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115th Congress    }                                    {       Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session       }                                    {       115-968

======================================================================

 
   TO DIRECT THE SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR TO MANAGE THE POINT REYES 
NATIONAL SEASHORE IN THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA CONSISTENT WITH CONGRESS' 
    LONGSTANDING INTENT TO MAINTAIN WORKING DAIRIES AND RANCHES ON 
   AGRICULTURAL PROPERTY AS PART OF THE SEASHORE'S UNIQUE HISTORIC, 
      CULTURAL, SCENIC AND NATURAL VALUES, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES

                                _______
                                

 September 25, 2018.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on 
            the State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Bishop of Utah, from the Committee on Natural Resources, submitted 
                             the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 6687]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Natural Resources, to whom was referred 
the bill (H.R. 6687) to direct the Secretary of the Interior to 
manage the Point Reyes National Seashore in the State of 
California consistent with Congress' longstanding intent to 
maintain working dairies and ranches on agricultural property 
as part of the seashore's unique historic, cultural, scenic and 
natural values, and for other purposes, having considered the 
same, report favorably thereon with amendments and recommend 
that the bill as amended do pass.
    The amendments are as follows:
  Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. MANAGEMENT OF AGRICULTURAL PROPERTY IN POINT REYES NATIONAL 
                    SEASHORE.

  Public Law 87-657 (16 U.S.C. 459c, et seq.) is amended as follows:
          (1) In section 5(b) (16 U.S.C. 459c-5(b))--
                  (A) in the first sentence, by striking ``As used in'' 
                and inserting the following:
  ``(1) As used in'';
                  (B) by striking ``The term `agricultural property' as 
                used'' and inserting the following:
  ``(2) The term `agricultural property' as used'';
                  (C) by striking ``means lands which were in regular 
                use'' and inserting ``means--
          ``(A) lands under agricultural lease or permit as of 
        September 1, 2018, or lands that were in regular use''; and
                  (D) by striking the period at the end and inserting 
                ``; and
          ``(B) on the northern district of the Golden Gate National 
        Recreation Area, lands under agricultural lease or permit as of 
        September 1, 2018, or lands that were in regular use for, or 
        were being converted to, agricultural, ranching, or dairying 
        purposes as of May 1, 1978, together with residential and other 
        structures related to the above uses of the property that were 
        in existence or under construction as of May 1, 1978.''.
          (2) In section 5 (16 U.S.C. 459c-5)--
                  (A) by inserting before subsection (a) the following:
  ``(a) The Secretary shall manage agricultural property consistent 
with Congress' long-standing intent that working dairies and ranches 
continue to be authorized to operate on agricultural property as part 
of the seashore's unique historic, cultural, scenic and natural 
values.''; and
                  (B) by redesignating subsequent subsections 
                accordingly.
          (3) In section 6 (16 U.S.C. 459c-6), by adding at the end the 
        following:
  ``(c)(1) In areas of agricultural property where Tule Elk present 
conflicts with working ranches or dairies, the Secretary shall manage 
the Tule Elk for separation from the working ranches or dairies. To 
minimize the conflicts and prevent establishment of new Tule Elk herds 
on agricultural property, the Secretary may work with Indian Tribes 
interested in the following:
          ``(A) Partnering with the Secretary in the relocation and 
        reestablishment of Tule Elk on Tribal lands.
          ``(B) Participating in hunting Tule Elk on a subsistence or 
        ceremonial basis.
          ``(C) Other partnerships and activities that the Secretary 
        determines are suitable and feasible for this purpose.
  ``(2) Nothing in this subsection reduces or diminishes the authority 
of the Secretary to use other existing authorities or management tools 
to separate Tule Elk from agricultural property.''.
          (4) By adding at the end, the following:
  ``Sec. 10.  Consistent with the purposes of this Act, including 
section 5(a), the Secretary is directed to complete, without delay, the 
General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes National Seashore and 
the northern district of Golden Gate National Recreation Area, its 
Environmental Impact Statement, and, upon completion of the Record of 
Decision, issue leases and special use permits of 20 years for working 
dairies and ranches on agricultural property. Nothing in this Act 
requires the Secretary to issue leases and special use permits of 20 
years in circumstances where there is no willing lessee, or to a 
previous lessee who has abandoned or discontinued ranching.''.

    Amend the title so as to read:
    A bill to direct the Secretary of the Interior to manage 
the Point Reyes National Seashore in the State of California 
consistently with Congress' long-standing intent to continue to 
authorize working dairies and ranches on agricultural property 
as part of the seashore's unique historic, cultural, scenic and 
natural values, and for other purposes.

                          Purpose of the Bill

    The purpose of H.R. 6687, as ordered reported, is to direct 
the Secretary of the Interior to manage the Point Reyes 
National Seashore in the State of California consistent with 
Congress' long-standing intent to continue to authorize working 
dairies and ranches on agricultural property as part of the 
Seashore's unique historic, cultural, scenic and natural 
values.

                  Background and Need for Legislation

    The Point Reyes National Seashore (PRNS), established in 
1962, encompasses roughly 71,000 acres of federal and 
nonfederal land in Marin County, California.\1\ The Point Reyes 
coastal prairie has been used for ranching since the 1850s when 
settlers moved west in search of gold and found the region to 
be ideal for dairy farming.\2\ By 1857, a San Francisco law 
firm, Shafter, Shafter, Park, and Heydenfeldt, owned over 
50,000 acres of the Point Reyes peninsula, including the 
coastal plain.\3\ The firm initially leased the land back to 
existing dairy ranches and sold Tomales Point. In 1866, the 
Shafter and Howard families divided the remainder of the land 
into a tenant dairy enterprise composed of 33 ranches.\4\ The 
Shafter family welcomed immigrants from all around the world to 
work on the ranches, creating a unique culture for the 
peninsula. In 1867, Marin County produced over 932 thousand 
pounds of butter.\5\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\National Park Service. ``Park Statistics'' Point Reyes National 
Seashore. https://www.nps.gov/pore/learn/management/statistics.htm
    \2\National Park Service. ``Ranching History at Point Reyes.'' 
https://www.nps.gov/pore/learn/historyculture/people_ranching.htm
    \3\Id.
    \4\Id.
    \5\Id.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Following an earthquake in 1906 and the stock market crash 
in 1929, the Shafter and Howard enterprises struggled to make 
ends meet.\6\ Dairies and ranches consolidated into 
cooperatives, and ranchers expanded their livestock production 
to include beef cattle, chickens, and other small animals. 
After the construction of the Golden Gate Bridge, 
transportation was expedited, and the Point Reyes creameries 
were no longer a top commodity. Many closed their doors after 
World War II.\7\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \6\Id.
    \7\Id.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    As Marin County expanded in the 1950s and 60s, property 
taxes dramatically increased at the same time as the price for 
dairy products dropped significantly, putting even more dairy 
ranches on the peninsula out of business. Out of fear of losing 
their businesses and way of life, the remaining ranchers worked 
with the Sierra Club to secure both their ranches and the open 
pastoral landscape that their families had worked to 
preserve.\8\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \8\Id.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The National Park Service (NPS) had sought protections for 
the peninsula as early as 1936.\9\ In 1962, Congress acted on 
NPS's requests and established the Point Reyes National 
Seashore under Public Law 87-657.\10\ To alleviate ranchers' 
concerns, Congress made clear in the enabling act that existing 
ranches should retain active operations within a designated 
pastoral zone. Dairy and cattle ranchers sold their land to NPS 
and then leased it back. Today most of the working ranches and 
dairies operate under annual agricultural leases or special use 
permits from NPS, which has left ranching families unable to 
afford proper maintenance of the property. Most of the current 
lessees are the fifth and sixth generation ranching 
families.\11\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \9\Id.
    \10\https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/STATUTE-76/pdf/STATUTE-76-
Pg538.pdf
    \11\``Ranching at the Seashore.'' Point Reyes National Seashore 
Association. http://www.ptreyes.org/activities/ranching-seashore
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The statutory history of the site reflects that Congress 
showed great vision by providing for ranching to continue 
within the PRNS to ensure that future generations would be able 
to experience PRNS' unique working landscapes. However, the 
1980 General Management Plan for the PRNS has not been updated 
to require that the PRNS be managed to reflect the importance 
and historical significance of agriculture to the area, leaving 
protected land use activities exposed to litigation from anti-
grazing groups and other activists. These inconsistencies have 
those working the land uncertain of their future on the 
PRNS.\12\ These ranches and dairies also provide broader 
benefits: they help preserve agriculture outside the PRNS 
boundaries by ensuring that other small-scale agricultural 
operations in the region have the facilities and services 
necessary to stay viable.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \12\https://www.sonomamag.com/point-reyes/
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    NPS has also failed to effectively manage the growing re-
introduced population of Tule Elk, which has resulted in a new 
herd competing with cows for forage, interfering with ranch 
operations, and damaging infrastructure--hardly the outcome 
envisioned by the 1998 Elk Management Plan. In addition, 
ranchers report that long-term leases and permits are necessary 
to help address the facility repair and maintenance challenges 
they face.
    More management options are needed to effectively separate 
Tule Elk and livestock on certain agricultural property where 
conflicts occur within the PRNS and the Golden Gate National 
Recreation Area (GGNRA). There is no reason thriving elk herds 
and sustainable working ranches and dairies cannot coexist 
within PRNS and GGNRA if there is effective separation and 
effective management. The legislation does not remove any of 
the management tools currently available to the NPS (including 
fencing, hazing, relocation, contraception and culling). 
Instead, it provides direction for more effective separation 
and adds new tools for NPS to consider, including the 
opportunity to explore relocation and cultural ceremonial 
activities with interested Native American Tribes, while 
leaving broad discretion to the NPS to determine how to manage 
the elk in particular situations.
    NPS has, across administrations, and since the creation of 
the PRNS and the GGNRA, consistently supported continued 
ranching in the PRNS and Northern areas of the GGNRA. With this 
legislation, Congress is affirming this long-standing policy 
and providing direction that a ``no ranching'' alternative for 
park management is inconsistent with the PRNS' historic intent, 
even if such an alternative is required to be studied under a 
legal settlement. Consistent with this direction, there should 
be a full and robust National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 
(NEPA, 42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.) analysis as part of the General 
Management Plan Amendment process to enable NPS to understand 
and evaluate the possible mitigation and management measures 
that could improve the environmental sustainability of the 
ranches and dairies, and to inform a broad range of land 
management policies and decisions, including lease/special use 
permit succession planning, elk management, and conservation 
practices. NEPA requires the engagement of the public in the 
review process, and the Committee finds no language in the bill 
that would exclude or reduce the robust participation by the 
public as required by the law.
    NPS has been working diligently to carry out then-Secretary 
Ken Salazar's 2012 decision to offer 20-year leases for 
ranching and dairying in the PRNS and GGNRA, going so far as 
preparing a Ranch Comprehensive Management Plan/Environmental 
Assessment in accordance with NEPA. The working relationship 
between NPS and the current working ranches and dairies is an 
important one, and the Committee is encouraged by the ongoing 
collaborative efforts between NPS and the ranchers, including 
through the General Management Plan Amendment process that will 
continue to go forward under this legislation.
    During consideration of the bill, the Committee adopted an 
amendment by Congressman Jared Huffman (D-CA) that clarified 
that NPS should exercise common-sense discretion in the 
supervision of the agricultural property. For example, the NPS 
is not financially responsible for operation of the ranches and 
dairies and is not required to bring properties back into 
agriculture that have been retired and converted to other 
purposes. Likewise, the amendment clarified that current 
lessees are eligible for the new longer-term leases, but if a 
lessee does not want a 20-year lease, a shorter-term lease 
remains an option. Importantly, NPS retains its existing 
authority to set appropriate lease terms and conditions and 
will be able to outline other management strategies and actions 
in the General Management Plan Amendment.

               Major Provisions of H.R. 6687 as Reported

           Requires the Secretary of the Interior to 
        manage agricultural property consistent with Congress's 
        long-standing intent that working ranches and dairies 
        continue to be authorized to operate on agricultural 
        property within the PRNS and GGNRA.
           Expands the definition of ``agricultural 
        property'' to include the northern district of the 
        GGNRA.
           Requires that immediately following the 
        completion of the General Management Plan Amendment, 
        Environmental Impact Statement, and the Record of 
        Decision, the Secretary must issue leases and permits 
        of 20 years to working dairies and ranches on 
        agricultural property within the PRNS and GGNRA.
           Where Tule Elk present conflicts with 
        working ranches and dairies on agricultural property, 
        requires the Secretary to manage the Tule Elk 
        population for effective separation from the working 
        ranches and dairies and allows the Secretary to work 
        with Indian tribes to control the Tule Elk populations.

                            Committee Action

    H.R. 6687 was introduced on August 28, 2018, by Congressman 
Jared Huffman (D-CA). The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Natural Resources. On September 5, 2018, the Natural Resources 
Committee met to consider the bill. Congressman Huffman offered 
an amendment designated #1; it was adopted by unanimous 
consent. No further amendments were offered, and the bill, as 
amended, was ordered favorably reported to the House of 
Representatives by unanimous consent.

            Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations

    Regarding clause 2(b)(1) of rule X and clause 3(c)(1) of 
rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, the 
Committee on Natural Resources' oversight findings and 
recommendations are reflected in the body of this report.

      Compliance With House Rule XIII and Congressional Budget Act

    1. Cost of Legislation and the Congressional Budget Act. 
With respect to the requirements of clause 3(c)(2) and (3) of 
rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives and 
sections 308(a) and 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 
1974, the Committee has received the following estimate for the 
bill from the Director of the Congressional Budget Office:

                                     U.S. Congress,
                               Congressional Budget Office,
                                Washington, DC, September 25, 2018.
Hon. Rob Bishop,
Chairman, Committee on Natural Resources,
House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for H.R. 6687, a bill to 
direct the Secretary of the Interior to manage the Point Reyes 
National Seashore in the State of California consistently with 
Congress' long-standing intent to continue to authorize working 
dairies and ranches on agricultural property as part of the 
seashore's unique historic, cultural, scenic, and natural 
values, and for other purposes.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Janani 
Shankaran.
            Sincerely,
                                                Keith Hall,
                                                          Director.
    Enclosure.

H.R. 6687--A bill to direct the Secretary of the Interior to manage the 
        Point Reyes National Seashore in the State of California 
        consistently with Congress' long-standing intent to continue to 
        authorize working dairies and ranches on agricultural property 
        as part of the seashore's unique historic, cultural, scenic, 
        and natural values, and for other purposes

    Upon establishment of the Point Reyes National Seashore in 
1962, ranches and dairies that were in existence were permitted 
to continue their operations within a designated area of the 
seashore. The National Park Service (NPS), which manages the 
seashore, has issued agricultural leases or special use permits 
to most of those ranches and dairies for periods ranging from 
one year to five years. H.R. 6687 would direct the NPS to issue 
20-year leases and permits.
    Payments from those leases and permits are recorded in the 
budget as discretionary offsetting collections and are applied 
toward cost recovery for range management activities by the NPS 
at the seashore. In 2017, the NPS spent about $1 million on 
those activities and received less than $500,000 in lease and 
permit payments. Extending lease terms to 20 years could affect 
the amount of those annual payments; however, CBO estimates 
that any effect on net discretionary spending would be 
insignificant over the 2019-2028 period.
    H.R. 6687 also would require the NPS to complete an 
environmental study, amend its management plan for the 
seashore, and manage the local tule elk population. CBO 
estimates that implementing those provisions would result in no 
additional costs to the NPS because we expect the agency will 
conduct those activities under the terms of a 2017 settlement 
agreement.
    Enacting H.R. 6687 would not affect direct spending or 
revenues; therefore, pay-as-you-go procedures do not apply.
    CBO estimates that enacting H.R. 6687 would not increase 
net direct spending or on-budget deficits in any of the four 
consecutive 10-year periods beginning in 2029.
    H.R. 6687 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act.
    The CBO staff contact for this estimate is Janani 
Shankaran. The estimate was reviewed by H. Samuel Papenfuss, 
Deputy Assistant Director for Budget Analysis.
    2. General Performance Goals and Objectives. As required by 
clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII, the general performance goal or 
objective of this bill, as ordered reported, is to direct the 
Secretary of the Interior to manage the Point Reyes National 
Seashore in the State of California consistent with Congress' 
long-standing intent to continue to authorize working dairies 
and ranches on agricultural property as part of the Seashore's 
unique historic, cultural, scenic and natural values.

                           Earmark Statement

    This bill does not contain any Congressional earmarks, 
limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as defined 
under clause 9(e), 9(f), and 9(g) of rule XXI of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives.

                    Compliance With Public Law 104-4

    This bill contains no unfunded mandates.

                       Compliance With H. Res. 5

    Directed Rule Making. This bill does not contain any 
directed rule makings.
    Duplication of Existing Programs. This bill does not 
establish or reauthorize a program of the federal government 
known to be duplicative of another program. Such program was 
not included in any report from the Government Accountability 
Office to Congress pursuant to section 21 of Public Law 111-139 
or identified in the most recent Catalog of Federal Domestic 
Assistance published pursuant to the Federal Program 
Information Act (Public Law 95-220, as amended by Public Law 
98-169) as relating to other programs.

                Preemption of State, Local or Tribal Law

    This bill is not intended to preempt any State, local or 
tribal law.

         Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

  In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italic, and existing law in which no 
change is proposed is shown in roman):

                       ACT OF SEPTEMBER 13, 1962


                          (Public Law 87-657)

 AN ACT To establish the Point Reyes National Seashore in the State of 
                  California, and for other purposes.



           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
  Sec. 5. (a) The Secretary shall manage agricultural property 
consistent with Congress' long-standing intent that working 
dairies and ranches continue to be authorized to operate on 
agricultural property as part of the seashore's unique 
historic, cultural, scenic and natural values.
  [(a)] (b) Except for property which the Secretary 
specifically determines is needed for interpretive or resources 
management purposes of the seashore, the owner of improved 
property or of agricultural property on the date of its 
acquisition by the Secretary under this Act may, as a condition 
of the acquisition, retain for himself and his or her heirs and 
assigns a right of use and occupancy for a definite term of not 
more than twenty-five years, or, in lieu thereof, for a term 
ending at death of the owner or the death or his or her spouse, 
whichever is later. The owner shall elect the term to be 
reserved. Unless the property is wholly or partly donated to 
the United States, the Secretary shall pay to the owner the 
fair market value of the property on the date of the 
acquisition minus the fair market value on that date of the 
right retained by the owner. A right retained pursuant to this 
section shall be subject to determination that it is being 
exercised in a manner inconsistent with the purposes of this 
Act, and it shall terminate by operation of law upon the 
Secretary's notifying the holder of the right of such 
determination and tendering to him or her an amount equal to 
the fair market value of that portion of the right which 
remains unexpired. Where appropriate in the discretion of the 
Secretary, he or she may lease the federally owned land (or any 
interest therein) which has been acquired by the Secretary 
under this Act, and which was agricultural land prior to its 
acquisition. Such lease shall be subject to such restrictive 
covenants as may be necessary to carry out the purposes of this 
Act. Any land to be leased by the Secretary under this section 
shall be offered first for such lease to the person who owned 
such land or was a leaseholder thereon immediately before its 
acquisition by the United States.
  [(b)] (c)(1) As used in this Act, the term ``improved 
property'' shall mean a private noncommercial dwelling, 
including the land on which it is situated, whose construction 
was begun before September 1, 1959, or, in the case of areas 
added by action of the Ninety-fifth Congress, May 1, 1978, and 
structures accessory thereto (hereinafter in this subsection 
referred to as ``dwelling''), together with such amount and 
locus of the property adjoining and in the same ownership as 
such dwelling as the Secretary designates to be reasonably 
necessary for the enjoyment of such dwelling for the sole 
purpose of noncommercial residential use and occupancy. In 
making such designation the Secretary shall take into account 
the manner of noncommercial residential use and occupancy in 
which the dwelling and such adjoining property has usually been 
enjoyed by its owner or occupant. [The term ``agricultural 
property'' as used]
  (2) The term ``agricultural property'' as used in this Act 
[means lands which were in regular use]  means--
          (A) lands under agricultural lease or permit as of 
        September 1, 2018, or lands that were in regular use 
        for, or were being converted to agricultural, ranching, 
        or dairying purposes as of May 1, 1978, or, in the case 
        of areas added by action of the Ninety-sixth Congress, 
        May 1, 1979, together with residential and other 
        structures related to the above uses of the property 
        that were in existence or under construction as of May 
        1, 1978[.]; and 
          (B) on the northern district of the Golden Gate 
        National Recreation Area, lands under agricultural 
        lease or permit as of September 1, 2018, or lands that 
        were in regular use for, or were being converted to, 
        agricultural, ranching, or dairying purposes as of May 
        1, 1978, together with residential and other structures 
        related to the above uses of the property that were in 
        existence or under construction as of May 1, 1978.
  [(c)] (d) In acquiring those lands authorized by the Ninety-
fifth Congress for the purposes of this Act, the Secretary may, 
when agreed upon by the landowner involved, defer payment or 
schedule payments over a period of ten years and pay interest 
on the unpaid balance at a rate not exceeding that paid by the 
Treasury of the United States for borrowing purposes.
  [(d)] (e) The Secretary is authorized to accept and manage in 
accordance with this Act, any lands and improvements within or 
adjacent to the seashore which are donated by the State of 
California or its political subdivisions. He is directed to 
accept any such lands offered for donation which comprise the 
Tomales Bay State Park, or lie between said park and Fish 
Hatchery Creek. The boundaries of the seashore shall be changed 
to include any such donated lands.
  [(e)] (f) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, no fee 
or admission charge may be levied for admission of the general 
public to the seashore.
  Sec. 6. (a) Except as otherwise provided in this Act, the 
property acquired by the Secretary under this Act shall be 
administered by the Secretary, without impairment of its 
natural values, in a manner which provides for such 
recreational, educational, historic preservation, 
interpretation, and scientific research opportunities as are 
consistent with, based upon, and supportive or the maximum 
protection, restoration, and preservation of the natural 
environment within the area, subject to the provisions of the 
Act entitled ``An Act to establish a National Park Service, and 
for other purposes'', approved August 25,1916 (39 Stat. 535), 
as amended and supplemented, and in accordance with other laws 
of general application relating to the national park system as 
defined by the Act of August 8, 1953 (67 Stat. 496) except that 
authority otherwise available to the Secretary for the 
conservation and management of natural resources may be 
utilized to the extent he finds such authority will further the 
purposes of this Act.
  (b) The Secretary may permit hunting and fishing on lands and 
waters under his jurisdiction within the seashore in such areas 
and under such regulations as he may prescribe during open 
seasons prescribed by applicable local, State, and Federal law. 
The Secretary shall consult with officials of the State of 
California and any political subdivision thereof who have 
jurisdiction of hunting and fishing prior to the issuance of 
any such regulations, and the Secretary is authorized to enter 
into cooperative agreements with such officials regarding such 
hunting and fishing as he may deem desirable.
  (c)(1) In areas of agricultural property where Tule Elk 
present conflicts with working ranches or dairies, the 
Secretary shall manage the Tule Elk for separation from the 
working ranches or dairies. To minimize the conflicts and 
prevent establishment of new Tule Elk herds on agricultural 
property, the Secretary may work with Indian Tribes interested 
in the following:
          (A) Partnering with the Secretary in the relocation 
        and reestablishment of Tule Elk on Tribal lands.
          (B) Participating in hunting Tule Elk on a 
        subsistence or ceremonial basis.
          (C) Other partnerships and activities that the 
        Secretary determines are suitable and feasible for this 
        purpose.
  (2) Nothing in this subsection reduces or diminishes the 
authority of the Secretary to use other existing authorities or 
management tools to separate Tule Elk from agricultural 
property.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  Sec. 10. Consistent with the purposes of this Act, including 
section 5(a), the Secretary is directed to complete, without 
delay, the General Management Plan Amendment for Point Reyes 
National Seashore and the northern district of Golden Gate 
National Recreation Area, its Environmental Impact Statement, 
and, upon completion of the Record of Decision, issue leases 
and special use permits of 20 years for working dairies and 
ranches on agricultural property. Nothing in this Act requires 
the Secretary to issue leases and special use permits of 20 
years in circumstances where there is no willing lessee, or to 
a previous lessee who has abandoned or discontinued ranching.

                                  [all]