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                                                     Calendar No. 451
115th Congress    }                                     {      Report
                                 SENATE
 2d Session       }                                     {     115-275

====================================================================== 





 
  DEPARTMENTS OF COMMERCE AND JUSTICE, SCIENCE, AND RELATED AGENCIES 
                       APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2019

                                _______
                                

                 June 14, 2018.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

           Mr. Moran, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                                 REPORT

                         [To accompany S. 3072]

    The Committee on Appropriations reports the bill (S. 3072) 
making appropriations for the Departments of Commerce and 
Justice, Science, and Related Agencies for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2019, and for other purposes, reports 
favorably thereon and recommends that the bill do pass.


 
Total obligational authority, fiscal year 2019

Total of bill as reported to the Senate\1\.............. $71,696,406,000
Amount of 2018 appropriations...........................  71,457,936,000
Amount of 2019 budget estimate..........................  66,084,754,000
Bill as recommended to Senate compared to--
    2018 appropriations.................................    +238,470,000
    2019 budget estimate................................  +5,611,652,000

\1\This level does not include -$8,382,000,000 in adjustments that the 
Congressional Budget Office scores to the bill. With these adjustments, 
the bill is consistent with the subcommittee's discretionary allocation 
of $62,995,000,000.







                                CONTENTS

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page

Purpose of the Bill..............................................     3
Summary of the Bill..............................................     3
Fighting Waste, Fraud, and Abuse.................................     4
Reprogrammings, Reorganizations, and Relocations.................     6
Congressional Budget Justifications..............................     7
Reporting Requirements...........................................     8
Reductions-in-Force..............................................     8
Appropriations Liaisons..........................................     8
Title I: Department of Commerce..................................     9
Title II: Department of Justice..................................    63
Title III: Science...............................................   112
    Office of Science and Technology Policy......................   112
    National Space Council.......................................   113
    National Aeronautics and Space Administration................   114
    National Science Foundation..................................   129
Title IV: Related Agencies.......................................   138
    Commission on Civil Rights...................................   138
    Equal Employment Opportunity Commission......................   138
    International Trade Commission...............................   139
    Legal Services Corporation...................................   139
    Marine Mammal Commission.....................................   140
    Office of the United States Trade Representative.............   141
    State Justice Institute......................................   142
Title V: General Provisions......................................   144
Compliance With Paragraph 7, Rule XVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the 
  Senate.........................................................   147
Compliance With Paragraph 7(c) Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................   149
Compliance With Paragraph 12, Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................   150
Budgetary Impact of Bill.........................................   151
Comparative Statement of Budget Authority........................   152






                          Purpose of the Bill

    The bill provides funding for: (1) the Department of 
Commerce [DOC]; (2) the Department of Justice [DOJ]; (3) 
several independent science agencies: the Office of Science and 
Technology Policy [OSTP], the National Space Council, the 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA], and the 
National Science Foundation [NSF]; and (4) several related 
commissions and agencies: the Commission on Civil Rights, the 
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission [EEOC], the United 
States International Trade Commission [ITC], the Legal Services 
Corporation [LSC], the Marine Mammal Commission, the Office of 
the United States Trade Representative [USTR], and the State 
Justice Institute [SJI].

                          Summary of the Bill

    The total amount of discretionary budget authority 
recommended by the Committee for fiscal year 2019 is 
$62,995,000,000, which is $3,395,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level. The Committee's recommendation is 
consistent with the allocation for the Commerce, Justice, 
Science, and Related Agencies appropriations bill, and adheres 
to the congressional budget agreement and provisions.
    While the discretionary budget authority in this bill has 
increased from the fiscal year 2018 enacted level, the 
Committee proposes to keep many of the programs and activities 
relatively flat while making strategic funding increases and 
decreases mainly due to necessary preparations to conduct the 
Constitutionally mandated Decennial Census and lower receipts 
to the Crime Victims Fund [CVF]. Together, these two 
programmatic differences account for $2,978,388,000 of the 
increased budget authority in this year's bill.
    In preparation for the 2020 Census, the Committee proposes 
a $1,007,388,000 increase above the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level for the Census Bureau, which is equal to the 2019 budget 
request. The Decennial Census is entering a critical 
development phase and is currently executing an End-to-End 
test. The data from the Census delivers important information 
to help facilitate the distribution of billions of dollars in 
Federal funding for grants supporting States, counties, and 
municipalities; determines the population for congressional 
apportionment; and provides valuable data for continued 
economic growth.
    Additionally, the Committee provides $4,436,000,000 to 
victims and for victim services through the CVF, which is equal 
to the fiscal year 2018 enacted amount and is above the 3-year 
average of deposits, a metric for CVF spending called for by 
the Senate Budget Committee. This spending level requires 
$1,971,000,000 in additional budget authority in the bill due 
to lower receipts coming into the fund during fiscal year 2018.
    Nonetheless, the Committee has strived to achieve a careful 
balance between the competing priorities of law enforcement, 
national security, economic development, scientific research, 
and space exploration, while having limited resources.
    The Department of Commerce is charged with addressing and 
executing several critical functions for our nation, which 
include: operating weather satellites and forecasting severe 
storms; enforcing trade laws to ensure American businesses can 
compete on a level playing field; completing a timely and 
accurate Constitutionally required Decennial Census; working 
with distressed communities to spur economic development; and 
properly managing our Nation's fisheries.
    While the bill adopts some of the cost saving measures in 
the 2019 budget request, the Committee does not support other 
proposed cuts to core programs, such as reductions to advanced 
weather forecasting operations and research and STEM education 
programs. The administration also proposes to eliminate 
important external competitive grant programs that partner with 
States and local communities across the Nation, which use 
matching funds to maximize any Federal investment. In contrast, 
the bill retains many of these grant programs which allow 
States and communities to steer financial priorities through a 
bottom-up approach instead of Federal agencies driving local 
decisions from afar. Additionally, the Committee proposes to 
decrease the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's 
Procurement, Acquisition and Construction [PAC] resources in 
fiscal year 2019 by $484,205,000, which reflects the 
anticipated reduced financial need for flagship weather 
satellite programs as they are launched and enter the 
operational phase.
    The changing landscape of criminal activity at home and 
abroad tests the Department of Justice's ability to deal with 
and adapt to emerging threats. The Committee believes that our 
Federal law enforcement agencies must work collaboratively--
particularly in tough budget environments--to focus and 
streamline limited resources in a manner that safeguards 
taxpayer dollars while preserving public safety. The Committee 
provides an approximate 2 percent increase for most Federal law 
enforcement components and the United States Attorneys, while 
maintaining strong funding for State and local justice grants.
    For the science agencies, the Committee sought to build 
upon the advances and calculated gains made in the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2018 (Public Law 115-141). Rather than 
curtail ongoing missions and research, and, for NASA, delay 
future exploration for years to come, the Committee attempted 
to leverage strategic increases as well as reductions so that 
NASA and NSF are able to achieve balanced and cost-effective 
operations. These efforts not only lead to scientific 
breakthroughs and technological advances, but continue to 
inspire and harness the excitement of our future science and 
business leaders.

                    Fighting Waste, Fraud, and Abuse

    The departments, agencies, boards, and commissions funded 
in this bill can and should continue to reduce operating 
expenses by placing greater scrutiny on overhead costs. Savings 
can and should be achieved by reducing non-essential travel, 
office supply, rent, and utility costs. The Committee also 
calls on departments, agencies, boards, and commissions funded 
in this bill to continue to achieve savings by lowering travel 
contractor costs related to air fares. The Committee continues 
longstanding restrictions on first class travel.
    The Committee is extremely concerned about the persistent 
pattern of cost overruns and schedule slippages on major 
projects and missions carried out by the agencies within this 
bill. In addition, reports have exposed a culture within many 
agencies that exhibits a lack of accountability and oversight 
of grant funding. Therefore, the Committee has continued bill-
wide provisions to ensure greater oversight and fiscal 
responsibility of taxpayer dollars.
    First, the bill requires each agency to notify the 
Committee immediately upon identification of program cost 
overruns greater than 10 percent.
    Second, the bill requires the Inspectors General of the 
Departments of Commerce and Justice, NASA, NSF, and the Legal 
Services Corporation to conduct reviews of grant and contract 
funds to ensure funds are being spent appropriately. For 
projects with persistent accountability issues, such as the 
Decennial Census and weather satellites, special funding is 
provided for additional Inspector General scrutiny.
    Third, the bill requires all departments and agencies to 
link all contracts that provide award fees to successful 
acquisition outcomes, and prohibits funds to pay for award or 
incentive fees for contractors with below satisfactory 
performance.
    The Committee also supports long-standing provisions that 
were once solely included in this bill but have since become 
government-wide provisions. These include: requiring each 
department, agency, board, and commission funded in this act to 
report spending on large conferences to the Inspectors General 
for audit; requiring all departments and agencies funded in 
this act to provide full access to documents and data for their 
respective Inspectors General to conduct investigations and 
audits; and prohibiting funds from being used for contracts, 
memoranda of understanding, cooperative agreements, grants, or 
loan activities if the proposed recipient has unpaid Federal 
tax liabilities or was convicted of a felony criminal 
violation.
    Finally, the Committee intends to continue to work with the 
Government Accountability Office [GAO] to expand the review of 
selected large-scale acquisition and construction projects. 
Specifically, the Committee directs ongoing GAO reviews of 
large NASA projects, major research equipment and facilities 
construction at the National Science Foundation, and separate 
reviews of the James Webb Space Telescope, with reports to the 
Committee on a biannual basis.
    Agencies shall provide access to all necessary data, as 
determined by GAO, in order for these reviews to be completed 
and provided to the Committee in a timely manner. The Committee 
believes that these project status reports are valuable in 
identifying cost overrun and schedule slippage problems early 
so they can be addressed immediately and has used information 
in the reviews to develop this recommendation.
    Representation Funds.--The Committee has reduced official 
reception and representation funds by 25 percent since fiscal 
year 2011. Modest representation funds are included for agency 
executives to provide necessary courtesies to our diplomatic 
partners and hold events to honor fallen officers, or to mark 
historic occasions such as space exploration missions or 
significant discoveries. However, savings can and should be 
achieved by reducing the costs of executive meetings, 
receptions, ceremonies, and conferences, and by purchasing 
fewer promotional items such as T-shirts, hats, mugs, key 
chains, and other similar items.
    Federal Vehicle Fleet Management.--The General Services 
Administration [GSA] issues guidance on Federal fleet 
management, but the Federal vehicle fleet is decentralized, 
with each agency maintaining flexibility to manage vehicle 
utilization as appropriate. In order to provide better 
transparency and accountability of funding for Federal 
vehicles, the Committee directs agencies funded in this bill to 
conduct an annual review of fleet utilization during the third 
quarter of each fiscal year and provide their corresponding 
Offices of Inspectors General [OIGs] with supporting 
documentation on the method used for determining optimal fleet 
inventories and justification for any deviation from GSA's 
Federal Property Management Regulations. OIGs shall be 
responsible for conducting annual audits of fleet management 
practices and make the subsequent results for non-law 
enforcement sensitive agencies publicly available.
    Reducing Duplication and Improving Efficiencies.--The 
Committee directs each agency funded in this bill to report to 
the Committee, within 1 year of enactment of this act, on all 
efforts made to address the duplication of Federal programs 
identified by annual GAO reports along with identifying 
substantive challenges and legal barriers to implementing GAO's 
recommendations, along with suggested legislative 
recommendations that could help the agency to further reduce 
duplication.

            Reprogrammings, Reorganizations, and Relocations

    Section 505, contained in the ``General Provisions'' of 
Title V, provides procedures for the reprogramming of funds. To 
reprogram is to change the use of funds from the specific 
purposes provided for in the act and the accompanying report 
or, in the absence of direction from the Committee, from the 
specific purposes provided for in the administration's budget 
request. Each title of the bill has also traditionally included 
separate provisions that define permissible transfers of 
resources between appropriation accounts. These transfer 
authority provisions are also pursuant to section 505 and were 
initiated in the early 1990s to provide additional flexibility 
to the agencies under the subcommittee's jurisdiction.
    The Committee expects each department and agency to closely 
follow the reprogramming procedures listed in section 505. 
These procedures apply to funds provided under this act, 
provided under previous appropriations acts that remain 
available for obligation or expenditure in fiscal year 2019, or 
provided from any accounts in the Treasury available to the 
agencies funded by this act. Section 505 requires that the 
Committee on Appropriations be notified by letter, at least 15 
days prior to reprogramming of funds, whether permanent or 
temporary, in excess of $500,000 or 10 percent, whichever is 
less, between programs, projects, or activities. Section 505 of 
this act is also applicable in cases where funding for an 
activity is reduced by 10 percent. In addition, the Committee 
is to be notified of reprogramming actions which are less than 
these amounts if such actions would have the effect of: 
committing the agency to significant funding requirements in 
future years; increasing funds or personnel by any means for 
any program, project, or activity for which funds have been 
previously denied or restricted by Congress; creating new 
programs, offices, agencies, or commissions or substantially 
augmenting existing programs, offices, agencies, or 
commissions; relocating offices or employees; or reorganizing 
offices, programs, or activities.
    The Committee also expects that any items that are subject 
to interpretation will be reported. The Committee expects that 
each department and agency funded in the bill will follow these 
notification policies precisely and will not reallocate 
resources or reorganize activities prior to submitting the 
required notifications to the Committee. Reprogramming or 
transfer requests shall be submitted only in the case of an 
unforeseen emergency or situation that could not have been 
anticipated when formulating the budget request for the current 
fiscal year.

                  Congressional Budget Justifications

    The Committee directs that all departments and agencies 
funded within this bill shall submit all of their fiscal year 
2020 budget justifications concurrently with the official 
submission of the administration's budget to Congress. Further, 
all departments and agencies with classified programs funded 
within this act are directed to submit their classified budget 
justification documents to the Committee, through appropriate 
means, at the same time the unclassified budget justifications 
are transmitted.
    These justifications shall include a sufficient level of 
detailed data, exhibits, and explanatory statements to support 
the appropriations requests, including tables that outline each 
agency's programs, projects, and activities for fiscal years 
2019 and 2020. For example, when requesting an enhancement of 
resources, the justification should detail the existing program 
and what the new resources would buy. The Committee directs the 
chief financial officer of each department or agency funded in 
this act's jurisdiction to ensure that adequate justification 
is given to each increase, decrease, and staffing and function 
change proposed in the fiscal year 2020 budget, particularly 
within the departmental operations and management accounts.
    The Committee expects that the fiscal year 2020 submissions 
will include sufficient detail to justify all programs, 
projects, and activities contained in each department, agency, 
or commission budget request. Budget justifications are 
prepared not for the use of the agencies but are the primary 
tool of the Committee to evaluate the resource requirements and 
proposals requested by the administration.

                         Reporting Requirements

    The Committee directs the departments and agencies funded 
in this bill to submit reports by the deadlines detailed herein 
or to provide advance notification if there is sufficient 
reason why deadlines cannot be met, along with the expected 
date of submission.
    The Committee also recognizes that some enduring reporting 
requirements from previous Appropriations laws may no longer be 
necessary for Congressional oversight purposes. In the interest 
of reducing government waste and expediting responses to 
current report mandates, each department or agency is invited 
to submit a list of reporting requirements that it considers 
outdated or no longer relevant for the review of the Committees 
on Appropriations. Any list submitted for review shall cite the 
original authority as well as a justification for eliminating 
each reporting requirement.

                          Reductions-in-Force

    The Committee directs departments or agencies funded in the 
accompanying bill that are planning to conduct a reduction-in-
force to notify the Committee in writing 30 days in advance of 
the date of the proposed personnel action.

                        Appropriations Liaisons

    The Committee prefers to channel the majority of its 
inquiries and requests for information and assistance through 
the budget offices or comptroller offices of the departments 
and agencies which it oversees but reserves the right to call 
upon any individual or organization in any agency under its 
jurisdiction.

                                TITLE I

                         DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

    The Committee recommends a total of $11,571,798,000 for 
DOC. The recommendation is $434,560,000 above the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level and $1,774,921,000 above the budget request.
    The Department of Commerce is responsible for a variety of 
activities critical to our Nation's well-being, including 
economic development, intellectual property protection, 
standards and measurements, trade enforcement, weather 
forecasting, and fisheries management. Our Nation relies on the 
Department to maintain America's competitiveness within today's 
foreign markets while promoting and expanding international 
trade opportunities. The Department brings together a diverse 
set of bureaus, specialized experts, research laboratories, and 
applied technology programs to support and expand opportunities 
for growth in the private sector. Few departments have such 
potential to directly impact the strength and sustainability of 
our communities and local businesses.

                   International Trade Administration


                     OPERATIONS AND ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $495,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     451,147,000
Committee recommendation................................     499,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $499,000,000 for 
the International Trade Administration [ITA]. The 
recommendation is $4,000,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level and $47,853,000 above the budget request. The 
discretionary appropriation is offset by $11,000,000 in fee 
collections.
    Offsetting Fee Collections.--ITA shall continue to identify 
and include an accurate assessment of expected fee collections 
and corresponding expenditures in its fiscal year 2019 spending 
plan and in its fiscal year 2020 budget request.
    Trade Enforcement.--The Committee provides $4,000,000 above 
the fiscal year 2018 enacted level for the Office of 
Enforcement and Compliance. ITA should make enforcement of 
antidumping and countervailing duties [AD/CVD] a priority, 
including thoroughly investigating dumping and subsidies 
causing injury to domestic businesses and expeditiously 
reducing trade remedy case backlogs.
    Additionally, the Committee is supportive of the 
Administration's request to self-initiate AD/CVD cases, as is 
authorized under current law. The process of preparing and 
filing a petition is time-consuming and expensive and, 
frequently, industry has already suffered injury in order to 
meet the statutory standard for initiating an AD/CVD 
investigation. ITA is encouraged to use funding under 
Enforcement and Compliance to provide direct assistance to 
industries in support of self-initiated cases and other AD/CVD 
enforcement.
    Trade Fraud and Evasion.--The Committee encourages ITA to 
coordinate with appropriate agencies, such as Customs and 
Border Protection, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the 
International Trade Commission, and the Departments of Justice 
and State, in order to report to the Committee on legislative 
remedies that may be needed to support U.S. Government-wide 
efforts to combat trade fraud and evasion.
    Additionally, the Committee notes that funding formerly 
requested for the Interagency Trade Enforcement Center has been 
moved from ITA to the Office of the United States Trade 
Representative for the Interagency Center on Trade 
Implementation, Monitoring, and Enforcement, following passage 
of the Trade Facilitation and Trade Enforcement Act of 2015 
(Public Law 114-125). As such, no funds are provided for these 
activities in ITA, but ITA shall continue to collaborate with 
all other Federal trade agencies to ensure U.S. trade laws and 
agreements are enforced fairly.
    U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service.--The U.S. and Foreign 
Commercial Service [US&FCS;] provides significant value to U.S. 
businesses looking to expand overseas export opportunities. The 
Committee rejects the proposed cuts to the US&FCS; and directs 
ITA to fund US&FCS;, and its core mission of export promotion, 
at the highest possible level in fiscal year 2019, and at no 
less than the amount provided in fiscal year 2018. At this 
funding level, the Committee does not anticipate the closure of 
any foreign or domestic offices. No offices shall be closed in 
fiscal year 2019 unless the Committee approves a reprogramming 
request to close such office or offices. Additionally, the 
Committee will not approve requests to close any domestic 
offices, called U.S. Export Assistance Centers, if such Center 
is the only one located in a given State.
    Furthermore, the Committee directs ITA to submit, not more 
than 60 days after enactment of this act, a report detailing 
any instances of US&FCS; staff diverted from working on trade 
promotion in the last year to other priorities, including trade 
enforcement and implementation of tariffs. Additionally, ITA is 
directed to submit, in its fiscal year 2019 spending plan and 
2020 budget request, a breakdown of Global Markets funding for 
the US&FCS; and for other activities.
    SelectUSA.--Up to $10,000,000 is provided for SelectUSA, 
except that none of the funds provided may be used to 
facilitate foreign direct investment in the United States 
unless an updated protocol to ensure that SelectUSA activities 
do not encourage such investments in the United States by 
State-owned entities is delivered to the Committee within 30 
days of enactment of this act.
    Capture and Trade Enforcement.--The Committee has long 
supported and valued the importance of trade enforcement for 
ensuring American businesses and products can enter the global 
marketplace on a level playing field. The objectivity of trade 
officials at ITA is essential for the success of our trade 
enforcement laws. The Committee is aware that the nature of 
trade enforcement activities involves the risk of ``capture,'' 
which is the process in which regulating officials begin to 
identify with regulated parties. Capture is often unintentional 
and develops over long periods of time, but can significantly 
influence regulators' decisionmaking. To better ensure the 
objectivity of enforcement decisions against foreign entities, 
including decisions not to enforce trade laws, the Committee 
requested a report in Public Law 115-141 reviewing the policies 
and procedures the agency has in place to prevent capture of 
its Enforcement and Compliance employees. The Committee looks 
forward to receiving the report.
    Survey of International Air Travelers [SIAT].--The 
Committee does not adopt the administration's proposal to seek 
alternative funding sources for SIAT and directs ITA to 
continue funding SIAT out of its base budget. Within funds 
provided, ITA is encouraged to increase the sample size for 
SIAT.
    General Data Protection Regulation.--The Committee urges 
ITA to continue its efforts to educate small businesses about 
the European Union's General Data Protection Regulation [GDPR]. 
The Committee is concerned that small businesses may be unaware 
of their compliance obligations as a result of GDPR and could 
be vulnerable to fines and significant financial risk. The 
Committee encourages ITA to work with Federal, State, and local 
partners to raise awareness about GDPR obligations on American 
small businesses.
    U.S. Trade Imbalance.--The Committee notes that the current 
U.S. trade imbalance is one important factor in helping guide 
our Nation's trade policies. However, the imbalance alone does 
not provide the full economic picture or strategic goals 
related to U.S. trade. Therefore, the Committee urges the 
administration to take into account all economic impacts, 
including potential negative effects of tariffs on imported 
goods, as the U.S. engages in trade negotiations and 
discussions.

                    Bureau of Industry and Security


                     OPERATIONS AND ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $113,500,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     120,647,000
Committee recommendation................................     121,600,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $121,600,000 for 
the Bureau of Industry and Security [BIS]. The recommendation 
is $8,100,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and 
$953,000 above the budget request.
    BIS is the principal agency involved in the development, 
implementation, and enforcement of export controls for 
commercial technologies and for many military technologies as a 
result of the President's export control reform initiative. The 
Export Enforcement Division detects, prevents, investigates, 
and assists in the sanctioning of illegal exports of such 
items.
    Export Control Regulatory Compliance Assistance.--The 
Committee directs BIS to continue its exporter outreach program 
to educate companies of all sizes on their obligations related 
to export controls. In this effort, BIS should continue 
targeting small- and medium-sized businesses and working with 
State and local trade and export associations, in addition to 
working with national industry groups, to ensure that small- 
and medium-sized businesses have clear, easy-to-understand 
information about complying with export control regulations.

                  Economic Development Administration

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $301,500,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      14,937,000
Committee recommendation................................     305,500,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $305,500,000 for 
the Economic Development Administration [EDA]. The 
recommendation is $4,000,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level and $290,563,000 above the budget request.
    EDA provides grants to local governments and nonprofit 
agencies for public works, planning, and other projects 
designed to facilitate economic development. The Committee 
directs EDA to coordinate with regional development 
organizations to support projects that will address some of the 
pressing issues that challenge rural economic development, 
including the opioid epidemic and inequities in broadband 
access. Funding amounts for the two appropriations accounts 
under this heading are displayed below.

                ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $262,500,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................................
Committee recommendation................................     266,500,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $266,500,000 for 
Economic Development Assistance Programs. The recommendation is 
$4,000,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and 
$266,500,000 above the budget request. EDA is directed to focus 
on its core programs and mission to aid the most distressed 
communities across the country. The Committee expects EDA to 
use all available carryover and prior year recoveries to the 
maximum extent possible. EDA shall consider geographic equity 
in making all award decisions and shall ensure that rural 
projects are adequately represented among those selected for 
funding. Of the amounts provided, funds are to be distributed 
as follows, and any deviation of funds shall be subject to the 
procedures set forth in section 505 of this act:

                ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Public Works............................................         117,500
Economic Adjustment Assistance..........................          37,000
Trade Adjustment Assistance for Firms...................          13,000
Regional Innovation Program.............................          25,000
Partnership Planning....................................          33,000
Technical Assistance....................................           9,500
Research and Evaluation.................................           1,500
Assistance to Coal Communities..........................          30,000
                                                         ---------------
      Total.............................................         266,500
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Broadband Projects.--EDA funding provided under Public 
Works, Economic Adjustment Assistance, and other programs may 
be used to support broadband infrastructure projects. High-
speed broadband is critical to help communities attract new 
industries and strengthen and grow local economies. EDA is 
encouraged to prioritize unserved areas. EDA shall continue to 
submit annual updates to the Committee describing the number 
and value of broadband projects supported as required by the 
Explanatory Statement accompanying Public Law 115-141.
    Outdoor Recreation Projects.--The Committee notes that 
projects supporting outdoor recreation as a catalyst for 
economic development may be eligible for EDA funding. EDA is 
encouraged to consider such projects when consistent with a 
region's Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy.
    Economic Adjustment Assistance [EAA].--EAA is EDA's most 
flexible economic development program, which provides access to 
appropriate funding for everything from disaster recovery to 
business accelerators and incubators. Within funding for EAA, 
the Committee provides no less than the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level to support EDA's collaborations with the Delta 
Regional Authority and the Appalachian Regional Commission to 
assist distressed communities. In addition, the Committee 
provides $3,000,000 for the Northern Border Regional Commission 
to assist the recovery of forest-based economies within the 
territory.
    Regional Innovation Program [RIP].--The Committee provides 
$25,000,000 to EDA for grants under RIP as authorized under the 
Revitalize American Manufacturing and Innovation Act of 2014 
(Public Law 113-235). RIP awards competitive grants to regional 
entities in support of innovation and entrepreneurship. EDA 
shall continue to ensure that RIP awards go to multiple 
grantees in multiple and diverse geographic areas, including an 
increased focus on organizations and States that have not 
previously received funding from the program. Furthermore, 
within funds provided for RIP, EDA shall award not less than 40 
percent of grants to support rural communities.
    University-based Business Incubators.--Within funding 
provided under RIP, the Committee directs EDA to invest in 
university-based, high-tech business incubators to encourage 
entrepreneurship and promote technology commercialization 
through business startups. Funding awards should include 
support for incubator projects where Federal labs and 
universities are collaborating to stimulate commercialization 
of research. Furthermore, this activity should support private-
public partnerships for economic growth and job creation in 
areas of high unemployment.
    New Forest Products.--The Committee notes that many forest-
based economies have experienced disruption and decline in 
recent years. EDA is encouraged to work with communities and 
regions that have been adversely impacted by rapid changes in 
the timber marketplace and to support projects that help these 
communities develop related industries, including 
commercialization of new forest products using low-grade wood. 
This work may include the coordination of economic development 
efforts across multiple States or Economic Development 
Districts. Additionally, the Committee reiterates that 
communities facing job losses are eligible for all EDA 
programs.
    Nuclear Plant Closures.--As part of the Explanatory 
Statement accompanying Public Law 115-141, the Committee 
directed EDA to report on its work to help identify and develop 
best practices to assist communities affected by loss of tax 
revenue and job loss due to nuclear power plant closures in 
recognition of the reality that communities that have a nuclear 
power plant that will undergo decommissioning, is currently 
undergoing decommissioning, or has completed decommissioning 
have become de facto high-level radioactive waste storage 
sites. The Committee further directs the Secretary of Commerce, 
in coordination with the Secretary of Energy, to build on EDA's 
efforts by working across the executive branch and report to 
the Committee, not later than 90 days after the date of 
enactment of this act, on existing resources and funding 
opportunities for which affected communities may be eligible. 
The report shall also include what opportunities exist for 
these affected communities to consider alternative uses for 
these sites upon completion of the decommissioning process and 
what Federal programs may assist in these efforts.
    STEM Apprenticeships.--The Committee notes that over the 
past decade, the growth in jobs requiring sophisticated 
science, technology, engineering, and math [STEM] skills was 
three times faster than growth in non-STEM jobs. Yet, U.S. 
employers have struggled to fill jobs in these fields. Because 
more than 50 percent of jobs that require STEM skills do not 
require a bachelor's degree, nontraditional higher education, 
such as apprenticeships, will be instrumental in meeting the 
urgent demand for a STEM-literate workforce. The Committee 
encourages EDA to provide grants to communities to create and 
expand STEM apprenticeship and other workforce training models, 
as directed in section 312 of the American Innovation and 
Competitiveness Act, Public Law 114-329. The Committee also 
directs EDA to provide an assessment, within 180 days of 
enactment of the act, of how STEM apprenticeship grants would 
complement EDA's investment priorities and grant programs, as 
well as how they would serve EDA's mission of facilitating 
regional economic development.
    Investing in Manufacturing Communities Partnership Program 
[IMCP].--The Committee notes that no funding has been requested 
and no funding is provided for the IMCP for fiscal year 2019.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $39,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      14,937,000
Committee recommendation................................      39,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $39,000,000 for 
salaries and expenses. The recommendation is the same as the 
fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $24,063,000 above the budget 
request.
    The Committee is concerned by the number of vacancies at 
EDA, particularly in its six regional offices. The Department 
is reminded that budget requests to Congress do not supersede 
current appropriations, and the Committee directs EDA to 
expedite its efforts to fill all outstanding vacancies 
regardless of any current or future budget requests.

                  Minority Business Development Agency


                     MINORITY BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $39,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      10,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      39,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $39,000,000 for the 
Minority Business Development Agency [MBDA]. The recommendation 
is equal to the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and is 
$29,000,000 above the budget request. MBDA is the only Federal 
agency dedicated to promoting the growth of minority-owned 
firms and assists small, medium, and large minority business 
enterprises to increase revenues and create jobs. The Committee 
directs that not less than 50 percent of funds provided to MBDA 
shall be awarded through competitive agreements, external 
awards, and grants.
    Annual Report.--The Committee recognizes the disparities in 
access to capital for minority-owned firms and businesses, 
including lower loan amounts, loan denials, and liquidated 
constraints. MBDA is encouraged to submit an annual report to 
Congress on the state of minority-owned businesses, which may 
include policy recommendations to ensure fair access to credit 
between minority-owned businesses and non-minority-owned 
businesses.
    Indian Tribes.--Within funds provided, MBDA is encouraged 
to address barriers to economic development for tribes and 
American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian 
populations, including full implementation of Public Laws 106-
447 and 106-464.

                   Economic and Statistical Analysis


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $99,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     100,987,000
Committee recommendation................................     102,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $102,000,000 for 
Economic and Statistical Analysis [ESA]. The recommendation is 
$3,000,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and 
$1,013,000 above the budget request. ESA conducts research to 
provide a better understanding of the U.S. economy, which helps 
Government make more informed policy decisions.
    Outdoor Recreation Satellite Account.--The Committee 
recognizes the national economic importance of the outdoor 
recreation industry. The Outdoor Recreation Jobs and Economic 
Impact Act of 2016 (Public Law 114-249) requires the Department 
to lead, in consultation with the Departments of Agriculture 
and the Interior and other Federal agencies, an assessment and 
analysis of the outdoor recreation economy of the United States 
and the effects attributable to it on the overall economy. The 
Committee appreciates the Department's initial analysis of 
outdoor recreation to the U.S. economy and provides $1,500,000 
to continue this work in fiscal year 2019. The Committee 
further expects the Department to continue working with the 
outdoor recreation industry, nongovernmental organizations, and 
other interested stakeholders to refine the national-level 
statistics and to develop new regional statistics.

                          Bureau of the Census

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $2,814,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   3,800,513,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,821,388,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $3,821,388,000 for 
the Census Bureau. The recommendation is $1,007,388,000 above 
the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $20,875,000 above the 
budget request.

                      CURRENT SURVEYS AND PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $270,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     249,125,000
Committee recommendation................................     270,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $270,000,000 for 
current surveys and programs. The recommendation is equal to 
the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $20,875,000 above the 
budget request. This account provides for the salaries and 
expenses associated with the statistical programs of the Bureau 
of the Census, including measurement of the Nation's economy 
and the demographic characteristics of the population.

                     PERIODIC CENSUSES AND PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $2,544,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   3,551,388,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,551,388,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $3,551,388,000 for 
periodic censuses and programs. The recommendation is 
$1,007,388,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and 
equal to the budget request.
    This account provides for the constitutionally mandated 
Decennial Census as well as other cyclical programs. 
Additionally, individual surveys are conducted for other 
Federal agencies on a reimbursable basis.
    2020 Decennial Census.--The Committee provides the full 
amount requested for the 2020 Decennial Census for fiscal year 
2019. The Census Bureau is directed to prioritize spending for 
activities that have the greatest potential to reduce cost and 
risk for the 2020 Decennial Census. Controlling costs for the 
2020 Decennial Census remains a top oversight concern for the 
Committee, and the ongoing 2018 End-to-End test will be a 
significant indicator of whether the processes, systems, and 
methods will be ready to conduct an accurate census. The 
Committee expects the Department, the Bureau, and the Inspector 
General to keep the Committee regularly apprised of the ongoing 
efforts to prepare for the 2020 Decennial Census beyond the 
regular quarterly status reports. The Committee notes that GAO 
added the 2020 Decennial Census to its high-risk report, and 
that the Bureau should diligently work on addressing the risks 
that have been identified.
    Oversight of Periodic Census Programs.--The Committee's 
recommendation provides $3,556,000 for the OIG to continue 
oversight and audits of periodic censuses and to provide the 
Bureau and Congress with independent recommendations for 
improving operations, which will be useful for oversight of the 
2020 Decennial Census. The Committee directs the Bureau to 
follow the OIG's recommendations.
    Quarterly Status Reports.--The Census Bureau is directed to 
continue its quarterly status reports to the Committee as it 
prepares for the 2020 Decennial Census. As the 2020 Decennial 
Census approaches, the Bureau is reminded that these quarterly 
reports must be scheduled on a timely basis to keep the 
Committee informed of the progress in executing the Bureau's 
plans, to identify ongoing and emerging risks, and to provide 
early warnings when goals and cost schedules are not being 
achieved.
    Undercounting.--The Committee directs the Census Bureau to 
ensure that the current proposed decennial questionnaire and 
the impact of new enumeration methods do not negatively affect 
demographic groups identified in its 2010 Census Coverage 
Measurement Survey as undercounted and directs the Bureau to 
provide a report within 60 days of enactment of this act 
providing the measures that are being taken to ensure potential 
undercounts of these groups are appropriately mitigated.
    Internet Self-Response.--The Committee urges the Census 
Bureau to conduct outreach to public libraries and other 
community technology centers to ensure that they are fully 
informed about the Internet self-response option for the 2020 
Decennial Census and equipped to support residents in census 
participation. The Bureau should work with libraries, in 
coordination with the Institute of Museum and Library Services, 
as part of the overall strategy to maximize survey response.
    Partnership and Communications Activities.--The Committee 
is concerned about the proposed levels for partnership staff 
and communications efforts for the 2020 Decennial Census. 
Sufficient partnership and communication activities are 
essential to build trust in the Census Bureau and to increase 
response rates. Investing in partnership and communication 
activities can reduce the overall cost of conducting the 2020 
Decennial Census. By helping increase self-response rates, 
there is a reduced need for additional non-response follow-up. 
Additionally, the Committee understands that the 2020 Decennial 
Census plan includes only about half the number of local field 
offices and Regional Census Centers compared to the 2010 
Decennial Census. Therefore, the Committee expects the Bureau 
to provide a plan that increases the number of partnership 
program staff, communication efforts, and field operations; an 
assessment of increasing external partnerships; and the 
associated costs, within 45 days of enactment. The plan should 
include an assessment of doubling the number of partnership 
staff and increasing the number of area census offices to 300. 
The Bureau is further encouraged to consider working with local 
service organizations as part of the overall strategy to 
maximize survey response, especially for homeless and displaced 
populations in rural areas.
    American Community Survey [ACS].--The Committee supports 
the ACS and directs the Bureau to continue using the ACS as a 
testbed for innovative survey and data processing techniques 
that can be used across the Bureau. The Committee notes that 
ACS is often the primary or only source of data available to 
State, local, and Federal agencies that need adequate 
information on a wide range of topics. The data provided is 
especially important to small towns and rural areas across the 
country, and the Bureau should ensure that rural areas are 
covered with the same accuracy as urban areas to the maximum 
extent practicable. The Committee further expects the Bureau to 
continue providing updates to the Committee on efforts to 
evaluate and, where possible, to reduce the number of questions 
included in the ACS, and the steps being taken to ensure that 
the ACS is conducted as efficiently and unobtrusively as 
possible.

       National Telecommunications and Information Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $39,500,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      33,646,000
Committee recommendation................................      39,500,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $39,500,000 for 
National Telecommunications and Information Administration 
[NTIA] salaries and expenses. The recommendation is the same as 
the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $5,854,000 above the 
budget request.
    The Committee retains language from previous years allowing 
the Secretary of Commerce to collect reimbursements from other 
Federal agencies for a portion of the cost resulting from the 
coordination of spectrum management, analysis, and operations. 
NTIA shall submit a report to the Committee no later than June 
1, 2019, detailing the collection of reimbursements from other 
agencies.
    Next Generation Broadband in Rural Areas.--The Committee 
recognizes that access to broadband in all communities across 
the Nation is essential for improving economic growth, 
education and job creation, civic engagement, public safety and 
health, global competitiveness, and a better quality of life. 
The Committee remains concerned that advanced broadband 
technologies have not been sufficiently deployed in rural areas 
of the Nation and encourages NTIA to coordinate with other 
relevant Federal agencies to identify and pursue policies that 
enable effective and efficient broadband deployment nationwide 
while advancing next-generation technologies, such as 5G 
networks.
    National Broadband Map Augmentation.--The Committee 
provides up to $7,500,000 to continue work modernizing the 
national broadband availability map in coordination with the 
Federal Communications Commission [FCC] and looks forward to an 
update on NTIA's efforts so far. The Committee directs NTIA to 
engage actively with rural and tribal communities to further 
enhance the accuracy of the national broadband availability 
map. Additionally, NTIA should include in its fiscal year 2020 
budget request an update on rural- and tribal-related broadband 
availability and access trends, challenges, and Federal actions 
to achieve equitable access to broadband services by currently 
underserved communities throughout the Nation. Furthermore, the 
Committee encourages NTIA, in coordination with the FCC, to 
develop and promulgate a standardized process for collecting 
data from State and local partners.
    Broadband Programs.--The Committee is encouraged by NTIA's 
recent efforts to develop frameworks, like the Broadband 
Community Assessment Tool [BCAT], to help communities assess 
their own broadband needs, and where appropriate, to forge 
public-private partnerships. The Committee encourages NTIA to 
continue development of the BCAT and other community-focused 
utilities.
    Federal Spectrum Management.--The Committee directs NTIA to 
continue to evaluate options for repurposing spectrum for 
broadband in support of making 500 megahertz [MHz] of spectrum 
available for wireless broadband use. NTIA shall also provide 
the Committee with annual updates on the progress in making 500 
MHz of spectrum available for commercial mobile use, including 
the strategy for freeing up additional spectrum from Federal 
agencies.
    Spectrum Management for Science.--Preserving access to key 
portions of radio spectrum important for radio astronomy 
observations and other scientific uses is essential for 
scientific discovery. The Committee encourages NTIA, in 
coordination with the FCC and other appropriate stakeholders, 
to continue ensuring spectrum access for radio astronomy as 
commercial use of radio spectrum increases. The Committee 
requests a report from NTIA within 180 days after enactment of 
this act on the coordination efforts underway.
    Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers 
[ICANN].--The Committee directs NTIA to remain a strong 
advocate for American companies, consumers, and government 
interests through its participation within the Governmental 
Advisory Committee and other mechanisms within ICANN. The 
Committee directs NTIA to ensure that the principles of 
accountability, transparency, security, and stability of the 
Internet are protected for consumers, businesses, and 
Government users. NTIA shall report semiannually to the 
Committee on adopted ICANN policies, including whether or not 
NTIA supported any changes, and to report on any changes that 
affect the .gov, .mil, .edu, and .us domains.
    FirstNet.--The Committee is supportive of FirstNet 
continuing a funding agreement with the Department's Inspector 
General for the purposes of oversight and accountability of 
FirstNet through the end of fiscal year 2019.

    PUBLIC TELECOMMUNICATIONS FACILITIES, PLANNING, AND CONSTRUCTION

    The Committee provides bill language allowing NTIA to 
continue oversight and administration of previously awarded 
grants. NTIA shall not use unobligated balances to award new 
grants.

               United States Patent and Trademark Office


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $3,500,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   3,370,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,370,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $3,370,000,000 for 
the United States Patent and Trademark Office [USPTO], which is 
$130,000,000 below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and equal 
to the budget request, to be derived from offsetting fee 
collections. Since fiscal year 2005, the Committee has refused 
to divert patent fees to other purposes.
    USPTO examines patent applications, grants patent 
protection for qualified inventions, and disseminates 
technological information disclosed in patents. USPTO also 
examines trademark applications and provides Federal 
registration to owners of qualified trademarks.
    Budget Execution.--The Committee continues to allow USPTO 
full access to patent and trademark fees and provides bill 
language allowing USPTO to retain any revenue in excess of 
appropriated levels.
    Transfer to Office of Inspector General [OIG].--The 
Committee provides $1,000,000 for OIG to continue oversight and 
audits of USPTO operations and budget transparency, and USPTO 
is directed to work with the Department to implement all OIG 
recommendations.
    Reprogramming and Spend Plan.--USPTO shall follow the 
reprogramming procedures outlined in section 505 of this act 
before using excess fee collections to forward fund expenses 
beyond fiscal year 2019.
    Intellectual Property [IP] Attaches.--The Committee is 
concerned that USPTO's IP attaches may not have adequate access 
to their foreign government counterparts and are not 
consistently involved in Embassy or consulate conversations 
regarding intellectual property matters. The Secretary is 
directed to work with USPTO, the US&FCS;, and the Department of 
State to ensure that the attaches are appropriately utilized, 
including in discussions and negotiations at the Counselor rank 
and above.

             National Institute of Standards and Technology

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $1,198,500,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     629,072,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,037,500,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $1,037,500,000 for 
the National Institute of Standards and Technology [NIST]. The 
recommendation is $161,000,000 below the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level and $408,428,000 above the budget request. Up to 
$9,000,000 may be transferred from the Scientific and Technical 
Research and Services account to the Working Capital Fund.
    NIST's mission is to promote U.S. innovation and industrial 
competitiveness by advancing measurement science, standards, 
and technology in ways that enhance economic security and 
improve our quality of life.

             SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL RESEARCH AND SERVICES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $724,500,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     573,429,000
Committee recommendation................................     724,500,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $724,500,000 for 
NIST Scientific and Technical Research and Services [STRS]. The 
recommendation is equal to the fiscal year 2018 enacted level 
and $151,071,000 above the budget request. The Committee 
directs NIST to provide a detailed spending plan for NIST's 
highest priority laboratory programs describing resources used 
for each program, project, or activity.
    Cybersecurity.--The Committee is aware of the Nation's 
growing need for a trained cybersecurity workforce and directs 
that no less than the fiscal year 2018 level is provided for 
cybersecurity research, outreach, industry partnerships, and 
other activities at NIST, including the National Cybersecurity 
Center of Excellence. Within the funds provided, the Committee 
encourages NIST to fund additional university system-led State 
and regional alliances and partnerships to focus on meeting the 
demand for a trained cybersecurity workforce, with a priority 
being placed on areas with a high concentration of Department 
of Defense, automotive, and health care related industries.
    Development of Cybersecure Medical Technology.--The 
Committee directs NIST to partner and work directly with 
academic institutions focused on computer security and privacy, 
with expertise in research to develop secure medical 
technologies, including secure medical devices, secure and 
privacy preserving medical software systems, and in training 
future scientists and practitioners in state-of-the-art 
techniques for supporting secure medical technologies. The 
focus of this partnership shall include exploring and testing 
how to develop new E-Health and connected medical devices with 
cybersecurity in mind, how to protect patient information in 
accordance with the Health Insurance Portability and 
Accountability Act (Public Law 104-191) requirements, and how 
to guarantee that critical network communication support 
patient needs.
    Industrial Internet of Things [IIoT].--The Committee 
provides no less than $2,000,000 for the continued development 
of an IIoT cybersecurity research initiative and to partner, as 
appropriate, with academic entities and industry to improve the 
sustainable security of IIoT devices in industrial settings, 
including new designs, protocols, algorithms, system 
architectures, identity and lifecycle strategies, and system 
hardware features, as well as proposed security standards. This 
proposed research will account for human, technical, and 
economic dimensions. These advanced strategies should couple 
computer science and engineering, psychology, economics, 
cryptography, and network research to deliver significant 
mitigations and options for industrial adoption, as well as 
guidance to consumers and industry on how to manage and utilize 
these devices consistent with best security practices.
    Quantum Science and Engineering.--The Committee provides up 
to $5,000,000 for the establishment of a consortium between 
NIST and public and private sector entities for the purpose of 
advancing the fields of quantum science and engineering.
    Forensic Sciences.--The Committee provides no less than the 
fiscal year 2018 amount for forensic science research. 
Additionally, the Committee provides $3,000,000 to support the 
Organization of Scientific Area Committees and $1,000,000 to 
support technical merit evaluations previously funded by 
transfer from DOJ.
    Disaster Resilient Buildings.--The Committee continues to 
recognize the importance of industry and municipal standards to 
better mitigate the impact of natural disasters and extreme 
weather events. Additionally, the Committee supports NIST's 
increased focus on multi-hazard, pre-impact risk mitigation and 
post-impact disaster studies. NIST is encouraged to collaborate 
with the National Science Foundation's Natural Hazards 
Engineering Research Infrastructure Experimental Facilities. 
The Committee directs NIST to provide no less than the fiscal 
year 2018 amount for competitive external awards. NIST shall be 
responsive to all grant applicants, including acknowledging 
receipt of applications, providing feedback to any unsuccessful 
applicants who request further information, and giving adequate 
notice of the timeline for announcing awards.
    Helmet Safety.--The Committee is aware of scientific data 
that demonstrates a correlation between football-related 
collisions and concussions, as well as other traumatic brain 
injuries that can lead to debilitating neural diseases such as 
dementia and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. The Committee 
encourages NIST to investigate an effective national testing 
standard to better scientifically understand the inadequacies 
of sports helmets while exploring future product designs that 
can safely reduce the neural risk of playing football, hockey, 
and other high-impact sports. The academic community has 
substantial knowledge about these issues, and NIST should work 
cooperatively with the academic community by funding research 
for advanced helmets and equipment and in developing new 
testing standards to ensure player safety. Additionally, NIST 
should consider establishing an effective national testing 
standard to inform the development of youth-specific helmet 
safety standards.
    Metals-Based Additive Manufacturing.--The Committee 
provides no less than the fiscal year 2018 enacted amount for 
competitive external grants for academic institutions to 
support research, development, and workforce training to 
overcome barriers to high-volume additive manufacturing of 
metals. While the Committee is aware of recent breakthroughs in 
metals-based additive manufacturing, major technical barriers 
still exist to dramatically improving build rates that would 
enable commercial markets to benefit from high-volume, metals-
based additive manufacturing.
    Plastics and Polymeric Materials.--The Committee recognizes 
the significant contributions that plastics have made to 
virtually all sectors of the economy, including in healthcare, 
infrastructure, food, and cosmetics, among many others. 
However, plastics take significant time to degrade in the 
environment due to their durability. The Committee believes 
advancements in creating products from recycled plastics could 
provide a more sustainable option for their use. Many hurdles 
remain in manufacturing products from recycled plastics with 
the same strength, color, odor, and malleability of new plastic 
products. Therefore, the Committee provides no less than the 
fiscal year 2018 enacted amount for competitive external grants 
for academic institutions to investigate plastic and polymeric 
materials, as well as novel methods to characterize both known 
and newly developed materials. Such investigations should 
address ways to increase the strength of recycled plastics and 
better understand mechanical properties including tensile 
stress, compressive stress, thermal properties, and 
nanostructure of polymeric materials that could serve as 
industry standards for recycled plastic products.
    Composites.--The Committee recognizes that composites have 
wide-ranging proven characteristics that include lightweight, 
high-strength, corrosion resistance, life cycle cost benefits, 
and long-term durability that translate to increased factors of 
safety for infrastructure engineering designs. The Committee 
urges NIST to work with relevant Federal agencies to coordinate 
existing standards and test methods for the use of composites 
and other innovative materials in infrastructure.
    Pyrrhotite in Concrete Aggregate.--NIST shall consider 
establishing standards for acceptable levels of pyrrhotite in 
concrete aggregate, and shall continue providing technical 
assistance to those interested in pyrrhotite detection, 
prevention, and mitigation tools.
    Regenerative Medicine Standards.--The Committee is pleased 
that NIST, the Food and Drug Administration, and the Standards 
Coordinating Body continue to work to implement the 
regenerative medicine standards provisions enacted under the 
21st Century Cures Act (Public Law 114-255). Currently, work is 
underway to develop processes and criteria for identifying, 
prioritizing, and assessing the quality, safety, feasibility, 
and cost-benefit of such standards. This work will create a 
foundation that allows industry, regulatory authorities, and 
other stakeholders to reduce barriers to regenerative medicine 
research and product development and accelerate the market 
readiness of these life-changing medical treatments.
    Graphene Research and Commercialization.--The Committee 
recognizes the emergence of graphene as an innovative material 
with significant commercial and national security potential. 
The Committee also recognizes that other countries are ahead of 
the United States in patenting and commercializing applications 
with this material. The Committee encourages NIST to continue 
to fund and pursue graphene research activities and designate 
industry and academic institutions with expertise, existing 
capabilities, and infrastructure related to the commercial 
application of graphene. NIST shall also provide the Committee 
with updates on the recompetition of NIST Centers of 
Excellence, including an examination of designating an 
additional Advanced Materials Center dedicated to graphene.
    Urban Dome Program.--The Committee notes the value of 
NIST's Urban Dome program and the importance of accurate 
measurement science for environmental monitoring and human 
health. More than half the world's population is living in 
urban areas, and this concentration is expected to intensify 
over the coming decades. The Committee provides no less than 
the fiscal year 2018 amount for the Office of Special Programs 
to maintain and consider expanding the number of urban dome 
locations in fiscal year 2019.
    Baldrige Performance Excellence.--The Committee provides 
$2,200,000 for costs associated with NIST's current level of 
personnel support and expertise that contribute to the Baldrige 
program. The Committee continues to direct the Secretary to 
work with the Baldrige program's private sector foundation to 
conduct a fundraising campaign to support the program as 
authorized in section 3(f) of Public Law 100-107, to ensure 
that the foundation has stable funding for the continuation of 
this program in the future. Additionally, the Committee 
commends the Baldrige program's efforts to improve the adoption 
of the NIST Cybersecurity Framework and encourages the program 
to build more partnerships and self-assessment tools to help 
organizations with their cybersecurity risk management. 
Further, the Committee encourages Baldrige to focus on and 
develop metrics and standards to assist rural healthcare 
providers by leveraging industry best practices.

                     INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY SERVICES

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $155,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      15,094,000
Committee recommendation................................     155,000,000

    The Committee provides $155,000,000 for Industrial 
Technology Services. The recommendation is equal to the fiscal 
year 2018 enacted level and $139,906,000 above the budget 
request. Supporting the Nation's manufacturers, especially 
small businesses, is critical to keeping America innovative in 
a global marketplace.
    Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership Program 
[MEP].--The Committee rejects the proposed elimination of MEP 
and instead provides $140,000,000 for the program. The 
Committee supports MEP's focus on strengthening the existing 
network of MEP centers and providing additional support to 
centers based on the documented performance of the center's 
activities and the manufacturing capacity of the area served by 
the center.
    Manufacturing USA.--The Committee provides $15,000,000 for 
NIST's activities in the National Network for Manufacturing 
Innovation [NNMI] (also known as ``Manufacturing USA''), to 
include no more than $5,000,000 for coordination activities, of 
which up to $1,000,000 may be used to support the Food and Drug 
Administration's participation in biomanufacturing innovation 
institutes. The Manufacturing USA program promotes American 
competitiveness by fostering the development of new 
manufacturing techniques and fields, accelerating 
commercialization, and providing technical assistance to U.S. 
companies. Within funding provided, NIST shall strive to 
minimize administrative costs in order to provide more direct 
support for research and development.

                  CONSTRUCTION OF RESEARCH FACILITIES

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $319,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      40,549,000
Committee recommendation................................     158,000,000

    The Committee provides $158,000,000 for construction of 
research facilities. The recommendation is $161,000,000 below 
the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $117,451,000 above the 
budget request. The funding provided includes no less than 
$58,000,000 for the continued renovation of NIST Building 1 
laboratory.
    NIST Campus Master Plans.--The Committee commends NIST for 
having developed and finalized master plans for the 
Gaithersburg and Boulder Campuses. The master plans provide 
NIST with a framework for the future physical development of 
its two campuses and a vision for that development over the 
next 20 years. The plans focus on existing and future 
laboratory buildings in addition to other support facilities, 
while at the same time taking into consideration the needs for 
roads, parking, security, storm water management, and site 
utilities infrastructure. The Committee is supportive of 
meeting NIST's physical infrastructure needs and directs it to 
develop an implementation plan for each of its master plans. 
The implementation plan shall be submitted with the fiscal year 
2020 budget submission and shall include timing and phasing of 
projects along with current and projected budget estimates for 
each of the projects identified.

            National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $5,909,364,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   4,553,108,000
Committee recommendation................................   5,482,954,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $5,482,954,000 for 
the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration [NOAA]. The 
recommendation is $426,410,000 below the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level and $929,846,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee commends the Department for its work to bring down 
the costs associated with NOAA's Procurement, Acquisition and 
Construction [PAC] accounts. The decrease in PAC resources in 
fiscal year 2019 reflects, as expected, the reduced financial 
need of NOAA's flagship weather satellite programs as the 
satellites launch and enter into the operational phase. 
Furthermore, several significant, one-time procurements 
including aircraft were fully funded in fiscal year 2018. While 
overall funding for NOAA is below the fiscal year 2018 level, 
the reduction in PAC resource needs alleviates the strain on 
other operations and research areas critical to NOAA's core 
mission. This allowed for an increase above the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level in NOAA's Operations, Research, and 
Facilities accounts.

                  OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $3,536,331,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   2,937,753,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,599,126,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $3,599,126,000 for 
NOAA's operations, research, and facilities. The recommendation 
is $62,795,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and 
$661,373,000 above the budget request.

                      NOAA NATIONAL OCEAN SERVICE

    The Committee's recommendation provides $583,900,000 for 
the National Ocean Service [NOS]. NOS programs provide 
scientific, technical, and management expertise to promote safe 
navigation; assess the health of coastal and marine resources; 
respond to natural and human-induced threats; and preserve 
coastal and ocean environments.
    The Committee's recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

       NATIONAL OCEAN SERVICE OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Navigation, Observations and Positioning:
    Navigation, Observations and Positioning...........          155,300
    Hydrographic Survey Priorities/Contracts...........           32,000
    Integrated Ocean Observing System--Regional                   37,000
     Observations......................................
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Navigation, Observations and Positioning..          224,300
                                                        ================
Coastal Science and Assessment:
    Coastal Science, Assessment, Response and                     77,500
     Restoration.......................................
    Competitive External Research......................           18,000
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Coastal Science and Assessment............           95,500
                                                        ================
Ocean and Coastal Management and Services:
    Coastal Zone Management and Services...............           43,500
    Coastal Management Grants..........................          110,000
    Coral Reef Program.................................           28,600
    National Estuarine Research Reserve System.........           27,500
    National Marine Sanctuaries........................           54,500
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Ocean and Coastal Management and Services.          264,100
                                                        ================
      GRAND TOTAL NOS..................................          583,900
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Navigation, Observations and Positioning.--The Committee 
strongly supports activities under Navigation, Observations and 
Positioning, including the full operational funding for NOAA's 
Navigation Response Teams.
    Hydrographic Surveys and Contracts.--The Committee 
continues to be concerned with NOAA's slow progress in reducing 
the backlog of hydrographic survey work for navigationally 
significant U.S. waters. Within the amount provided for 
Hydrographic Survey Priorities/Contracts, NOAA is directed to 
accelerate the acquisition of survey data and the preparation 
of navigation charts needed to minimize the risks associated 
with increased maritime traffic. In addition, not more than 5 
percent of funds available for the Hydrographic Survey 
Priorities/Contracts program may be used for internal 
Hydrographic Survey Priorities/Contracts program management 
costs.
    Hydrographic Charting in the Arctic.--Despite the massive 
backlog for charting of navigationally significant areas 
nationally, and in the Arctic specifically, NOAA's fiscal year 
2019 budget request continues to propose underfunding the 
acquisition of data from contract surveys. Hydrographic survey 
work in the Arctic, in particular, is subject to a shorter 
operational season than other U.S. coastal regions. The 
Committee believes Arctic surveys could be completed more 
efficiently through increased and accelerated contracting. 
Therefore, NOAA is directed to award contracts for hydrographic 
surveys in the Arctic as early in the calendar year as possible 
to maximize the operational season, utilizing effective and 
efficient contract services. Within the amount provided for 
Hydrographic Survey Priorities/Contracts, NOAA is directed to 
accelerate the acquisition of survey data through the use of 
contractors necessary to minimize the risks associated with 
increased maritime traffic. In addition, NOAA is directed to 
utilize all contractors that are available, qualified, and 
experienced in the Arctic for U.S. Arctic hydrographic surveys.
    Gulf of Mexico Coast Survey.--The Committee encourages NOS 
to engage in high-priority cooperative habitat mapping in the 
Gulf of Mexico, particularly in areas currently unmapped but 
prone to disaster. In doing so, NOS may prioritize areas where 
understanding the long-term implications of new energy 
exploration would be critical.
    Geospatial Modeling Grants.--The Committee provides 
$8,000,000 within Navigation, Observations and Positioning for 
the competitive Geospatial Modeling Grants program for which 
all funding shall be distributed externally.
    Hydrographic Research and Technology Development.--The 
Committee supports the intended use of funds requested for 
Hydrographic Research and Technology Development. In addition, 
the Committee provides $2,000,000 above the request for NOAA to 
designate and continue supporting joint ocean and coastal 
mapping centers in other areas of the country to be co-located 
with an institution of higher education as authorized by the 
Omnibus Public Land Management Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-11). 
The Committee emphasizes that additional funding is provided 
for the designation of other joint ocean and coastal mapping 
centers and therefore shall not decrease funding levels for any 
existing centers.
    Integrated Ocean Observing System [IOOS].--The Committee 
directs NOAA and the IOOS regions to work with Federal agencies 
collecting regional observations to better integrate and 
disseminate information with the goal of reducing duplicative 
efforts and to provide users with streamlined access to 
observational information. In addition, within funding provided 
above the request for IOOS, NOS shall work to complete and 
operate the National High Frequency Radar System, and is 
encouraged to utilize autonomous underwater gliders in support 
of the observing system's mission.
    Coastal Science, Assessment, Response and Restoration.--
Within the funds provided for Coastal Science, Assessment, 
Response and Restoration, $2,372,000 shall be for operations 
and staffing of the Gulf of Mexico Disaster Response Center 
[DRC]. The DRC shall continue to serve as the Gulf Coast hub 
for NOAA's emergency preparedness, response, and recovery 
operations. Furthermore, the Committee provides up to an 
additional $500,000 to expand regional emergency preparedness 
training and to develop and disseminate best practices for 
using data from past environmental disasters to better prepare 
for, respond to, and assess the environmental impacts of future 
events.
    Marine Debris.--The Committee provides an increase of 
$1,000,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level for NOAA's 
Marine Debris Program. The Committee strongly supports ongoing 
efforts to address marine debris around the country including 
projects in rural and remote communities that lack 
infrastructure to address the problem, as well as projects in 
urban communities that include removal of abandoned vessels and 
pilings that harm the ecosystem and hinder recreational 
fishing. Furthermore, the Committee directs NOS to coordinate 
with northern Gulf of Mexico State and local communities and 
officials, and with State, territorial, and local communities 
and officials in communities significantly impacted by 
hurricanes in 2017, to assist in waterway cleanup efforts to 
remove marine debris and trash from the aquatic environment. 
These activities should help lead to the development of cost-
effective programmatic solutions to address land-generated 
marine debris.
    National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science [NCCOS].--The 
Committee strongly supports the contribution NCCOS makes to 
NOAA and other Federal partners, and provides $1,000,000 above 
the fiscal year 2018 enacted amount for NCCOS. Furthermore, the 
Committee is aware of the ground-breaking research in the area 
of emerging marine toxins and harmful algal blooms taking place 
within NCCOS labs. Because of the significant implications for 
the nation in protecting both human health and national 
security, the Committee directs NOAA to continue supporting 
these efforts through the collective expertise of Federal, 
State, and academic partners.
    Harmful Algal Blooms [HABs].--The Committee recognizes the 
need to support local efforts to address HABs. Within funding 
for Coastal Science and Assessment, the Committee provides up 
to $5,000,000 to accelerate deployment of effective methods of 
intervention and mitigation to reduce the frequency, severity, 
and impact of harmful algal bloom events in freshwater systems. 
Additionally, the Committee encourages NOS to expand its 
collaboration with States to monitor, predict, track, and 
respond to HABs in the marine environment. Within funding 
provided, up to $1,000,000 may be used to expand existing 
support for States to assess domoic acid levels of HAB species 
in the marine environment.
    HABs Regional Watershed Integrated Assessments and Action 
Strategies.--The Committee recognizes the importance of the 
Great Lakes Integrated Assessment and Action Strategy to 
harmful algal bloom prevention, control, and mitigation efforts 
in the Great Lakes region, and encourages the Federal Inter-
agency Task Force on Harmful Algal Blooms and Hypoxia, 
established under section 4001 of title 33, and the Interagency 
Working Group tasked with implementing the Harmful Algal Bloom 
and Hypoxia Research and Control Act to identify and prioritize 
additional watersheds that would benefit from the development 
of regionally-specific Integrated Assessments and Action Plans, 
including those regions that have been impacted by freshwater 
and saltwater harmful algal blooms.
    Integrated Water Prediction.--Within funding provided for 
Coastal Zone Management and Services, the Committee provides no 
less than the fiscal year 2018 level for NOS to continue 
supporting the development and operation of the Integrated 
Water Prediction program with NOAA's National Weather Service.
    Coastal Zone Management Grants.--The Committee provides 
$80,000,000 for Coastal Zone Management Grants for coastal 
States to carry out activities related to their respective 
coastal zone management plans.
    Title IX Fund.--The Committee provides $30,000,000 for 
Title IX Fund grants as authorized under section 906(c) of 
Title IX of Public Law 114-113. NOAA shall administer this 
program in accordance with 16 U.S.C. 750(b) and 3701, for 
collaborative partnerships that incorporate non-Federal 
matching funds with a priority on supporting authorized 
activities not otherwise funded within this act, and direct 
costs shall not exceed 5 percent. NOAA shall retain oversight 
and accounting of this funding. In selecting the areas of focus 
for the Title IX Fund, NOAA and the National Fish and Wildlife 
Foundation should consider proposals that enhance ocean and 
coastal management; bolster coastal infrastructure and 
resilience; support regional collaborative efforts and 
partnerships; advance the collection, synthesis, and public 
sharing of ocean data; and help coastal communities adapt to 
changing ocean conditions.
    Coral Reef Program.--The Committee recognizes the unique 
ecological and economic value of coral reefs, including the 
benefit of buffering coastal communities from hazards such as 
coastal storms and hurricanes. Furthermore, urgent efforts are 
needed to reverse the decline of coral populations in the 
United States. Therefore, the Committee provides up to 
$5,000,000 for NOS to work with academic institutions and non-
governmental research organizations to establish innovative 
restoration projects to restore degraded coral reefs. This may 
include implementing landscape-scale coral reef restoration 
initiatives to outplant lab-grown or aquaculture-raised coral 
fragments representing diverse assemblages of native coral 
species, as well as the necessary research and development for 
these efforts. Restoration projects should utilize genetic 
strains that demonstrate enhanced resiliency to increased water 
temperatures, decreased pH, and coral disease, and include 
designs for multiyear monitoring to assess survival and 
ecosystem health.
    The Committee is aware of proposals to protect investments 
in coral reef management using alternative risk management, 
including parametric insurance. NOS is encouraged to assess 
whether it has any role to play in such proposals and report 
its findings to the Committee.
    Temperate and Cold-Water Corals.--The Committee urges 
NOAA's coral reef program to support research of all coral 
species, including temperate and cold-water corals.
    Marine National Monuments.--Within funding provided for 
National Marine Sanctuaries, up to $1,000,000 may be used for 
competitive research and management grants for existing marine 
national monuments administered by NOS, provided such grants 
are subject to a 100 percent non-Federal match.
    National Estuarine Research Reserve System.--The Committee 
provides $27,500,000 for the National Estuarine Research 
Reserve System [NERRS], which is $27,500,000 above the 
President's request and $2,500,000 above the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level. NERRS sites provide mixed-use areas that are 
protected for long-term research, monitoring, education, and 
coastal stewardship. The program is a positive example of State 
and Federal partnership. Within funding provided for NERRS, up 
to $2,000,000 may be used to implement a Graduate Research 
Fellowship program with national workforce benefits. The 
program shall not be subject to any matching requirement, shall 
be administered by the Office for Coastal Management, and named 
in memory of Margaret A. Davidson.
    NOAA is further encouraged to work with its NERRS and 
National Marine Sanctuary partners on efforts for early 
detection, rapid response, and control of invasive species, 
especially those that jeopardize endangered or threatened 
native species.

                 NOAA NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE

    The Committee's recommendation provides $924,889,000 for 
the National Marine Fisheries Service [NMFS]. NMFS programs 
provide for the management and conservation of the Nation's 
living marine resources and their environment, including fish 
stocks, marine mammals, and endangered species.
    Committee recommendations are displayed in the following 
table:

 NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Protected Resources Science and Management:
    Marine Mammals, Sea Turtles, and Other Species....           125,719
    Species Recovery Grants...........................             8,000
    Atlantic Salmon...................................             6,500
    Pacific Salmon....................................            63,000
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Protected Resources Science and                     203,219
       Management.....................................
                                                       =================
Fisheries Science and Management:
    Fisheries and Ecosystem Science Programs and                 148,427
     Services.........................................
    Fisheries Data Collections, Surveys and                      170,909
     Assessments......................................
    Observers and Training............................            53,955
    Fisheries Management Programs and Services........           121,116
    Aquaculture.......................................            15,000
    Salmon Management Activities......................            37,543
    Regional Councils and Fisheries Commissions.......            40,175
    Interjurisdictional Fisheries Grants..............             3,365
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Fisheries Science and Management.........           590,490
                                                       =================
Enforcement...........................................            69,796
                                                       =================
Habitat Conservation and Restoration..................            61,384
                                                       =================
      GRAND TOTAL NMFS................................           924,889
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    NMFS Project Consultations.--The Committee provides an 
increase of $10,000,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
amount for NMFS to address the backlog of consultation requests 
under the Endangered Species Act. NMFS backlog of consultation 
requests, particularly those from the U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers, has caused significant permitting delays for local 
communities seeking to implement various projects across the 
country. The Committee directs NMFS to work with the Corps of 
Engineers and other Federal agencies to improve coordination 
and efficiency of consultations within the permitting process.
    Marine Mammal Protection.--The Committee supports NMFS's 
mission under this activity to monitor, protect, and recover 
at-risk marine mammal species listed under the Endangered 
Species Act in 2005, but whose populations continue to decline. 
The Committee encourages NMFS to utilize funding for the 
protection and recovery of marine mammal species at risk due to 
factors such as limited prey species, water-borne toxin 
accumulation, and vessel and sound impacts.
    North Atlantic Right Whale.--The Committee is concerned 
that North Atlantic right whale populations remain critically 
low. In 2017, there were 17 North Atlantic right whale deaths 
attributed to ship strikes and fishing gear. An additional 
right whale death has been documented in 2018, and no right 
whale calves have been seen on their traditional calving 
grounds. Therefore, the Committee provides an additional 
$1,000,000 within Marine Mammals, Sea Turtles, and Other 
Species to increase research and monitoring of North Atlantic 
right whales to better understand how the species interacts 
with fisheries and shipping traffic and is adapting to changing 
ocean conditions and shifting feeding grounds.
    Hawaiian Monk Seals and Sea Turtles.--Within funding for 
Marine Mammals, Sea Turtles, and Other Species, the Committee 
provides NOAA no less than the fiscal year 2018 amount for 
Hawaiian Monk Seals and Hawaiian Sea Turtles.
    Prescott Grants.--Within Marine Mammals, Sea Turtles, and 
Other Species, the Committee provides $4,000,000 for the John 
H. Prescott Marine Mammal Rescue Assistance grant program.
    Species Recovery Grants.--The Committee provides an 
increase of $1,000,000 over the fiscal year 2018 enacted amount 
for Species Recovery Grants, and directs NMFS to utilize both 
the Endangered Species Act Recovery Plan and the Marine Mammal 
Protection Act Take Reduction Plan priorities when evaluating 
marine mammal projects.
    Atlantic Salmon.--NOAA has identified major threats to 
Atlantic salmon, including interrelated effects of freshwater 
salmon habitat loss, lost prey buffering, and marine derived 
nutrients from declines of co-evolved diadromous species. 
Within the funding provided for Atlantic Salmon, the Committee 
directs NOAA to enable a broader use of funds for restoration 
of diadromous species and habitats that support salmon recovery 
by providing ecological functions critical to the Atlantic 
salmon life cycle. The Committee further directs NOAA to ensure 
that adequate resources continue to be provided for State 
agencies to implement the recovery strategy effectively.
    Pacific Salmon.--Within the funding provided for Pacific 
salmon, NOAA shall consider expanding salmonid monitoring 
activities, including through the use of tags and acoustic 
tracking to utilize real-time monitoring to avoid impacts to 
protected species. NOAA is also encouraged to work with 
partners to address the backlog of hatchery genetic management 
plans and expedite approval.
    Promote and Develop Fisheries Products and Research Funding 
Transfer.--The bill maintains the provision restricting the use 
of the Promote and Develop Fisheries Products and Research 
funds transferred from the Department of Agriculture to NOAA in 
a way that better meets the intended purpose of the transfer 
mandated by the Saltonstall-Kennedy Act. None of the funds may 
be used for internal NOAA or DOC management, but rather, funds 
may only be used for activities that directly benefit U.S. 
fisheries and fishery communities. Specifically, these funds 
may only be used for: cooperative research; annual stock 
assessments; efforts to improve data collection, including 
catch monitoring and reporting for commercial, charter, and 
recreational fisheries; interjurisdictional fisheries grants; 
and Fisheries Information Networks.
    As part of the fiscal year 2019 spending plan, NOAA shall 
include a clear accounting of how the Promote and Develop 
transfer funds will be allocated based on the funding criteria 
described in this bill.
    Saltonstall-Kennedy [S-K] Grant Program.--The Committee 
rejects the Administration's proposal to eliminate the S-K 
grant program and further directs that not less than 15 percent 
of the total amount of the transferred funds shall be provided 
for the competitive S-K grant program. The Committee also 
directs NOAA to obligate no less than 80 percent of the S-K 
grant program funds externally through a competitive grant 
process. NOAA shall consult with a diverse group of industry 
participants representing the entirety of the supply chain, 
from all regions of the country, to identify funding 
priorities. Prior to obligating these funds, NOAA shall provide 
the Committee with a detailed spending plan describing which 
fisheries activities will be funded in each of the regions and 
how the plan incorporates regional priorities. The Committee 
further encourages NOAA to prioritize marketing and development 
of the seafood industry, as was the original intent of the S-K 
grant program.
    NMFS Staffing.--The Committee acknowledges that NMFS 
regional staff are most effective in meeting their mission when 
staff are located in the communities they serve. To the 
greatest extent practicable, the Committee directs NMFS to 
consider stationing regional staff within the regions they 
serve. Further, NMFS is directed to submit a report to the 
Committee, within 90 days of enactment of this act, describing 
the benefits and impacts of transitioning up to 90 percent of 
its regional staff to the regions that they serve. 
Additionally, the Committee encourages NMFS to station Regional 
Science Directors within the regions they serve.
    Aleutian Island Pollock.--The Committee appreciates NMFS's 
timely response and report to Congress on Aleutian Island 
pollock. In accordance with the agency's own recommendation 
from that report, NMFS is directed to, in coordination with 
Adak, the Aleut Corporation, and the North Pacific Fishery 
Management Council, issue an Exempted Fishing Permit [EFP] for 
a pollock test fishery, and depending on the results of that 
EFP, consider additional regulatory changes to the management 
of Aleutian Islands pollock.
    Gulf Reef Fish.--The Committee recognizes that accurate 
estimates of reef fish, such as red snapper, gray triggerfish, 
greater amberjack, and gag grouper, in the Gulf of Mexico 
require additional resources for research and assessment. 
Within funding under Fisheries Science Base Activities, the 
Committee provides up to $5,000,000 for NMFS to partner with 
academic research institutions that are uniquely positioned to 
better understand the population dynamics of these important 
species.
    Exempted Fishing Permits for Red Snapper Fishing.--The 
Committee commends each Gulf State for developing a strong 
proposal for reef fish management to improve recreational 
fishing access. Within the amount provided for Fisheries Data 
Collections, Surveys and Assessments, the Committee provides 
$5,000,000 for NMFS to deliver technical support as needed to 
the Gulf States to ensure successful implementation of each 
state plan.
    In addition, the Committee continues to direct NMFS to 
incorporate agency-independent and alternative approaches to 
stock assessments into the agency's own stock assessments used 
for the management of reef fish in the Gulf of Mexico. 
Furthermore, all stock assessments used by NMFS for Gulf reef 
fish should include fishery data collected on artificial reefs, 
offshore oil platforms, and other offshore fixed energy 
infrastructure.
    In addition, if an increase is made to the acceptable 
biological catch for red snapper in the Gulf of Mexico as a 
result of the direction provided in this report for stock 
assessments, the Committee urges NOAA to consider allocating 
not less than 80 percent of any total above 10 million pounds 
of quota to the recreational sector. While all sectors have 
faced challenges in the gulf red snapper fishery, the private-
boat recreational sector has been especially impacted.
    Ecosystem Imbalance.--NOAA shall take into consideration 
any imbalance in the ecosystem that may be occurring between 
larger red snapper and other fish species before accepting 
amendments to existing regulations or implementing new 
regulations that directly affect red snapper quotas in the Gulf 
of Mexico.
    South Atlantic Reef Fish.--NMFS shall consider employing 
the independent and alternative stock assessment strategies 
directed by the Committee for the Gulf of Mexico to NMFS 
assessments of reef fish in the South Atlantic. The Committee 
provides up to $1,500,000 for these activities and notes 
deficiencies that have plagued reef fish management in the Gulf 
of Mexico also affect NMFS management of reef fish in the South 
Atlantic.
    Fishing Gear Selectivity Study.--Within funding provided 
for Fisheries Data Collections, Surveys and Assessments, NOAA 
shall consider conducting a multiyear, agency-independent study 
to evaluate the selectivity and potential bias of different 
gears used to assess reef fish populations in the South 
Atlantic region, which should build on recent work being 
conducted by State agencies on red snapper. Specifically, the 
study should address whether the use of certain gear by the 
South Atlantic Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment, and 
Prediction Survey, such as Chevron traps, fail to adequately 
sample across age classes of reef fish, including red snapper, 
due to the different behaviors and habits exhibited by larger 
and smaller fish within the same or similar species. NOAA is 
further encouraged to initiate a multiyear, agency-independent 
study using multiple hooked-gears to sample South Atlantic red 
snapper for age composition, sexual maturity, and egg 
production.
    Highly Migratory Species.--Within funding provided for 
Fisheries Ecosystem Science, Programs, and Services, the 
Committee provides up to $2,000,000 for cooperative, 
competitive extramural research on highly migratory fish 
species in the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic. This should 
include examining the impact of offshore oil platforms on the 
biology of highly migratory species, such as yellow fin tuna. 
The Committee recognizes that highly migratory species, and the 
coastal communities that rely on the health of these stocks, 
could greatly benefit from improved, science-based management 
and conservation.
    Lobster Fishing Gear.--The Committee is supportive of 
ongoing research to develop alternative lobster fishing gear 
such as ropeless traps and reduced breaking-strength rope. The 
Committee encourages further collaboration between the fishing 
industry, academic institutions, and nongovernmental 
organizations in the development of such gear and in field 
trials and preliminary implementation.
    Report on U.S. Shark Fisheries.--According to the NMFS 
Status of Stocks 4th Quarter 2017 Update, there are 64 stocks 
of sharks that are actively caught or caught as bycatch in U.S. 
waters, including prohibited species. Of those 64 species, 40 
have ``unknown'' overfished and overfishing status, 12 are not 
overfished and not experiencing overfishing, 4 are overfished 
and experiencing overfishing, and 8 have mixed status 
information. The Committee directs NMFS to issue a report on 
the status of U.S. shark fisheries within 90 days of enactment 
of this act. The report should include the dates of the three 
most recent assessments of each shark stock in the U.S., when 
the next assessments are scheduled, and annual statistics for 
commercial landings and bycatch of each species for the 
previous 5 years.
    Fisheries Information Networks.--Within funding provided 
for Fisheries Data Collections, Surveys, and Assessments, 
$23,000,000 is provided for Fisheries Information Networks.
    Northwest Fisheries Ecosystem Monitoring System.--The 
Committee recognizes the importance of long-term data series 
monitoring ocean conditions and ecological indicators. This 
information is important in management decisions for salmon and 
other marine species, and to enable advance forecasting 
capabilities for early detection of ocean conditions known to 
produce harmful toxins that affect regional fisheries closures. 
Within funds for Fisheries Data Collections, Surveys and 
Assessments, the Committee encourages the Northwest Fisheries 
Science Center to continue to invest in long-term data 
monitoring of ocean conditions of the Northern California 
Current.
    Marine Recreational Information Program [MRIP].--The 
Committee provides up to $3,000,000 within Fisheries Data 
Collection, Surveys and Assessments, subject to a 50-percent 
non-Federal matching requirement, to implement the 
recommendations of the National Academy of Sciences [NAS] made 
in the 2017 report entitled ``Review of the Marine Recreational 
Information Program.'' This funding should focus on assisting 
States to establish more reliable fishery data collection tools 
such as smartphone applications or text messaging supplements 
so that MRIP may leverage better in-season management of reef 
fish. NMFS is also encouraged to enter into an additional 
agreement with NAS to prepare a supplementary report and set of 
recommendations to resolve challenges related to in-season 
management of annual catch limits.
    Northeast Groundfish Research.--The Committee is concerned 
about the decline of the Northeast Multispecies Fishery and the 
health of fishing stocks in the Gulf of Maine. Within funding 
provided for Fisheries Ecosystem Science Programs and Services, 
the Committee provides $2,000,000 for groundfish research, with 
a focus on the effects of changing climatic conditions and 
warming waters on the fishery, including stock health and 
natural mortality. NOAA is further encouraged to prioritize 
research regarding relative gear efficiency and stock 
boundaries. This funding is intended to support research 
conducted by the Northeast Fisheries Science Center, research 
conducted separately by, or in collaboration with, outside 
partners such as higher education institutions or State 
agencies, and research conducted in cooperation with the 
fishing industry.
    Cooperative Research.--Depleted fish stocks result in 
significant economic losses to our Nation. At a time when 
fishing opportunities are constrained by uncertainty in stock 
assessments and increased access to healthy stocks depends on 
better data, the Committee believes that maintenance of ongoing 
monitoring programs, surveys, and improved research is 
critical. The Committee encourages NMFS to continue to 
prioritize long-time series surveys that are conducted 
cooperatively with industry and States. NMFS is additionally 
encouraged to prioritize studies using video systems deployed 
in commercial trawl nets for surveys conducted cooperatively 
with States, industry, and nonprofit institutions that can be 
validated and incorporated into survey data. NMFS is also 
encouraged to focus on improved understanding of natural 
mortality and relative gear efficiency to ensure accurate 
measures of catchability. Furthermore, the Committee encourages 
the Northeast Fisheries Science Center to consider prioritizing 
cooperative research efforts for species that are experiencing 
shifts in range and population density due to warming waters 
and other global environmental changes.
    The Northeast Fisheries Science Center is directed to work 
collaboratively with the fishing industry to update and publish 
the Northeast Cooperative Research Strategic Plan, including: 
the identification of science priorities; a process for greater 
involvement of fishermen in data collection; and better 
communication of how the results of cooperative fisheries 
research are used.
    Baseline Data for Gulf of Mexico.--The Committee directs 
NOAA to continue supporting baseline research for fisheries 
health in the Gulf of Mexico, including studies of pelagic 
species. NOAA is encouraged to increase and continue 
collaborations in the Gulf to establish an integrated and 
comprehensive ecosystem-level fisheries monitoring enterprise 
and sentinel species program.
    Electronic Monitoring and Reporting.--Within Fisheries 
Ecosystem Science Programs and Services, the Committee provides 
no less than the fiscal year 2018 amount for Electronic 
Monitoring and Electronic Reporting [EM/ER] to support the 
development, testing, and installation of EM/ER technologies 
across the country. The Committee recognizes that advancements 
in EM/ER have the potential to cut costs and improve data 
collection for most U.S. fisheries. NMFS is directed to 
prioritize EM/ER implementation in fiscal year 2019, and 
expedite to the fullest extent practicable the transition to 
full EM/ER. Within the funds provided for these activities, not 
less than $3,500,000 shall be available, in accordance with 16 
U.S.C. 3701, for collaborative partnerships that include non-
Federal matching funds to implement cost-shared EM/ER programs 
that support fisheries conservation and management. During the 
development and implementation of electronic reporting and 
monitoring programs, NOAA shall consult directly with industry 
and work through the Fishery Management Councils (established 
under sections 1851 and 1852 of title 16) to develop 
appropriate cost-sharing arrangements that are commensurate 
with the ex-vessel value of the fishery.
    Furthermore, NMFS shall continue to work in fiscal year 
2019 with the charter for-hire recreational fishery fleet in 
the Gulf of Mexico; the Northeast multispecies groundfish 
fishery fleet, including small vessels within that fleet; and 
any regional fishery fleet interested in implementing EM/ER 
technologies to better track information that is currently 
collected through the use of human observers.
    Electronic Monitoring Data Storage.--Within 60 days of 
enactment of this act, the Committee directs NMFS to provide a 
report to the Committee detailing how NMFS intends to store 
data collected from Electronic Monitoring [EM]. Because the 
Committee believes storing EM data for periods longer than 18 
months would be unnecessary and not cost efficient, the report 
should include any reasoning that may be contrary to the 
Committee's position.
    Northeast Multispecies Fishery.--The Committee recognizes 
that the New England groundfish fisheries management programs 
continue to present substantial financial challenges to the 
participants as well as to the economic sustainability of those 
fisheries and fishing communities. NOAA is directed to fully 
fund the At-Sea Monitoring costs in the New England groundfish 
fishery, including sea and shore side infrastructure costs. The 
Committee provides $10,300,000 within Observers and Training 
for this purpose. NOAA is directed to submit a plan to the 
Committee not less than 180 days after enactment of this act 
that will establish fully operational electronic monitoring and 
reporting procedures for the Northeast Multispecies Fishery not 
later than September 30, 2021. The plan should include NOAA's 
proposal to cover vessel equipment and installation costs, with 
daily, half-day, or quarter-day operational costs to be borne 
by the fishing vessels. The Committee notes that while 
participation in EM/ER observer coverage will remain voluntary 
after the September 30, 2021, deadline, vessels not 
participating in EM/ER coverage will also be required to cover 
their daily, half-day, or quarter-day observer costs after that 
date.
    Illegal, Unreported, and Unregulated [IUU] Fishing.--Under 
Fisheries Management Programs and Services, the Committee 
provides no less than the fiscal year 2018 amount to combat IUU 
fishing. An additional $1,400,000 is provided for the 
implementation of the program established under Section 539 of 
the Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Act, 2018 
(Public Law 115-141). NOAA is directed to continue 
strengthening its efforts to detect and deter illegally 
harvested and improperly documented seafood, including working 
with other U.S., international, and foreign agencies to ensure 
fair competition for our country's domestic fishermen and 
safety for American consumers.
    The Committee encourages NOAA to work with U.S. Customs and 
Border Protection to improve and expand efforts to identify 
high-risk shipments and collect critical import data in order 
to increase enforcement of import restrictions on IUU seafood 
products and expand investigations of foreign IUU hotspots.
    Additionally, the Committee supports NOAA's Office of Law 
Enforcement and its efforts to combat IUU fishing. NOAA is 
directed to consider how innovative remote sensing technology 
could help fulfill its mission, including satellite imaging and 
traceability, and shall consider developing a comprehensive IUU 
enforcement strategy in consultation with the U.S. Coast Guard. 
NOAA may also confer with the Federal Law Enforcement Training 
Center [FLETC] and may contract with FLETC to assess and 
provide technical assistance to improve NOAA's current law 
enforcement strategy.
    Bycatch Reduction.--The development and implementation of 
practical bycatch solutions is a priority for U.S. and 
international fisheries management and protected species 
conservation. The Committee supports the requested amount for 
reducing bycatch, of which NMFS is directed to make no less 
than the fiscal year 2018 amount available for competitive 
grants to non-Federal researchers working with U.S. fishermen 
on the development of improved fishing practices and innovative 
gear technologies.
    Pacific Coast Groundfish Fishery.--The Committee recognizes 
the ongoing impacts on the Pacific coast groundfish fishery 
trawl industry resulting from NMFS's delay in promulgating 
regulations to collect loan payments for the 2003 fishing 
vessel and permit buyback program. This delay caused an 
additional $4,000,000 in interest to accrue, resulting in an 
estimated $10,000,000 of additional loan payments for the 
Pacific coast groundfish fishery trawl industry. The Committee 
notes the implementation of the Revitalizing the Economy of 
Fisheries in the Pacific Act of 2014, section 3095 of Public 
Law 113-291, which is intended to provide relief related to 
this legacy issue.
    Regional Aquaculture Coordinators.--The Committee directs 
NMFS to designate a Regional Aquaculture Coordinator [RAC] for 
each of the six National Marine Fisheries Regions, to be 
located at each respective regional office. The goal of each 
RAC should be to liaise with aquaculture stakeholders and 
industry as well as relevant Federal, State, local, and tribal 
government entities; assist with Federal grants management and 
training programs; and foster science collaborations among 
stakeholders, academics, and governments within their 
designated fisheries region.
    Regional Pilots in Sustainable Aquaculture.--The NMFS 
Aquaculture Office is directed to continue regional pilot 
programs for partnerships between the seafood industry and 
community partners that can develop, validate, and deploy 
economically and environmentally sustainable aquatic farming 
techniques and regional business practices to grow domestic 
seafood production. To maximize the impact of these pilot 
grants, NMFS is encouraged to give priority consideration to 
promising but less commercially developed technologies, such as 
those targeting shellfish, seaweed, and other relative 
newcomers to the domestic aquaculture industry. The Committee 
provides $2,500,000 in the NMFS Aquaculture budget for this 
purpose. This funding is in addition to the laboratory funding 
for NOAA's fisheries science centers engaged in aquaculture 
research, which shall be funded at no less than the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level.
    Aquaculture Activities at Fisheries Science Centers.--The 
Committee remains concerned about the staffing levels at NMFS 
fisheries science centers. NOAA is encouraged to grow staffing 
levels and improve resources and facilities at the Northeast 
and Northwest Fisheries Science Centers to return staffing 
levels to those in fiscal year 2010.
    Oyster Aquaculture, Research, and Restoration.--Within the 
increased funding level provided for NMFS Aquaculture, the 
Committee provides no less than $5,000,000 to support ongoing 
research in off-bottom oyster production in coastal areas, 
particularly those new to this method of production, including 
the Gulf of Mexico, and encourages NMFS to dedicate resources 
for further research in oyster genetics, disease, and economic 
modeling. NMFS is also encouraged to support regional 
partnerships to classify and preserve natural genetic variation 
in oysters.
    In addition, the Committee recognizes that the shellfish 
farming industry is composed of thousands of small farmers who 
are unable to fund critical research in the fields of shellfish 
disease, food safety, warming waters, and ocean acidification. 
To improve coordination and consistency, the Committee directs 
NMFS Aquaculture to engage and partner with industry, academic 
institutions, and States to conduct collaborative research to 
address the challenges facing this growing industry. Further, 
NMFS Aquaculture is encouraged to coordinate with the 
Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service [ARS] 
to leverage and supplement existing ARS shellfish research 
partnerships.
    Salmon Management Activities.--Within the amount provided 
for Salmon Management activities, the Committee recommends 
$16,000,000, an increase of $2,000,000 above fiscal year 2018, 
to enable States and tribal communities to implement necessary 
Pacific Salmon Treaty agreements. The Committee fully supports 
all other aspects of the budget request for Salmon Management 
activities that are essential to meeting these treaty 
obligations. The Committee also provides no less than the 
fiscal year 2018 amount for the operation and maintenance of 
Mitchell Act hatcheries.
    Genetic Stock Identification.--The Committee supports 
continued research and testing of genetic stock identification 
[GSI] management techniques in the Pacific salmon fishery to 
meet the dual purpose of protecting weak and the Endangered 
Species Act listed stocks, while allowing for sustainable 
commercial and recreational access to healthy stocks in the 
wild. NMFS shall continue to support GSI research, including 
the collection, analysis, and testing of methods that rely on 
genetics-based data to identify and track the location of 
federally protected stocks in the wild.
    Fishery Councils and Commissions.--The Committee provides 
$40,175,000 to support the Regional Fishery Management 
Councils, Interstate Marine Fisheries Commissions, and 
International Fisheries Commissions, which represents a 12 
percent increase over fiscal year 2018. NMFS shall apply this 
percentage increase equally across Councils & Commissions.
    Furthermore, the Committee recognizes the important role 
that regional management plays in sustaining a balanced 
ecosystem and healthy fish populations and the advantage that 
aggregate data can provide in understanding emerging trends 
across our Nation's fisheries. The Committee directs the 
Regional Councils and Fisheries Commissions to prioritize 
research and monitoring of high priority species in the face of 
changing environmental conditions.
    Offshore Wind.--The Committee supports the responsible 
development of renewable energy projects off the Atlantic Coast 
and the existing offshore wind permitting process, which 
includes assessing impacts on fisheries and marine mammals. The 
Committee also acknowledges the importance of consultation with 
the fishing industry in the siting of wind energy areas to 
ensure sustained access to important fishing grounds that 
support the economic growth of coastal communities. Therefore, 
the Committee encourages NOAA, in consultation with the Bureau 
of Ocean Energy Management within the Department of the 
Interior, the regional fishery management councils, and the 
Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, to improve 
engagement with the fishing industry.
    Cooperative Agreements with States.--The Committee rejects 
the administration's proposal to eliminate funding for 
cooperative enforcement agreements with States, including 
execution of Joint Enforcement Agreements. Instead, no less 
than the fiscal year 2018 amount is provided for these 
activities that are critical for proper surveillance and 
enforcement of our nation's fisheries laws. Additionally, the 
Committee directs NMFS Office of Law Enforcement to use a 
stable funding model and ensure that Federal enforcement 
requirements are better aligned with the priorities of State 
and territorial enforcement partners.
    Northeast Lobster Enforcement.--The Committee encourages 
continued collaboration between States, NOAA, and the U.S. 
Coast Guard to improve Federal capacity for offshore lobster 
enforcement in the Northeast. Offshore enforcement of fixed-
gear fisheries, such as lobster, is critical to ensure fishing 
gear is compliant and minimizes negative impacts on whale 
health. The Committee directs NOAA to report to the Committee 
within 180 days on its progress on this issue and any further 
steps needed to ensure adequate enforcement of offshore lobster 
fishing.
    Horseshoe Crab Survey.--The Committee remains concerned 
about the inability to estimate the abundance of the mid-
Atlantic horseshoe crab population. Adequate data is required 
to ensure State and interstate managers can effectively manage 
the stock, which is important to the biomedical and commercial 
fishing industries, as well as to the ecology of the mid-
Atlantic region. The Committee encourages NMFS to continue this 
important survey to generate the data necessary to ensure the 
mid-Atlantic horseshoe crab stock remains on a sustainable 
path.
    Seafood Reporting.--The United States leads the world in 
responsibly managed fisheries and aquaculture, and the 
Committee supports NOAA's activities to inform consumers about 
our Nation's sustainable fisheries through the agency's 
FishWatch program. However, the Committee is concerned that the 
exclusive use or recognition of third-party certifications for 
seafood sustainability by the Department could have unintended 
consequences for various domestic fisheries. The Committee 
acknowledges that some U.S. fisheries voluntarily utilize 
third-party seafood sustainability certification schemes, but 
believes it is not the Department's role to adopt such 
certification schemes when doing so could result in the 
Department arbitrarily influencing the U.S. domestic seafood 
market. The Committee believes support for third-party 
certifications is best presented in non-governmental forums. 
Therefore, the Committee directs the Department not to adopt, 
use, or promote any third-party certification scheme for 
seafood sustainability but to instead continue providing 
consumers with independent and accountable information 
generated from within the Department.
    Economic Impact of Turtle Excluder Devices [TEDs].--In 
fiscal year 2018, the Committee directed NMFS to provide a 
report regarding any potential rule to require all skimmer 
trawls, pusher-head trawls, and wing nets rigged for fishing to 
use TEDs in their nets. The report directed NMFS to provide 
specific steps it would consider to eliminate the negative 
economic impact of any such rule. The Committee directs NMFS to 
deliver the report as soon as possible for the Committee to 
review and further consider this important issue.
    Habitat Conservation and Restoration.--The Committee 
provides $61,384,000 for Habitat Conservation and Restoration 
activities. Up to $8,000,000 may be used to address the 
Essential Fish Habitat consultation backlog. Within the amount 
provided, NOAA is encouraged to include funding for the multi-
year Habitat Blueprint Focus Area partnership agreements 
developed under the Habitat Blueprint initiative. The Committee 
encourages NOAA to include a broader ecosystem-based management 
philosophy; expand criteria to include recreational species, 
managed commercial species, and forage species; and prioritize 
proposals that engage local communities. NOAA should continue 
to emphasize the value of partnerships when evaluating grant 
applications.

                 NOAA OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH

    The Committee's recommendation provides $508,256,000 for 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Research [OAR]. OAR programs provide 
environmental research and technology needed to improve NOAA 
weather forecasts, climate predictions, and marine services. To 
accomplish these goals, OAR supports a network of scientists in 
its Federal research laboratories, universities, and joint 
institutes and partnership programs.
    Committee recommendations are displayed in the following 
table:

  OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH OPERATIONS, RESEARCH AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Climate Research:
    Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes..........            61,000
    Regional Climate Data and Information............            39,000
    Climate Competitive Research.....................            60,000
                                                      ------------------
      Total, Climate Research........................           160,000
                                                      ==================
Weather and Air Chemistry Research Programs:
    Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes..........            75,000
    U.S. Weather Research Program....................            18,000
    Tornado Severe Storm Research/Phased Array Radar.            12,622
    Joint Technology Transfer Initiative.............            10,000
                                                      ------------------
      Total, Weather and Air Chemistry Research......           115,622
                                                      ==================
Ocean, Coastal and Great Lakes Research:
    Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes..........            40,000
    National Sea Grant College Program...............            71,000
    Marine Aquaculture Research......................            12,000
    Sustained Ocean Observations and Monitoring......            43,500
    Integrated Ocean Acidification...................            11,000
    Ocean Exploration................................            35,000
    National Oceanographic Partnership Program [NOPP]             8,000
                                                      ------------------
      Total, Ocean, Coastal and Great Lakes Research.           220,500
                                                      ==================
High Performance Computing Initiatives...............            12,134
                                                      ==================
      GRAND TOTAL OAR................................           508,256
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes.--The Committee 
provides $4,000,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level 
for Ocean, Coastal and Great Lakes Research Laboratories and 
Cooperative Institutes and expects the administration to fully 
fund Cooperative Institutes at appropriate levels in future 
years, including those currently supporting NOAA 's coastal 
resilience mission.
    Additionally, not less than 90 days after enactment of this 
act, NOAA is directed to update its ``Prospectus for 
Cooperative Institutes in the 21st Century'' plan to include 
the procedures under which a university or other academic 
institution can apply for Cooperative Institute status. The 
Committee continues to strongly support well established 
institutes, including those focused on watershed effects on 
marine ecosystems, remote sensing, and long-term monitoring of 
oil spill impacts on marine ecosystem health.
    Climate Research.--The Committee rejects OAR's request to 
eliminate Climate Competitive Research and Arctic Research. 
Instead the Committee provides $2,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2018 enacted amount, including for the support and expansion of 
the National Integrated Drought Information System and the 
Regional Drought Early Warning Information System.
    Arctic Research.--The Committee provides no less than 
$6,000,000 for arctic research funded under OAR's Climate 
Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes and Regional Climate 
Data and Information.
    Weather & Air Chemistry Laboratories and Cooperative 
Institutes.--The Committee rejects OAR's proposed elimination 
of the Air Resources Laboratory [ARL], as well as OAR's 
proposed closing of the Unmanned Aircraft Systems [UAS] Program 
Office. The Committee provides no less than the fiscal year 
2018 enacted amount for ARL and the UAS Program Office.
    Unmanned Aircraft Systems.--The Committee encourages NOAA 
to collaborate with NASA and other agencies to develop and 
deploy UAS capabilities for environmental sensing applications. 
These UAS assets should be deployed to benefit existing data 
collection and modeling needs and goals, including for weather 
prediction, earth system monitoring, and environmental and 
climate research.
    Multi-Function Phased Array Radar [MPAR] Program.--The 
Committee recognizes the importance of the MPAR program in the 
development and implementation of the next generation weather 
and aircraft radar surveillance network. The Committee directs 
NOAA to maintain its leadership in the MPAR research and 
development effort as the program transitions to the Spectrum 
Efficient National Surveillance Radar [SENSR] program, and 
encourages continued work on a Memorandum of Understanding 
among NOAA, the Federal Aviation Administration, the Department 
of Defense, and the Department of Homeland Security that 
delineates each agency's or Department's needs regarding the 
function and timeline of a joint multi-use and multi-function 
radar system.
    Vortex-Southeast [Vortex-SE].--The Southeastern United 
States commonly experiences devastating tornadoes under 
variables and conditions that differ considerably from the 
Midwest, where tornado research has historically been focused. 
Within funds provided for Weather and Air Chemistry Research 
Programs, no less than $5,000,000 is provided for OAR to 
continue collaborating with the National Science Foundation's 
Vortex-SE initiative to better understand how environmental 
factors that are characteristic of the Southeastern United 
States affect the formation, intensity, and storm path of 
tornadoes for this region.
    Remote Sensing for Snowpack and Soil Moisture.--The 
Committee strongly supports NOAA's continued development of the 
National Water Model to improve operational forecasts at NOAA's 
National Water Center. Within funding provided for OAR's U.S. 
Weather Research Program, up to $2,000,000 is for research 
activities to improve fine and large-scale measurements of snow 
depth and soil moisture data that can be used to expand and 
improve the National Water Model and contribute directly to the 
mission of NOAA's National Water Center.
    Hydrologic Modeling Grants.--The Committee recognizes the 
success of the National Water Model in advancing flood 
forecasting and predicting other water related hazards. Within 
funding for the U.S. Weather Research Program, OAR shall make 
grants available for the development of high resolution 
hydrologic modeling systems to address issues related to 
floods, drought, water quality, and ecosystem health. Research 
should include addressing water-related issues in the 
Southeastern United States, including those relating to 
agriculture.
    Airborne Phased Array Radar [APAR].--Within funding for 
NOAA's U.S. Weather Research Program, no less than $4,000,000 
is provided to research and develop aircraft-based hazardous 
weather observing systems, such as APAR. NOAA shall coordinate 
these research and development activities with the National 
Science Foundation.
    Infrasonic Weather Monitoring Research.--Within funding 
provided for the U.S. Weather Research Program, the Committee 
provides up to $1,000,000 to support external research 
opportunities with academic institutions in infrasonic 
monitoring methods of violent weather. The Committee believes 
that advanced infrasound signal processing methodologies and 
studies, deployed through a network of infrasound arrays to 
detect tornadoes and hurricanes, have the potential to improve 
forecast accuracy.
    National Sea Grant College Program.--The Committee again 
flatly rejects the administration's proposed elimination of 
NOAA's Sea Grant program. Instead, the Committee provides an 
increase of $6,000,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
amount for the Sea Grant program and its research, education, 
extension, and outreach activities, which are critical for 
coastal communities and benefit the entire Nation. This level 
of funding supports the key focus areas in the program's 
strategic plan: sustainable fisheries and aquaculture, 
resilient communities and economies, healthy coastal 
ecosystems, environmental literacy, and workforce development. 
In addition, the Committee directs NOAA to continue funding all 
Sea Grant STEM education and fellowship programs. Further, NOAA 
is directed to continue its partnership with academic programs 
that provide legal expertise related to Sea Grant's mission and 
also encourages the Sea Grant program to prioritize providing 
training, education, outreach, and technical assistance for 
young fishermen.
    Additionally, the Committee understands that the Sea Grant 
program provides no less than $1,000,000 in annual base 
funding, or $4,000,000 over the course of the 4-year grant 
cycle, to each Sea Grant program with Institutional or College 
Program status. NOAA is directed to continue this funding model 
for Sea Grant programs receiving Institutional or College 
Program status in fiscal year 2019.
    Sea Grant Fellowship Program.--NOAA's Sea Grant program is 
reminded that the Committee's broad support is due to the 
program's historically objective standards, State-driven goals, 
and non-partisan priorities. Within NOAA's Sea Grant program, 
the National Sea Grant Fellowship program serves as a valuable 
pipeline for our Nation's future ocean science and policy 
experts. The Fellowship program should remain objective and 
apolitical, and should increase its efforts to recruit 
qualified, non-partisan candidates who are committed to working 
on oceans and coastal issues for any Member of Congress, 
regardless of political affiliation.
    Fisheries-Related Research.--The Committee remains 
concerned about the negative impacts of the short recreational 
fishing season for red snapper in the Gulf of Mexico. While the 
relief provided by the administration for the 2018 fishing 
season is welcomed, the Committee notes it is only a short-term 
solution with the potential to further restrict fishing access 
in the future. Additional data sources and assessment 
approaches are needed and should be pursued by entities other 
than NOAA's regulating line office, NMFS. Therefore, the 
Committee continues to provide up to the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level within Sea Grant to research and develop 
alternative approaches to data collection and analyses.
    American Lobster Research.--Within increased funding for 
the Sea Grant program, the Committee provides $2,000,000 for 
partnerships between State agencies, academia, and industry to 
address American lobster research priorities in the Gulf of 
Maine, Georges Bank, and southern New England. Research should 
focus on stock resilience in the face of environmental changes, 
including life history parameters, distribution and abundance, 
and species interactions, with the purpose of informing future 
management actions.
    Aquaculture Research.--The Committee provides $12,000,000 
for marine aquaculture research. NOAA is directed to support 
marine aquaculture research and development in partnership with 
universities. Similar research efforts have led to beneficial 
outcomes such as the development and commercialization of new 
technologies to meet the domestic demand for seafood, including 
finfish, shrimp, and oysters. As the administration strives to 
reduce our Nation's significant trade deficit in aquaculture-
raised seafood, NOAA shall report to the Committee within 90 
days of enactment of this act on the important contributions 
Aquaculture Research grants have made to domestic seafood 
production.
    Ocean Exploration.--The Committee directs NOAA to use a 
portion of the funding provided for Ocean Exploration to make 
competitive external awards to academic institutions that have 
partnered with OAR's Ocean Exploration program in the past. 
This includes those institutions with ocean-going assets, such 
as Autonomous Underwater Vehicles [AUV], to support new 
exploration missions, expeditions, and deep-sea research in the 
Gulf of Mexico.
    NOAA is also encouraged to work with the Department of 
Defense and other relevant agencies to continue fundamental 
ocean exploration in which open source data are collected for 
the oceanographic community and private industries in real-time 
through telepresence technology. Furthermore, the Committee 
encourages NOAA to leverage partnerships with universities to 
increase capacity for deepwater AUVs as a means to sustain 
utility of AUV assets. The Committee also encourages NOAA to 
work with the Department of Defense, especially the Naval 
Meteorology and Oceanography Command and the Naval Undersea 
Warfare Center, to leverage assets and facilities to support 
deepwater AUV program development.
    National Oceanographic Partnership Program.--The Committee 
provides $8,000,000 to advance ocean science research through 
the National Oceanographic Partnership Program [NOPP] (10 
U.S.C. 7901-7903), provided that none of the funding provided 
may be used to support more than 50 percent of any particular 
project cost. Of the funding provided for NOPP, up to 
$3,000,000 may be used to continue projects supported by fiscal 
year 2018 funds under the Ocean Joint Technology Transfer 
Initiative [O-JTTI], and such funds provided in fiscal year 
2019 may be used to support up to 100 percent of these project 
costs.

                     NOAA NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE

    The Committee's recommendation provides $1,019,219,000 for 
the National Weather Service [NWS]. NWS programs provide timely 
and accurate meteorologic, hydrologic, and oceanographic 
warnings and forecasts to ensure the safety of the population, 
mitigate property losses, and improve the economic productivity 
of the Nation. NWS is also responsible for issuing operational 
climate forecasts for the United States. The Committee has made 
saving lives and livelihoods through accurate weather 
forecasting a priority.
    The Committee's recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

      NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Observations..........................................           224,363
Central Processing....................................            97,890
Analyze, Forecast, and Support........................           503,938
Dissemination.........................................            50,028
Science and Technology Integration....................           143,000
                                                       -----------------
      GRAND TOTAL NWS.................................         1,019,219
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Information Technology Officers [ITOs].--The Committee does 
not approve the NWS proposal to consolidate ITOs in fiscal year 
2019. NWS was invited to submit a proposal for a single pilot 
Regional Enterprise Application Development and Integration 
[READI] team comprised of volunteer ITOs. However, the 
Committee has not yet received such a proposal. Should NWS 
decide to submit a proposal for a single pilot READI team 
project, its subsequent successes and challenges will assist 
the Committee in evaluating the larger consolidation proposal 
if resubmitted in future fiscal years.
    NWS Staffing.--The Committee is very concerned with the 
continued number of NWS employee vacancies. Given the 
importance of the NWS mission to protect the lives and property 
of our Nation's citizens, extended vacancies are unacceptable--
particularly when the Committee has provided more than adequate 
resources and direction to fill vacancies expeditiously for the 
past several fiscal years. Because NWS has failed to respond 
satisfactorily to the Committee's concerns regarding these 
vacancies, NOAA is directed to present a separate accounting of 
all NWS filled and open positions, including the length of time 
the positions have been unfilled, in its fiscal year 2019 spend 
plan. The spend plan shall also include the specific funding 
proposed for all NWS employees and associated expenses that are 
separate from other program costs.
    The Committee also recognizes that some vacant NWS 
positions may be redundant and invites the Department to submit 
a justification for eliminating redundant unfunded vacancies in 
its fiscal year 2020 budget request, to include a full list of 
positions proposed for elimination, including reasoning for 
each elimination. Until such time as a plan to eliminate those 
vacancies is approved, NWS is directed to continue efforts to 
fill all vacancies as expeditiously as possible. Furthermore, 
the Committee adopts direction provided in the Explanatory 
Statement accompanying Public Law 115-141 regarding quarterly 
briefings on NWS staffing.
    Report on NWS Staffing in Alaska.--The Committee remains 
concerned about potential NWS staffing reductions in Alaska. As 
a part of the Explanatory Statement accompanying Public Law 
115-141, the Committee directed the NWS to provide a report 
about how the NWS plans to maintain or improve forecasting and 
communication around the State, especially in the most remote 
areas. The Committee looks forward to receiving and reviewing 
this report, and reminds NWS that any staffing changes must 
comply with the reprogramming procedures set forth in section 
505 of this act.
    National Mesonet Program.--The Committee provides 
$19,000,000 for the continuation and expansion of the National 
Mesonet Program. Funds should be made available through a 
competitive weather data procurement that sustains coverage of 
areas currently included within the national mesonet, as well 
as an expansion of coverage in high risk areas. NOAA is also 
encouraged to add new observations such as total lightning 
data, regional aircraft observations, and vertical column 
measurements in tornado-prone areas. Additionally, within funds 
provided, NOAA is encouraged to incorporate state mesonet data 
into the national mesonet network. NOAA should require that 
awardees provide mesonet data in formats that can be integrated 
by NWS for use in forecasts and severe weather alerts. Of the 
funds provided, up to $500,000 may be used for Meteorological 
Assimilation Data Ingest System activities, and up to $500,000 
may be used for costs associated with the National Mesonet 
Program Office. The Committee views the National Mesonet 
program as an important component of any effort to effectively 
develop a ``Weather-Ready Nation'' and expects that future NOAA 
budget requests will continue to reflect it as a priority.
    National Centers for Environmental Prediction [NCEP].--The 
Committee does not adopt the NWS proposal to consolidate 
centers under NCEP in fiscal year 2019.
    Facilities Maintenance.--Within funding for Analyze, 
Forecast and Support, the Committee provides $8,000,000 for the 
NWS's highest priority facilities repair and deferred 
maintenance requirements at Weather Forecast Offices [WFOs].
    Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Services Expansion [AHPS].--
The Committee rejects NWS's proposal to slow the expansion of 
AHPS, which will enable greater information on the magnitude 
and likelihood of floods and droughts across certain areas of 
the nation. No less than the fiscal year 2018 amount is 
provided for AHPS activities.
    National Data Buoy Center [NDBC].--The Committee provides 
sufficient funding to maintain, at a minimum, NDBC operations 
at 80 percent data availability. The Committee directs NOAA to 
provide adequate funding to support maintenance and service of 
the Tropical Atmosphere/Ocean Array [TAO] and Deep Ocean 
Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis [DART] array across the 
equatorial Pacific. The Committee further directs NOAA to 
include a schedule to restore existing data buoy operability 
and its strategy to minimize outages in the future as part of 
the agency's spending plan.
    Tsunami Warning Program.--The Committee rejects NWS's 
proposed cut to the Tsunami Warning Program. Funding is 
provided at no less than the fiscal year 2018 amounts, 
including for the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation program 
grants, to ensure that high-quality tsunami watches, warnings, 
and advisories are issued to safeguard lives and property.
    Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System [AWIPS].--
Within increased funding for Central Processing, the Committee 
provides NWS's full request for AWIPS Cyclical Refreshment.
    Integrated Water Prediction [IWP] and the National Water 
Model.--The Committee does not approve the requested decrease 
to the IWP program, which is funded across multiple NWS budget 
lines. Instead, the Committee provides no less than the fiscal 
year 2018 amount for IWP. Similarly, the Committee rejects 
slowing the development of the National Water Model and 
provides no less than the fiscal year 2018 level for its 
continued and expedited development.
    National Water Center.--The Committee provides no less than 
the fiscal year 2018 enacted level for operations and staffing 
of the National Water Center [NWC] to develop and operate IWP. 
NWS shall leverage this funding with resources provided to NOS 
for IWP and resources provided to OAR for remote sensing of 
snowpack and soil moisture measurements.
    The Committee is pleased with research-to-operations 
efforts at the NWC between NWS and the University Corporation 
for Atmospheric Research. This relationship highlights how 
separate entities and agencies can work together to transfer 
research into operational solutions that benefit the Nation. 
The NWC serves as the first ever clearinghouse for research and 
operational forecasting of all water-related issues facing our 
Nation, including: severe floods, storm surge, droughts, and 
water quality, among others. Given the importance of NWC to 
better protect lives and property of our Nation's citizens, 
NOAA is directed to expedite staffing and operations at NWC to 
achieve full operating capability as soon as possible. 
Furthermore, to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the 
NWS Office of Water Prediction, and to foster development of 
the NWC as a center of excellence for water resources 
prediction and related decision support services, funding is 
provided within Analyze, Forecast, and Support to increase 
staffing levels at the NWC Water Prediction Operations Division 
above the planned fiscal year 2018 staffing levels. The NWS is 
directed to post and fill future vacancies within the Office of 
Water Prediction expeditiously, and NWS is encouraged to 
consolidate personnel, as deemed necessary to create staffing 
efficiencies, to the NWC. The Committee directs NOAA to provide 
a report no less than 45 days after enactment of this act with 
an updated staffing plan that includes an update on commitments 
from partner agencies and a timeline for achieving baseline 
operating capability in the first quarter of fiscal year 2019.
    Hydrology and Water Resource Programs.--The Committee 
provides no less than $6,000,000 for NWS, in coordination with 
existing academic research consortiums, such as the University 
Corporation for Atmospheric Research, to collaborate with 
external academic partners to improve fine and large-scale 
measurements of snow depth and soil moisture data that can be 
used to expand and improve the National Water Model and 
contribute directly to the mission of NOAA's National Water 
Center.
    Consumer Option for an Alternative System To Allocate 
Losses [COASTAL] Act Implementation.--Within funding provided 
for Science and Technology Integration, the Committee provides 
not less than $5,000,000 for the continued development and 
implementation of the COASTAL Act, which was included in the 
Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (Public Law 
112-141). The Committee supports NOAA's work to assist 
homeowners impacted by destructive winds and storm surges 
associated with hurricanes and super-storms. The Committee 
directs NOAA to continue to leverage existing Federal assets, 
expertise, and partnerships in carrying out COASTAL Act 
activities. Furthermore, NOAA is directed to provide the 
Committee with updates every 6 months on progress made and 
challenges related to implementation, as well as any proposed 
solutions.
    Storm Surge Modeling Technology.--The Committee recognizes 
the need to deploy more precise, accurate, and real-time 
modeling technology that is tailored to specific regions. These 
activities would improve and complement NOAA's Sea, Lake, and 
Overland Surge from Hurricanes [SLOSH] model. The Committee 
directs NOAA to expand existing collaborations with research 
universities that will produce better predictive capabilities 
than NOAA's current SLOSH model provides. The Committee directs 
NOAA, in collaboration with academic research institutions and 
other Federal agencies, to integrate improved technologies into 
standard modeling operations for storm surge and inland 
flooding.
    Inland Flooding.--The Committee is aware that flood 
evacuations are typically planned for storm surge flooding and 
not the subsequent inland flooding that occurs with major 
weather events. The Committee encourages NWS, in coordination 
with State and Federal partners, to advance its inland flooding 
model based on the assessment of flood potential using sensor 
and elevation data to determine areas of impact, as well as 
safe evacuation paths and shelter locations. NWS and its 
partners should focus on obtaining information that can be 
applied to a model for inland evacuation planning, and be used 
by communities interested in a tested inland flood evacuation 
network plan. The model should eventually be integrated with 
the National Water Model to provide comprehensive, real-time 
evacuation information.
    Science and Technology Integration.--The Committee provides 
no less than the fiscal year 2018 level for Mid-Range Weather 
Outlooks, including seasonal to subseasonal forecasting, and 
Investments in Numerical Weather Prediction Modeling, which 
provides critical support to the Hurricane Forecast Improvement 
Project, among other important forecasting activities. 
Furthermore, the Committee urges NOAA to expedite the project 
plan described by the Hurricane Forecast Improvement Act 
(Public Law 115-25). The Committee encourages NWS to reduce 
errors in tracking and intensity forecasts of hurricanes by 
identifying technology and methods available to significantly 
improve hurricane forecasting.
    NWS Radar and Satellite Spectrum Studies.--As NOAA 
continues its study to evaluate sharing the 1675-1680 MHz GOES 
band, the Committee directs the agency to consult with private 
industry about the potential application of spectrum sharing 
technology for shared commercial use. Furthermore, NOAA is 
encouraged to study opportunities for early entry and flexible 
access to the 1300-1350 MHz spectrum band through use of 
private sector spectrum sharing technologies that protect 
Federal incumbents while making spectrum available for 
commercial use. The Committee believes such a study may provide 
additional options for the Spectrum Efficient National 
Surveillance Radar [SENSR] program to both enable commercial 
use of the 1300-1350 MHz spectrum band and reduce technology 
risk in the multistakeholder SENSR program.

  NOAA NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE, DATA AND INFORMATION SERVICE

    The Committee's recommendation provides $242,666,000 for 
National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information Service 
[NESDIS] operations. NESDIS programs operate environmental 
polar-orbiting and geostationary satellites and collect and 
archive global environmental data and information for 
distribution to users in commerce, industry, agriculture, 
science, and engineering, the general public, and Federal, 
State, and local agencies.
    The Committee's recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

     NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE, DATA AND INFORMATION SERVICE
                  OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Environmental Satellite Observing Systems:
    Office of Satellite and Product Operations........           146,924
    Product Development, Readiness & Application......            31,000
    Commercial Remote Sensing Licensing & Enforcement.             1,800
    Office of Space Commerce..........................             1,800
    Group on Earth Observations [GEO].................               500
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Environmental Satellite Observing Systems           182,024
                                                       =================
National Centers for Environmental Information........            60,642
                                                       -----------------
      GRAND TOTAL NESDIS..............................           242,666
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    National Centers for Environmental Information [NCEI].--The 
Committee recommends $60,642,000 for NCEI, which consolidated 
several programs previously funded separately. While the 
Committee supports the current budget structure for NESDIS, it 
is essential to ensure that key programs continue to receive 
adequate funding. Specifically, the Committee provides not less 
than the fiscal year 2018 enacted levels of $6,000,000 for 
Regional Climate Services, $3,650,000 for Regional Climate 
Centers, and $5,500,000 for Coastal Data Development. NOAA 
shall consider the Coastal Data Development program as the 
central repository to manage data collections and information 
services of the various Gulf of Mexico Restoration activities 
funded in response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill for 
scientific stewardship. Furthermore, within NCEI, the Committee 
encourages NOAA to fully support critical international 
partnerships, including the Global Climate Observing System.
    Big Earth Data Initiative.--The Committee rejects the 
proposed elimination of the Big Earth Data Initiative and 
provides no less than the fiscal year 2018 amount for the 
program.

                          NOAA MISSION SUPPORT

    The Committee's recommendation provides $269,256,000 for 
NOAA's mission support activities. These programs provide for 
overall NOAA management, including staffing of the Under 
Secretary's office and services to NOAA field offices. These 
programs also support NOAA's Education Office consistent with 
the recommendations of the Joint Ocean Commission. The 
facilities subactivity provides for repair and maintenance to 
existing facilities, planning and design, and environmental 
compliance.
    Committee recommendations are displayed in the following 
table:

          MISSION SUPPORT OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Corporate Services:
    Executive Leadership..............................            27,957
    Mission Services and Management...................           148,000
    IT Security.......................................            10,050
    Payment to DOC Working Capital Fund...............            55,249
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Corporate Services.......................           241,256
                                                       =================
NOAA Education Program................................            28,000
                                                       =================
      GRAND TOTAL, MISSION SUPPORT....................           269,256
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Corporate Services.--Within funding provided for Corporate 
Services, NOAA is directed to focus on improving workforce 
management, particularly expediting the hiring process to fill 
extended vacancies with highly qualified candidates across the 
agency's line offices. NOAA shall also focus on improving its 
management of acquisition and grant services.
    Facilities.--The Committee provides no less than the fiscal 
year 2018 enacted amount for NOAA Facilities.
    Education.--The Committee rejects the proposal to eliminate 
NOAA's Office of Education. Within the funds provided for 
NOAA's Education Program, $5,000,000 is for competitive 
educational grants, which includes continued support for 
Environmental Literacy Grants and for improving geographic 
literacy; $15,500,000 is for the Educational Partnership 
Program with minority-serving institutions; and $7,500,000 is 
for Bay-Watershed Education and Training regional programs. 
NOAA is encouraged to engage students in live, interactive 
programming using telepresence technology.
    Education Partnership Program.--The Committee encourages 
NOAA to consider the creation of a Cooperative Science Center 
at a Hispanic Serving Institution to help educate and train the 
fastest growing segment of the U.S. population, and one that is 
underrepresented in NOAA's scientific workforce.
    Outstanding Loan Balances.--The Committee encourages NOAA 
and its respective line offices to work with communities and 
businesses, on a case-by-case basis, to resolve outstanding 
balances in a manner that considers the borrower's current 
financial ability but remains fair to American taxpayers.

             NOAA OFFICE OF MARINE AND AVIATION OPERATIONS

    The Committee's recommendation provides $226,420,000 for 
NOAA's marine and aviation operations. The Office of Marine and 
Aviation Operations provides aircraft and marine data 
acquisition, repair, and maintenance of the existing fleet; 
planning of future modernization; and technical and management 
support for NOAA-wide activities through the NOAA Commissioned 
Officer Corps.

   OFFICE OF MARINE AND AVIATION OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Marine Operations and Maintenance.....................           190,670
Aviation Operations...................................            35,750
                                                       -----------------
      GRAND TOTAL, OMAO...............................           226,420
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Capital Assets.--Any decisions related to laying up any 
vessels, grounding any aircraft, or decommissioning any capital 
asset are subject to the standard reprogramming procedures set 
forth in section 505 of this act. Any changes from the spending 
plan shall also be subject to section 505 of this act. NOAA 
shall continue to provide the Committee with a monthly 
operational status of the fleet and aircraft.
    Aviation Operations.--The Committee provides the full 
amount requested for NOAA's Aircraft Operations Center [AOC]. 
The Committee maintains its direction for NOAA to provide a 
comprehensive plan to find a permanent, cost-effective home in 
the Gulf Coast region, potentially co-located with a Federal 
partner that can meet NOAA's operational needs.
    Unmanned Surface Vehicles [USVs].--The Committee is 
concerned about NOAA's ability to meet the demand for at-sea 
research days with its current combination of an aging fleet 
and charter vessels, as well as responding to emerging mission 
requirements. The Committee recognizes that USVs are not a 
replacement for crewed research ships, but are a synergistic 
complement to crewed ships' capabilities. Within funding for 
Marine Operations and Maintenance, the Committee provides up to 
$3,000,000 for the competitive acquisition of USVs data as a 
cost-effective augmentation for relevant research missions and 
fisheries data collection.
    Atmospheric Rivers.--As part of the Explanatory Statement 
accompanying Public Law 115-141, the Committee requested a 
report about the feasibility and potential benefit of using 
airborne assets to conduct storm monitoring of the U.S. West 
Coast, with a particular interest in atmospheric rivers. The 
Committee looks forward to the submission of the report. 
Furthermore, within Aviation Operations, up to $1,000,000 may 
be used for additional monitoring of atmospheric rivers.
    Unmanned Aircraft Systems.--The Committee urges NOAA to 
expand its data collection for hurricane forecasting to include 
all levels of the atmosphere below 60,000 feet above sea level 
and notes the potential of UAS platforms to accomplish this 
expanded mission while reducing costs and likely promoting more 
reliable hurricane forecast models. The Committee encourages 
NOAA to improve collaboration with other science agencies of 
the Federal government to share and expand limited UAS 
availability, including working with NASA to utilize UAS 
platforms to supplement data collection from manned hurricane 
hunter missions.
    Dropsondes.--The Committee recognizes the importance of 
dropsondes as a critical tool for atmospheric data collection, 
including for hurricane forecast modeling. The Committee 
directs NOAA to provide, within 90 days of enactment of this 
act, a comprehensive accounting of its dropsonde use for data 
collection, including acquisition costs, for fiscal year 2018. 
Furthermore, the Committee encourages NOAA to outline specific 
dropsonde acquisition costs as part of its fiscal year 2020 
budget request.

            NOAA PROCUREMENT, ACQUISITION, AND CONSTRUCTION

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $2,290,684,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   1,623,006,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,806,479,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $1,806,479,000 for 
NOAA's procurement, acquisition, and construction. The 
recommendation is $484,205,000 below the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level and $183,473,000 above the budget request.
    Committee recommendations are displayed in the following 
table:

                PROCUREMENT, ACQUISITION AND CONSTRUCTION
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
National Ocean Service:
    National Estuarine Research Reserve Construction..             1,900
    Marine Sanctuaries Construction/Acquisition.......             2,000
                                                       -----------------
      Total National Ocean Service--PAC...............             3,900
                                                       =================
Ocean and Atmospheric Research:
    Research Super Computing..........................            41,000
                                                       =================
National Weather Service:
    Observations......................................            21,129
    Central Processing................................            66,761
    Dissemination.....................................            34,619
    WFO Construction..................................            19,650
                                                       -----------------
      Total, National Weather Service--PAC............           142,159
                                                       =================
National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information
 Services:
    Geostationary Systems [GOES-R]....................           408,380
    Polar Weather Satellites..........................           927,991
    Cooperative Data and Rescue Services [CDARS]......            37,900
    Space Weather Follow-on...........................            12,000
    COSMIC-2..........................................             5,892
    Satellite Ground Services.........................            58,000
    System Architecture and Advanced Planning.........             4,929
    Projects, Planning, and Analysis..................            40,000
    Satellite CDA Facility............................             2,450
    Commercial Weather Data Pilot.....................             3,000
                                                       -----------------
      Total, NESDIS--PAC..............................         1,500,542
                                                       =================
Mission Support:
    NOAA Construction.................................            31,000
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Mission Support--PAC.....................            31,000
                                                       =================
Office of Marine and Aviation Operations:
    Fleet Capital Improvements & Tech Infusion........            25,878
    New Vessel Construction...........................            75,000
                                                       -----------------
      Total, OMAO--PAC................................           100,878
                                                       =================
Unobligated balances from prior years.................           -13,000
                                                       -----------------
      GRAND TOTAL, PAC................................         1,806,479
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    National Estuarine Research Reserve [NERR] Construction.--
The Committee provides no less than the fiscal year 2018 
enacted amount for NERR Construction to support the expansion 
of the NERR system. Furthermore, the Committee remains 
concerned about the increased costs and lack of transparency 
associated with certain third-party green building rating 
systems. The use of certain green building standards can 
arbitrarily discriminate against domestic building materials 
such as wood that could be locally sourced, thereby increasing 
costs to taxpayers without significant benefits in energy and 
water savings. The Committee again directs NOAA to use funding 
provided for NERR Construction subject only to green building 
rating systems or standards that are voluntary consensus 
standards; have achieved American National Standard Institute 
[ANSI] Designation; or were developed by an ANSI Audited 
Designator, and take into consideration the environmental and 
economic benefits of building materials through lifecycle 
analysis. Not later than 90 days after enactment of this act, 
NOAA shall notify the Committee of any new, existing, or 
planned construction projects at NERRS sites that receive 
accreditation for energy savings from a third-party green 
building rating system.
    High Performance Computing.--The Committee recognizes 
NOAA's high performance computing needs and its current 
limitations on providing high fidelity results in near real-
time. Within funding provided for OAR Research Supercomputing, 
$15,000,000 shall be used to continue to develop a dedicated 
high performance computing facility in collaboration with 
partners that have existing high performance computing 
expertise and scientific synergies. OAR is encouraged to find a 
funding balance in HPC resources with the partnerships that are 
currently in existence, with an emphasis on finding synergies 
with existing NOAA infrastructure.
    National Weather Service.--The Committee provides requested 
amount for National Weather Service Observations to continue 
the Next Generation Weather Radar Service Life Extension 
Program as planned, but no less than fiscal year 2018 enacted 
amount for the Automated Surface Observing System.
    NWS Construction and Major Repair.--The Committee provides 
$11,000,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted amount for 
Facilities Construction and Major Repair for NWS to address its 
most pressing major construction needs among the Weather 
Forecasting Offices.
    Integrated Water Prediction.--The Committee provides no 
less than the fiscal year 2018 enacted level for Central 
Processing under NWS PAC, which includes not less than 
$4,500,000 to procure operational high performance computing 
resources to enable modeling improvements associated with the 
IWP initiative.
    Polar Weather Satellites.--The Committee provides 
$927,991,000 for Polar Weather Satellites, which is $50,000,000 
above the request. While the Committee approves combining the 
Joint Polar Satellite System [JPSS] and Polar Weather Follow-on 
[PFO] program offices, section 104 of the act maintains 
language capping the life cycle cost of JPSS to $11,322,125,000 
and adds language capping the life cycle cost of PFO at 
$7,573,000,000.
    Space Weather Follow-on.--The Committee provides 
$12,000,000 for NOAA's space weather sentinel activity. Funding 
above the request shall be used for NOAA to pursue launch 
options for a compact coronagraph. The Committee notes the 
necessity of having the Federal Government develop and 
implement a coherent space weather architecture that addresses 
scientific, national security and meteorologically operational 
requirements using a constellation of lower cost satellites, 
akin to a NASA Explorer Class framework, and expects to receive 
a plan before the end of fiscal year 2018. While NASA's 
heliophysics program generally addresses the scientific needs 
and priorities for this domain, it has also been utilized for 
operational requirements, despite the fact that these 
satellites are generally not designed for that purpose and are 
capable of providing forecast warning times of just minutes to 
a few days. Hence, the Nation must design a space weather 
program that addresses current needs, particularly given the 
vulnerability of our communications and electrical 
infrastructure to severe space weather events and the 
devastating effects those events would have on the economy.
    Metop-C.--The Committee provides $40,000,000 for Projects, 
Planning, and Analysis to support pre-launch testing and Ground 
Support Equipment of U.S. instruments on Metop-C, which is 
scheduled for launch in October 2019. These instruments will 
provide complementary data to the JPSS morning orbit in polar 
satellite data and are critical for maintaining Numerical 
Weather Prediction model accuracy for 3-7 day forecasts.
    Commercial Weather Data Pilot.--The Committee provides 
$3,000,000 to support the assessment and potential use of 
commercial data in NOAA's weather modeling and forecasting 
through pilot purchases of commercial data.
    Radio Occultation Data.--The Committee is concerned about 
NOAA's continued access to high quality radio occultation [RO] 
data for operational forecasts, and continued research to 
improve modeling capacity. Under Public Law 115-25, NOAA was 
directed to conduct a commercial pilot project to acquire RO 
data, and to proceed with the COSMIC program of record. While 
the Committee is optimistic about the role for commercial RO 
data, continued operational data is critical for weather 
forecasting. With NOAA's cancellation of COSMIC 2B and the 
original COSMIC program nearing the end of its life, the 
Committee directs NOAA to develop and submit a plan within 180 
days of passage to manage the risk of an RO data gap and 
preserve the quality of NOAA forecasts. The plan should include 
a report on the implementation of the RO provisions of Public 
Law 115-25.
    NOAA Satellite Reporting.--The Committee directs NOAA to 
provide quarterly programmatic and procurement status reports 
of all satellites actively orbiting, in space but in standby 
mode, and under development unless any reprogramming, system 
failure, construction delay, or other extraordinary 
circumstance warrants an immediate update. As part of the 
agency's quarterly satellite briefing, NOAA shall include 
updates on preparations and enhancements necessary to 
accommodate an increased volume of satellite data and shall 
compare initial cost estimates to actual expenditures.
    Facilities Maintenance.--The Committee provides $10,000,000 
for NOAA' s highest priority facilities repair and deferred 
maintenance requirements. NOAA has significant facilities 
repair and deferred maintenance liabilities and the Committee's 
is concerned by reports, including the Department's OIG Report, 
``NOAA: Repair Needs Data Not Accurate, and Real Property 
Utilization Not Monitored Adequately,'' (OIG-17-032-A), that 
indicate NOAA is not appropriately managing its real property 
maintenance needs. Thirty days prior to obligating any of these 
additional facilities repair and deferred maintenance funds, 
NOAA shall submit a report providing the following information: 
(1) a NOAA-wide prioritized list of its deferred facilities 
maintenance needs, including an explanation of how such list 
was developed; (2) an estimate of the total amount and 
composition of deferred facilities maintenance, including an 
explanation of how such estimate was developed; (3) how NOAA 
maintains information on, and manages, its deferred maintenance 
needs and activities; and (4) an update on addressing the 
recommendations of OIG-17-032-A.
    NOAA Marine Operation Facilities.--The Committee has 
provided funding for the past several fiscal years under 
Mission Support PAC for preparatory work for new berths and 
shore facilities at Newport, Rhode Island. The facility will 
permanently accommodate the NOAA Ship Henry B. Bigelow and 
other vessels in the future. As part of the Explanatory 
Statement accompanying Public Law 115-141, the Committee 
requested a plan outlining the cost, size, scope, and timeline 
for constructing and outfitting this facility, which is co-
located on U.S. Navy property. There is increasing urgency to 
act since NOAA could lose access to some of its existing 
Atlantic facilities as soon as 2021. The Committee is awaiting 
this plan, which was due 60 days after enactment of Public Law 
115-141, and withholds 25 percent of funds provided for 
Executive Leadership within the Mission Support line office 
until NOAA submits it to the Committee.
    Mission Support, Facilities Initiative.--Within the funding 
provided under Mission Support PAC for NOAA Construction, 
$20,500,000 is to complete the second phase of repairs and 
construction at NOAA's Mukilteo Research Station.
    Vessel Deferred Maintenance and Technology Infusion.--
Within the funding provided above the request for Fleet Capital 
Improvements and Technology Infusion, $3,000,000 shall be for 
deferred maintenance and $10,000,000 shall be for technology 
infusion.
    NOAA Fleet Recapitalization.--In November 2016, the 
Committee approved NOAA's updated Fleet Recapitalization Plan, 
which established a foundation for new vessel construction over 
the next 10 years. The Committee is pleased that NOAA's fiscal 
year 2019 budget request includes $75,000,000 for new vessel 
construction, which follows the Committee's direction and tempo 
for revitalizing the agency's aging fleet. The Committee 
commends NOAA's plan to leverage work done by the U.S. Navy to 
reduce design risk, ship acquisition cost, and vessel delivery 
time. The Committee further urges NOAA to continue efforts to 
find additional ship acquisition efficiencies.
    Buy American Provisions.--In recognition of the economic 
and national security importance of the domestic shipbuilding 
industrial base, the Department of Commerce, NASA, and NSF are 
reminded of the Buy American provisions contained in law that 
apply to the Department of Defense, particularly 10 U.S.C. 
2534(a)(3) and (4) regarding air circuit breakers, welded 
shipboard anchor, mooring chain with a diameter of 4 inches or 
less, and, to the extent they are unique to marine 
applications, gyrocompasses, electronic navigation chart 
systems, steering controls, pumps, propulsion and machinery 
control systems, totally enclosed lifeboats; certain powered 
and non-powered valves; and certain machine tools for metal-
working machinery. In awarding any new contracts related to the 
acquisition, construction, or conversion of a marine vessel, 
the Department of Commerce, NASA, and NSF are urged to make 
every effort to acquire, consistent with schedule and cost 
competition requirements, only U.S. manufactured components, 
consistent with 10 U.S.C. 2534 and for auxiliary equipment 
(including pumps) for shipboard services; propulsion equipment 
(including engines, reduction gears, and propellers); shipboard 
cranes; and spreaders for shipboard cranes.
    Fishing Community Presence.--NOAA shall consider all viable 
ports when undertaking capital planning reviews, including 
those that do not currently have a significant NOAA presence.

                  PACIFIC COASTAL SALMON RECOVERY FUND

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $65,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................................
Committee recommendation................................      70,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $70,000,000 for the 
Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery Fund [PCSRF]. The 
recommendation is $5,000,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level and $70,000,000 above the budget estimate. Funds are for 
conservation and restoration of Pacific salmon populations. 
State and local recipients of this funding will provide 
matching contributions of at least 33 percent of Federal funds. 
In addition, funds will be available to tribes without a 
matching requirement.
    Further, within the funds provided for the Pacific Coastal 
Salmon Recovery Fund, no eligible coastal State shall receive 
less than $5,000,000. Additionally, the Committee directs NOAA 
to provide a report within 90 days of enactment that details 
the current competitive evaluation process for PCSRF funding 
and how PCSRF benefits both the Endangered Species Act listed 
Pacific salmon populations and declining stocks which have not 
yet warranted protection under the Endangered Species Act. 
Further, NOAA is directed to report on how its current 
priorities meet the intent of the PCSRF to support the recovery 
and protection of all declining salmon stocks.

                      FISHERMEN'S CONTINGENCY FUND

Appropriations, 2018....................................        $349,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................         349,000
Committee recommendation................................         349,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $349,000 for the 
Fishermen's Contingency Fund. The recommendation is equal to 
the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and equal to the President's 
request.

                      FISHERY DISASTER ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $20,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................................
Committee recommendation................................      15,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $15,000,000 for 
Fishery Disaster Assistance to address fisheries disasters 
declared by the Secretary of Commerce. The recommendation is 
$5,000,000 below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and 
$15,000,000 above the budget request.

                   FISHERIES FINANCE PROGRAM ACCOUNT

Appropriations, 2018....................................     -$3,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      -8,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      -8,000,000

    The Committee recommends that direct loans administered 
through this account for individual fishing quotas may not 
exceed $24,000,000. Traditional direct loans may not exceed 
$100,000,000, which is the same as the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level and budget request. The Committee encourages NOAA to 
facilitate new vessel construction, vessel replacement, and 
upgrades within the Fisheries Finance Program to the greatest 
extent practicable.

                                 OTHER


                        Departmental Management


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $63,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      58,994,000
Committee recommendation................................      63,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $63,000,000 for 
Departmental Management Salaries and Expenses. The 
recommendation is equal to the fiscal year 2018 enacted level 
and $4,006,000 above the budget request.
    Within Departmental Management, the Salaries and Expenses 
account provides funding for the Secretary, Deputy Secretary, 
and support staff. Responsibilities involve policy development 
and implementation affecting U.S. and international activities, 
as well as establishing internal goals for operations of the 
Department.
    Not less than 90 days after enactment of this act, the 
Department shall submit to the Committee a report detailing 
actions taken to cut costs and a detailed account of funds 
saved by such actions across the Department's bureaus.
    Working Capital Funds.--For each of the three working 
capital funds within DOC, the following are to be provided to 
the Committee and the Office of Inspector General by November 
30 of each fiscal year: (1) A comparison of the final budget or 
spending plan at the project or activity level to the actual 
year-end data as of September 30 of the prior fiscal year, 
including detailed narratives for variances greater than 5 
percent at the project or activity; (2) the initial budget or 
spending plan by project or activity for the current fiscal 
year; and (3) a detailed schedule of fiscal year-end 
unobligated and carryover balances by source funding category 
and by expiring budget fiscal year, to include: direct 
authority, Federal and intragovernmental reimbursable authority 
by trading partner, non-Federal reimbursable authority, amounts 
held for future asset replacement, and other categories.
    Concrete Masonry Products.--The Committee recognizes that 
concrete block is a durable product used in the construction of 
public infrastructure, commercial facilities, and homes. The 
Committee recognizes the need for legislation to enable 
concrete masonry manufacturers to establish, finance, and carry 
out a coordinated program of research, education, and promotion 
of markets for concrete masonry products and that would give 
the Department legal authority for the program's operation and 
to maintain oversight.
    Small Business Innovation Research.--The Committee 
recognizes the importance of the Small Business Innovation 
Research [SBIR] program and its previous accomplishments in 
facilitating commercial successes from federally funded 
research and development projects. The SBIR program encourages 
small domestic businesses to engage in Federal research and 
development and creates jobs in the smallest firms. The 
Committee therefore directs the DOC to place an increased focus 
on awarding SBIR grants to firms with fewer than 50 people.
    DATA Act.--As part of an OIG report (OIG-18-005), 
independent accountants analyzed the Department's second 
quarter fiscal year 2017 submission of financial and award data 
in accordance with the Digital Accountability and Transparency 
Act of 2014 (Public Law 113-101). OIG-18-005 found ``material 
and pervasive errors'' in the Department's submission, leading 
the independent accountants to conclude that the audited 
submission was not presented in accordance with the Department 
of Treasury's guidance for compliance under Public Law 113-101. 
The Committee directs the Department to continue to take action 
to address the deficiencies highlighted in OIG-18-005.
    Improved International Travel Data.--The Committee notes 
that initial data reported by the Department indicated there 
was a decrease in international visitors to the United States 
in 2016 and 2017. The Department has now suspended reporting on 
new international arrival information due to anomalies found in 
this data. As a result, the Committee believes more thorough, 
accurate and timely data is needed to effectively understand 
and address the potential decline in international visitors to 
the United States, or a potential decline in our market share 
of international travel. The Committee directs the Department, 
in coordination with the Departments of State and Homeland 
Security, as appropriate, to provide: (1) a report on the cause 
of the anomalies in the international arrivals data and a 
timeline and course of action for correcting the information; 
(2) monthly international arrival data for each month within 60 
days of the end of each month; (3) average wait times for 
visitor visa processing, by country, each month within 60 days 
of the end of each month; (4) refusal rates for visitor visa 
applications, by country, each month within 60 days of the end 
of each month. Monthly data should be provided to the Committee 
for the last 3 years and provided monthly from enactment of 
this act.
    Enterprise Services.--The Committee supports the 
Department's overall goal to transition the bureaus to a shared 
services model to standardize and streamline transactional 
tasks in order to reduce costs and strengthen core mission 
focus. However, the Committee acknowledges that the shared 
services model may not make sense for all services and every 
bureau, as was discussed during the Department's 2019 budget 
request hearing. The Committee directs the Department to report 
within 90 days of enactment of the act on how it intends to 
move forward with this effort, including which portions, if 
any, of the shared services model USPTO will participate in and 
how that will impact the implementation of the shared services 
model.
    Cybersecurity.--The Department of Commerce has a well-known 
and critical cybersecurity mission, not the least of which is 
the role that NIST plays in providing guidance and assistance 
to commercial and government stakeholders throughout the world. 
NIST provides the underlying guidance for the Federal 
Information Security Management Act requirements, which provide 
the baseline for cybersecurity risk management against which 
all Federal agencies are measured. However, the Committee is 
concerned that the Department as a whole is lagging behind 
other Federal agencies with respect to cybersecurity. In 
particular, the Committee is concerned about the pace of 
implementation by the Department of the Continuous Diagnostics 
and Mitigation [CDM] program requirements. The Committee 
directs the Department, within 60 days of enactment of this 
act, to provide a briefing on the Department's plan for 
achieving all of the major milestones for Phases 1 through 3 of 
CDM.
    Space Commerce.--The Committee is aware of the instruction 
for the Department contained in Space Policy Directive 2 [SPD-
2] and looks forward to considering a legislative proposal to 
implement SPD-2 when it is officially transmitted to the 
Congress. The Committee encourages the Department to work with 
other Federal agencies to ensure current activities affected by 
directives in SPD-2 are continued until any proposed 
legislative action has been signed into law. Activities funded 
by the Department in fiscal year 2018 that are addressed in 
SPD-2 have been funded in the same account as funding was 
provided in fiscal year 2018.
    Unobligated Balances.--The Committee remains concerned 
about the amount of unobligated funding within DOC. As directed 
in section 507 of this act, the Department is directed to 
continue reporting all unobligated balances to the Committee on 
a quarterly basis.
    Spending Plans.--Under section 533 of this act, the 
Department is required to submit a spending plan within 45 days 
of the enactment of this act. That plan should describe the 
programs, projects, and activities of the Department so that 
the Committee receives detailed descriptions of how the 
Department intends to operationalize the funding provided in 
annual appropriations bills. The Committee expects a detailed 
accounting of each bureau's spending, including reimbursable, 
fee-funded, or working capital fund spending, particularly with 
regard to specific programs, projects, and activities described 
in the bill and accompanying report. The Department shall 
continue to work with the Committee to ensure that its spending 
plans provide adequate information for continued oversight of 
the Department.

                      RENOVATION AND MODERNIZATION

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $45,130,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       2,796,000
Committee recommendation................................      38,612,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $38,612,000, which is 
$6,518,000 below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and 
$35,816,000 above the budget request, for continuing renovation 
activities at the Herbert C. Hoover Building, which is the full 
amount the Department requires to complete through the sixth 
phase of the ongoing renovation.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $32,744,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      32,030,000
Committee recommendation................................      32,744,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $32,744,000 for the 
OIG. The recommendation is equal to the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level and $714,000 above the budget request.
    In addition to funds provided under this heading, the 
Committee has recommended transfers to the OIG: $1,000,000 from 
the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office; $1,302,000 from the 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; and $3,556,000 
from the Census Bureau for oversight and audits of those 
activities. The Committee directs the OIG to continue strict 
oversight activities for satellite procurements, cybersecurity, 
and the decennial census.
    Working Capital Fund Audits.--The Committee continues to 
direct the OIG to audit all of the working capital funds within 
the Department to evaluate the Department's budgetary controls 
over all funds. The OIG shall assess: the controls in place to 
develop reimbursement formulas; the relationship of 
reimbursements to client services; the appropriateness of the 
level of fund balances; and compliance with appropriations law 
and direction. As part of this assessment, the Inspector 
General shall pay particular attention to the increasing 
amounts of funding needed to support the Department's Office of 
General Counsel, including the justification and metrics for 
how such funding is being levied against each agency and, 
reciprocally, how the agencies account for the services they 
receive from the OIG. If at any point during these audits the 
OIG encounters problems with accessing any necessary 
information or data from the Department, the OIG is directed to 
notify the Committee immediately.
    Audits and Investigations.--The Committee believes that 
robust investigations and audits are essential to rooting out 
waste, fraud, and abuse, but that limiting inquiries only to 
individuals in the Department does not necessarily lead to 
comprehensive findings and recommendations. The Committee 
directs the OIG to modify its policies and procedures to ensure 
that investigations or reports include interviews with all 
parties to the project or program in question, including, but 
not limited to, contractors responsible for projects under 
review. The Committee cautions the OIG against issuing 
preliminary findings prior to interviewing a majority of the 
entities involved with the program or project under 
investigation, unless the OIG believes the findings are time 
sensitive or additional interviews are immaterial.

               General Provisions--Department of Commerce

    Section 101 makes Department funds available for advanced 
payments only upon certification of officials designated by the 
Secretary that such payments are considered to be in the public 
interest.
    Section 102 makes appropriations for salaries and expenses 
available for the hire of passenger motor vehicles, and for 
services, uniforms, and allowances as authorized by law.
    Section 103 provides the authority to transfer funds 
between Department accounts. The provision makes transfers 
subject to the Committee's standard reprogramming procedures 
and requires notification to the Committee prior to capital 
asset disposal.
    Section 104 extends congressional notification requirements 
for the NOAA satellite programs.
    Section 105 provides authority for the Secretary to furnish 
certain services within the Herbert C. Hoover Building.
    Section 106 clarifies that grant recipients under the 
Department may continue to deter child pornography, copyright 
infringement, or any other unlawful activity over their 
networks.
    Section 107 provides NOAA the authority to share resources 
with entities outside the agency.
    Section 108 requires that, before charging for 
congressional reports, the National Technical Information 
Service [NTIS] advise the public of free ways to receive or 
access these reports. For those reports that cannot be found 
free of charge or when a customer requires a mailed, hard copy, 
NTIS may only charge a de minimus copying and mailing fee.
    Section 109 allows the Secretary to waive the bond 
requirement for research vessel repair and construction 
contracts that would align Commerce's authorities with those of 
other Federal agencies and address difficulties NOAA has 
experienced in obtaining competitive bids for ship repairs.
    Prior to exercising waiver authority under section 109 of 
this act, the Secretary shall promulgate regulations specifying 
criteria under which waiver authority may be used, including 
the types of contracts eligible for consideration, surety 
alternatives, and acceptable risk profiles in order to protect 
the taxpayer and ensure that NOAA maximizes cost-savings. The 
Department is directed to notify the Committee not less than 15 
days prior to any waiver issued under this section. In 
addition, the Department shall, not later than 120 days after 
the date of enactment of this act, prepare a report including 
the actual costs of repairing, rehabilitating, and replacing 
vessels in fiscal years 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018, 2019, and 
annually thereafter, including an indication of those vessels 
for which NOAA waived the Miller Act.
    Section 110 allows NOAA to be reimbursed by Federal and 
non-Federal entities for performing certain activities.
    The Committee remains concerned that agreements for 
offsetting collections provided for under this section could 
result in a conflict of interest, or the appearance of a 
conflict of interest, for the Department. The Department is 
directed to exercise caution and consider any unintended 
consequences that could result from such agreements, including, 
but not limited to, augmentation of appropriations, initiation 
of new programs not authorized by this act or any other act of 
Congress, and liabilities extending beyond the period of any 
such agreement. The Department shall provide to the Committee 
monthly updates on all offsetting fee collections, including 
each entity participating in the agreement, as well as the 
terms of and specific activities funded by the agreement. 
Additionally, estimates of anticipated fee collections shall be 
included in the Department's annual spend plans. To further 
ensure the Committee maintains sufficient oversight for 
activities carried out under this section, language is included 
specifying that any offsetting collection would require the 
consent of each party subject to the agreement and all 
offsetting collections shall be subject to procedures set forth 
by section 505 of this act.
    Section 111 provides authority for the programs of the 
Bureau of Economic Analysis and the Bureau of the Census to 
enter into cooperative agreements in order to assist in 
improving statistical methodology and research.

                                TITLE II

                         DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

    The Committee recommends a total of $30,698,837,000 for the 
DOJ. The recommendation is $402,573,000 above the fiscal year 
2018 funding level and $1,864,093,000 above the budget request. 
The Committee's recommendation emphasizes key priorities 
regarding funding for the Department's critical ongoing 
missions and activities to protect the safety, security, and 
rights of our citizens.
    Fighting the Heroin and Opioid Epidemic.--The Committee 
continues its commitment to helping States and local 
communities in the fight against heroin and the illegal use of 
opioids through comprehensive programs covering law 
enforcement, prevention, and treatment. A total of $482,500,000 
in DOJ grant funding is provided to help our State and local 
partners tackle this epidemic, an increase of $36,000,000 above 
the fiscal year 2018 level, including increased funding for 
programs covered under the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery 
Act and Community Oriented Policing Services [COPS] Anti-Heroin 
Task Forces. The Drug Enforcement Administration [DEA] is 
funded at $2,654,836,000, an increase of $44,936,000, which 
will allow for the continuation of heroin enforcement teams as 
well as other interdiction and intervention efforts, including 
expansion of DEA's 360 Strategy.
    Combating the Continued Methamphetamine Crisis.--The 
Committee notes that in addition to the heroin and opioid 
epidemic, many communities and families continue to suffer from 
a longstanding methamphetamine crisis. In many States, 
particularly in rural areas, meth-related deaths vastly 
outnumber those from heroin. The Committee recognizes the 
strain methamphetamine places on families, communities, rural 
health providers, and law enforcement agencies, including the 
disproportionate burden to American Indian tribes. The 
Committee continues its commitment to fight methamphetamine 
trafficking and use by providing $8,000,000 for competitive 
grants under the COPS Anti-Methamphetamine Task Forces program 
as well as $10,000,000 provided to DEA to help State and local 
law enforcement for meth lab cleanup and container programs. 
The Committee also notes that of the funding provided in COPS 
for tribal resources can be used for anti-methamphetamine 
efforts.
    Trafficking in Persons.--The Department shall dedicate no 
less than the fiscal year 2018 levels for the Human Trafficking 
Prosecution Unit [HPTU], the Federal Bureau of Investigation 
[FBI], and the U.S. Attorneys' Offices [USAO] to investigate 
and prosecute crimes of human trafficking. For fiscal year 
2019, the Committee looks forward to reviewing, on an annual 
basis, the HTPU report on human trafficking victims as well as 
the FBI report on Innocence Lost Operations, as directed by 
Senate Report 115-139 and codified in Public Law 115-141. The 
Committee also expects the designation of a lead agent in each 
FBI field office as a point of contact for slavery and human 
trafficking investigations, a point of contact in each USAO who 
shall serve as the coordinator for all activities within that 
office concerning human trafficking and forced labor matters, 
and an update regarding improved processes that enable 
survivors with T-visas to obtain an expedited letter of support 
from the Department when their criminal case is closed, as 
required by Senate Report 115-139 and codified in Public Law 
115-141.
    The Committee reminds the Department of the request to 
establish and provide an interim report on the progress of a 
multi-disciplinary task force addressing human trafficking to 
harvest fish in international waters, as well as the final 
report due by March 23, 2019, as directed by Senate Report 115-
139 and codified in Public Law 115-141.
    Child Sexual Exploitation and Sharing Economy.--Not later 
than 1 year after the date of enactment of this act, the 
Attorney General shall submit to the Committees on 
Appropriations and the Judiciary a report detailing the impact 
of short-term rentals and the sharing economy upon human 
trafficking and child sexual exploitation. The report shall 
identify additional challenges that the sharing economy poses 
in identifying and prosecuting perpetrators of human 
trafficking and child sexual exploitation. The report shall 
also include recommendations to minimize the negative impacts 
of the sharing economy with regard to human trafficking and 
child sexual exploitation.
    Domestic Trafficking Victims Fund Special Assessments.--
Section 101 of The Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act of 
2015 (Public Law 114-22) mandated the collection of a $5,000 
special assessment from persons convicted of certain Federal 
offenses related to human trafficking and sexual exploitation. 
Funds from this special assessment are to be deposited into the 
Domestic Trafficking Victims Fund operated by the Department of 
Justice. The Committee encourages the Attorney General to use 
funds under this Act to ensure that Assistant United States 
Attorneys are specifically trained on the mandatory nature and 
enforcement of this special assessment, including the 
imposition of liens under 18 U.S.C. 3613, to provide additional 
funding, resources, and services for the victims of human 
trafficking and law enforcement officials involved in the 
elimination of this crime.
    Intellectual Property Rights [IPR] Enforcement.--The 
Committee expects the Department to continue to make IPR 
enforcement an investigative and prosecutorial priority. 
Sophisticated, often transnational, criminal enterprises engage 
in a range of illegal activity, including identity theft, 
connected to the theft of copyrighted content. Given the strong 
links to other illegal activity, the Department's IP-dedicated 
personnel should investigate U.S.-based sites and applications 
that are engaged in such criminal activity. The FBI shall 
submit a report to the Committee, not later than 90 days after 
enactment of this act, detailing the activities of its 
dedicated agents investigating IPR cases, particularly in the 
area of creative content theft.
    The Committee reminds USAO to remain focused on IPR crimes. 
Based on a new wave of digital copyright piracy involving 
devices and software that connect televisions directly to 
copyright-theft sites, the Committee directs the USAOs to place 
an emphasis on the investigation and prosecution of criminal 
enterprises distributing such illicit copyright-theft devices.
    Cybersecurity.--The Department has several offices with 
cybersecurity responsibilities, including those within the FBI, 
the National Security Division, the Criminal Division, and 
USAO. At a minimum, the Committee directs the Department to 
maintain its cybersecurity posture at no less than the fiscal 
year 2018 level to defend and respond to current and emerging 
attacks that threaten its own infrastructure and activities.
    Strengthening Police-Community Relations.--The Committee 
continues to recognize and support the important need for 
lasting collaborative relationships between local police and 
the public and provides $123,000,000 for State and Local Law 
Enforcement Assistance and Community Oriented Policing Services 
[COPS] Office grant programs related to police community 
relations. Strong partnerships between the police and the 
communities they protect reduce crime, ensure that citizens' 
civil rights are protected, and improve officer safety.
    The Committee supports the FBI's June 10, 2016, guidance 
affirming the Criminal Justice Information Services [CJIS] 
Advisory Policy Board recommendation that all law enforcement 
agencies be National Incident-Based Reporting System [NIBRS] 
compliant by January 1, 2021. The FBI's NIBRS captures detailed 
crime incident data, beyond what the Uniform Crime Reporting 
System currently tracks, such as arrests and officer-involved 
shootings, is not only critical in aiding State and local law 
enforcement agencies as they work to keep our communities safe, 
but also increases transparency and accountability of law 
enforcement to the public. To assist in this effort, the 
Committee again funds the National Crime Statistics Exchange 
[NCS-X] at $5,000,000 to help additional law enforcement 
agencies make the transition into NIBRS and allow the Bureau of 
Justice Statistics to produce nationally representative 
estimates of crimes known to the police that can be 
disaggregated by victim-offender characteristics, the 
circumstances of the crime, victim-offender relationship, and 
other important elements of criminal events.
    Addressing Violent Crime.--The Committee supports the 
Department's ongoing commitment to address violent crime around 
the country and encourages the Department to continue to devote 
key law enforcement resources, including Bureau of Alcohol, 
Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives [ATF], FBI, DEA, and U.S. 
Marshals Service personnel, to high crime areas, both urban and 
rural, experiencing ongoing episodes of violent crime.
    Fix NICS.--The Fix NICS Act of 2017, enacted as title VI of 
division S of Public Law 115-141, requires DOJ to develop 
Federal agency and State implementation plans for the upload of 
relevant records to National Instant Criminal Background Check 
System [NICS]. The Committee directs DOJ to use all funds and 
resources necessary to complete such implementation plans by 
the deadline required under the act, not later than March 23, 
2019, and directs the Attorney General to make all 
implementation plan compliance determinations required under 
the act no later than September 30, 2019. The Attorney General 
shall use all necessary resources available under this act to 
comply with the requirements of Section 103(g) of the Brady 
Handgun Violence Prevention Act.
    Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crimes Act.--The 
Committee fully supports the goals of the Emmett Till Unsolved 
Civil Rights Crimes Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 
114-325) to investigate and prosecute previously unresolved 
civil rights era ``cold case'' murders suspected of having been 
racially motivated, through a partnership among the Civil 
Rights Division [CRT], the FBI, the Community Relations Service 
[CRS], State and local law enforcement officials, and other 
eligible entities. To continue supporting Emmett Till 
activities, the Committee urges the Department to use such sums 
as may be necessary from within the base budget for the CRT's 
Cold Case Initiative; for the FBI to pursue Emmett Till Act 
cold cases; and for CRS to partner with law enforcement 
agencies and communities to help resolve conflicts resulting 
from the investigation of unsolved civil rights era cases. 
Additionally, the Committee directs the National Institute of 
Justice, the Bureau of Justice Assistance, and the Office for 
Victims of Crime to continue providing grants for cold case DNA 
investigations to aid State and local law enforcement agencies 
in their investigation and prosecution of unsolved civil rights 
cold cases.
    Working Capital Fund [WCF].--The Committee expects the 
Department to execute funding to the fullest extent possible 
without any carryover balances. The Committee directs DOJ to 
continue to use the WCF only as a repository for reimbursable 
funds from components and to obligate and execute that funding 
expeditiously. The DOJ shall provide a report to the Committee 
within 45 days of enactment of this act regarding balances in 
the WCF including carryover funds, the intended uses of those 
funds, and a spending plan. The spending plan shall include: 
the amount each component contributes to the WCF; a detailed 
accounting of collections into the WCF from appropriations, 
reimbursable funds, and alternative sources of funding, 
including the Three Percent Fund; a list of settlements and 
collections from the Three Percent Fund in excess of 
$3,000,000, and a categorical accounting of obligations out of 
the WCF including a breakdown of services provided from the 
Department to each component. The Department is further 
directed to provide quarterly updates on the WCF to the 
Committee.
    DOJ Three Percent Fund [Fund] Transparency.--Section 11013 
of the 21st Century Department of Justice Appropriations 
Authorization Act (Public Law 107-273; 116 Stat. 1823; 28 
U.S.C. 527 note) permits the Department to credit 3 percent to 
the Working Capital Fund of all amounts collected pursuant to 
the Department's civil debt collection litigation activities. 
Such collections are deposited into the Fund, and they are 
intended to be accounted for separately and are not to be 
commingled with other amounts in the WCF. Pursuant to statute, 
the Three Percent Fund is to be used: first, for paying the 
costs of processing and tracking civil and criminal debt-
collection litigation, and, thereafter, for financial systems 
and for debt-collection-related personnel, administrative, and 
litigation expenses.
    The Committee is concerned that the Fund is now supporting 
initiatives and personnel well beyond its primary purposes: 
financial systems and debt collection management. In fact, the 
Committee is aware that in 2016 the Fund was supporting nearly 
600 full-time equivalents, only 42 of which were for the Fund's 
intended purpose. While the statute allows the Fund to support 
administrative and litigation expenses, the Committee is 
concerned that the lack of transparency associated with the 
Fund suggests that the Department may be funding certain 
programs and initiatives specifically rejected in annual 
funding measures.
    To improve transparency and accountability, the Committee 
directs the Department to submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House and Senate, within 90 days of 
enactment of this act, providing a detailed accounting of Three 
Percent Fund collections and expenditures over the previous 
five fiscal years. The report should account for each 
collection and the 3 percent credit thereof, and should further 
account for the allocation, obligation, and full-time 
equivalents for each Fund-supported program or initiative 
within each DOJ component. The Department is further directed 
to report, within 30 days of the end of each quarter of the 
fiscal year thereafter, the collections, credits, and 
allocations occurring in that quarter.
    Madoff Victim Fund [MVF].--The Committee understands that 
the Special Master appointed by the Department has begun 
distributing funds from the $4,000,000,000 MVF to victims of 
the Madoff criminal fraud case. As the Special Master makes 
further distributions to existing and new claimants, the 
Committee remains concerned about the lack of transparency 
regarding the methodology for allowing and disallowing claims, 
the means to prevent duplication of payments to claimants who 
have already recovered funds from other sources, and the final 
thresholds of recovery that the Department and the Special 
Master believe they can achieve for compensated victims from 
the MVF.
    Therefore, the Committee directs the Special Master to 
report within 30 days after enactment with information on the 
formulas and/or criteria used to determine payment amounts, 
classifications of payments, current and ongoing efforts to 
protect against duplicative or excessive payments throughout 
the process, and expected timelines associated with future 
payments. This report shall include an explanation describing 
the working relationship between the Special Master and the 
Bankruptcy Trustee, and if there is not currently a working 
relationship, a detailed plan for how the Special Master plans 
to coordinate future efforts to the maximum extent practicable, 
given the significantly higher level of distribution to the 
bankruptcy claimants.
    Cell-Site Simulator [CSS] Technology.--Funds provided in 
this act shall be used only to deploy or facilitate the use of 
CSS technology for criminal investigations if such use complies 
fully with DOJ's guidance issued on September 3, 2015. The 
Department shall ensure that this guidance is followed strictly 
by Federal, State, and local entities that receive funding 
under this act, to include compliance with requirements of the 
Fourth Amendment and the Pen Register Act. As directed in the 
guidance, CSS technology must be configured only as pen 
registers and may not be used to collect content of any 
communication or subscriber account information. In addition, 
the departmental guidance requires comprehensive and consistent 
training on the appropriate use of CSS technology; adopting 
rigorous practices for handling and retaining data acquired 
through the use of this technology; and scrupulously auditing 
the use of such technology. The Committee awaits the 
Department's report, as specifically outlined in Senate Report 
115-139 and codified in Public Law 115-141, on DOJ's use of CSS 
technology and its compliance with the guidance.
    Financial Fraud.--The Committee directs the Attorney 
General to continue to prioritize resources at the Department 
of Justice to ensure that reports of financial fraud including 
scams against senior citizens are thoroughly investigated, with 
the goal of bringing the perpetrators of these crimes to 
justice.
    Sexual Assault Survivors' Rights Implementation.--The 
Survivors' Bill of Rights Act of 2016 (Public Law 114-236) 
directed the Department, in conjunction with the Department of 
Health and Human Services, to establish a joint working group 
to develop, coordinate, and disseminate best practices 
regarding the care and treatment of sexual assault survivors 
and the preservation of forensic evidence. The Committee looks 
forward to the report requested in Senate Report 115-139 and 
codified in Public Law 115-141 as well as the timely completion 
of the working group's report to Congress containing its 
findings and recommended actions.
    Spending Plan.--In compliance with section 533 of this act, 
the Committee directs the Department to submit a spending plan, 
signed by the Attorney General, within 45 days of enactment of 
this act.

                         General Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $114,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     114,207,000
Committee recommendation................................     114,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $114,000,000 for 
General Administration salaries and expenses. The 
recommendation is equal to the fiscal year 2018 enacted level 
and $207,000 below the budget request.
    The General Administration account provides funding for 
senior policy officials responsible for departmental management 
and policy development. The specific offices funded by this 
account include: the immediate Office of the Attorney General 
[OAG); the immediate Office of the Deputy Attorney General 
[ODAG]; the immediate Office of the Associate Attorney General; 
Office of Legal Policy; Office of Public Affairs; Office of 
Legislative Affairs [OLA]; Office of Professional 
Responsibility; Office of Intergovernmental and Public Liaison; 
and the Justice Management Division [JMD].
    Wildlife Trafficking.--The Committee continues to note the 
dramatic and disconcerting increase of criminal activity 
involving wildlife that includes the illegal trade in 
rhinoceros horns and elephant ivory, poaching of wild animals 
for their parts, illegal capture and transport of endangered 
animals, and illegally harvested timber, as well as money 
laundering that comes with these products' sale on the black 
market. There are indisputable linkages between these 
activities and the financing of armed insurgencies and 
transnational organized crime that threaten the stability and 
development of African countries and pose a serious threat to 
U.S. security interests.
    The Committee awaits the report as specifically outlined in 
Senate Report 115-139 and codified in Public Law 115-141, and 
directs the Attorney General to continue to submit an annual 
report on the specific steps the Department is taking to 
further address wildlife trafficking and the illegal natural 
resources trade.
    Timely Responses to Committee Inquiries.--While the 
Committee primarily communicates with the Department through 
JMD, it reserves the right to call upon any individual or 
organization within its jurisdiction for requests for 
information. The Committee again reminds DOJ that it has both 
budgetary and oversight capabilities, and requests for 
additional information from the Chairmen, Vice Chairmen, or 
Ranking Members or their staffs to OAG, ODAG, and OLA should be 
treated as a priority for the Department and responded to both 
courteously and expeditiously.
    Special Counsel.--The Committee directs the leadership of 
the Department to adhere faithfully to all of its established 
processes and regulations regarding the operations of any 
Special Counsel.
    Public Charge Reporting.--The Committee directs the 
Department to publicly report on the status of implementing the 
April 11, 2017, memorandum to Federal prosecutors from the 
Attorney General, including each USAO District's designated 
Border Security Coordinator, and the number of Federal criminal 
prosecutions in the previous and current fiscal year for 
charges under 8 U.S.C. Sec. 1324, 1325, and 1326, disaggregated 
by charge, District, and month. The Department shall continue 
to publish such disaggregated data, on an annual basis.
    Commission on Native Children.--The Committee supports the 
need to address issues affecting Native children and recognizes 
the important work of the Commission on Native Children. The 
Committee directs DOJ to continue to support the Commission as 
specified in the Alyce Spotted Bear and Walter Soboleff 
Commission on Native Children's Act (Public Law 114-244).

                 JUSTICE INFORMATION SHARING TECHNOLOGY

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $35,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      31,713,000
Committee recommendation................................      35,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $35,000,000 for 
Justice Information Sharing Technology [JIST]. The 
recommendation is equal to the fiscal year 2018 enacted level 
and $3,287,000 above the budget request.

                EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $504,500,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     563,407,000
Committee recommendation................................     563,407,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $563,407,000 for 
the Executive Office for Immigration Review, of which 
$4,000,000 is a transfer from the U.S. Citizenship and 
Immigration Services [USCIS] Immigration Examiners Fee Account. 
The recommendation is $58,907,000 above the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level and equal to the budget request.
    This account funds the Executive Office for Immigration 
Review [EOIR], including the Board of Immigration Appeals 
[BIA], immigration judges, and administrative law judges who 
decide through administrative hearings whether to admit or 
exclude aliens seeking to enter the country, and whether to 
deport or adjust the status of aliens whose status has been 
challenged.
    EOIR Backlog of Cases and Immigration Judge Hiring.--The 
Committee is concerned that EOIR's immigration court caseload 
continues to escalate, adding to the growing backlog of cases, 
which totaled 692,298 at the end of March 2018. While the 
Committee recommendation includes funding for 75 additional 
immigration judges [IJ], adding to the 200 IJs provided by the 
Committee in fiscal years 2015-2018, as well as funding for 
technology and space, the Committee is concerned that providing 
more IJs alone is not enough to solve the backlog problem. The 
Committee believes that consistent policies regarding docket 
management and case adjudication will allow IJs to reduce the 
impending backlog.
    As directed in Senate Report 115-139 and codified in Public 
Law 115-141, EOIR shall continue to submit monthly performance 
and operating reports detailing the backlog of cases and the 
hiring of new IJ teams. The Committee is pleased to learn the 
hiring process has become more efficient and encourages the 
Department to continue filling vacant IJ positions with highly 
qualified individuals from a diverse pool of candidates, 
including those with non-governmental, private bar experience, 
to conduct fair, impartial hearings consistent with due 
process.
    As part of the monthly reporting requirement, EOIR is 
directed to report on any IJs sent on a temporary basis to any 
court outside of their current location including the number of 
days designated for the temporary assignment, the location of 
the temporary assignment and the IJs home location.
    EOIR Technology Improvements.--The Committee supports EOIRs 
efforts to update its technology systems, including a new case 
management system. The Committee expects EOIR to expedite 
efforts to implement this system so that temporary IJs can 
better maintain their home court caseloads while on assignment. 
Finally, the Committee directs EOIR to develop a strategy for 
uploading existing case files into this new case management 
system so that the current cases benefit from the technological 
efficiencies provided, enabling further reductions in the 
Immigration Court backlog. EOIR is directed to report to the 
Committee no later than 30 days after enactment regarding its 
strategy for including current cases in its case management 
system, and shall update the Committee quarterly thereafter on 
technological efficiencies and improvements to the backlog.
    Legal Orientation Program [LOP].--The Committee's 
recommendation maintains the fiscal year 2018 level of no less 
than $10,400,000 for services provided by LOP. This includes 
funding for both the Immigration Help Desk and LOP for 
Custodians [LOPC], including efforts, pursuant to the 
Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008 
(Public Law 110-457), for custodians of unaccompanied, 
undocumented children to address the custodian's responsibility 
for the child's appearance at all immigration proceedings, and 
to protect the child from mistreatment, exploitation, and 
trafficking. The Committee directs the Department to continue 
LOP without interruption, including during any review of the 
program. The Committee also directs the Department to utilize 
all appropriated funds solely for legitimate program purposes.
    The Committee supports LOP, which was created in 2003 and 
currently informs more than 50,000 detained non-citizens per 
year about their legal rights and responsibilities in 
immigration court. The Committee emphasizes that LOP benefits 
taxpayers by increasing the efficiency of immigration 
proceedings and reducing costs related to immigration 
detention. According to a 2012 Department of Justice report to 
this Committee, LOP services resulted in net savings to the 
Government of more than $17,800,000.
    Recognizing that LOP currently serves detained individuals 
in a limited number of States, the Committee directs that 
attention be paid to geographic equity as LOP expands the reach 
of its services to additional detention centers. The Committee 
notes the particular need for legal services at more remote 
immigration detention sites that are far from legal service 
providers in urban centers.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $97,250,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      95,866,000
Committee recommendation................................      99,195,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $99,195,000 for the 
OIG. The recommendation is $1,945,000 above the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level and $3,329,000 above the budget request.
    This account finances the activities of the OIG, including 
audits, inspections, investigations, and other reviews of 
programs and operations of the Department to promote efficiency 
and effectiveness, and to prevent and detect fraud, waste, and 
abuse, as well as violations of ethical standards arising from 
the conduct of Department employees in their numerous and 
diverse activities.
    Oversight of Crime Victims Fund Grants.--Section 510 of 
this act maintains $10,000,000 for the OIG to continue its 
expanded audits of the CVF including funding set aside for 
Indian tribes. The Committee remains concerned that the 
Department is not doing enough to proportionately adjust its 
grant monitoring activities to reflect significant changes in 
CVF spending in order to avoid waste, fraud, and abuse. The 
Committee directs the OIG to continue its audits of CVF awards 
and assist the Department to ensure these important funds are 
used appropriately and effectively.

                    United States Parole Commission


                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $13,308,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      12,672,000
Committee recommendation................................      13,308,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $13,308,000 for the 
United States Parole Commission. The recommendation is equal to 
the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $636,000 above the 
budget request.

                            Legal Activities


            SALARIES AND EXPENSES, GENERAL LEGAL ACTIVITIES

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $897,500,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     891,836,000
Committee recommendation................................     910,500,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $910,500,000 for 
General Legal Activities salaries and expenses. The 
recommendation is $13,000,000 above the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level and $18,664,000 above the budget request.
    This amount funds the establishment of litigation policy, 
conduct of litigation, and various other legal responsibilities 
through the Office of the Solicitor General, the Tax Division, 
the Criminal Division [CRM], the Civil Division, the 
Environmental and Natural Resources Division, the Civil Rights 
Division [CRT], the Office of Legal Counsel, and INTERPOL 
Washington.
    INTERPOL Washington.--From within the funds provided for 
General Legal Activities, the Committee directs the Department 
to provide no less than the fiscal year 2018 level for INTERPOL 
Washington. The Committee has provided no-year authority in the 
amount of $685,000 to ensure sufficient resources are available 
for INTERPOL Washington's dues payments and help the Department 
better manage fluctuations in currency exchange rates. INTERPOL 
Washington's command center [IOCC] operates 24 hours a day, 7 
days a week, 365 days a year, responding to requests for 
international criminal investigative and humanitarian 
assistance from more than 18,000 U.S. law enforcement agencies 
and their counterparts in 189 other INTERPOL-member countries. 
INTERPOL Washington's responsibility to respond to increasing 
foreign and domestic requests places additional operational 
demands on the resources of this organization.
    Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty Reform.--Mutual Legal 
Assistance Treaty [MLAT] requests are the formal mechanism in 
which countries request assistance in obtaining evidence 
located in a foreign country for criminal investigations and 
proceedings located in another country. The Committee supports 
the Department's full request of $32,300,000 for Criminal 
Division [CRM] to provide sustainability to the MLAT reform 
process and support the Office of International Affairs [OIA] 
and has increased funding in this account for this purpose. 
This funding is critical to avoid further backlogs in the 
critical support provided by OIA to protect the United States 
and support U.S. Attorneys' Offices, as well as our State and 
local law enforcement partners.
    Civil Rights.--The Committee provides no less than the 
fiscal year 2018 enacted level to continue its efforts to 
enforce civil rights laws; expand its capacity to prosecute and 
provide litigation support for human trafficking, hate crimes, 
and unsolved civil rights era crimes; carry out its 
responsibilities associated with the civil rights of 
institutionalized persons and the access rights of the 
disabled; investigate and prosecute police misconduct; and 
enhance the enforcement of fair housing and fair lending laws.
    Civil Rights Violations in State and Local Prisons and 
Jails.--The Committee continues to be concerned by reports of 
civil rights violations in State and local prisons and jails, 
and directs the CRT to increase efforts to investigate and 
address violations of the Civil Rights of Institutionalized 
Persons Act in State and local prisons and jails. The Committee 
directs the CRT to use such sums as necessary from amounts 
appropriated in fiscal year 2019 to address such issues in 
State and local prisons and jails.
    Human Rights Crimes.--The Committee remains concerned by 
the large number of suspected human rights violators from 
foreign countries who have found safe haven in the United 
States and directs the CRM to continue its efforts to 
investigate and prosecute serious human rights crimes, 
including genocide, torture, use or recruitment of child 
soldiers, and war crimes. For this purpose, the Committee's 
recommendation supports continued funding for the CRM to 
investigate and prosecute individuals who violate Federal laws 
regarding serious human rights abuses.
    Enforcement of Federal Hate Crime Laws.--The Committee is 
concerned by reports of increased incidents of bias-motivated 
crimes and directs the Civil Rights Division to aggressively 
prosecute hate crimes and work with the FBI, U.S. Attorneys, 
and the Community Relations Service to improve hate crime 
reporting and prevent hate crimes from taking place in the 
first instance.
    Protecting the Rights of Servicemembers and Veterans.--The 
Committee recognizes the importance of ensuring that 
servicemembers and veterans have access to essential legal 
resources to educate themselves and their families on their 
rights and enable them to defend themselves during times of 
need. The Committee supports funding this program at no less 
than the fiscal year 2018 level to continue to enforce existing 
law, such as the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment 
Rights Act (Public Law 103-353), and to provide outreach and 
training efforts on behalf of servicemembers, veterans, and 
their families.
    International Training.--The Committee remains concerned 
about the budget and staffing challenges faced by the Office of 
Overseas Prosecutorial Development, Assistance and Training 
[OPDAT] and International Criminal Investigative Training 
Assistance Program [ICITAP] programs under the current funding 
structure provided via the Department of State. While the 
Committee encourages the Departments of Justice and State to 
maintain open communications regarding programmatic and 
resource needs to truly execute their missions, OPDAT and 
ICITAP should ideally receive a transfer of funds from State 
within 90 days of enactment of this act. Should an immediate 
source of funding be needed ahead of a completed transfer of 
funds, the Committee recommends that the Department of Justice 
notify the Committee immediately.

               THE NATIONAL CHILDHOOD VACCINE INJURY ACT

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $10,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       9,340,000
Committee recommendation................................      10,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides a reimbursement of 
$10,000,000 for legal costs. The recommendation is equal to the 
fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $660,000 above the budget 
request.
    This account covers the Department's expenses associated 
with litigating cases under the National Childhood Vaccine 
Injury Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-660).

               SALARIES AND EXPENSES, ANTITRUST DIVISION

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $164,977,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     164,663,000
Committee recommendation................................     164,977,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $164,977,000 for 
the Antitrust Division. The recommendation is equal to the 
fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $314,000 above the budget 
request. This appropriation is offset by $136,000,000 in pre-
merger filing fee collections, resulting in a direct 
appropriation of $28,977,000.

                        UNITED STATES ATTORNEYS

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $2,136,750,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   2,105,182,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,179,485,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $2,179,485,000 for 
the Executive Office for United States Attorneys [EOUSA] and 
the 94 USAOs. The recommendation is $42,735,000 above the 
fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $74,303,000 above the budget 
request.
    As in past years, the Committee directs the United States 
Attorneys to focus their efforts on those crimes where the 
unique resources, expertise, or jurisdiction of the Federal 
Government can be most effective.
    Adam Walsh Act Implementation.--The Committee expects the 
EOUSA to continue to focus on investigations and prosecutions 
related to the sexual exploitation of children, as authorized 
by the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006 
(Public Law 109-248), and as part of Project Safe Childhood. 
The recommendation fully funds the budget request of 
$48,341,000 for this purpose in fiscal year 2019.
    Combating Financial and Mortgage Fraud.--The Committee 
directs the EOUSA to prioritize resources and provide no less 
than the fiscal year 2018 level to conduct criminal 
investigations and prosecutions of mortgage and financial 
fraud, including financial fraud against seniors; predatory 
lending; and market manipulation matters to ensure that reports 
of financial fraud are thoroughly addressed and the 
perpetrators of these crimes are brought to justice.
    Civil Rights Prosecutions.--The Committee's recommendation 
provides no less than the fiscal year 2018 level for continued 
civil rights enforcement that will advance both criminal and 
civil litigation, including the prosecution of sex and labor 
trafficking.
    Cybercrime.--As national and international cyber threats 
become increasingly sophisticated, our Federal prosecutors must 
become better versed in digital forensic evidence. The 
Committee's recommendation fully funds the budget request of 
$60,459,000 for cybercrime activities. The USAO will be able to 
increase the number of investigations and prosecutions of cyber 
attacks and cyber intrusions, and provide the high-caliber 
level of training on cybercrime and digital evidence needed for 
Assistant U.S. Attorneys to be able to analyze and present 
digital evidence across all types of criminal cases.
    The Committee does not support proposed funding cuts for 
Intellectual Property and Child Pornography activities, and 
instead directs USAO to provide no less than the fiscal year 
2018 funding level for prosecution of these cyber-related 
crimes.

                   UNITED STATES TRUSTEE SYSTEM FUND

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $225,908,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     223,221,000
Committee recommendation................................     225,908,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $225,908,000 for 
the United States Trustee System Fund. The recommendation is 
equal to the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $2,687,000 
above the budget request. The appropriation is offset by 
$360,000,000 in fee collections.
    The United States Trustee Program, authorized by 28 U.S.C. 
581 et seq., is the component of the Department with 
responsibility for protecting the integrity of the bankruptcy 
system by overseeing case administration and litigation to 
enforce the bankruptcy laws.

      SALARIES AND EXPENSES, FOREIGN CLAIMS SETTLEMENT COMMISSION

Appropriations, 2018....................................      $2,409,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       2,409,000
Committee recommendation................................       2,409,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $2,409,000 for the 
Foreign Claims Settlement Commission. The recommendation is 
equal to the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and equal to the 
budget request.
    The Foreign Claims Settlement Commission settles claims of 
American citizens arising from nationalization, expropriation, 
or other takings of their properties and interests by foreign 
governments.

                     FEES AND EXPENSES OF WITNESSES

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $270,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     270,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     270,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $270,000,000 for 
fees and expenses of witnesses. The recommendation is equal to 
the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and equal to the budget 
request.
    This appropriation, which is considered mandatory for 
scorekeeping purposes, provides for fees and expenses of 
witnesses who appear on behalf of the Government in cases in 
which the United States is a party, including fact and expert 
witnesses. These funds are also used for mental competency 
examinations and witness and informant protection. The 
Committee includes bill language prohibiting the Department 
from transferring funds out of this account.
    The Committee expects that no funds will be expended for 
expert witness services, including the payment of fees and 
expenses of expert witnesses, from any other DOJ accounts but 
Fees and Expenses of Witnesses.

           SALARIES AND EXPENSES, COMMUNITY RELATIONS SERVICE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $15,500,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................................
Committee recommendation................................      15,500,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $15,500,000 for the 
CRS. The recommendation is equal to the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level and $15,500,000 above the budget request.
    The Community Relations Service, established by title X of 
the Civil Rights Act of 1964, provides assistance to 
communities and persons in the prevention and resolution of 
disagreements arising from discriminatory practices.
    Hate Crimes Prevention.--Within funds provided, the 
Committee provides no less than the fiscal year 2018 level to 
handle the workload and responsibilities stemming from passage 
of the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd, Jr., Hate Crimes 
Prevention Act [HCPA] (Public Law 111-84). The HCPA expanded 
the CRS's mandate, requiring that it help communities prevent 
and respond to violent hate crimes committed on the basis of 
gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, and 
disability, in addition to race, color, and national origin. 
This funding will maximize the CRS crisis response nationwide 
and enable CRS to fulfill both its original mandate and 
expanded mandate under the HCPA.

                         ASSETS FORFEITURE FUND

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $20,514,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      20,514,000
Committee recommendation................................      20,514,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $20,514,000 for the 
Assets Forfeiture Fund [AFF]. The recommendation is equal to 
the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and equal to the budget 
request.

                     United States Marshals Service

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $2,900,892,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   2,821,342,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,948,409,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides a total of 
$2,948,409,000 for the United States Marshals Service [USMS]. 
The recommendation is $47,517,000 above the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level and is $127,067,000 above the budget request.

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $1,311,492,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   1,270,371,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,377,409,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $1,377,409,000 for 
USMS salaries and expenses. The recommendation is $65,917,000 
above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $107,038,000 above 
the budget request. The core missions of USMS include the 
apprehension of fugitives; protection of the Federal judiciary 
and witnesses; execution of warrants and court orders; and the 
custody and transportation of unsentenced prisoners.
    In addition to receiving direct appropriations, the 
Committee is aware that USMS also receives funding from the 
Department's Assets Forfeiture Fund [AFF] to augment salaries 
and expenses that are intended to directly administer AFF-
related activities like the management and sale of forfeited 
assets. The Committee directs the Department to continue to 
provide quarterly reports on the USMS's use of AFF funding, as 
directed in Senate Report 115-139 and codified in Public Law 
115-141.
    Investigative Operations.--The Committee directs USMS to 
provide no less than the fiscal year 2018 levels to maintain 
its missions regarding gang enforcement, International Megan's 
Law, and sex offender apprehension. Per Senate Report 115-139 
and codified in Public Law 115-141, the Committee expects USMS 
to continue the process to establish an additional Regional 
Fugitive Task Force [RFTF], with a report to be submitted 
within 90 days of enactment of this act on the status of the 
new RFTF including, staffing, operational space and agreements, 
equipment, and expected future resource needs.
    International Operations.--The Committee reminds USMS to 
submit the report requested in Senate Report 115-139 and 
codified in Public Law 115-141 on its extradition program, 
detailing its international operations workload. The report 
should include the number of extraditions and deportations, 
district cooperation, and extradition requests made by foreign 
counterparts in a timely manner. Given that transnational 
criminal organizations and fugitives know no geographical 
bounds, the Committee expresses support for increased USMS 
capabilities in Mexico and an increased presence in South 
America.

                              CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $53,400,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      14,971,000
Committee recommendation................................      35,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $35,000,000 for 
construction in space controlled, occupied, or utilized by the 
USMS in Federal courthouses and buildings, including but not 
limited to the creation, renovation, and expansion of prisoner 
movement areas, elevators, and other law enforcement and court 
security support space. The recommendation is $18,400,000 below 
the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $20,029,000 above the 
budget request.

                       FEDERAL PRISONER DETENTION

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $1,536,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   1,536,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,536,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $1,536,000,000 for 
Federal Prisoner Detention [FPD]. The recommendation is equal 
to the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and equal to the budget 
request.
    The Committee expects USMS to anticipate the true funding 
needs for this account in order to avoid funding shortfalls and 
the need for emergency reprogrammings to avert deficiencies. 
The Committee directs USMS to report to the Committee on a 
quarterly basis the current number of individuals in the 
detention system, the projected number of individuals, and the 
associated annualized costs.

                       National Security Division


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $101,031,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     101,369,000
Committee recommendation................................     101,369,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $101,369,000 for 
the National Security Division [NSD]. The recommendation is 
$338,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and equal to 
the budget request.
    The NSD coordinates the Department's national security and 
counterterrorism missions through law enforcement 
investigations and prosecutions, and handles counterespionage 
cases. The NSD works in coordination with the FBI, the 
Intelligence Community, and the U.S. Attorneys. Its primary 
function is to prevent acts of terrorism and espionage from 
being perpetrated in the United States by foreign powers.
    Foreign Agents Registration Act [FARA].--The Committee 
recognizes the importance of the National Security Division's 
[NSD] enforcement of FARA, Public Law 75-583; in order to 
increase transparency and accountability across the Federal 
Government by ensuring that persons acting on behalf of a 
foreign government disclose that relationship. The Committee 
continues to support the Office of Inspector General's 
recommendations to improve NSD's ability to administer and 
enforce FARA. The Committee directs that the Department 
continue to provide adequate funding of NSD's FARA activities.

                      Interagency Law Enforcement


                 INTERAGENCY CRIME AND DRUG ENFORCEMENT

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $542,850,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     521,563,000
Committee recommendation................................     521,563,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $521,563,000 for 
Interagency Crime and Drug Enforcement. The recommendation is 
$21,287,000 below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and equal 
to the budget request.
    The Interagency Crime and Drug Enforcement account funds 
the Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Forces [OCDETF]. 
The mission of the OCDETF is to ensure a coordinated, multi-
agency, intelligence-based, and prosecutor-led approach to 
identifying, disrupting, and dismantling those drug trafficking 
and money laundering organizations primarily responsible for 
the Nation's illicit drug supply and drug-related violence.
    International Drug Enforcement.--OCDETF is urged to 
continue to coordinate with the DEA and other Federal and 
international law enforcement partners to play a role in the 
interception and disruption of foreign drug shipments, as 
directed by Senate Report 115-139 and codified in Public Law 
115-141.

                    Federal Bureau of Investigation


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $9,030,202,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   8,872,080,000
Committee recommendation................................   9,030,202,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $9,030,202,000 for 
the FBI salaries and expenses. The recommendation is equal to 
the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $158,122,000 above the 
budget request.
    Criminal Justice Information Services [CJIS].--The 
Committee recommends the full funding request for CJIS, 
including fee collections. The recommendation provides up to 
$121,000,000 for the FBI to continue improvements to the 
National Instant Criminal Background Check System [NICS] to 
increase the capacity and efficiency of the existing NICS 
system to perform background checks on prospective firearms 
buyers. The Committee's recommendation does not support the 
full request to rescind funds from the CJIS fee collections and 
instead directs the FBI to invest an appropriate amount of the 
fee collections into making necessary upgrades to CJIS's 
systems.
    Cybersecurity.--The FBI remains the only agency with the 
statutory authority, expertise, and ability to combine 
counterterrorism, counterintelligence, and criminal 
investigatory resources to neutralize, mitigate, and disrupt 
illegal domestic computer-supported operations. The Committee 
supports the requested adjustments-to-base and programmatic 
increases for cybersecurity activities throughout the FBI.
    Terrorist Explosive Device Analytical Center [TEDAC].--The 
Committee's recommendation provides no less than the fiscal 
year 2018 level for full operational funding to TEDAC and the 
additional operational support associated with the TEDAC campus 
in fiscal year 2019, which will continue to strengthen the role 
of TEDAC as the U.S. Government's strategic-level improvised 
explosive device exploitation center and provide the resources 
necessary to fully staff the facility.
    Hazardous Devices School [HDS] and International Advanced 
Canine Technology Center.--The Committee recognizes HDS's 
status as both the sole certification authority of civilian 
State, local, and Federal bomb technicians and the sole 
accrediting authority of civilian State, local, and Federal 
bomb squads intending to utilize any manner of render safe or 
device defeat within the United States and its territories. The 
Committee supports the FBI Weapons of Mass Destruction 
Directorate's efforts at no less than the fiscal year 2018 
level, to more efficiently and effectively disseminate critical 
threat information to the explosives detection canine community 
and, in conjunction with government and academic partners to 
support this national security program.
    Enhancements at TEDAC and HDS.--The Committee supports the 
recent enhancements at TEDAC and HDS, including additional 
advanced render safe techniques courses for public safety bomb 
technicians. The Committee encourages the FBI's further 
research and testing of the functions and effects of explosive 
devices in order to better exploit design weaknesses and 
enhance its training courses, which in turn allows HDS to 
provide the required standardized and consistent training to 
the entire civilian, domestic bomb squad community. Within the 
funds provided for FBI, up to $2,500,000 may be made available 
for the FBI's Research Development Testing and Evaluation 
[RDTE] Program to rapidly develop tools and techniques to 
defeat IED threats to the United States, including advanced 
counter explosive device research focusing on hypervelocity 
impact and hypervelocity flight dynamics. Using IED information 
collected from the intelligence community and TEDAC, the RDTE 
program anticipates advances in IED technology, researches 
suitable solutions and develops technologies and procedures for 
incorporation into render safe training at HDS.
    Human Rights Violations.--The Committee directs the FBI to 
continue its efforts to investigate and support the DOJ's 
criminal prosecution of serious human rights crimes committed 
by foreign nationals, including genocide, torture, use or 
recruitment of child soldiers, and war crimes. The Committee's 
recommendation continues funding this effort at the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level.
    Innocent Images National Initiative.--The Committee's 
recommendation supports the fiscal year 2019 request of 
$91,640,000 for the Innocent Images National Initiative, 
allowing the FBI to target and investigate sexual predators on 
the Internet. The Committee is concerned that the proposed 
reductions to the base program are insufficient to cover the 
current Innocent Images caseload that combat child sexual 
exploitation and child victimization.
    Law Enforcement Medical Demonstration.--The Committee 
supports the Bureau's actions to formalize external 
partnerships in the Operational Medicine Program in order to 
support medical contingency planning and improve the delivery 
of medical care for high-risk law enforcement missions. The 
Committee looks forward to reviewing the Bureau's report, as 
directed in Senate Report 115-139 and codified in Public Law 
115-141 regarding these partnerships.
    National Bioforensic Analysis Center.--The Committee 
recognizes the need to maintain operations at the National 
Bioforensic Analysis Center [NBFAC] and supports the work 
performed at the NBFAC in furtherance of the FBI's mission. The 
Committee understands NBFAC currently operates under a contract 
executed by the Department of Homeland Security [DHS], and that 
the FBI intends to enter into a cost-sharing agreement or 
memorandum of understanding/agreement with DHS, so that the 
Bureau may continue ongoing operations at this facility.
    The Committee supports the bioforensic analysis and 
investigations performed at NBFAC, and looks forward to 
learning more about the proposed cost sharing agreement between 
the Bureau and DHS. The Committee supports $20,800,000 for the 
FBI's role at the NBFAC and directs the FBI to report, not 
later than 30 days after the enactment of this act, with 
alternative financial plans regarding the maintenance and or 
ownership of the facility.
    Counter-Unmanned Aircraft Systems [UAS].--The Committee 
supports efforts to expand the Bureau's counter-UAS program 
capabilities including increased partnerships with State and 
local law enforcement.
    FBI Police.--A 2014 study conducted by the FBI's Inspection 
Division revealed that the primary obstacle faced by FBI Police 
management was the low retention rate of FBI police officers, 
Federal law enforcement officers tasked with protecting FBI 
facilities, properties, personnel, visitors, and operations, 
due to lower pay and fewer benefits compared to other members 
in the National Capital Region like the U.S. Capitol Police and 
CIA Police. This has a subsequent negative effect on morale and 
as a result of lower pay and benefits.
    Under 28 U.S.C. 540C, the Director of the FBI, subject to 
the supervision of the Attorney General, may establish a 
permanent police force, to be known as the FBI police. The FBI 
police shall perform such duties as the Director may prescribe 
in connection with the protection of persons and property 
within FBI buildings and grounds.
    The Committee encourages the Director of the FBI to make 
the rates of basic pay, salary schedule, pay provisions, and 
benefits for members of the FBI police equivalent to the rates 
of basic pay, salary schedule, pay provisions, and benefits 
applicable to other Federal police divisions. Within 180 days 
of enactment, the FBI shall report to the Committee on the 
retention rate and pay of the FBI police compared to other 
Federal law enforcement with similar missions. The Committee 
urges the FBI to coordinate, as appropriate, with the U.S. 
Office of Personnel Management [OPM] and any other relevant 
agency as it implements these activities.

                              CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $370,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      51,895,000
Committee recommendation................................     385,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $385,000,000 for 
FBI construction. The recommendation is $15,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $333,105,000 above the 
budget request.
    FBI Headquarters.--Due to concerns about the FBI 
Headquarters Revised Nationally-Focused Consolidation Plan 
which was submitted to Congress by the General Services 
Administration [GSA] on February 12, 2018, the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2018 (Public Law 115-141) included no 
funding for this project. No funds were requested for the 
project for fiscal year 2019, and no funds are provided in this 
bill.
    The Committee continues to be reluctant to appropriate any 
additional funds for this project due to the unanswered 
questions regarding the new plan, including the revision of 
longstanding mission and security requirements. The Committee 
encourages the FBI to work with GSA to submit a prospectus for 
a new, fully-consolidated headquarters building, including at 
one of the three previously vetted sites that complies with 
prior Congressional directives and actions and meets 
Interagency Security Committee [ISC] Level V security 
standards.
    21st Century Facilities.--The Committee continues to 
support the FBI's long-term vision for co-locating 
complimentary mission operations while balancing the eventual 
transition into a new headquarters building with changing 
footprints at Quantico, Clarksburg, Huntsville, and Pocatello 
facilities. The delay in the new FBI headquarters project only 
exacerbates the need to secure viable space for supporting a 
variety of missions, workforce, and land requirements. The 
Committee recommendation provides funding at no less than the 
fiscal year 2018 enacted level to further support the FBI's 
21st Century Facility plans and encourages the FBI to 
transition from interim facilities to full operating 
capabilities, including plans for technological requirements. 
As part of this 21st Century Planning, the FBI should continue 
to research the feasibility of using public-private partnership 
opportunities, provided that the annual lease and operating 
costs are reasonable and the facilities can be securely 
constructed and maintained at a level that meets the FBI's 
requirements.

                    Drug Enforcement Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $2,609,900,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................\1\2,862,162,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,654,836,000

\1\The budget request includes $254,000,000 for the consolidation of the 
High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area [HIDTA] from the Office of National 
Drug Control Policy to the DEA. The Committee recommendation does not 
include this transfer.

    The Committee's recommendation provides total resources of 
$2,654,836,000 for the DEA, of which $420,703,000 is derived 
from the DEA's Diversion Control Fee Account [DCFA]. The 
recommendation is $44,936,000 above the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level and $207,326,000 below the budget request. When 
compared to the budget request for DEA operations only, the 
recommendation is $46,674,000 higher. Within the funds 
provided, $10,000,000 is for assistance to State and local law 
enforcement for proper removal and disposal of hazardous 
materials at clandestine methamphetamine labs, and to initiate 
container programs.
    The DEA's mission is to enforce the controlled substances 
laws and regulations of the United States and bring to the 
criminal and civil justice system of the United States--or any 
other competent jurisdiction--those organizations and principal 
members of organizations involved in the growing, 
manufacturing, or distribution of controlled substances 
appearing in or destined for illicit traffic in the United 
States; and to support non-enforcement programs aimed at 
reducing the availability of illicit controlled substances on 
the domestic and international markets.
    Medical Registration Coordination.--The Committee requested 
a plan from the Department regarding over-prescribing of 
opioids by medical practitioners as part of Senate Report 114-
239 and codified in Public Law 115-31. This plan is well 
overdue, and the Committee requests its immediate submission.
    Drug Diversion at Veterans Health Administration 
Facilities.--The Committee remains alarmed by the rates of 
prescription drug opioid abuse and related overdoses among 
veterans, as well as allegations of diversion of prescription 
opioids from Veterans Health Administration [VHA] facilities 
into the illicit drug market. According to a February 2018 
Government Accountability Office report, the oversight of 
controlled substances within VHA remains a significant problem. 
That VHA facilities continue to be a source for the illicit 
distribution and use of opioids is extremely concerning, and 
the Committee directs the DEA to ensure that investigations of 
drug diversion in VHA facilities remain a priority. As stated 
in Senate Reports 114-66, 114-239, and 115-131, the Committee 
continues to expect the DEA to take steps to ensure that 
sufficient resources are allocated for investigations of drug 
diversion at VHA facilities.
    Permanent Drug Take Back Collection Sites.--The Committee 
applauds the option for consumers and long-term care facilities 
to dispose of unneeded medicines by transferring them, 
including prescription opioids, to DEA-registered collectors, 
which safely and securely collect and dispose of 
pharmaceuticals containing controlled substances. Authorized 
permanent collection sites may be located in retail pharmacies, 
hospital or clinic pharmacies, and law enforcement facilities. 
Some authorized collection sites may also offer mail-back 
programs or collection receptacles, sometimes called ``drop-
boxes,'' to assist consumers in safely disposing unused 
medicines. The Committee directs DEA to continue this program 
and expand locations where possible.
    Discussions with Reverse Distributors.--The Committee 
encourages DEA to meet with commercial hazardous waste 
management industry members, many who are reverse distributors 
for the receipt and destruction of unwanted controlled 
substances. Such meetings should include discussions that 
establish a formal process for evaluating alternative methods 
of disposal, other than incineration, as a means of meeting 
DEA's ``Non Retrievable'' standard. Such methods may include 
dissolving controlled substances in solvents and acids. 
Further, the Committee encourages DEA to develop a process for 
permitting alternative safety measures for the transportation 
of controlled substances for disposal, including secure tamper-
proof evidence packages or security tape sealed drums, to 
ensure compliance with both the Resource Conservation and 
Recovery Act (Public Law 94-580) and the Secure and Responsible 
Drug Disposal Act (Public Law 111-273).

          Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $1,293,776,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   1,316,678,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,316,678,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $1,316,678,000 for 
ATF. The recommendation is $22,902,000 above the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level and equal to the budget request. ATF has 
diverse law enforcement responsibilities, and the funding 
increase is provided to allow ATF to carry out these duties and 
to fill existing positions that are currently vacant.
    ATF reduces the criminal use of firearms and illegal 
firearms trafficking, and assists other Federal, State, and 
local law enforcement agencies in reducing crime and violence. 
ATF investigates bombing and arson incidents and assists with 
improving public safety by reducing the criminal misuse of and 
trafficking in explosives, combating acts of arson and arson-
for-profit schemes, and removing safety hazards caused by 
improper and unsafe storage of explosive materials.
    Combating Gun Violence and Enforcing Existing Gun Laws.--
The Committee's recommendation maintains ATF's ability to 
enforce existing firearms laws and perform regulatory oversight 
and training, including through the National Integrated 
Ballistics Information Network [NIBIN]. This funding will 
enable ATF to continue to collect, report, and share ballistic 
intelligence with Federal, State, local, and tribal law 
enforcement partners to identify, target, and disrupt violent 
criminals, including serial shooters. Funds will support work 
with State and local law enforcement agencies and laboratories 
to collect ballistic hit information to provide leads to 
Firearms Intelligence Groups for investigations and document 
successful prosecutions as a result of NIBIN.
    United States-Mexico Firearms Trafficking.--The Committee 
continues to support the ATF's efforts to combat weapon 
trafficking on the border. The ATF shall continue to provide 
the Committee with annual data on the total number of firearms 
recovered by the Government of Mexico, and of those, the number 
for which an ATF trace is attempted, the number successfully 
traced, and the number determined to have originated in the 
United States prior to being recovered in Mexico.
    National Center for Explosives Training and Research 
[NCETR].--Since fiscal year 2013, ATF has had the use of NCETR 
at its disposal as a critical facility and Federal asset with 
unique capabilities. However, the Committee has remained 
concerned that NCETR has been understaffed and underutilized. 
Therefore, in an effort to capitalize on the Federal 
investments that currently exist at NCETR, such as the lab and 
test range, the Committee directs the Department to partner 
with Federal, State, and local law enforcement entities, as 
well as the U.S. military where appropriate, to conduct 
research in the field of explosives and precursor chemicals.

                         Federal Prison System


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $7,114,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   7,042,328,000
Committee recommendation................................   7,256,280,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $7,256,280,000 for 
Bureau of Prisons [BOP] salaries and expenses. The 
recommendation is $142,280,000 above the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level and $213,952,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee supports the Department's request to increase funding 
for BOP's cybersecurity, including improving network defenses 
and mitigating insider threats.
    BOP Staffing and Hiring.--The Committee remains concerned 
that the Department has maintained a hiring freeze for BOP when 
it has since lifted the hiring moratorium for other DOJ law 
enforcement agencies. The inmate to correctional officer ratio 
continues to remain at 8.3 to 1, a level that the Committee 
considers unsafe and believes BOP should immediately correct. 
The Committee directs DOJ to revisit hiring policies to ensure 
BOP is able to appropriately staff its 122 Federal facilities 
across the United States, particularly the hiring of 
correctional officers at medium- and high-security facilities. 
Finally, the Committee is concerned about the extensive number 
of eliminated positions proposed by BOP as part of its budget 
request. The Committee rejects further position eliminations.
    Hiring and Staffing Reports.--The Committee directs BOP to 
submit quarterly hiring and staffing reports, including 
corrections officer-to-inmate ratios from Pay Period 26-2016 to 
the present for the OPM position classification standard 
Correctional Officer Series GS-0007, broken out by region, 
institution, security level, and shift (morning watch, day 
watch, evening watch) no later than 90 days after enactment. 
For any institution with a staffing ratio greater than 25:1, or 
an incident involving deadly force in any such report, BOP 
shall provide a separate, detailed explanation of the role 
staffing may or may not have played in the incident along with 
a corrective plan to ensure it will not happen again.
    Augmentation.--While BOP reports that there is a higher 
incidence of serious assaults by inmates on staff at high- and 
medium-security institutions than at the lower security 
facilities, to meet staffing needs, BOP routinely uses a 
process called ``augmentation,'' whereby a non-custodial 
employee is assigned custodial responsibilities. The Committee 
again directs BOP to curtail its overreliance on augmentation, 
particularly in housing units, a directive issued as part of 
Senate Report 115-139 and codified in Public Law 115-141. BOP 
should instead hire additional full-time correctional staff 
before continuing to augment existing staff. BOP is further 
directed to submit quarterly reports to the Committee on the 
use of augmentation broken out by region, institution, and 
security level each time this practice is employed.
    Alleviating Overcrowding at High-Security Facilities.--The 
overcrowding rate at high-security prisons remains high at 26 
percent. The Committee supports BOP's efforts to alleviate 
overcrowding at high-security facilities through the process of 
activating additional prisons. The Committee expects BOP to 
adhere to its activation schedule regarding these prison 
facilities, including the acceptance of high-security inmates 
at the United States Penitentiary [USP] in Thomson, Illinois, 
as BOP estimates overcrowding at high-security facilities to be 
reduced to 19 percent with the full opening of USP Thomson. The 
Committee continues to direct that this facility be designated 
as a high-security USP.
    The Committee previously directed BOP to ensure at least 
two correctional officers are on duty for each housing unit for 
all three shifts at all high-security institutions to include 
United States Penitentiaries and Administrative and Federal 
Detention Centers. BOP is directed to continue to submit 
quarterly reports to the Committee showing compliance with this 
directive and provide a cost estimate and strategic plan for 
implementation for medium-security institutions that currently 
do not have a second officer for all three shifts.
    Medication-Assisted Treatment [MAT] Expansion.--The 
Committee directs that no less than the fiscal year 2018 level 
be provided for BOP to continue the MAT program for inmates 
with heroin and opioid addiction. This voluntary pilot program 
treats approximately 200 inmates in residential reentry 
centers. BOP is directed to provide a report to the Committee 
within 90 days of enactment of this act including the number of 
locations and number of individuals using MAT as well as a 
strategic plan for deploying the MAT program to all BOP Regions 
including timelines and locations.
    Federal Detainers.--In an effort to ensure that criminal 
aliens are not improperly released into our communities, the 
Committee directs BOP to offer Immigration and Customs 
Enforcement [ICE] the first opportunity to take into custody 
and remove an individual with a Federal detainer instead of BOP 
and ICE automatically deferring to States and municipalities 
who are seeking custody of the same individual. ICE's decision 
to exercise this right of first refusal with BOP will be 
informed, in part, by the State or municipality's willingness 
to cooperate with Federal authorities on ICE detainers.
    Compassionate Release.--The Committee notes that BOP 
expanded the grounds for, and streamlined the process of, 
considering requests for compassionate release in 2013. The 
Committee is also aware that the Department of Justice Office 
of Inspector General [OIG] recommended additional reforms to 
the compassionate release program in its 2013 review of the 
program. In 2016, the U.S. Sentencing Commission [USSC] amended 
the criteria for compassionate release and encouraged BOP to 
file a motion for those prisoners who meet the criteria as 
identified by the Commission.
    The Committee awaits the information required by Senate 
Report 115-139 and codified in Public Law 115-141, including an 
account of: (1) any steps taken by BOP to implement the OIG and 
USSC's recommendations; (2) for those recommendations not met, 
BOP's plan for future implementation and/or an explanation as 
to why these recommendations cannot be implemented; (3) the 
number of prisoners granted or denied compassionate release 
during each of the last 5 years; (4) for each of the past 5 
years, the number of requests initiated by or on behalf of 
prisoners, categorized by the criteria relied on as grounds for 
a reduction in sentence; (5) for each year, the number of 
requests approved by the Director of the BOP, categorized by 
the criteria relied on as grounds for a reduction in sentence; 
(6) for each year, the number of denials by the Director of the 
BOP, categorized by the criteria relied on as grounds for a 
reduction in sentence and the reason given for the denial; (7) 
for each year, the period of time between the date the request 
was received by the warden and the final decision, categorized 
by the criteria relied on as grounds for a reduction in 
sentence; and (8) for each year, the number of prisoners who 
died while their compassionate release requests were pending 
and, for each, the amount of time that elapsed between the date 
the request was received by the warden.
    Inmate Mental Health Care and Restrictive Housing.--The 
Committee was encouraged that the Bureau of Prisons [BOP] 
agreed to resolve the 15 recommendations made by the Department 
of Justice Inspector General [DOJ-IG] in July 2017 regarding 
the need for BOP to improve its screening, treatment, and 
monitoring of inmates with mental illness housed in Restrictive 
Housing Units. The Committee encourages BOP to continue to 
develop evidence-based policies and appropriate facilities that 
ensure BOP can do its job safely while also providing proper 
care for those inmates with mental illnesses. As such, the 
Committee requests a report, within 180 days of enactment of 
this act, from BOP on the status of resolving each of those 15 
DOJ-IG recommendations issued in July 2017.
    Correctional Education Evaluation.--The Committee 
recognizes the value of correctional education in reducing 
recidivism. The Committee is concerned, however, that there is 
a lack of comprehensive data and analysis on key questions such 
as the necessary amount of intervention education; how 
intervention needs vary by educational program; and what models 
of instruction and curriculum delivery are most effective in 
correctional environments. Therefore, the Committee encourages 
the National Corrections Institute's [NCI] efforts to establish 
public-private partnerships with research and correctional 
institutions to evaluate completed demonstration projects 
involving postsecondary education programs in prisons, and 
looks forward to reviewing NCI's findings on correctional 
education in a report submitted to the Committee not later than 
90 days after the date of enactment.
    Report on Contract Facilities.--The Committee reminds BOP 
of the direction provided in Senate Report 115-139 as codified 
in Public Law 115-141 on submitting a detailed report on the 
use of contract facilities for fiscal years 2016 and 2017. The 
Committee looks forward to the timely submission of this 
report.
    Freedom of Information Act Records.--The Committee expects 
BOP to maintain records and respond to records requests, 
consistent with the requirements of section 5 U.S.C. 552 
(commonly referenced as the Freedom of Information Act), for 
information related to all Federal offenders in the custody of 
BOP, regardless of whether such offenders are housed in a 
Federal or non-Federal prison, detention center, correctional 
institution, privately managed or community-based facility, or 
local jail. The Committee further notes that BOP should not 
withhold records from disclosure unless BOP reasonably foresees 
that disclosure would harm an interest protected by an 
exemption described in 5 U.S.C. 552b, or as otherwise 
prohibited by law.
    Residential Reentry Centers.--The Committee maintains 
concerns and expectations regarding Residential Reentry Centers 
[RRCs] as outlined in Senate Report 115-139 and codified in 
Public Law 115-141, including the direction requiring BOP to 
alert the Committee before adopting any significant change in 
policy or practice involving RRCs or other recidivism-reduction 
measures. The Committee directs BOP not to cancel or modify any 
existing contracts for RRCs if another BOP-contracted RRC 
facility does not exist within 100 miles of the existing RRC. 
In instances where RRC contracts are expiring, the Committee 
directs BOP to take interim and emergency measures to prevent 
facility closures and the interruption of services, including 
by expediting solicitations and re-solicitations for existing 
services.
    Minimum Security Camps.--The Committee does not approve of 
BOP's proposal to close or move any of the Bureau's seven 
stand-alone federal correctional minimum security camps.

                        BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $161,571,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      99,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     274,000,000

    This act includes $274,000,000 for the construction, 
acquisition, modernization, maintenance and repair of prison 
and detention facilities housing Federal inmates. The 
recommendation is $112,429,000 above the enacted level and 
$175,000,000 above the budget request. Within this amount not 
less than $175,000,000 is for costs related to construction of 
new facilities currently not fully funded that remain on BOP's 
Monthly Construction Status Report. BOP shall proceed with 
ongoing planned and associated new construction efforts to meet 
projected capacity requirements, as identified in its monthly 
status of construction reports to the Committee. BOP is 
directed to continue to provide such reports on a quarterly 
basis, along with notifications and explanations of any 
deviation from construction and activation schedules, and any 
planned adjustments or corrective actions.
    The Committee includes bill language in Title V--General 
Provisions stipulating that no BOP resources may be used for 
facilities to house detainees from the United States Naval 
Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

                FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INCORPORATED

                (LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES)

Appropriations, 2018....................................      $2,700,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       2,700,000
Committee recommendation................................       2,700,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides a limitation on the 
administrative expenses of $2,700,000 for the Federal Prison 
Industries, Inc. The recommendation is equal to the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level and equal to the budget request.

               State and Local Law Enforcement Activities

    In total, the Committee recommends $3,001,800,000 for State 
and local law enforcement and crime prevention grant programs, 
including: $2,504,300,000 in discretionary appropriations and 
in mandatory appropriations, and $497,500,000 from funds 
provided under section 510 of this act. The total is 
$67,500,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and 
$957,000,000 above the budget estimate.
    Management and Administration Expenses.--The Department 
shall, in preparing its fiscal year 2019 spending plan, assess 
management and administration [M&A;] expenses compared to 
program funding. The Committee directs the Department to ensure 
that its assessment methodology is equitable and, for programs 
funded through the Crime Victims Fund, that the assessment 
reflects a fair representation of the share of each program 
devoted to common M&A; costs. The Committee also directs grant 
offices to minimize administrative spending in order to 
maximize the amount of funding that can be used for grants or 
training and technical assistance. The Committee reiterates the 
direction provided in Public Law 113-76 that the Department 
shall detail, as part of its budget submission for fiscal year 
2020 and future years, the actual costs for each grant office 
with respect to training, technical assistance, research and 
statistics, and peer review for the prior fiscal year, along 
with estimates of planned expenditures by each grant office in 
each of these categories for the current year and the budget 
year.
    Expanded Purpose Areas for Crime Victim Assistance.--The 
Committee reminds Office for Victims of Crime [OVC] of the 
final rule (81 Fed. Reg. 44515) regarding the expansion of 
purpose areas that can be used for victim services programs 
including discretionary grants.
    Compliance with Federal Laws.--The Committee directs the 
Department to ensure that all applicants for Edward Byrne 
Memorial Justice Assistance Grants [Byrne JAG], Community 
Oriented Policing Services [COPS] grants, and State Criminal 
Alien Assistance Program [SCAAP] funds are required to attest 
and certify that the potential grant recipients are in 
compliance with all applicable Federal laws, and shall be 
required to continue to remain compliant throughout the 
duration of their grant award period.
    Grant Funding Set-Asides.--The Committee notes the 
significant number of reductions in grant funding allowable for 
various purposes, including training, technical assistance, 
research, evaluation, and statistics activities with set-asides 
ranging anywhere from 2 percent to 10 percent of total grant 
funding provided. To that end, the Committee directs the 
Department to continue providing a comprehensive report 
concurrently with the spending plan that details the total 
amount provided for each grant program in this act, the 
specific reductions taken, the purpose for those reductions, 
and the final use of those resources, including any transfers 
that may occur among Office of Justice Programs [OJP], Office 
on Violence Against Women [OVW], and COPS. The Committee 
expects that the report will provide a complete analysis of the 
final amounts externally awarded and the amounts retained 
internally for other purposes.
    Grant Funds for Rural Areas.--The Committee is concerned 
about the needs of rural areas, especially those communities 
with high crime rates. The Committee wants to ensure that the 
challenges encountered by the residents of these areas are 
being addressed through the equitable use of grant funding. The 
Committee reminds the Department to consider the unique needs 
of rural communities when making grant awards through the 
numerous programs funded under this act.
    Tribal Grants and Victim Assistance.--The Committee 
provides a total of $91,000,000 in discretionary grant funding 
for tribes as follows: $50,000,000 within OJP for tribal 
assistance; $7,000,000 for a tribal youth program within the 
Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; 
$27,000,000 for tribal resources and $3,000,000 for a Tribal 
Access Program within the COPS Office; and $4,000,000 for a 
special domestic violence criminal jurisdiction program within 
the Office on Violence Against Women.
    For tribal assistance grants within OJP, funding is to be 
used to support efforts to help tribes improve the capacity of 
their criminal and civil justice systems. OJP is expected to 
consult closely with tribal stakeholders in determining how 
tribal assistance funds will be awarded for detention 
facilities, including outdated detention facilities that are 
unfit for detention purposes and beyond rehabilitation; courts; 
alcohol and substance abuse programs; civil and criminal legal 
assistance; and other priorities. The Committee directs OJP to 
submit, as part of the Department's spending plan for fiscal 
year 2019, a plan for the use of these funds that is informed 
by such consultation.
    In addition, the bill includes a 5 percent set-aside for 
tribes within the Crime Victims Fund. OVC is directed to 
consult closely with tribal stakeholders to improve services 
for tribal victims of crime to include expanded purpose areas 
described in the OVC final rule effective August 8, 2016. OVC 
shall continue to follow direction provided by the Committee in 
Senate Report 115-139 and codified in Public Law 115-141 
regarding grant application requirements, accountability, and 
assistance.
    Human Trafficking in Indian Country.--The Committee 
encourages the Departments of Justice, Interior, and Health and 
Human Services to work together to address the need for and 
impact of Federal grant assistance regarding human trafficking 
in Indian Country, to ensure that Federal dollars are used 
effectively and efficiently.
    Post-Conviction Relief for Trafficking Victims.--The 
Committee recognizes that serious, sustained efforts and 
investments in victim-centered programs are necessary to help 
address the rise in human trafficking and is committed to 
helping victims seek justice and ensure that offenders are held 
accountable. The Committee is concerned about reports that 
trafficking victims are prosecuted, both at the Federal and 
state levels, for crimes directly related to their trafficking. 
Criminal convictions often disqualify victims from numerous 
Federal programs and impede their recovery. The Committee is 
concerned that removing expungement services from eligible 
activities for fiscal year 2018 OVC grants contradicts the 2017 
Trafficking in Persons Report released by the State Department, 
which encouraged the expansion of vacatur services.
    In light of the 2017 State Department report, the Committee 
requests a study from the Department on the number of 
trafficked victims who are convicted of crimes related to their 
trafficking, the types of crimes, and an analysis on how the 
Federal government can supplement state vacatur programs. The 
report shall be submitted to Congress within 30 days of 
enactment of this bill.
    Submission of Officer Training Information.--The Committee 
directs the Department to continue following direction provided 
in fiscal years 2017 and 2018 regarding the submission of 
officer training data as part of the Byrne-JAG and COPS hiring 
grant process.
    STOP School Violence Act.--The Committee provides a total 
of $100,000,000 for the STOP School Violence Act (Division S, 
Title V of Public Law 115-141) grant program, which is equal to 
the authorized amount and is $25,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2018 level. Of this amount, $75,000,000 is provided to the 
Bureau of Justice Assistance [BJA] for evidence-based school 
safety programs outlined in the Act and $25,000,000 is provided 
to the COPS Office for their respective competitive grant 
programs as outlined in the act. States, localities, Tribes and 
corresponding school districts should consider using BJA funds 
as permitted under the Act for school violence prevention 
programs to prevent violent acts before a weapon enters a 
campus, including development and operation of evidence-based 
school threat assessments and trainings for school personnel 
and students to identify and report signs of violence against 
others or self. As designated in the authorization for the COPS 
portion of this program, funding is allowable for strengthening 
security measures, such as technology for expedited 
notification of local law enforcement during an emergency, 
locks, lighting, and other deterrent measures.
    Consent Decrees and Grant Assistance.--The Committee is 
aware that the Department's Civil Rights Division is currently 
enforcing 14 consent decrees. The Committee is also aware of 
the benefits received by the local communities and their 
citizens after a consent decree has been successfully enforced 
and the required reforms are implemented. As tensions between 
certain communities and police departments have grown in recent 
years, the Committee seeks to ensure that consent decrees 
continue to be implemented successfully and accordingly, 
encourages the Department to provide additional training and 
technical assistance for jurisdictions participating in a 
consent decree with the Department.
    Financial Exploitation.--The Committee commends the work of 
the OVC to address the issue of financial exploitation of older 
Americans by guardians, conservators, and other fiduciaries. As 
emphasized in Senate Report 115-139 and codified in Public Law 
115-141, the Committee encourages OVC to continue working with 
stakeholders to minimize loss of the assets of individuals 
subject to conservatorship and to improve access to the legal 
system by victims of conservatorship exploitation.
    Issuance of DOJ Grant Solicitations.--The Committee directs 
all Department of Justice grant making components to have 
fiscal year 2019 grant solicitations posted no later than March 
31, 2019, to ensure applicants to have a minimum of 60 days to 
submit an application and to ensure that DOJ has adequate time 
to consider the funding requests and submissions subject to 
requirements outlined in section 505 of the bill. Should a new 
grant program be appropriated or an existing grant program be 
modified by this act, the Department shall issue solicitations 
for new programs or re-issue modified grant program 
solicitations as expeditiously as possible while still meeting 
the requirements of section 505.
    DOJ Grants, Multi-Year Awards Oversight.--The Committee 
encourages DOJ to review its multi-year grant award processes 
and protocols to ensure grantees have fully complied with the 
rules of year one funding before year two funding is disbursed 
in multi-year grant awards.

                    Office on Violence Against Women

       VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN PREVENTION AND PROSECUTION PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2018.................................... \1\$492,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................  \2\485,500,000
Committee recommendation................................  \1\497,500,000

\1\Derived by transfer from funding available under section 510 of this 
act.
\2\Requested to be derived from funding available under section 510 of 
this act.

    The Committee's recommendation provides $497,500,000 for 
OVW grants. The recommendation is $5,500,000 above the fiscal 
year 2018 enacted level and $12,000,000 above the budget 
request. Resources are provided to the OVW to respond to the 
needs of all victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, 
dating violence, and stalking, including, but not limited to, 
Native women, immigrants, LGBT victims, college students, 
youths, and public housing residents.
    The table below displays the Committee's recommendations 
for the programs under this office.

       VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN PREVENTION AND PROSECUTION PROGRAMS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Program                           Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
STOP Grants..........................................           215,000
Transitional Housing Assistance......................            36,000
Research and Evaluation on Violence Against Women....             3,000
Consolidated Youth Oriented Program..................            11,000
Grants to Encourage Arrest Policies..................            53,000
    Homicide Reduction Initiative....................            [4,000]
Sexual Assault Victims Services......................            37,500
Rural Domestic Violence and Child Abuse Enforcement..            42,000
Violence on College Campuses.........................            20,000
Civil Legal Assistance...............................            45,000
Elder Abuse Grant Program............................             5,000
Family Civil Justice.................................            16,000
Education and Training for Disabled Female Victims...             6,000
National Center on Workplace Responses...............             1,000
Research on Violence Against Indian Women............             1,000
Indian Country--Sexual Assault Clearinghouse.........               500
Tribal Special Domestic Violence Criminal                         4,000
 Jurisdiction........................................
Rape Survivor Child Custody Act......................             1,500
                                                      ------------------
      TOTAL, Violence Against Women Prevention and              497,500
       Prosecution Programs..........................
------------------------------------------------------------------------


    STOP Grants.--Within the discretionary budget authority 
appropriated, $215,000,000 is for formula grants to the States. 
This is equal to the budget request and equal to the fiscal 
year 2018 enacted level. The recommendation supports increasing 
access to comprehensive legal services for victims, providing 
short-term housing assistance and support services for domestic 
violence victims, and education and training to end violence 
against and abuse of women with disabilities.
    Sexual Assault Services Act [SASA].--The Committee's 
recommendation provides $37,500,000, which is $2,500,000 above 
both the budget request and the fiscal year 2018 enacted level, 
to directly fund the needs of sexual assault victims.
    As part of VAWA 2005 and reauthorized by VAWA 2013, the 
Sexual Assault Services Program addresses considerable gaps in 
services to sexual assault victims. The Committee supports a 
dedicated stream of funding to provide a broad range of 
services to adult and child sexual assault victims and their 
families through the well-established and well-regarded system 
of community-based rape crisis centers throughout the United 
States, and maintains its strong commitment to ensuring that 
these rape crisis centers have access to technical assistance, 
training, and support.
    Protecting VAWA.--The Committee expects the Attorney 
General to ensure enforcement of Section 5 of the Justice for 
All Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114-324) and to 
issue guidance making clear that it would be inappropriate to 
subject OVW funds to such penalties.

                       Office of Justice Programs

    The OJP is responsible for providing leadership, 
coordination, and assistance to its Federal, State, local, and 
tribal partners to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of 
the U.S. justice system in preventing, controlling, and 
responding to crime. As most of the responsibility for crime 
control and prevention falls to law enforcement officers in 
States, cities, and other localities, the Federal Government is 
effective in these areas only to the extent that it can enter 
into successful partnerships with these jurisdictions. 
Therefore, OJP is tasked with administering grants; collecting 
statistical data and conducting analyses; identifying emerging 
criminal justice issues; developing and testing promising and 
innovative approaches to address these issues; evaluating 
program results; and disseminating these findings and other 
information to State, local, and tribal governments. The 
Committee directs OJP to submit an annual report on grant 
programs that have not received a sufficient number of 
qualified applicants.

                  RESEARCH, EVALUATION AND STATISTICS

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $90,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      77,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      90,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $90,000,000 for the 
Research, Evaluation and Statistics account. The recommendation 
is equal to the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $13,000,000 
above the budget request.
    Funding in this account provides assistance in the areas of 
research, evaluation, statistics, hate crimes, DNA and 
forensics, criminal background checks, and gun safety 
technology, among others.
    The Committee's recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

                   RESEARCH, EVALUATION AND STATISTICS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Program                           Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Bureau of Justice Statistics.........................            48,000
    NCS-X Implementation Program.....................            [5,000]
National Institute of Justice........................            42,000
    Domestic Radicalization Research.................            [4,000]
    Research on School Safety........................            [1,000]
    Juvenile Online Victimization Survey.............            [1,000]
    National Center for Restorative Justice..........            [3,000]
                                                      ------------------
      TOTAL, Research Evaluation and Statistics......            90,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Spending Plans.--The Department shall submit to the 
Committee as part of its spending plan for State and Local Law 
Enforcement Activities a plan for the use of all funding 
administered by the National Institute of Justice and the 
Bureau of Justice Statistics, respectively, for approval by the 
Committee prior to the obligation of any such funds.
    Bureau of Justice Statistics [BJS].--The Committee's 
recommendation provides $48,000,000 for the BJS. Within the 
funds provided, $5,000,000 is provided for the National Crime 
Statistics Exchange [NCS-X]. NCS-X will improve the collection 
and reporting into the NIBRS, which provides more detailed 
criminal data such as officer-related shooting incidents.
    National Institute of Justice [NIJ].--The Committee's 
recommendation provides $42,000,000 for the NIJ, in addition to 
$4,000,000 transferred from the OVW for research and evaluation 
on violence against women and Indian women. Within the funds 
provided for NIJ, $4,000,000 is provided for domestic 
radicalization research. The NIJ's mission is to advance 
scientific research, development, and evaluation to advance the 
administration of justice and public safety.
    National Center on Restorative Justice.--Within the funds 
available for the NIJ, the Committee provides $3,000,000 for 
NIJ to enter into a partnership with an accredited university 
of higher education and/or law school for the purposes of 
establishing a National Center on Restorative Justice with the 
purpose of educating and training the next generation of 
justice leaders. The Center shall also support research 
focusing on how best to provide direct services to address 
social inequities, such as simultaneous access to substance 
abuse treatment and higher education. The Center shall engage 
and challenge undergraduate, Master's, and law students, in 
conjunction with criminal justice professionals, community 
members, educators, and social service providers, at the State, 
regional, and national level, aiming to broaden their 
understanding of justice systems and restorative approaches 
through a degree program, a summer institute, or short courses, 
while encouraging access to educational opportunities for 
incarcerated individuals.
    Impairment Detection Technology.--The Committee is 
concerned about the lack of reliable, accurate, and 
performance-capable devices and technologies that can be used 
by law enforcement in the field to screen and detect the use of 
certain drugs, including cannabinoids, opiates, cocaine, 
methamphetamine, methadone, and fentanyl. The lack of reliable 
technology for such detection has implications for public 
safety in terms of ensuring that impaired drivers are not 
allowed to remain behind the wheel and to ensure the safety of 
law enforcement coming into contact with dangerous and potent 
drugs, such as fentanyl. The Committee is aware that NIJ has 
previously conducted research in this area in coordination with 
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the National 
Institute of Drug Abuse, the Centers for Disease Control, the 
Office of National Drug Control Policy, and the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology, among others. That 
research, however, has not been updated since 2015, and to 
date, no such reliable, broad based technology nor device has 
been identified to aid law enforcement in the field. The 
Committee directs the NIJ to re-start this initiative, working 
in coordination with the same Federal partners and any 
additional partners that may be useful to the effort, to 
identify and/or develop such devices and technologies. The 
Committee further directs the NIJ to report back to the 
Committee not later than 180 days after enactment of this act, 
and not less than every 6 months thereafter until such time as 
technologies are identified and deployed to law enforcement in 
the field.
    National Juvenile Online Victimization Study.--The National 
Juvenile Online Victimization Study [N-JOV], designed to help 
law enforcement combat technology-facilitated child 
exploitation crimes, has been conducted three times, with the 
last study [N-JOV3] conducted in 2009. As access to the 
Internet, social media, and other technology has rapidly 
advanced in the past decade, the ability to protect children 
against online predatory behavior has struggled to keep pace.
    The Committee provides $1,000,000 for NIJ to administer a 
competitive grant to an accredited research university for an 
N-JOV4 study. This study will allow for the identification of 
new threats, problems and concerns encountered by law 
enforcement in the changing technological environment; improved 
tracking and monitoring of new and abating threats; and a 
better understanding of which investigative strategies are 
associated with more favorable outcomes in protecting children 
from online victimization.
    Researching School Violence.--The Committee provides 
$1,000,000 for NIJ to continue to develop a model and best 
practices for comprehensive school safety including identifying 
the root causes of violence in schools using the four prior 
years of research conducted under the Comprehensive School 
Safety Initiative, which funded 100 projects in K-12 schools 
aimed at preventing school violence in fiscal years 2014 
through 2017. NIJ shall provide a report to the Committee 
within one year of enactment of this act on the model and best 
practices for schools.
    The Committee also directs NIJ to establish metrics to 
determine the effectiveness in deterring school violence 
through the grants issued by BJA and COPS as part of the STOP 
School Violence Initiative. NIJ is directed to provide their 
methodology on these metrics within 30 days of enactment of 
this act as well as an annual report published on their website 
of the success of these grants.
    Campus Sexual Assault Prevention Research.--The Committee 
directs NIJ to continue Federal research projects at 
institutions of higher education on campus sexual assault 
prevention interventions and advance the dissemination of best 
practices per direction provided in Public Law 115-141.

               STATE AND LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $1,677,500,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   1,132,500,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,678,500,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $1,678,500,000 for 
State and local law enforcement assistance. The recommendation 
is $1,000,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and 
$546,000,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee's recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

               STATE AND LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Program                           Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grants.............           445,000
    Officer Robert Wilson III VALOR Initiative.......           [12,000]
    Smart Policing...................................           [10,000]
    Smart Prosecution................................           [10,000]
    NamUs............................................            [2,400]
    Academic Based Training Program to improve Police-           [2,500]
     Based Responses to People with Mental Illness...
     John R. Justice Grant Program...................            [2,000]
    Prison Rape Prevention and Prosecution...........           [15,500]
    Kevin and Avonte's Law...........................            [2,000]
    Regional Law Enforcement Technology Initiative...            [3,000]
State Criminal Alien Assistance Program..............           100,000
Victims of Trafficking Grants........................            85,000
Capital Litigation and Wrongful Conviction Review....             5,000
Economic, High-Tech, White Collar, and Cybercrime                15,500
 Prevention..........................................
    Intellectual Property Enforcement Program........            [2,500]
    Digital Investigation Education Program..........            [2,000]
Adam Walsh Act Implementation........................            20,000
Bulletproof Vests Partnerships.......................            25,000
    Transfer to NIST/OLES............................            [1,500]
National Sex Offender Public Website.................             1,000
National Instant Criminal Background Check System                75,000
 (NICS) Initiative...................................
    NICS Act Record Improvement Program..............           [25,000]
Paul Coverdell Forensic Science......................            35,000
DNA Initiative.......................................           132,000
    Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grants..................          [121,000]
    Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing                 [7,000]
     Grants..........................................
    Sexual Assault Forensic Exam Program Grants......            [4,000]
Sexual Assault Kit Initiative [SAKI].................            50,000
CASA-Special Advocates...............................            12,000
Tribal Assistance....................................            50,000
Second Chance Act/Offender Reentry...................            90,000
    Smart Probation..................................            [6,000]
    Children of Incarcerated Parents Demo Grants.....            [5,000]
    Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with                      [4,000]
     Enforcement.....................................
    Pay for Success..................................            [7,500]
    Pay for Success (Permanent Supportive Housing                [5,000]
     Model)..........................................
Anti-Opioid Initiative...............................           360,000
    Drug Courts......................................           [80,000]
    Mentally Ill Offender Act........................           [32,500]
    Residential Substance Abuse Treatment............           [35,000]
    Veterans Treatment Courts........................           [22,500]
    Prescription Drug Monitoring.....................           [30,000]
    Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Program...............          [160,000]
Justice Reinvestment Initiative......................            28,000
Keep Young Athletes Safe Act.........................             2,500
Body Worn Camera Partnership Program.................            22,500
STOP School Violence Act.............................            75,000
Project Safe Neighborhoods...........................            50,000
    Byrne Criminal Justice Innovation Program........           [20,000]
    Gang and Youth Violence Education and Prevention.            [5,000]
    Community-Based Violence Prevention Initiatives..            [8,000]
                                                      ------------------
      TOTAL, State and Local Law Enforcement                  1,678,500
       Assistance....................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Program.--
The Committee recommends $445,000,000 for Byrne-JAG. Funding is 
not available for luxury items, real estate, or construction 
projects. The Department should expect State, local, and tribal 
governments to target funding to programs and activities that 
conform with evidence-based strategic plans developed through 
broad stakeholder involvement. The Committee directs the 
Department to make technical assistance available to State, 
local, and tribal governments for the development or update of 
such plans. Funding is authorized for law enforcement programs 
including those that promote data interoperability between 
disparate law enforcement entities; prosecution and court 
programs; prevention and education programs; corrections 
programs; drug treatment and enforcement programs; planning, 
evaluation, and technology improvement programs; and crime 
victim and witness programs, other than compensation.
    Smart Prosecution.--State and local prosecutors are 
involved in more than 90 percent of all criminal prosecutions 
in the United States. Unfortunately, throughout much of the 
country, local prosecutors' offices are struggling to 
effectively adjust to the growing amount of evidence and the 
subsequent intricacies of investigation and prosecution of 
crimes, particularly cyber, organized, and drug crimes, that 
have come with the digital age. The Committee supports the use 
of technology, intelligence, and data analytics in innovative 
ways that enable prosecutors to focus resources on the people 
and places associated with high concentrations of criminal 
activity. The Committee directs that OJP dedicate up to 
$5,000,000 of the $10,000,000 provided for Smart Prosecution 
for competitive grants focused on new solutions to public 
safety concerns, including the use of technology, intelligence, 
and data analytics to improve the operations of prosecutors' 
offices in an effort to more efficiently and effectively aid 
communities in achieving a reduction in crime.
    Regional Law Enforcement Technology Initiative.--The 
Committee recognizes that the ability of local law enforcement 
to efficiently gather, analyze, and disseminate pertinent 
information is critical to investigating, reporting, and 
responding to crimes and suspicious activity in communities. 
The Committee believes that a technology initiative focused on 
leveraging local and regional law enforcement partnerships and 
enabling a secure method for the sharing of sensitive law 
enforcement information and resources is vital to the long-term 
success of our law enforcement personnel and the safety of our 
citizens. This initiative could be accomplished through various 
models, including fusion centers, task forces, or centers of 
excellence.
    The Committee believes that among locations in the United 
States, law enforcement operating in the five States comprising 
the Gulf Coast is well situated to serve as a testbed for such 
an initiative and has provided not less than $3,000,000 for 
competitive grants to local government entities, including 
local law enforcement agencies, to develop such an initiative, 
for the purposes of efficiently supporting and promoting the 
exchange of information, investigate techniques, and best 
practices with the ultimate goal of reducing crime and 
improving officer safety in these communities. The Committee 
further directs the Department to ensure that the grantee 
submit a written report on the use of the grant funds, lessons 
learned, and how such an initiative could be utilized by other 
law enforcement agencies nationwide.
    VALOR Initiative.--The Committee's recommendation provides 
$12,000,000 within Byrne-JAG for the Officer Robert Wilson III 
Preventing Violence Against Law Enforcement Officer Resilience 
and Survivability Initiative [VALOR]. The Committee expects 
Federal law enforcement agencies to continue and expand on 
efforts to provide local police with information as to whether 
or not a suspect has a violent history, to the extent that 
transfer of such information is allowable and available via 
Federal law enforcement databases, in an effort to prevent 
officer deaths. The Committee notes that an additional 
$10,000,000 is provided under the COPS heading for Protecting 
Our Lives by Initiating COPS Expansion [POLICE] Act (Public Law 
114-199) programs which help to provide active shooter training 
programs for State and local law enforcement officers.
    Kevin and Avonte's Law.--The Committee provides funding of 
$2,000,000 for competitive grants awarded to non-profit and 
State and local entities to prevent wandering and locate 
missing individuals with forms of dementia, such as Alzheimer's 
Disease, or developmental disabilities, such as autism as 
described in the underlying authorization of division Q of 
Public Law 115-141.
    Prison Rape Elimination Act [PREA] Audit Quality 
Initiative.--Facility audits are a key component in helping 
agencies move their sexual abuse prevention and response 
policies from written documents to everyday practices. BJA has 
outlined a meaningful Quality Improvement Initiative, and the 
Committee supports the Department using the necessary resources 
to carry out this work.
    Fentanyl Detection.--The Committee is aware of far too many 
incidents of first responders experiencing accidental overdoses 
after coming into contact with fentanyl or fentanyl analogues 
and understands the role played by fentanyl detection equipment 
and training on identifying fentanyl, particularly for police 
officers and other first responders, to keep officers safe by 
minimizing exposure. As such, the Committee encourages the 
Department to support the use of grant funds like Byrne-JAG for 
the purchase of fentanyl detection equipment and training as 
well as naloxone distribution for law enforcement safety.
    Academic-Based Training Center to improve Police-Based 
Responses to People with Mental Illness.--The Committee 
understands that law enforcement officers are often the first 
responders to calls regarding individuals with mental illnesses 
and often encounter mentally ill individuals while completing 
their routine patrol duties. The Committee recognizes the need 
for support and training so that law enforcement officers and 
other first responders are better equipped to handle such 
encounters and help provide appropriate treatment as well as 
reduce the number of individuals entering the legal system.
    The Committee recommends $2,500,000 for a grant program 
implementing academic-based, transdisciplinary crisis 
intervention training to educate, train, and prepare officers 
so that they are equipped to appropriately interact with 
mentally ill individuals in the course of completing their job 
responsibilities. This training should be developed by an 
institution of higher education, in conjunction with health 
care professionals to provide crisis intervention training 
which shall focus on understanding mental and behavioral 
health, developing empathy, navigating community resources, de-
escalation skills and practical application training for all 
first responders. The Committee expects this grant program to 
serve as a pilot program, establishing best practices for law 
enforcement agencies.
    Gunfire Detection Technology.--Gunfire detection and 
location technology has been helpful in assisting law 
enforcement to rapidly respond to gun crime and analyze 
physical evidence found at the scene. The Committee encourages 
the Department to work with State and local governments to 
assist in the further deployment of such technologies, and to 
collect and analyze data from such systems in order to better 
address gun related crimes.
    National Instant Criminal Background Check System [NICS] 
Initiative Grants.--The Committee funds the program at 
$75,000,000, which is $14,000,000 above the budget request, to 
continue to improve the submission of State criminal and mental 
health records to NICS. This investment will strengthen the 
national background check system by assisting States in finding 
ways to make more records available in the NICS system, 
especially mental health records, thereby addressing gaps in 
Federal and State records currently available in NICS. Those 
gaps significantly hinder the ability of NICS to quickly 
confirm whether a prospective purchaser is prohibited from 
acquiring a firearm. The Committee expects OJP to track whether 
grant recipients are submitting data in a timely manner into 
the NICS system.
    Project Safe Neighborhoods [PSN].--The Committee's 
recommendation includes $50,000,000 for PSN, the full, 
authorized level for this grant program. As referenced in bill 
language, the Senate passed amendment to the underlying 
authorization funded several purpose areas. Therefore, the 
Committee recommendation includes $20,000,000 for the Byrne 
Criminal Justice Innovation Program, $5,000,000 for the Gang 
and Youth Violence Education and Prevention Program and 
$8,000,000 for Community-Based Violence Prevention Initiatives. 
The remaining funds shall be distributed per the block grant 
authorization.
    The Committee encourages OJP to use PSN funds to support 
evidence-based and data-driven focused intervention, 
deterrence, and prevention initiatives that aim to reduce 
violence. These initiatives should be trauma-informed, 
recognizing that people who are at risk of committing violence 
often themselves have been victims of violent trauma or have 
witnessed traumatic experiences in the past.
    Grants to Combat Human Trafficking.--The Committee's 
recommendation provides $85,000,000 for services and task force 
activities for U.S. citizens, permanent residents, and foreign 
nationals who are victims of trafficking, as authorized by 
Public Law 106-386 and amended by Public Law 113-4, of which no 
less than $22,000,000 is for the Enhanced Collaborative Model 
to Combat Human Trafficking Task Force Program. The Committee 
urges that human trafficking task forces funded under this 
grant program take affirmative measures to emphasize the 
investigation and prosecution of persons who patronize or 
solicit children for sex as a human trafficking demand 
reduction strategy. OJP shall consult with stakeholder groups 
in determining the overall allocation of Victims of Trafficking 
funding and shall provide a plan to the Committee for the use 
of these funds as part of the Department's fiscal year 2019 
spending plan.
    The Committee notes that funding provided in this program 
may be used for victims of sex and labor trafficking who are 
minors, as authorized under VAWA 2013. Child trafficking 
victims require specialized care, and these resources can be 
used for items like residential care, emergency social 
services, mental health counseling, and legal services. This 
funding level also includes $10,000,000 for the Minor Victims 
of Trafficking Grant program, of which $8,000,000 is for victim 
services grants for sex-trafficked minors, as authorized by 
Public Law 113-4, with the remaining $2,000,000 for victim 
services grants for labor-trafficked minors. The Committee 
encourages OJP to give an affirmative preference to applicants 
for grants that treat minors engaged in commercial sex acts as 
victims of a severe form of trafficking in persons, and 
discourages the charging of such individuals for prostitution 
or a sex trafficking offense. The Committee encourages DOJ to 
work in close coordination with the Department of Health and 
Human Services to encourage collaboration and reduce 
duplication of effort.
    Capital Litigation Improvement and Wrongful Conviction 
Review.--The Committee recognizes the need for legal 
representation and investigation services for individuals with 
post-conviction claims of innocence. The Committee directs that 
at least 50 percent of the $5,000,000 appropriated to the 
Capital Litigation Improvement and Wrongful Conviction Review 
grant programs shall be used to support Wrongful Conviction 
Review grantees providing high quality and efficient post-
conviction representation for defendants in post-conviction 
claims of innocence. Wrongful Conviction Review grantees shall 
be nonprofit organizations, institutions of higher education, 
and/or state or local public defender offices that have in-
house post-conviction representation programs that show 
demonstrable experience and competence in litigating post-
conviction claims of innocence. To avoid any possible conflicts 
of interest, the Committee directs that the requirement of 
partnership with a state or local prosecutor's office and an 
organization or entity dedicated to ensuring just convictions 
and/or acquittals be discontinued. Grant funds shall support 
grantee provision of post-conviction legal representation of 
innocence claims; case review, evaluation, and management; 
experts; potentially exonerative forensic testing; and 
investigation services related to supporting these post-
conviction innocence claims.
    Bulletproof Vests.--Within the $25,000,000 provided for 
bulletproof vests, $1,500,000 is to be transferred directly to 
the NIST Office of Law Enforcement Standards [OLES] to continue 
supporting ballistic- and stab-resistant material compliance 
testing programs. The Committee expects the BJA to continue 
strengthening internal controls to manage the Bulletproof Vest 
Partnership program. Improving grantee accountability in the 
timely use of Federal funds to purchase body armor will help 
every police officer who needs a vest to get one, thus saving 
officers' lives.
    Second Chance Act Grants and Drug Treatment.--The 
recommendation provides $90,000,000 for Second Chance Act [SCA] 
grants. The Committee expects that SCA funding will support 
grants that foster the implementation of strategies that have 
been proven to reduce recidivism and ensure safe and successful 
reentry back to their communities of adults released from 
prisons and jails. The SCA supports activities such as 
employment assistance, substance abuse treatment including MAT 
options, housing, local transportation, mentoring, family 
programming, and victim support. SCA grants will also support 
demonstration projects designed to test the impact of new 
strategies and frameworks.
    The Committee continues to support the Office of Management 
and Budget's scoring mechanism for SCA grant funding as it 
relates to opioid abuse and the heroin epidemic. In addition, 
when awarding SCA grants, the Committee directs the OJP to 
consider the impact of reentry of prisoners on communities in 
which a disproportionate number of individuals reside upon 
release from incarceration. The OJP shall assess the reentry 
burdens borne by local communities and local law enforcement 
agencies; review the resources available in such communities to 
support successful reentry and the extent to which those 
resources are used effectively; and make recommendations to 
strengthen the resources in such communities which are 
available to support successful reentry and to lessen the 
burden placed on such communities by the need to support 
reentry.
    DNA Backlog and Crime Lab Improvements.--The Committee is 
once again extremely disappointed that the Department's budget 
request slashes funding by $25,000,000 for critical grant 
programs to help State and local agencies address their 
backlogs and test forensic evidence. The Committee continues 
its strong support for DNA backlog and crime lab improvements 
by recommending $132,000,000 to strengthen and improve Federal 
and State DNA collection and analysis systems that can be used 
to accelerate the prosecution of the guilty while 
simultaneously protecting the innocent from wrongful 
prosecution. Within funds provided, $121,000,000 is for Debbie 
Smith DNA Backlog Reduction grants, $7,000,000 is for Kirk 
Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing grants, and $4,000,000 
is for Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners grants.
    The Committee expects that the OJP will make funding for 
DNA analysis and capacity enhancement a priority in order to 
meet the purposes of the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant 
Program. The Committee directs the Department to submit to the 
Committee as part of its spending plan for State and Local Law 
Enforcement Activities a plan with respect to funds 
appropriated for DNA-related and forensic programs, including 
the alignment of appropriated funds with the authorized 
purposes of the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program.
    Enforcing the Debbie Smith Act.--The Justice for All 
Reauthorization Act of 2016 (Public Law 114-324) clarified that 
not less than 75 percent of amounts made available under this 
provision shall be provided for grants for activities described 
under paragraphs (1), (2), and (3) of section (2)(a) of the DNA 
Analysis and Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 (42 U.S.C. 
14135(a)). This 75 percent requirement had previously been 
codified by Congress and the President as part of the Sexual 
Assault Forensic Evidence Reporting Act of 2013, which was 
enacted as Title X of the Violence Against Women 
Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113-4). Though this 
provision has been codified for more than 4 years, NIJ has 
failed to recognize it as binding. With the enactment of 
section 3 of the Justice for All Reauthorization Act of 2016, 
Congress has made its intent clear. The Committee therefore 
instructs the Attorney General to ensure that not less than 75 
percent of the funds provided under this provision are provided 
to states and units of local government through grants to 
address the DNA crime scene evidence backlog.
    Sexual Assault Kit Initiative [SAKI].--The Committee's 
recommendation includes $50,000,000 to continue a competitive 
grant program started in fiscal year 2015 as part of the 
initiative to reduce the backlog of rape kits at law 
enforcement agencies. The NIJ shall provide competitively 
awarded grants with a comprehensive community-based approach to 
addressing the resolution of cases in the backlog. The 
Committee directs the NIJ to provide a report not later than 90 
days after enactment of this act on its progress in developing 
a strategy and model to serve as best practices for discovering 
and testing kits, training law enforcement, and supporting 
victims throughout the process as required by Public Law 113-
235.
    Sexual Assault Forensic Evidence Reporting Act [SAFER].--
The SAFER Act was included as title X of the Violence Against 
Women Act of 2013 (Public Law 113-4) and was reauthorized by 
the SAFER Act of 2017 (Public Law 115-107). The Act authorized 
the Attorney General to make grants for the purpose of helping 
State and local law enforcement agencies conduct audits of the 
rape kit backlog. In 2016, the Department fully implemented the 
SAFER Act by providing grants for such a purpose under the 
Sexual Assault Forensic Evidence-Inventory, Tracking, and 
Reporting Program. The Committee strongly encourages the 
continuation of this important program to deliver justice for 
victims of sexual assault.
    Paul Coverdell Forensic Science.--The recommendation 
provides a total of $35,000,000 of which $17,000,000 is to 
specifically target the challenges the opioid epidemic has 
brought to the forensics community as described in the 
Explanatory Statement accompanying Public Law 115-141.
    Economic, High-Tech, White Collar, and Cybercrime 
Prevention.--The Committee recommends $15,500,000 to assist 
State and local law enforcement agencies in the prevention, 
investigation, and prosecution of economic, high-tech, and 
Internet crimes. Given the importance of protecting our 
Nation's new technologies, ideas, and products, the Committee 
includes the request of $2,500,000 for competitive grants that 
help State and local law enforcement tackle intellectual 
property [IP] thefts, such as counterfeiting and piracy.
    Additionally, the Committee recognizes the need to expand 
opportunities for computer and digital forensics education at 
both the undergraduate and graduate levels in order to prepare 
for these challenges. To meet this need, $2,000,000 shall be 
dedicated for a separate competitive grant program to expand a 
partnership with an institution for higher learning for the 
purposes of furthering educational opportunities for students 
training in computer forensics and digital investigation.
    Office of Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, 
Apprehending, Registering, and Tracking [SMART Office].--The 
Committee supports the work being done by the SMART Office to 
provide technical assistance to State, local, and tribal 
governments on sex offender registration and notification, but 
understands that current notification and reporting tools and 
practices may not be reaching all appropriate law enforcement 
agencies in a timely manner. The Committee directs the 
Government Office of Accountability to perform a study 
examining what technological efficiencies are needed within the 
SMART Office, including whether sex offender notifications are 
timely and effective. The Committee looks forward to reviewing 
this report within 90 days of enactment.
    Keeping Young Athletes Safe Act.--The Committee again 
provides funding of $2,500,000 for a competitive grant program 
to safeguard young athletes against abuse, including emotional, 
physical, and sexual abuse, in sports. The Committee directs 
that funding be prioritized for curriculum development and 
training for abuse prevention education in youth athletic 
programs and for investigation and resolution of sexual abuse 
claims. OJP is directed to submit a report no later than 90 
days after enactment of this act describing how grant funding 
was used by the grantees by purpose area for the prior fiscal 
year, the number of trainings provided, the number of claims 
investigated, and the number of investigations referred to law 
enforcement for prosecution.
    Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act [CARA] Programs.--
The Committee provides a total of $360,000,000 for CARA 
programs, including $80,000,000 for drug courts; $22,500,000 
for veterans treatment courts; $35,000,000 for Residential 
Substance Abuse Treatment including access to MAT options; 
$30,000,000 for prescription drug monitoring; $32,500,000 for 
the Mentally Ill Offender Act; and $160,000,000 for the 
Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Program [COAP].
    The Committee directs that funding for COAP programs is 
focused on prevention and education efforts, effective 
responses to those affected by substance abuse, and services 
for treatment and recovery from addiction. The Committee 
encourages the Department to prioritize grant funding in States 
with high per capita opioid overdose death rates to ensure that 
efforts are focused where they are needed the most. Of the 
$160,000,000 for COAP, no less than $5,000,000 shall be made 
available for additional replication sites employing the Law 
Enforcement Assisted Diversion [LEAD] model, with applicants 
demonstrating a plan for sustainability of LEAD-model diversion 
programs; no less than $5,000,000 shall be made available for 
education and prevention programs to connect law enforcement 
agencies with K-12 students; and no less than $10,000,000 shall 
be made available for embedding social services with law 
enforcement in order to rapidly respond to opioid overdoses 
where children are impacted.
    The Committee supports specialized residential substance 
abuse treatment programs for inmates with co-occurring mental 
health and substance abuse disorders or challenges. Given the 
strong nexus between substance abuse and mental illness in our 
prisons and jails, the Committee encourages the Attorney 
General to ensure that funds provided for residential substance 
abuse treatment for state prisoners are being used to treat 
underlying mental health disorders in addition to substance 
abuse disorders.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of drug courts and 
the vital role that they serve in reducing crime among people 
with a substance use or mental health disorder. In recent 
years, drug courts have been on the front lines of the opioid 
epidemic and have become important resources for law 
enforcement and other community stakeholders affected by opioid 
addiction. The Committee supports the ability of drug courts to 
address offenders with co-occurring substance abuse and mental 
health problems, and supports court ordered assisted outpatient 
treatment programs for individuals struggling with mental 
illness. Within the funding provided for drug courts, the 
Committee encourages OJP to give attention to States and 
localities that have the highest concentrations of opioid-
related cases, and to prioritize assistance to underserved 
areas whose criminal defendants currently have relatively 
little opportunity to access drug courts. The Committee 
encourages OJP to coordinate, as appropriate, with other 
Federal agencies like the Department of Health and Human 
Services, as it implements these activities in order to avoid 
duplication.
    Finally, the Committee recognizes that the 21st Century 
CURES Act authorized the funding of Forensic Assertive 
Community Treatment [FACT] Initiatives as part of the adult and 
juvenile collaboration program grants. The Committee encourages 
OJP to make funding available for FACT Initiatives within these 
programs.

                       JUVENILE JUSTICE PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $282,500,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     229,500,000
Committee recommendation................................     297,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $297,000,000 for 
juvenile justice programs. The recommendation is $14,500,000 
above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $67,500,000 above 
the budget request.
    The Committee strongly supports a comprehensive approach of 
substantial funding for a robust portfolio of programs that 
work to improve the lives of the youth in our communities. 
Title II State Formula and title V juvenile delinquency 
prevention grants are the backbone of programs assisting State 
and local agencies to prevent juvenile delinquency and ensure 
that youth who are in contact with the juvenile justice system 
are treated fairly. Combined with other critical programs like 
youth mentoring, the Committee believes that a balanced level 
of programming is the way to best help at-risk and vulnerable 
youth and their families.
    The Committee's recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

                        JUVENILE JUSTICE PROGRAMS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Program                           Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Part B--State Formula Grants.........................            66,000
    Emergency Planning-Juvenile Detention Facilities.              [500]
Youth Mentoring Grants...............................            94,000
Title V--Delinquency Prevention Incentive Grants.....            30,500
    Tribal Youth.....................................            [7,000]
    Children of Incarcerated Parents Web Portal......              [500]
    Girls in Justice System..........................            [2,000]
    Opioid Affected Youth Initiative.................           [10,000]
    Children Exposed to Violence.....................           [11,000]
Victims of Child Abuse Programs......................            25,000
Missing & Exploited Children Programs................            76,000
Training for Judicial Personnel......................             3,500
Improving Juvenile Indigent Defense..................             2,000
                                                      ------------------
      TOTAL, Juvenile Justice........................           297,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Any deviation from the above plan is subject to the 
reprogramming requirements of section 505 of this act.
    Part B: State Formula Grants.--The Committee provides 
$66,000,000 for grants to implement comprehensive State 
juvenile justice plans, including community-based prevention 
and intervention programs and activities for juvenile 
offenders. This amount is $6,000,000 above the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level and $8,000,000 above the budget request.
    Within the amount provided, the Committee recommends 
$500,000 for competitive demonstration grants for State, local, 
and tribal juvenile justice detention facilities and systems to 
meet the needs of children and adolescents housed in detention 
facilities in preparation for, during, and after a disaster, as 
detailed in the 2011 emergency planning guidance issued by the 
Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention [OJJDP].
    The Committee directs the OJP to submit as part of its 
spending plan for State and Local Law Enforcement Activities a 
plan for the administration of Part B State Formula Grants. The 
Committee expects this plan to include details pertaining to 
the formulas utilized in awarding grants under this heading.
    The Committee urges DOJ to encourage title II grant 
recipients to coordinate with their State education agencies to 
support continuity of education opportunities for adjudicated 
youth and encourages the Department to continue its efforts to 
institute reforms to ensure States' compliance with the Title 
II core requirements. The Department shall report to the 
Committee on these efforts 60 days after enactment.
    Youth Mentoring Grants.--To support the critical work of 
national, regional, and local organizations in nurturing and 
mentoring at-risk children and youth, the Committee recommends 
$94,000,000 for competitive, peer-reviewed youth mentoring 
grants, of which $14,000,000 is for helping youth impacted by 
opioids. Within 45 days of enactment of this act, the OJP is 
directed to provide a report and spend plan to the Committee 
detailing the criteria and methodology that will be used to 
award these grants, as well as an explanation of any deviations 
from the criteria and Committee directions used in fiscal year 
2018. The Committee expects that the OJJDP will take all steps 
necessary to ensure fairness and objectivity in the award of 
these and future competitive grants.
    Helping Youth Impacted by Opioids.--The recommendation 
provides $25,500,000 in OJJDP grant funding to support States, 
local communities, and tribal jurisdictions in their efforts to 
develop and implement effective programs for children, youth, 
and at-risk juveniles and their families who have been impacted 
by the opioid crisis and drug addiction. Within this amount, 
$10,000,000 is provided to continue the Opioid Affected Youth 
Initiative within Title V: Delinquency Prevention grants, 
$14,000,000 is provided for youth mentoring grants, and the 
increase of $1,500,000 for Training for Judicial Personnel 
shall be dedicated for specialized training for juvenile and 
family court judges on handling families impacted by opioids 
including additional pressures on youth in foster care.
    Preventing Trafficking of Girls and Involvement in the 
Juvenile Justice System.--Girls in the United States with a 
history of sexual and physical abuse, school failure, substance 
dependency, and involvement in the welfare system, and who live 
in impoverished communities or are homeless, are at an 
increased risk of becoming victims of domestic human 
trafficking. The Committee provides $2,000,000 for the ``Girls 
in the Justice System'' grant program, which will enable 
organizations, including nonprofit entities, with a successful 
track record of administering prevention and early intervention 
programs for girls vulnerable to trafficking and who are most 
likely to end up in the juvenile justice system, at a local or 
state-level, to replicate these programs at a national level. 
Funding for this program will further support prevention and 
early intervention strategies and curricula throughout the 
country, and place vulnerable girls on a path toward success, 
stability, and long-term contribution to society.
    Children Exposed to Violence.--The Committee notes that 
nearly two-thirds of children in the U.S. have been exposed to 
violence, which can impact development, health, and educational 
outcomes, and perpetuate the cycle of violence and substance 
abuse. The Committee provides $11,000,000 for grants to help 
communities reduce crime and violence against children through 
support to State agencies and law enforcement entities 
including training and technical assistance to better serve 
youth exposed to violence.
    Victims of Child Abuse Act.--The Committee's recommendation 
provides $25,000,000 for the various programs authorized under 
the Victims of Child Abuse Act (Public Law 101-647) and directs 
OJJDP to ensure that not less than 90 percent of the grants 
awarded are for the purposes of developing and maintaining 
child advocacy centers [CAC], including training and 
accreditation. The Committee further directs OJJDP to ensure 
that these funds are used efficiently in order to ensure the 
highest percentage possible of Federal funding is used for 
actual services to victims of child abuse. Within the funds 
provided, $5,000,000 shall be for Regional Children's Advocacy 
Centers [RCACs] Programs. The RCACs were established to provide 
information, consultation, training, and technical assistance 
to communities, and to help establish child-focused programs 
that facilitate and support coordination among agencies 
responding to child abuse.
    The Committee continues to support efforts by CACs to use 
their unique model and expertise to help military installations 
address cases of child abuse, and again provides $1,000,000 
from within the funds provided to continue to support a pilot 
project to identify, develop, and operationalize best 
practices. As this effort has been funded since fiscal year 
2017, the Committee directs OJJDP to report on the status of 
this pilot including the locations of CACs and military 
installations working together, the number of children served 
through these partnerships, and lessons learned from this pilot 
program.
    Missing and Exploited Children Programs.--The Committee 
recommends $76,000,000 for Missing and Exploited Children 
Programs and expects the Department to allocate no less than 
the current funding level for task force grants, training and 
technical assistance, research and statistics, and 
administrative costs for the Internet Crimes Against Children 
[ICAC] program. The Committee directs OJP to provide a spending 
plan for the use of these funds as part of the Department's 
spending plan for fiscal year 2019, which shall include only 
investments in authorized national programs that serve as a 
resource center and clearinghouse on missing and exploited 
children.
    Within funds provided, the Committee again directs up to 
$3,000,000 for a competitive grant program to increase the 
technological investigative capacity and associated training of 
law enforcement to support the development, refinement, and 
advancement of widely used investigative tools, methods, and 
technologies that address child pornography, exploitation, and 
sex trafficking as directed in Senate Report 115-139 and 
codified in Public Law 115-141.
    Within the funds provided, the Committee recommends no less 
than $2,400,000 for the operation and activities of the 
existing AMBER Alert program. The Department is further 
directed to provide assistance to tribes as authorized under 
the Ashlynne Mike AMBER Alert in Indian Country Act (Public Law 
115-166) allowing the integration of state AMBER Alert 
communication plans with tribal systems.
    National Endangered Missing Advisory Communications.--The 
Committee recognizes that the AMBER Alert system has succeeded 
beyond all expectations, and is credited with directly aiding 
the safe recovery of approximately 75 children every year. 
Because immediate public notification is critical in missing 
child cases and not all cases meet the specific criteria 
established under the AMBER Alert system, the Committee 
encourages the Department to explore the establishment of a 
national endangered missing advisory communications network 
that would enable immediate public notification for missing 
child cases who may be in danger of death or serious bodily 
injury regardless of evidence of abduction. The Department is 
requested to report to the Committee within 90 days of 
enactment of this act the best way to include these nationwide 
endangered public notifications into existing infrastructure or 
if a new system is needed, estimated costs for this type of 
system, and what other Federal, State and local partners are 
required to successfully operate such a system.

                    PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICERS BENEFITS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $116,800,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     120,300,000
Committee recommendation................................     128,800,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $128,800,000 for 
public safety officers benefits. The recommendation is 
$12,000,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and 
$8,500,000 above the budget estimate. This program provides a 
one-time death benefit payment to eligible survivors of 
Federal, State, and local public safety officers whose death 
was the direct and proximate result of a traumatic injury 
sustained in the line of duty or certain eligible heart attacks 
or strokes. Within funds provided, $104,000,000 is for death 
benefits for survivors, an amount estimated by the 
Congressional Budget Office and considered mandatory for 
scorekeeping purposes.
    The Committee also recommends $24,800,000, as requested, 
for disability benefits for injured officers and education 
benefits for the families of officers who have been permanently 
disabled or killed in the line of duty.

                  Community Oriented Policing Services


             COMMUNITY ORIENTED POLICING SERVICES PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $275,500,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................................
Committee recommendation................................     310,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $310,000,000 for 
community oriented policing services. The recommendation is 
$34,500,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and 
$310,000,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee's recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

                  COMMUNITY ORIENTED POLICING SERVICES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Program                           Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
COPS Hiring Grants...................................           235,000
    Tribal Resources Grant Program...................           [27,000]
    Tribal Access Program............................            [3,000]
    Community Policing Development/Training and                 [10,000]
     Technical Assistance............................
    Regional Information Sharing Activities..........           [37,000]
    Law Enforcement Mental Health and Wellness Act...            [2,000]
POLICE Act...........................................            10,000
Anti-Methamphetamine Task Forces.....................             8,000
Anti-Heroin Task Forces..............................            32,000
STOP School Violence Act.............................            25,000
                                                      ------------------
      TOTAL, Community Oriented Policing Services....           310,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Any deviations from the above plan are subject to the 
reprogramming requirements of section 505.
    COPS Hiring Program.--The Committee recommends $235,000,000 
for COPS Hiring grants to help State, local, or tribal law 
enforcement agencies to create and preserve police officer 
positions and to increase community policing capacity and crime 
prevention efforts. Grants will have an award cap of $125,000 
and require grantees to provide a 25 percent local match. The 
Committee encourages the COPS Office to focus on efforts to 
train and increase the capacity of law enforcement agencies, 
executives and managers serving rural communities to enhance 
the use of community policing practices and innovations in 
policing to expand the effectiveness of limited resources.
    Regional Information Sharing Activities.--The Committee 
recommends $37,000,000, an increase of $27,000,000 above the 
budget request and $1,000,000 above the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level, to support activities that enable the sharing of 
nationwide criminal intelligence and other resources with 
State, local, and other law enforcement agencies and 
organizations. Such activities should address critical and 
chronic criminal threats, including gangs, terrorism, 
narcotics, weapons and officer safety or ``event 
deconfliction,'' and should reflect regional as well as 
national threat priorities. In addition, funds shall be 
available to support local-to-local law enforcement data and 
information sharing efforts focused on solving routine crimes 
by sharing law enforcement information not categorized as 
criminal intelligence. All activities shall be consistent with 
national information-sharing standards and requirements as 
determined by the BJA.
    Anti-Methamphetamine Task Forces.--The Committee's 
recommendation provides $8,000,000 for the COPS Office to make 
competitive grants to law enforcement agencies in States with 
high seizures of precursor chemicals, finished methamphetamine, 
laboratories, and laboratory dump seizures. These funds shall 
be utilized for investigative purposes to locate or investigate 
illicit activities such as precursor diversion, laboratories, 
or methamphetamine traffickers.
    Anti-Heroin Task Forces.--The Committee reiterates concerns 
over the dramatic rise of heroin abuse, deaths, and related 
crime in the United States. The need for additional resources 
and training to address these challenges is apparent, and the 
Committee created the anti-heroin program within the COPS 
Office in fiscal year 2015, continually providing funding in 
succeeding fiscal years. Despite the plea for additional 
resources from law enforcement as well as the interest of the 
Committee, the Department again proposes to eliminate this 
program as part of the fiscal year 2019 budget request. 
Instead, the Committee provides $32,000,000 for the COPS Office 
to make competitive grants to law enforcement agencies in 
States with high per capita levels of primary treatment 
admissions for both heroin and other opioids. These funds shall 
be utilized for drug enforcement, including investigations and 
activities related to the distribution of heroin or unlawful 
diversion and distribution of prescription opioids. Priority 
shall be given to those drug task forces, managed and operated 
by the State, serving a majority of counties in the State.
    School Resource Officers.--The Committee directs that the 
COPS Office continue to implement requirements and procedures 
regarding written memorandum of understanding and training 
requirements, including clear definitions of officers' roles 
and responsibilities on campus, for any COPS Hiring Grant funds 
used to hire school-based law enforcement officers.
    Policing Practices and Accountability Initiative.--The 
Committee supports the COPS Office's efforts to integrate the 
Task Force on 21st Century Policing recommendations and urges 
the Policing Practices and Accountability Initiative to 
continue its work across Department of Justice programs and 
agencies to provide support and best practices for law 
enforcement agencies working to address issues of public trust.
    Leadership Training.--The Committee believes that 
comprehensive, career-long leadership education and development 
for all local law enforcement officers, from newly sworn 
officers to those with command level experience, remains 
critical to reduce crime, control emergent situations, decrease 
liability and risk, and strengthen relationships between law 
enforcement agencies and the communities they serve. The 
Committee encourages the Department to develop a multi-year 
strategy to build local problem-solving capacity with law 
enforcement via ethical leadership development, which may 
include an online learning system that could be matched with 
existing training programs.

               General Provisions--Department of Justice


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions:
    Section 201 limits the amount of funding the Attorney 
General can use for official reception and representation.
    Section 202 prohibits the use of funds in this title to pay 
for an abortion except where the life of the mother would be in 
danger, or in the case of rape or incest.
    Section 203 prohibits the use of funds in this title to 
require a person to perform or facilitate an abortion.
    Section 204 requires female prisoners to be escorted when 
off prison grounds.
    Section 205 allows the Department of Justice, subject to 
the Committee's reprogramming procedures, to transfer up to 5 
percent between appropriations, but limits to 10 percent the 
amount that can be transferred into any one appropriation.
    Section 206 limits the placement of maximum or high 
security prisoners to appropriately secure facilities.
    Section 207 restricts Federal prisoner access to certain 
amenities.
    Section 208 requires review by the Deputy Attorney General 
and the Department's Investigative Review Board prior to the 
obligation or expenditure of funds for major technology 
projects.
    Section 209 requires the Department to follow reprogramming 
procedures prior to any deviation from the program amounts 
specified in this title or the reuse of specified deobligated 
funds provided in previous years.
    Section 210 prohibits the use of funds for OMB Circular A-
76 competitions for work performed by employees of the Bureau 
of Prisons or of the Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated.
    Section 211 prohibits U.S. Attorneys from simultaneously 
holding multiple jobs outside of the scope of a U.S. Attorney's 
professional duties.
    Section 212 permits up to 3 percent of grant and 
reimbursement program funds made available to the Office of 
Justice Programs to be used for training and technical 
assistance, and permits up to 2 percent of grant and 
reimbursement program funds made available to that office to be 
transferred to the National Institute of Justice or the Bureau 
of Justice Statistics for criminal justice research and 
statistics.
    Section 213 gives the Attorney General the authority to 
waive matching requirements for Second Chance Act adult and 
juvenile reentry demonstration projects; State, tribal and 
local reentry courts; and drug treatment programs. If a waiver 
is granted, the Attorney General shall document any factors and 
material presented by a grantee upon determining that a fiscal 
hardship exists prior to making an award.
    Section 214 waives the requirement that the Attorney 
General reserve certain funds from amounts provided for 
offender incarceration.
    Section 215 prohibits funds, other than funds for the 
national instant criminal background check system established 
under the Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, from being 
used to facilitate the transfer of an operable firearm to a 
known or suspected agent of a drug cartel where law enforcement 
personnel do not continuously monitor or control such firearm.
    Section 216 places limitations on the obligation of funds 
from certain Department of Justice accounts and funding 
sources.
    Section 217 permits the Department of Justice to 
participate in Performance Partnership Pilot collaboration 
programs.

                               TITLE III

                                SCIENCE

                Office of Science and Technology Policy

Appropriations, 2018....................................      $5,544,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       5,544,000
Committee recommendation................................       5,544,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $5,544,000 for the 
Office of Science and Technology Policy [OSTP]. The 
recommendation is the same as both the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level and the budget request.
    OSTP was created by the National Science and Technology 
Policy, Organization, and Priorities Act of 1976 (Public Law 
94-282) and coordinates science and technology policy for the 
White House. OSTP provides scientific and technological 
information, analyses, and advice for the President and the 
executive branch; participates in the formulation, 
coordination, and implementation of national and international 
policies and programs that involve science and technology; 
maintains and promotes the health and vitality of U.S. science 
and technology infrastructure; reviews and analyzes, with the 
Office of Management and Budget, the research and development 
budgets for all Federal agencies; and coordinates research and 
development efforts of the Federal Government to maximize the 
return on the public's investment in science and technology and 
to ensure Federal resources are used efficiently and 
appropriately.
    Scientific Review.--The Committee maintains a firm belief 
that long-standing investments in basic research have resulted 
in transformational discoveries and dramatic improvements in 
the economy, healthcare, infrastructure, communications, 
national security, and many other sectors. Much of this success 
can be attributed to the process of peer review for the 
allocation of research funding and publication, and on 
community prioritization, such as through decadal surveys, 
which provide clear priorities for Federal investment and 
valuable oversight benchmarks. The Committee directs OSTP to 
ensure Federal science agencies continue to rely on peer review 
and prioritization efforts from the scientific community.
    Open Access to Federal Research.--The Committee has 
received reports by OSTP on the progress of all Federal 
agencies in developing and implementing policies to increase 
public access to federally funded scientific research. The 
Committee is pleased by the progress, but previously instructed 
OSTP to have all relevant departments' and agencies' plans 
approved by the end of calendar year 2014 with implementation 
occurring by early calendar year 2018. OSTP is directed to 
continue providing annual reports to the Committee in order to 
keep Congress apprised of the remaining progress needed to make 
federally funded research accessible to the public as 
expeditiously as possible.
    Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics 
Education.--The Committee continues to support effective 
mission-oriented science, technology, engineering, and 
mathematics [STEM] education programs at NASA, NOAA, NSF, and 
NIST within this bill, and encourages OSTP to work with non-
Federal education and outreach communities.
    Emerging Contaminants.--Emerging contaminants are 
increasingly being detected at low levels in drinking water 
systems across the country. Prolonged exposure to unregulated 
drinking water contaminants may pose human health risks, and 
the lack of research on potential health effects has hindered 
Federal and State efforts to develop and strengthen the 
effectiveness of drinking water advisories or standards for 
these materials. The OSTP Director shall continue efforts to 
address critical research gaps related to emerging 
contaminants.
    Research on the Great Lakes Resources.--The Committee notes 
that the Great Lakes resources represent a unique, linked, and 
economically-critical freshwater ecosystem that faces 
significant environmental challenges, including invasive 
species, runoff, and HABs, and believes its long-term health 
depends on the quality of scientific knowledge and technical 
and policy solutions gained by research operations. The 
Committee is concerned that the vessels of the Great Lakes 
ecosystem Federal research fleet and regional academic 
institutions' fleets are nearing the end of their useful 
service lives and inadequate for the demands of their 
interdisciplinary research mission, resulting in capability 
gaps and undermining Federal research goals. Accordingly, the 
Committee directs OSTP, no later than 180 days after enactment 
of this act, to submit an assessment of Great Lakes resources 
research operations, to include an evaluation of current large 
lake fleet capabilities, projected fleet requirements and 
costs, and the feasibility of Federal agencies, including NOAA 
and NSF, in partnering with regional institutions and 
universities that have recognized commitments to fresh water 
research sciences to procure and operate research vessels on 
the Great Lakes and within the Great Lakes ecosystem.

                         National Space Council

Appropriations, 2018....................................      $1,965,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       1,965,000
Committee recommendation................................       1,965,000

    The Committee provides $1,965,000 for the National Space 
Council. The recommendation is the same as both the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level and the request.
    The National Space Council was established by title V of 
Public Law 100-685 and after ceasing operation in 1993, was 
reestablished by Executive Order 13803. The National Space 
Council provides advice and assistance to the President on 
national space policy and strategy. The Council reviews United 
States Government space policy, including long-range goals; 
develop a strategy for national space activities; and develop 
recommendations for the President on space policy and space-
related issues. The National Space Council's additional roles 
are to monitor and coordinate implementation of the Nation's 
objectives in space by executive departments and agencies; 
foster close coordination, cooperation, and technology and 
information exchange among the civil, national security, and 
commercial space sectors; and facilitate resolution of 
differences concerning major space and space-related policy 
issues.

             National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Appropriations, 2018.................................... $20,736,140,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................  19,892,200,000
Committee recommendation................................  21,323,400,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $21,323,400,000 for 
the National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA]. The 
recommendation is $587,260,000 above the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level and $1,431,200,000 above the budget request.
    NASA was established by the National Aeronautics and Space 
Act of 1958 (Public Law 85-568) to conduct space and 
aeronautical research and development and to conduct flight 
activities for peaceful purposes. NASA's unique mission of 
exploration, discovery, and innovation is intended to preserve 
the United States' role as both a leader in world aviation and 
as the pre-eminent space-faring nation. It is NASA's mission 
to: advance human and robotic exploration, use, and development 
of space; advance and communicate scientific knowledge and 
understanding of the Earth, the Moon, the solar system, and the 
universe; and research, develop, verify, and transfer advanced 
aeronautics and space technologies.
    For Science, the Committee's recommendation strives to keep 
NASA's near-term launches on track to continue progress in 
exploring our solar system and the universe, understanding the 
sun, and observing our planet. The Committee expects NASA to 
continue making progress on the recommendations of the National 
Academies' decadal surveys, now and in the future.
    This bill continues investments in human spaceflight that 
will travel beyond low-Earth orbit with NASA developed crew and 
launch vehicles; enables the burgeoning domestic launch 
industry that is bringing cargo, and eventually crew, to the 
International Space Station; and supports NASA's science and 
technology programs. These elements should be viewed as 
complementary pieces of a balanced whole.
    NASA is directed to continue providing the Committee with a 
quarterly launch schedule, by mission, that describes risks 
associated with launch delays due to problems with the launch 
vehicle, impacts of launch delays to other missions in the 
launch queue, and a budget estimate of the anticipated carrying 
costs for missed launch windows.
    The Committee is counting on NASA to maintain focus on 
improving oversight and accountability throughout the agency. 
NASA's acquisition management continues to be on the GAO ``high 
risk'' list. GAO's most recent assessment of NASA's large-scale 
projects found the agency's cost and schedule performance on 
major projects has deteriorated since last year. Since May 
2017, the average launch delay has increased from 7 to 12 
months and development cost growth is at least 18.8 percent, up 
from 15.6 percent in 2017. NASA is directed to cooperate fully 
and to provide timely program analysis, evaluation data, and 
relevant information to the GAO so that GAO can report to 
Congress shortly after the annual budget submission of the 
President and semiannually thereafter on the status of large-
scale NASA programs, projects, and activities based on its 
review of this information.
    In addition, NASA is directed to provide the Committee, 
with its budget justification, the reserves assumed by NASA to 
be necessary within the amount proposed for each directorate, 
theme, program, project, and activity, or, if the proposed 
funding level for a directorate, theme, program, project, or 
activity is based on confidence level budgeting, the confidence 
level and reserves assumed in the proposed funding level.
    The Committee understands that NASA projects undergo major 
reviews in addition to regular oversight throughout the year. 
When one of these reviews results in changing the cost profile 
of a project in the current or budget request year, the 
Committee expects to be informed in a timely fashion so that 
its actions can reflect the most recent NASA analysis and 
expectation. Keeping the Committee up to date should reduce 
NASA's propensity to submit spending plans that disregard 
Congressional direction.
    The Federal funding priorities for NASA set forth in this 
bill and report should not be interpreted as suggestions from 
the Committee. Rather they should be interpreted like any other 
statutory requirement levied upon NASA. The Committee objects 
to NASA's efforts in recent fiscal years to redirect funding 
away from priorities clearly set by the Congress in law. NASA's 
continued use of section 505 of this bill in this manner will 
result in limited funding flexibility in the future.
    The Committee does not adopt the proposed reconfiguration 
of NASA's account structure. Instead, the Committee has 
maintained the same account structure as fiscal year 2018 and 
has chosen to rename the Education account to Science, 
Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics [STEM] Opportunities.
    The Committee is supportive of NASA's STEM education 
efforts that provide hands-on learning experiences for middle, 
high school, and college students, including space launch 
activities, and therefore rejects the proposed cancellation of 
education programs. These types of programs allow students to 
experience the full range of STEM-related skills involved in 
designing, testing, and launching vehicles and designing 
payloads to deepen their interest in science and engineering 
fields.
    The Committee has chosen to articulate the funding levels 
of programs, where appropriate, in the form of tables and, if 
necessary, supplemented with explanatory report language.

                                SCIENCE

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $6,221,500,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   5,895,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   6,400,300,000

    The Committee provides $6,400,300,000 for Science, which is 
$178,800,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and 
$505,300,000 above the budget request. The Science account 
encompasses: Earth Science, Planetary Science, Astrophysics, 
the James Webb Space Telescope, Heliophysics, and Education. 
This funding supports NASA programs that seek to answer 
fundamental questions concerning the ways in which Earth is 
changing; the comparison of Earth with other planets in the 
solar system and around other stars; the connections between 
the Sun and Earth; and the origin and evolution of planetary 
systems, the galaxy, and the universe, including the origin and 
distribution of life in the universe. These objectives are 
assisted by input from the scientific community through decadal 
surveys and are achieved through robotic flight missions, 
ground-based scientific research and data analysis, and the 
development of new technologies for future missions. NASA shall 
continue its progress toward implementing the recommendations 
of decadal surveys in Earth Science, Heliophysics, Planetary 
Science, and Astrophysics.
    The Committee commends the Science Mission Directorate's 
[SMD] efforts to respond to data challenges by implementing 
innovative cloud storage agreements, investing in data and 
information systems, and developing supercomputing 
capabilities. By procuring information technology [IT] services 
through a utility-based model and paying only for services 
consumed, SMD's cloud computing engagements have delivered 
rapid and measurable capability gains, along with significant 
cost savings. The Committee directs NASA to report to the 
Committees on Appropriations not later than 90 days after the 
enactment of this act on the status of expanding the adoption 
of cloud computing within the Mission Directorate, including 
the use of commercial cloud computing services, use cases where 
cloud computing has enhanced services, current plans for the 
expansion of cloud computing, security impacts, any factors 
delaying or inhibiting the expansion of cloud computing usage, 
and any cost savings achieved in the previous 3 fiscal years by 
the utilization of commercial cloud computing services.

                                 SCIENCE
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Earth Science.........................................        1,931,000
Planetary Science.....................................        2,201,500
Astrophysics..........................................        1,243,200
James Webb Space Telescope............................          304,600
Heliophysics..........................................          720,000
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Science..................................        6,400,300
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Earth Science.--Within the amount for Earth Science, the 
Committee recommendation includes $162,400,000 for Landsat 9 to 
maintain a 2020 launch profile; $161,000,000 for the Plankton, 
Aerosol, Cloud ocean Ecosystem [PACE] mission to maintain a 
2022 launch date; $18,000,000 for CLARREO Pathfinder to 
continue progress on a Tier-1 decadal survey recommendation; 
$5,100,000 for OCO-3; $10,000,000 for the Carbon Monitoring 
System; and $1,700,000 for NASA instruments on the Deep Space 
Climate Observatory. Within 30 days of the enactment of this 
act, NASA shall report on the 5-year budget profile needed for 
PACE and CLARREO Pathfinder to achieve planned launch dates and 
continue originally planned operations. The recommendation 
fully supports Earth Venture and NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture 
Radar at no less than the request level.
    The Committee is also supportive of efforts for the 
development of aircraft instrumentation and arrays that can 
conduct remote sensing for scientific and operational research, 
and directs the agency to continue partnering with non-Federal 
researchers to test new technologies for analyzing snow, ice 
and soil moisture.
    Sustainable Land Imaging and Competition.--In the interest 
of maximizing capability and cost-effectiveness, the Committee 
directs NASA to provide a report on the details of acquisition 
plans for Sustainable Land Imaging [SLI] beyond Landsat-9, that 
accommodate a full and open competition for the acquisition of 
instruments for the SLI satellite program, within 120 days 
after passage of this legislation.
    Earth Science Decadal.--The Committee supports the release 
and recommendations of the National Academy of Sciences' Earth 
Science and Applications from Space Decadal Survey report and 
directs NASA to implement its findings to the extent 
practicable. As articulated by the report, NASA should plan to 
competitively select future missions that address high priority 
target observables in the designated and explorer categories. 
The Committee believes an increase in competed, Principal 
Investigator-led missions will encourage responsible cost and 
schedule constraints, develop novel remote sensing 
technologies, and leverage the talents and expertise of 
scientists at universities and research institutions.
    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles.--The Committee strongly supports 
NASA's efforts to develop and refine Unmanned Aerial Vehicle 
[UAV] platforms and encourages NASA to improve collaboration 
and cooperation with other science agencies of the Federal 
Government to share and expand limited UAV availability, 
including working with NOAA, to allow expanded utilization and 
supplement data collection in support of hurricane forecast 
modeling.
    Planetary Science.--The Committee recommendation includes 
the request level of $60,000,000 for Near Earth Object 
Observations, and $97,000,000 for Planetary Defense/Double 
Asteroid Redirection Test [DART]. The Committee acknowledges 
that NASA will use resources available in fiscal year 2018 to 
address the Mars 2020 heat shield testing mishap and, 
therefore, provides the request level for Mars 2020. The 
Committee reiterates its previous direction that if the Mars 
helicopter demonstration would delay the overall Mars 2020 
mission, it should not be included in the Mars 2020 program. 
Funding for Mars Exploration includes $50,000,000 for studies 
and technology development for a 2026 Mars sample return 
mission.
    The recommendation also includes the request level for New 
Frontiers, Radioisotope Power Systems, and the Europa Clipper. 
For Europa Clipper, a portion of the fiscal year 2019 funding 
may be derived from the project's substantial prior year 
balances. The recommendation also includes $218,000,000, as 
requested, for Lunar Discovery and Exploration, including 
$18,000,000 to continue the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. The 
Lunar Discovery and Exploration program will provide science 
payloads and instruments for Lunar Lander missions, like those 
developed in partnership with NASA's Lunar CATALYST program. 
These small robotic missions, starting in 2020, intend to 
provide NASA with access to the lunar surface for the first 
time in nearly 50 years and allow for affordable commercial 
procurement of a variety of science and exploration payloads to 
prepare for future science and crewed Exploration Missions. 
This program supports a regular cadence of at least one robotic 
mission to the lunar surface per year using U.S.-built Lunar 
Landers.
    DART.--The Committee directs NASA to continue the 
development of the DART technology demonstration mission, with 
a target launch not later than June 2021. The Committee 
understands that ground based telescopes and radars will be 
used to provide the needed measurements to assess the degree of 
deflection resulting from the DART impactor and that this 
telescope support is already baselined in the NASA mission. The 
Committee directs NASA to develop a plan for funding the 
Planetary Defense Office for DART and subsequent activities 
which will support successive space-based survey missions and 
technology demonstrations that will rapidly advance the 
Nation's planetary defense capabilities.
    Green Bank Observatory.--The Committee recognizes the 
significant investment NSF has made to develop the world-class 
scientific facility at the Green Bank Telescope Observatory 
[GBO] and the benefit NASA has gained through its use of the 
GBO facility. NASA is encouraged to continue its use of GBO to 
support its Planetary Science Research program, including 
orbital debris monitoring and other activities, and to 
coordinate with NSF and other government agencies to develop 
and support multi-agency management plans for GBO, including 
research, facilities, and maintenance funding. NASA shall 
include in its fiscal year 2020 budget request any planned 
support for the subsequent 5 fiscal years.
    Astrophysics.--The Committee recommendation includes no 
less than $98,300,000 for the Hubble Space Telescope, no less 
than $15,000,000 for search for life technology development to 
leverage and scale technologies developed for the James Webb 
Space Telescope, and $352,000,000 for the Wide-Field InfraRed 
Survey Telescope [WFIRST]. The Committee has again rejected the 
proposal to cut Hubble operations given costs that the program 
has absorbed to continue three fellowship programs, address 
hardware degradation through software changes, and enhance the 
long-term value of Hubble's data archive.
    WFIRST.--The Committee rejects the proposal to cancel this 
mission which was the highest priority of the most recent 
Astrophysics decadal survey to settle fundamental questions 
about the nature of dark energy and has provided $352,000,000 
for WFIRST to be developed on a timeline that allows a 2025 
launch date. The Committee is concerned about the growing cost 
of the prime mission and expects NASA to use a firm 
$3,200,000,000 mission cost cap in its future planning of the 
mission. To reduce mission costs and ensure that overlap with 
the James Webb Space Telescope is maximized, NASA should 
implement the most efficient development program for the 
telescope and its instruments.
    Decadal Survey.--The Committee, NASA, and NSF, among 
others, rely on decadal surveys to prioritize scientific 
investments in large, medium, and small projects. The Committee 
directs NASA to support the National Academies in keeping the 
next Astrophysics decadal survey on schedule, rather than 
delaying the survey, as the astronomy community and other 
Federal agencies are relying on its results.
    Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy [SOFIA].--
NASA regularly reviews its missions, as part of the senior 
review process, to measure mission performance based on 
scientific merit, national needs, the technical status of the 
mission, and budget efficiency to help resources prioritize and 
ensure they are meeting their science goals. NASA is encouraged 
to review SOFIA at the appropriate time to determine if this 
mission should have its prime mission extended.
    SMD Education.--The Committee provides no less than 
$45,000,000 for education. The Committee supports the 
recommendation that the Astrophysics program administer this 
SMD-wide education funding. The Committee encourages SMD-funded 
investigators to be directly involved in outreach and education 
efforts. NASA should continue to prioritize funding for on-
going education efforts linked directly to its science 
missions.
    James Webb Space Telescope.--The Committee maintains its 
strong support for the completion of the James Webb Space 
Telescope [JWST], and provides $304,600,000, the same as the 
budget request. The bill maintains an overall development cost 
ceiling for JWST at $8,000,000,000, and the Committee intends 
to hold NASA and its contractors to that commitment. At this 
time, NASA has not submitted a request to increase the cap, 
despite numerous cost and schedule challenges. The Committee is 
disappointed with the execution and management of this project, 
especially given the attention paid to it by NASA and 
contractor leadership. The Committee expects to be briefed 
expeditiously when the ongoing independent assessment is 
complete and expects to be kept fully informed on issues 
relating to program and risk management, achievement of cost 
and schedule goals, and the program's technical status. The 
Committee appreciates GAO's continuing work to monitor JWST 
progress, costs, and schedule.
    Heliophysics.--The Committee recognizes that a greater 
understanding of our Sun and the accompanying technologies 
developed for that purpose will help to mitigate the hazards 
that solar activity poses to ground- and space-based platforms 
that strengthen our national security, economic 
competitiveness, and scientific prowess. The recommendation 
provides $720,000,000 for Heliophysics, including $100,000,000 
for Solar Terrestrial Probes, an increase of $9,000,000 above 
the request to support continued mission formulation and 
development of Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe 
[IMAP], implement accompanying Missions of Opportunity [MOs], 
and maintain operations for ongoing missions.
    Heliophysics Explorer.--The Committee is encouraged by 
NASA's commitment to implement a 2-year cadence of alternating 
Small Explorer [SMEX] and Mid-sized Explorer [MIDEX] missions, 
and enable a regular selection of MOs to allow heliophysics 
researchers to rapidly respond to and participate in missions 
both inside and outside of NASA. The recommendation provides 
the request level of $109,200,000 for Heliophysics Explorers.
    Diversify, Realize, Integrate, Venture, Educate [DRIVE] 
Initiative.--The Committee supports implementation of the DRIVE 
initiative, a top priority of the National Research Council 
Decadal Survey, which would increase the competitive 
Heliophysics research program from 10 percent to 15 percent of 
the budget request to enable the development of new 
technologies and establish competitively-awarded Heliophysics 
Science Centers. The Committee recognizes the increasingly 
multidisciplinary nature of Heliophysics and seeks to provide 
researchers with the necessary tools to enable continued 
scientific progress in this field.
    Space Weather Research.--In response to the Space Weather 
Action Plan and the recommendations of the Decadal Survey, the 
Committee recommendation provides no less than $15,000,000 for 
the space weather research program to support innovation in 
solar observational capabilities and continue development of a 
space weather research program that advances research-to-
operations, operations-to-research, and computational aspects 
of space weather mitigation. NASA should coordinate with NOAA 
and the Department of Defense to ensure that NASA is focused on 
research and technology that enables other agencies to 
dramatically improve their operational space weather assets and 
the forecasts they generate using data from those assets, 
including current and future ground-based telescopes and 
instruments that are expected to come on line, such as the 
Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope.

                              AERONAUTICS

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $685,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     633,900,000
Committee recommendation................................     725,000,000

    The Committee provides $725,000,000 for Aeronautics, which 
is $40,000,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and 
$91,100,000 above the budget request. The Aeronautics account 
funds research in key areas related to the development of 
advanced aircraft technologies and systems, including those 
related to aircraft safety, ultra-efficient vehicles and fuel 
efficiency, hypersonics, and research that supports the Next 
Generation Air Transportation System in partnership with the 
Joint Planning and Development Office.
    The Committee supports New Aviation Horizons and is 
encouraged by NASA's efforts toward developing a Low Boom 
Flight Demonstrator X-plane, referred to as the Low Boom Flight 
Demonstrator [LBFD]. Within the funds provided for Aeronautics, 
appropriate funds are included to enable the next X-plane 
demonstration planned beyond LBFD.
    Advanced Materials Research.--The Committee recognizes the 
continuing role NASA and university research institutions play 
in developing advanced materials platforms for next-generation 
air and space vehicles. NASA is encouraged to partner with 
academic institutions that have strong capabilities in 
aviation, aerospace structures, and materials testing and 
evaluation, and provides $5,000,000 above the request to 
advance university-led aeronautics materials research.
    Unmanned Traffic Management.--The Committee commends NASA 
for leveraging its capabilities in assisting the Nation's UAS 
test sites to advance its efforts on the unmanned traffic 
management [UTM] program. NASA is encouraged to work with 
Federal agencies, States, counties, cities, and tribal 
jurisdictions on research toward the development of a future 
UTM system that will ensure the broadest level of acceptance 
from local jurisdictions.
    The Committee is interested in NASA research and 
development efforts designed to further new innovations in 
propulsion, simplified vehicle operations, increased 
automation, and the integration of these operations into 
controlled airspace. The Committee believes these technologies 
can address critical mobility challenges. The Committee expects 
NASA to work with industry stakeholders and coordinate with the 
Federal Aviation Administration [FAA] to expedite technology 
introduction and maximize improvements in safety, 
affordability, and environmental benefits like noise and 
emissions reduction. As part of this effort, NASA is encouraged 
to leverage other directorates' research efforts, test sites, 
and industry partnerships where applicable.
    Unmanned Aerial Systems Research.--NASA conducts research 
to reduce technical barriers associated with integrating UAS 
into the National Airspace System [NAS]. This research remains 
a national priority with the potential to increase public 
safety and bring economic benefits to a wide range of 
industries.
    Advanced Composites.--To address the ongoing need for 
improved methods, tools, and protocols to reduce the 
development and certification timeline for composite materials 
and structures, the Committee funds advanced composites at the 
fiscal year 2019 request level.

                            SPACE TECHNOLOGY

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $760,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................  \1\818,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     932,800,000

\1\Amount shown reflects the fiscal year 2019 budget request in the 
fiscal year 2018 account structure.

    The Committee provides $932,800,000 for Space Technology, 
which is $172,800,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level 
and $114,800,000 above the budget request, as formatted in the 
fiscal year 2018 account structure. The Space Technology 
Program funds basic research that can advance multi-purpose 
technologies to enable new approaches to NASA's current 
missions. These technologies can serve all NASA mission 
directorates and are not solely focused on enabling human 
spaceflight. Funding for the human research program remains in 
Exploration Research and Technology and is not transferred to 
Space Technology, as requested. Space Technology also includes 
funding for NASA's Small Business Innovative Research [SBIR] 
and Small Business Technology Transfer programs.
    The Committee is supportive of many of the technologies 
being developed within Space Technology, which will have wide 
ranging benefits for NASA missions and throughout the agency. 
Of particular note are the enabling technologies of Solar 
Electric Propulsion; the laser communications relay 
demonstration; in-space manufacturing and assembly; and 
composite tanks and structural materials. These key supporting 
technologies will provide enabling capabilities for multiple 
robotic and human exploration missions. The Committee is also 
supportive of the Regional Economic Development Program and 
encourages NASA to consider expanding the program to all 50 
States.
    The recommendation includes $35,000,000 for additive 
manufacturing, $20,000,000 for the Flight Opportunities 
Program, and $5,000,000 to advance large scale production and 
use of innovative nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes.
    Satellite Servicing/RESTORE-L.--The Committee recommends 
$180,000,000 for the Restore-L Project only to conduct and 
demonstrate the capabilities to refuel satellites in low earth 
orbit utilizing Landsat-7. The project shall target a launch 
before Landsat-7's fuel supply runs out in late calendar year 
2020. As the program progresses from research to 
implementation, the Committee encourages NASA to work with 
private sector and university partners to facilitate 
commercialization of the technologies developed within the 
program and directs NASA to submit with its fiscal year 2020 
budget request a report on current efforts underway to 
encourage commercialization of technology within the Restore-L 
program, with a focus on how intellectual property will be 
handled.
    Nuclear Propulsion.--NASA is continuing its work to develop 
the foundational technologies and advance low-enriched uranium 
nuclear thermal propulsion systems that can provide 
significantly faster trip times for crewed missions than non-
nuclear options. Not less than $75,000,000 shall be expended to 
support the development and demonstration of a nuclear thermal 
propulsion system. Within 180 days of the enactment of this 
act, NASA, in conjunction with other relevant Federal 
departments and agencies shall submit a multi-year plan that 
enables a demonstration no later than 2024 and describes future 
missions and propulsion and power systems enabled by this 
capability.
    Small Satellite Technical Challenges.--The Committee 
provides $2,000,000 above the budget request to further address 
the technical challenges associated with designing, 
fabricating, and testing capable small satellites and 
constellations of satellites.
    Small Business Innovation Research.--The Committee 
recognizes the importance of the SBIR program and its previous 
success in commercialization of results from federally funded 
research and development projects. The SBIR program encourages 
domestic small businesses to engage in Federal research and 
development, and creates jobs. The Committee therefore directs 
NASA to place an increased focus on awarding SBIR awards to 
firms with fewer than 50 employees.

                              EXPLORATION

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $4,790,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................\1\4,743,500,000
Committee recommendation................................   5,338,700,000

\1\Amount shown reflects the fiscal year 2019 budget request in the 
fiscal year 2018 account structure.

    The Committee provides $5,338,700,000 for Exploration, 
which is $548,700,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level 
and $595,200,000 above the budget request, as formatted in the 
fiscal year 2018 account structure. The Exploration account 
funds the capabilities required to develop, demonstrate, and 
deploy the transportation, life support, and surface systems 
that will enable sustained human presence beyond low-Earth 
orbit and throughout the solar system. The Committee believes 
the Nation deserves a safe and robust human spaceflight program 
to explore beyond low-Earth orbit.
    The Space Launch System [SLS], Orion multi-purpose crew 
vehicle, and Exploration ground systems are all critical 
infrastructure for the development and sustainment of the 
Nation's human exploration goals. These investments will enable 
the human exploration of space beyond low Earth orbit, and 
provide flexibility for a variety of mission destinations 
including the Moon and Mars.
    The Committee provides: $2,150,000,000 for SLS and 
concurrent Exploration Upper Stage development; $1,350,000,000 
for Orion; and $795,000,000 for Exploration Ground Systems, 
including $255,000,000 for construction of a second mobile 
launch platform and associated SLS activities. In addition to 
this funding, $25,900,000 is further provided under 
Construction of Facilities for Exploration-related 
construction, bringing the total funding for ground systems to 
$820,900,000. These funding levels reflect consistent 
programmatic funding to ensure the earliest possible crewed 
launch of SLS, as well as prepare for future science and crewed 
missions. The Committee is disappointed by reports that 
workmanship and manufacturing challenges could delay the launch 
of Exploration Mission-1 until calendar year 2020.
    It is important to note that the funding levels provided by 
the Committee support the development of multiple iterations of 
launch and crew test articles and flight vehicles that are 
being developed and produced during fiscal year 2019. By 
providing the funds to complete a second mobile launch 
platform, NASA will have greater mission flexibility to launch 
using SLS launch vehicle variants that utilize both the Interim 
Cryogenic Propulsion Stage and Exploration Upper Stage engines. 
This flexibility will allow for SLS to have a more regular 
launch cadence, enable earlier crewed launches for future lunar 
missions, and provide further opportunities for scientific 
missions, such as the Europa Clipper.
    NASA's human exploration program is made up of three 
distinct, but equally important pieces: the SLS heavy-lift 
launch vehicle and its propulsion systems, Orion, and the 
supporting ground systems that process and enable the launch of 
these vehicles. If any of these activities are delayed, then 
the entire exploration enterprise of launching humans beyond 
low Earth orbit by NASA is also hindered. Therefore, it is 
important to view these programs as part of a complete system 
and to budget accordingly so that the Nation can advance its 
exploration goals.
    The Committee is disappointed that NASA has been slow to 
comply with previous bill language to provide the Committee 
with an integrated budget for these activities that shows a 
budget profile to launch Exploration Mission-2 as early as 
possible. NASA's delayed response to the provision does not 
reflect positively on the ability for NASA to execute Space 
Policy Directive 1 [SPD-1] which calls for NASA to lead 
missions that return humans to the Moon and eventually Mars. 
Without such a coordinated spending plan, NASA has been 
hindered with inefficient planning due to unrealistic proposed 
budgets in previous years and will continue to face challenges 
into the future without such a plan. NASA is again directed in 
bill language to provide such a budget and the Committee 
expects a response that is timely and conforms to the goals 
laid out in SPD-1.
    Advanced Exploration Systems [AES].--The Committee provides 
$1,043,700,000 for AES. Within these amounts, $504,200,000 is 
for development of the Lunar Orbital Platform in support of 
development of the initial power and propulsion element. The 
Committee is supportive of the Human Research Program, but does 
not agree with NASA's proposed move of this activity and other 
activities funded in this account in fiscal year 2018 into 
Space Technology and instead provides funding for this activity 
within AES.
    Advanced Cislunar and Surface Capabilities [ACSC].--The 
Committee provides $116,500,000 for ACSC. As NASA embarks on a 
return to the Moon as part of its larger human exploration 
strategy, the need for the development of a range of lander 
technologies to support such missions is critical. Small and 
medium-sized landers will be needed for exploration activities 
while building up to larger landers and eventually human ascent 
vehicles. NASA should ensure that its investments in this 
account and in science are coordinated and that between the two 
accounts, the agency is pursuing the development of landers of 
varying sizes and capabilities so as to meet its long-term 
science and exploration goals. Public-private partnerships 
[PPPs] with U.S. commercial space companies could help expedite 
development of lunar landers, including development of 
hardware, propulsion, communications, and software necessary 
for lunar landing vehicles, and NASA is encouraged to use firm 
fixed-price partnerships with PPPs, as appropriate. To ensure 
that landers in a range of sizes are a part of ACSC, NASA shall 
allocate $25,000,000 within its lunar lander demonstration 
program in fiscal year 2019 to meet the goal of delivering 
medium to large payloads to the lunar surface by 2023.

                            SPACE OPERATIONS

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $4,751,500,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   4,624,600,000
Committee recommendation................................   4,639,100,000

    The Committee provides $4,639,100,000 for Space Operations, 
which is $112,400,000 below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level 
and $14,500,000 above the budget request. The Space Operations 
account funds the International Space Station [ISS] and the 
supporting functions required to conduct operations in space. 
The ISS is a complex of research laboratories in low-Earth 
orbit in which American, Russian, and international partner 
astronauts conduct unique scientific and technological 
investigations in a microgravity environment.
    Commercial Low-Earth Orbit Development [LEO].--The 
Committee supports maintaining the International Space Station 
[ISS] with direct Federal funding beyond 2025 until a viable 
alternative exists to achieve NASA's objectives in LEO. The 
Committee supports public-private partnerships to advance 
commercial capabilities in LEO, particularly those involving 
in-kind contributions by NASA, such as making a docking node on 
the ISS available for partnership opportunities. The agreement 
provides $40,000,000 for port implementation analysis and power 
augmentation studies necessary to enable potential future 
commercial activities at the ISS.
    Space Transportation.--The Committee provides the requested 
amounts of $1,935,600,000 for the delivery of cargo and 
payments for current and future crew services to the ISS, and 
up to $173,100,000 for payment of successfully completed crew 
development milestones. The Committee is hopeful that crewed 
demonstration missions will be flown soon, but notes that the 
GAO has reported in ``NASA: Assessments of Major Projects'' 
that the certification of both contractors' vehicles will 
likely be delayed until calendar year 2019 or possibly later. 
The Committee encourages NASA to regain the ability to launch 
astronauts to ISS from the United States in a safe and timely 
manner but is concerned that further delays to the crew program 
will lead to additional unanticipated scheduling challenges and 
transportation costs. NASA shall inform the Committee of the 
causes of any delays to demonstration missions, certification 
dates, and any additional associated costs, including 
additional payments for alternative transportation services, at 
the time they are determined by NASA, and not wait to disclose 
them as part of the regular quarterly reporting requirement.
    ISS Research.--Increased crew time aboard the ISS presents 
more research opportunities. The Committee directs NASA to 
promote new grant opportunities that will support and further 
biological and physical sciences research within a microgravity 
environment, including continued study of and quantifying 
potential exposure to cosmic rays through initiatives such as 
the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer. In making grant opportunities 
available, the Committee urges the Administrator to abide by 
the priorities established by the National Academies' decadal 
survey titled ``Recapturing a Future for Space Exploration: 
Life and Physical Sciences Research for a New Era.''
    Rocket Propulsion Test Program.--The Committee recommends 
the fiscal year 2019 requested amount for the NASA Rocket 
Propulsion Test program to ensure test infrastructure remains 
adequate to support the Space Launch System and other 
propulsion development programs.
    Testing Infrastructure.--The Committee encourages NASA to 
develop plans to fully utilize NASA-owned rocket testing 
infrastructure for commercially developed launch vehicles to 
ensure that these vehicles are not only tested in the same 
manner as Government-developed launch vehicles, but also at the 
same facilities, to ensure consistency in testing across all 
potential vehicles.
    Space and Flight Support Launch Services.--The Committee 
believes that the small launch vehicle development will lead to 
a capability that will maximize benefits to the government, the 
private sector, and universities while promoting increased 
participation in the small launch market. The recommendation 
supports funding in Space Technology, Science, and Exploration, 
estimated at $30,000,000, that is provided to the Launch 
Services Program to procure launch vehicles of small payloads 
to increase opportunities for improved access to suborbital and 
orbital launch opportunities once the current round is 
completed. NASA shall also keep the Committee informed of the 
two upcoming demonstration launches planned for 2018, as well 
as its future plans to maximize utilization of this program 
that will lower small launch costs and increase access to 
space.
    Space Network Ground Segment Sustainment [SGSS].--The 
Committee understands that the independent review of SGSS is 
underway and will be complete by the end of July 2018. The 
recommendation provides $109,900,000 to complete the initial 
Operational Readiness Review of SGSS, including installing and 
testing the software pool on one antenna at the White Sands 
Complex. If the independent review team recommends SSGS 
completion through Final Acceptance Review in fiscal year 2021, 
and this recommendation is accepted, the Committee understands 
funding beyond fiscal year 2019 will be required.
    21st Century Launch Complex.--The Committee notes that 
maintaining multiple launch sites contributes to assured access 
to the ISS for NASA, researchers, and industry. The 
recommendation includes $15,000,000 for NASA-owned launch 
facilities, of which $10,000,000 shall be for the Wallops 
Flight Facility launch complex. Within 45 days of the enactment 
of this act, NASA shall submit to the Committees on 
Appropriations a prioritized list of remaining needs for NASA-
owned launch facilities necessary for range modernization to 
meet critical maintenance, capacity, and range safety needs 
over the next 5 years, along with an indication of whether 
these projects are planned to be funded under Exploration or 
Construction of Facilities [CoF]. The Committee notes that 
significant funding for Kennedy Space Center and Wallops Flight 
Facility projects have been included in CoF in both the fiscal 
year 2018 enacted bill and in this act.

    SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, AND MATHEMATICS OPPORTUNITIES

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $100,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................................
Committee recommendation................................     110,000,000

    The Committee does not agree with the proposed cancellation 
of the activities within Education and has provided funding for 
the programs formerly within Education under a new Science, 
Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics [STEM] Opportunities 
account for the upcoming fiscal year. The Committee provides 
$110,000,000 for STEM Opportunities, which is $10,000,000 above 
the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $110,000,000 above the 
budget request. As part of this activity, NASA is directed to 
continue progress toward the Committee and NASA's shared goal 
of capping administrative costs at no more than five percent. 
This account funds STEM education activities to educate and 
inspire our next generation of explorers and innovators.
    The Committee is not averse to considering funding these 
activities either within the STEM Opportunities directorate or 
other alternative locations, but believes that they should 
continue. NASA has an enormous reach in inspiring the future 
scientists, engineers, and other technical activities that keep 
the Nation at the forefront of research and exploration and 
should review its programs to ensure they are appropriately 
funded.
    The Committee directs NASA to use fiscal year 2019 to 
review the programs within the STEM Opportunities Mission 
Directorate, along with its other education-related activities, 
in order to set NASA's STEM activities on a path forward to 
take advantage of the positive impact NASA's programs and 
missions have on the public. NASA shall provide the Committee a 
report on the results of this comprehensive review, including 
options for sustained and improved educational impact at all 
levels across the country, 90 days from enactment of this act.
    The funds within STEM Opportunities are provided to ensure 
continuity in the ongoing programs as NASA evaluates its role 
in STEM education and development of students in science and 
engineering fields.

                           STEM OPPORTUNITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
NASA Space Grant......................................            44,000
Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research             21,000
 [EPSCOR].............................................
Minority University Research and Education Project....            33,000
STEM Education and Accountability Projects............            12,000
                                                       -----------------
      TOTAL...........................................           110,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Space Grant.--The Committee provides $44,000,000 for Space 
Grant and directs NASA to support a multi-year extension of the 
current Space Grant program, and to allocate the entire funding 
amount for consortia-led institutions in all 52 participating 
jurisdictions according to the percentage allocation provided 
to States in the current 5-year grant award.
    Competitive Program.--The Committee provides $10,000,000 
for the Competitive Program for Science, Museums, Planetariums, 
and NASA Visitors Centers within the STEM Education and 
Accountability Projects. This competitive grant program creates 
interactive exhibits, professional development activities, and 
community-based programs to engage students, teachers, and the 
public in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

                 SAFETY, SECURITY, AND MISSION SERVICES

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $2,826,900,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   2,749,700,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,750,000,000

    The Committee provides $2,750,000,000 for Safety, Security, 
and Mission Services, which is $76,900,000 below the fiscal 
year 2018 enacted level and $300,000 above the budget request. 
The Safety, Security, and Mission Services account funds agency 
management, including headquarters and each of the nine NASA 
field centers, as well as the design and execution of non-
programmatic Construction of Facilities and Environmental 
Compliance and Restoration activities.
    Independent Verification and Validation [IV&V;] Program.--
Within the amounts provided for cross-agency support, the 
Committee recommends $39,100,000 for NASA's IV&V; Program.
    Virtual Institute for Aerospace Systems Engineering.--The 
Committee is concerned with the increases in NASA's mission 
costs and schedule as reported by GAO. As missions become more 
complex and new technologies are proposed for development, NASA 
programs increasingly need improved estimates of the cost and 
schedules necessary to mature technologies for use in NASA 
missions. Reducing development and schedule uncertainty 
associated with integrating new technologies will benefit NASA 
as it embarks on ambitious missions across the Science, 
Aeronautics, and Exploration mission directorates. The 
Committee encourages NASA to work with government, academic, 
and industry partners to establish a ``virtual institute'' 
focused on advancing systems engineering with the goal of 
improving mission success and affordability.
    Information Technology.--The Committee is extremely 
concerned with reports from the Inspector General [IG] and GAO 
on the state of NASA's Information Technology [IT] security. 
NASA needs to have outward facing systems that provide 
information and scientific data to users. These systems also 
must have protections in place for sensitive data and internal 
operations. NASA requires an appropriate workforce to ensure 
the agency's IT systems are secure. Both the IG and GAO 
highlight deficiencies within the Office of the Chief 
Information Officer. NASA is directed to provide the Committee 
with its plans to implement the recent recommendations of the 
IG and GAO on IT security no later than 30 days after 
enactment.
    Cybersecurity.--The Committee's recommendation includes the 
full request for Agency Information Technology Services to 
support shifting NASA's IT model to one that enhances 
cybersecurity with strong governance and strong information 
security practices.
    Buy American Provisions.--NASA is reminded of language 
included in the NOAA section of this report regarding Buy 
American provisions related to the acquisition, construction, 
or conversion of a marine vessel or marine vessel components.

       CONSTRUCTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL COMPLIANCE AND RESTORATION

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $562,240,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     388,200,000
Committee recommendation................................     388,200,000

    The Committee provides $388,200,000 for Construction and 
Environmental Compliance and Restoration, which is $174,040,000 
below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and the same as the 
budget request. The Construction and Environmental Compliance 
and Restoration account provides for design and execution of 
programmatic, discrete and minor revitalization, construction 
of facilities projects, facility demolition projects, and 
environmental compliance and restoration activities.
    Ensuring Continued Access to Kennedy Space Center [KSC].--
The Committee notes that NASA's Indian River Bridge provides 
access from payload processing facilities on the mainland of 
Florida to the launch complexes at KSC and Cape Canaveral Air 
Force Station. Cape Canaveral is among the world's busiest 
spaceports and hosted two-thirds of all U.S. launches in 2017. 
Maintenance on the bridge has not been prioritized by NASA, and 
as early as 2021, the bridge structure may be so degraded that 
it will be ``de-rated'' from supporting heavy loads such as 
trucks transporting space payloads. If this occurs, the impact 
to national security, civil, and commercial space operations 
will be substantial. The Committee directs NASA to ensure 
continued access to KSC, including consideration of innovative 
funding solutions involving the State of Florida, the 
Department of Defense, and NASA. The Committee looks forward to 
receiving a construction proposal from NASA that may include 
in-kind contributions, including land transfers.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $39,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      39,300,000
Committee recommendation................................      39,300,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $39,300,000 for the 
Office of Inspector General, which is $300,000 above the fiscal 
year 2018 enacted level and the same as the budget request. The 
Office is responsible for promoting efficiency and preventing 
and detecting crime, fraud, waste, and mismanagement.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    The Committee includes bill language regarding the 
availability of funds for certain prizes.
    The Committee also includes bill language regarding 
transfers of funds between accounts and the NASA spending plan 
for fiscal year 2019.

                      National Science Foundation

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $7,767,356,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   7,472,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   8,068,667,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $8,068,667,000 for 
the National Science Foundation [NSF]. The recommendation is 
$301,311,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and 
$596,667,000 above the budget request.
    The National Science Foundation was established as an 
independent agency by the National Science Foundation Act of 
1950 (Public Law 81-507) and is authorized to support research 
and education programs that promote the progress of science and 
engineering in the United States. The Foundation supports 
research and education in all major scientific and engineering 
disciplines through grants, cooperative agreements, contracts, 
and other forms of assistance in all parts of the United 
States. The Foundation also supports unique domestic and 
international large-scale research facilities.

                    RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $6,334,476,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   6,150,680,000
Committee recommendation................................   6,556,183,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $6,556,183,000. The 
recommendation is $221,707,000 above the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level and $405,503,000 above the budget request.
    The Research and Related Activities [R&RA;] appropriation 
funds scientific discovery, trains a dynamic workforce, and 
supports broadly accessible state-of-the-art tools and 
facilities. Research activities contribute to the achievement 
of these outcomes through expansion of the knowledge base; 
integration of research and education; stimulation of knowledge 
transfer between academia and the public and private sectors; 
and international activities, and bring the perspectives of 
many scientific disciplines to bear on complex problems 
important to the Nation. The Foundation's discipline-oriented 
R&RA; account includes: Biological Sciences; Computer and 
Information Science and Engineering; Engineering; Geosciences; 
Mathematical and Physical Sciences; Social, Behavioral and 
Economic Sciences; Office of Cyberinfrastructure; Office of 
International Science and Engineering; Office of Polar 
Programs; Integrative Activities; and the U.S. Arctic Research 
Commission.
    The Committee's fiscal year 2019 recommendation supports 
Federal long-term basic research that has the potential to 
transform our economy and our way of life in the context of a 
constrained Federal budget. Private industry, foundations, and 
non-profits bring additional expertise, resources, and capacity 
to NSF-funded research. This can further accelerate discovery 
and translation of research to products and services, and 
enhances the preparation of the future workforce to benefit 
society and grow the American economy. The Committee strongly 
encourages NSF to leverage the Nation's research communities 
through partnering and collaboration to make available 
infrastructure, expertise, and financial resources to the U.S. 
scientific and engineering research and education enterprise.
    Scientific Facilities and Instrumentation.--A critical 
component of the Nation's scientific enterprise is the 
infrastructure that supports researchers in discovery science. 
Investments to advance the frontiers of research and education 
in science and engineering are critical to the Nation's 
innovation enterprise. The Committee encourages the NSF to 
fully fund its U.S. scientific research facilities and 
instruments to adequately support scientists and students 
engaged in sustained, cutting-edge research.
    Astronomy.--U.S.-based astronomy researchers and facilities 
funded through NSF continue to make groundbreaking discoveries 
utilizing world-class scientific research instruments and 
facilities. NSF funding enables research in the U.S., at 
facilities across the globe, and at observatories operated by 
universities, including the National Optical Astronomy 
Observatories, the National Radio Astronomy Observatories, and 
the National Solar Observatory. As NSF determines the 
appropriate levels of support for astronomy research grants by 
scientists and students engaged in ground-breaking research and 
investments, the Committee expects NSF to continue its support 
of world-class scientific research facilities and 
instrumentation to maximize its investments in research while 
preliminarily preparing for facility upgrades and activities 
associated with supporting the next Astrophysics decadal. In 
addition to this support, partnerships should be explored when 
feasible to maximize research capabilities at such facilities.
    10 Big Ideas.--NSF has embarked on a long-term plan to use 
10 Big Ideas, along with two convergence accelerators, to guide 
funding for areas that will drive NSF's long-term research 
agenda and investments in fundamental research. These ideas are 
meant to define the focus of cutting-edge research uniquely 
suited for NSF's broad portfolio. The Committee is supportive 
of NSF using its position as the lead Federal agency in 
supporting basic research in all fundamental science areas and 
expects that as NSF uses the 10 Big Ideas as a focusing tool, 
the funding for the fundamental scientific disciplines will be 
maintained. The Committee has provided significant funding 
above the amount provided in fiscal year 2018 and also above 
the amount requested in fiscal year 2019. Therefore, NSF shall 
maintain its core research at levels not less than those 
provided in fiscal year 2017. The Committee believes that the 
additional funds provided for fiscal year 2019 are more than 
adequate to continue basic research and allow NSF to position 
the United States to continue as a global science and 
engineering leader using the 10 Big Ideas framework.
    Windows on the Universe.--One of NSF's 10 Big Ideas 
includes pursuing multi-messenger research that utilizes NSF's 
previous investments in both physics and astronomy to 
simultaneously study cosmic events in light, particles, and 
gravitational waves. NSF is encouraged to support both ongoing 
operations of existing and future NSF funded astronomy and 
physics facilities within its budget as part of their 10 Big 
Idea planning.
    Navigating the New Arctic.--As the Foundation develops the 
Navigating the New Arctic program, the Committee urges NSF to 
formulate research programs leveraging expertise from regions 
accustomed to adapting to changing marine ecosystems. 
Specifically, NSF should consider the impact of the opening of 
the two trans-arctic sea routes and the proximity to deep U.S. 
ports.
    Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research 
[EPSCoR].--The Committee underscores the importance of the 
EPSCoR program in spurring innovation and strengthening the 
research capabilities of institutions that are historically 
underserved by Federal research and development funding. The 
EPSCoR program is funded at no less than $176,650,000. NSF 
shall make every effort to achieve efficiencies to ensure that 
no more than 5 percent of the amounts provided for the program 
are used for administration and other overhead costs.
    Study of Temperate Woodland and Alpine Ecosystems and 
Ecoregions.--The Committee expects NSF to continue supporting 
research on unique mountain temperate woodland ecosystems and 
ecoregions, and to advance research in this area in order to 
better understand and sustain the health and vitality of 
mountain ecosystems.
    Mathematical Sciences Institutes.--The Committee recognizes 
the importance of the NSF Mathematical Sciences Institutes 
across the country, which provide important basic research in 
multiple fields.
    Rules of Life.--One of the research gaps in biological 
knowledge is the inability to look at an organism's genetics 
and environment and predict its observable characteristics. 
Research in this area will open new doors to answer fundamental 
questions in life sciences. To that end, the Committee supports 
NSF's funding for research in plant genomics and directs NSF to 
continue to advance the ongoing plant genomics research 
program, further its work in crop-based genomics research, and 
to maintain a focus on research related to crops of economic 
importance. These activities directly address the Rules of Life 
research question that is a focus of NSF.
    USArray Monitor Transfer.--The Committee encourages NSF to 
continue its work with the U.S. Geological Survey [USGS] to 
transfer monitoring stations in seismically active areas with 
sparse instrumentation to the USGS that NSF had planned to be 
removed in 2019.
    VORTEX-SE.--NSF has been working in conjunction with the 
NOAA to build up to a full research campaign to study the 
unique characteristics of tornadoes in the southeast. The large 
VORTEX-SE field campaign is expected to take place in the 
spring of 2020. The previous field campaigns in 2016 and 2017 
have provided important new insights into the observing 
strategy for the larger VORTEX-SE field campaign and the field 
data collected as part of these campaigns is currently being 
assimilated into storm-scale models, which in turn enables 
improvements in tornado forecast capability. In preparation for 
the 2020 field campaign, the Committee expects that future 
budget requests for VORTEX-SE will include adequate budgetary 
resources for associated research and instrumentation that will 
maximize the scientific return of the 2020 field campaign. As 
part of VORTEX-SE, the Committee encourages NSF to look beyond 
its traditional research disciplines and programs and to 
utilize the collaborative opportunities of the Prediction of 
and Resilience against Extreme Events program for co-funding 
grants that enhance understanding of the fundamental natural 
processes and hazards of tornadoes in the southeast and to 
improve models of these seasonal extreme events.
    High-Performance Computing.--The Committee commends NSF on 
its continuing commitment to its high-performance computing and 
data analysis capabilities and urges NSF to make timely and 
significant investments in high-performance computing. NSF 
should remain committed to developing and supporting systems 
that facilitate tremendous leaps in computational simulation 
including artificial intelligence, storage, quantum computing, 
and data analyses that enable a broad range of scientific 
research. Leading edge high-performance computing 
infrastructure is vital for continued U.S. world leadership and 
international scientific competitiveness, particularly given 
computational investments and technical achievements in high-
performance computing by other nations, notably China and 
Japan. The Committee recommends that NSF establish a timely, 
well-funded budget line in future budget submissions to 
Congress to support world-class leadership computing for the 
national open science community.
    Domestic Manufacturing.--The Committee encourages NSF to 
continue to support meritorious research on the U.S. steel 
industry.
    Cybersecurity.--The Committee's recommendation includes no 
less than the fiscal year 2018 enacted level for cybersecurity 
research.
    Innovation Corps.--The Committee provides no less than the 
fiscal year 2018 amount for the Innovation Corps [I-Corps] 
program to build on the successes of its innovative public-
private partnership model. Technology transfer is an important 
contributor to American innovation, and NSF plays a critical 
role in enabling our Nation's brightest academic minds to bring 
their ideas and ingenuity to the marketplace. Scientists are 
trained in discovery but need help turning their research into 
real-world products and profits. Programs like I-Corps create 
jobs in our laboratories today and jobs in American industries 
tomorrow. The Committee encourages NSF to facilitate greater 
participation in the program from academic institutions in 
States that have not previously received awards.
    Marine Seismic Research.--The Committee continues to 
recognize the importance of ensuring that NSF-funded marine 
research vessels with unique capabilities remain available to 
the academic community to support a variety of important 
undersea research efforts and acknowledges that NSF plans to 
fund projects on the R/V Marcus G. Langseth through 2020. 
Within 45 days of enactment, NSF shall brief the Committees on 
future plans for marine seismic research, including maintaining 
access to world class research tools.
    HBCUs Excellence in Research.--The Committee supports the 
Historically Black Colleges and Universities [HBCUs] Excellence 
in Research program, and the recommendation includes 
$15,000,000 for the program. The program is assisting in 
addressing NSF's previously troubling track record of only 
providing substantial research funding to a small number of 
HBCUs.

          MAJOR RESEARCH EQUIPMENT AND FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $182,800,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      94,650,000
Committee recommendation................................     249,254,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $249,254,000 for 
Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction [MREFC]. 
The recommendation is $66,454,000 above the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level and $154,604,000 above the budget request.
    The MREFC appropriation supports the acquisition, 
procurement, construction, and commissioning of unique national 
research platforms and facilities as well as major research 
equipment. Projects supported by this appropriation push the 
boundaries of technology and offer expanded opportunities for 
the science and engineering community. Preliminary design and 
development activities, ongoing operations, and maintenance 
costs of the facilities are provided through the R&RA; 
appropriation account.
    The Committee's recommendation includes funding at the 
requested level for the continued construction of the Daniel K. 
Inouye Solar Telescope and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. 
In addition, the Committee provides the requested $28,700,000 
in order to complete funding for the second Regional Class 
Research Vessel [RCRV] and $60,500,000 to begin the funding for 
the third RCRV. Finally, NSF is directed to fund the 
construction effort associated with the Antarctic 
Infrastructure Modernization for Science [AIMS] project through 
the MREFC account and provides $95,104,000 with the remainder 
of the funding for AIMS provided within the Research and 
Related Activities account.
    The Committee encourages GAO to continue its annual review 
of programs funded within MREFC so that GAO can report to 
Congress shortly after each annual budget submission of the 
President and semiannually thereafter on the status of large-
scale NSF projects and activities based on its review of this 
information. The Committee notes that MREFC has a ``no cost 
overrun'' policy and expects GAO's analysis to address any NSF 
adjustments to proposed activities and scope.
    Buy American Provisions.--NSF is reminded of language 
included in the NOAA section of this report regarding Buy 
American provisions related to the acquisition, construction, 
or conversion of a marine vessel or marine vessel components.

                     EDUCATION AND HUMAN RESOURCES

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $902,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     873,370,000
Committee recommendation................................     915,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $915,000,000 for 
this account. The recommendation is $13,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $41,630,000 above the budget 
request.
    The Education and Human Resources appropriation supports a 
comprehensive set of programs across all levels of education in 
STEM. The appropriation supports activities that unite school 
districts with institutions of higher learning to improve 
precollege education. Other precollege activities include the 
development of the next generation of STEM education leaders, 
instructional materials, and the STEM instructional workforce. 
Undergraduate activities support curriculum, laboratory, and 
instructional improvement; expand the STEM talent pool; attract 
STEM participants to teaching; augment advanced technological 
education at 2-year colleges; and develop dissemination tools. 
Graduate support is directed to research and teaching 
fellowships, internships, and instructional workforce 
improvement by linking precollege education systems with higher 
education. Programs also seek to broaden the participation of 
groups underrepresented in the STEM enterprise and promote 
informal science education.
    Advanced Technological Education.--The Committee provides 
$66,000,000 for Advanced Technological Education.
    Fellowships and Scholarships.--The Committee does not adopt 
the proposed funding reductions for the NSF Scholarships in 
STEM, Robert Noyce Scholarship Program, or the Graduate 
Research Fellowship and instead provides the fiscal year 2018 
funding level for these programs.
    CyberCorps: Scholarships for Service.--The CyberCorps 
program has awarded more than 3,000 scholarships to train 
Federal cybersecurity professionals. Nearly half of the 
program's graduates are placed in national security and defense 
agencies. The Committee provides no less than $55,000,000 for 
the CyberCorps: Scholarships for Service program, of which not 
less than $7,500,000 should be used to continue work with 
community colleges that have been designated as a Center of 
Academic Excellence in Information Assurance 2-Year Education 
[CAE2Y] by the National Security Agency and the Department of 
Homeland Security, including through providing scholarships to 
students at CAE2Y's who will not transfer into a 4-year 
program, such as career-changers who possess 4-year degrees and 
veterans of the Armed Forces. Additionally, the Committee urges 
NSF to collaborate with the National Initiative for 
Cybersecurity Education at NIST on their efforts to develop 
cybersecurity skills in the workforce, especially in support of 
non-traditional or technical degree qualifications.
    Informal Science Education.--The Committee maintains its 
strong support for NSF's informal science education program and 
provides no less than $62,500,000 for Advancing Informal STEM 
Learning and $51,880,000 for STEM+C Partnerships. The Committee 
encourages NSF to coordinate and provide necessary support for 
investments in both in- and out-of-school time STEM education 
programs across Federal agencies, including support for 
extracurricular STEM programs. The Education and Human 
Resources directorate is further encouraged to continue its 
NSF-wide efforts to support informal STEM education programs, 
including leveraging the research directorates to support 
activities that match their respective content areas.
    Division of Research on Learning [DRL] in Formal and 
Informal Settings.--As part of the research funded through the 
DRL, the Committee recognizes the importance of out-of-school 
time STEM mentor-led engagement programs, including STEM 
networks, festivals, and competitions. Such programs are highly 
effective in filling the higher education STEM pipeline. The 
Committee urges NSF to focus on populations underrepresented in 
the STEM fields and encourages NSF to fund out-of-school time 
STEM engagement program activities.
    Division on Human Resource Development.--The Committee 
recommends $35,000,000 for the HBCUs Undergraduate Program, 
$8,000,000 for the Alliance for Graduate Education and the 
Professoriate, $46,000,0000 for the Louis Stokes Alliances for 
Minority Participation, $15,000,000 for the Tribal Colleges and 
Universities Program, and $24,000,000 for Centers for Research 
Excellence in Science and Technology. In addition, $30,000,000 
is provided for the Hispanic Serving Institutions program to 
build capacity at institutions of higher education that 
typically do not receive high levels of NSF funding.
    Bioprocessing.--The Committee encourages NSF to include 
training in bioprocessing within appropriate research areas as 
part of their educational efforts.
    Inclusion Across the Nation of Communities of Learners of 
Underrepresented Discoverers in Engineering and Science 
[INCLUDES].--The Committee supports the Big Idea to broaden 
participation in science and engineering by developing networks 
and partnerships that involve organizations and consortia from 
different sectors committed to the common agenda of STEM 
inclusion, and the recommendation provides $20,000,000 for 
INCLUDES.
    Advancement of Women in Academic Science and Engineering 
Careers [ADVANCE].--The Committee is supportive of the ADVANCE 
program, which funds efforts to address the systemic barriers 
to women's STEM careers. To maintain these efforts, the 
Committee provides $18,000,000, the same as the fiscal year 
2018 funding level.

                 AGENCY OPERATIONS AND AWARD MANAGEMENT

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $328,510,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     333,630,000
Committee recommendation................................     328,510,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $328,510,000 for 
Agency Operations and Award Management. The recommendation is 
the same as the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $5,120,000 
below the budget request.
    The appropriation provides salaries and expenses, 
including: staff salaries, benefits, travel, training, rent, 
advisory and assistance services, communications and utilities 
expenses, supplies, equipment, and other operating expenses 
necessary for management of NSF's research and education 
activities.
    The Committee continues to believe that NSF should include 
criteria that evaluate how a proposal will advance our Nation's 
national security and economic interests, as well as promote 
the progress of science and innovation in the United States.
    The Committee reiterates its long-standing requirement that 
NSF submit reprogrammings when initiating new programs or 
activities of more than $500,000 or when reorganizing 
components. The Committee expects to be notified of 
reprogramming actions which involve less than the above-
mentioned amount if such actions would have the effect of 
changing the agency's funding requirements in future years, or 
if programs or projects specifically cited in the Committee's 
reports are affected.

                  OFFICE OF THE NATIONAL SCIENCE BOARD

Appropriations, 2018....................................      $4,370,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       4,320,000
Committee recommendation................................       4,370,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $4,370,000 for the 
Office of the National Science Board. The recommendation is the 
same as the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $50,000 above 
the budget request.
    The National Science Board is the governing body of NSF and 
is charged with serving as an independent adviser to the 
President and Congress on policy matters related to science and 
engineering research and education.
    Operations and Maintenance Costs.--The Committee notes the 
report requested in fiscal year 2018 on whether the issue of 
increasing operations and maintenance costs for large 
facilities merits a change in NSF's funding principles was 
released on May 24, 2018. The Committee stands ready to 
consider any formal proposals made by the Board and the 
Foundation during the fiscal year 2020 budget process.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $15,200,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      15,350,000
Committee recommendation................................      15,350,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $15,350,000 for the 
Office of Inspector General [OIG]. The recommendation is 
$150,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and the same 
as the budget request.
    The OIG appropriation provides audit and investigation 
functions to identify and correct deficiencies that could lead 
to instances of fraud, waste, or mismanagement.

                        ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISION

    The bill includes one administrative provision to allow 
limited transfers of funds among accounts.

                                TITLE IV

                            RELATED AGENCIES

                       Commission on Civil Rights

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2018....................................      $9,700,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       9,200,000
Committee recommendation................................      10,065,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $10,065,000 for the 
salaries and expenses of the Commission on Civil Rights, 
$365,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $865,000 
above the request.
    State Advisory Committees [SAC].--The SACs represent the 
eyes and ears of the Commission in their respective States. The 
Committee is pleased with the Commission's decision to extend 
all existing SAC charters from 2 years to 4 years and looks 
forward to the improvements in work quality that can be 
attributed to this change. In order to facilitate these 
improvements, additional funding has been provided to allow 
each of the SACs to hold at least one face-to-face meeting 
annually and to enable the Commission to provide the SACs with 
appropriate support in order accomplish this goal.
    Donations.--The Commission shall provide to the Committee 
quarterly updates on all gifts and donations, as well as the 
terms of and specific activities funded by the gift or 
donation. Additionally, anticipated funding from gifts or 
donations shall be included in the Commission's annual spend 
plan.

                Equal Employment Opportunity Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $379,500,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     363,807,000
Committee recommendation................................     379,500,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $379,500,000 for 
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission [EEOC] salaries and 
expenses. This recommendation is the same as the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level and $15,693,000 above the request.
    The EEOC is the leading Federal agency dedicated to 
eradicating employment discrimination in both the public and 
private sectors on the basis of race, color, national origin, 
sex, religion, pregnancy, age, disability, and family medical 
history or genetic information. The EEOC serves both U.S. 
public and private workplaces by helping provide a fair and 
inclusive workplace, which engenders employee satisfaction and 
commitment, and enhances employee retention, productivity, and 
profitability.
    Inventory Backlog Reduction.--The Committee notes that at 
the end of fiscal year 2017 the EEOC had a private sector 
inventory of 61,621 cases and a substantial Federal sector 
hearing inventory. While this represents a significant decrease 
in the inventory backlog, it still represents a substantial 
number of unresolved cases. Using appropriated funds for 
activities that do not directly resolve this backlog of 
existing and incoming claims denies cases with complainants the 
opportunity of a timely resolution. EEOC's own budget 
submission states that justice delayed is justice denied. 
Therefore, the Committee directs the EEOC to prioritize its 
staffing and resources toward reducing the number of current 
and outstanding unresolved private sector pending charges and 
public sector hearings. Further, EEOC is directed to report to 
the Committee within 30 days of enactment on the number of A, 
B, and C charges for each of the last 5 fiscal years.
    Public Comment on EEOC Guidance.--The Committee is 
concerned that as the EEOC conducts its business in protecting 
against employment discrimination, its guidance proposals can 
be adopted without the opportunity of public input prior to 
implementation and enforcement. Therefore, if requested by at 
least two Commissioners, the EEOC shall make any new guidance 
available for public comment in the Federal Register for not 
less than 30 days prior to taking any potential action on 
proposed guidance.
    State and Local Enforcement Assistance.--The Committee 
recommends up to $29,500,000 to assist State and local 
enforcement agencies. This will help ensure that EEOC provides 
adequate resources to its State partners.

                     International Trade Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $93,700,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      87,615,000
Committee recommendation................................      95,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $95,000,000. The 
recommendation is $1,300,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level and is $7,385,000 above the budget request.
    ITC is an independent, quasi-judicial agency responsible 
for conducting trade-related investigations and providing 
Congress and the President with independent technical advice 
related to U.S. international trade policy. The Committee 
reminds the administration and the Office of Management and 
Budget that Congress granted ITC specific bypass authority for 
submitting its budget estimate to the Legislative Branch, 
pursuant to section 175 of the Trade Act of 1974. Therefore, 
all future budget estimates for ITC shall be transmitted to 
Congress without revision by the President, pursuant to such 
act.

                       Legal Services Corporation


               PAYMENT TO THE LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $410,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      18,200,000
Committee recommendation................................     410,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation rejects the proposal to 
terminate the payment to LSC and provides $410,000,000 for 
payment to LSC. The recommendation is the same as the fiscal 
year 2018 enacted level and $391,800,000 above the President's 
budget request.
    The Committee's recommendation provides $376,000,000 for 
basic field programs, to be used for competitively awarded 
grants and contracts; $19,400,000 for management and 
administration; $4,000,000 for client self-help and information 
technology; $5,100,000 for OIG; $1,000,000 for loan repayment 
assistance; and $4,500,000 for LSC's Pro Bono Innovation Fund.
    Governance and Management.--LSC must continue to improve 
its governance and management in order to further restore the 
transparency of the organization and direct additional funds 
into legal aid, where resources are desperately needed. The 
Committee expects the Inspector General of LSC to continue 
conducting annual audits of LSC grantees to ensure that funds 
are not being used in contravention of the restrictions by 
which LSC grantees are required to abide.
    Pro Bono Innovation Fund.--The Committee's recommendation 
provides no less than $4,500,000 to continue the Pro Bono 
Innovation Fund. This fund supports innovative projects that 
promote and enhance pro bono initiatives throughout the Nation, 
as well as leverages Federal dollars to increase free legal aid 
for low-income Americans by engaging private attorneys.

          ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISION--LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION

    The Committee's recommendation continues the administrative 
provisions contained in the fiscal year 1998 appropriations act 
(Public Law 105-119) regarding operation of this program to 
provide basic legal services to disadvantaged individuals and 
the restrictions on the use of LSC funds.
    LSC funds cannot be used to engage in litigation and 
related activities with respect to a variety of matters 
including: (1) redistricting; (2) class action suits; (3) 
representation of illegal aliens; (4) political activities; (5) 
abortion; (6) prisoner litigation; (7) welfare reform; (8) 
representation of charged drug dealers during eviction 
proceedings; and (9) solicitation of clients. The exception to 
the restrictions occurs in a case where there is imminent 
threat of physical harm to the client or prospective client.

                        Marine Mammal Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2018....................................      $3,431,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       2,449,000
Committee recommendation................................       4,200,000

    The Committee rejects the proposed elimination of the 
Marine Mammal Commission and instead provides $4,200,000. The 
recommendation is $769,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level and $1,751,000 above the budget request.
    The Marine Mammal Commission and its Committee of 
Scientific Advisors on Marine Mammals provide oversight and 
recommend actions on domestic and international topics to 
advance policies and provisions of the Marine Mammal Protection 
Act. The Commission provides precise, up-to-date scientific 
information to Congress on issues related to the safety of 
marine mammals.

            Office of the United States Trade Representative


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $57,600,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      63,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      57,600,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $57,600,000 for the 
Office of the United States Trade Representative [USTR]. The 
recommendation is equal to the fiscal year 2018 enacted level 
and $5,400,000 below the budget request. USTR is responsible 
for developing and leading international negotiations for the 
United States on policies regarding international trade, direct 
investment, and commodities. Its areas of responsibility 
include all matters relating to the World Trade Organization; 
trade, commodity, and direct investment matters dealt with by 
certain international institutions; industrial, agricultural, 
and services trade policy; and trade-related protection of 
intellectual property and the environment.
    Within funds provided, the Committee continues to support 
USTR's accepting full financial responsibilities of the 
Interagency Center on Trade Implementation, Monitoring, and 
Enforcement (formerly named the Interagency Trade Enforcement 
Center) in fiscal year 2019.
    Trade and Agricultural Exports.--The Committee supports 
efforts to reduce foreign tariffs and non-tariff trade barriers 
for U.S. agricultural exports, including the strong enforcement 
of trade rules and regulations. However, the Committee is 
concerned trade actions resulting in decreased foreign market 
access for U.S. agricultural products due to retaliation 
threaten to harm our Nation's farmers and ranchers. The 
Committee urges USTR and Secretary of Commerce to fully 
evaluate and consider the impact foreign tariffs and other 
retaliatory actions have on U.S. farmers and ranchers when 
negotiating with trade partners and in making trade related 
decisions.
    De Minimis Thresholds.--The Committee recognizes that the 
current disparity in de minimis thresholds have a 
disproportionate impact on small businesses, who often take 
advantage of e-commerce to send low-value shipments to 
customers in foreign countries. USTR is encouraged to consider 
these impacts when negotiating with trading partners to address 
excessively low de minimis thresholds.
    Economy Act Transfers.--USTR is directed to continue 
isolating Economy Act payments as individual transfers and to 
submit documentation of and justification for all Economy Act 
transfers, regardless of amount, to and from other Federal 
agencies, to the Committees not less than 15 days before such 
transfers of sums are made.
    Travel.--USTR is directed to provide monthly travel reports 
detailing all trips outside of the United States, including the 
purposes and costs of such trips. Additionally, USTR shall 
continue to provide the Committee with quarterly reports 
outlining the status of ongoing trade negotiations, enforcement 
activities, and objectives achieved for existing trade 
agreements.

                      TRADE ENFORCEMENT TRUST FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $15,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................................
Committee recommendation................................      15,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $15,000,000 for the 
Trade Enforcement Trust Fund as authorized under the Trade 
Facilitation and Trade Enforcement Act of 2015 (Public Law 114-
125). The recommendation is equal to the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level and $15,000,000 above the budget request.
    Trade Enforcement Trust Fund.--The Committee supports 
efforts to enforce U.S. rights under trade agreements and to 
increase compliance of U.S. trade partners. The Committee 
requests USTR provide a breakdown of expenses for the Trade 
Enforcement Trust Fund's activities such as: the number of 
positions supported by the funding; a detailed list of the 
enforcement actions taken by the Trust Fund since 2015, such as 
the initiation of consultations with trading partners; the 
filing of World Trade Organization cases; the commencement of 
dispute settlement proceedings under free trade agreements; and 
other enforcement actions not listed here but deemed necessary 
for the Committee's review.

                        State Justice Institute


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2018....................................      $5,121,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       6,921,000
Committee recommendation................................       6,121,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $6,121,000 for the 
State Justice Institute. The recommendation is $1,000,000 above 
the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $800,000 below the 
budget request.
    The Institute was created in 1984 to further the 
development and adoption of improved judicial administration in 
State courts.
    State Courts Response to the Opioid Epidemic and the Impact 
on Children.--In addition to base funding, the recommendation 
includes an additional $1,000,000 above the fiscal year 2018 
level for activities that can improve State court responses to 
the opioid epidemic, particularly with respect to children and 
families affected by opioids. Expected activities include 
implementation of pilot programs that focus on reducing trauma 
and promoting safe and timely placement of children; 
partnerships that explore placing children with relatives 
across State lines; promoting evidence-based prevention and 
intervention strategies for infants exposed to opioids and 
other substance abuse; identification of best practices, 
pilots, and evaluation of early intervention strategies for 
parents with substance abuse issues at risk of losing their 
children; education of judges, court staff, foster parents, and 
others on identification and early intervention strategies in 
cases that involve young children of parents with opioid use 
disorder; and partnerships with State Prescription Drug 
Monitoring Programs and child welfare agencies to pilot data 
sharing initiatives to improve services to children and 
families.

                                TITLE V

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

                        (INCLUDING RESCISSIONS)

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions 
for the departments, agencies and commissions funded in the 
accompanying act. Similar provisions were included in the 
fiscal year 2018 act.
    Section 501 prohibits the use of appropriations for certain 
publicity and propaganda purposes.
    Section 502 prohibits any appropriations contained in this 
act from remaining available for obligation beyond the current 
fiscal year unless expressly provided.
    Section 503 limits funds for certain consulting purposes.
    Section 504 provides that, should any provision of the act 
be held to be invalid, the remainder of the act would not be 
affected.
    Section 505 stipulates the policy and procedures by which 
funding available to the agencies funded under this act may be 
reprogrammed for other purposes.
    Section 506 provides for a penalty for persons found to 
have falsely mislabeled products.
    Section 507 requires agencies to provide quarterly reports 
to the Appropriations Committees regarding unobligated 
balances.
    Section 508 requires agencies and departments funded in 
this act to absorb any necessary costs related to downsizing or 
consolidation within the amounts provided to the agency or 
department.
    Section 509 limits funds for the sale or export of tobacco 
or tobacco products.
    Section 510 stipulates obligation of receipts and the use 
of certain funds for victim services available under the Crime 
Victims Fund.
    Of the funds set aside for Indian tribes, the Committee 
expects that the Office for Victims of Crime [OVC] will award 
such funds to Indian tribes that have not been designated high-
risk grantees by the Department of Justice and that comply with 
grant application requirements. OVC is expected to provide 
instructional model grant applications and other guidance to 
aid tribes in preparing grant applications. Grant-receiving 
tribes will need to certify that grant funds will not be used 
to supplant funds otherwise available for tribal victim 
assistance so that OVC can ensure grant accountability and that 
grants are being used effectively to improve services for 
tribal victims of crime.
    Section 511 prohibits the use of Department of Justice 
funds for programs that discriminate against, denigrate, or 
otherwise undermine the religious beliefs of students 
participating in such programs.
    Section 512 limits transfers of funds between agencies.
    Section 513 requires the Inspectors General of the 
Departments of Commerce and Justice, the National Aeronautics 
and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, and 
the Legal Services Corporation to conduct reviews of activities 
funded in this act and requires certifications regarding 
conflicts of interest.
    Section 514 prohibits funds for certain telecommunications 
and information technology acquisitions unless the acquiring 
department or agency has assessed the supply chain risk of the 
technology, including risks from technology originating in 
China, Russia, Iran, and North Korea.
    Section 515 prohibits the use of funds to support or 
justify the use of torture.
    Section 516 limits funds pertaining to certain activities 
related to the export of firearms.
    Section 517 limits funds that would deny permits to import 
certain products.
    Section 518 prohibits funds for activities that seek to 
include certain language in new trade agreements.
    Section 519 prohibits funds to authorize a national 
security letter in contravention of the statutes authorizing 
the FBI to issue national security letters.
    Section 520 requires notification to the Committees in the 
event of cost overruns.
    Section 521 authorizes funds appropriated for intelligence 
activities for the Department of Justice during fiscal year 
2019 until the enactment of the Intelligence Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2019.
    Section 522 prohibits contracts or grant awards in excess 
of $5,000,000 unless the prospective contractor or grantee has 
certified in writing that he or she has filed all Federal tax 
returns, has not been convicted of a criminal offense under the 
IRS Code of 1986, and has no unpaid Federal tax assessment.
    Section 523 specifies rescissions of prior appropriations.
    Section 524 provides for a rescission from defunct NASA 
accounts.
    Section 525 prohibits the use of funds to purchase first 
class or premium airline travel in contravention of current 
regulations and improves reporting.
    Section 526 prohibits the use of funds to pay for the 
attendance of more than 50 employees at any single conference 
outside the United States and limits the cost of any such 
conference incurred by an agency.
    Section 527 prohibits the use of funds in this act for the 
transfer or release of certain individuals detained at Naval 
Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to or within the United States, 
its territories or possessions.
    Section 528 prohibits the use of funds in this act to 
construct, acquire, or modify any facility in the United 
States, its territories, or possessions to house certain 
individuals who, as of June 24, 2009, were located at Naval 
Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for the purposes of detention or 
imprisonment in the custody or control of the Department of 
Defense.
    Section 529 requires agencies funded in this act to report 
on undisbursed balances.
    Section 530 prohibits the use of funds by the National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA] or the Office of 
Science and Technology Policy [OSTP] to engage in bilateral 
activities with China or a Chinese-owned company or effectuate 
the hosting of official Chinese visitors at certain facilities 
unless the activities are authorized by subsequent legislation 
or NASA or OSTP have made a certification pursuant to 
subsections (c) and (d) of this section.
    Section 531 prohibits funds made available by this act from 
being used to deny the importation of certain shotgun models.
    Section 532 prohibits the use of funds to establish or 
maintain a computer network that does not block pornography, 
except for law enforcement purposes.
    Section 533 requires departments and agencies funded in 
this bill to submit spending plans to the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees within 45 days of enactment of this 
act.
    Section 534 prohibits the use of funds to implement the 
Arms Trade Treaty until the Senate approves a resolution of 
ratification for the Treaty.
    Section 535 prohibits funds to pay for award or incentive 
fees for contractors with below satisfactory performance or 
performance that fails to meet the basic requirements of the 
contract. The Committee directs any head of any executive 
branch department, agency, board, commission, or office funded 
by this act to require that all contracts within their purview 
that provide award fees to link such fees to successful 
acquisition outcomes, specifying the terms of cost, schedule, 
and performance.
    Section 536 prohibits the use of funds by the Department of 
Justice to prevent States from implementing laws related to a 
certain section of the Agricultural Act of 2014.
    Section 537 prohibits the use of funds by the Department of 
Justice to prevent States from implementing State laws related 
to medical marijuana.

  COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Rule XVI, paragraph 7 requires that every report on a 
general appropriation bill filed by the Committee must identify 
items of appropriation not made to carry out the provisions of 
an existing law, a treaty stipulation, or an act or resolution 
previously passed by the Senate during that session.
    The Committee recommends funding for the following programs 
or activities that currently lack an authorization for fiscal 
year 2019, either in whole or in part, and therefore fall under 
this rule:

         APPROPRIATIONS NOT AUTHORIZED BY LAW--FISCAL YEAR 2019
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Last year of
                     Agency/program                        authorization
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Commerce:
    International Trade Administration:
        Export Promotion................................            1996
    Bureau of Industry and Security:
        Export Administration...........................            2001
    Economic Development Administration:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2008
        Economic Development Assistance Programs:
            Public Works and Economic Development.......            2008
    Bureau of the Census:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2015
    National Telecommunications and Information
     Administration:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            1993
    National Institute of Standards and Technology:
        Scientific and Technical Research and Services..            2013
        Industrial Technology Services..................            2013
        Construction of Research Facilities.............            2013
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration:
        Operations, Research, and Facilities:
            National Ocean Service:
                Coral Reef Conservation.................            2004
                Hydrographic Services...................            2007
                Coastal Zone Management.................            1999
                Marine Protection, Research,                        2005
                 Preservation & Sanctuaries.............
            National Marine Fisheries Service:
                Endangered Species Act Amendment........            1992
                Marine Mammal Protection................            1999
                NOAA Marine Fisheries Program...........            2000
                Interjurisdictional Fisheries...........            2012
                Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation               2013
                 and Management.........................
                Estuary Restoration.....................            2012
            Oceanic and Atmospheric Research:
                National Sea Grant College Program......            2008
        Procurement, Acquisition and Construction:
            National Ocean Service:
                Marine Protection, Research,                        2005
                 Preservation & Sanctuaries.............
Department of Justice:
    General Administration:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2009
        Justice Information Sharing Technology..........            2009
    Administrative Review & Appeals:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2009
    Office of Inspector General:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2009
    U.S. Parole Commission:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2009
    Legal Activities:
        General Legal Activities:
            Salaries and Expenses.......................            2009
        Antitrust Division:
            Salaries and Expenses.......................            2009
        U.S. Attorneys:
            Salaries and Expenses.......................            2009
        Foreign Claims Settlement Commission:
            Salaries and Expenses.......................            2009
        Fees and Expenses of Witnesses..................            2009
        Community Relations Service:
            Salaries and Expenses.......................            2009
        Assets Forfeiture Fund Current Budget Authority.            2009
    U.S. Marshals Service...............................            2009
        Salaries and Expenses...........................             N/A
        Federal Prison Detention........................             N/A
        Construction....................................             N/A
    National Security Division:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................             N/A
    Interagency Law Enforcement:
        Interagency Crime and Drug Enforcement..........            2009
    Federal Bureau of Investigation.....................            2009
        Salaries and Expenses...........................             N/A
        Construction....................................             N/A
    Drug Enforcement Administration:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2009
    Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2009
    Federal Prison System...............................            2009
        Salaries and Expenses...........................             N/A
        Buildings and Facilities........................             N/A
    Office on Violence Against Women Programs:
        National Institute of Justice Research and                   N/A
         Evaluation on Violence Against Women...........
        Consolidated Youth Oriented Program.............             N/A
            Homicide Reduction Initiative...............             N/A
        Research--Violence Against Indian Women.........            2015
        Sexual Assault in Indian Country Clearinghouse..             N/A
    Office of Justice Programs:
        Research, Evaluation, and Statistics:
            National Institute of Justice...............            1995
            Bureau of Justice Statistics................            1995
    State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance:
        Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grants........            2012
            Body-Worn Camera Partnership................             N/A
            VALOR Initiative............................             N/A
            Smart Policing..............................             N/A
            Smart Prosecution...........................             N/A
        John R. Justice Grant Program...................            2014
        Adam Walsh Act..................................            2009
        State Criminal Alien Assistance Program.........            2011
        Residential Substance Abuse Treatment...........            2000
        Drug Courts.....................................            2008
        Economic, High Tech, White Collar and Cybercrime             N/A
         Prevention.....................................
        Second Chance Act/Offender Reentry..............            2010
            Smart Probation.............................             N/A
            Children of Incarcerated Parents Demo Grants             N/A
            Pay for Success (Discretionary).............             N/A
            Pay for Success (Permanent Supportive                    N/A
             Housing Model).............................
        National Sex Offender Website...................             N/A
        Veterans Treatment Courts Program...............             N/A
        Rape Kit Backlog................................             N/A
        Justice Reinvestment Initiative.................             N/A
        Project HOPE Opportunity Probation with                      N/A
         Enforcement....................................
    Juvenile Justice Programs:
        Part B--State Formula...........................            2007
            Emergency Planning in Juvenile Justice                   N/A
             Facilities.................................
        Title V--Local Delinquency Prevention Incentive             2008
         Grants.........................................
            Gang/Youth Violence Education and Prevention       N/A; 2007
        Missing and Exploited Children Programs.........      2004; 2019
        Competitive Grants for Girls in the Justice            N/A; 2007
         System.........................................
        Children of Incarcerated Parents Web Portal.....            2007
    COPS Programs:
        COPS Hiring Program.............................            2009
        Regional Information Sharing Activities.........            2003
        Anti-Methamphetamine Task Forces................             N/A
        Anti-Heroin Task Forces.........................             N/A
National Aeronautics and Space Administration:
    Science.............................................            2018
    Aeronautics.........................................            2018
    Exploration.........................................            2018
    Space Operations....................................            2018
    Education...........................................            2018
    Safety, Security and Mission Services...............            2018
    Construction and Environmental Compliance and                   2018
     Restoration........................................
    Office of the Inspector General.....................            2018
National Science Foundation.............................            2013
Related Agencies:
    U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2000
    Commission on Civil Rights:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            1995
    International Trade Commission:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2004
    Payment to the Legal Services Corporation:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            1980
    Marine Mammal Commission:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            1999
    Office of the U.S. Trade Representative:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2004
    State Justice Institute:
        Salaries and Expenses...........................            2008
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\NOAA authorizations are spread across over 60 separate statutory
  authorities. In many cases, the authorizations do not match exactly to
  specific programs.

COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(c), RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, on June 14, 2018, 
the Committee ordered favorably reported a bill (S. 3072) 
making appropriations for the Departments of Commerce and 
Justice, Science, and Related Agencies for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2019, and for other purposes, provided, 
that the bill be subject to amendment and that the bill be 
consistent with its budget allocation, and provided that the 
Chairman of the Committee or his designee be authorized to 
offer the substance of the original bill as a Committee 
amendment in the nature of a substitute to the House companion 
measure, by a recorded vote of 30-1, a quorum being present. 
The vote was as follows:
        Yeas                          Nays
Chairman Shelby                     Mr. Lankford
Mr. McConnell
Mr. Alexander
Ms. Collins
Ms. Murkowski
Mr. Graham
Mr. Blunt
Mr. Moran
Mr. Hoeven
Mr. Boozman
Mrs. Capito
Mr. Daines
Mr. Kennedy
Mr. Rubio
Mrs. Hyde-Smith
Mr. Leahy
Mrs. Murray
Mrs. Feinstein
Mr. Durbin
Mr. Reed
Mr. Tester
Mr. Udall
Mrs. Shaheen
Mr. Merkley
Mr. Coons
Mr. Schatz
Ms. Baldwin
Mr. Murphy
Mr. Manchin
Mr. Van Hollen

 COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 12 of the rule XXVI requires that Committee 
reports on a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any 
statute or part of any statute include ``(a) the text of the 
statute or part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and 
(b) a comparative print of that part of the bill or joint 
resolution making the amendment and of the statute or part 
thereof proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through 
type and italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate 
typographical devices the omissions and insertions which would 
be made by the bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form 
recommended by the Committee.''
    In compliance with this rule, no changes to existing law 
are displayed because this bill proposes no changes.

                        BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL


  PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS
                                                     AMENDED
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               Budget authority                 Outlays
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee    Amount  in     Committee    Amount  in
                                                           allocation       bill       allocation       bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with the subcommittee
 allocation for 2019: Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice,
 Science, and Related Agencies:
    Mandatory...........................................          319           319           332        \1\332
    Discretionary.......................................       62,995        62,995        70,863     \1\70,863
        Security........................................        5,400         5,400            NA            NA
        Nonsecurity.....................................       57,595        57,595            NA            NA
Projection of outlays associated with the
 recommendation:
    2019................................................  ............  ............  ............    \2\46,063
    2020................................................  ............  ............  ............       14,874
    2021................................................  ............  ............  ............        4,391
    2022................................................  ............  ............  ............        1,249
    2023 and future years...............................  ............  ............  ............        4,968
Financial assistance to State and local governments for            NA        -5,204            NA        \2\180
 2019...................................................
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
\2\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
 
NA: Not applicable.


  COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET (OBLIGATIONAL) AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2018 AND BUDGET ESTIMATES AND AMOUNTS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL FOR FISCAL
                                                                        YEAR 2019
                                                                [In thousands of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                        Senate Committee recommendation
                                                                                                                            compared  with (+ or -)
                             Item                                     2018         Budget estimate      Committee    -----------------------------------
                                                                  appropriation                      recommendation         2018
                                                                                                                        appropriation    Budget estimate
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
 
              International Trade Administration
 
Operations and administration.................................          495,000           451,147           499,000            +4,000           +47,853
Offsetting fee collections....................................          -13,000           -11,000           -11,000            +2,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Direct appropriation....................................          482,000           440,147           488,000            +6,000           +47,853
 
                Bureau of Industry and Security
 
Operations and administration.................................           75,500            81,647            82,600            +7,100              +953
    Defense function..........................................           38,000            39,000            39,000            +1,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Bureau of Industry and Security..................          113,500           120,647           121,600            +8,100              +953
                                                               =========================================================================================
              Economic Development Administration
 
Economic development assistance programs......................          262,500   ................          266,500            +4,000          +266,500
Salaries and expenses.........................................           39,000            14,937            39,000   ................          +24,063
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Economic Development Administration..............          301,500            14,937           305,500            +4,000          +290,563
                                                               =========================================================================================
             Minority Business Development Agency
 
Minority business development.................................           39,000            10,000            39,000   ................          +29,000
 
               Economic and Statistical Analysis
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................           99,000           100,987           102,000            +3,000            +1,013
 
                     Bureau of the Census
 
Current surveys and programs..................................          270,000           249,125           270,000   ................          +20,875
Periodic censuses and programs (new structure)................        2,544,000         3,551,388         3,551,388        +1,007,388   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Bureau of the Census.............................        2,814,000         3,800,513         3,821,388        +1,007,388           +20,875
                                                               =========================================================================================
  National Telecommunications and Information Administration
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................           39,500            33,646            39,500   ................           +5,854
 
           United States Patent and Trademark Office
 
Salaries and expenses, current year fee funding...............        3,500,000         3,370,000         3,370,000          -130,000   ................
Offsetting fee collections....................................       -3,500,000        -3,370,000        -3,370,000          +130,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, United States Patent and Trademark Office........  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
        National Institute of Standards and Technology
 
Scientific and technical research and services................          724,500           573,429           724,500   ................         +151,071
Industrial technology services................................          155,000            15,094           155,000   ................         +139,906
    Manufacturing extension partnerships......................         (140,000)  ................         (140,000)  ................        (+140,000)
    National Network for Manufacturing Innovation.............          (15,000)  ................          (15,000)  ................         (+15,000)
Construction of research facilities...........................          319,000            40,549           158,000          -161,000          +117,451
Working Capital Fund (by transfer)............................           (9,000)           (9,000)           (9,000)  ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Institute of Standards and Technology...        1,198,500           629,072         1,037,500          -161,000          +408,428
                                                               =========================================================================================
        National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
 
Operations, research, and facilities..........................        3,536,331         2,937,753         3,599,126           +62,795          +661,373
    (By transfer).............................................         (144,000)         (144,000)         (157,980)         (+13,980)         (+13,980)
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................        3,536,331         2,937,753         3,599,126           +62,795          +661,373
 
Procurement, acquisition and construction.....................        2,290,684         1,623,006         1,806,479          -484,205          +183,473
Pacific coastal salmon recovery...............................           65,000   ................           70,000            +5,000           +70,000
Fishermen's Contingency Fund..................................              349               349               349   ................  ................
Fishery Disaster Assistance...................................           20,000   ................           15,000            -5,000           +15,000
Fisheries Finance Program Account.............................           -3,000            -8,000            -8,000            -5,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration..        5,909,364         4,553,108         5,482,954          -426,410          +929,846
                                                               =========================================================================================
                    Departmental Management
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................           63,000            58,994            63,000   ................           +4,006
Renovation and modernization..................................           45,130             2,796            38,612            -6,518           +35,816
Office of Inspector General...................................           32,744            32,030            32,744   ................             +714
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Departmental Management..........................          140,874            93,820           134,356            -6,518           +40,536
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, title I, Department of Commerce..................       11,137,238         9,796,877        11,571,798          +434,560        +1,774,921
          (By transfer).......................................          153,000           153,000           166,980           +13,980           +13,980
                                                               =========================================================================================
                TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
 
                    General Administration
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................          114,000           114,207           114,000   ................             -207
Justice information sharing technology........................           35,000            31,713            35,000   ................           +3,287
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, General Administration...........................          149,000           145,920           149,000   ................           +3,080
                                                               =========================================================================================
Executive Office for Immigration Review.......................          504,500           563,407           563,407           +58,907   ................
    Transfer from immigration examinations fee account........           -4,000            -4,000            -4,000   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Direct appropriation..................................          500,500           559,407           559,407           +58,907   ................
Office of Inspector General...................................           97,250            95,866            99,195            +1,945            +3,329
 
                United States Parole Commission
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................           13,308            12,672            13,308   ................             +636
 
                       Legal Activities
 
Salaries and expenses, general legal activities...............          897,500           891,836           910,500           +13,000           +18,664
Vaccine Injury Compensation Trust Fund........................           10,000             9,340            10,000   ................             +660
Salaries and expenses, Antitrust Division.....................          164,977           164,663           164,977   ................             +314
    Offsetting fee collections--current year..................         -126,000          -136,000          -136,000           -10,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Direct appropriation..................................           38,977            28,663            28,977           -10,000              +314
                                                               =========================================================================================
Salaries and expenses, United States Attorneys................        2,136,750         2,105,182         2,179,485           +42,735           +74,303
United States Trustee System Fund.............................          225,908           223,221           225,908   ................           +2,687
    Offsetting fee collections................................         -135,000          -360,000          -360,000          -225,000   ................
    New fees (Sec. 3004, Public Law 115-72)...................          -96,000   ................  ................          +96,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Direct appropriation..................................           -5,092          -136,779          -134,092          -129,000            +2,687
                                                               =========================================================================================
Salaries and expenses, Foreign Claims Settlement Commission...            2,409             2,409             2,409   ................  ................
Fees and expenses of witnesses................................          270,000           270,000           270,000   ................  ................
Salaries and expenses, Community Relations Service............           15,500   ................           15,500   ................          +15,500
Assets Forfeiture Fund........................................           20,514            20,514            20,514   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Legal Activities.................................        3,386,558         3,191,165         3,303,293           -83,265          +112,128
                                                               =========================================================================================
                United States Marshals Service
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................        1,311,492         1,270,371         1,377,409           +65,917          +107,038
Construction..................................................           53,400            14,971            35,000           -18,400           +20,029
Federal Prisoner Detention....................................        1,536,000         1,536,000         1,536,000   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, United States Marshals Service...................        2,900,892         2,821,342         2,948,409           +47,517          +127,067
                                                               =========================================================================================
                  National Security Division
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................          101,031           101,369           101,369              +338   ................
 
                  Interagency Law Enforcement
 
Interagency Crime and Drug Enforcement........................          542,850           521,563           521,563           -21,287   ................
 
                Federal Bureau of Investigation
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................        3,663,553         3,599,403         3,663,553   ................          +64,150
    Counterintelligence and national security.................        5,366,649         5,272,677         5,366,649   ................          +93,972
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Salaries and expenses.........................        9,030,202         8,872,080         9,030,202   ................         +158,122
 
Construction..................................................          370,000            51,895           385,000           +15,000          +333,105
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Bureau of Investigation..................        9,400,202         8,923,975         9,415,202           +15,000          +491,227
                                                               =========================================================================================
                Drug Enforcement Administration
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................        2,609,900         2,608,162         2,654,836           +44,936           +46,674
    Diversion control fund....................................         -419,574          -420,703          -420,703            -1,129   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Drug Enforcement Administration..................        2,190,326         2,187,459         2,234,133           +43,807           +46,674
                                                               =========================================================================================
High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas Program.................  ................          254,000   ................  ................         -254,000
 
      Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................        1,293,776         1,316,678         1,316,678           +22,902   ................
 
                     Federal Prison System
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................        7,114,000         7,042,328         7,256,280          +142,280          +213,952
Buildings and facilities......................................          161,571            99,000           274,000          +112,429          +175,000
Limitation on administrative expenses, Federal Prison                     2,700             2,700             2,700   ................  ................
 Industries, Incorporated.....................................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Prison System............................        7,278,271         7,144,028         7,532,980          +254,709          +388,952
                                                               =========================================================================================
          State and Local Law Enforcement Activities
 
Office on Violence Against Women:
    Prevention and prosecution programs.......................  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................
        (By transfer).........................................         (492,000)  ................         (497,500)          (+5,500)        (+497,500)
Office of Justice Programs:
    Research, evaluation and statistics.......................           90,000            77,000            90,000   ................          +13,000
    State and local law enforcement assistance................        1,677,500         1,132,500         1,678,500            +1,000          +546,000
    Juvenile justice programs.................................          282,500           229,500           297,000           +14,500           +67,500
    Public safety officer benefits:
        Death benefits........................................           92,000           104,000           104,000           +12,000   ................
        Disability and education benefits.....................           24,800            16,300            24,800   ................           +8,500
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal............................................          116,800           120,300           128,800           +12,000            +8,500
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Total, Office of Justice Programs...................        2,166,800         1,559,300         2,194,300           +27,500          +635,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
 
Community Oriented Policing Services:
    COPS programs.............................................          275,500   ................          310,000           +34,500          +310,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, State and Local Law Enforcement Activities.......        2,442,300         1,559,300         2,504,300           +62,000          +945,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, title II, Department of Justice..................       30,296,264        28,834,744        30,698,837          +402,573        +1,864,093
                                                               =========================================================================================
                      TITLE III--SCIENCE
 
Office of Science and Technology Policy.......................            5,544             5,544             5,544   ................  ................
National Space Council........................................            1,965             1,965             1,965   ................  ................
 
         National Aeronautics and Space Administration
 
Science.......................................................        6,221,500         5,895,000         6,400,300          +178,800          +505,300
Aeronautics...................................................          685,000           633,900           725,000           +40,000           +91,100
Space Technology..............................................          760,000   ................          932,800          +172,800          +932,800
Exploration Research and Technology...........................  ................        1,002,700   ................  ................       -1,002,700
Exploration...................................................        4,790,000   ................        5,338,700          +548,700        +5,338,700
Deep Space Exploration Systems................................  ................        4,558,800   ................  ................       -4,558,800
Space Operations..............................................        4,751,500   ................        4,639,100          -112,400        +4,639,100
LEO and Spaceflight Operations................................  ................        4,624,600   ................  ................       -4,624,600
STEM Opportunities formerly Education.........................          100,000   ................          110,000           +10,000          +110,000
Safety, Security and Mission Services.........................        2,826,900         2,749,700         2,750,000           -76,900              +300
Construction and environmental compliance and restoration.....          562,240           388,200           388,200          -174,040   ................
Office of Inspector General...................................           39,000            39,300            39,300              +300   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Aeronautics and Space Administration....       20,736,140        19,892,200        21,323,400          +587,260        +1,431,200
                                                               =========================================================================================
                  National Science Foundation
 
Research and related activities...............................        6,263,476         6,079,680         6,485,183          +221,707          +405,503
    Defense function..........................................           71,000            71,000            71,000   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................        6,334,476         6,150,680         6,556,183          +221,707          +405,503
 
Major research equipment and facilities construction..........          182,800            94,650           249,254           +66,454          +154,604
Education and human resources.................................          902,000           873,370           915,000           +13,000           +41,630
Agency operations and award management........................          328,510           333,630           328,510   ................           -5,120
Office of the National Science Board..........................            4,370             4,320             4,370   ................              +50
Office of Inspector General...................................           15,200            15,350            15,350              +150   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Science Foundation......................        7,767,356         7,472,000         8,068,667          +301,311          +596,667
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, title III, Science...............................       28,511,005        27,371,709        29,399,576          +888,571        +2,027,867
                                                               =========================================================================================
                  TITLE IV--RELATED AGENCIES
 
                  Commission on Civil Rights
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................            9,700             9,200            10,065              +365              +865
 
            Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................          379,500           363,807           379,500   ................          +15,693
 
                International Trade Commission
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................           93,700            87,615            95,000            +1,300            +7,385
 
                  Legal Services Corporation
 
Payment to the Legal Services Corporation.....................          410,000            18,200           410,000   ................         +391,800
 
                   Marine Mammal Commission
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................            3,431             2,449             4,200              +769            +1,751
 
            Office of the U.S. Trade Representative
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................           57,600            63,000            57,600   ................           -5,400
Trade Enforcement Trust Fund..................................           15,000   ................           15,000   ................          +15,000
 
                    State Justice Institute
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................            5,121             6,921             6,121            +1,000              -800
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, title IV, Related Agencies.......................          974,052           551,192           977,486            +3,434          +426,294
                                                               =========================================================================================
                  TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS
 
DOC National Institute of Standards and Technology, Technology  ................           -2,000   ................  ................           +2,000
 Innovation Program (rescission)..............................
DOC National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,            ................  ................  ................  ................  ................
 Operations, Research and Facilities (rescission).............
DOC National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,            ................  ................  ................  ................  ................
 Procurement Acquisition and Construction (rescission)........
Economic Development Assistance Programs (rescission).........          -10,000   ................          -10,000   ................          -10,000
    Rescission of emergency funding...........................  ................          -40,000   ................  ................          +40,000
DOJ, Working Capital Fund (rescission)........................         -154,768           -69,768           -75,000           +79,768            -5,232
DOJ, Assets Forfeiture Fund (rescission, temporary)...........  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................
DOJ, Assets Forfeiture Fund (rescission, permanent)...........         -304,000   ................         -674,000          -370,000          -674,000
 
FBI, Salaries and expenses:
    (Fees) nondefense (rescission)............................          -51,642           -60,044           -52,048              -406            +7,996
    (Fees) defense (rescission)...............................          -75,649           -87,956           -76,243              -594           +11,713
Federal Prisoner Detention (rescission).......................  ................          -71,000   ................  ................          +71,000
DOJ, Federal Prison System, Buildings and Facilities            ................          -50,000   ................  ................          +50,000
 (rescission).................................................
Violence against women prevention and prosecution programs              -15,000   ................          -10,000            +5,000           -10,000
 (rescission).................................................
Office of Justice programs (rescission).......................          -40,000           -85,000           -40,000   ................          +45,000
COPS (rescission).............................................          -10,000   ................          -10,000   ................          -10,000
Keeping Young Athletes Safe...................................            2,500   ................  ................           -2,500   ................
NASA closeouts (rescission)...................................  ................           -4,000            -4,000            -4,000   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, title V, General Provisions......................         -658,559          -469,768          -951,291          -292,732          -481,523
                                                               =========================================================================================
                     OTHER APPROPRIATIONS
 
  FURTHER ADDITIONAL SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS FOR DISASTER
                RELIEF ACT, 2018 (P.L. 115-123)
 
                    DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
 
              Economic Development Administration
 
Economic Development Assistance Programs (emergency)..........          600,000   ................  ................         -600,000   ................
 
        National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
 
Operations, Research, and Facilities (emergency)..............          120,904   ................  ................         -120,904   ................
Procurement, Acquistion and Construction (emergency)..........           79,232   ................  ................          -79,232   ................
Fisheries Disaster Assistance (emergency).....................          200,000   ................  ................         -200,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration..          400,136   ................  ................         -400,136   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, Department of Commerce...........................        1,000,136   ................  ................       -1,000,136   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
                     DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
 
                United States Marshals Service
 
Salaries and expenses (emergency).............................            2,500   ................  ................           -2,500   ................
 
                Federal Bureau of Investigation
 
Salaries and expenses (emergency).............................            8,601   ................  ................           -8,601   ................
    Counterintelligence and national security (emergency).....           12,599   ................  ................          -12,599   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Bureau of Investigation..................           21,200   ................  ................          -21,200   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
                Drug Enforcement Administration
 
Salaries and expenses (emergency).............................           11,500   ................  ................          -11,500   ................
 
                     Federal Prison System
 
Salaries and expenses (emergency).............................           16,000   ................  ................          -16,000   ................
Buildings and facilities (emergency)..........................           34,000   ................  ................          -34,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Prison System............................           50,000   ................  ................          -50,000   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, Department of Justice............................           85,200   ................  ................          -85,200   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
                            SCIENCE
 
         National Aeronautics and Space Administration
 
Construction and Environmental Compliance and Restoration                81,300   ................  ................          -81,300   ................
 (emergency)..................................................
 
                  National Science Foundation
 
Research and Related Activities (emergency)...................           16,300   ................  ................          -16,300   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Science..........................................           97,600   ................  ................          -97,600   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
                       RELATED AGENCIES
 
                  Legal Services Corporation
 
Payment to the Legal Services Corporation (emergency).........           15,000   ................  ................          -15,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Other Appropriations.............................        1,197,936   ................  ................       -1,197,936   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Grand total.............................................       71,457,936        66,084,754        71,696,406          +238,470        +5,611,652
          Appropriations......................................      (70,921,059)      (66,554,522)      (72,647,697)      (+1,726,638)      (+6,093,175)
          Rescissions.........................................        (-661,059)        (-429,768)        (-951,291)        (-290,232)        (-521,523)
          Emergency appropriations............................       (1,197,936)  ................  ................      (-1,197,936)  ................
          Rescissions of emergency funding....................  ................         (-40,000)  ................  ................         (+40,000)
      (By transfer)...........................................          645,000           153,000           664,480           +19,480          +511,480
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