, Violence Against        10,000,000
     Women Prevention and Prosecution Programs........
    Office of Justice Programs........................        50,000,000
Legal Activities, Assets Forfeiture Fund..............       674,000,000
 

                           Transfers of Funds

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is submitted describing 
the transfers of funds provided in the accompanying bill:
    In title I, under Bureau of the Census, Periodic Censuses 
and Programs, language is included to transfer funds to the 
Department of Commerce, Office of Inspector General.
    Under U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Salaries and 
Expenses, language is included to transfer funds to the Civil 
Service Retirement and Disability Fund, the Federal Employees 
Health Benefit Fund, the Federal Employees Group Life Insurance 
Fund, and the Department of Commerce, Office of Inspector 
General.
    Under National Institute of Standards and Technology, 
Scientific and Technical Research and Services, language is 
included allowing for transfers to the Working Capital Fund.
    Under National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 
Operations, Research, and Facilities, language is included to 
transfer funds from the Promote and Develop Fishery Products 
and Research Pertaining to American Fisheries fund.
    Under National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 
Procurement, Acquisition, and Construction, language is 
included to transfer funds to the Department of Commerce, 
Office of the Inspector General.
    Under Office of the Inspector General, language is included 
to transfer funds from the Public Safety Trust Fund.
    Section 103 provides for the transfer of funds between 
Department of Commerce appropriations in certain circumstances.
    In title II, under General Administration, Justice 
Information Sharing Technology, language is included allowing 
for the transfer of funds.
    Under General Administration, Executive Office for 
Immigration Review, language is included to transfer funds to 
the Executive Office for Immigration Review from fees deposited 
in the Immigration Examinations Fee account.
    Under Legal Activities, Salaries and Expenses, Community 
Relations Service, language is included allowing for the 
transfer of funds in certain circumstances.
    Under Federal Prison System, Salaries and Expenses, 
language is included to allow the transfer of funds to the 
Department of Health and Human Services.
    Under State and Local Law Enforcement Activities, Office on 
Violence Against Women, Violence Against Women Prevention and 
Prosecution Programs, language is included to allow the 
transfer of funds in certain circumstances.
    Under State and Local Law Enforcement Activities, State and 
Local Law Enforcement Assistance, language is included to allow 
the transfer of funds in certain circumstances.
    Under State and Local Law Enforcement Activities, Public 
Safety Officer Benefits, language is included to allow the 
transfer of funds in certain circumstances.
    Section 205 provides language for the transfer of funds 
between Department of Justice appropriations in certain 
circumstances.
    Section 211 provides language for the transfer of funds 
between certain grant funds and the National Institute of 
Justice and the Bureau of Justice Statistics.
    In title III, under National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration, Administrative Provisions, language is included 
allowing for the transfer of funds between appropriations and 
for unexpired balances from a previous account to be 
transferred to a new account established in this Act.
    Under National Science Foundation, Administrative 
Provisions, language is included allowing for the transfer of 
funds among appropriations.
    Under United States Trade Representative, Trade Enforcement 
Trust Fund, language is included providing for the transfer of 
funds.
    Under General Provisions, Section 508 provides for the 
transfer of funds in certain circumstances.

   Disclosure of Earmarks and Congressionally Directed Spending Items

    Neither the bill nor the report contain any Congressional 
earmarks, limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as 
defined in clause 9 of rule XXI of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives.

          Compliance With Rule XIII, CL. 3(e) (Ramseyer Rule)

    In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the Committee notes that the 
accompanying bill does not propose to repeal or amend a statute 
or part thereof.

               Changes in the Application of Existing Law

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1)(A) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the following statements are 
submitted describing the effect of provisions in the 
accompanying bill that directly or indirectly change the 
application of existing law.
    Language is included for a number of accounts placing 
limitations on representation and reception allowances in order 
to restrict the amount of money that would otherwise be spent 
on these activities. The bill also provides that a number of 
appropriations shall remain available for obligation beyond the 
current fiscal year. While these provisions are not 
specifically authorized for all of the items, it is deemed 
desirable to include such language for certain programs in 
order to provide for orderly administration and effective use 
of funds.
    In title I, Department of Commerce, under International 
Trade Administration, Operations and Administration, language 
is included providing that funds may be used for engaging in 
trade promotion activities abroad, including expenses of grants 
and cooperative agreements, for the purposes of promoting 
exports of U.S. firms. Language is also provided allowing for 
full medical coverage for dependent members of immediate 
families of employees stationed overseas and employees 
temporarily posted overseas; travel and transportation of 
employees of the International Trade Administration; employment 
of Americans and aliens by contract for services; rental of 
space abroad and expenses of alteration, repair, or 
improvement; purchase or construction of temporary demountable 
exhibition structures for use abroad; and payment of tort 
claims. In addition, language is included regarding official 
representation expenses abroad, purchase of passenger motor 
vehicles for official use abroad, obtaining insurance on 
official motor vehicles, and rental of tie lines. Language is 
also recommended deriving a portion of available funds from 
fees. Furthermore, language is included designating funding for 
China antidumping and countervailing duty enforcement and 
compliance activities. Moreover, language is included providing 
for two-year availability of funds. Finally, language is 
included regarding the contributions under the Mutual 
Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961.
    Under Bureau of Industry and Security, Operations and 
Administration, the language provides for no-year availability 
of funds. Language is included regarding the costs associated 
with the performance of export administration field activities 
both domestically and abroad; full medical coverage for 
dependent members of immediate families of employees stationed 
overseas; employment of Americans and aliens by contract for 
services abroad; payment of tort claims; official 
representation expenses abroad; awards of compensation to 
informers; and purchase of passenger motor vehicles for 
official use and motor vehicles for law enforcement use without 
regard to any price limitation established by law. In addition, 
language is included regarding the Mutual Educational and 
Cultural Exchange Act of 1961. Finally, language is recommended 
providing that payments and contributions collected and 
accepted for materials or services may be retained for use in 
covering the cost of those activities and other communications.
    Under Economic Development Administration, Economic 
Development Assistance Programs, the language provides for no-
year availability of funds.
    Also, under Salaries and Expenses, language is included 
regarding the monitoring of approved projects.
    Under Minority Business Development Agency, Minority 
Business Development, language is included making funds 
available for fostering, promoting, and developing minority 
business enterprises, including expenses of grants, contracts 
and other agreements.
    Under Economic and Statistical Analysis, Salaries and 
Expenses, language is included providing for two-year 
availability of funds.
    Under Bureau of the Census, Current Surveys and Programs, 
language is included providing that funds may be used for 
collecting, compiling, analyzing, preparing and publishing 
statistics and for promotion, outreach and marketing 
activities.
    Also, under Periodic Censuses and Programs, language is 
included providing three-year availability of funds. Language 
is also included providing that funds may be used for 
collecting, compiling, analyzing, preparing and publishing 
statistics and for promotion, outreach and marketing 
activities. In addition, language is included providing for a 
transfer to the ``Office of Inspector General'' account for 
activities associated with carrying out investigations and 
audits related to the Bureau of the Census. Finally, language 
is included withholding funds for certain Census information 
technology projects until the Bureau submits an expenditure 
plan.
    Under National Telecommunications and Information 
Administration (NTIA), Salaries and Expenses, language is 
included permitting the Secretary of Commerce to charge Federal 
agencies for costs in spectrum management, analysis, 
operations, and related services; and to use such collections 
in telecommunications research. The language also allows the 
Secretary to retain and use as offsetting collections all funds 
transferred, or previously transferred for telecommunications 
research, engineering and activities by the Institute for 
Telecommunication Sciences of NTIA. Finally, language is 
included providing that funds so transferred shall remain 
available until expended.
    Also, under Public Telecommunications Facilities, Planning 
and Construction, language is included allowing recoveries and 
unobligated balances of funds previously appropriated to be 
available for the administration of all open grants until their 
expiration.
    Under United States Patent and Trademark Office, Salaries 
and Expenses, language is included providing that appropriated 
funds be reduced as offsetting collections are assessed and 
collected. Language is including making funds available until 
expended and providing that funds received in excess of 
appropriations be deposited in a Patent and Trademark Fee 
Reserve fund, to be available until expended pursuant to the 
Director submitting a spending plan subject to section 505 of 
this Act, after which the funds shall be transferred to the 
Salaries and Expenses account. In addition, language is 
included limiting representation expenses. Language is also 
included regarding basic pay and certain retirement benefits. 
Additional language is included regarding USPTO's financial 
statements. Furthermore, language is included providing that 
fees and surcharges charged are available to USPTO pursuant to 
section 42(c) of title 35, United States Code. Finally, the 
language provides that an amount be transferred to the Office 
of Inspector General (OIG).
    Under National Institute of Standards and Technology 
(NIST), Scientific and Technical Research and Services, 
language is included providing for no-year availability of 
funds. In addition, language is included allowing transfers to 
the Working Capital Fund. Language is included limiting funds 
for official reception and representation expenses. Finally, 
language is included allowing NIST to provide local 
transportation for a certain fellowship program.
    Also, under Industrial Technology Services, language is 
included providing no-year availability of funds. The language 
also designates an amount for the Manufacturing Extension 
Partnership and the National Network for Manufacturing 
Innovation.
    In addition, under Construction of Research Facilities, 
language is included providing for no-year availability of 
funds. Language is also included regarding the submission of 
certain materials in support of construction budget requests.
    Under National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 
(NOAA), Operations, Research, and Facilities, language is 
included allowing for two-year availability for funds, except 
for cooperative enforcement funds, which are available for 
three years. Language is also included allowing maintenance, 
operation, and hire of aircraft and vessels; grants, contracts, 
or other payments to nonprofit organizations for the purposes 
of conducting activities pursuant to cooperative agreements; 
and relocation of facilities. Language is included allowing 
fees and donations received by a particular office to be 
retained and used for expenses related to certain activities. 
In addition, language is included that provides that certain 
funds be derived from various sources and restricting their use 
to certain activities. Moreover, language is included 
specifying that deviations from amounts included in the report 
accompanying the Act shall be subject to section 505 of this 
Act. Finally, language is included providing for retired pay 
expenses.
    Also, under Procurement, Acquisition and Construction, 
language is included providing for three-year availability for 
funds, except for construction funds, which are available until 
expended. Language is also included providing that certain 
funds be derived from various sources. In addition, language is 
included specifying that deviations from amounts included in 
the report accompanying the Act shall be subject to section 505 
of this Act. Language is included regarding the submission of 
certain materials in support of construction budget requests. 
Language is included transferring an amount to the OIG.
    In addition, under Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery, 
language is included providing for two-year availability of 
funds. Language is also included allowing the Secretary of 
Commerce to issue grants to specific States and Federally 
recognized tribes for conservation projects for listed 
endangered or threatened salmon and steelhead populations, 
populations at risk to be so listed, and for maintaining 
populations necessary for the exercise of tribal treaty fishing 
rights, and for conservation of Pacific coastal salmon and 
steelhead habitat, to be allocated under scientific and merit 
principles and not available for marketing activities; and 
requiring a State match.
    Furthermore, under Fishermen's Contingency Fund, language 
is included providing for the appropriation of funds to be 
derived from receipts collected pursuant to Title IV of Public 
Law 95-372 and provides that these funds are available until 
expended.
    Additionally, under Fishery Disaster Assistance language is 
included providing no year availability of funds.
    Moreover, under Fisheries Finance Program Account, language 
is included placing limitations on individual fishing quota 
loans and traditional direct loans.
    Under Departmental Management, Salaries and Expenses, 
language is included limiting funds for official reception and 
representation expenses.
    Under Department of Commerce, General Provisions, the 
following general provisions that fall within the rule are 
recommended:
    Section 101 makes funds available for advanced payments 
only upon certification of officials designated by the 
Secretary that such payments are considered to be in the public 
interest.
    Section 102 makes appropriations for the Department 
available for hire of passenger motor vehicles, for services, 
and for uniforms and allowances as authorized by law.
    Section 103 provides the authority to transfer funds 
between Department of Commerce appropriation accounts and 
requiring notification to the Committee of certain actions.
    Section 104 extends Congressional notification requirements 
for NOAA satellite programs and includes life cycle cost 
amounts for certain satellites.
    Section 105 provides for reimbursement for services within 
Department of Commerce buildings.
    Section 106 clarifies that grant recipients under the 
Department of Commerce may continue to deter child pornography, 
copyright infringement, or any other unlawful activity over 
their networks.
    Section 107 provides the Administrator with the authority 
to avail NOAA of needed resources, with the consent of those 
supplying the resources, to carry out responsibilities of any 
statute administered by NOAA.
    Section 108 prohibits the National Technical Information 
Service from charging customers for certain publications, 
except under certain conditions and requires charges be limited 
to recovering costs.
    Section 109 authorizes NOAA to receive payments from other 
entities to defray some costs of permitting and regulatory 
activities.
    In title II, Department of Justice, under General 
Administration, Salaries and Expenses, language is included 
providing for an amount for security and construction of 
Department of Justice facilities, which shall remain available 
until expended.
    Also, under Justice Information Sharing Technology, 
language is included providing that funds be available until 
expended. Language is also included allowing transfers up to a 
certain amount to this account for information technology 
initiatives, and that these funds may be transferred subject to 
requirements in this Act and shall be available until expended.
    In addition, under Executive Office for Immigration Review, 
language is included providing that an amount shall be derived 
by transfer from the Executive Office for Immigration Review 
fees deposited in the ``Immigration Examinations Fee'' account. 
Language is also included making an amount available until 
expended for certain purposes.
    Moreover, under Office of Inspector General, language is 
included providing for not to exceed $10,000 to meet unforeseen 
emergencies of a confidential character.
    Under United States Parole Commission, Salaries and 
Expenses, language is included providing that upon the 
expiration of a term of office of a Commissioner, the 
Commissioner may continue to act until a successor has been 
appointed.
    Under Legal Activities, Salaries and Expenses, General 
Legal Activities, language is included providing not to exceed 
a certain amount for expenses of collecting evidence, to be 
expended under the direction of, and to be accounted for solely 
under the certificate of, the Attorney General. Language is 
also included providing for the administration of pardons and 
clemency petitions. Language is also included providing for 
rental of space in the District of Columbia. Language is 
included making an amount available until expended for 
litigation support contracts. In addition, language is included 
making certain funds available to INTERPOL available until 
expended. Also, language is included limiting the amount of 
funds for official representation and reception expenses 
available to INTERPOL Washington. Furthermore, language is 
included providing funds to the Civil Rights Division for 
expenses associated with election monitoring, authority to 
reimburse the Office of Personnel Management for such expenses, 
and availability of such funds until expended. Finally, 
language is included for expenses associated with processing 
cases under the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986.
    Also, under Salaries and Expenses, Antitrust Division, 
language is included providing for no-year availability of 
funds and the use of offsetting collections. The language also 
provides that fees collected for premerger notification 
filings, regardless of the year of collection, shall be 
retained and used for necessary expenses in this appropriation, 
and shall remain available until expended.
    In addition, under Salaries and Expenses, United States 
Attorneys, language is included regarding inter-governmental 
and cooperative agreements and limiting funds for official 
reception and representation expenses. Language is also 
included extending the availability of certain funds. Finally, 
language is included requiring each United States Attorney to 
establish or participate in a task force on human trafficking.
    Furthermore, under United States Trustee System Fund, 
language is included regarding refunds due depositors. Language 
is also included providing for the extended availability of 
certain funds and the use of offsetting collections.
    Moreover, under Fees and Expenses of Witnesses, language is 
included regarding contracts for the procurement and 
supervision of expert witnesses. In addition, language is 
included regarding funds for construction of buildings for 
safesites, armored and other vehicles, and telecommunication 
equipment. The language also provides for no-year availability 
of funds. In addition, language is included providing no funds 
may be transferred pursuant to section 205 of this Act.
    And under Salaries and Expenses, Community Relations 
Service, language is included regarding the transfer of funds 
for conflict resolution and violence prevention activities, 
which shall be subject to the provisions of section 505 of this 
Act.
    Under United States Marshals Service, Salaries and 
Expenses, language is included limiting official reception and 
representation expenses, and providing for no-year availability 
for part of the appropriation.
    Also, under Construction, language is included providing 
for no-year availability of funds.
    In addition, under Federal Prisoner Detention, language is 
included providing for no-year availability of funds. Language 
is also included providing that the United States Marshals 
Service shall be responsible for managing the Justice Prisoner 
and Alien Transportation System. In addition, language is 
included limiting the amount of funds considered ``funds 
appropriated for State and local law enforcement assistance''.
    Under National Security Division, Salaries and Expenses, 
language is included providing for the no-year availability of 
funds for IT systems. Language is also included providing that 
upon a determination by the Attorney General that emergent 
circumstances require additional funding for the activities of 
the National Security Division, the Attorney General may 
transfer such amounts to this heading from available 
appropriations for the current fiscal year for the Department 
of Justice, as may be necessary to respond to such 
circumstances. The language provides that such a transfer shall 
be treated as a reprogramming under section 505 of this Act.
    Under Interagency Law Enforcement, Interagency Crime and 
Drug Enforcement, language is included providing for no-year 
availability for some of the funds. Language is also included 
regarding authorities under which funds may be used.
    Under Federal Bureau of Investigation, Salaries and 
Expenses, language is included providing for no-year 
availability of certain funds. Language is included providing 
for a limitation on representational expenses.
    Under Construction, language is included specifying the 
purpose of the appropriation and making it available until 
expended.
    Under Drug Enforcement Administration, Salaries and 
Expenses, language is included providing for funds to meet 
unforeseen emergencies of a confidential character. Language is 
also included allowing conduct of drug education and training 
programs, including travel and related expenses for 
participants in such programs and the distribution of items of 
token value that promote the goals of such programs. In 
addition, language is included providing for no-year 
availability of certain funds. Finally, language is included 
providing for a limitation on representational expenses.
    Under Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, 
Salaries and Expenses, language is included allowing training 
of State and local law enforcement agencies with or without 
reimbursement, including training in connection with the 
training and acquisition of canines for explosives and fire 
accelerants detection, and allowing provision of laboratory 
assistance to State and local law enforcement agencies, with or 
without reimbursement. Language is also included limiting 
official reception and representation expenses. In addition, 
language is included providing funds for the payment of 
attorneys' fees. Additional language is included prohibiting 
expenses to investigate or act upon applications for relief 
from Federal firearms disabilities under section 925(c) of 
title 18, United States Code. Language is further included 
regarding expenses to investigate applications filed by 
corporations for relief from section 925(c) of title 18, United 
States Code. In addition, language is included providing for 
no-year availability of certain funds. Moreover, language is 
included that prohibits funds to transfer the functions, 
missions or activities of ATF to other agencies or departments.
    Under Federal Prison System, Salaries and Expenses, 
language is included that provides for the transfer to the 
Department of Health and Human Services funds necessary for 
medical relief for inmates. Language is also included that 
provides authority to the Director to enter into contracts to 
furnish health care. In addition, language is included placing 
a limitation on funds for reception and representation 
expenses. Furthermore, language is included extending the 
availability of certain funds. Finally, language is included 
providing authority for the Federal Prison System to accept 
donated property and services.
    Also, in Building and Facilities, language is included 
providing for no-year availability of funds. Language is also 
included stating labor of prisoners may be used for work under 
this heading.
    Additionally, under Federal Prison Industries, 
Incorporated, language is included authorizing Federal Prison 
Industries, Incorporated, to make such expenditures, within the 
limits of funds and borrowing authority available, and in 
accord with the law, and to make such contracts and 
commitments, without regard to fiscal year limitations, as may 
be necessary in carrying out the program set forth in the 
budget for the current fiscal year for such corporation.
    Furthermore, under Limitation on Administrative Expenses, 
Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated, language is included 
making available funds for its administrative expenses, and for 
certain services, to be computed on an accrual basis to be 
determined in accordance with the corporation's current 
prescribed accounting system, and such amounts shall be 
exclusive of depreciation, payment of claims, and expenditures 
which such accounting system requires to be capitalized or 
charged to cost of commodities acquired or produced, including 
selling and shipping expenses, and expenses in connection with 
acquisition, construction, operation, maintenance, improvement, 
protection, or disposition of facilities and other property 
belonging to the corporation or in which it has an interest.
    Under State and Local Law Enforcement Activities, Office on 
Violence Against Women, Violence Against Women Prevention and 
Prosecution Programs, language is included making funds 
available until expended. Language is also included placing a 
limitation on funds to be made available for expenses related 
to evaluation, training, and technical assistance. In addition, 
language is included providing for specific appropriations for 
various programs within the Office on Violence Against Women. 
Furthermore, language is included making available certain 
unobligated balances for specified programs. The language also 
applies certain conditions to specified grants. It provides for 
certain funds to be transferred to ``Research, Evaluation and 
Statistics''' for administration by the Office of Justice 
Programs.
    Under Office of Justice Programs, Research, Evaluation and 
Statistics, language is included to provide for no-year 
availability of funds. Language is also included to provide for 
specific appropriations for various programs within the Office 
of Justice Programs.
    Also, under State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance, 
language is included to provide for no-year availability of 
funds. Language is also included regarding an Officer Robert 
Wilson III Memorial Initiative on Preventing Violence Against 
Law Enforcement Officer Resilience and Survivability 
Initiative, juvenile indigent defense, a National Missing and 
Unidentified Persons System, Violent Gang and Gun Crime 
Reduction, Capital Litigation and Wrongful Conviction Review, 
Prison Rape Prevention and Prosecution, Missing Alzheimer's 
Patients, Emergency Federal Law Enforcement Assistance, managed 
access systems and the application of certain sections and 
special rules. In addition, language is included regarding 
Federal immigration and other detainees housed in State and 
local detention facilities. Furthermore, language is included 
regarding local government use of funds to increase the number 
of law enforcement officers. Language is also included 
regarding DNA training and education for law enforcement, 
correctional personnel, and court officers. There is further 
language regarding certain time limitations under the Second 
Chance Act. Furthermore, language is included waiving a 
provision of law that terminated the COPS Hiring Program after 
September 2000. Language is also included regarding smart 
policing, smart prosecution, tribal law enforcement, regional 
information sharing activities, and certain police training. 
The language also provides for certain funds to be transferred 
to ``Research, Evaluation and Statistics''. Language is 
included allowing the transfer of certain balances from the 
``Community Oriented Policing Services Programs'' account, 
subject to the requirements of section 505 of this Act. 
Finally, the language specifies appropriations for various 
programs within the Office of Justice Programs.
    In addition, under Juvenile Justice Programs, language is 
included providing for no-year availability of funds. Language 
is also included waiving a provision of law with respect to 
funding for missing and exploited children programs. Finally, 
the language delineates certain amounts for various programs 
under this heading.
    Furthermore, under Public Safety Officer Benefits, language 
is included providing for no-year availability of funds. 
Language is also included providing for the transfers of funds 
in emergent circumstances, which shall be subject to the 
provisions of section 505 of this Act.
    Under Department of Justice, General Provisions, the 
following general provisions that fall within the rule are 
recommended:
    Section 201 makes available additional reception and 
representation funding for the Attorney General from the 
amounts provided in this title.
    Section 202 prohibits the use of funds to pay for an 
abortion, except in the case of incest, rape or to preserve the 
life of the mother.
    Section 203 prohibits the use of funds to require any 
person to perform or facilitate the performance of an abortion.
    Section 204 establishes the obligation of the Director of 
the Bureau of Prisons to provide escort services to an inmate 
receiving an abortion outside of a Federal facility, except 
where this obligation conflicts with the preceding section.
    Section 205 establishes the Committee's requirements and 
procedures for transfer proposals.
    Section 206 prohibits the use of certain funds for 
transporting prisoners classified as maximum or high security, 
other than to a facility certified by the Bureau of Prisons as 
appropriately secure.
    Section 207 prohibits the use of funds for the purchase or 
rental by Federal prisons of audiovisual equipment, services 
and materials used primarily for recreational purposes, except 
for those items and services needed for inmate training, 
religious, or educational purposes.
    Section 208 requires review by the Deputy Attorney General 
and the Department Investment Review Board prior to the 
obligation or expenditure of funds for major information 
technology projects.
    Section 209 requires the Department to follow reprogramming 
procedures prior to any deviation from the program amounts 
specified in this title or the reuse of specified deobligated 
funds provided in previous years.
    Section 210 prohibits U.S. Attorneys from holding dual or 
additional responsibilities that exempt U.S. Attorneys from 
statutory residency requirements.
    Section 211 permits up to 3 percent of grant and 
reimbursement program funds made available to OJP to be used 
for training and technical assistance and permits up to 2 
percent of grant or reimbursement funds made available to that 
office to be used for criminal justice research, evaluation and 
statistics.
    Section 212 waives the requirement that the Attorney 
General reserve certain funds from amounts provided for 
offender incarceration.
    Section 213 permanently prohibits funds, other than funds 
for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System 
established under the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, 
from being used to facilitate the transfer of an operable 
firearm to a known or suspected agent of a drug cartel where 
law enforcement personnel do not continuously monitor or 
control such firearm. This language is made permanent.
    Section 214 places limitation on the obligation of funds 
from certain Department of Justice accounts and funding 
sources.
    In title III, Science, under Office of Science and 
Technology Policy, language is included providing that certain 
funds be available for reception and representation expenses, 
and rental of conference rooms.
    Under National Space Council, language is included 
providing that certain funds be available for reception and 
representation expenses.
    Under National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 
Science, language is included providing for the two year 
availability of funds. Language is also included regarding a 
limitation on formulation and development costs of a certain 
program with an associated notification requirement and 
language is also included concerning a planetary science 
mission.
    Also, under Aeronautics, language is included providing for 
the two year availability of funds.
    In addition, under Exploration Research and Technology, 
language is included providing for the two year availability of 
funds.
    Under Deep Space Exploration Systems, language is included 
providing for the multi-year availability of funds. Language is 
also included that delineates amounts for program components. 
Language is also included describing certain reports and 
requiring the inclusion of estimates in future budget requests.
    In LEO and Spaceflight Operations, language is included 
providing for the multi-year availability of funds.
    Additionally, under Education, language is included 
providing for the multi-year availability of funds. Language is 
also included delineating amounts for program components.
    Under Safety, Security and Mission Services, language is 
included providing for the multi-year availability of funds. 
Language is also included to limit official reception and 
representation expenses.
    Under Construction and Environmental Compliance and 
Restoration, language is included providing for the multi-year 
availability of funds. Language is also included restricting 
receipts and expenditures made pursuant to enhanced use lease 
arrangements and requiring the inclusion of estimates in future 
budget requests.
    Under Office of Inspector General, language is included 
providing for the multi-year availability of certain funds.
    In the Administrative Provisions, language is included 
regarding: availability of funds for announced prizes; 
limitations on transfers of funds among NASA accounts; the 
submission of a spending plan; language regarding transfer of 
unexpired balances of previous accounts to new accounts; and 
language limiting obligation of certain funds pending 
submission of certain reports.
    Under National Science Foundation, Research and Related 
Activities, language is included that provides for the multi-
year availability of funds. Language is also included that 
governs funding availability for polar research and operation 
support. In addition, language is included providing that 
certain receipts may be credited to this appropriation.
    Also, under Major Research Equipment and Facilities 
Construction, language is included providing for no-year 
availability of funds.
    In addition, under Education and Human Resources, language 
is included providing for the multi-year availability of funds.
    Furthermore, under Agency Operations and Award Management, 
language is included regarding contracts for maintenance and 
operation of facilities and other services. Language is also 
included limiting representation expenses.
    Under Office of the National Science Board, language is 
included limiting funds for official reception and 
representation.
    Under Office of Inspector General, language is included 
providing for the multi-year availability of certain funds.
    Under Administrative Provision, language is included 
regarding transfers of funds. Also, language is included 
requiring the Director to submit notification of certain 
activities 30 days in advance.
    In title IV, Related Agencies, under Commission on Civil 
Rights, Salaries and Expenses, language is included prohibiting 
expenses to employ in excess of a specific level of full-time 
individuals or to reimburse Commissioners for certain billable 
days. Language is also included prohibiting certain 
unauthorized activities.
    Under Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Salaries and 
Expenses, language is included designating an amount for 
payments to State and local enforcement agencies. Language is 
also included limiting funds for official reception and 
representation expenses. Finally, language is included 
authorizing the Chair to accept donations or gifts to carry out 
the work of the Commission.
    Under International Trade Commission, Salaries and 
Expenses, language is included limiting funds for official 
reception and representation expenses. Language is also 
included providing for no-year availability of funds.
    Under Legal Services Corporation, Payment to the Legal 
Services Corporation, language is included regarding pay for 
officers and employees. Language is also included delineating 
amounts for specific programs and regarding authorities to 
transfer funds. In addition, language is included designating 
the Legal Services Corporation as an agency of the Federal 
Government for the purposes of reprogramming.
    Under Administrative Provision, Legal Services Corporation, 
language is included that prohibits the use of funds for 
certain activities.
    Under Office of the United States Trade Representative, 
Salaries and Expenses, language is included providing for the 
no-year availability of some funds. Language is also included 
limiting funds for official reception and representation 
expenses.
    Also, under Trade Enforcement Trust Fund, language is 
included regarding certain notifications.
    Under State Justice Institute, Salaries and Expenses, 
language is included limiting funds for reception and 
representation expenses. Language is also included providing 
for multi-year availability of certain funds. In addition, 
language is included designating the State Justice Institute as 
an agency of the Federal Government for the purposes of 
reprogramming.
    In title V, General Provisions, the following general 
provisions that fall within the rule are recommended:
    Section 501 prohibits the use of funds for publicity or 
propaganda purposes unless expressly authorized by law.
    Section 502 prohibits any appropriation contained in this 
Act from remaining available for obligation beyond the current 
fiscal year unless expressly authorized.
    Section 503 provides that the expenditure of any 
appropriation contained in this Act for any consulting service 
through procurement contracts shall be limited to those 
contracts where such expenditures are a matter of public record 
and available for public inspection, except where otherwise 
provided under existing law or under existing Executive order 
issued pursuant to existing law.
    Section 504 provides that if any provision of this Act or 
the application of such provision to any person or circumstance 
shall be held invalid, the remainder of the Act and the 
application of other provisions shall not be affected.
    Section 505 prohibits a reprogramming of funds that: (1) 
creates or initiates a new program, project, or activity; (2) 
eliminates a program, project, or activity; (3) increases funds 
or personnel by any means for any project or activity for which 
funds have been denied or restricted; (4) relocates an office 
or employees; (5) reorganizes or renames offices, programs, or 
activities; (6) contracts out or privatizes any function or 
activity presently performed by Federal employees; (7) augments 
funds for existing programs, projects, or activities in excess 
of $500,000 or 10 percent, whichever is less, or reduces by 10 
percent funding for any program, project, or activity, or 
numbers of personnel by 10 percent; or (8) results from any 
general savings, including savings from a reduction in 
personnel, which would result in a change in existing programs, 
projects, or activities as approved by Congress, unless the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations are notified 15 
days in advance of such reprogramming of funds.
    Section 506 provides that if it is determined that any 
person intentionally affixes a ``Made in America'' label to any 
product that was not made in America that person shall not be 
eligible to receive any contract or subcontract made with funds 
made available in this Act. The section further provides that 
to the extent practicable, with respect to purchases of 
promotional items, funds made available under this Act shall be 
used to purchase items manufactured, produced, or assembled in 
the United States or its territories or possessions.
    Section 507 requires quarterly reporting on the status of 
balances of appropriations.
    Section 508 provides that any costs incurred by a 
department or agency funded under this Act resulting from, or 
to prevent, personnel actions taken in response to funding 
reductions in this Act, or, for the Department of Commerce, 
from actions taken for the care and protection of loan 
collateral or grant property, shall be absorbed within the 
budgetary resources available to the department or agency, and 
provides transfer authority between appropriation accounts to 
carry out this provision, subject to reprogramming procedures.
    Section 509 prohibits funds made available in this Act from 
being used to promote the sale or export of tobacco or tobacco 
products or to seek the reduction or removal of foreign 
restrictions on the marketing of tobacco products, except for 
restrictions that are not applied equally to all tobacco or 
tobacco products of the same type. This provision is not 
intended to impact routine international trade services to all 
U.S. citizens, including the processing of applications to 
establish foreign trade zones.
    Section 510 limits the obligation of receipts deposited 
into the Crime Victims Fund to $2,600,000,000 during fiscal 
year 2019. The language also provides for a tribal set-aside.
    Section 511 prohibits the use of Department of Justice 
funds for programs that discriminate against or denigrate the 
religious or moral beliefs of students participating in such 
programs.
    Section 512 prohibits the transfer of funds made available 
in this Act to any department, agency or instrumentality of the 
United States Government, except for transfers made by, or 
pursuant to authorities provided in, this Act or any other 
appropriations Act.
    Section 513 prohibits funds for acquisition of certain 
information systems unless the acquiring department or agency 
has reviewed and assessed certain risks. Any acquisition of 
such an information system is contingent upon the development 
of a risk mitigation strategy and a determination that the 
acquisition is in the national interest. Each department or 
agency covered by this section shall consult with the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and other relevant agencies when 
reviewing supply chain risks and making a determination that 
the acquisition is in the national interest. Each department or 
agency covered by this section is directed to ensure it is 
following the criteria established by the FBI and the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology when acquiring or 
renewing certain information systems. Each department or agency 
covered under this section shall submit a quarterly report to 
the Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate 
describing reviews and assessments of risk made pursuant to 
this section and any associated findings or determinations.
    Section 514 prohibits the use of funds made available in 
this Act to support or justify the use of torture by any 
official or contract employee of the United States Government.
    Section 515 permanently prohibits the use of funds to 
require certain export licenses.
    Section 516 permanently prohibits the use of funds to deny 
certain import applications regarding ``curios or relics'' 
firearms, parts, or ammunition.
    Section 517 prohibits the use of funds made available in 
this Act to include certain language in trade agreements.
    Section 518 prohibits the use of funds made available in 
this Act to authorize or issue a national security letter (NSL) 
in contravention of certain laws authorizing the FBI to issue 
NSLs.
    Section 519 requires congressional notification regarding 
any project within the Departments of Commerce or Justice, the 
National Science Foundation or the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration totaling more than $75,000,000 that has 
cost increases of 10 percent or more.
    Section 520 deems funds for intelligence or intelligence 
related activities as authorized by Congress during fiscal year 
2019 until the enactment of the Intelligence Authorization Act 
for fiscal year 2019.
    Section 521 prohibits contracts or grant awards in excess 
of $5,000,000 unless the prospective contractor or grantee 
certifies that the organization has filed all Federal tax 
returns, has not been convicted of a criminal offense under the 
Internal Revenue Code of 1986, and has no unpaid Federal tax 
assessment.
    Section 522 provides for rescissions of unobligated 
balances from the Departments of Commerce and Justice.
    Section 523 prohibits the use of funds made available in 
this Act for the purchase of first class or premium air travel 
in contravention of certain Federal regulations.
    Section 524 prohibits the use of funds made available in 
this Act to pay for the attendance of more than 50 department 
or agency employees, who are stationed in the United States, at 
any single conference outside the United States, unless the 
conference is a law enforcement training or operational event 
where the majority of Federal attendees are law enforcement 
personnel stationed outside the United States.
    Section 525 prohibits the use of funds in this or any other 
Act for the transfer or release of certain individuals detained 
at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to or 
within the United States, its territories, or possessions.
    Section 526 prohibits the use of funds in this or any other 
Act to construct, acquire, or modify any facility in the United 
States, its territories, or possessions to house certain 
individuals who, as of June 24, 2009, were located at United 
States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for the purposes of 
detention or imprisonment in the custody or control of the 
Department of Defense.
    Section 527 requires tracking and reporting of undisbursed 
balances in expired grant accounts.
    Section 528 prohibits the use of funds made available in 
this Act by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration 
(NASA), the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) or 
the National Space Council (NSC) to engage in bilateral 
activities with China or a Chinese-owned company unless the 
activities are authorized by subsequent legislation or NASA, 
OSTP or NSC after consultation with the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation have made a certification pursuant to subsections 
(c) and (d) of this section.
    Section 529 permanently prohibits funds from being used to 
deny the importation of shotgun models if no application for 
the importation of such models, in the same configuration, had 
been denied prior to January 1, 2011, on the basis that the 
shotgun was not particularly suitable for or readily adaptable 
to sporting purposes.
    Section 530 prohibits the use of funds made available in 
this Act to establish or maintain a computer network that does 
not block pornography, except for law enforcement or victim 
assistance purposes.
    Section 531 requires each department and agency funded in 
the bill to submit spending plans.
    Section 532 prohibits funds made available by this Act to 
implement the Arms Trade Treaty until the Senate approves a 
resolution of ratification.
    Section 533 requires a quarterly report from the Department 
of Commerce, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 
and the National Science Foundation on official travel to 
China.
    Section 534 requires not less than 10 percent of the funds 
provided for certain programs be provided to persistent poverty 
counties.
    Section 535 prohibits funds to approve the registration, 
renewal, or maintenance of the registration of a mark, trade 
mark, trade name, or commercial name when the mark, trade mark, 
trade name, or commercial name was unlawfully confiscated in 
Cuba.
    Section 536 prohibits funds from being used to require a 
person licensed under section 923 of title 18, United States 
Code, to report information to the Department of Justice 
regarding the sale of multiple rifles or shotguns to the same 
person.
    Section 537 allows States to bring a civil action against 
the United States to restore the sovereignty reserved for the 
States by the Constitution.
    Section 538 prohibits funds to move a Bureau of Alcohol, 
Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives facility.
    Section 539 prohibits funds to enter into a civil 
settlement agreement on behalf of the United States that 
includes certain donations.
    Section 540 prohibits funds to prepare for the shutdown of 
the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy.
    Section 541 prohibits certain National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration actions regarding certain 
hydroelectric projects.
    Section 542 prohibits the Department of Justice from 
preventing certain States from implementing State laws 
regarding the use of medical marijuana.
    Section 543 prohibits funding to be used in contravention 
of the ``Order Activating Suspended Denial Order Relating to 
Zhongxing Telecommunications Equipment Corporation and ZTE 
Kangxun Telecommunications Ltd.'' published on April 23, 2018.

                  Appropriations Not Authorized by Law

    The Committee, in a number of instances, has found it 
necessary to recommend funding for ongoing activities and 
programs for which authorizations have not been enacted to 
date. Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1)(B) of rule XIII of the Rules 
of the House of Representatives, the following table lists the 
appropriations in the accompanying bill that are not authorized 
by law for the period concerned:

                                                               UNAUTHORIZED APPROPRIATIONS
                                                                    Fiscal Year 2019
                                                                 (dollars in thousands)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                     Authorization level in     Appropriations in
                             Program                                Last year of          last year of            last year of        Appropriations in
                                                                    authorization         authorization           authorization           this bill
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Commerce:
  International Trade Administration:
    Operations and Administration:
      Export Promotion Activities...............................              1996               such sums               264,885                     *
  Bureau of Industry and Security:
    Operations and Administration...............................              1994               such sums                34,747               113,500
  Economic Development Administration:
    Salaries and Expenses.......................................              2008               such sums                30,832                39,000
    Economic Development Assistance Programs....................                               various                                         262,500
      Public Works and Economic Development Act Programs........              2008                 500,000               349,100              (198,500)
  Minority Business Development Agency:
    Minority Business Development...............................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                40,000
  Economics and Statistics Administration:
    Salaries and Expenses.......................................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                99,000
  National Telecommunications and Information Administration:
    Salaries and Expenses.......................................              1993                  17,900                18,493                39,500
  National Institute of Standards and Technology:
    Scientific and Technical Research and Services..............              2013                 676,700               609,514               720,000
    Industrial technology services..............................              2013                 241,709               140,316               145,000
      Manufacturing extension partnerships......................              2013                (165,100)             (126,088)             (140,000)
    Construction of research facilities.........................              2013                 121,300                58,874               120,000
  National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration:
    Operations, Research and Facilities:
      National Ocean Service....................................              1993                 121,183               150,864               462,646
        Navigation, Observations and Positioning................                               various                                        (154,179)
        Integrated Ocean Observing System Regional Observations.              2013               such sums               (34,932)              (37,500)
        Hydrographic Survey Priorities/Contracts................              2012                 (34,020)              (28,973)              (32,000)
        Coastal Science, Assessment, Response and Restoration...                               various                                         (80,000)
        Competitive External Research...........................                               various                                         (18,500)
        Coastal Zone Management and Services....................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a               (44,000)
        Coastal Zone Management Grants..........................              1999                 (50,500)              (52,700)              (75,000)
        Coral Reef Program......................................              2004                 (16,000)              (26,100)              (27,000)
        Sanctuaries and Marine Protected Areas..................              2005                 (40,000)              (58,750)              (57,500)
        National Estuarine Research Reserve System..............              1999                  (4,600)               (4,300)              (27,000)
      National Marine Fisheries Services:
        Marine Mammals, Sea Turtles and Other Species...........                               various                                         113,500
        Species Recovery Grants.................................              1992                                                               5,993
        Atlantic Salmon.........................................              1992                                                               6,224
        Pacific Salmon..........................................              1992                                                              67,000
        Fisheries and Ecosystem Science Programs and Services...                               various                                         144,196
        Fisheries Data Collections, Surveys and Assessments.....                               various                                         165,249
        Observers and Training..................................                               various                                          43,955
        Fisheries Management Programs and Services..............                               various                                         112,643
        Salmon Management Activities............................                               various                                          37,000
        Regional Councils and Fisheries Commissions.............                               various                                          37,000
        Interjurisdictional Fisheries Grants....................              2012                   3,400                 1,157                 3,500
        Enforcement.............................................                               various                                          70,000
        Habitat Conservation and Restoration....................                               various                                          54,000
      Oceanic and Atmospheric Research..........................              1993               1,589,081               202,172                   *,
        Climate Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes.........              1993                (103,877)              (79,948)              (72,792)
        Climate Data and Information............................                               various                                         (25,671)
        Weather Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes.........              2018                 (85,758)              (85,758)              (85,758)
        Weather and Air Chemistry Research Programs.............              2018                 (25,758)              (25,758)              (25,758)
        Joint Technology Transfer Initiative....................              2018                 (20,000)              (20,000)              (20,000)
        Ocean and Coastal Laboratories and Cooperative                                                                                         (36,000)
         Institutes.............................................                               various
        National Sea Grant College Program......................              2014                                       (62,800)              (68,500)
        Marine Aquaculture Program..............................              2014                                        (4,500)              (11,500)
        Ocean Exploration and Research..........................              2015                 (59,436)              (28,000)              (48,000)
        Integrated Ocean Acidification..........................              2012                 (20,000)               (6,359)              (13,000)
        Sustained Ocean Observations and Monitoring.............               n/a                     n/a                   n/a               (43,000)
        High Performance Computing Initiatives..................              1996                  (4,500)               (6,500)              (12,180)
      National Weather Service:
        Operations and research activities......................              1993                 395,822                                            
        Observations............................................                               various                                         236,000
        Central Processing......................................              1993                                                              90,000
        Analyze, Forecast and Support...........................                               various                                         500,000
        Dissemination...........................................              1993                                                              52,000
        Science and Technology Integration......................                               various                                         137,000
      National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information
       Service:
        Office of Satellite and Product Operations..............              1993                                                             150,000
        Product Development, Readiness and Application..........              1993                                                              36,500
        Group on Earth Observations.............................              1993                     n/a                   n/a                   500
        National Centers for Environmental Information..........              1993                  39,596                32,646                60,000
      Mission Support:
        Mission Support Services................................              1993                  75,750                71,433               237,126
        NOAA Office of Education................................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                28,500
      Office of Marine and Aviation Operations:
        Marine Operations and Maintenance.......................              1993                  68,518                61,222               190,000
        Aviation Operations.....................................              1993                  10,336                 9,872                37,250
    Procurement, Acquisition and Construction:
      National Ocean Service:
        National Estuarine Research Reserve Construction........               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                 1,900
        Marine Sanctuaries Construction.........................              2005                   6,000                10,000                 3,000
      Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research:
        Research Supercomputing/CCRI............................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                41,000
      National Weather Service:
        Observations............................................              1993                                        84,516                16,250
        Central Processing......................................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                67,500
        Dissemination...........................................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                35,500
        Weather Forecast Office Construction....................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                 8,750
      National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information
       Service:
        GOES-R..................................................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a               408,380
        Space Weather Follow-on.................................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                10,000
        Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS).....................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a               572,240
        Polar Follow-on.........................................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a               305,751
        CDARS...................................................              1993                   2,300                   n/a                   500
        COSMIC-2/GNSS-RO........................................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                 5,892
        Satellite Ground Services...............................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                58,000
        System Architecture and Advanced Planning...............               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                 5,000
        Projects, Planning, and Analysis........................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                40,000
        Satellite CDA Facility..................................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                 2,450
      Mission Support:
        NOAA Construction.......................................              1993                  94,500                64,500                10,000
      Office of Marine and Aviation Operations:
        Fleet Capital Improvements and Technology Infusion......               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                22,000
    Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery.............................              2009                  90,000                80,000                65,000
    Fishermen's Contingency Fund................................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                   349
    Fishery Disaster Assistance.................................              2013               such sums                 5,000                20,000
    Fisheries Finance Program Account...........................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                -5,000
  Departmental Management:
    Salaries and Expenses.......................................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                56,500
    Office of Inspector General.................................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                34,744
Department of Justice:
  General Administration:
    Salaries and Expenses.......................................              2009                 181,561               105,805               102,500
    Justice Information Sharing Technology......................              2009                 204,152                80,000                40,000
    Executive Office for Immigration Review.....................             2009                      n/a                   n/a               626,000
    Office of Inspector General.................................              2009                  81,922                80,681               102,000
  United States Parole Commission:
    Salaries and Expenses.......................................              2009                  12,711                12,570                12,672
  Legal Activities:
    Salaries and Expenses, General Legal Activities.............              2009                 764,526               805,655               897,500
    Salaries and Expenses, Antitrust Division...................              2009                 162,488               157,788               164,977
    Salaries and Expenses, United States Attorneys..............              2009               1,829,194             1,851,336             2,250,000
    Salaries and Expenses, Foreign Claims Settlement Commission.              2009                   1,429                 1,823                 2,409
    Fees and Expenses of Witnesses..............................              2009                 203,755               168,300               270,000
    Salaries and Expenses, Community Relations Service..........              2009                  10,977                 9,873                15,500
    Assets Forfeiture Fund (discretionary)......................              2009                  22,000                20,990                20,514
  United States Marshals Service................................              2009                 900,178               954,000             2,986,193
    Salaries and Expenses.......................................                                         ?              (960,000)           (1,392,400)
    Construction................................................                                         ?                (4,000)              (25,000)
    Federal Prison Detention#...................................              2009               1,858,509             1,355,319            (1,586,793)
  National Security Division:
    Salaries and Expenses.......................................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a               101,369
  Interagency Law Enforcement:
    Interagency Crime and Drug Enforcement......................              2009                 744,593               515,000               570,000
  Federal Bureau of Investigation...............................              2009               6,480,608             7,301,191             9,321,029
    Salaries and Expenses.......................................                                         ?            (7,182,700)           (9,256,029)
    Construction................................................                                         ?              (153,491)              (65,000)
  Drug Enforcement Administration:
    Salaries and Expenses.......................................              2009               1,930,462             1,959,084             2,319,692
  Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives:
    Salaries and Expenses.......................................              2009               1,038,939             1,078,215             1,316,678
  Federal Prison System.........................................              2009               5,698,292             6,171,561             7,302,400
    Salaries and Expenses.......................................                                         ?            (5,600,792)           (7,152,400)
    Buildings and Facilities....................................                                         ?              (575,807)             (150,000)
  Office on Violence Against Women:
    Violence Against Women Prevention and Prosecution Programs:
      STOP Grants...............................................              2018                 215,000               215,000               215,000
      Transitional Housing Assistance...........................              2018                  35,000                35,000                35,500
      Research and Evaluation on Violence against Women.........               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                 3,500
      Consolidated Youth-oriented Program.......................                               various                                          11,000
        Engaging Men and Youth in Prevention....................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                      
        Grants to Assist Children and Youth Exposed to Violence.               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                      
        Supporting Teens Through Education Program..............              2011                   5,000                    **                      
        Services to Advocate and Respond to Youth...............               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                      
      Grants to Encourage Arrest Policies.......................              2018                  53,000                53,000
        Homicide Reduction Initiative...........................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                (4,000)
      Sexual Assault Victims Services...........................              2018                  40,000                35,000                35,500
      Rural Domestic Violence and Child Abuse Enforcement.......              2018                  50,000                40,000                40,000
      Violence on College Campuses..............................              2018                  12,000                20,000                20,000
      Civil Legal Assistance....................................              2018                  57,000                45,000                45,000
      Elder Abuse Grant Program.................................              2018                   9,000                 5,000                 5,000
      Family Civil Justice......................................                               various                                          16,000
        Court Training and Improvements Program.................              2011                   5,000                    **
        Safe Havens Program.....................................              2011                  20,000                    **
      Education and Training for Disabled Female Victims........              2018                   9,000                 6,000                 6,000
      National Resource Center on Workplace Responses...........              2018                   1,000                   500                   500
      Research on Violence Against Indian Women.................              2015                   1,000                   940                 1,000
      Indian Country--Sexual Assault Clearinghouse..............               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                   500
      Tribal Special Domestic Violence Criminal Jurisdiction....              2018                     n/a                   n/a                   n/a
  Office of Justice Programs:
    Research, Evaluation and Statistics:
      Bureau of Justice Statistics..............................              1995                  33,000                32,335                50,000
        NCS-X Implementation Program............................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                (5,000)
      National Institute of Justice.............................              1995                  33,000                58,879                44,000
        Domestic Radicalization Research........................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                (4,000)
    State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance:
      Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grants..................              2012               1,095,000               470,000               441,500
        Officer Robert Wilson III VALOR Initiative..............               n/a                     n/a                   n/a               (15,000)
        Juvenile Indigent Defense...............................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                (2,500)
        NamUS...................................................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                (2,400)
        Violent Gang and Gun Crime Reduction....................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a               (50,000)
        Prison Rape Prevention and Prosecution..................              2010                  40,000                15,000               (15,500)
        Emergency Federal Law Enforcement Assistance............              2016                  20,000                   n/a               (10,000)
        Managed Access..........................................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                (2,000)
      State Criminal Alien Assistance Program...................              2011                 950,000                    **               255,000
      Victims of Trafficking....................................              2017                  45,000                11,000               100,000
      Economic, High-tech, White Collar and Cybercrime                         n/a                     n/a                   n/a                11,000
       Prevention...............................................
      Adam Walsh Act Implementation.............................              2009               such sums                18,000                20,000
      National Sex Offender Public Website......................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                 1,000
      Community Teams to Reduce the Sexual Assault Kit (SAK)                   n/a                     n/a                   n/a                47,500
       Backlog..................................................
      CASA--Special Advocates...................................              2018                  12,000                12,000                12,000
      Tribal Assistance.........................................                               various                                          40,000
        Tribal Courts...........................................              2004               such sums                (8,000)                   ??
        Alcohol and Substance Abuse.............................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                    ??
        Indian Prison Grants....................................              2000                  (2,753)               (5,000)                   ??
        Training/TA Civil and Criminal Legal Assistance.........               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                    ??
      Second Chance Act/Offender Reentry........................              2010                  55,000               100,000                85,000
        Children of Incarcerated Parents Demo Grants............               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                (5,000)
      Community trust initiative................................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                65,000
        Body-worn Camera Partnership............................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a               (22,500)
        Justice Reinvestment Initiative.........................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a               (30,000)
        Research and statistics on community trust..............               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                (2,500)
        Byrne Criminal Justice Innovation Program...............               n/a                     n/a                   n/a               (15,000)
      COPS Hiring Grants........................................                                                       1,000,000               225,500
        Smart Policing..........................................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                (5,000)
        Smart Prosecution.......................................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                (2,500)
        Regional information sharing activities.................              2003                 100,000                29,000               (40,000)
        Tribal Resources Grant Program..........................              2015                  44,000               (33,000)              (35,000)
        Community Policing Development/Training and Technical                  n/a                     n/a                   n/a               (10,000)
         Assistance.............................................
        POLICE Act..............................................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a               (20,000)
    Juvenile Justice Programs:
      Youth Mentoring Grants....................................              2007               such sums                                     100,000
      Victims of Child Abuse Programs...........................              2018                  20,000                21,000                21,000
      Missing and Exploited Children Programs...................                               various                                          84,000
        Missing and Exploited Children grants...................              2018                       *                     *                     *
      Training for Judicial Personnel...........................              2018                   2,300                 2,000                 2,000
        Tribal Youth Program....................................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a                 5,000
Science:
  National Aeronautics and Space Administration:
    Science.....................................................              2017               5,500,000             5,764,900             6,680,600
    Aeronautics.................................................              2017                 640,000               660,000               715,000
    Exploration Research and Technology.........................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a               900,000
    Deep Space Exploration Systems..............................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a             5,083,900
    LEO and Spaceflight Operations..............................               n/a                     n/a                   n/a             4,624,700
    Education...................................................              2017                 115,000               100,000                90,000
    Safety, Security and Mission Services.......................              2017               2,788,600             2,768,600             2,850,000
    Construction and Environmental Compliance and Remediation...              2017                 388,000               360,700               562,240
    Office of Inspector General.................................              2017                  37,400                37,900                39,300
  National Science Foundation:
    Research and Related Activities.............................              2013               6,637,849             5,983,280           6,651,500  
    Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction........              2013                 236,764               196,170               268,040
    Education and Human Resources...............................              2013               1,041,762               895,610               902,000
    Agency Operations and Award Management......................              2013                 363,670               299,400               333,630
    Office of the National Science Board........................              2013                   4,906                 4,440                 4,370
    Office of Inspector General.................................              2013                  15,049                14,200                15,350
Related Agencies:
  Commission on Civil Rights:
    Salaries and Expenses.......................................              1995                   9,500                 8,904                 9,700
  International Trade Commission:
    Salaries and Expenses.......................................              2004                  57,240                58,295                95,000
  Legal Services Corporation:
    Payment to the Legal Services Corporation...................              1980                 205,000               300,000               410,000
  Marine Mammal Commission:
    Salaries and Expenses.......................................              1999                   1,750                 1,240                 3,431
  Office of the U.S. Trade Representative:
    Salaries and Expenses.......................................              2004                  33,108                41,552                57,600
  State Justice Institute:
    Salaries and Expenses.......................................              2008                   7,000                 3,760                 5,821
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
* The recommendation does not provide a specific amount for this program.
  Authorization provides a single amount for activities spread across multiple NOAA Control Table lines.
 The Weather Research and Forecasting Innovation Act of 2017 (Public Law 102-567) authorized Weather and Air Chemistry Research Programs. Other programs
  are unauthorized.
  The last time the NWS was comprehensively authorized was 1993. Though specific programs, like the Tsunami Warning and Education Program, are currently
  authorized the recommendation does not provide a specific amount for those programs.
  The authorization authorizes funding for the ``Administrative Review and Appeals'' account, which encompassed the activities of the Executive Office
  for Immigration Review and the Office of Pardon Attorney. The recommendation seperates these into different accounts.
? Authorization does not provide amounts for specific accounts within this agency.
# This was formerly the ``General Administration, Detention Trustee'' account.
** The authorization for this program expired in FY2011. Since the government was funded by a full-year continuing resolution, the Committee did not
  provide a specific appropriation for this program.
   These programs have been combined into the Consolidated Youth-oriented Program.
?? The recommendation includes an overall amount for tribal assistance but does not specify amounts for each particular program.
   The authorization for this program expired in FY2007. Since the government was funded by a full-year continuing resolution, the Committee did not
  provide a specific appropriation for this program.
   Within the Research and Related Activities account, funding for Dyslexia and windstorm research are authorized.

                 Comparison With the Budget Resolution

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives and section 308(a)(1)(A) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the following table compares 
the levels of new budget authority and outlays provided in the 
bill with the appropriate allocations made under section 302(b) 
of the Budget Act:

                        SUBCOMMITTEE ON COMMERCE, JUSTICE, SCIENCE, AND RELATED AGENCIES
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                   302(b) allocation                       This bill
                                         -----------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                Budget                              Budget
                                              Authority          Outlays          Authority          Outlays
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
General purpose discretionary...........          62,520            72,161            62,520            72,145*
Mandatory...............................             319               332               319               332*
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
* Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

                      Five-Year Outlay Projections

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII and section 
308(a)(1)(B) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the 
following table contains five-year outlay projections 
associated with the budget authority provided in the 
accompanying bill, as provided to the Committee by the 
Congressional Budget Office:

                        [In millions of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
-------------------------------------------------------
Projection of outlays associated with the
 recommendation:
  2019................................................          47,345*
  2020................................................          15,483
  2021................................................           4,576
  2022................................................           1,405
  2023 and future years...............................           4,774
------------------------------------------------------------------------
* Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

               Assistance to State and Local Governments

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII and section 
308(a)(1)(C) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the 
Congressional Budget Office has provided the following 
estimates of new budget authority and outlays provided by the 
accompanying bill for financial assistance to State and local 
governments:

                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                              Budget Authority       Outlays
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Financial assistance to State and local governments for 2019................          -6,559               346*
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
* Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

                          Program Duplication

    No provision of this bill establishes or reauthorizes a 
program of the Federal Government known to be duplicative of 
another Federal program, a program that was included in any 
report from the Government Accountability Office to Congress 
pursuant to section 21 of Public Law 111-139, or a program 
related to a program identified in the most recent Catalog of 
Federal Domestic Assistance.

                          Directed Rule Making

    The bill does not direct any rule making.

      Comparative Statement of New Budget (Obligational) Authority

    The following table provides a detailed summary, for each 
department and agency, comparing the amounts recommended in the 
bill with fiscal year 2018 enacted amounts and budget estimates 
presented for fiscal year 2019:



                             MINORITY VIEWS

    We commend Chairman Culberson for his efforts in assembling 
the Fiscal Year (FY) 2019 Commerce, Justice, Science (CJS) 
bill. However, we remain deeply concerned about this year's 
overall appropriations process and are resolutely opposed to 
the direction it appears to be headed.
    The agencies and programs funded under the CJS bill play 
key roles in securing our nation, promoting economic 
development, and ensuring our leadership in scientific 
endeavors. We are pleased that many critical priorities are 
well-funded in this bill. At the same time, however, many other 
essential programs aimed at helping hardworking American 
families, ensuring public safety, and understanding and 
mitigating the effects of extreme weather and climate change 
are underfunded, many quite substantially. The bill also lacks 
necessary oversight over the Trump Administration and contains 
several harmful riders.
    Before we detail our concerns, we point out some of the 
positive investments this bill makes. It provides needed 
increases for research grants at the National Science 
Foundation (NSF), the hiring of additional immigration judges, 
and funding for both the Legal Orientation Program and the 
immigration help desk. The bill also provides increases for 
several important Department of Justice (DOJ) grants, and 
sustains and increases investments previously made in the 
fiscal year 2018 Appropriations Act for activities to combat 
the opioid crisis. In addition, the bill provides increases for 
Federal law enforcement.
    The bill also rejects several of the Administration's worst 
proposals, including its proposed cuts to the Minority Business 
Development Agency and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration (NOAA)'s Sea Grant program, both of which are 
given modest increases in this bill. Modest increases are also 
provided for several other NOAA coastal and ocean programs that 
the Administration had proposed to cut, such as the Integrated 
Ocean Observing System, the National Estuarine Research Reserve 
System, and Sanctuaries and Marine Protected Areas, though the 
Coastal Zone Management Grants program is frozen at the FY 2018 
level. The bill also largely rejects cuts to the educational 
efforts of NOAA, NSF, and the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration (NASA), which help inspire and train our next 
generation of scientists.
    President Trump proposed ending Federal support for 
Economic Development Administration programs and the 
Manufacturing Extension Partnership program, even though these 
programs help create and retain tens of thousands of jobs each 
year throughout the country. The Committee bill maintained 
these programs at the fiscal year 2018 levels, and we would 
like to work together to provide funding increases for FY 2019.
    The bill also rejects the Administration's proposal to 
eliminate the Legal Services Corporation (LSC). LSC grants help 
local providers assist veterans, domestic violence victims, the 
elderly, and many others to assert their legal and 
constitutional rights. The LSC plays a crucial role in ensuring 
that our legal and constitutional rights are available to all 
Americans, not just those who can afford it. We want to work 
together to increase the funding for LSC as this process moves 
forward. It is, however, unfortunate that an amendment by Rep. 
David Price to add $10 million to the agency to help address 
the eviction crisis in this country was rejected by the 
majority. As he pointed out in his remarks, in jurisdictions 
all over the country, large majorities of persons evicted lack 
legal representation and are beholden to landlords who 
sometimes unlawfully evict hardworking Americans. Examples 
include Newark (where 90% of persons facing eviction were 
unrepresented by attorneys), Philadelphia (74% unrepresented), 
and San Francisco (53% unrepresented).
    The Census Bureau is well funded in this bill, which is 
particularly important now that the Bureau is in the process of 
conducting final testing and other preparations to help ensure 
a thorough and accurate population count during the 2020 
Decennial Census. Thorough preparation is needed now to avoid 
unexpectedly higher costs in the next few years. We also 
appreciate the committee report's directive that the Census 
Bureau ensure that its fiscal year 2019 partnership and 
communications activities in support of the 2020 Census are 
conducted at a level of effort no less than that conducted 
during fiscal year 2009 in preparation for the 2010 Census.
    We are deeply concerned, however, that the bill does not 
prevent the Trump Administration from embarking on its sudden 
and very misguided plan to add a question on citizenship status 
to the 2020 Census. The decision to add this question was made 
over the objections of Census Bureau experts as well as six 
former Census Bureau directors. In addition, this question was 
not included in the list of 2020 Census topics sent to Congress 
just last year. The last census in which the entire nation was 
asked about citizenship status was 1950. In the current 
political atmosphere, however, with the debate over the 
especially volatile issue of immigration, a great many 
households will be fearful of responding to a census form that 
asks persons about their citizenship status. This will lead to 
reduced self-response rates, a significantly higher non-
response follow-up workload, a much more costly and less 
accurate census, and reduced federal resources and political 
representation for a host of states and communities throughout 
the country. We must also emphasize that Thomas Brunell, 
President Trump's first choice to be director of the Census 
Bureau, had this to say in a recent interview with Science 
magazine: ``I'm agnostic on whether [the citizenship question] 
is needed. I think the critical point is that the 
administration wants to put it on there. They have made a 
political decision.'' Brunell added that as a result of the 
question, non-response follow-up, ``may be a little bit harder 
and more expensive to do because there will be a couple million 
more people they need to count.'' This is totally unacceptable, 
and we are dismayed that the Committee rejected the Serrano-
Meng amendment to prevent the Census Bureau from including in 
the 2020 Census a question on citizenship status. Removing this 
question from the 2020 Census is absolutely vital, and will 
help ensure that Congress abides by the constitutional 
requirement to count the whole number of persons in the United 
States.
    Furthermore, we are deeply concerned that the CJS bill cuts 
funding for a number of critical programs and public 
investments.
    Programs that conduct crucial climate research are 
significantly reduced in this bill. There is a 38% cut to NOAA 
climate research, including the complete elimination of the 
Climate Competitive Research, Sustained Observations and 
Regional Information budget line. Furthermore, NASA's Earth 
Science program is cut by $21 million below the current level. 
Such funding cuts would jeopardize our ability to improve the 
scientific understanding of our planet and its changes. This, 
in turn, would undermine our ability to protect the health and 
safety of our communities.
    Furthermore, the Committee bill contains a cut to NOAA's 
overall operations, research, and facilities budget, including 
the elimination of the Title IX Fund (formerly known as the 
Regional Coastal Resilience Grant program). This program funds 
important work in coastal and Great Lakes areas, ensuring that 
states and communities are prepared to face challenges such as 
restoring coastal infrastructure and addressing growing 
problems like erosion, sea level rise, ocean acidification, and 
marine debris.
    The Justice Department is also underfunded in a number of 
critical areas. While the overall level of funding for DOJ 
grants is approximately equal to the comparable FY 2018 level, 
the bill cuts funding for the core COPS hiring program, which 
supports the hiring of law enforcement officers. We are also 
troubled by the bill's elimination of two crucial juvenile 
justice grant programs: State Formula Grants and Delinquency 
Prevention Incentive Grants. These grant programs reduce crime, 
promote police-community relations, and prevent recidivism.
    We continue to be extremely troubled by the inclusion of 
gun-related riders, including one that would effectively 
prevent the enforcement of an existing requirement that Federal 
firearms licensees (FFLs) in the four southwest Border States 
report to the National Tracing Center on the sale of certain 
kinds of semi-automatic rifles favored by the Mexican drug 
cartels. This reporting requirement is narrow and targeted, 
applying only to Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, and California, 
and only when a dealer sells two or more qualifying long guns 
to a single individual within five business days. Qualifying 
guns are rifles that (1) are semi-automatic; (2) are greater 
than .22 caliber; and (3) can hold a detachable magazine. It 
does not apply to shotguns or the vast majority of rifles 
regularly used for hunting purposes.
    This reporting requirement is identical to one that has 
existed for decades for handguns, and in no way does it hinder 
the ability of any law-abiding person to purchase as many 
rifles as he or she desires. It is not an undue burden on FFLs, 
with the time to complete a multiple sales form estimated at 12 
minutes and an estimated annual cost in employee time of only 
$16.
    This very limited reporting requirement has proven to be an 
important tool for Federal law enforcement in the effort to 
uncover illegal trafficking operations intended to supply semi-
automatic weapons to violent drug gangs across the border. 
According to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and 
Explosives (ATF), these multiple sales reports have thus far 
led to more than 1,000 defendants recommended for prosecution, 
including both alleged straw purchasers and others farther up 
the firearms trafficking chain. Also according to ATF, the 
reporting requirement is forcing firearms traffickers to change 
tactics, making straw purchases more difficult and serving as a 
deterrent for many people who might have engaged in straw 
purchasing in the past.
    This is not about restricting gun ownership or compiling a 
registry of long gun owners. Information that does not become 
part of a trafficking investigation is purged from ATF records 
within two years. This is a law enforcement response to the 
evidence from successful tracings of weapons recovered in 
Mexico. These tracings show that a large number of these 
weapons were initially sold by licensed gun dealers in 
California, Arizona, New Mexico, or Texas.
    In 2013, a unanimous panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for 
the Fifth Circuit affirmed an earlier court finding that 
Federal law ``unambiguously authorizes'' this reporting 
requirement. This Committee simply has no business tying the 
hands of law enforcement agencies as they attempt to rein in 
crime. We are disappointed that the Committee rejected the 
Wasserman Schultz amendment to strike this rider from the bill.
    Further, we are concerned about other inappropriate riders 
that do not belong in this bill, including a rider that places 
restrictions on the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO)'s 
ability to issue trademarks to Cuban nationals, even in cases 
in which a specific license from the Treasury Department's 
Office of Foreign Assets Control has been issued. Aside from 
meddling in foreign policy, the provision would create a 
significant administrative burden on PTO, setting an impossible 
standard that PTO reports it cannot meet.
    Democrats on the Committee also attempted to reverse two 
recent decisions by the Department of Justice through 
immigration-related amendments that we are disappointed were 
not adopted. The Serrano amendment would have prevented the 
Department of Justice from imposing case closure quotas as a 
basis for immigration judges' performance evaluations. This 
ill-advised plan will create a conflict of interest between 
immigration judges and the public. In addition, it is likely to 
increase the backlog, put due process at risk, and threaten the 
judicial independence of the immigration courts. The Serrano 
amendment, had it been adopted, would have allowed immigration 
judges to continue to conduct fair and impartial hearings for 
each case before them. The Roybal-Allard amendment, which would 
have blocked the Department of Justice from prosecuting asylum 
seekers until after their asylum claim is evaluated, was also 
disappointingly not adopted. The Trump Administration's zero 
tolerance policy aimed at prosecuting immigrants entering the 
country includes the separation of parents and children. 
Although the Administration hasn't publicly stated this, family 
separation is being used as a cruel tactic to deter immigrants 
from coming to the United States.
    Rep. Lowey offered two common sense amendments that were 
defeated. The first would allow the Department of Justice to 
block the sales of firearms to persons known or suspected to be 
engaged in conduct related to terrorism. Currently, Federal law 
prohibits nine categories of dangerous people from purchasing 
or owning firearms. However, Federal law does not allow the 
Attorney General the discretion to block a firearms purchase to 
an individual on a terror watch list. There have been 
consequences. For example, on November 5, 2009, at Fort Hood 13 
people were shot and killed and 30 others wounded by Nidal 
Hasan, who passed a background check and bought a handgun even 
though he was under investigation by the FBI for links to 
terrorism. Allowing the Attorney General the discretion to 
block these purchases is a sensible approach that should be 
widely supported.
    The second Lowey amendment would have prohibited the use of 
funds to obstruct, hinder, frustrate, impede, or prevent any 
investigative work conducted by Special Counsel Robert S. 
Mueller. It is imperative that Special Counsel Mueller's 
investigation be conducted completely free of meddling from the 
White House, the Department of Justice, or anyone else. The 
Lowey amendment would have made it clear that it is unlawful 
for employees of the Department of Justice, the White House, or 
any other Federal entity to meddle in an investigation that is 
critical for Americans' confidence in our democracy and the 
institutions of government.
    We believe that this Committee has a duty to check the 
actions taken by this Administration to undermine our 
democratic norms and constitutional protections. Interference 
in independent investigations, undermining due process, and 
politicizing non-political surveys are just three ways that 
this Administration is weakening the foundations of our 
democracy. It is time for Congress, and this Committee, to 
speak out on behalf of the American people, and our side will 
continue to fight for these values.
    Even though the Committee defeated amendments to help 
prevent terrorists from purchasing firearms and protecting the 
special counsel's investigation, the Committee very unwisely 
adopted the Valadao amendment, which is aimed at preventing 
NOAA from being involved in the process for prescribing the 
passage of endangered and threatened fish along the Tuolumne 
River in California. This rider would prevent the restoration 
of salmon to iconic habitat near Yosemite National Park. It 
undermines Federal Power Act provisions that allow for the 
restoration of fish passage past hydropower dams in order to 
preserve healthy ecosystems and fisheries. NOAA and the Federal 
Energy Regulatory Commission are involved in numerous 
hydropower relicensing proceedings around the country. This 
provision sets an extremely bad precedent and should not be in 
the bill.
    The Committee did come together in one area related to 
Chinese sanctions. The Ruppersberger-DeLauro amendment was 
adopted to prevent the Trump Administration from backtracking 
on the April 2018 sanctions that were imposed on the Chinese 
telecommunications company ZTE. For more than six years, ZTE 
illegally sold technology products containing U.S. components 
to both Iran and North Korea. As a result, ZTE was fined $1.2 
billion by the U.S. Government for violating export control 
law. Due to ZTE's subsequent false statements to the U.S. 
Government, as well as ZTE's payment of bonuses to company 
personnel involved in the illegal transactions, the Commerce 
Department in April 2018 very wisely imposed on ZTE a 7-year 
denial of export privileges. However, less than four weeks 
later, President Trump issued the following outrageous, 
shocking, and thoroughly irresponsible tweet: ``President Xi of 
China, and I, are working together to give massive Chinese 
phone company, ZTE, a way to get back into business, fast. Too 
many jobs in China lost. Commerce Department has been 
instructed to get it done!'' Setting aside the President's 
inexplicably seeming to care more about the job creation of 
America's international competitors than job creation here at 
home, we simply cannot allow the Administration to backtrack on 
the enforcement of export control law, especially for clear 
sanctions violations. The Ruppersberger-DeLauro amendment is 
aimed at ensuring that bad behavior is not rewarded, and that 
the United States does not reverse course on its vital 
responsibility to protect the nation by ensuring there are 
consequences to willful and blatant violations of export 
control laws and regulations.
    This bill, like most other appropriations bills, must be 
considered in the context of the full appropriations process. 
The Bipartisan Budget Act enacted early this year provided 
relief from unworkable discretionary spending caps. The 
agreement was supposed to provide the country with stability 
following a year of shutdowns, last-minute veto threats, and 
general uncertainty in government. That stability lasted long 
enough for Congress to pass a bipartisan Omnibus appropriations 
bill for FY 2018 and then Republican chaos reigned again. The 
President threatened to veto the bill, unhappy with Congress' 
large investments in programs to help low- and middle-income 
Americans and rejection of his campaign-promised border wall.
    Even after the President backed off his threat and signed 
the bill, the Administration and Republican leadership in 
Congress, many of whom voted for the Bipartisan Budget Act and 
the Omnibus, have continued to attempt to undo those bipartisan 
agreements. Now, the majority is seeking to pass a rescissions 
bill to undo funding and mollify an angry President. We have 
been told by OMB Director Mick Mulvaney that this is the first 
of many rescission packages meant to bring spending in line 
with the President's priorities, ignoring Congressional action 
that dismissed the President's FY 2017 and FY 2018 draconian 
budget requests.
    In addition to the unacceptable rescissions proposals, the 
majority's lack of transparency with regard to how it will 
allocate the FY 2019 discretionary budget also endangers future 
bipartisan compromise. The majority has abandoned longstanding 
committee practice to provide the Members and the public with a 
budget blueprint for domestic spending, known as 302(b) 
allocations. Members are forced to vote on bills without the 
full picture on the impact of each bill on other bills, like 
those that invest in education, job training and creation, 
health care, consumer protection, and other top priorities for 
American families. Democrats can only be left to assume that 
the majority is siphoning money from bills at the end of the 
process that are important to economic growth and the safety, 
security, and well-being of our families.
    In conclusion, in spite of all our concerns, we would like 
to reiterate our appreciation for Chairman Culberson's work 
with us on a number of issues. The bill funds a number of the 
Minority's priorities. However, the shortcomings in this bill 
are very real. Although there is much to commend in the CJS 
appropriations bill, we cannot support the bill in its current 
form. Furthermore, we are extremely disappointed in the 302(b) 
allocation process because hiding these numbers only makes our 
Committee's work more difficult. Inviting partisanship back 
into the appropriations process by shortchanging critical 
domestic and international priorities will endanger the good 
work in this and other bills.

                                   Nita M. Lowey.
                                   Jose E. Serrano.

                                  [all]