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                                                     Calendar No. 452
115th Congress     }                                    {       Report
                                 SENATE
 2d Session        }                                    {      115-276
======================================================================



 
     DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, ENVIRONMENT, AND RELATED AGENCIES 
                       APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2019
                                _______
                                

                 June 14, 2018.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

         Ms. Murkowski, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                                 REPORT

                         [To accompany S. 3073]

    The Committee on Appropriations reports the bill (S. 3073) 
making appropriations for the Department of the Interior, 
environment, and related agencies for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 2019, and for other purposes, reports favorably 
thereon and recommends that the bill do pass.


 
Total obligational authority, fiscal year 2019

Total of bill as reported to the Senate................. $35,914,720,000
Amount of 2018 appropriations...........................  36,589,147,000
Amount of 2019 budget estimate..........................  28,338,610,000
Bill as recommended to Senate compared to--
    2018 appropriations.................................    -674,427,000
    2019 budget estimate................................  +7,576,110,000

                    ========================================================
                      __________________________________________________










                                CONTENTS

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
Summary of Bill..................................................     4
    Major Changes Recommended in the Bill........................     4
    Reprogramming Guidelines.....................................    11
Title I:
    Department of the Interior:
        Land and Water Resources: Bureau of Land Management......    12
    Fish and Wildlife and Parks:
        U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service...........................    18
        National Park Service....................................    29
    Energy and Minerals:
        U.S. Geological Survey...................................    37
        Bureau of Ocean Energy Management........................    42
        Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement...........    43
        Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement.....    43
    Indian Affairs: Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian 
      Education..................................................    45
    Departmental Offices:
        Office of the Secretary..................................    53
        Insular Affairs..........................................    54
        Office of the Solicitor..................................    55
        Office of Inspector General..............................    56
        Office of Special Trustee for American Indians...........    56
    Department-wide Programs:
        Wildland Fire Management.................................    56
        Central Hazardous Materials Fund.........................    57
        Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration.......    57
        Working Capital Fund.....................................    57
        Payments in Lieu of Taxes................................    58
    General Provisions: Department of the Interior...............    58
Title II:
    Environmental Protection Agency:
        Program Description......................................    60
        Science and Technology...................................    63
        Environmental Programs and Management....................    64
        Office of Inspector General..............................    72
        Buildings and Facilities.................................    72
        Hazardous Substance Superfund............................    72
        Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund..............    74
        Inland Oil Spill Program.................................    74
        State and Tribal Assistance Grants.......................    74
        Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Program......    77
        Administrative Provisions................................    77
Title III:
    Related Agencies:
        Department of Agriculture: Forest Service................    78
        Administrative Provisions................................    89
        Department of Health and Human Services:
            Indian Health Service................................    89
            Contract Support Costs...............................    94
            National Institutes of Health........................    95
            Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.....    95
        Other Related Agencies:
            Executive Office of the President....................    96
            Council on Environmental Quality and Office of 
              Environmental Quality..............................    96
            Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board.......    96
            Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation..........    97
            Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native 
              Culture and Arts Development.......................    97
            Smithsonian Institution..............................    98
            National Gallery of Art..............................   100
            John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.......   100
            Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.....   101
            National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities:
                National Endowment for the Arts..................   102
                National Endowment for the Humanities............   102
            Commission of Fine Arts..............................   103
            National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs...........   103
            Advisory Council on Historic Preservation............   104
            National Capital Planning Commission.................   104
            United States Holocaust Memorial Museum..............   105
            Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission.............   105
            Women's Suffrage Centennial Commission...............   105
Title IV: General Provisions.....................................   107
Compliance with Paragraph 7, Rule XVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the 
  Senate.........................................................   109
Compliance with Paragraph 7(c), Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules 
  of the Senate..................................................   110
Compliance with Paragraph 12, Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................   111
Budgetary Impact of Bill.........................................   114
Comparative Statement of Budget Authority........................   115

                            SUMMARY OF BILL

    For this bill, estimates totaling $35,914,720,000 in new 
obligational authority are provided for the programs and 
activities of the agencies and bureaus of the Department of the 
Interior, except the Bureau of Reclamation, and the following 
related agencies:
    Environmental Protection Agency
    Department of Agriculture: Forest Service
    Department of Health and Human Services:
        Indian Health Service
        National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
        Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
  Council on Environmental Quality and Office of Environmental 
        Quality
    Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board
    Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation
  Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and 
        Arts Development
    Smithsonian Institution
    National Gallery of Art
    John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts
    Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
    National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities:
        National Endowment for the Arts
        National Endowment for the Humanities
    Commission of Fine Arts
    National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs
    Advisory Council on Historic Preservation
    National Capital Planning Commission
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission
    Women's Suffrage Centennial Commission
    World War I Centennial Commission

                 Major Changes Recommended in the Bill

    This bill includes revisions to the budget estimate for the 
2019 fiscal year.
    A comparative summary of funding in the bill is shown by 
agency or principal program in the following table:

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                   Committee
                                                                                Committee        recommendation
                                                          Budget  estimate    recommendation     compared with
                                                                                                budget estimate
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
          TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
 
Bureau of Land Management..............................          1,023,278          1,343,398            320,120
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.........................          1,226,129          1,574,934            348,805
National Park Service..................................          2,701,969          3,215,565            513,596
United States Geological Survey........................            859,680          1,148,457            288,777
Bureau of Ocean Energy Management......................            129,450            129,450  .................
Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement.........            132,051            134,051              2,000
Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement...            121,673            252,852            131,179
Bureau of Indian Affairs...............................          2,414,260          3,075,045            660,785
Departmental Offices...................................            443,976            469,464             25,488
Department-Wide Programs...............................          1,536,224          1,328,093           -208,131
PILT...................................................  .................            500,000            500,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Title I--Department of the Interior.......         10,588,690         13,171,309          2,582,619
                                                        ========================================================
       TITLE II--ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
 
Science and Technology.................................            448,965            706,473            257,508
Environmental Programs and Management..................          1,784,852          2,597,999            859,147
Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest System Fund........  .................  .................  .................
Office of Inspector General............................             37,475             41,489              4,014
Buildings and Facilities...............................             39,553             34,467             -5,086
Hazardous Substance Superfund..........................          1,088,830          1,091,947              3,117
Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund............             47,532             91,941             44,409
Inland Oil Spill Programs..............................             15,673             18,209              2,536
State and Tribal Assistance Grants.....................          2,929,467          3,575,041            536,496
WIFIA..................................................             20,000             10,000  .................
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Title II--EPA.............................          6,191,887          8,058,488          1,886,601
                                                        ========================================================
              TITLE III--RELATED AGENCIES
 
Department of Agriculture: Forest Service..............          4,658,189          6,298,429          1,640,240
Department of Health and Human Services................  .................  .................  .................
    Indian Health Service..............................          5,424,023          5,772,116            348,093
    National Institutes of Health: National Institute               53,967             78,349             24,382
     of Environmental Health Science...................
    ATSDR..............................................             62,000             74,691             12,691
    Council on Environmental Quality and Office of                   2,994              3,005                 11
     Environmental Quality.............................
Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board.........              9,500             11,000              1,500
Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation............              4,400              7,400              3,000
Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture               9,960              9,960  .................
 and Arts Development..................................
Smithsonian Institute..................................            957,444          1,043,397             85,953
National Gallery of Art................................            146,900            167,202             20,302
John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.........             37,490             41,290              3,800
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.......              7,474             12,000              4,526
National Endowment for the Arts........................             28,949            155,000            126,051
National Endowment for the Humanities..................             42,307            155,000            112,693
Commission of Fine Arts................................              2,771              2,771  .................
National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs.............  .................              2,750              2,750
Advisory Council on Historic Preservation..............              6,440              6,440  .................
National Capital Planning Commission...................              7,948              7,948  .................
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum................             56,602             59,500              2,898
Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission...............             31,800              1,800            -30,000
Women's Suffrage Centennial Commission.................  .................              1,000              1,000
World War I Centennial Commission......................              6,000              7,000              1,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Title III--Related Agencies Grand Total..........         11,558,033         13,918,923          2,360,890
                                                        ========================================================
                        TITLE IV
 
Infrastructure.........................................  .................            766,000            766,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Grand Total......................................         28,276,890         35,853,000          7,576,110
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND

    The following table displays appropriations from the Land 
and Water Conservation Fund.

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2018   Budget request
                                                                 enacted       (Discretionary)    In this bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Land and Water Conservation Fund..........................           425,000           -12,867           425,038
 
State and Local Programs..................................           224,731  ................           235,296
    National Park Service State Assistance................           124,006  ................           124,006
    Coop. Endangered Species Conservation Fund............            19,638  ................            30,800
    American Battlefield Protection Act...................            10,000  ................            15,000
    Highlands Conservation Act............................            10,000  ................  ................
 
Forest Legacy Program.....................................            67,025  ................            65,490
 
Federal Land Acquisition..................................           200,269            33,133           189,742
    Bureau of Land Management.............................            24,916             3,392            26,016
    Fish and Wildlife Service.............................            53,839            11,953            45,189
    National Park Service.................................            46,935             8,788            35,438
    Forest Service........................................            64,337  ................            74,099
    Department of the Interior Valuation Services.........            10,242             9,000             9,000
    Rescissions...........................................            -5,968           -46,000           -16,028
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    WILDLAND FIRE BUDGETING REFORMS

    Division O of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018 
(Public Law 115-141) created a budget cap adjustment, to be 
made available in fiscal year 2020, for extraordinary wildfire 
suppression costs. The cap adjustment will be available to both 
the Forest Service and the Department of the Interior for 
suppression costs above the fiscal year 2015 10-year average 
for the respective agencies. This important tool will stabilize 
agency budgets and provide for better oversight of program 
investments. In lieu of the ability to utilize the cap 
adjustment in fiscal year 2019, the Committee has provided 
funds, in addition to the current 10-year average, in the event 
the 10-year average is insufficient to cover suppression costs 
for the fiscal year.

                        MULTI-AGENCY DIRECTIVES

    Wildlife Data Coordination.--The Department of the Interior 
and U.S. Forest Service are expected to prioritize continued 
coordination with other Federal agencies and State wildlife 
agencies to utilize State fish and wildlife data and analyses 
as an applicable source to inform land use, land planning, and 
related natural resource decisions. Federal agencies should not 
unnecessarily duplicate raw data, but when appropriate, 
evaluate existing analysis of data prepared by the States and 
reciprocally, share data with State wildlife managers, to 
ensure that the most complete data set is available for 
decision support systems.
    Land Grants, Acequias and Community Ditches.--The 
Secretaries of the Interior and Agriculture are urged to 
recognize the traditional use of State-recognized community 
land grants, acequias, and community ditches in the American 
Southwest during the land use planning process.
    White Nose Bat Syndrome.--The Forest Service, the National 
Park Service, the Fish and Wildlife Service, the Bureau of Land 
Management, and the United States Geological Survey are to be 
commended for their respective roles in bat conservation and in 
the fight against white-nose syndrome in bats. These agencies 
must continue to play an important role in the implementation 
of the National Science Strategy on white-nose syndrome. Within 
the funds provided, these agencies are expected to prioritize 
research on, and efforts to address, white-nose syndrome in 
bats and also to work with other Federal, State, and private 
organizations to implement the North American Bat Monitoring 
Program.
    Multi-Agency Transparency.--The Committee expresses support 
for increasing transparency within all agencies of the 
Department of the Interior, the Forest Service and the 
Environmental Protection Agency. The agencies are encouraged to 
disclose costs associated with analyses required by the 
National Environmental Policy Act.
    Recreational Access.--The Committee believes increasing 
access to our public lands is important and provides funding to 
all four land management agencies, the Bureau of Land 
Management, National Park Service, Forest Service, and the Fish 
and Wildlife Service, to complete projects that enhance access 
to public lands for hunting, fishing, and other recreational 
activities. The Committee expects recreational access projects 
to be selected based on their role in meeting key recreation 
needs and the agencies should work with their respective 
regions, State offices, and/or management units to identify all 
potential projects. Further, the agencies are again directed to 
include in future budget justifications an explanation of the 
process and criteria used for allocating funds for recreational 
access in the previous year.
    Land and Water Conservation Fund [LWCF].--The Committee's 
recommendation for fiscal year 2019 is $425,038,000 including a 
rescission. Consistent with the directive contained in division 
G of the explanatory statement accompanying Public Law 115-141, 
the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2018, the Department of 
the Interior and the U.S. Forest Service provided ranked 
prioritized lists of Federal land acquisition projects to the 
Committee, as requested. The Committee utilized these lists as 
ranked by the agencies in priority order to include projects 
and funding levels for LWCF programs in this recommendation.
    The agencies are directed to continue their longstanding 
process of identifying and prioritizing potential Federal land 
acquisition projects in anticipation of program appropriations. 
As consistent with previous years and as part of the annual 
budget process, the Committee directs each agency to submit a 
comprehensive list of ranked projects to the Committee within 
30 days of the submission of the fiscal year 2020 budget or 
March 1, 2019, whichever comes first. The comprehensive list is 
expected to be comprised of projects for which a willing seller 
has been identified, an appraisal or market research has been 
initiated, and the projects have been deemed by management 
units and regional or state offices to meet resource management 
goals or the parcel is part of an exchange, inholding, or 
donation. To the extent that the President's Budget includes 
funding for land acquisition projects, the prioritization of 
projects should be consistent with the comprehensive list of 
ranked projects provided to the Committee.
    Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act [ANILCA] 
Training.--The Department of the Interior and the Forest 
Service shall conduct annual ANILCA training for all employees 
with any oversight, regulatory, or managerial duties or 
responsibilities for the State of Alaska. Additionally, the 
Department of the Interior and the Forest Service shall conduct 
annual ANILCA training in a village within a conservation 
system unit for all land managers stationed within the State of 
Alaska.
    The Committee also encourages both the Department of the 
Interior and the Forest Service to utilize local hire 
authorities included within ANILCA, which increases management 
efficiencies, retention of employees, and facilitates a 
workforce with knowledge of local cultural and resource values.
    Paper Reduction Efforts.--The Committee is concerned about 
the millions of taxpayer dollars spent on wasteful printing 
practices each year and the lack of clear printing policies 
within each of the agencies. While progress has been made to 
better utilize the cloud and digitize records, little progress 
has been made to reform in-house printing practices. The 
Committee urges each agency funded by this bill to work with 
the Office of Management and Budget to reduce printing and 
reproduction by 34 percent and directs each agency to submit a 
report to the Committee within 60 days of enactment of this act 
on what steps have been taken to reduce printing volume and 
costs. The report should specifically identify how much money 
each agency will be saving.
    Transparency of Information.--Federal agencies funded under 
this act shall clearly state within the text, audio, or video 
used for advertising or educational purposes, including emails 
or Internet postings, that the communication is printed, 
published, or produced and disseminated at U.S. taxpayer 
expense. The funds used by a Federal agency to carry out this 
requirement shall be derived from amounts made available to the 
agency for advertising or other communications regarding the 
programs and activities of the agency.
    Fleet Management Practices.--Agencies shall provide 
supporting documentation on their methods for determining their 
optimal fleet inventories and justification for any deviation 
from GSA's Federal Property Management Regulations. Agency OIGs 
shall be responsible for doing yearly audits of fleet 
management practices which should be made publicly available.
    Invasive Species.--The Committee recognizes the critical 
importance of early detection and rapid response [EDRR] of 
invasive species as a strategy to mitigate the threats and 
impacts of invasive species and expects the Department of the 
Interior and the Forest Service to prioritize EDRR and control 
of invasive species that imperil endangered, threatened, or 
candidate species. In particular, the Committee supports 
efforts to prioritize EDRR in areas with large populations of 
invasive species. Within 180 days of the date of enactment of 
this act, the agencies shall provide the Committee with a 
report on their efforts to prioritize EDRR as part of their 
expected program of work for fiscal year 2019, including detail 
on how the agencies plan to protect specific native species and 
natural resource values on public lands across the Nation.
    Cooper Landing.--The Sterling Highway Milepost 45-60 
Project Final Environmental Impact Statement and Final Section 
4(f) Evaluation were published for public review and comment on 
March 9, 2018. The Committee understands the Department of the 
Interior will continue to play a key role in this project as it 
moves forward--specifically authorized to undertake a land 
exchange--and directs the Department to provide a briefing on 
next steps within 60 days after the Record of Decision has been 
signed.
    Rural Airstrips.--The Committee encourages the Departments 
of the Interior and Agriculture to coordinate with Federal land 
management agencies, including but not limited to the Bureau of 
Land Management, Forest Service, and National Park Service, as 
well as the Federal Aviation Administration, to ensure 
consistency in charting airstrips located on Federal lands that 
are and may be useful for administrative, recreational, and 
emergency purposes.
    Public Access.--The Department of the Interior and the 
Forest Service are directed to notify the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations in advance of any proposed project 
specifically intending to close an area to recreational 
shooting, hunting, or fishing on a non-emergency basis of more 
than 30 days.
    Chesapeake Bay.--The explanatory statement accompanying the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2018 (Public Law 114-141) 
noted the agreements by the Environmental Protection Agency 
(Agency), States and other stakeholders to locate a Chesapeake 
Bay Liaison Office in Annapolis, Maryland to facilitate 
coordination among jurisdictions and participating Federal 
agencies in support of the Chesapeake Bay Program and further 
noted the commitment made by the Agency to locate the office 
in, or immediately adjacent to, Annapolis, in compliance with 
the signed agreements and to also ensure that the future office 
space will continue to accommodate all of the current 
Chesapeake Bay Program Office participants.
    The Committee expects the Agency, as well as the Department 
of the Interior, to work closely with the General Services 
Administration to follow the directive contained in the 
explanatory statement and sign a new lease in this fiscal year 
in the Annapolis, Maryland area. Additionally, the Agency and 
Department should take steps to ensure that Federal agencies 
and non-Federal partners currently housed in the Chesapeake Bay 
Program Office remain housed in the new office to facilitate 
program coordination, as practicable.
    Domestic Production of Critical Minerals.--The Committee 
supports the Administration's ``Executive Order on a Federal 
Strategy to Ensure Secure and Reliable Supplies of Critical 
Minerals,'' issued on December 20, 2017, and the related 
Interior Secretarial Order No. 3359, issued on December 21, 
2017, respectively. The United States is not only reliant upon 
foreign sources for many of the raw materials needed for our 
economic and national security, but is also attracting a 
decreasing share of global investment in this important sector. 
These trends have serious and negative implications for the 
domestic mineral supply chains for technological innovation, 
modern infrastructure, and national security. The Department of 
the Interior, EPA, and the Forest Service are directed to work 
collaboratively to reverse such trends by streamlining 
permitting and review process and enhancing access to critical 
mineral resources which will facilitate increasing discovery, 
production, and domestic refining of critical minerals.
    Delivery of Reports and Correspondence.--All reports, 
correspondence, and reprogramming requests from the agencies to 
the Committee shall be provided in both physical and electronic 
formats.
    Dead and Downed Trees.--The Committee is concerned by the 
substantial increase in the number of dead and downed trees as 
a result of drought and invasive pests on public lands in the 
West managed by the Forest Service, National Park Service, and 
Bureau of Land Management. Given the increased potential for 
devastating wildfires, the Committee directs the Forest 
Service, National Park Service, and Bureau of Land Management 
to work with State and local governments to facilitate the 
prompt removal of these trees and to prioritize funding for 
projects that reduce fire threats to communities, drinking 
water supplies, and utilities.
    21st Century Conservation Service Corps and Public Lands 
Corps.--The Department of Interior, its subdivisions, and the 
Forest Service are directed to continue their partnerships with 
the 21st Century Conservation Service Corps (also referred to 
as 21CSC), and Public Lands Corps, in order to accomplish 
access, conservation, wildfire, maintenance backlog, and 
infrastructure projects and engage additional youth and 
veterans as detailed and authorized in the Public Lands Corps 
Act of 1993 (16 U.S.C. Chapter 37, Subchapter II).
    Harassment-Free Workplace.--The Department of Interior, 
Forest Service, and Environmental Protection Agency are 
directed to report to the Committee within 120 days of the 
enactment of this act on agency actions to address harassment 
of employees, including plans to improve monitoring, training 
and enforcement, and implement policies that prevent 
retaliation. The reports shall include a detailed list of any 
actions taken or expected to be taken during fiscal years 2018 
and 2019.
    Ethics Compliance in Spending Federal Funds.--The Committee 
feels strongly that it is essential that agencies provided 
funding in this act comply with all applicable ethics 
regulations. To that end, the Committee directs that none of 
the funds made available in this act may be used in 
contravention of 5 CFR 2635, the Standards of Ethical Conduct 
for Employees of the Executive Branch.
    Deferred Maintenance.--The Committee has made a concerted 
effort to address the backlog maintenance needs on our public 
lands and directs the Department of the Interior and Forest 
Service to maintain an updated 5-year deferred maintenance 
plans that, to the extent practicable, include a list of all 
outstanding deferred maintenance needs, and to provide them to 
the Committee upon request.
    Coral Reef Health.--The Committee is concerned that 
emerging coral diseases have proven to be a major source of 
coral mortality, especially along the Florida Reef Tract, and 
pose a significant obstacle to coral reef restoration efforts. 
The Committee encourages the Department of the Interior to work 
with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, as 
well as state and territorial government partners, to support 
coral monitoring, research, and restoration efforts in highly 
impacted and high priority coral reef habitats in U.S. waters 
including in Biscayne National Park and Dry Tortugas National 
Park.

                        Reprogramming Guidelines

    The Committee retains the reprogramming guidelines 
contained in the Explanatory Statment accompanying Division G 
of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018--the Fiscal Year 
2018 Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations 
Act (Public Law 115-141).

                                TITLE I

                       DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

                        LAND AND WATER RESOURCES

                       Bureau of Land Management

    The Bureau of Land Management [Bureau] manages over 245 
million acres of public lands, primarily in 11 Western States 
and Alaska. The Bureau also has responsibility for 700 million 
acres of federally owned sub-surface mineral estate. The Bureau 
is mandated to administer these lands for multiple uses, 
including recreation, wildlife habitat, mineral and energy 
production, timber harvesting, and rangeland grazing, while 
managing natural, cultural, and historical resources.

                   MANAGEMENT OF LANDS AND RESOURCES

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $1,166,043,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     911,320,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,196,143,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $1,196,143,000 
for the Management of Lands and Resources account. This amount 
is $13,100,000 above the enacted level and $265,519,000 above 
the request. Program changes to the enacted level are detailed 
in the following budget activity narratives. Funding levels for 
each sub-activity can be found in the table that accompanies 
this statement.
    The United States, as an Arctic Nation, has broad interest 
in the region, which includes meeting security needs, 
protecting the environment, responsibly managing resources, 
supporting indigenous communities, promoting scientific 
research, and strengthening international cooperation. The 
Bureau is directed to focus on enhancing economic opportunities 
for the people who live and work in the Arctic. While the 
Committee appreciates the diverse mission of the Arctic 
Council, it believes that focusing on subsistence and improving 
the lives of the local communities through economic development 
is of the utmost importance.
    Land Resources.--The bill provides $211,742,000 for Land 
Resources, a decrease of $36,454,000 below the enacted level 
and $37,997,000 above the request. The Committee accepts the 
Bureau's request to restructure several budget line items to 
increase efficiency in delivery of program results to the 
ground. Within Land Resources, Soil, Water, and Air and 
Riparian Management have been relocated within Rangeland 
Management and Wildlife and Aquatic Habitat Management; these 
activities have been provided funding at the enacted level, so 
as to not diminish program output. Within the funds provided 
for Rangeland Management, the Committee expects the Bureau to 
continue to implement the Secretary's directive to adopt more 
aggressive practices to prevent catastrophic wildfires through 
robust fuels reduction and pre-suppression techniques, and to 
manage the spread of invasive plants. Additionally, the Bureau 
is directed, to the greatest extent practicable, to make vacant 
grazing allotments available to a holder of a grazing permit or 
lease when lands covered by the holder of the permit or lease 
are unusable because of drought or wildfire.
    National Seed Strategy.--The Committee recognizes the 
importance of the National Seed Strategy, particularly in the 
aftermath of severe fires, and directs the Bureau to continue 
to implement the strategy in a manner that balances the need 
for a variety of seeds to accomplish immediate and long-term 
restoration goals.
    Wild Horses and Burros.--The Committee appreciates the 
Bureau's delivery of the plan of options, as directed by the 
Senate and House Committees on Appropriations, to address the 
population and cost challenges of this program, but remains 
concerned that a politically-viable solution remains to be 
agreed upon while the animal population continues to grow. The 
Committee notes that a high percentage of funding for this 
program goes to the housing of horses in long-term pastures and 
short-term holding facilities, and therefore provides 
$5,555,000 above the enacted level for the Bureau as an initial 
investment to implement a multiple-strategy approach within its 
current authorities that reduces the numbers of animals on the 
range and held off the range. The Bureau is directed to ensure 
that the committees of jurisdiction are kept informed of its 
progress. The Committee continues the current prohibitions on 
destruction and sale authority contained in the bill.
    Wildlife and Aquatic Habitat Management.--The bill provides 
$182,504,000 for Wildlife and Aquatic Habitat Management, 
$63,087,000 above the request. As previously noted, the 
Committee has accepted changes to budget line items important 
to managing wildlife habitat and has created the ``Wildlife and 
Aquatic Habitat Management'' category. The Committee expects 
this to improve delivery of results on the ground and directs 
the Bureau to provide the Committee with evidence of the 
efficiency of this budget structure change within 180 days of 
enactment of this Act. Additionally, because of the concern 
relating to transparency of funding for threatened and 
endangered species, the Committee expects that no less than 
$21,567,000 will be spent on activities previously covered 
under the threatened and endangered species standalone budget 
line item.
    Recreation Management.--The bill provides $76,729,000 for 
Recreation Management, an increase of $4,000,000 above the 
enacted level and $11,624,000 above the request. Of the funds 
provided, $18,264,000 is for Wilderness Management and 
$58,465,000 is for Recreation Management activities. Of the 
funds made available for wilderness, priority shall be given to 
activities to improve wilderness habitat and adjoining habitat 
by managing for noxious weed infestations and fuels management. 
Of the funds made available for recreation management 
activities, $5,000,000 is provided as a one-time investment to 
support expanding recreational access to public lands for 
outdoor recreation, enhance conservation stewardship, and 
improve habitat management, which are the goals of Secretarial 
Orders 3356 (September 15, 2017) and Executive Order 3347 
(March 2, 2017).
    Energy and Minerals Management.--The bill provides 
$196,052,000 for oil, gas, coal, renewable, and other minerals 
management, an increase of $2,124,000 above the enacted level 
and $11,086,000 above the request. The detailed allocation of 
funding by program is included in the table that accompanies 
this statement. Within the oil and gas programs, funding levels 
are sufficient to maintain program capacity and to continue 
progress toward cleanup of the next cluster of legacy wells in 
need of remediation. Using additional funds made available 
above the enacted level, the Bureau is directed to conduct a 
pilot program to incorporate technology to remotely manage 
permitting workloads in up to two high-volume offices. The 
Committee is aware of the difficulty the Bureau has in 
recruiting and maintaining personnel in some areas where demand 
for permitting activities is greatest. The Committee believes 
that the utilization of certain data files, such as those 
containing high definition video and/or GPS location data, 
provided at the expense of the permittee, may allow the Bureau 
to more efficiently utilize time and resources within the 
program by obviating the need for site visits. The goal of the 
pilot should be to utilize personnel in remote field offices 
and demonstrate the utility of using advancements in technology 
to validate compliance with permit conditions.
    Given the structure of the renewable energy program, 
coupled with development trends, the Committee has provided 
sufficient funding to meet the demand and needs for the 
program. The decrease in funding does not reflect a lower 
priority for the program, rather it reflects the actual needs 
of the program at this time. Should funding levels exceed 
program needs, the Committee expects the Bureau to consider 
reprogramming funds to areas of higher priority with unmet 
needs.
    Chaco Canyon.--The Committee appreciates that the Bureau of 
Land Management has delayed the lease sale scheduled for March 
8, 2018 until further analysis, as well as robust tribal 
consultation can be conducted and expects the Bureau to refrain 
from leasing within a 10 mile radius of the Chaco Culture 
National Historical Park.
    Soda Ash.--The Committee is concerned about maintaining the 
United States' global competitiveness in the production of 
natural soda ash and supports a reduction in the Federal 
royalty rate for soda ash mined on Federal land to a minimum of 
2 percent, which is consistent with current law. The Committee 
encourages the Bureau to work with soda ash producers to assist 
them in reducing royalty rates and directs the Bureau to take 
the necessary steps to reduce the Federal royalty rate for soda 
ash as appropriate.
    Required Reports.--The Committee directs the Bureau to 
submit all outstanding reports required under 42 U.S.C. 
15924(e) no later than 30 days after the date of enactment of 
this act.
    Legacy Wells.--The Bureau is directed to provide the 
Committee, within 90 days of enactment of this act, with 
information detailing a strategy for funding completion of 
remediation of the remaining legacy wells within its 
jurisdiction within the next 10 years.
    Tribal Coordination.--The Committee directs that any 
coordinating office created by the Bureau in partnership with 
other oil and gas related permitting agencies shall closely 
coordinate with the Fort Berthold Tribal authorities.
    Placer Mining Reclamation Activities.--The Bureau is 
instructed to utilize existing revegetation standards, and 
approve reclamation where evidence of regrowth exists within 
180 days of enactment.
    Realty and Ownership Management.--The bill provides 
$74,480,000 for public land realty and ownership management 
activities, equal to the enacted level and $12,610,000 above 
the request. The Committee continues the direction to the 
Bureau to coordinate with all responsible Federal agencies to 
expedite the cleanup process of contaminated Alaska Native 
lands, including the Department of Defense and the Forest 
Service, so that the lands meet appropriate environmental 
standards at the earliest possible date.
    Red River Survey.--The Bureau is directed to utilize funds 
previously provided to the Bureau to contract with independent, 
third-party surveyors who are licensed and qualified to conduct 
official gradient boundary surveys and who are selected jointly 
and operate under the direction of the Texas General Land 
Office and the Oklahoma Commissioners of the Land Office, in 
consultation with each affected federally recognized Indian 
tribe. The Bureau is expected to defer any final decision-
making regarding land use plans as part of the Oklahoma, 
Kansas, and Texas Resource Management Plan Revision until 
appropriate surveys have been conducted to determine ownership 
along the Red River or until a legislative solution is enacted.
    Resource Protection and Maintenance.--The bill provides 
$133,240,000 for Resource Protection and Maintenance, an 
increase of $10,000,000 below the enacted level and $59,683,000 
above the request. The Committee accepts the proposal to 
consolidate Hazardous Materials and Abandoned Mine lands [AML] 
line items into one. Of the funds made available for the 
combined line item, the $5,000,000 increase is a one-time 
investment in AML remediation, in lieu of providing level 
funding for the Bureau's deferred maintenance account. 
Additionally, the Bureau is expected to prioritize marijuana 
eradication programs. The Bureau is encouraged to consider 
recurring recreational events carefully as land use plans are 
revised or updated.
    Resource Management Planning.--The Committee is aware of 
backlogs in resource management planning at the Bureau and 
provides $5,000,000 above the enacted level to address these 
issues, and is directed to focus these funds on greater sage-
grouse and sage-steppe, and other high priority conservation 
areas.
    BLM Ring of Fire Resource Management Plan.--The Committee 
is concerned about the lengthy planning process for an 
amendment to the BLM Ring of Fire Resource Management Plan 
regarding the Haines Planning Block. The Committee directs the 
Bureau of Land Management to swiftly work through the remainder 
of the planning process in order to finalize the amendment to 
the Ring of Fire Resource Management Plan.
    Eastern Interior Planning Area of Alaska.--The Committee 
remains concerned about the impacts the Bureau's Regional 
Management Plan/Final Environmental Impact Statement for the 
Eastern Interior Planning Area of Alaska is having on the 
people who live in or near the area as well as those who travel 
there. While the Committee recognizes that some parts of the 
Eastern Interior of Alaska may deserve special protection, the 
plans make major substantive changes to land management plans 
that have governed the Eastern Interior of Alaska for over 30 
years, and the breadth and scope of new designations of ``Areas 
of Critical Environmental Concern'' and the retention of a 
large percentage of existing Public Land Orders originally 
withdrawn pursuant to section 17(d)(1) of the Alaska Native 
Claims Settlement Act are especially problematic. The Committee 
instructs the Bureau to review and consider reducing the 
restrictions imposed through the Fortymile Record of Decision 
and Resource Management Plan, to prioritize the conveyance of 
any lands selected by the State of Alaska or Alaska Native 
Corporations within this subunit, and to begin the process of 
determining what will replace the Fortymile Resource Management 
Plan once those conveyances are complete. Further, the Bureau 
is instructed to evaluate re-opening its Tok field office, in 
order to locate the Eastern Interior field office within its 
operating area.
    Ambler Mining District.--The Committee expects the Bureau 
of Land Management to adhere to the timelines for completing 
and finalizing environmental reviews for the road from the 
Dalton Highway to the Ambler Mining District, including 
consideration of the inclusion of broadband infrastructure, 
that it has indicated will allow for appropriate local 
consultation and subsistence impact reviews while respecting 
the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act requirement 
for expeditious review. Additionally, the Committee is 
concerned about the coordination of multiple Federal agencies 
and processes involved in permitting various portions of the 
road, in particular coordination of the Bureau's Environment 
Impact Statement and the National Park Service's Environmental 
and Economic Review, and expects all permitting agencies to 
work together to ensure the analysis and review of potential 
routes does not result in conflicting agency conclusions or 
decision timelines.
    Transportation and Facilities Maintenance.--The bill 
provides $98,326,000 for Transportation and Facilities 
Maintenance, a decrease of $20,000,000 below the enacted level 
and $39,827,000 above the request. The Committee is still 
awaiting information regarding the Bureau's plans for deferred 
maintenance spending provided in fiscal year 2018, and 
consequently has decided to provide $30,000,000 in deferred 
maintenance and direct the remaining $20,000,000 to support 
work in other programs, including AML remediation, the national 
landscape conservation system and backlog planning.
    Workforce and Organizational Support.--The bill provides 
$181,251,000 for Workforce Organization and Support, $3,304,000 
above the enacted level and $14,046,000 above the request. The 
Committee supports efforts to invest in Service First 
initiatives to increase efficiency and provide better service 
to the public. While the Committee believes the Bureau can make 
significant improvements, the Committee believes it is 
unrealistic to expect the Bureau to find more than $10,000,000 
in efficiencies in one fiscal year.
    National Landscape Conservation System.--The bill provides 
$41,819,000 for the National Landscape Conservation System, 
$5,000,000 above the enacted level and $15,559,000 above the 
request. It is the Committee's belief that when developing a 
plan for a national monument, livestock grazing should 
continue.
    Mining Law Administration.--The bill provides $39,696,000 
for Mining Law Administration. This amount is equal to the 
budget request and the enacted level and is fully offset by 
collections from mining claims fees.

                            LAND ACQUISITION

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $24,916,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      -6,608,000
Committee recommendation................................      26,016,000

    The bill provides $26,016,000 for land acquisition. The 
Committee provides $9,000,000 for recreational access, 
$1,000,000 above the enacted level. Any funds allocated by 
Congress for the acquisition of lands within Red Cliffs 
National Conservation Area should be equitably distributed at 
the direction of the Bureau. The amount provided within this 
bill is available for the following distribution of funds and 
projects as ranked and provided by the administration:

                        BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                             Budget            Bill
State               Project                 estimate     (Discretionary)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
   IDLittle Salmon River Recreation    ..............              800
      Area
   MTEverson Bench                     ..............              400
   COGold Belt Access                  ..............            2,400
   CAHeadwaters National Forest        ..............            1,500
      Reserve
   WYFortification Creek Wilderness    ..............              100
      Study Area
   ALRebel Road                        ..............              400
   UTRed Cliffs National Conservation  ..............            4,000
      Area
   IDRidge to Rivers                   ..............              300
   NMSabinoso Area of Critical         ..............              600
      Environmental Concern
   CASand to Snow National Monument    ..............            1,000
   NMFort Stanton Snowy River Cave     ..............            1,900
      National Conservation Area
 
     Acquisition Management                     1,916            2,000
     Recreation Access                 ..............            9,000
     Inholdings, Emergencies, and               1,396            1,616
      Hardships
 
     Rescission of funds                      -10,000  ...............
                                      ----------------------------------
           Total, Land Acquisition             -6,608           26,016
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                   OREGON AND CALIFORNIA GRANT LANDS

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $106,985,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      90,031,000
Committee recommendation................................     106,543,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $106,543,000 for 
Oregon and California Grant Lands, a decrease of $442,000 below 
the enacted level and $16,512,000 above the request. The 
Committee appreciates the unique and important role of the 
Oregon and California Grant Lands within the Bureau. The 
Committee is concerned about the Bureau's ability to generate 
an adequate and predictable supply of timber and the resulting 
county revenues in Western Oregon under the agency's plan that 
limits sustained yield management to just 20 percent of the 
forest land. The Bureau should focus on reducing the program's 
facilities footprint, and no funds are provided for 
construction of new recreational facilities within the program.
    Sudden Oak Death.--The Committee is aware that since 2001, 
the Bureau, in partnership with the U.S. Forest Service, has 
been treating Sudden Oak Death infestations on public lands in 
Oregon. The Committee expects the funding provided to be 
adequate to continue these efforts.

                           RANGE IMPROVEMENTS

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $10,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      10,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      10,000,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $10,000,000 for range 
improvements, an amount equal to the enacted level.

               SERVICE CHARGES, DEPOSITS, AND FORFEITURES

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $24,595,000
    Offsetting collections..............................     -24,595,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      25,850,000
    Offsetting collections..............................     -25,850,000
Committee recommendation................................      25,850,000
    Offsetting collections..............................     -25,850,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $25,850,000 for 
service charges, deposits, and forfeitures. The appropriation 
is fully offset by the collection of fees to pay for reasonable 
administrative and other costs.

                       MISCELLANEOUS TRUST FUNDS

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $24,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      24,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      24,000,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $24,000,000 for 
miscellaneous trust funds, equal to the enacted level.

                      FISH AND WILDLIFE AND PARKS


                     U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the principal Federal 
agency responsible for conserving, protecting and enhancing 
fish, wildlife and plants and their habitats. The Service 
manages more than 150 million acres in the National Wildlife 
Refuge System, which encompasses 566 national wildlife refuges, 
thousands of small wetlands and other special management areas 
and Marine National Monuments. It also operates 72 national 
fish hatcheries, 65 fish and wildlife management offices, and 
80 ecological services field stations. The agency enforces 
Federal wildlife laws, administers the Endangered Species Act, 
manages migratory bird populations, restores nationally 
significant fisheries, conserves and restores wildlife habitat 
such as wetlands, and helps foreign governments with their 
conservation efforts. It also oversees the Federal Assistance 
program, which distributes hundreds of millions of dollars in 
excise taxes on fishing and hunting equipment to State fish and 
wildlife agencies.

                          RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $1,279,002,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   1,130,644,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,292,067,000

    The bill provides $1,292,067,000 for resource management. 
This amount is $13,065,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level.
    Ecological Services.--$250,017,000 is provided for 
Ecological Services activities. Within the ecological services 
program, funding is provided as follows:
    Listing.--$17,818,000 is provided for endangered species 
listing activities. The Service is directed to brief the 
Committee on its work plan for this funding as it relates to 
petition activities, listing of foreign species, and critical 
habitat designations.
    Lesser Prairie-Chicken.--The lesser prairie-chicken [LPC] 
was listed as a threatened species under the Endangered Species 
Act of 1973 [ESA] following a multi-year drought that plagued 
the habitat area and reduced population numbers. That listing 
was vacated by the U.S. District Court for the Western District 
of Texas because the Service failed to adequately consider the 
impact of voluntary conservation efforts to conserve the 
species. Those voluntary conservation efforts, in addition to 
increased rainfall in the habitat area, have resulted in the 
bird's population increasing by approximately 71 percent since 
the peak of the drought. It is noted that this increase has not 
negated the importance of continuing to address habitat loss 
and the long-term population goals for the species, which 
requires additional attention including voluntary conservation 
efforts. The Committee is concerned that by listing the species 
under the ESA in spite of the unprecedented level of voluntary 
conservation efforts in the habitat area, the Service 
significantly reduced the incentive for stakeholders to pursue 
future initiatives to preserve the LPC and other species. The 
Committee notes that if the listing of a species is viewed as 
inevitable, stakeholders lose the incentive to invest in 
private, voluntary conservation efforts. Therefore, the 
Committee directs the Service to collaborate with local and 
regional stakeholders on improving voluntary solutions to 
conserve the species with the goal of avoiding the necessity of 
listing the LPC under the ESA.
    Settlement Agreements.--The Committee continues to be 
concerned that there is not adequate transparency for impacted 
stakeholders when the Service chooses to enter into a 
settlement agreement on an endangered species listing petition. 
This is particularly concerning in the context of multiple 
species--as happened in the 2011 multispecies litigation 
settlement agreements. The Committee urges the Service to avoid 
entering into any multi-species settlement agreement unless the 
State and local governments where the species are located are a 
party to that agreement.
    Transparency of Data.--The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 
2018 [Act] included language directing the Service to develop a 
plan to improve the transparency of the underlying data used to 
make listing determinations and critical habitat designations. 
The Committee expects the Service to provide the report 
required by the Act and improve upon its efforts to make 
underlying data publicly available.
    Traditional Knowledge.--The Committee remains concerned 
that the Service has not fully incorporated traditional Tribal 
knowledge in its implementation of the Endangered Species Act 
[ESA]. When appropriate, the Committee expects the Service to 
make every effort to incorporate traditional knowledge in ESA 
decisions. The Committee also expects the Service to engage in 
additional outreach to Tribal governments in circumstances 
where traditional knowledge may provide valuable information, 
including for species like the northern sea otter.
    Planning and Consultation.--The bill provides $106,079,000 
for planning and consultation, $500,000 above the fiscal year 
2018 level. The increase should be used to assist the Service 
with National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA] compliance and 
specifically avoid delays in permitting energy development and 
infrastructure projects. Within planning and consultation, 
$4,000,000 is provided for Gulf Coast Restoration activities to 
ensure that the Service has the resources necessary to avoid 
delays in projects related to the Deepwater Horizon incident. 
This is consistent with the amount provided in fiscal year 
2018. Because the Committee has provided the Service with 
substantial resources for Gulf Coast Restoration, the Committee 
expects the Service to move forward with project reviews in a 
timely manner.
    Central Everglades Planning Project.--The Committee directs 
the Service to expedite the biological opinions for the Central 
Everglades Planning Project South Phase and the Central 
Everglade Planning Project New Water Phase. The Committee urges 
the Service to complete the biological opinion for the 
Everglades Agricultural Area Reservoir (a component of the New 
Water Phase) by September 13, 2018 and the South Phase by 
February 13, 2019 if current project planning remains on 
schedule.
    Pearl River Basin.--The Service is directed to expedite 
review and decision on recommendations for the flood damage 
reduction and flood risk management project in the Pearl River 
Basin, Mississippi, as authorized by section 401(e)(3) of the 
Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662, 100 
Stat. 4132), as modified by section 3104 of the Water Resources 
Development Act of 2007 (Public Law 110-114; 121 Stat. 1134).
    Conservation and Restoration.--The bill provides 
$32,396,000 for conservation and restoration. This is equal to 
the fiscal year 2018 enacted level.
    Recovery.--$93,724,000 is provided for recovery, an 
increase of $2,692,000 over the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. 
The Service should focus its resources on delisting and 
downlisting of species that have met articulated conservation 
goals and should use funding to propose or finalize rules for 
species with completed 5-year review status reviews that 
recommend delisting and downlisting. There are at least 49 
species that fit into that category.
    Within the funds provided, $5,500,000 is provided for 
Recovery Challenge matching grants to increase partnerships 
with agencies and organizations implementing high priority 
recovery activities as prescribed in recovery plans. Of this 
amount, $2,500,000 is for longstanding partnerships that were 
funded prior to the creation of these grants in the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018, including for the 
northern aplomado falcon, California condor, and Stellar's 
eider. The remaining $3,000,000 shall be spent in accordance 
with the instructions in the report accompanying the Act. 
$3,000,000 is for the State of the Birds program. Additionally, 
the Service is directed to use $1,000,000 of the amount 
provided to reinstate the wolf-livestock loss demonstration 
program as authorized by Public Law 111-11. States with de-
listed wolf populations shall continue to be eligible for 
funding, provided that those States continue to meet the 
eligibility criteria contained in Public Law 111-11. 
Additionally, the bill provides $1,000,000 to implement the 
Prescott Grant Program as authorized by section 408(e) of the 
Marine Mammal Protection Act (16 U.S.C. 1421f-1(e)).
    American Burying Beetle.--The Committee is aware that the 
Service is currently undertaking a required status review of 
the American Burying Beetle to determine whether listing as an 
endangered species is still warranted. Within funds provided, 
the Service is directed to propose a rule by the end of the 
fiscal year to delist or downlist the American Burying Beetle 
should the status review make a finding that delisting or 
downlisting is warranted.
    Eider Recovery Efforts.--The Service is directed to 
continue its support of captive propagation of the spectacled 
and Stellar's eiders and fund it at not less than the fiscal 
year 2018 level.
    Florida Grasshopper Sparrow.--The Committee directs the 
Service to support Florida Grasshopper Sparrow recovery 
efforts. The Committee notes that the disease and health 
studies necessary to understand and combat captive-bred sparrow 
mortality may have important benefits to the recovery of other 
endangered birds including the Cape Sable Seaside Sparrow.
    Grizzly Bear Conflicts.--The Committee directs the Fish and 
Wildlife Service to work with ranchers, conservation groups, 
local governments, and other local partners to reduce conflicts 
between grizzly bears and livestock. These efforts should draw 
upon lessons learned with the Wolf Livestock Loss Demonstration 
Program to improve conservation outcomes while limiting impacts 
to agricultural producers.
    Native Handicrafts.--On July 6, 2016, the Service issued 
regulation that implemented a ``near-total ban'' on the 
commercial trade of elephant ivory in the United States. The 
Committee is concerned that the Federal prohibition on the sale 
and trade of elephant ivory has negatively impacted the Alaska 
Native arts economy. The Committee reiterates that the 
Service's 2016 regulation does not apply to Alaska Native 
handicrafts made from walrus ivory and mammoth ivory. The 
Committee appreciates the Service's efforts on this matter to 
date. The Committee expects the Service to continue its efforts 
to promote this distinction and directs the Service to develop 
a plan for greater outreach on this matter.
    Red Wolf.--The Committee acknowledges issues raised by the 
North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission regarding the Red 
Wolf Recovery Program. The Committee urges the Service to work 
closely with the Commission to avoid negative impacts to 
landowners and other native species during fiscal year 2019.
    Subsistence Activities.--The Committee is closely 
monitoring the Service's efforts to implement an agreement 
between the United States and the Russian Federation on 
management of the Alaska-Chukotka Polar Bear Population. The 
Service should seek the most current science on this matter as 
it works to implement the agreement and should incorporate 
traditional knowledge from Alaska Natives. The Committee 
believes successful management of the population can only occur 
with the engagement of the Alaska Natives and expects the 
Service to consult with Alaska Native Organizations and other 
wildlife management organizations with expertise on matters 
related to subsistence. Subsistence is culturally important and 
a primary source of Alaska Natives' nutritional needs. The 
Committee directs the Service to implement a civil-based, co-
management regime.
    Habitat Conservation.--The bill provides $65,008,000 for 
habitat conservation, equal to the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level. The Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program is funded at 
$51,633,000. Funding is provided for nutria eradication at not 
less than the fiscal year 2018 level of $1,725,000.
    National Wildlife Refuge System.--$491,180,000 is provided 
for the National Wildlife Refuge System, an increase of 
$4,423,000 above the fiscal year 2018 level.
    Within that amount, $237,467,000 has been provided for 
wildlife and habitat management, an increase of $4,075,000 over 
fiscal year 2018. A general program increase of $4,000,000 has 
been provided so that the Service can focus on its highest 
priority needs within the Refuge system. Funding for the 
subsistence program is at $2,835,000, and $10,000,000 has been 
provided for invasive species with an emphasis on invasive 
species activities within the Everglades. Additionally, the 
bill provides $1,500,000 for the Pacific Marine National 
Monuments and the enacted level for nutria eradication in the 
Chesapeake Bay.
    Refuge Visitor Services has been provided $73,319,000 and 
refuge maintenance is funded at $139,888,000.
    Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge.--The Committee 
appreciates the Service's recent announcement related to a 
visitor's center at the Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge. 
The Committee encourages the Service to consider and prioritize 
LEED certification as a goal for the planning and design, 
construction, operations and maintenance of a visitor center 
and administrative building at Canaan Valley National Wildlife 
Refuge.
    Continued Funding Prohibitions.--The Committee directs the 
Service to continue to follow the directive from previous 
fiscal years that prohibits a caribou hunt on Kagalaska Island 
and efforts to remove cattle on Chirikof and Wosnesenski 
Islands in the State of Alaska.
    Corolla Wild Horses.--The Corolla Wild Horses are a unique 
piece of America's history that can be traced back over 400 
years to the arrival of Spanish explorers on the Outer Banks of 
North Carolina. Due to economic development in Currituck 
County, North Carolina, the herd size has diminished resulting 
in lack of genetic diversity, threatening the entire herd. 
Because the horses roam on private and some Service land, a 
management plan is needed between the Service, the State of 
North Carolina, Currituck County, North Carolina, and the 
Corolla Wild Horses Fund that allows for the herd size to be 
grown to no fewer than 110 and no greater than 130 horses, 
which may be achieved through the introduction of horses from a 
related herd. The Committee expects this management plan be 
entered into between the four parties no later than 180 days 
after enactment of this act and the Committee expects the 
Corolla Wild Horses Fund to continue to pay all costs 
associated with managing the Corolla horses.
    Green River National Wildlife Refuge.--The Committee 
appreciates the efforts of the Service regarding a potential 
national wildlife refuge consisting of approximately 24,000 
acres--to be acquired willingly from landowners--in the Green 
River Bottoms area near the confluence of the Green River and 
Ohio River in Henderson County, Kentucky. The Committee directs 
the Service to forgo the development of the preliminary Land 
Protection Strategy and go directly to the full Land Protection 
Plan in order to expedite its establishment of the Green River 
National Wildlife Refuge in that area to provide high-quality 
hunting and sportfishing opportunities; opportunities for 
environmental education, interpretation, and wildlife-oriented 
recreation; and habitat for waterfowl, nongame birds, fish, and 
wildlife. As the Service establishes the refuge, the Committee 
encourages the Service to look for opportunities to partner 
with other Federal, State, local, and non-governmental 
entities, including potential partnership opportunities related 
to environmental mitigation for interstate bridge construction 
projects in the area. The Committee is aware that the I-69 
interstate bridge corridor selection process is ongoing. While 
the Service should consider the bridge corridor selection 
process, the Committee does not support delaying the 
establishment of the refuge. Within 120 days of the date of 
enactment of this act, the Service is directed to report to the 
Committee on its progress toward establishment of the refuge.
    Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge.--The Committee is 
pleased with the new license agreement reached between Service 
and the South Florida Water Management District to extend the 
60-year partnership between the State of Florida and the 
Federal government over the management and conservation of the 
Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge. The 
Committee encourages the Service to contribute funding towards 
the management of invasive plant infestations, including Old 
World Climbing Fern which threaten the value of this resource 
for ongoing Everglades restoration efforts, the provision of 
critical wildlife habitat, and the enjoyment of the public.
    Trespassing on Alaska Native Lands.--The Committee is 
concerned about recent reports of trespassing on Alaska Native 
lands that border National Wildlife Refuges. The Committee 
believes the Service must do more to ensure that agreements 
between Alaska Native organizations and the Service that 
prohibit such trespassing are enforced. The Committee directs 
the Service to develop a plan to reduce such trespassing and to 
provide the Committee with that plan within 180 days of 
enactment of this act.
    Conservation and Enforcement.--$146,907,000 has been 
provided for Conservation and Enforcement, which is $5,617,000 
above the enacted level in fiscal year 2018.
    Within Conservation and Enforcement, the bill includes 
$49,660,000 for the migratory bird management program. This 
includes $3,237,000 for aviation management to continue the 
Service's efforts on aviation safety and training for pilots.
    Further, $80,053,000 is included for law enforcement 
activities to help combat illegal global wildlife trafficking 
and for implementation of the Lacey Act, an increase of 
$3,000,000 over the enacted level. Of the additional funds, 
$1,000,000 is for activities at ports that do not currently 
have a wildlife inspector and $2,000,000 is for the Service's 
work with the Indian Arts and Crafts Board to combat 
international trafficking of counterfeit arts and crafts and to 
conduct criminal investigations of alleged violations of the 
Indian Arts and Crafts Act.
    Additionally, the bill includes $17,194,000 for 
international affairs, which is $1,387,000 above the enacted 
level. Within that funding, $550,000 is included to support the 
important work of the Service with the Arctic Council.
    Wildlife Trafficking.--The Service plays a critical role in 
the ongoing effort to combat the global crisis of wildlife 
poaching and trafficking, which is driven by demand for high-
value illegal wildlife products and facilitated by 
sophisticated criminal networks profiting from this multi-
billion dollar black market industry. Poaching of rhinoceros 
and elephants has reached unprecedented levels, and illegal 
trade is undermining the conservation of scores of other 
species. The Committee continues to support government-wide 
efforts to combat wildlife trafficking and has provided 
significant resources to that effort. These resources will 
support the Service in continuing to strengthen its forensic 
capabilities to disrupt smuggling networks, improve 
collaboration with other Federal, State, local, and foreign 
governments, and promote international wildlife conservation.
    Convention of International Trade in Endangered Species of 
Wild Fauna and Flora [CITES] Permits.--The Committee directs 
the Service to conduct an internal review of their current 
CITES Flora permitting process, in an effort to identify any 
inefficiencies resulting in significant delays of permit 
approval. Within 150 days of enactment of this act, the 
Committee directs the Service to provide a detailed report of 
their findings to the Committee. The Service should consider 
alternative solutions to the current CITES permitting process 
that would ameliorate any delays and include these suggestions 
in their report to the Committee.
    Fish and Aquatic Conservation.--$165,227,000 is provided 
for Fish and Aquatic Conservation, an increase of $600,000 
above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. Adequate funding is 
provided to ensure that no fish hatcheries will close in fiscal 
year 2019.
    Within the Fish and Aquatic Conservation program, funding 
is provided for national fish hatchery system operations, 
maintenance and equipment, and aquatic habitat and species 
conservation as follows:
    National Fish Hatchery System Operations.--$55,822,000 is 
provided for National Fish Hatchery System Operations, equal to 
the fiscal year 2018 enacted level.
    It is recognized that the Service has entered into 
reimbursable agreements with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 
the Tennessee Valley Authority, the Department of Interior's 
Central Utah Project, and the Bonneville Power Administration 
in order to ensure the continued operation of mitigation 
hatcheries. So that operations at these hatcheries are not 
disrupted, future budget requests must ensure that Federal 
partners have committed to making sufficient funding available 
to reimburse the Service before the Service proposes to 
eliminate funding for mitigation hatcheries.
    Maintenance and Equipment.--$22,920,000 is provided for 
maintenance and equipment expenses related to the National Fish 
Hatchery System, equal to the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. A 
portion of the funding provided for National Fish Hatchery 
Maintenance and Equipment should be allocated to hatcheries 
where partner agencies fund mitigation work.
    Aquatic Habitat and Species Conservation.--$86,485,000 is 
provided for aquatic habitat and species conservation, an 
increase of $600,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. 
Within aquatic habitat and species conservation, funding is 
provided as follows:
  --Habitat Assessment and Restoration.--$33,987,000 is 
        provided for habitat assessment and restoration 
        activities. Within this amount, $4,000,000 has been 
        provided for work related to implementation of the 
        Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement and related 
        settlement agreements, of which not less than 
        $3,500,000 is to support rearing and population 
        monitoring activities that will stabilize endangered 
        fish populations, and $4,000,000 has been provided for 
        activities associated with the Delaware Basin 
        Conservation Act. The Committee also provides 
        $13,988,000 for fish passage improvements.
  --Population Assessment and Cooperative Management.--
        $30,150,000 is provided for population assessment and 
        cooperative management activities. Fisheries 
        subsistence is funded at $9,554,000, equal to the 
        fiscal year 2018 enacted level, and $500,000 is 
        provided for the Lake Champlain Sea lamprey program.
  --Aquatic Invasive Species.--$22,348,000 is provided for 
        aquatic invasive species activities, an increase of 
        $600,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. 
        Within these funds, $3,088,000 has been provided to 
        implement section 5(d)(2) of the Lake Tahoe Restoration 
        Act.
    Asian Carp.--The Committee recognizes the importance of the 
work conducted by the Service to combat the serious threat of 
Asian carp and provides $11,000,000 for Asian carp activities, 
an increase of $600,000 above the enacted level. Funding should 
be used to control Asian carp in the Mississippi and Ohio River 
Basins--including in Kentucky Lake, Lake Barkley and the Ohio 
River--and to prevent them from entering and establishing in 
the Great Lakes. The Service should consider the utility of 
creating a dedicated funding source to increase the intensity 
and geographic scope of efforts to prevent entry into the Great 
Lakes.
    Invasive Species.--The Committee is aware that work is 
ongoing in several regions to address the threats posed by 
aquatic invasive species and directs the Service to continue to 
make available competitive grant funding for projects to 
eliminate these destructive, non-native species, which include 
Asian carp, quagga-zebra mussels, and variable-leaf 
watermilfoil. The Committee encourages the Service to support 
research, monitoring, and mitigation efforts, as well as 
efforts to disseminate such work, in all regions.
    National Fish Habitat Program.--The Committee understands 
that the Service has worked to reduce administrative costs in 
the National Fish Habitat Program, but remains concerned that 
those costs continue to make up a large percentage of the 
program. The Committee directs the Service to further reduce 
administrative costs so that additional funding can be provided 
to projects recommended and submitted by the National Fish 
Habitat Board for approval by the Secretary.
    Cooperative Landscape Conservation.--Cooperative landscape 
conservation is funded at $12,988,000, equal to the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level. Within that amount, $1,000,000 is provided 
for Gulf Coast restoration.
    Science Support.--The Committee has rejected the proposal 
to eliminate the Service's Science Support program and has 
provided $16,267,000 for the program. Adaptive science is 
funded at $9,517,000, of which $931,000 is for Gulf Coast 
restoration activities. Service science is funded at 
$6,750,000.
    Within Service science, $3,500,000 is provided for white-
nose syndrome research. In addition to these funds, the Service 
is encouraged to continue dedicating at least $2,000,000 of 
funds appropriated for species recovery to white-nose syndrome 
work. The Service should also continue, along with the United 
States Geological Survey, to lead and implement the North 
American Bat Monitoring Program in association with other 
Federal natural resource management agencies and offices, 
States, and non-governmental partners.
    General Operations.--$144,473,000 is provided for general 
operations. Funding for central and regional operations is 
provided at the requested level. Funding for the National 
Conservation Training Center has been provided $25,014,000, a 
decrease of $4,300,000 which is attributed to a one-time 
deferred maintenance increase that is not needed in fiscal year 
2019. Funding for the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation is 
maintained at the fiscal year 2018 level of $7,022,000.

                              CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $66,540,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      13,746,000
Committee recommendation................................      50,413,000

    The bill provides $50,413,000 for Construction and includes 
$33,873,000 for the backlog of deferred maintenance principally 
at national fish hatcheries and national wildlife refuges. The 
Service is directed to provide a spend plan to the Committees 
within 120 days of enactment of this act for the additional 
deferred maintenance funding. The detailed allocation of 
funding by activity is included in the table at the end of this 
explanatory statement. For line-item construction, the Service 
is expected to follow the project priority list in the table 
below. When a construction project is completed or terminated 
and appropriated funds remain, the Service may use 
reconstruction, replacement, or repair of facilities or 
equipment damaged or destroyed by storms, floods, fires and 
similar unanticipated events.
    The amount provided within the bill is available for the 
following distribution of funds and projects requested by the 
administration:

                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                              Budget         Committee
State               Project                  estimate     recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
   IL Crab Orchard NWR                       1,000,000       1,000,000
   AK Alaska Maritime NWR                    2,675,000       2,675,000
   NM Valle de Oro NWR                       1,000,000       1,000,000
   MQ Midway Atoll NWR                             800             800
   AK Yukon Delta NWR                              400             400
   MI Pendillis Creek NFH                          700             700
   TX San Marcos Aquatic Resources           1,608,000       1,608,000
       Center
   AZ Alchesay NFH                             150,000         150,000
   MI Sullivan Creek NFH                        60,000          60,000
    * HQ Branch of Dam Safety                      250             250
    * HQ Branch of Dam Safety                      200             200
    * HQ Information Resources &                   250             250
       Technology Management
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                            LAND ACQUISITION

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $63,839,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       6,953,000
Committee recommendation................................      45,189,000

    The bill provides $45,189,000 for land acquisition. The 
Committee provides $3,000,000 for recreational access. The 
Committee continues to support the work of the Highlands 
Conservation Act grants to protect and preserve the priority 
projects in PA, NJ, NY, and CT and expects the Service to 
continue to obligate funding from prior years to support 
eligible projects. The Committee continues to support public 
lands for hunting, fishing, and other recreational activities 
and has provided an additional $500,000 for these projects. The 
Committee strongly encourages the Service to continue to 
provide outreach to all units of the National Wildlife Refuge 
System, including both Clarks and Cahaba River, to ensure these 
refuges are aware of all funding opportunities available to 
fulfill the vision of Secretarial Order 3356. The amount 
provided within this bill is available for the following 
distribution of funds and projects as ranked and provided by 
the administration:

                        FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                             Budget            Bill
    State              Project              estimate     (Discretionary)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
          MT Montana National          ..............            4,000
              Wildlife Refuges and
              Conservation Area
          FL Everglades Headwaters     ..............            2,000
              NWR and CA
          SD Dakota Grassland          ..............            4,000
              Conservation Area
          AR Cache River NWR           ..............            3,100
          MD Blackwater NWR            ..............            1,000
       IA/MN Northern Tallgrass        ..............              500
              Prairie NWR
          FL St Marks NWR              ..............            2,000
    ID/UT/WY Bear River Watershed CA   ..............            1,500
          TX Laguana Atascosa NWR      ..............            1,000
          CO San Luis Valley CA        ..............            2,000
 CT/MA/NH/VT Silvio O. Conte National  ..............            1,000
              Fish and Wildlife
              Refuge
 
             Acquisition Management             9,615           12,773
             Recreational Access       ..............            3,000
             Inholdings, Emergencies,           1,641            5,351
              Hardships
             Exchanges                            697            1,500
             Land Protection Planning  ..............              465
             Highlands Conservation    ..............  ...............
             Rescission                        -5,000  ...............
            ------------------------------------------------------------
                   Total, Land                  6,953           45,189
                    Acquisition
------------------------------------------------------------------------

            COOPERATIVE ENDANGERED SPECIES CONSERVATION FUND

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $53,495,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................................
Committee recommendation................................      49,495,000

    The Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund 
program has been provided $49,495,000. Funds are to be 
distributed as follows: $10,508,000 for endangered species 
conservation grants to States and territories; $5,485,000 for 
habitat conservation planning grants; $19,638,000 for habitat 
conservation land acquisition grants; and $11,162,000 for 
species recovery land acquisition.

                     NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE FUND

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $13,228,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................................
Committee recommendation................................      13,228,000

    The National Wildlife Refuge Fund has been provided 
$13,228,000. This amount is equal to the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level.

               NORTH AMERICAN WETLANDS CONSERVATION FUND

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $40,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      33,600,000
Committee recommendation................................      43,000,000

    The North American Wetlands Conservation Fund program has 
been provided $43,000,000. This amount is $3,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2018 enacted level.

              NEOTROPICAL MIGRATORY BIRD CONSERVATION FUND

Appropriations, 2018....................................      $3,910,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       3,900,000
Committee recommendation................................       3,910,000

    The recommendation for the neotropical migratory bird 
conservation fund is $3,910,000, equal to the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level.

                MULTINATIONAL SPECIES CONSERVATION FUND

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $11,061,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       6,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      12,061,000

    The multinational species conservation fund programs have 
been provided $12,061,000, an increase of $1,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2018 enacted level. Funds are distributed as 
follows: $2,782,000 for African elephant conservation; 
$3,640,000 for rhinoceros and tiger conservation; $1,757,000 
for Asian elephant conservation; $2,175,000 for great ape 
conservation; and $1,707,000 for marine turtle conservation.

                    STATE AND TRIBAL WILDLIFE GRANTS

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $63,571,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      31,286,000
Committee recommendation................................      65,571,000

    The State and Tribal Wildlife Grants program has been 
provided $65,571,000. This amount is $2,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2018 enacted level. The recommended level provides 
$55,000,000 for State and Tribal apportioned grants; $4,209,000 
for competitive grants for Tribes; and $6,362,000 for 
competitive grants for States.
    Pacific Flyway.--The Committee is concerned about the loss 
of seasonal wetland habitat along the Pacific Flyway. The 
Committee encourages the Service to work with private 
landowners and organizations representing agriculture, 
conservation science, and waterbird habitat enhancement to 
develop critical waterbird conservation programs that provide 
temporary, seasonal, and working wetland habitat for 
shorebirds, waterfowl, raptors and other species.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    The bill continues several administrative provisions from 
previous years.

                         National Park Service

    Since the creation of Yellowstone National Park in 1872, 
the National Park System has grown to encompass 401 sites 
spanning more than 84 million acres in all 50 States, the 
District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, 
Saipan, and the Virgin Islands. The National Park Service, 
created in 1916, is charged with preserving these sites 
``unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations.'' The 
Service and its more than 20,000 employees also contribute to 
the protection of other historical, cultural and recreational 
resources through a variety of grant and technical assistance 
programs.

                 OPERATION OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $2,477,969,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   2,425,117,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,500,369,000

    The Committee recommends $2,500,369,000 for the operation 
of the national park system, an increase of $75,252,000 above 
the budget request. The Committee has focused on maintaining 
services and the physical infrastructure at the Nation's parks 
in order to preserve the visitor experience. Program changes 
are detailed below and in the table that accompanies the 
Committee report. The bill restores all proposed funding 
reductions to national park system units and directs that the 
units be funded at no less than the fiscal year 2018 level.
    Resource Stewardship.--The Committee recommends 
$334,437,000 for resource stewardship, equal to the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level and $7,214,000 above the budget request. The 
reduction of $83,000 proposed for the Everglades restoration 
efforts is restored. Funds within the Resource Stewardship 
program shall be used to continue landscape restoration 
projects at newly authorized national parks, as provided by 
Public Law 114-113 and $500,000 for cave and karst ecosystem 
research.
    Visitor Services.--The Committee recommends $255,683,000 
for visitor services which is equal to the enacted level and 
$2,432,000 below the budget request. The recommendation does 
not accept reducing within the visitor services program 
proposed in the budget request.
    Facility Operations and Maintenance.--The Committee 
recommends $825,019,000 for facility operations and 
maintenance, an increase of $15,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level and $43,056,000 above the budget request. 
The Committee has included a $7,500,000 increase for repair and 
rehabilitation projects and a $7,500,000 increase for cyclic 
maintenance needs. These increases build upon the $25,000,000 
increase included for these activities in the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2018. The Committee believes it is critical 
to maintain these funds to address chronic deferred maintenance 
needs.
    Park Support.--The Committee recommends $548,432,000 for 
park support, an increase of $12,400,000 above the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level and $41,815,000 above the budget request. 
The increase above the enacted level is to fully fund all new 
park units such as the Freedom Riders, Castle Mountains, 
Birmingham Civil Rights, Stonewall, and Ste. Genevieve National 
Historical Park units and to address critical new 
responsibilities at various units, including $1,200,000 for 
Park Police replacement aircraft capacity. The recommendation 
retains funding provided in fiscal year 2018 for the Manhattan 
Project National Historical Park and Honouliuli units, 
Coltsville National Historic Park, as well the Partnership Wild 
and Scenic River program. Those units are funded at their 
fiscal year 2018 level. Funding for the Roosevelt-Campobello 
International Park shall also be maintained at the current 
level. Funding requested for the agency's reorganization 
efforts is provided.
    Within the funds provided for Park Support the Committee 
has provided the request of $400,000 to support operations at 
the Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument. The Service is 
directed to continue its collaborative work to ensure the 
development of a Management Plan for the Katahdin Woods and 
Waters National Monument that addresses the concerns of 
affected stakeholders including, but not limited to, local 
communities and businesses.
    Park Protection.--The Committee recommends $357,226,000 for 
park protection, a $5,000,000 decrease below the fiscal year 
2018 level. The reduction is related to one-time costs for the 
replacement of Park Police aviation assets. Annual funding 
related to new aircraft is provided under Park Support as part 
of the agencies new and emerging field requirements.
    External Administrative Costs.--The Committee recommends 
$179,572,000 for external administrative costs which is equal 
to the enacted level. The Committee notes the rising costs 
associated with assessments for the Department's working 
capital fund and encourages DOI to seek efficiencies to reduce 
these charges to the individual agencies.
    Blackstone River Valley National Historical Park.--
Commensurate with the recommendation to restore funding for all 
park units, the Committee supports funding for the Blackstone 
River Valley National Historical Park at no less than the 
fiscal year 2018 level, with the expectation that the Service 
will continue to make funds available to the local coordinating 
entity to maintain staffing and capacity to assist in 
management of the park, as authorized in Public Law 113-291.
    Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historical Trail.--
The Committee is dismayed that the Service intends to proceed 
with management changes that affect the Service's Chesapeake 
Bay Office, the Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic 
Trail and the Werowocomoco site despite congressional concerns. 
The Service is directed to produce a report within 30 days of 
enactment that details impacts to funding and staffing; a legal 
analysis of the Service's authority to make this change given 
existing authorizing language directing the Secretary of the 
Interior to administer the trail in coordination with the 
Chesapeake Bay Gateways Network and the Chesapeake Bay Program; 
and a list of what actions the Service intends to take in 
fiscal years 2018 and 2019 to ensure that these changes do not 
weaken the Service's commitment to Chesapeake Bay Program 
partnerships. The recommendation continues funding for the 
Service's Chesapeake Bay Office at the fiscal year 2018 level.
    Chisholm and Great Western Trail.--The Committee is 
concerned about the Service's lack of progress in completing a 
final study on the feasibility of designating the Chisholm and 
Great Western Trail cattle trails as national historic routes, 
as directed by Section 5303 of the Omnibus Public Land 
Management Act of 2009. The Committee directs the Service to 
work expeditiously to complete the study in a timely fashion 
and report back to the Committee on any impediments to 
completion.
    National Trails System.--The Committee understands the 
importance of providing adequate funding to develop and 
maintain the National Trails System for future generations to 
enjoy. In preparation for the National Trails System's 50-year 
anniversary in 2019, the Committee urges the National Park 
Service to renew its efforts to support construction and 
maintenance projects and volunteer coordination efforts, 
including activities in support of non-unit National Scenic 
Trails.
    Trail Building.--The Committee recognizes the great need 
for trail building and repair, and commends the agency on its 
work to engage and support volunteers who contribute thousands 
of hours each year completing this work. The Committee is 
concerned that the National Scenic Trails lack capacity to 
coordinate volunteers who would be willing to help address 
local maintenance backlogs and to buildout new miles of trail, 
and therefore encourages the Service to support trail design, 
project planning and volunteer coordination necessary to 
facilitate use of volunteer hours on non-unit National Scenic 
Trails.
    Director's Order 21.--Given the National Park Service 
budget constraints of the last decade and the need to find 
other revenue sources, Congress provided NPS authority to 
expand its donor acknowledgement polices as part of Public Law 
113-291. Within 90 days of enactment, the Service shall report 
to the Committee on the steps that it has taken or is planning 
to take in fiscal year 2019 to implement the law.
    Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum.--The Committee 
notes that a directive was included in the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2018 that required a report from the 
Service concerning funds allocated to the Oklahoma City 
National Memorial and Museum in previous years as authorized by 
Congress. This report was also to provide funding options for 
reaching the fully authorized level of $5,000,000. The 
Committee has yet to receive this report and expects the agency 
to provide this report expeditiously in order to resolve this 
issue.
    Denali National Park Road.--The Secretary of the Interior, 
acting through the Director of the National Park Service, shall 
submit to Congress a report regarding the feasibility of 
rerouting the Denali National Park Road [Road] should current 
stabilization efforts fail; as well as options for 
reconstruction of the Road in the future within 90 days of 
enactment. The Department is encouraged to allocate sufficient 
funding provided in this act to ensure the report is published 
in an expedited timeframe. The Department is also directed to 
provide quarterly updates to the Committees on Appropriations 
of both the House and Senate on the progress and status of 
efforts to inform additional vulnerability assessments along 
the road, as well as to inform risk reduction techniques, 
including the use of emergency procedures.
    The Department shall continue to collaborate with the 
U.S.G.S., Federal Highway Administration, and Army Corps of 
Engineers, to further monitor, predict, and respond to 
geohazard threats along the road. The multidisciplinary team 
shall continue to develop both long and short-term plans for 
incorporating geohazards into the rerouting and potential 
reconstruction of the road. Any findings of such an evaluation 
shall be included in the quarterly briefings to the Committees.
    Cape Lookout National Seashore.--The Committee understands 
that the National Park Service is reviewing the Cape Lookout 
National Seashore's Off-Road Vehicle Management Plan. The 
Committee expects the National Park Service to adopt the least 
restrictive land use option that allows adequate access to the 
Seashore while maintaining sufficient protections for wildlife 
and natural resources.
    Point Reyes National Seashore.--The Committee notes that 
multi-generational ranching and dairying is important both 
ecologically and economically for the Point Reyes National 
Seashore and the surrounding community. These historic 
activities are also fully consistent with Congress's intent for 
the management of Point Reyes National Seashore. The Committee 
is aware that the Park Service is conducting a public process 
to comply with a multi-party settlement agreement that includes 
the preparation of an environmental impact statement to study 
the effects of dairying and ranching on the park. The Committee 
strongly supports the inclusion of alternatives that continue 
ranching and dairying, including the Service's Initial Proposal 
to allow existing ranch families to continue ranching and 
dairying operations under agricultural lease/permits with 20-
year terms, and expects the Service to make every effort to 
finalize a General Management Plan Amendment that continues 
these historic activities.
    Glen Echo Park.--The Committee encourages the National Park 
Service to work to complete a cooperative agreement with 
Montgomery County, Maryland for the operations of Glen Echo 
Park, located in Glen Echo, Maryland, that meets the goals of 
reducing the financial burden on NPS while increasing the 
benefits to those who enjoy and use the park.
    Lake Clark, NP.--The Department of the Interior is 
instructed to review requiring the superintendents of Lake 
Clark National Park and Preserve and the Yukon-Charley Rivers 
National Preserve to live within their respective park units or 
bordering communities.
    Staff Housing.--The Department of Interior is encouraged to 
consider providing staff housing facilities in communities with 
field offices and parks and to share those facilities among 
bureaus in Alaska.
    Digitization Partnerships.--The Committee continues to 
support the Service's continued efforts to increase outreach 
and work to develop partnerships and programs with Hispanic 
Serving Institutions and Historical Black Colleges and 
Universities by focusing on public-private partnerships. These 
collaborative efforts will allow our nationally recognized 
parks to disseminate critical and historically significant 
information such as the National Underground Railroad 
collection to the public through digital means.
    Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park.--The 
Committee encourages the Service to continue working with the 
Town of Williamsport and the Maryland Economic Development 
Corporation on finalizing a cooperative management agreement 
that consolidates agency facilities out of the Potomac River 
floodplain in a location within one half mile of the Park's 
current Williamsport visitor center.

                  NATIONAL RECREATION AND PRESERVATION

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $63,638,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      32,199,000
Committee recommendation................................      64,138,000

    The Committee recommends $64,138,000 for national 
recreation and preservation programs, an increase of 
$31,939,000 above the budget request and $500,000 above the 
fiscal year 2018 enacted level.
    Natural Programs.--The Committee recommends $14,170,000 for 
natural programs equal to the enacted level. All proposed 
reductions are restored, including funds for the Chesapeake 
Gateways and Trails program and Rivers, Trails and Conservation 
Assistance.
    Cultural Programs.--The Committee recommends $25,562,000 
for cultural programs, an increase of $500,000 above the 
enacted level. The increase above the enacted level is provided 
pursuant to 20 U.S.C. 4451(b) for grants to nonprofit 
organizations or institutions for the purpose of supporting 
programs for Native Hawaiian or Alaska Native culture and arts 
development at a total program level of $1,000,000 as provided 
in the explanatory statement accompanying the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2018. This program is a good example of a 
multi-state, multi-organizational collaboration as envisioned 
under the American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian 
Culture and Art Development Act. Other cultural programs, 
including grants to preserve and interpret Japanese American 
Confinement Sites, are continued at their fiscal year 2018 
levels.
    Preservation Briefs.--The Committee urges the National Park 
Service's Technical Preservation Services to review and update 
Preservation Briefs to reflect the current state of building 
science, building materials technology, and safety standards.
    Grants Administration.--The recommendation does not include 
the proposed transfer of grants administration to cultural 
programs, as proposed in the request.
    Heritage Partnership Programs.--The Committee recommends 
$20,321,000 for heritage partnership programs, which is equal 
to the enacted level. This level of funding provides 
$19,339,000 for grants to national heritage areas and $982,000 
to administer the program. The Committee believes that Heritage 
areas serve an important purpose in support of historical and 
cultural education, preservation and tourism activities. The 
Committee continues to encourage individual heritage areas to 
develop plans for long-term sufficiency and supports 
longstanding efforts to develop and implement a new 
distribution formula that provides additional resources for 
newer areas while maintaining the robust capabilities of more 
established areas. The Committee is aware that progress has 
been made towards this goal but understands that more work is 
still needed to develop a consensus among the Service and all 
congressionally authorized areas on an equitable funding 
distribution. Accordingly, the Committee expects the Service to 
continue its work with currently authorized areas to develop 
and implement a sustainable, long-term funding solution for the 
program. In the meantime, the Committee directs NPS to continue 
Heritage Partnership Program grants in the same manner as 
fiscal year 2018, which provides that the $500,000 increase 
above the fiscal year 2017 funding level shall be equally 
distributed to Tier 1 areas or Tier 2 areas currently receiving 
the minimum funding levels of $150,000 and $300,000 
respectively.

                       HISTORIC PRESERVATION FUND

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $96,910,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      32,672,000
Committee recommendation................................      88,910,000

    The Committee recommends $88,910,000 for the historic 
preservation fund, an increase of $56,238,000 above the budget 
request and $8,000,000 below the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level. Program changes are detailed below and in the 
comprehensive table that accompanies the Committee report.
    The Committee recommendation provides $48,925,000 for 
grants-in-aid to states and territories and $11,485,000 for 
grants-in-aid to Tribes, which is equal to the enacted level 
for both programs.
    The Committee has provided $13,000,000 to continue the 
Civil Rights in America portion of the Centennial Initiative. 
These funds are available to protect and preserve the history 
and sites associated with the Civil Rights movement. The 
recommendation also provides $5,000,000 to fund preservation 
grants for Historically Black Colleges and Universities and 
continues $500,000 in grants for underserved populations.
    The Committee has continued funding provided in the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018 of $5,000,000 for 
preservation grants to revitalize historic properties of 
national, State and local significance in order to restore, 
protect and foster economic development of rural villages and 
downtown areas. Grants shall be made available to States, local 
governments, Tribes, or community non-profit organizations for 
the purpose of making sub-grants to eligible projects. Priority 
shall be given to applicants with a demonstrated capacity for 
allocating similar awards for preservation of such sites. The 
Committee recommends that applicants cap their administrative 
costs at no more than 5 percent. The Service shall provide a 
spend plan for the Committee's review no later than 60 days 
after the enactment of this act and shall distribute grants 
expeditiously.
    The Save America's Treasures program is provided 
$5,000,000.

                              CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $359,704,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     241,333,000
Committee recommendation................................     364,704,000

    The bill includes $364,704,000 for construction 
requirements for the national park system, which is $5,000,000 
above the enacted level, and $123,371,000 above the request. 
Changes from the request are a general increase of $123,371,000 
for line item construction. The Committee directs the Service 
to provide no later than 60 days after enactment of this Act an 
operating plan for the allocation of funds. Requests for 
reprogramming will be considered pursuant to the guidelines in 
the front of this report. Within the funds for planning, the 
Service is expected to continue funding newly authorized 
special resource studies, including a Congressionally-
authorized study of the Wood-Pawcatuck watershed for potential 
designations as a wild and scenic river.
    The Committee has not yet received an updated fiscal year 
2019 construction priority list from the Park Service due to 
the late passage of fiscal year 2018 appropriations. As a 
result, a detailed list of distribution of line-item 
construction projects is not included in this report. The 
Committee expects the Service to provide its updated fiscal 
year 2019 priority list as expeditiously as possible.
    Sperry Chalet, Glacier NP.--The Committee encourages the 
National Park Service to move forward with its planned 
reconstruction of the historic Sperry Chalet in Glacier 
National Park, and to work with local partners and volunteer 
organizations to reduce costs and increase opportunities for 
public engagement in the rebuilding process. The Committee 
notes that this project received $12,000,000 in fiscal year 
2018.
    Gustavus Intertie, Glacier NP.--The Committee is concerned 
that the City of Gustavus, AK has not been kept fully apprised 
of the Service's current construction plans for a hydraulic 
intertie between Glacier Bay NP and the City. The National Park 
Service shall consult the City of Gustavus on a regular basis 
as they issue the RFP, prospectus, and design/build contracts 
for the intertie at Glacier Bay National Park.

                 LAND ACQUISITION AND STATE ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $180,741,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      -1,212,000
Committee recommendation................................     174,444,000

    The bill provides $174,444,000 for land acquisition and 
State assistance including $50,438,000 for land acquisition and 
$124,006,000 for State assistance. The Committee provides 
$3,000,000 for recreational access activity for the Park 
Service an increase of $1,000,000 above the enacted level. The 
Committee is aware of efforts by non-Federal agencies in 
helping the Federal Government leverage funds in order to 
maximize funding for the management and acquisition of lands 
for the Ice Age, North Country, and New England Scenic Trails. 
The funding provided by the Committee for recreation access may 
be available to acquire land to close gaps in the National 
Scenic Trails. The Committee urges the Service to consider 
geographic distribution to ensure investments for the trail 
system are reflected in project prioritization. The amount 
provided within this bill is available for the following 
distribution of funds and projects as ranked and provided by 
the administration:

                          NATIONAL PARK SERVICE
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                             Budget            Bill
   State              Project               estimate     (Discretionary)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
        LA Jean Lafitte National       ..............            1,456
            Historical Park and
            Preserve
        AL Little River Canyon         ..............              985
            National Preserve
        WY Grand Teton National Park   ..............            5,250
        VA Cedar Creek and Belle       ..............            1,556
            Grove National Historical
            Park
        TN Obed Wild and Scenic River  ..............              962
 NC/SC/TN/ Overmountain Victory        ..............              185
        VA  National Historic Trail
        AR Buffalo National River      ..............              246
        MI Sleeping Bear Dunes         ..............            2,308
            National Lakeshore
     KY/TN Big South Fork National     ..............              398
            River and Recreation Area
        MD Antietam National           ..............              557
            Battlefield
           Acquisition Management               8,788            9,679
           Recreational Access         ..............            3,000
           Emergencies, Hardships,     ..............            3,928
            Relocations and
            Deficiencies
           Inholdings, Exchanges,      ..............            4,928
            Donations
           American Battlefield        ..............           15,000
            Protection Grant Program
                                      ----------------------------------
                 Total, Land                    8,788           50,438
                  Acquisition
                                      ==================================
           State Assistance Grants,    ..............          100,000
            Discretionary
           State Assistance Grants,    ..............           20,000
            Competitive
           Administrative Expenses     ..............            4,006
                                      ----------------------------------
                 Total, State          ..............          124,006
                  Assistance
                                      ==================================
           Rescission                         -10,000  ...............
                                      ----------------------------------
                 Total, Land                   -1,212          174,444
                  Acquisition and
                  State Assistance
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          CENTENNIAL CHALLENGE

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $23,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................................
Committee recommendation................................      23,000,000

    The recommendation includes $23,000,000, equal to the 
fiscal year 2018 level for the Centennial Challenge program. 
From amounts in the Centennial Challenge account, the Committee 
encourages the Department to make $5,000,000 available for 
critical programs and projects, pursuant to 54 U.S.C. 1011 
Subchapter II, subject to terms and conditions outlined in 
Title IV of Public Law 114-289. This funding will be used to 
continue a program begun under Public Law 110-161 that provides 
dedicated Federal funding to leverage partnerships for 
signature projects and programs for the national park system, 
including critical infrastructure investments. The Committee 
understands that the $20,000,000 in Centennial Challenge 
matching funds provided in fiscal year 2017 was matched with 
nearly $33,000,000 from partner organizations across the 
nation. The Committee recognizes the National Park Foundation 
and other non-Federal partners for their efforts to address 
longstanding deferred maintenance needs throughout the National 
Park System.
    The Committee expects that these funds will be used 
primarily as an additional tool for the Service to address its 
backlog maintenance issues. While a 1-to-1 matching requirement 
is required by law for projects to qualify for these funds, the 
Service is urged to give preference to projects that 
demonstrate additional leveraging capacity from its partners.

                          ENERGY AND MINERALS


                         U.S. Geological Survey

    Established in 1879, the U.S. Geological Survey [USGS] 
serves as the Earth and natural science research bureau for the 
Department of the Interior and is the only integrated natural 
resources research bureau in the Federal Government. USGS 
conducts research, monitoring, and assessments to contribute to 
understanding America's lands, water, and biological resources. 
Its research and data products support the Department's 
resource and land management needs and also provide the water, 
biological, energy, and mineral resources information needed by 
other Federal, State, Tribal, and local government agencies to 
guide planning, management, and regulatory programs. More than 
9,000 scientists, technicians, and support staff of the USGS 
are located in nearly 400 offices in every State and in several 
foreign countries throughout the world. The USGS leverages its 
resources and expertise in partnership with more than 2,000 
agencies of Federal, State, local, and Tribal governments; the 
academic community; nongovernmental organizations; and the 
private sector.

                 SURVEYS, INVESTIGATIONS, AND RESEARCH

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $1,148,457,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     859,680,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,148,457,000

    The bill provides $1,148,457,000 for the U.S. Geological 
Survey, equal to the fiscal year 2018 enacted level.
    Ecosystems.--The bill provides $158,232,000 for Ecosystems 
programs, which is an increase of $500,000 above the 2018 
enacted level. The Committee expects the $1,500,000 provided 
for programs nearing completion will be redistributed for other 
research areas such as coral disease research, detection, and 
response. Within the wildlife program, $250,000 is included 
above the enacted level of $2,998,000 to continue White Nose 
Syndrome studies; funds appropriated shall continue to help 
lead and implement the North American Bat Monitoring Program in 
association with other Federal natural resource management 
agencies and offices, States, and non-governmental partners. An 
increase of $250,000 has been included for the Cooperative 
Research Unit Program. The Committee strongly encourages that 
of the funds provided, $250,000 in additional funding be 
allocated to undertake research into the causes, and possible 
mitigation, of the dramatic decline in moose populations in the 
southern portions of that animal's New England range. The 
Committee expects the base funding of $5,620,000 to continue to 
be used to address Asian Carp issues in the Great Lakes and 
Upper Mississippi River.
    The Committee is aware of the work the Survey is performing 
in critical landscapes such as the Arctic, Puget Sound, 
California Bay Delta, Everglades, Great Lakes, Columbia River, 
and the Chesapeake Bay, and encourages this work to continue. 
The Committee appreciates the research that the Survey is 
conducting regarding the Columbia River's flow regimes and 
understands the value of such research in light of the Columbia 
River Treaty. The Committee urges such flow regime research to 
be conducted in partnership with academic partners that have an 
advanced-technology observation and prediction system in this 
Estuary. The Committee also notes the grave ecological threats 
and public nuisance posed by many invasive species and directs 
the Survey to prioritize research, detection, and response 
efforts on invasive species with extremely high impacts on 
public lands and natural resources, including Burmese Pythons 
in the Florida Everglades and Big Cypress Swamp.
    The Committee directs the Survey to formulate and report 
back to the Committee on a transition plan, to be prepared in 
conjunction with the Smithsonian Institution, regarding the 
curation of the Institution's collection for which the Survey 
is currently responsible within 180 days of enactment of this 
act.
    The Committee notes that USGS Cooperative Research Units 
[CRU] have served as a cooperative network with Interior 
partners to improve and increase youth involvement in science 
and resources management. The Committee recognizes the value of 
these programs in building the workforce of tomorrow and 
strongly encourages the Survey to develop a plan and address 
open research positions at research institutions and fill open 
positions at CRUs as quickly as practicable to support the 
educational pipeline.
    Land Resources.--The bill provides $158,299,000, a 
$5,800,000 increase above the enacted level, for the Climate 
and Land Use Change program. Within these funds, Landsat 9 is 
fully funded, the America View program receives $1,215,000, and 
funding for the eight regional science centers is provided at 
the negotiated annual agreement levels.
    Energy, Minerals and Environmental Health.--The bill 
provides $113,638,000 for Energy, Minerals, and Environmental 
Health programs, an increase of $10,800,000 above the enacted 
level. The Committee includes $3,800,000 for the implementation 
of Secretarial Order 3352 and encourages the Survey to continue 
to work on the U.S. domestic mineral base survey.
    The Committee supports the direction in Executive Order 
13817 and Secretarial Order 3359 to improve topographic, 
geological, and geophysical mapping, and provides $7,000,000 
for the new critical minerals initiative. The Committee expects 
the Survey to work collaboratively with State geological 
surveys to focus resources toward completing its core task of 
geologically surveying regions of the country that have high 
quality mineral and energy resources that remain unmapped at a 
useable scale such as the Arctic mineral belt which includes 
the Yukon Tanana Uplands. The Committee's expectation also 
includes that the Survey will consult with State geological 
surveys to update and conduct new evaluations of oil and gas 
resources in low-permeability reservoirs as in previous years.
    The Committee encourages the development of a convergent 
system that integrates sensors that can be used proactively for 
contaminant sensing across a wide range of needs such as 
agriculture, oil and gas, water resources, and infrastructure. 
The Committee directs the Survey to report back within 90 days 
of enactment of this act on how the Survey may enter into 
partnerships to develop a system for the integration of 
sensors.
    Natural Hazards.--The bill includes $157,253,000 for 
Natural Hazards programs, a decrease of $21,360,000 from the 
enacted level. Within the Earthquake Hazards program, the 
Committee continues to support the early earthquake warning 
event characterization activity and expects the base level of 
$12,900,000 for an earthquake early warning prototype to 
continue. The Committee also expects the base level of $800,000 
for the Central and Eastern U.S. Seismic Network to continue. 
The Committee is concerned about the lack of knowledge and real 
time instrumentation available for the Cascadia subduction 
zone; therefore, the Committee encourages the continued 
development of a system for Cascadia that will help prepare for 
and mitigate the negative human and economic impacts in the 
region in the event of a major seismic event.
    Earthquakes have enormous potential to cause catastrophic 
casualties, damage, economic loss, and disruption. The Survey's 
Advanced National Seismic System [ANSS] helps the Nation 
prepare by providing a framework to build out and maintain 
strong monitoring capabilities across all areas of the country. 
The Committee understands the National Science Foundation [NSF] 
has supported temporary seismometer deployments across the 
United States for the EarthScope USArray project and that once 
the project is complete in a specific area the seismometers may 
then be available for other entities to adopt. The Committee 
has expressed support for the adoption of these seismic 
stations through the direction of implementation plans and 
included $1,400,000 for the purchase of stations in the 2018 
omnibus appropriations bill. The Committee continues the 
$1,400,000 and includes an additional $600,000 for the 
continued adoption and integration of stations into the ANSS. 
The Survey is directed to report back to the Committee within 
60 days of enactment of this act on the status of the 
acquisition of this equipment from NSF along with a report 
outlining the expected future cost of operation and maintenance 
of the stations. The Committee continues the $1,000,000 for 
regional seismic networks which are working to incorporate and 
use the Earthscope data and expects this funding to continue 
according to the same methodology used in fiscal year 2018.
    The 2018 omnibus appropriations bill included $10,000,000 
in capital costs for earthquake early warning and $13,500,000 
for volcano equipment, which is not continued. Base funding for 
the volcano hazards program is included along with an increase 
of $1,540,000 for the operation of the equipment purchased with 
the one time capital infrastructure funding. The Committee 
directs the Survey to report back within 180 days of enactment 
of this act on a timeline for installation of the new equipment 
and a cost schedule regarding the operation and maintenance of 
the new equipment. The Committee continues the $5,000,000 to 
advance the ANSS.
    The Committee remains concerned that systems and equipment 
used to monitor, detect, and warn the public of volcanic and 
seismic hazards, including lahars and earthquakes on high-
threat volcanoes, are outdated and inadequate to address the 
substantial risks posed by those natural hazards. The Committee 
includes an additional $500,000 for the Survey's plan to 
repair, upgrade, and expand monitoring, detection, and warning 
systems and equipment on high-threat volcanoes.
    The Committee is also concerned about the potential 
landslide risk to certain communities and directs the Survey to 
report back to the Committee within 180 days of enactment of 
this act outlining a research strategy to identify at-risk 
communities in each State.
    Water Resources.--The bill includes $220,054,000 for Water 
Resources, an increase of $2,500,000 above the enacted level.
    The Committee expects the base level of $1,000,000 for the 
U.S.-Mexico transboundary aquifer project and $4,000,000 for 
the Mississippi Alluvial plain project to continue. The 
Committee also expects the funding included in the 2018 omnibus 
appropriations bill for research on shallow and fractured 
bedrock terrain to be continued. The groundwater monitoring 
network is to be maintained at enacted levels.
    The Committee expects the Survey to install streamgages on 
certain transboundary rivers and have provided $1,500,000 for 
this activity along with an additional $1,000,000 for the 
Federal priority streamgage network. The Committee supports 
having a cost effective streamgage strategy and encourages the 
Survey's efforts in this regard as they move forward with the 
Next Generation Water Observing System and other efforts, 
including pilots in reference watersheds. The Committee also 
expects the $120,000 for the streamgage on the Unuk River to be 
continued. Within 180 days of the enactment of this act, the 
Committee directs the Survey to identify and report back to the 
Committee on the work and resources necessary to collect, 
analyze, and assess ecological and water quantity/quality data 
that is needed to document baseline conditions and to assess 
potential impacts to water quality and/or aquatic resources 
related to hard rock copper and gold mining projects in British 
Columbia for transboundary watersheds. The Committee continues 
the direction that the Survey enter into a formal partnership 
with local Tribes and other Federal agencies as necessary in 
the area to develop a water quality strategy for the 
transboundary rivers.
    The Cooperative Water Program was renamed as part of a 
budget restructure in 2016. The new Cooperative Matching Funds 
is expected to be maintained at enacted levels.
    The Water Resources Research Act remains at the enacted 
fiscal year level of $6,500,000.
    Core Science Systems.--The bill includes $118,062,000 for 
Core Science Systems, an increase of $1,760,000 above the 
enacted level for the 3D Elevation Program [3DEP] program. The 
Committee expects the base level of $7,722,000 to be continued 
for the 3D Elevation: Alaska Mapping and Map Modernization. The 
Committee is aware of advanced, commercialized LiDAR 
technologies that have been used extensively by the military 
for years that have high utility for aerial imaging in support 
of topographical surveys with improved foliage penetration, and 
greater data density and detail at lower cost than conventional 
LiDAR. The Committee encourages the Survey to better utilize 
such advanced technologies for the nation-wide 3DEP to the 
maximum extent possible and to report back to the Committees 
within 180 days of enactment of this act.
    Science Support.--The bill includes $102,828,000 for 
Science Support programs, equal to the enacted level.
    Facilities.--The bill includes $120,091,000 for facilities, 
deferred maintenance and capital improvement, equal to the 
enacted level. The Committee has continued funding for the 
Menlo Park facility transition, but remains concerned about the 
cost of this transition as well as the deteriorating conditions 
at other facilities. The Committee directs the Survey to submit 
a spend plan for the additional funding provided along with a 
facility assessment on the facilities in need of repair with 
cost estimates and innovative proposals for resolving potential 
issues within 180 days of enactment of this act.
    The Committee supports the U.S. Geological Survey's 
National Wildlife Health Center [NWHC] and its important role 
in detecting novel pathogens and emerging infectious diseases, 
developing rapid diagnostic tests, conducting disease 
surveillance, and designing vaccines used to control these 
diseases. The current location of the center provides critical 
collaboration opportunities that enhances the work conducted at 
NWHC. No final decision on possible relocation of the center 
shall be made this fiscal year. In order to fully meet the 
mission of the center, in responding to wildlife mission 
threats and supporting national biosecurity goals, within 90 
days of enactment of this act, the Committee requests a report 
on how USGS future budget planning will support the 
infrastructure needs at NWHC.

                   Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

    The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management is responsible for 
resource evaluation, environmental review, leasing activities, 
and lease management for the Nation's offshore energy and 
minerals resources.

                        OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $171,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     179,266,000
Committee recommendation................................     179,266,000

    The bill provides $179,266,000 for the Ocean Energy 
Management account, equal to the request. This amount will be 
partially offset with the collection of offsetting rental 
receipts and cost recovery fees totaling $49,816,000.
    Renewable Energy.--The bill provides $20,720,000 for 
renewable energy activities, as detailed in the request. The 
Bureau should continue to work with the Department of Energy to 
identify and permit a national offshore wind test site and to 
exchange information with the Department and the coastal States 
about the development of new technology related to the 
structural material, environmental, and design safety criteria, 
as well as design and performance standards, of transitional 
depth and floating wind turbines. The Bureau is also expected 
to continue working with coastal States and other stakeholders 
to study new wind energy areas, including in shallow, 
transitional, and deep (over 200 feet) waters.
    The Committee expects the review and approval process for 
offshore renewable energy projects, including wind, to remain 
consistent with the legal rights of current leaseholders.
    Conventional Energy.--The bill provides $61,799,000 for 
conventional energy activities, equal to the request. The 
Bureau is reminded to continue to provide quarterly reports on 
the status of exploration and development plans to the House 
and Senate Committees on Appropriations as required under the 
approval of the reorganization of the Bureau of Ocean Energy 
Management, Regulation and Enforcement.
    Environmental Assessment.--The bill provides $79,774,000 
for environmental assessment activities, equal to the request.
    Executive Direction.--The bill provides $16,973,000 for 
executive direction of the Bureau, including the Office of the 
Director, equal to the request.
    North Carolina Wind Leases.--According to information 
provided by the Bureau to the Committee, no lease sales will be 
held for offshore areas of North Carolina for wind energy 
during fiscal year 2019. The Committee directs the Bureau to 
follow this commitment and to continue to work with local 
stakeholders, industry, and State task forces to address local 
concerns related to the visual impacts of any proposed leasing 
activity in subsequent fiscal years.
    The Committee supports the responsible development of 
offshore wind energy projects, and expects the Bureau to 
improve engagement with key stakeholders, particularly 
individual commercial and recreational fishermen, as well as 
State fishery and coastal management agencies, during the 
Offshore Wind Energy Authorization Process. The Committee 
further expects the Bureau to ensure that lessees consult with 
and consider the concerns of affected fishermen and other 
stakeholders at each stage of the leasing and development 
process.

             Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement

    The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement is 
responsible for regulating and enforcing safety, environmental, 
and conservation compliance during the development of the 
Nation's ocean energy and mineral resources on the Outer 
Continental Shelf, and oil spill research.

             OFFSHORE SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT

                    (INCLUDING RESCISSION OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $186,411,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     187,240,000
Committee recommendation................................     187,240,000

    The bill provides $187,240,000 for the Offshore Safety and 
Environmental Enforcement account, commensurate with the 
enacted level. This amount will be partially offset with the 
collection of offsetting rental receipts, cost recovery fees, 
and inspection fees, totaling $65,889,000.
    Operations, Safety and Regulation.--The bill provides 
$146,340,000 for operations, safety, and regulation activities, 
equal to the request.
    Administrative Operations.--The bill provides $18,129,000 
for administrative operations equal to the request.
    Executive Direction.--The bill provides $18,097,000 for 
executive direction of the Bureau, including the Office of the 
Director equal to the request.

                           oil spill research

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $14,899,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      12,700,000
Committee recommendation................................      12,700,000

    The bill provides $12,700,000 for oil spill research, as 
requested.

          Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement

    The Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 
[OSMRE] was established in 1977 to oversee and carry out the 
requirements of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act 
in concert with States and Indian Tribes. OSMRE's primary 
objectives are to ensure coal mining activities are conducted 
in a manner that protects citizens and the environment during 
mining, ensure the land is properly reclaimed, and mitigate 
effects of past mining by reclaiming abandoned coal mines. 
OSMRE addresses its mission with a mix of grants to States and 
Tribes to carry out their own regulatory and reclamation 
programs, and the administration of OSMRE's regulatory and 
reclamation programs. The Surface Mining Control and 
Reclamation Act Amendments of 2006 (Public Law 109-432) revised 
the mine reclamation fee distribution mechanism beginning in 
fiscal year 2008. State and Tribal reclamation grants are now 
provided under mandatory appropriations instead of through this 
bill.

                       REGULATION AND TECHNOLOGY

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $115,804,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     101,298,000
Committee recommendation................................     114,900,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $114,900,000 for 
Regulation and Technology, $904,000 below the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level. The bill maintains State regulatory grants at 
$68,590,000, which is equal to the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level.

                    ABANDONED MINE RECLAMATION FUND

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $139,672,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      20,375,000
Committee recommendation................................     137,952,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $137,952,000 for 
the Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fund, $1,720,000 below the 
fiscal year 2018 enacted level. Of the funds provided, 
$22,952,000 shall be derived from the Abandoned Mine 
Reclamation Fund, and $115,000,000 shall be derived from the 
General Fund.
    The Committee provides a total of $115,000,000 for grants 
to States and federally recognized Indian Tribes for the 
reclamation of abandoned mine lands in conjunction with 
economic and community development and reuse goals. States and 
Tribes shall use these funds to accelerate the remediation of 
AML sites with economic and community development end uses in 
mind. In doing so, the Committee envisions a collaborative 
partnership between the State and Tribal AML programs and their 
respective State and local economic and community development 
programs that will explore ways to return legacy coal sites to 
productive reuse. The Committee notes that these grants are 
provided from the General Fund and are therefore separate from 
the mandatory payments from the Abandoned Mine Land fund in 
fiscal year 2019.
    Assistance to Impacted States.--For fiscal year 2019, 
$75,000,000 shall be provided to the three Appalachian States 
with the largest unfunded needs for the reclamation of Priority 
1 and Priority 2 sites as delineated in the Abandoned Mine Land 
Inventory System. State AML programs, in consultation with 
State economic and community development authorities, shall 
develop a list of eligible AML projects in Appalachian counties 
that have a nexus to economic and community development, and 
select qualifying AML projects that have the potential to 
create long-term economic benefits. State AML programs should 
consider whether a model similar to the Appalachian Regional 
Commission grants process could streamline project selection, 
and whether an interagency agreement or other contracting 
mechanisms could streamline program implementation. Eligible 
grant recipients are limited to State and local governmental 
entities who may subcontract project-related activities as 
appropriate.
    Consistent with fiscal year 2018, the Committee provides an 
additional $30,000,000 for the next three Appalachian States 
with the largest unfunded needs for the reclamation of Priority 
1 and Priority 2 sites as delineated in the Abandoned Mine Land 
Inventory System. The $30,000,000 shall be divided equally 
among the next three States. Eligible grant recipients for the 
$30,000,000 are also limited to State and local governmental 
entities who may subcontract project-related activities as 
appropriate.
    The Committee provided funds for Tribes for the first time 
in fiscal year 2018 and continues to believe that Tribes can 
contribute to the success of the pilot. For fiscal year 2019, 
the Committee has provided $10,000,000 for grants to federally 
recognized Indian Tribes. Eligible grant recipients for the 
$10,000,000 are also limited to Tribal governmental entities 
who may subcontract project-related activities as appropriate.

                             INDIAN AFFAIRS


        Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian Education

    The Bureau of Indian Affairs [BIA] was founded in 1824 to 
uphold a Government-to-government relationship between the 
Federal Government and Tribal entities. The Federal Government 
retains trust responsibility for individual Indians and Tribes 
as a result of formal treaties and agreements with Native 
Americans.
    The Bureau provides services directly or through contracts, 
grants, or compacts to a population of 1.9 million American 
Indians and Alaska Natives who are members of 566 federally 
recognized Indian Tribes in the lower 48 States and Alaska. 
Programs administered by the BIA and Tribes include an 
education system for almost 48,000 elementary and secondary 
students; 28 Tribal colleges, universities and post secondary 
schools; social services; natural resource management on 56 
million acres of trust land; economic development; law 
enforcement; administration of Tribal courts; implementation of 
land and water claim settlements; replacement and repair of 
schools; repair and maintenance of roads and bridges; and 
repair of structural deficiencies on high hazard dams.

                      OPERATION OF INDIAN PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $2,411,200,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   2,002,996,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,403,890,000

    The bill provides a total of $2,403,890,000 for the 
Operations of Indian Programs account, a decrease of $7,310,000 
below the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. This decrease is 
attributed to the one time cost associated with forward funding 
educational institutions in the 2018 Consolidated 
Appropriations Act. Other budget reductions proposed in the 
request are not included in the recommendation. The Committee 
has included fixed costs and internal transfers as proposed 
along with the following instructions. The Committee would like 
to remind the Bureau of the importance of meeting reporting 
requirements and notes that the Bureau has not submitted 
reports as directed over the last several fiscal years. The 
Committee directs the formation of these reports in order to 
help determine funding levels for programs; therefore, if the 
Bureau cannot produce information as requested, the Committee 
may not be able to properly evaluate programs and future 
funding levels may be impacted.
    The addition of many Bureau programs to the Government 
Accountability Office's [GAO] 2018 high risk list (GAO-17-317) 
indicate there are several challenges to overcome in order to 
improve the Federal management of programs that serve Tribes 
and their members. The Committee stands ready to work with the 
Bureau's to implement the GAO recommendations and strongly 
encourages the Bureau to make these necessary changes.
    Tribal Government.--The bill provides $319,973,000 for 
Tribal government programs, an increase of $2,006,000 over the 
fiscal year 2018 enacted level. The recommendation supports 
$4,448,000 for small and needy Tribes. This funding will enable 
all small and needy Tribes to receive the maximum base level 
provided by the Bureau to run Tribal governments and directs 
the Bureau to make these payments quickly after the 
apportionment is approved. The recommendation supports 
$1,120,000 for new Tribes and notes the challenge of 
reconciling the timing of the Tribal recognition process with 
the annual budget formulation process. If additional Tribes are 
recognized during fiscal year 2019 beyond those contemplated in 
the budget request, the Bureau is urged to support their 
capacity building efforts to the extent feasible. The Committee 
is also aware that new Tribes seeking Tribal recognition are 
often meet with delay. The Committee expects the Bureau to 
efficiently administer the Tribal recognition process and 
strongly encourages action on pending requests. The Committee 
provides $34,823,000 for road maintenance. The Committee is 
concerned about the future funding of the Road Maintenance 
account, the backlog for deferred maintenance of roads in 
Indian Country, and the implementation of roads data in the 
National Tribal Transportation Facility Inventory; therefore, 
the Committee directs the Bureau to report back to the 
Committee within 60 days of enactment of this act on how the 
Bureau plans to allocate the funds provided in the bill and the 
progress being made to implement the GAO recommendations 
outlined in the report GAO-17-423. Within the program funding 
for road maintenance, $1,000,000 is continued for the 
implementation of the NATIVE Act of 2016.
    The Committee is concerned about the funding and allocation 
for the Consolidated Tribal Government Program and has included 
the fiscal year 2018 enacted level for this program along with 
fixed costs. The Committee again requests the Bureau report 
back to the Committee within 30 days of enactment of this act 
with a description of the number of Tribes that use this 
program and how increases for this program compare to others 
that offer similar services.
    Human Services.--The bill includes $161,416,000 for human 
services programs, an increase of $353,000 above the enacted 
level. The recommendation includes funding to continue the 
Tiwahe Initiative at the enacted levels. The Committee believes 
this initiative is a way to help strengthen Tribal communities 
by leveraging programs and resources; however, it is important 
to measure program effectiveness. The Committee directs the 
Bureau to report back within 90 days of enactment of this act 
on the performance measures being used to monitor and track the 
initiative's effectiveness in Indian country. Within the 
amounts provided for Tiwahe, at least $300,000 is to be used to 
support women and children's shelters that are serving the 
needs of multiple tribes or Alaska native Villages in the areas 
served by Tiwahe pilot sites. The Committee continues to 
support the Tiwahe pilot initiative; however, the Committee 
understands there are significant social service needs in 
Indian Country. The Committee directs the Bureau to report back 
within 180 days of enactment of this act on the status of the 
National Training Center for Indian Services and how this 
Center will seek to improve social services across Indian 
Country.
    The Committee also includes additional funding to support a 
program level of $76,000,000 for welfare assistance. The 
Committee remains concerned about the funding distribution for 
welfare assistance and directs the Bureau to report back to the 
Committee upon enactment of this act on how this funding would 
be distributed. The Committee also recommends to continue the 
Housing Program at the enacted level of $9,708,000.
    Trust--Natural Resources Management.--The recommendation 
includes $204,870,000 for trust and natural resources programs, 
an increase of $668,000 above the enacted level. Within the 
amounts, $12,036,000 is provided for the Tribal Management/
Development Program. The recommendation does not include the 
proposed cuts to the rights protection implementation program 
or the invasive species program. It is the Committee's 
understanding the Bureau has entered into cooperative 
agreements with Ahtna Inter Tribal Resource Commission and the 
Kuskokwim River Inter-Tribal Fisheries Commission with other 
organizations interested in establishing similar agreements; 
therefore, it is the Committee's expectation that within the 
funding provided, pilot projects and programs for Alaska 
subsistence will continue.
    The Committee continues direction for the Bureau to enter 
into a formal partnership with local Tribes and the United 
States Geological Survey to help develop a water quality 
strategy for transboundary rivers.
    The Committee recognizes that many Tribes west of the 
Mississippi River tend to have reservations that are larger in 
terms of land mass than those east of the Mississippi River and 
face challenges including drought. However, the Committee 
expects that Tribes across the country who have resource 
challenges receive appropriate funding.
    The Department of the Interior is expected to promote and 
expand the use of agreements with Indian Tribes to protect 
Indian trust resources from catastrophic wildfire, insect and 
disease infestation, or other threats from adjacent Federal 
lands, as authorized by law. The Committee directs the Bureau 
to coordinate with the Office of Wildland Fire to submit a 
report describing how the Department determines the use of 
wildfire suppression and rehabilitation resources and 
prioritizes Indian forest land.
    The Committee directs the Bureau to report back in 30 days 
of enactment of this act with a detailed cost estimate of the 
Bureaus responsibilities under the Pacific Salmon Treaty.
    Trust--Real Estate Services.--The bill includes 
$130,680,000, for trust-real estate services programs, an 
increase of $839,000 from the enacted level. Within the amounts 
provided, programs are expected to be continued at the enacted 
level with fixed costs and internal transfers included. The 
Committee has restored the proposed budget cuts to the Alaska 
Native programs and directs a program level of $450,000 for the 
certification of historical places and cultural sites, 
including Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act sites. Within the 
amounts provided, the Committee also expects funding of 
$1,500,000 to continue for rights protection litigation 
support. The Committee directs the Bureau to conduct an 
inventory of wells for which BIA is responsible to reclaim, 
including cost estimates, for submission to the Committee 
within 90 days of enactment of this act.
    Fee-to-Trust.--The Committee notes the Bureau's ongoing 
public comment period concerning the revision of fee-to-trust 
regulations and directs the Bureau to report to the Committee 
within 30 days of the date of the enactment of this act 
concerning the status of all pending applications before the 
Bureau, including detail on tribal consultation undertaken 
during the revision process.
    Education.--The bill includes $899,658,000 for education 
programs, a decrease of $14,755,000 below the enacted level. 
This decrease is attributed to the one-time forward funding 
provided in the 2018 Consolidated Appropriations Act and is not 
the result of a programmatic decrease. The Committee fully 
supports making the needed reforms to the Bureau of Indian 
Education [BIE] in order to improve the quality of education 
offered to address the performance gap of student's education 
at BIE-funded schools. The first phase of the current reform 
effort was approved in 2015; however, the Committee has not 
received any updated information on the next phase nor has the 
Bureau complied with Committee directives to report on the 
status of multiple programs as part of the fiscal year 2018 
appropriations process. Over the past 3 years, the GAO has 
issued several reports (GAO-13-774, GAO-15-121, GAO-17-447, 
GAO-17-421, and GAO-16-313) outlining management challenges at 
the Bureau and there are still outstanding open recommendations 
to address as well as additional issues outlined in the high 
risk report (GAO-17-317). The Committee is fully supportive of 
efforts to reform and better the system, but concerns about how 
the Bureau manages funding, tracks school conditions, and 
manages the overall school system remain. The Committee stands 
ready to work with the administration on the appropriate steps 
forward and directs the Office of the Assistant Secretary-
Indian Affairs to report back within 60 days of enactment of 
this act on the progress made towards implementing all the GAO 
recommendations and the current status of the reform effort as 
well as the status of Congressional directives.
    The Committee fully supports broadening access to Native 
language and culture programs, which have been linked to higher 
academic achievement for Native youth. The Committee expects 
the Individual Student Equalization Program program should 
continue to enhance access to Native language and culture 
programs in BIE-funded schools and directs the Bureau to report 
within 60 days of enactment of this act on how previous funding 
provided has been and can continue to be used to support these 
programs.
    Within the funds provided for education program 
enhancements, $2,000,000 is directed to continue native 
language immersion grants. The Bureau is expected to report 
within 60 days of enactment of this act regarding the status of 
fiscal year 2018 funds and the planned distribution of funds in 
this act.
    The Committee remains concerned about the distribution 
methodology of the Johnson O'Malley [JOM] assistance grants and 
requests the Bureau report back to the Committee within 90 days 
of enactment of this act on the status of updating the JOM 
counts and the methodology used to determine the new counts. 
The Committee would like the Bureau to include what, if any, 
barriers there are to providing updates to the JOM count.
    The Committee also recognizes that many Tribal colleges 
have significant unfunded needs and directs the Bureau to work 
with Tribal leaders and other stakeholders to develop a 
consistent methodology for determining Tribal college operating 
needs to inform future budget requests. The Committee expects 
the methodology to address operating and infrastructure needs 
including classrooms and housing.
    The administration's emphasis on education must be 
complemented by efforts to improve interagency coordination for 
the multiplicity of programs that affect the wellbeing of 
Native children. In addition to education, these include 
healthcare, social service, child welfare and juvenile justice 
programs. The Committee encourages the Bureau to work with 
other relevant Federal, State, local, and Tribal organizations 
to begin the process of identifying ways to make programs more 
effective in serving Native Children.
    The Committee is concerned by the recent Government 
Accountability Office report (GAO-17-423) on Tribal 
transportation, which identified potential negative impacts of 
road conditions on Native student school attendance. The 
Committee recommends BIE take steps to improve its data 
collection on the cause of student absences, including data on 
road and weather conditions, and to report back to the 
Committee within 120 days of enactment of this act regarding 
its actions to improve student absence data tracking and 
analysis.
    The Committee understands the importance of bringing 
broadband to reservations and villages, but remains concerned 
about how these funds are used and the planning process used 
for this type of investment. The Committee directs the agency 
to report back within 90 days of enactment of this act on a 
scalable plan to increase bandwidth in schools, procure 
computers, and software. This report should also include how 
the Bureau is working with other Federal agencies to coordinate 
and plan for the technology buildout.
    The Bureau, working with the Indian Health Service as 
appropriate, is also urged to consider integrating school-based 
preventative health services such as dental care into 
elementary schools in order to improve health outcomes of 
Tribal students.
    Public Safety and Justice.--The bill includes $407,267,000 
for public safety and justice programs, an increase of 
$1,747,000 above the enacted level. Within the funding provided 
for criminal investigations and police services, $1,000,000 is 
to be continued for the implementation of Native American 
Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. The Committee also 
expects the recidivism initiative administered through the 
Tiwahe initiative to be continued at current levels and 
$7,500,000 is continued to help people affected by opioid 
addiction.
    The Committee does not accept the proposed decrease for 
Tribal justice support and restores this amount to ensure 
$13,000,000 remains available to address the needs of Public 
Law 83-280 States. The Committee remains concerned about the 
Tribal courts needs as identified in the Indian Law and Order 
Commission's November 2013 report which notes Federal 
investment in Tribal justice for Public Law 83-280 States has 
been more limited than elsewhere in Indian Country. The 
Committee expects the Bureau to continue to work with Indian 
Tribes and Tribal organizations to consider options that 
promote, design, or pilot Tribal court systems for Tribal 
communities subject to full or partial State jurisdiction under 
Public Law 83-280.
    Within the amounts provided, the Committee also continues 
$2,000,000 for the implementation of the Violence Against Women 
Act [VAWA] for both training and VAWA specific Tribal court 
needs.
    The Committee understands that several Tribes who were 
terminated and then subsequently restored now face significant 
challenges in securing law enforcement funding through self-
determination contracts. The Bureau is directed to work with 
affected Tribes to assess their law enforcement needs and 
submit a report to the Committee within 60 days of enactment of 
this act that details the amounts necessary to provide 
sufficient law enforcement capacity for these Tribes.
    Community and Economic Development.--The bill provides 
$46,579,000 for community and economic development programs, an 
increase of $132,000 above the enacted level. Within these 
amounts, the Committee expects the funding for the Tiwahe 
initiative will continue at enacted levels. The recommendation 
continues program increases of $3,400,000 for cooperative 
agreements to carry out the provisions of the NATIVE Act of 
2016 and $1,000,000 for the modernization of oil and gas 
records including the National Indian Oil and Gas Management 
System [NIOGEMS]. The Committee understands the NIOGEMS has 
been distributed to some Tribes and regional offices and 
instructs the Bureau to report back within 120 days of 
enactment of this act on the cost to further expand this system 
to more reservations and offices.
    The recent GAO high risk report found the Bureau does not 
properly manage Indian energy resources held in trust and 
thereby limits opportunities for Tribes and their member to use 
those resources to create economic benefits in their 
communities. The Committee requests the Bureau work to make the 
necessary changes recommended by the GAO report and report back 
to the Committee outlining any barriers, statutory or 
regulatory, that prohibit or slow the pace of resource 
development as well as a status update on the open items that 
still need to be implemented according to the GAO report.
    Executive Direction and Administrative Services.--The bill 
includes $233,447,000 for executive direction and 
administrative services, an increase of $1,700,000 above the 
enacted level.
    The Committee notes that the Bureau has not yet complied 
with the fiscal year 2018 directive to provide a report on 
funding requirements associated with operating and law 
enforcement needs for congressionally authorized treaty fishing 
sites on the Columbia River. The Bureau is directed to transmit 
the report no later than 30 days following enactment of this 
act. The Bureau is also urged to incorporate unfunded needs for 
these sites as part of the Bureau's fiscal year 2020 budget.
    The Committee is concerned the Indian Employment, Training 
and Related Services Act, as amended, has not been fully 
implemented. The Bureau shall report back within 60 days of 
enactment of this act on the status of implementation.

                         CONTRACT SUPPORT COSTS

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $241,600,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     247,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     247,000,000

    Contract Support Costs.--The Committee has continued 
language from fiscal year 2018 establishing an indefinite 
appropriation for contract support costs estimated to be 
$247,000,000 which is an increase of $5,400,000 above the 
fiscal year 2018 level. By retaining an indefinite 
appropriation for this account, additional funds may be 
provided by the Bureau if its budget estimate proves to be 
lower than necessary to meet the legal obligation to pay the 
full amount due to Tribes. The Committee believes fully funding 
these costs will ensure that Tribes have the necessary 
resources they need to deliver program services efficiently and 
effectively.

                              CONSTRUCTION

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $354,113,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     111,921,000
Committee recommendation................................     359,419,000

    The bill includes a total appropriation of $359,419,000 for 
the Construction account, an increase of $5,306,000 above the 
enacted level. The Committee has included fixed costs and 
internal transfers as proposed along with the following 
instructions: Education Construction program amounts support a 
level of $238,250,000 and includes $105,504,000 for replacement 
schools, $23,935,000 for replacement facilities, $13,576,000 
for employee housing, and $95,235,000 for facility improvement 
and repair. The Committee expects the increases continued for 
the facility improvement and repair program shall be used to 
address deficiencies identified by annual school safety 
inspections. Public Safety and Justice programs receive 
$35,310,000 and continues $18,000,000 for the restart of the 
facilities replacement and construction program, $4,494,000 for 
employee housing; $9,372,000 for facilities improvement and 
repair, $170,000 for fire safety coordination, and $3,274,000 
for fire protection. Resources management receives a total of 
$72,231,000 and includes: $29,695,000 for irrigation projects, 
with at least $10,000,000 for projects authorized by the WIIN 
Act, $38,265,000 for dam projects and $1,016,000 for survey and 
design, $2,605,000 for engineering and supervision, and 
$650,000 for Federal power compliance. The Committee expects 
the funds designated for WIIN Act activities will be deposited 
into the Indian Irrigation Fund and fund those projects 
authorized by Public Law 114-322. General administration or 
other Program Construction receives $13,628,000 and includes 
$1,119,000 for telecommunications repair, and $8,590,000 for 
construction program management with increases in order to 
fully fund the Ft. Peck water system, and $3,919,000 for 
facilities improvement and repair.
    The Committee remains concerned about the deferred 
maintenance projects at schools and directs the Bureau to 
submit the allocation plan as required by Public Law 115-31. 
The Committee is encouraged to learn that BIA and BIE continue 
to work together to ensure annual safety inspections are 
completed for all BIE school facilities. However, the Committee 
is concerned that, as recommended by the Government 
Accountability Office in report GAO-16-313, BIA and BIE have 
not developed concrete tracking and capacity-building systems 
to ensure safety issues flagged by these inspections are 
addressed in a timely manner. Furthermore, the Committee is 
concerned by reports from tribally operated BIE schools that 
BIE does not provide timely access to or training about the 
Facilities Improvement and Repair Program and other available 
emergency maintenance funding. The Committee directs BIE and 
BIA to report back within 90 days with a detailed 
implementation plan to address these remaining concerns.
    The Committee understands many schools are in need of 
repair, improvement, and upgrades in order to bring schools 
into good condition. The Committee stands ready to work with 
the administration and Tribes to develop a comprehensive 
strategy that provides safe, functional, and accessible 
facilities for schools. The Committee directs the Bureau to 
report back within 90 days of enactment of this act on the 
progress the Bureau has made towards implementing a long-term 
facilities plan similar to the Department of Defense process in 
2009 as encouraged in the joint explanatory statement 
accompanied by Public Law 114-113.
    The Committee continues the increases for dam safety and is 
concerned there is an unknown number of dams on reservations 
that have not received a hazard classification and that the 
current review process is behind schedule resulting in delays 
for dams to receive a comprehensive review. The Committee 
strongly encourages the Bureau to begin the work on the dams 
and report back to the Committee on the best way to effectively 
quantify the potential pool of dams on reservations in need of 
a review and/or classification.

INDIAN LAND AND WATER CLAIMS SETTLEMENTS AND MISCELLANEOUS PAYMENTS TO 
                                INDIANS

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $55,457,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      45,644,000
Committee recommendation................................      55,457,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $55,457,000 for 
the Indian Land and Water Claim Settlements account which is 
equal to the enacted level. The Committee appreciates the 
importance of settling the numerous land and water settlements 
and directs the Department to submit a spending plan to the 
Committee within 90 days of enactment of this act for how it 
plans to allocate the funds provided by the bill for the 
specific settlements detailed in the budget request. The 
Committee recommendation notes that sufficient funding has been 
provided to complete required payments for the Navajo Trust 
Fund and the Navajo Gallup Water Supply Project in fiscal year 
2019.

                 INDIAN GUARANTEED LOAN PROGRAM ACCOUNT

Appropriations, 2018....................................      $9,272,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       6,699,000
Committee recommendation................................       9,279,000

    The bill includes a total appropriation of $9,279,000 for 
the Indian Guaranteed Loan account. This amount is an increase 
of $5,000 above the enacted level in order to fund fixed costs.

                          Departmental Offices


                        Office of the Secretary


                        DEPARTMENTAL OPERATIONS

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $124,182,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     134,673,000
Committee recommendation................................     134,673,000

    The bill includes a total appropriation of $134,673,000 for 
the Office of the Secretary account. This amount is $10,491,000 
above the enacted level and equal to the request. The increase 
is explained by moving appraisal functions from the Office of 
Special Trustee to the Office of the Secretary. The Committee 
has maintained the staff and funding associated with the office 
of Native Hawaiian Relations within the office of the Assistant 
Secretary, Policy, Management and Budget to the Assistant 
Secretary Insular and International Affairs.
    Leadership and Administration.--The recommendation includes 
an appropriation of $107,368,000 for the leadership and 
administration activity, equal to the request.
    Management Services.--The bill provides an appropriation of 
$18,777,000 for the management services activity, equal to the 
request. The increase is for the Office of Valuation Services 
and includes a transfer of funds from the Office of the Special 
Trustee for American Indians for appraisal services.
    Conservation Partnerships.--The Committee continues to 
support the partnerships between the Department and the 21st 
Century Conservation Service Corps and Public Land Corps, which 
help to engage youth and veterans in hands-on service to our 
public lands, and expects these efforts to continue.
    Reorganization.--The Committee has provided funds as 
requested for the Department's reorganization plan. However, 
many of the details of this proposal remain unknown. This is in 
large part because the Department is seeking the input of many 
stakeholders and has yet to incorporate these recommendations 
into its final reorganization plan. Given the current lack of 
specifics relating to the reorganization proposal, the 
Committee directs the Department to not obligate these funds 
until the Secretary has submitted a reprogramming in accordance 
with the procedures outlined in this report that provides 
greater detail on the reorganization, its impacts on staff, 
funding, and service delivery, and how these funds will be 
expended. The Committee has heard from tribal organizations 
about the need for more robust consultation related to this 
proposal as well, and therefore expects the Department to meet 
with these groups and formulate a process for tribal 
consultation that meets the needs of all stakeholders. The 
Committee further expects the Department to continue to meet 
with the committees of jurisdiction, to inform them ahead of 
forthcoming actions and to respond to their requests for the 
quantitative analyses and materials associated with this 
proposal.

                            Insular Affairs

    The Office of Insular Affairs [OIA] was established on 
August 4, 1995, through Secretarial Order No. 3191, which also 
abolished the former Office of Territorial and International 
Affairs. OIA has administrative responsibility for coordinating 
Federal policy in the territories of American Samoa, Guam, the 
U.S. Virgin Islands, and the Commonwealth of the Northern 
Mariana Islands [CNMI], and oversight of Federal programs and 
funds in the freely associated states of the Federated States 
of Micronesia [FSM], the Republic of the Marshall Islands 
[RMI], and the Republic of Palau.
    Following the expiration of the first Compact of Free 
Association in 2003, a new Compact of Free Association was 
negotiated between the United States and the states of FSM and 
RMI. Under the Compact, the status of free association 
recognizes each Freely Associated State as a sovereign state 
with the capacity to conduct foreign affairs consistent with 
the terms of the Compact. The Compact places full 
responsibility for defense with the United States. The Compact 
also provides grant funds and Federal program assistance, 
principally through the Department of the Interior.
    U.S. Virgin Islands Hurricane Impacts.--The Committee 
continues to be concerned about the catastrophic impacts of 
Hurricane Irma to the U.S. Virgin Islands, especially in light 
of financial solvency issues coupled with the anticipated 
amount of time before government, industry, and utilities are 
able to fully function and generate revenues. The Committee 
directs the Office to provide information to the Committee on 
recovery needs not met via Federal Emergency Management Agency 
assistance or those reported to the office by the government of 
the U.S. Virgin Islands.
    American Samoa.--The Committee is concerned about the long-
term impact of Cyclone Gita on American Samoa, particularly as 
it relates to impending increase in the minimum wage and how 
that will impact American Samoa's economy and its ability to 
recover. Additionally, given the state of the Lyndon B. Johnson 
Hospital, the Committee directs the Office to provide 
information, within 90 days of enactment of this act, to the 
Committee on the condition of the hospital; the estimated cost 
of building a new hospital; the estimated cost of completing 
all renovations necessary to modernize the hospital; and 
estimates of whether a renovated facility has sufficient 
capacity to meet American Samoa's needs.

                       ASSISTANCE TO TERRITORIES

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $96,870,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      80,967,000
Committee recommendation................................     100,688,000

    The bill includes $100,688,000 for assistance to 
territories, $3,818,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level and $19,721,000 above the request. Funding levels for 
each subactivity can be found in the table at the end of this 
statement.
    Within these amounts, the bill includes a total of 
$4,000,000 to continue discretionary grants to mitigate the 
impact of Compact-related migration on affected jurisdictions, 
as authorized by section 104(e) of Public Law 108-188. This 
amount is equal to the fiscal year 2018 level. As in previous 
years, the Department shall allocate these grants in 
conjunction with other currently authorized mandatory grants in 
order to help offset educational costs incurred by these 
jurisdictions. The recommendation also includes a total of 
$3,500,000 for brown tree snake removal activities and 
$2,500,000 for the Coral Reef Initiative.
    The bill recognizes that the Office of Insular Affairs' 
most impactful spending is through projects to improve 
education, drinking water, sanitation, health, safety, 
transportation, reliability of power, improving availability of 
technology, including through fiber optics, and economic 
opportunity and sustainability. The Committee directs these 
funds to be awarded accordingly. Additionally, the Office of 
Insular Affairs is directed to continue to award non-
competitive technical assistance funds to support investments 
in civic education programs for Insular Area students.
    American Samoa Operations Grants/American Samoa 
Construction.--The bill provides $23,720,000 for grants to 
American Samoa, $718,000 above the enacted level and $1,473,000 
above the request.
    CNMI/Covenant Grants.--The recommendation includes 
$27,720,000 for covenant grants, equal to the enacted level.

                      COMPACT OF FREE ASSOCIATION

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $127,187,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       3,109,000
Committee recommendation................................       3,563,000

    The bill includes $3,563,000 for Compact of Free 
Association programs, $123,624,000 below the enacted level, and 
$454,000 above the request. The Consolidated Appropriations 
Act, 2018 provided full funding for the Palau Compact of Free 
Association. Within the funds made available, the Committee has 
provided $750,000 for Enewetak support.

                        Office of the Solicitor


                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $66,675,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      65,674,000
Committee recommendation................................      65,674,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $65,674,000 for 
the Office of the Solicitor, equal to the budget request.

                      Office of Inspector General


                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $51,023,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      52,486,000
Committee recommendation................................      52,486,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $52,486,000 for 
the Office of Inspector General, equal to the budget request.

             Office of Special Trustee for American Indians

    The Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians 
holds responsibility for approximately 56 million acres of 
land, with more than 10 million acres belonging to individual 
Indians and 46 millions acres held in trust for Indian Tribes.

                         FEDERAL TRUST PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $119,400,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     104,067,000
Committee recommendation................................     112,380,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $112,380,000 for the 
Federal Trust Programs account, a decrease of $7,020,000 from 
the enacted level. The recommendation includes a total 
appropriation of $19,016,000 for historical accounting 
activities and decreases account for a transfer of funds to the 
Office of Valuation for Appraisal Services.
    The Committee recommendation does not include the proposal 
to transfer functions from the Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian 
Relocation [ONHIR] to the Office of Special Trustee [OST] as 
proposed in the request. The Committee has previously included 
funding to lead to the eventual closure of the ONHIR and 
expects the administration to submit a comprehensive plan that 
addresses the transfer of all outstanding services, records, 
and rangeland activities to other agencies before the closure 
of the office. The Committee is also deeply concerned by the 
lack of meaningful Tribal consultation on the proposal and 
directs the OST to work with the Bureau of Indian Affairs and 
ONHIR to immediately consult with affected Tribes on matters 
related to the closure and transition.

                        Department-Wide Programs


                        WILDLAND FIRE MANAGEMENT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    The Department's Wildland Fire Management account funds 
fire prevention, readiness, suppression, and rehabilitation 
activities performed by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Bureau of 
Land Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the 
National Park Service.

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $948,087,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     870,384,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,116,076,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $1,116,076,000 
for wildland fire management, $167,989,000 above the enacted 
level, and $245,692,000 above the request. This includes 
$175,865,000 for additional suppression resources in the event 
the 10-year average is insufficient to cover the costs of 
wildland fire suppression.
    Fire Operations.--The bill provides $886,179,000 for 
Wildfire Preparedness and Suppression. This amount includes 
$322,179,000 for preparedness and $564,000,000 for fire 
suppression operations.
    Other Operations.--The bill provides $225,897,000 for other 
wildland fire management operations. This includes $188,000,000 
for hazardous fuels management, $20,470,000 for burned area 
rehabilitation, $18,427,000 for fire facilities, and $3,000,000 
for joint fire science. Prior to the Committee accepting the 
proposal to require individual bureaus to fund their respective 
fire facilities, the Department must provide an analysis of the 
impact to individual bureaus and the line items the Department 
expects those facilities to be funded through.

                    CENTRAL HAZARDOUS MATERIALS FUND

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $10,010,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       2,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      10,010,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $10,010,000 for the 
Central Hazardous Materials Fund, equal to the enacted level 
and $8,010,000 above the request.

           NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENT AND RESTORATION

                NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENT FUND

Appropriations, 2018....................................      $7,767,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       4,600,000
Committee recommendation................................       7,767,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $7,767,000 for 
the Natural Resource Damage Assessment Fund, an amount equal to 
the enacted level and $3,167,000 above the request. The 
detailed allocation of funding by activity is included in the 
table at the end of this explanatory report.

                          WORKING CAPITAL FUND

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $62,370,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      56,735,000
Committee recommendation................................      56,735,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $56,735,000 for 
the Working Capital Fund. This amount is equal to the request.

                  OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $137,757,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     137,505,000
Committee recommendation................................     137,505,000

    The bill provides $137,505,000 for the Office of Natural 
Resources Revenue which is equal to the request.

                       PAYMENTS IN LIEU OF TAXES

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $530,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     405,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     500,000,000

    The bill includes full funding for the Payments in Lieu of 
Taxes [PILT] program for fiscal year 2018 in Section 114 of 
Title I, General Provisions, which is estimated to be 
$500,000,000 for the fiscal year.

                           General Provisions


                       DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    Title I of the bill includes ``General Provisions, 
Department of the Interior'', which are various legislative 
provisions affecting the Department. The provisions are:
    Sec. 101. Provides secretarial authority for the intra-
bureau transfer of program funds for expenditures in cases of 
emergency when all other emergency funds are exhausted.
    Sec. 102. Provides for the department-wide expenditure or 
transfer of funds by the Secretary in the event of actual or 
potential emergencies including forest fires, range fires, 
earthquakes, floods, volcanic eruptions, storms, oil spills, 
grasshopper and Mormon cricket outbreaks, and surface mine 
reclamation emergencies.
    Sec. 103. Provides for use of appropriated funds by the 
Secretary for contracts, rental cars and aircraft, certain 
library memberships, and certain telephone expenses.
    Sec. 104. Provides for the transfer of unobligated balances 
from the Bureau of Indian Affairs or the Office of Special 
Trustee for American Indians for expenditure or transfer for 
Indian trust management activities.
    Sec. 105. Permits the redistribution of Tribal priority 
allocation and Tribal base funds to alleviate funding 
inequities.
    Sec. 106. Authorizes the acquisition of lands for the 
purpose of operating and maintaining facilities that support 
visitors to Ellis, Governors, and Liberty Islands.
    Sec. 107. Authorizes Outer Continental Shelf inspection 
fees to be collected by the Secretary of the Interior.
    Sec. 108. Authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to 
continue the reorganization of the Bureau of Ocean Energy 
Management, Regulation and Enforcement.
    Sec. 109. Provides the Secretary of the Interior with 
authority to enter into multi-year cooperative agreements with 
nonprofit organizations for long-term care of wild horses and 
burros.
    Sec. 110. Addresses the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's 
responsibilities for mass marking of salmonid stocks.
    Sec. 111. Allows the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of 
Indian Education to more efficiently and effectively perform 
reimbursable work.
    Sec. 112. Provides for the humane transfer of excess wild 
horses.
    Sec. 113. Provides authority for the Department of the 
Interior to enter into cooperative agreements with nonprofit 
organizations designated under the Older Americans Act.
    Sec. 114. Extension of Payments in lieu of taxes.
    Sec. 115. Addresses issuance of rules for sage-grouse.
    Sec. 116. Technical correction for a provision in the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018.

                                TITLE II

                    ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

                          Program Description

    The Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] was created 
through Executive Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1970, designed 
to consolidate certain Federal Government environmental 
activities into a single agency. The plan was submitted by the 
President to the Congress on July 8, 1970, and the EPA was 
established as an independent agency in the executive branch on 
December 2, 1970, by consolidating 15 components from 5 
departments and independent agencies.
    A description of EPA's pollution control programs by media 
follows:
    Air.--The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 authorize a 
national program of air pollution research, regulation, 
prevention, and enforcement activities.
    Water Quality.--The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as 
amended, provides the framework for protection of the Nation's 
surface waters. The law recognizes that it is the primary 
responsibility of the States to prevent, reduce, and eliminate 
water pollution. The States determine the desired uses for 
their waters, set standards, identify current uses and, where 
uses are being impaired or threatened, develop plans for the 
protection or restoration of the designated use. They implement 
the plans through control programs such as permitting and 
enforcement, construction of municipal waste water treatment 
works, and nonpoint source control practices. The act also 
regulates discharge of dredge or fill material into waters of 
the United States, including wetlands.
    Drinking Water.--The Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974, as 
amended in 1996, charges EPA with the responsibility of 
implementing a program to assure that the Nation's public 
drinking water supplies are free of contamination that may pose 
a human health risk, and to protect and prevent the 
endangerment of ground water resources which serve as drinking 
water supplies.
    Hazardous Waste.--The Resource Conservation and Recovery 
Act of 1976 [RCRA] mandated EPA to develop a regulatory program 
to protect human health and the environment from improper 
hazardous waste disposal practices. The RCRA Program manages 
hazardous wastes from generation through disposal.
    EPA's responsibilities and authorities to manage hazardous 
waste were greatly expanded under the Hazardous and Solid Waste 
Amendments of 1984. Not only did the regulated universe of 
wastes and facilities dealing with hazardous waste increase 
significantly, but past mismanagement practices, in particular 
prior releases at inactive hazardous and solid waste management 
units, were to be identified and corrective action taken. The 
1984 amendments also authorized a regulatory and implementation 
program directed to owners and operators of underground storage 
tanks.
    The Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest Establishment Act 
of 2012 amended subtitle C of the Solid Waste Disposal Act to 
establish an electronic means of tracking wastes subject to 
RCRA regulation. Appropriations to the Hazardous Waste 
Electronic Manifest Fund support development, operation, 
maintenance, and upgrading of the hazardous waste electronic 
manifest system.
    Pesticides.--The objective of the pesticide program is to 
protect the public health and the environment from unreasonable 
risks while permitting the use of necessary pest control 
approaches. This objective is pursued by EPA under the Food 
Quality Protection Act, the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and 
Rodenticide Act, the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, and 
the Pesticide Registration Improvement Extension Act of 2012 
through three principal means: (1) review of existing and new 
pesticide products; (2) enforcement of pesticide use rules; and 
(3) research and development to reinforce the ability to 
evaluate the risks and benefits of pesticides.
    Radiation.--The radiation program's major emphasis is to 
minimize the exposure of persons to ionizing radiation, whether 
from naturally occurring sources, from medical or industrial 
applications, nuclear power sources, or weapons development.
    Toxic Substances.--The Toxic Substances Control Act 
establishes a program to stimulate the development of adequate 
data on the effects of chemical substances on health and the 
environment, and institute control action for those chemicals 
which present an unreasonable risk of injury to health or the 
environment. The act's coverage affects more than 60,000 
chemicals currently in commerce, and all new chemicals.
    Multimedia.--Multimedia activities are designed to support 
programs where the problems, tools, and results are cross media 
and must be integrated to effect results. This integrated 
program encompasses the EPA's research, enforcement, and 
abatement activities.
    Superfund.--The Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 established a national 
program to protect public health and the environment from the 
threats posed by inactive hazardous waste sites and 
uncontrolled spills of hazardous substances. The original 
statute was amended by the Superfund Amendments and 
Reauthorization Act of 1986. Under these authorities, EPA 
manages a hazardous waste site clean-up program including 
emergency response and long-term remediation.
    Brownfields.--The Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 as amended by the Small 
Business Liability Relief and Brownfields Revitalization Act of 
2002 establishes a national program to assess, cleanup, and 
provide support to States, tribes, local communities, and other 
stakeholders to work together to develop Brownfields.
    Leaking Underground Storage Tanks.--The Leaking Underground 
Storage Tank [LUST] Program addresses petroleum releases from 
federally regulated underground storage tanks. It was created 
in 1986 when Congress amended subtitle I of the Solid Waste 
Disposal Act. EPA implements the LUST response program 
primarily through cooperative agreements with the States. In 
2005, the Energy Policy Act expanded eligible uses of the Trust 
Fund to include certain leak prevention activities.
    Inland Oil Spill.--The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, 
as amended by section 4202 of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, 
established a national program to help prepare for, and respond 
to, any oil spill affecting the inland waters of the United 
States.

                         Programmatic Guidance

    The bill provides $8,058,488,000 for the Environmental 
Protection Agency [EPA]. The bill does not support reductions 
proposed in the budget request unless explicitly noted.
    Congressional Budget Justification.--The Agency is directed 
to continue to include the information requested in House 
Report 112-331 and any proposals to change State allocation 
formulas that affect the distribution of appropriated funds in 
future budget justifications.
    Reprogramming and Workforce Reshaping.--The agreement does 
not include any of the requested funds for workforce reshaping. 
Further, the Committee does not expect the Agency to 
consolidate or close any regional offices in fiscal year 2019. 
The Agency is held to the reprogramming limitation of 
$1,000,000 and should continue to follow the reprogramming 
directives as provided in the front of this report. It is noted 
that such reprogramming directives apply to proposed 
reorganizations, workforce restructure, reshaping, transfer of 
functions, or downsizing, especially those of significant 
national or regional importance, and include closures, 
consolidations, and relocations of offices, facilities, and 
laboratories.
    Further, the Agency may not use any amount of deobligated 
funds to initiate a new program, office, or initiative, without 
the prior approval of the Committee. Within 30 days of 
enactment of this Act, the Agency is directed to submit to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations its annual 
operating plan for fiscal year 2019, which shall detail how the 
Agency plans to allocate funds at the program project level.
    Other.--It is noted that the current workforce is below the 
fiscal year 2018 level, therefore, the agreement includes 
rescissions in the Science and Technology and Environmental 
Programs and Management accounts that capture expected savings 
associated with such changes. The Agency is directed to first 
apply the rescissions across program project areas to reflect 
routine attrition that will occur in those program project 
areas in fiscal year 2019 and then to reflect efficiency 
savings in a manner that seeks, to the extent practicable, to 
be proportional among program project areas. Amounts provided 
in this Act are sufficient to fully fund Agency payroll 
estimates.
    The Committee understands that the Agency routinely makes 
funding payroll requirements a top priority, and the Committee 
expect the Agency will continue to do so as it executes its 
fiscal year 2019 appropriation and applies the rescissions.
    The Committee does not expect the Agency will undertake 
adverse personnel actions or incentive programs to comply with 
the rescissions nor does the Committee expect the Agency will 
undertake largescale adverse personnel actions or incentive 
programs in fiscal year 2019. As specified in the bill 
language, the rescissions shall not apply to the Geographic 
Programs, the National Estuary Program, and the National 
Priorities funding in the Science and Technology and 
Environmental Programs and Management accounts. The Agency is 
directed to submit, as part of the operating plan, detail on 
the application of such rescissions at the program project 
level.

                         Science and Technology


                    (INCLUDING RESCISSION OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $706,473,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     448,965,000
Committee recommendation................................     706,473,000

    The bill provides $706,473,000 for science and technology 
activities with an additional $17,398,000 to be paid from 
Hazardous Substance Superfund to fund ongoing research 
activities authorized by the Comprehensive Environmental, 
Compensation and Liability Act of 1980, as amended. This amount 
is equal to the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. A detailed 
allocation of funding by program is included in the table that 
accompanies this report. Additional changes to the request are 
detailed below
    Indoor Air and Radiation.--$5,997,000 is provided for 
indoor air and radiation activities, equal to the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level. The proposed elimination of radon 
activities has been rejected and the program is funded at not 
less than the fiscal year 2018 level.
    Pesticides Licensing.--$6,027,000 is provided for pesticide 
program activities. This amount is equal to the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level.
    Research: Air and Energy.--$94,906,000 has been provided. 
Of this amount, up to $3,000,000 shall be used to continue the 
study under the heading ``Partnership Research'' contained in 
the explanatory statement of Public Law 115-141.
    Research: Chemical Safety and Sustainability.--$126,930,000 
is provided for the chemical safety and sustainability program. 
Funding for the endocrine disruptor program and for 
computational toxicology are maintained at the fiscal year 2018 
level.
    Research: National Priorities.--The bill provides 
$5,000,000, which shall be used for extramural research grants, 
independent of the Science to Achieve Results [STAR] grant 
program, to fund high-priority water quality and availability 
research by not-for-profit organizations who often partner with 
the Agency. Because these grants are independent of the STAR 
grant program, the Agency should strive to award grants in as 
large an amount as is possible to achieve the most 
scientifically significant research. Funds shall be awarded 
competitively with priority given to partners proposing 
research of national scope and who provide a 25-percent match. 
The Agency is directed to allocate funds to grantees within 180 
days of enactment of this act.
    Additional Guidance.--The Committee has provided the 
following additional guidance with respect to funding provided 
under this account.
    Computational Toxicology.--The Agency is directed to 
continue following the guidance contained in the explanatory 
statement of Public Law 115-141.
    Enhanced Aquifer Use.--The Agency is directed to continue 
following the guidance contained in Senate Report 114-281.
    Integrated Risk Information System.--The Agency is directed 
to continue following the guidance contained in the explanatory 
statement accompanying Public Law 115-141.
    Nanomaterials Research.--The Committee notes the increased 
capabilities that the Food and Drug Administration [FDA] has 
developed to study environment, health, and safety of 
nanomaterials [nanoEHS] within FDA's Jefferson Laboratory 
Campus, including the National Center for Toxicological 
Research, and its consolidated headquarters at White Oak, 
Maryland. The FDA can and should be more involved in nanoEHS 
research with other agencies, particularly in activities 
involving human health. Out of the amounts appropriated, the 
Administrator shall seek to involve the FDA in nanoEHS research 
to the maximum extent possible, including participation in EPA 
funded research.
    STAR Grants.--The Committee has provided funds to continue 
the Science to Achieve Results program and the Committee 
directs the Agency to distribute grants consistent with fiscal 
year 2018.
    Harmful Algal Blooms.--The Committee recognizes the 
increasing challenges many communities face from harmful algal 
blooms [HABs] in freshwater and coastal ecosystems. The 
Committee encourages the Agency to fund research grants that 
help promote scientific progress towards preventing and 
controlling HABs in freshwater and coastal ecosystems, 
including research to (1) determine the effectiveness of 
existing nutrient treatment technologies, (2) evaluate the 
scale-up of emerging nutrient treatment technologies and 
develop new technologies, and (3) develop best management 
practices to help both rural and urban communities control 
nutrients in their watersheds.

                 Environmental Programs and Management


                    (INCLUDING RESCISSION OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $2,597,999,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   1,784,852,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,597,999,000

    The bill provides $2,597,999,000 for environmental programs 
and management activities. This amount is equal to the fiscal 
year 2018 enacted level. A detailed allocation of funding by 
program is included in the table that accompanies this report. 
Additional changes to the request are detailed below.
    Clean Air.--The Committee has provided the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level for Clean Air programs. Within these funds, the 
Committee continues to support the EnergySTAR program at the 
fiscal year 2018 level.
    Further, the Committee does not support the proposed 
termination of voluntary programs, including Natural GasSTAR, 
AgSTAR, the Combined Heat and Power Partnership, and other 
partnership programs where EPA works collaboratively with non-
governmental entities to identify beneficial methods to reduce 
emissions, reduce pollution, or increase efficiency. The 
Committee funds both program areas related to stratospheric 
ozone at not less than the fiscal year 2018 enacted level.
    Environmental Protection: National Priorities.--The bill 
provides $15,000,000 for a competitive grant program for 
qualified non-profit organizations, excluding institutions of 
higher education, to provide technical assistance for improved 
water quality or safe drinking water, adequate waste water to 
small systems or individual private well owners. The Agency 
shall provide $12,300,000 for Grassroots Rural and Small 
Community Water Systems Assistance Act, for activities 
specified under section 1442(e) of the Safe Drinking Water Act 
(42 U.S.C. 300j-1(e)(8)). The Agency is also directed to 
provide $1,700,000 for grants to qualified not-for-profit 
organizations for technical assistance for individual private 
well owners, with priority given to organizations that 
currently provide technical and educational assistance to 
individual private well owners. The Agency is directed to 
provide on a national and multi-State regional basis, 
$1,000,000 for grants to qualified organizations for the sole 
purpose of providing on-site training and technical assistance 
for wastewater systems. The Agency shall require each grantee 
to provide a minimum 10 percent match, including in kind 
contributions. The Agency is directed to allocate funds to 
grantees within 180 days of enactment of this act.
    The Committee remains concerned that the Agency made a 
decision to put out a multi-year Request for Applications for 
fiscal year 2017 and 2018 without the express approval of the 
Committee. The Agency is directed to obtain Committee approval 
for any similar activity in the future.
    Geographic Programs.--The bill provides $454,958,000 for 
Geographic Programs, an increase of $7,101,000 above the fiscal 
year 2018 enacted level. Funding levels for the specific 
geographic programs are as follows:
  --$300,000,000 for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.
  --$73,000,000 for the Chesapeake Bay program.
  --$4,819,000 for the San Francisco Bay program.
  --$28,000,000 for the Puget Sound program.
  --$3,204,000 for the South Florida program.
  --$12,000,000 for the Long Island Sound program.
  --$14,542,000 for the Gulf of Mexico program.
  --$11,000,000 for the Lake Champlain program.
  --$5,000,000 for the Southern New England Estuaries program.
  --$948,000 for the Lake Pontchartrain program.
  --$1,000,000 for the Columbia River Basin Restoration 
        program.
    Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.--A long-term goal of 
the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative [GLRI] articulated in 
the GLRI Action Plan calls for land use, recreation and 
economic activities that are managed to ensure that nearshore 
aquatic, wetland and upland habitats will sustain the health 
and function of natural communities. The Committee is aware 
that Metropolitan Planning Organizations in the region are 
working on site-specific land-use and economic development 
projects with local communities bordering the Great Lakes that 
can help advance this effort. The Agency is encouraged to work 
with these groups to advance this long-term goal as they 
allocate funding under the GLRI.
    Additionally, the Committee urges the Environmental 
Protection Agency and Great Lakes Interagency Taskforce to 
provide continued attention and resources towards building the 
capacity of on-the-ground partners, including States and 
Tribes, as ongoing partners in the stewardship of the Great 
Lakes. The Committee recognizes the importance of Tribal self-
governance and encourages the Agency to work with Tribal 
governments and the Bureau of Indian Affairs to develop a 
proposal for the creation of a distinct GLRI Tribal program 
through which GLRI funds would be provided to allow Tribes the 
flexibility to develop the programs that are of the highest 
priorities to their communities, and which fulfill the spirit 
of self-determination, meet treaty obligations, and carry out 
Federal trust responsibilities.
    The Committee encourages agency funds for Great Lakes 
projects to be made available for projects in the historic 
Great Lakes Basin, which includes the Chicago River Watershed.
    Gulf of Mexico.--The bill provides $14,542,000 for the Gulf 
of Mexico Geographic Program where hypoxia is a growing cause 
for concern. The Committee directs the Agency to coordinate 
with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Gulf States, and 
other State, local and private partners to leverage greater 
resources toward conservation projects on working-lands within 
the Gulf Region and Mississippi River Basin. The Agency is 
directed to distribute funds in the same manner as fiscal year 
2018.
    Chesapeake Bay.--The Committee recommends $73,000,000 for 
the Chesapeake Bay program. From within the amount provided, 
$6,000,000 is for nutrient and sediment removal grants and 
$6,000,000 is for small watershed grants to control polluted 
runoff from urban, suburban and agricultural lands.
    Lake Champlain.--The Committee recommends $11,000,000 for 
the Lake Champlain program. From within the amount provided, 
$4,399,000 shall be allocated in the same manner as fiscal year 
2017. Funds appropriated above $4,399,000 shall be for 
otherwise unmet needs necessary to implement the EPA's 2016 
Phosphorus Total Maximum Daily Load Plan for Lake Champlain for 
projects and work identified in the State implementation plan.
    Puget Sound.--The bill provides $28,000,000 and the Agency 
shall follow the direction under this heading in House Report 
115-238.
    Northwest Forest Program.--The Committee continues to 
support the Northwest Forest Program at not less than the 
fiscal year 2018 funding level.
    South Florida Program.--The Committee has provided 
$3,204,000 for the South Florida program, an increase of 
$1,500,000 above the enacted level. Within the increase, the 
Committee provides $500,000 to monitor coral health in South 
Florida, $500,000 to enhance water quality and seagrass 
monitoring in the Caloosahatchee Estuary and Indian River 
Lagoon especially with respect to assessing the impact of Lake 
Okeechobee discharges, and $500,000 to enhance water quality 
and seagrass monitoring in Florida Bay and Biscayne Bay 
especially with respect to assessing the impact of Everglades 
Restoration projects.
    Columbia River Basin Restoration Program.--The bill 
provides $1,000,000 for the purpose of commencing 
implementation of the Columbia River Basin Restoration Program, 
which was authorized in Public Law 114-322, including the 
establishment of a stakeholder working group, establishment of 
a voluntary and competitive restoration and grant program, and 
development of an annual budget plan to accomplish the goals of 
protection and restoration of the Columbia River Basin.
    Indoor Air and Radiation.--$27,637,000 has been provided 
for indoor air and radiation activities, equal to the fiscal 
year 2018 enacted level. The proposed elimination of the radon 
program has been rejected and funding should be provided at not 
less than the fiscal year 2018 level. Funds have been included 
for the Radiation Protection and Reduce Risks from Indoor Air 
programs.
    Information Exchange/Outreach.--Tribal capacity building is 
funded at not less than the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. The 
Committee is concerned that the smart skin cancer education 
program has recently received insufficient attention from the 
Agency, and therefore the Agency is directed to use 
environmental education funds for the smart skin cancer 
education program, similar to prior years. The Committee 
expects the Agency to continue the Small Minority Business 
Assistance program.
    International Programs.--The bill provides $15,400,000 for 
International Programs, which includes funds for the U.S.-
Mexico Border program at the fiscal year 2018 enacted level.
    IT/Data Management.--The Committee has provided the 
additional funds requested for information security.
    Legal/Science/Regulatory/Economic Review.--The Committee 
recommends $111,414,000, equal to the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level. Within this amount, Integrated Environmental Strategies 
is funded at the fiscal year 2018 level, so that the Agency can 
continue to provide locally-led, community-driven technical 
assistance to localities, States, and other Federal agencies.
    Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.--The bill provides 
$112,377,000, an increase of $3,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level. Of funds provided under this section, not 
less than $8,000,000 should be allocated for the purpose of 
developing and implementing a Federal permit program for the 
regulation of coal combustion residuals in nonparticipating 
States, as authorized under section 4005(d)(2)(B) of the Solid 
Waste Disposal Act (42 U.S.C. 6945(d)(2)(B)). Additionally, the 
Committee continues the Waste Minimization and Recycling 
program, and has provided $1,000,000 to help public entities 
demonstrate community anaerobic digester applications to 
municipal solid waste streams and farm needs such as capturing 
excess phosphorus.
    Toxics Risk Review and Prevention.--$92,521,000 is provided 
for toxics risk review and prevention activities and maintains 
funding for the Pollution Prevention program and the Lead Risk 
Reduction program.
    Water: Ecosystems.--$47,788,000 has been provided for water 
ecosystem programs, equal to the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level. Within the amount provided, $26,723,000 has been 
provided for National Estuary Program grants as authorized by 
section 320 of the Clean Water Act. This amount is sufficient 
to provide each of the 28 national estuaries in the program 
with a grant of at least $600,000.
    Water: Human Health Protection.--$98,507,000 has been 
provided for water-related human health protection activities. 
The proposed elimination of the beach program has been rejected 
and funding is provided at the fiscal year 2018 level.
    Water Quality Protection.--$210,417,000 has been provided 
for water quality protection. The Committee rejects the 
proposed elimination of the WaterSENSE program, and provides 
not less than the fiscal year 2018 level.
    Additional Guidance.--The Committee has provided the 
following additional guidance with respect to funding provided 
under this account.
    Coal Refuse-Fired Electrical Generating Units.--The Agency 
is directed to continue following the guidance contained in the 
explanatory statement accompanying Public Law 115-141.
    Community Affordability Study.--The Committee is concerned 
about the Environmental Protection Agency's continued emphasis 
on the metric of 2 percent of median house income for 
determining community affordability. The Committee supports the 
recommended framework and criteria in the National Academy of 
Public Administration (the Academy) Panel's report, Developing 
a New Framework for Community Affordability of Clean Water 
Services. Within available funds, the Committee directs EPA to 
contract with the Academy to propose potential formulas 
consistent with the framework's criteria for utilization by the 
agency. The Academy's review shall (1) evaluate a subset of the 
most promising alternative community affordability formulas, 
(2) identify their advantages and disadvantages, and (3) 
recommend three to five community affordability formulas that 
could be appropriate replacements for the indicators and 
formulas in EPA's 1997 Combined Sewer Overflows-Guidance for 
Financial Capability Assessment and Schedule Development and 
the 2014 Financial Capability Framework for Municipal Clean 
Water Act Requirement. The EPA shall contract with the Academy 
within 60 days of the date of enactment of this act. The 
Academy shall submit a report with its findings and 
recommendations to Congress and EPA no later than 6 months 
after the date of contract with EPA.
    Diesel Generators in Remote Alaska Villages.--The Agency is 
directed to continue following the guidance contained in the 
explanatory statement accompanying Public Law 115-141.
    Ecolabels for Federal Procurement.--The Agency is directed 
to continue following the guidance contained in the explanatory 
statement accompanying Public Law 115-141.
    Energy Star.--The Committee is concerned that litigation 
over non-compliance of voluntary Energy Star efficiency 
standards, which can be the result of a standard that has 
changed, may lead some participants to avoid participating in 
the program. The Committee is also aware of the need for 
products carrying the Energy Star label to achieve the required 
efficiency levels to best benefit consumers. The Committee 
directs the Agency to evaluate how the Agency may balance these 
interests to ensure that the Energy Star program is both fair 
to voluntary participants and reliable for consumers and report 
back within 180 days of the enactment of this act.
    Fish Grinding.--The Agency is directed to continue 
following the guidance contained in the explanatory statement 
accompanying Public Law 115-141.
    Interagency Consultations.--The Agency is directed to 
continue following the requirements of Senate Report 114-281 
regarding consultation with the Secretary of Agriculture 
related to the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide 
Act.
    Integrated Planning.--The Agency is encouraged to continue 
using an integrated planning approach to enhance flexibility 
for communities struggling to meet compliance costs mandated 
under the Clean Water Act [CWA] as well as the Agency's efforts 
to consider a community's ability to pay for compliance costs 
when determining permitting actions under the CWA. The Agency 
is directed to maintain technical assistance and outreach to 
communities seeking to develop and implement an integrated 
planning approach to meeting Clean Water Act requirements. 
Further, the Committee urges the Agency to implement integrated 
planning measures through a flexible permit process rather than 
enforcement actions and consent decrees.
    Kootenai Watershed.--The Committee directs the Agency to 
continue its work with Federal, State, tribal and local 
partners--including local elected officials such as county 
commissioners, mayors, State representatives, State senators 
and local citizens--to monitor and reduce any contaminants in 
the Kootenai watershed found to be hazardous. The Agency is 
directed to work with the State Department and other partners 
to identify any remaining gaps in water quality information 
necessary to address any contaminants found to be hazardous in 
the Kootenai with Canada. The Agency is directed to report to 
the Committee with this information within 180 days of 
enactment of this act.
    Lead and Copper Rule.--The Committee is aware that the 
Agency has announced plans to update the Lead and Copper Rule. 
The Committee supports this action and urges the Agency to act 
expeditiously on this matter. The Committee directs the Agency 
to brief the Committee within 60 days of enactment of this act 
about its plans for this action.
    National Estuary Program.--The Committee supports the 
National Estuary Program and believes that estuaries provide 
critical ecosystem services that protect human health and 
public safety. These include water filtration, flood control, 
habitat enhancement and restoration, shoreline stabilization, 
erosion prevention, and the protection of coastal communities 
during hurricanes and storms. The Committee recognizes that 
many industries rely on healthy estuaries, and the Committee 
has provided funding to ensure the protection of these critical 
ecosystems.
    Pesticide Registration Improvement Act.--The Committee has 
recommended sufficient funding for compliance with the 
Pesticides Registration Improvement Act. The Committee direct 
the Agency to continue compliance with the fiscal year 2017 
quarterly reporting requirement related to previously collected 
maintenance fees that are currently unavailable for obligation. 
To ensure the Committee has the most accurate information 
regarding this issue, the Agency is directed to provide a 
briefing within 30 days of enactment of this act.
    PFOA/PFAS.--The Committee is aware that the Agency has 
announced plans to take the next step under the Safe Drinking 
Water Act process to evaluate the need for a maximum 
contaminant level for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances. The 
Committee supports this action and urges the Agency to act 
expeditiously on this matter. The Committee directs the Agency 
to brief the Committee within 60 days of enactment of this act 
about its plans for this action.
    Public Access to Research.--The Agency released its Plan to 
Increase Access to Results of EPA-Funded Scientific Research on 
November 29, 2016. The Committee urges the Agency to continue 
its efforts towards full implementation of the plan, and 
directs the Agency to provide an update on its efforts in its 
fiscal year 2020 budget request.
    Regulation of Groundwater.--The Agency is directed to 
continue following the guidance contained in the explanatory 
statement accompanying Public Law 115-141. The Committee 
reiterates that, since enactment in 1972, the Clean Water Act 
has regulated impacts to navigable waters, while regulation of 
groundwater has remained outside of the act's jurisdiction. 
Instead, legislative history surrounding the CWA indicates that 
Congress intended for groundwater pollution to be regulated 
through the CWA's nonpoint source program and other Federal and 
State laws.
    Significant New Alternatives Policy Program.--The Committee 
reiterates the direction contained within the explanatory 
statement associated with the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 
2017 to consider harmonizing the status of any previously 
approved refrigerant or foam-blowing agent with other domestic 
and international programs for refrigeration and commercial air 
conditioning applications, and corresponding deadlines for 
military, space- and aeronautics-related applications.
    Small Refinery Relief.--The Committee continues the 
directive contained in Senate Report 114-281 related to small 
refinery relief. The Agency is reminded that, regardless of the 
Department of Energy's recommendation, additional relief may be 
granted if the Agency believes it is warranted.
    Small Remote Incinerators.--The Committee believes the 
Agency's efforts to regulate small remote incinerators [SRIs] 
will have negative impact on remote areas in Alaska where 
traditional waste disposal methods are unavailable. Because 
SRIs in Alaska are used to manage food waste, elimination of 
SRIs would result in the inability to dispose of food waste in 
a timely manner--a situation that creates an attraction to 
wildlife and increases the potential for potentially lethal 
human--wildlife contact. Additionally, many Alaska sites have 
no road connection to landfills so waste will often have to be 
flown via fixed and rotary wing aircraft to landfills as far 
away as 65 miles. In its original efforts to regulate SRIs, the 
Agency recognized these issues and exempted SRIs in Alaska. 
Following the Agency's decision to reverse course because of a 
court decision, the Committee and stakeholders have attempted 
to work with the Agency for at least 3 years. Unfortunately, 
those efforts have not resulted in any relief for users of SRIs 
in Alaska. Because that is the case, the bill includes language 
delaying enforcement as the Committee, stakeholders, and the 
Agency work toward a solution. The Committee appreciates the 
work of the Agency and encourages all parties to find a 
solution by the end of fiscal year 2019. The Committee directs 
the Agency to brief the Committee on its progress on a 
quarterly basis.
    Toxic Substances Control Act Modernization.--The Committee 
notes that legislation to modernize the Toxic Substances 
Control Act [TSCA] was enacted in 2016. This bill includes 
language that will enable the EPA to collect and spend new fees 
to conduct additional chemical reviews, consistent with TSCA 
modernization legislation. Those fees are expected to be 
$27,000,000 per year once the program is fully implemented. The 
Congressional Budget Office estimates that in fiscal year 2019, 
fee collections will begin several months after the beginning 
of the fiscal year and will total $5,000,000. This bill also 
includes language ensuring that new fee collections will 
supplement, not supplant, appropriated resources for these 
activities.
    Transparency of Public Calendars.--The Committee 
appreciates the Agency's recent steps to post the daily 
calendars of the Agency's senior leaders on the Agency's public 
website. These efforts follow a traditional commitment by the 
Agency to provide a high level of transparency of officials' 
calendars. The Committee directs the Agency to continue 
publishing such daily calendars, and to the extent it is 
practicable, the Agency is encouraged to take steps to publish 
calendars within 24 hours of the end of each day in which 
official or political business is conducted, including the 
calendars of the Administrator, Deputy Administrator, each 
Regional Administrator, and any individuals serving in an 
acting capacity for such positions. As the EPA continues to 
take steps to improve transparency, the Agency should ensure 
that each daily calendar includes meetings, calls, and events, 
as well as the names of the organizations represented in those 
meetings, calls, or events.
    Vehicle Idling Training.--The Committee notes that diesel 
vehicle operators and businesses in the private sector have 
reduced their vehicle fleet costs and improved air quality by 
participating in programs that offer certifications for idle 
reduction and fuel efficient driving programs. The Agency is 
directed to conduct a cross agency analysis to determine which 
branches of government could achieve savings and improve air 
quality by engaging in external programs, including University 
Extension programs that offer this training.
    Electric Pathway.--The Committee notes the backlog of 
applications under the Renewable Fuels Pathway II rule 
finalized in 2014. No applications for the electric pathway--
which could help support rural agricultural communities--have 
been approved since the rule went into effect. The Committee 
strongly encourages the Agency to take action on the existing 
applications within 90 days of the enactment of this act.
    Lead Standards.--Lead poisoning causes significant health, 
neurological, behavioral, intellectual, and academic 
impairments. In the Toxic Substances Control Act and the 
Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act, Congress 
required the Agency to promulgate standards for the 
identification of lead hazards, including lead-based paint, 
lead-contaminated dust, and lead-contaminated soil. The 
Committee urges EPA to meet the timeline set by the Ninth 
Circuit Court in proposing new standards that ``prevent 
childhood lead poisoning and eliminate lead-based paint 
hazards''.

             HAZARDOUS WASTE ELECTRIC MANIFEST SYSTEM FUND

Appropriations, 2018....................................................
Budget estimate, 2019...................................................
Committee recommendation................................................

    As requested in the budget, an administrative provision has 
been included to authorize the Agency to both collect and spend 
e-Manifest user fees in fiscal year 2019. The first time this 
program was fully fee funded was in fiscal year 2018.

                      Office of Inspector General

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $41,489,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      37,475,000
Committee recommendation................................      41,489,000

    The bill provides $41,489,000 for the Office of Inspector 
General, which is equal to the fiscal year 2018 enacted level 
and $4,014,000 above the budget request.

                        Buildings and Facilities

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $34,467,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      39,553,000
Committee recommendation................................      34,467,000

    The bill provides $34,467,000 for buildings and facilities 
programs. This amount is equal to the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level.

                     Hazardous Substance Superfund


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $1,091,947,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   1,088,830,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,091,947,000

    The bill provides $1,091,947,000 for Superfund programs and 
language to transfer $8,718,000 to the Office of Inspector 
General account and $17,398,000 to the Science and Technology 
account. When combined with an additional $43,000,000 included 
in a general provision in title IV, the bill provides a total 
of $1,134,947,000 for the Hazardous Substance Superfund 
account. A detailed allocation of funding by program is 
included in the table that accompanies this report. Additional 
changes to the request are detailed below.
    Enforcement.--$166,375,000 is provided for Superfund 
enforcement, equal to the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. The 
Agency is directed to continue financial support of the 
Department of Justice [DOJ] in fiscal year 2018 at a level that 
will ensure the DOJ can continue to initiate and prosecute 
civil, judicial, and administrative site remediation cases and 
ensure that responsible parties perform cleanup actions at 
sites where they are liable.
    Additional Guidance.--The Committee has provided the 
following additional guidance with respect to funding provided 
under this account:
    Contaminants of Emerging Concern.--The Committee recommends 
$181,306,000 for Emergency Response and Removal activities. 
When combined with an additional $5,000,000 included in a 
general provision in title IV, the Committee recommends a total 
of $186,306,000. These activities should include collaborative 
work with State, Tribal, and local governments to help 
communities address contaminants of emerging concern. 
Furthermore, the Committee recommends that the Agency 
expeditiously remediate Superfund sites contaminated by these 
emerging contaminants, and provide technical assistance and 
support to States and Tribes during the remedial cleanup 
process.
    Continued Improvements.--The Committee encourages the 
Superfund program to continue to implement more meaningful 
performance measures of Superfund site clean-up. Additionally, 
the Committee encourages efforts to continually improve the 
system for delisting National Priority List sites in order to 
recognize cleanup progress, and to consider more consistency in 
site cleanup standards while recognizing site variabilities and 
ensuring that the requirements of the National Contingency Plan 
are met. The Committee urges the Agency to enhance on-the-
ground cooperation with local impacted parties by engaging 
local stakeholders on a consistent basis.
    Privacy for Agricultural Producers.--The Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2018, included bill language to provide 
relief to livestock producers related to emissions reporting 
under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, 
and Liability Act of 1980 [CERCLA]. In order to protect 
American farmers and ranchers, the committee directs the 
Agency, consistent with its legal obligations, to maintain its 
efforts to preserve the privacy of agricultural operations who 
are required to report under other statutes in compliance with 
the Paperwork Reduction Act, the Privacy Act of 1974, and 
section 1170 of the Food Security Act of 1985.
    Sediment Guidance.--The Committee notes that EPA first 
issued the Contaminated Sediment Remediation Guidance for 
Hazardous Waste Sites in 2005 and provided some updates in 
EPA's January 2017 OLEM Directive (9200.1-130). Given the 
importance of consistently implementing Superfund policy, the 
Committee encourages the Administrator to issue a directive 
reiterating the critical need to strictly follow the 
Contaminated Sediment Guidance and integrate applicable 
recommendations from the Task Force.
    Tribal Guidance.--The Committee recognizes the importance 
of government-to-government Tribal consultation as well as the 
necessity to honor Tribal treaty rights and resources protected 
by treaties. The Agency is directed to fully implement the 
agency's Guidance for Discussing Tribal Treaty Rights to ensure 
agency actions adequately consider treaty rights proactively 
throughout the consultation process.
    PCB Contamination.--The Committee is aware of the 
persistent PCB contamination in Minden, Fayette County, West 
Virginia and is concerned about the reportedly high incidence 
of cancer experienced by Minden's residents. The Committee 
encourages the EPA to report regularly to the West Virginia 
congressional delegation on the status of its efforts in 
Minden, West Virginia.
    Bubbly Creek.--The Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers are strongly encouraged to coordinate on an agreement 
to resolve legacy contamination issues related to the South 
Fork of the South Branch of the Chicago River.

              Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $91,941,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      47,532,000
Committee recommendation................................      91,941,000

    The bill provides $91,941,000 for leaking underground 
storage tank trust fund activities, equal to the fiscal year 
2018 enacted level. A detailed allocation of funding by program 
is included in the table that accompanies this statement.

                        Inland Oil Spill Program

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $18,209,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      15,673,000
Committee recommendation................................      18,209,000

    The bill provides $18,209,000 for inland oil spill 
programs, equal to the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. A 
detailed allocation of funding by program is included in the 
table that accompanies this statement.

                   State and Tribal Assistance Grants

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $3,562,161,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   2,929,467,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,575,041,000

    The bill provides $3,562,161,000 for State and Tribal 
assistance grants. This amount is $12,880,000 above the fiscal 
year 2018 enacted level. A detailed allocation of funding by 
program is included in the table that accompanies this 
statement. Additional changes to the request are detailed 
below.
    Infrastructure Assistance.--$2,482,000,000 has been 
provided for infrastructure assistance. The amount provided 
increases in funding for State Revolving Fund programs. When 
combined with a title IV general provision, the bill includes 
$1,694,000,000 for the Clean Water State Revolving Fund program 
and $1,164,000,000 for the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund 
program.
    Assistance to Small and Disadvantaged Communities.--Within 
a title IV general provision, the bill provides $30,000,000 to 
continue a grant program to help small and disadvantaged 
communities develop and maintain adequate water infrastructure. 
The program was created in section 2104 of Public Law 114-322. 
The Agency is directed to brief the Committee prior to 
publishing its request for applications related to this new 
grant program.
    Reducing Lead in Drinking Water.--Within a title IV general 
provision, the bill provides $15,000,000 to continue a grant 
program, created in section 2105 of Public Law 114-322, to 
provide assistance to eligible entities for lead reduction 
projects. The Agency is directed to brief the Committee prior 
to publishing its request for applications related to this new 
grant program.
    Lead Testing.--Within a title IV general provision, the 
bill provides $25,000,000 to continue a grant program for 
voluntary testing of drinking water for lead contaminants at 
schools and child care facilities, as authorized in section 
2107 of Public Law 114-322. The Agency is directed to brief the 
Committee prior to publishing its request for applications 
related to this new grant program.
    Use of Iron and Steel.--The bill includes language in title 
IV general provisions that stipulates requirements for the use 
of iron and steel in State Revolving Fund projects, and the 
agreement includes only the following guidance. The Committee 
acknowledges that EPA may issue a waiver of said requirements 
for de minimis amounts of iron and steel building materials. 
The Committee emphasizes that any coating processes that are 
applied to the external surface of iron and steel components 
that otherwise qualify under the procurement preference shall 
not render such products ineligible for the procurement 
preference regardless of where the coating processes occur, 
provided that final assembly of the products occurs in the 
United States.
    Targeted Airshed Grant.--$50,000,000 has been provided for 
Targeted Airshed Grants. These grants shall be distributed on a 
competitive basis to nonattainment areas that EPA determines 
are ranked as the top five most polluted areas relative to 
annual ozone or particulate matter 2.5 standards as well as the 
top five areas based on the 24-hour particulate matter 2.5 
standard where the design values exceed the 35 mg/m3 standard. 
To determine these areas, the Agency shall use the most recent 
design values calculated from validated air quality data. The 
Committee notes that these funds are available for emission 
reduction activities deemed necessary for compliance with 
national ambient air quality standards and included in a State 
Implementation Plan submitted to EPA. Not later than the end of 
fiscal year 2019, EPA should provide a report to the Committee 
that includes a table showing how fiscal year 2017 and 2018 
funds were allocated. The table should also include grant 
recipients and metrics for anticipated or actual results.
    Animas River Spill.--The Committee feels strongly that an 
adequate long-term water quality monitoring program must be 
place for the states and tribes affected following the Gold 
King Mine Spill into the Animas River that impacted Colorado, 
New Mexico, Arizona, and the Navajo Nation. The Committee has, 
to date, provided $8,000,000 for the first two installments of 
a 5-year total authorization of $20,000,000 in the Water 
Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act (Public Law 114-
322). The Committee provides $4,000,000 for fiscal year 2019 
and directs the EPA to continue to work in consultation with 
affected States and Tribes on this effort. In addition, the 
Committee expects the EPA to process all state, tribal, and 
local requests for reimbursements for costs incurred in an 
expeditious manner.
    Further, the Committee concurs with the Agency's decision 
to reconsider its previous determination to deny claims for 
damages from the Animas River Spill by invoking the 
discretionary act exemption in the Federal Tort Claims Act, but 
is concerned that little progress has been made on processing 
or paying out claims. The Committee is also concerned that the 
Agency is applying or may apply an inconsistent standard that 
discriminates against certain claimants. The Committee expects 
the Agency and the Federal government to take a clear and 
consistent position on the question of whether they are 
responsible for damages caused to others by the Gold King Mine 
release. The Committee supports paying out all legitimate 
claims from the Judgment Fund, consistent with the Federal Tort 
Claims Act, and communicating all relevant aspects of the 
claims process clearly to all affected communities, State, 
local and Tribal governments, along with the Committee. Within 
30 days of enactment of this Act, the Agency shall provide to 
the Committee a written report detailing the status of the 
review of the legal basis for allowing or rejecting claims and 
the date by which such review will be complete, the current 
process underway for processing claims, the status of all 
claims, including reconsidered claims, the Agency's complete 
plan for processing all claims, and any other future planned 
actions related to current or future claims.
    Categorical Grants.--For categorical grants to States and 
other environmental partners for the implementation of 
delegated programs, the bill provides $1,093,041,000, an 
increase of $17,000,000 over the fiscal year 2018 enacted 
level. The Committee continues to reject the elimination of the 
Radon program and the Beaches Protection program and funding is 
provided at fiscal year 2018 enacted levels for both programs.
    The Committee has provided additional funding to the States 
because the States are expected to continue the leading role 
they have taken to ensure compliance with environmental 
statutes. The Committee believes that it is important for the 
Agency to work collaboratively with State partners and to 
provide them support as they attempt to implement delegated 
environmental program.
    Categorical Grant: Multipurpose Grants.--Because the States 
are expected to take a leading role in compliance with 
environmental cleanup, the bill contains $27,000,000 for 
Multipurpose grants to States and Tribes, an increase of 
$17,000,000 above the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. The 
Committee was disappointed with the Agency's funding formula in 
fiscal year 2016 because it did not provide the flexibility 
that Congress expected and instead gave preference to air 
programs. In fiscal year 2019, the Agency is directed to give 
maximum flexibility to states, so that states, not the Agency, 
may determine where funds from this grant program are of most 
value.
    Categorical Grant: Nonpoint Source (Sec. 319).--The 
Committee has provided $170,915,000 in Nonpoint Source grants, 
equal to the fiscal year 2018 level. The Committee expects the 
Agency to examine the allocation formula to ensure that 
resources are being spent in areas with the most pressing need.
    Categorical Grant State and Local Air Quality Management.--
The bill provides $228,219,000 for State and Local Air Quality 
Management Grants, equal to the fiscal year 2018 level. The 
Agency is directed to allocate funds for this program using the 
same formula as fiscal year 2015. The Committee understands the 
Office of Air and Radiation was able to provide some additional 
funds to the States in fiscal year 2016 using balances. The 
Committee encourages the Agency to do the same in fiscal year 
2019 and to provide those additional funds to the regions with 
the highest need. Should the Agency seek to change the formula, 
it should submit a proposal in its fiscal year 2020 budget 
justification for consideration by the Committee.

          Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Program

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $10,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      20,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      10,000,000

    The bill provides a total of $63,000,000 for the Water 
Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act [WIFIA] Program. 
Within base funding in title II, the bill provides $10,000,000 
and a title IV general provision provides $50,000,000. This 
level is equal to the fiscal year 2018 level. From within the 
amount provided, the Committee directs $8,000,000 to assist 
with the administrative expenses for the WIFIA program. Because 
the Committee has provided significant funding for 
administrative expenses, the Agency has the resources it needs 
to avoid any delays in project funding.
    Greater investment in the replacement of aging 
infrastructure will help mitigate nationwide issues the 
Committee is tracking related to contaminants such as lead and 
arsenic, help address Combined Sewer Overflows and Sanitary 
Sewer Overflows, and allow systems to improve water delivery 
for residents. Of the recommended amount, $55,000,000 is 
provided for direct loan subsidization which may translate into 
a potential loan capacity in excess of $6,000,000,000 to 
eligible entities for water infrastructure projects.
    The Committee encourages the Agency to prioritize 
applications for WIFIA financing for projects that address lead 
and emerging contaminants, including PFOA and PFAS.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

             (INCLUDING TRANSFER AND RESCISSIONS OF FUNDS)

    The bill continues several administrative provisions from 
previous years.
    Rescission.--The bill includes a rescission of $109,078,000 
of unobligated balances from the State and Tribal Assistance 
Grants account. The Agency shall calculate the requisite 
percent reduction necessary to rescind such amounts from new 
obligational authority provided to this account, both from the 
direct appropriation and from amounts provided in a general 
provision in title IV, and apply it across program project 
areas by formula. The Agency is directed to submit, as part of 
the operating plan, detail on the application of such 
rescissions by program project area.

                               TITLE III

                            RELATED AGENCIES

                       DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

  Office of the Under Secretary For Natural Resources and Environment

Appropriations, 2018....................................        $875,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................         875,000
Committee recommendation................................         875,000

    The Committee recommends $875,000 for the Office of the 
Under Secretary for Natural Resources and Environment, equal to 
the enacted level and the budget request.

                             Forest Service

    The U.S. Forest Service, a bureau of the Department of 
Agriculture, manages 193 million acres in 44 States and 
territories. In addition, the Service maintains a system of 
research stations and experimental forests and ranges 
throughout the country. The Agency also provides technical and 
financial assistance to private landowners, States, and 
communities to help sustain the Nation's urban and rural 
forests.
    The Committee has expressed a desire for the Service's 
budget to better reflect management needs for our Nation's 
forests, and the Service has taken steps to address their 
budgeting practices. These efforts include a concerted effort 
by the Service to work with the Committee to improve 
transparency and confidence in the Service's management of its 
programs and activities.
    The Forest Service has been utilizing Cost Pools to pay for 
certain costs associated with personnel, administrative 
activities, facilities, and other expenses, rather than paying 
those costs out of program dollars or utilizing an 
administrative account. The fiscal year 2018 Omnibus ended the 
assessment of Cost Pool 9, and directed the Service to plan for 
transition away from Cost Pools, generally. The Committee 
expects the Service to follow this direction and believes that 
ending the practice of Cost Pools in favor of more direct 
accounting for costs previously covered by Cost Pools is in the 
best interest of the agency and the taxpayer. The Committee 
remains committed to giving the Service the opportunity to 
present options for replacing Cost Pools and expects that the 
transition away from Cost Pools will occur not later than the 
beginning of fiscal year 2020. Additionally, the Service is 
directed to continue to provide regular updates on the progress 
of transition planning.
    Wildfire Suppression.--As noted in the Front Matter, the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018 created a wildfire 
suppression cap adjustment to fund extraordinary fire 
suppression costs, which will be available to the Service in 
fiscal year 2020. Until that time, the Service will have to use 
regular, appropriated funds to pay for wildfire suppression 
costs in the wake of the costliest fire season in the agency's 
history. Much like the aftermath of the fire season of 2000 
that spurred the development of the National Fire Plan, the 
Committee expects an evaluation of how the Federal government 
manages our national forests for optimum health and risk-
management. Despite ever-increasing investments in hazardous 
fuels mitigation since the development of the National Fire 
Plan, the Forest Service has not been able to keep pace with 
the disastrous curve on wildfires. The Committee is also aware 
that at the time of the development of the National Fire Plan, 
approximately 34 million acres were identified as having a high 
risk of fire. The Committee is troubled that after significant 
investments in hazardous fuels management since that time, 
there are now about 80 million acres at a high risk of fire. 
This troubling trend will not reverse itself if the Service 
continues to operate under the status quo. The Committee 
believes that the Service should more precisely and effectively 
target management activities to reduce the threat of 
catastrophic wildfires, improve management of the national 
forest system, and assist in protection of other Federal, 
State, and private lands from the ravages of catastrophic fire. 
This is a function of both prioritization and budgeting 
practices, and should include an evaluation of the impacts to 
non-Federal lands when the Service forgoes initial attack to 
suppress a fire, especially within proximity to communities.
    Consistent with authorities provided in Division O of the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2018, the Service is directed 
to provide the Committee risk-mapping for high fire-prone areas 
and describe the resources that would be necessary to treat the 
highest risk areas on an annual basis. The Service should 
cooperatively work with universities, such as the University of 
California, and the University of Nevada, that have expertise 
in this area, as well as the Department of the Interior. The 
Forest Service is directed and expected to use all authorities 
available to harvest salvage timber, decrease the risk of fires 
around communities, and secure safe access to national forest 
system lands for the public.

                     FOREST AND RANGELAND RESEARCH

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $297,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     258,800,000
Committee recommendation................................     300,000,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $300,000,000 for 
forest and rangeland research. This amount is $3,000,000 above 
the enacted level and $41,200,000 above the request.
    Forest Inventory and Analysis.--The bill provides 
$77,000,000 for Forest Inventory and Analysis, equal to the 
enacted level.
    Research and Development Programs.--The bill provides 
$223,000,000 for base research activities, including Fire Plan 
Research and Development. Within the funds provided, the Forest 
Service is expected to adequately fund Fire Plan Research and 
Development. Of the funds available for Forest and Rangeland 
Research, not less than $2,000,000 is to support funding with 
existing academic partners in the northern forest region to 
support research to sustain the health of northern forest 
ecosystems and communities, to develop new forest products, and 
to improve forest biodiversity management.
    The Service requested that the Committee end funding for 
the Joint Fire Science Program [JFSP] in fiscal year 2017, and 
the Committee agreed. Since that time, the Committee has become 
aware that, despite the Service's lack of contribution to the 
JFSP, Service researchers and employees continue to take 
advantage of funding opportunities and partnerships made 
possible by JFSP. This is one of many examples brought to the 
Committee's attention of where the Service's research program 
does not align with or meet the needs of the agency. The 
Service is directed to provide $3,000,000 to the JFSP for 
fiscal year 2019.
    The Committee continues to be concerned about the 
prioritization of research dollars within the Service. Given 
the limited resources available, the Committee believes the 
agency should focus on key areas where the Service's management 
responsibilities will benefit the most. This includes forest 
land management, research to improve the sustainability of the 
domestic forest products industry, and collaborations to solve 
real-time problems facing our nation's forests. The Committee 
is aware that the research program relies heavily on securing 
funding outside of the Forest Service to conduct research. 
While this can be an important tool to extend available 
resources, the Committee is concerned that this places the 
Service in a position to direct research efforts where outside 
funding is most likely to be awarded, and not necessarily to 
the highest priority needs that meet the mission of the agency 
and improve our Nation's forests.
    The Committee directs the Service to restructure its 
research program to enhance coordination on forest related 
research and development for enhanced relevance, global 
competitiveness, and effective coordination. The Service should 
work with the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, 
Department of Energy, and National Science Foundation to help 
avoid the duplication that often proceeds from Federal agencies 
working in silos. The Committee notes the success and 
popularity of the Forest Products Laboratory as a model for the 
type of applied research Congress believes the Service should 
be engaged in. The Service is directed to report on its 
research restructuring progress within 30 days of enactment of 
the act.
    Forest Products Laboratory.--The Forest Products Laboratory 
[FPL] provides benefits across a wide range of forest related 
issues, as demonstrated, in part, by the requests for FPL 
participation in a variety of endeavors important to Members of 
Congress. Of the funds available to the FPL, not less than 
$1,000,000 is to sustain funding with existing academic 
partners focused on research and technology development to 
create new and expanded markets and to advance high-value, 
high-volume wood markets from restorative actions on the 
Nation's public and private forests. Additionally, $1,500,000 
is to develop a wood bridge demonstration program in 
conjunction with non-Federal partners to support rural 
infrastructure needs through research, development, and 
demonstration to stimulate new market development, as well as 
education and technical assistance to governmental agencies, 
industry, and research institutions. The Committee further 
recognizes the importance of the Wood Education and Resource 
Center supporting the forest products industry in the Eastern 
Hardwood Region through its Wood Energy Technical Assistance 
Program, and provides an increase of $500,000 for the Center's 
activities.
    Rapid Ohi'a Death.--The Committee applauds the 
collaborative work occurring relating to Ceratocystis in 
Hawai'i and believes it is a model within the agency of the 
importance of applied science and collaboration with Federal 
partners to address real time management needs for the Service.
    Bighorn Sheep.--The Committees direct the Forest Service to 
continue the quantitative, science-based analyses of the risk 
of disease transmission between domestic and bighorn sheep 
required in the fiscal year 2016 explanatory statement.

                       STATE AND PRIVATE FORESTRY

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $329,587,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     172,296,000
Committee recommendation................................     333,990,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $333,990,000 for 
State and Private Forestry programs, an increase of $4,403,000 
above the enacted level and $161,694,000 above the request. 
Program changes to the enacted level are detailed in the 
following budget activity narratives and funding levels for 
each subactivity can also be found in the table at the end of 
this report. Within the funds provided, $1,000,000 shall be 
made available for the Forest Ecosystem Monitoring Cooperative 
for Maine, New Hampshire, New York and Vermont.
    Ceratocystis Disease.--As noted previously, the Committee 
applauds the collaborative work occurring relating to 
Ceratocystis in Hawai'i. The Service is directed to continue 
its study of the disease in the United States, and efforts to 
manage and control its spread, and to work with the Department 
of Agriculture to locate the sources of Ceratocystis varieties 
that pose particular threats.
    Forest Ecosystem Services Research.--The Committee directs 
the Service to continue to utilize existing partnerships with 
research institutions and states to fund research to establish 
methods, tools, and standard protocols that help quantify 
forest ecosystem services, particularly carbon, in natural 
forested regions as a resource that can be managed by forest 
landowners for ecological and economic benefit.
    Landscape Scale Restoration [LSR].--The bill provides an 
appropriation of $14,000,000 for Landscape Scale Restoration, 
an amount equal to the enacted level and $14,000,000 above the 
request. The Committee directs the Service to include outcomes 
produced from the LSR program in the previous fiscal year in 
the future budget submissions. Funds available for LSR should 
be focused on state and national priority projects that have 
significant, measurable impact on these priorities.
    Forest Health Management.--The bill provides $96,500,000 
for Forest Health Management activities, an amount equal to the 
enacted level and $10,629,000 above the request. This includes 
$55,500,000 for activities on Federal lands and $41,000,000 on 
cooperative lands.
    Cooperative Forestry.--The bill provides $118,490,000 for 
Cooperative Forestry activities, a decrease of $1,535,000 below 
the enacted level and $99,015 above the request. This includes 
$20,500,000 for Forest Stewardship, $4,000,000 for Community 
Forest and Open Space Conservation, and $28,500,000 for Urban 
and Community Forestry. When funding decisions are made 
regarding investigating and addressing tree mortality, strong 
consideration should be given to Spruce beetle infestations in 
Region 10, especially in light of its rapid spread into 
Anchorage, the Matanuska-Susitna Valley, and Denali National 
Park and Preserve. The Committee expects the Service's 
partnership with the Alaska Division of Forestry and the 
University of Alaska Fairbanks Cooperative Extension Service to 
expand, as needed, to educate and assist private landowners 
with bark beetle infestations, and to work with private and 
public landowners where infestations occur to manage dead and 
dying trees in an effort to prevent devastating wildfires.
    Forest Stewardship.--The Committee recommends the Service 
consider developing outcome-based reporting for this program 
and urges the Service to reevaluate whether allocating program 
funding using the current allocation formula is the most 
effective use of program resources.
    Community Wood Energy Program.--The Committee understands 
legislative efforts are underway to modernize the Community 
Wood Energy Program. In concert with those efforts, the 
Committee expects the Service to utilize the modernized program 
to incentivize the repurposing of low-grade and low-value wood 
that landowners remove to promote healthy private forestlands, 
and to support the adoption of wood energy systems that help 
grow the market for these materials.
    Forest Legacy.--The bill provides $65,490,000 for the 
forest legacy program. The amount provided within this bill is 
available for the following distribution of funds and projects 
as ranked and provided by the administration:


                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                             Budget            Bill
State               Project                 estimate     (Discretionary)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
   MTKootenai Forestlands              ..............            6,000
      Conservation Project
   VTHunger Mountain Headwaters        ..............              155
   TNSkinner Mountain Forest           ..............            5,665
   HIKamehamenui Forest Project        ..............            1,000
   NCBalsam Range                      ..............            1,800
   ORHood River Forest and Fish        ..............            2,220
      Conservation Project
   FLKeystone Longleaf Preserve        ..............            2,300
   ARHot Springs Forest                ..............            1,370
   CADiamond D Forest                  ..............            4,000
   MSPascagoula River Conservation     ..............            3,500
      Lands
   IAHeritage Valley                   ..............            3,000
   IDBoundary Connections 2            ..............            3,800
   OHLittle Smokies 2                  ..............            2,500
   AZSan Pedro Riparian Forest         ..............            1,800
      Protection Project
   NMRio Brazos Watershed/Brazos       ..............            2,055
      Cliff
   MNCamp Ripley Sentinel Landscape    ..............              900
   LAClear Creek WMA FY19 Forest       ..............            3,500
      Legacy Project
   PRProtecting Resilient Landscape    ..............            1,275
      in PR Central Range
   SCLiberty Hill Extension            ..............            1,330
   MDElk Neck Peninsula                ..............              555
   CTAshford Woodlands Project         ..............            1,450
   RIScituate Reservoir Watershed      ..............            2,905
   VAJames River Headwaters            ..............            1,000
   VTWorcester Woods II                ..............            3,530
   MIElk Forest at Black River         ..............            1,500
 
     Administration                    ..............            6,400
     Rescission of funds from failed           -4,000  ...............
      or partially failed projects
                                      ----------------------------------
               Total, Forest Legacy            -4,000           65,490
                Program
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $1,923,750,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   1,719,954,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,937,653,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $1,937,653,000 for 
national forest system operations, an increase of $13,903,000 
above the enacted level and $217,699,000 above the request.
    Land Management Planning, Assessment and Monitoring.--The 
bill provides $180,000,000 for Land Management Planning, 
Assessment and Monitoring, an increase of $737,000 above the 
enacted level and $23,250,000 above the request.
    Recreation, Heritage and Wilderness.--The bill provides 
$260,000,000 for Recreation, Heritage and Wilderness, an 
increase of $2,152,000 above the enacted level, and $19,764,000 
above the request. Within the funds provided, $500,000 is made 
available to support infrastructure and trails development, and 
to build the capacity of local user groups and partnership 
organizations for all National Recreation Areas administered by 
the Forest Service established after 1997.
    Recommended Wilderness.--The Committee recognizes that 
management of Service land recommended as wilderness in forest 
plans is not consistent across all regions, nor are the full 
spectrum of adaptive management steps, provided in the Forest 
Service Handbook Chapter 70, consistently utilized in plan 
components to maintain existing uses to the extent possible. 
The Committee recognizes the Service is required by statute to 
protect the characteristics that provide the basis for 
wilderness recommendation. The Committee encourages the Service 
to allow and manage existing uses, to the extent possible, 
utilizing all the adaptive management steps provided in the 
handbook, so that such uses do not prevent the protection and 
maintenance of the social and ecological characteristics that 
provide the basis for wilderness designation. The Committee 
also encourages the Service to reconsider historic uses that 
have been prevented in areas recommended as wilderness that 
otherwise can be managed utilizing the adaptive management 
steps provided in the handbook so that they do not permanently 
harm the social and ecological characteristics that provide the 
basis for wilderness designation.
    Grazing Management.--The bill provides $57,000,000 for 
Grazing Management programs, $144,000 above the enacted level 
and $8,930,000 above the request.
    Vacant Grazing Allotments.--The Service is directed, to the 
greatest extent practicable, to make vacant grazing allotments 
available to a holder of a grazing permit or lease when lands 
covered by the holder of the permit or lease are unusable 
because of drought or wildfire.
    Hazardous Fuels.--The bill provides an appropriation of 
$435,000,000 for Hazardous Fuels, $5,000,000 above the enacted 
level and $45,000,000 above the request. The Service is 
directed to prioritize hazardous fuels removal projects that 
are critical to protecting public safety in high hazard areas 
in National Forests facing significant tree mortality. Of the 
funds made available, no less than $6,000,000 is for 
implementation of section 5 of Public Law 106-506. The 
Committee urges the Service to increase cross-boundary 
collaboration with landowners near National Forest System 
lands, and encourages the use of hazardous fuels funding for 
work across ownerships. The Committee believes that investing 
in the research and development of advanced woody biomass uses 
will help reduce excessive hazardous fuels on our Nation's 
forestlands while creating new economic markets and opportunity 
for taxpayers.
    Forest Products.--The bill provides $368,000,000 for Forest 
Products, $2,000,000 above the enacted level and $26,835,000 
above the request. Funds made available for Forest Products 
shall not be used for restoration projects that are not tied to 
the offering or completion of a timber sale, or in association 
with a stewardship contracting process. Additionally, the 
Service is directed to utilize timber sales, whenever possible 
and appropriate, to address issues relating to tree mortality. 
The additional funds provided for forest products are directed 
to be used to build the timber program capacity by facilitating 
necessary planning work, and the hiring and training of timber 
management personnel to deliver increased volume levels.
    Agency Timber Target.--The Forest Service is directed to 
provide information within 90 days of enactment of this act 
detailing the resources necessary to increase the agency's 
timber target to 4 billion board feet, annually; including the 
geographic regions most likely to contribute to the increase in 
forest product production should a new timber target be 
implemented, as well as any barriers to achieving the higher 
target level. Additionally, the Forest Service is directed to 
meet timber target goals using commercial products and 
excluding personal use firewood from accomplishment reporting.
    Tongass National Forest.--Without a comprehensive stand-
level inventory, the transition plan required by the Tongass 
Land and Resource Management Plan Amendment lacks the 
scientific basis needed for success and no less than $1,000,000 
is provided for the continuation of the inventory currently 
underway. The Committee expects the Service to meet the 
requirements of section 705(a) of the Alaska National Interest 
Lands Conservation Act (16 U.S.C. 539d(a)) and to consider a 
plan revision or new plan amendment based on the results of the 
inventory. Any plan revision or amendment should include a 
timber management program sufficient to preserve a viable 
timber industry in the region. Until the Forest Service has 
determined, based on a completed stand-level inventory, what 
the timing and supply of economic young growth needed for a 
successful final transition and whether the 2016 Forest Plan 
should be amended or revised, the Service is directed not to 
implement a final transition away from its Tongass old growth 
timber program to a program based primarily on young growth.
    Dead and Dying Trees.--The Committee directs the Service to 
prioritize hazardous fuels reduction projects on the greatest 
fire risks along wildland urban interfaces facing significant 
tree mortality. Additionally, the Forest Service is directed to 
offer timber sales expeditiously in areas where dead and dying 
trees occur as a result of wildfire or insect and disease 
infestations.
    Vegetation and Watershed Management.--The bill provides 
$180,000,000 for Vegetation and Watershed Management 
activities, equal to the enacted level and $14,320,000 above 
the request. The Committee continues to be concerned with the 
pace and scale of the Service's use of the authorities granted 
by section 8204 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 to perform 
critically needed treatments of insect and disease infested 
trees on National Forests, particularly in light of the recent 
severe fire season. The Committee expects the Service to fully 
and promptly implement this authority. The Service is directed 
to provide to the Committee, within 45 days of enactment of 
this act, specific information regarding geographic locations 
where the Service intends to take advantage of this authority. 
Within the funds made available, $6,000,000 is provided for 
implementation of section 5 of Public Law 106-506.
    Wildlife and Fish Habitat Management.--The bill provides 
$137,000,000 for Wildlife and Fish Habitat Management, $570,000 
above the enacted level and $18,250,000 above the request.
    Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Fund.--The bill 
provides $40,000,000 for Collaborative Forest Landscape 
Restoration projects, equal to the enacted level and 
$40,000,000 above the request.
    Minerals and Geology Management.--The bill provides 
$75,000,000 for Minerals and Geology Management, $800,000 above 
the enacted level and $10,400,000 above the request.
    Landownership and Access Management.--The bill provides 
$76,500,000 for Landownership and Access Management, $2,500,000 
above the enacted level and $10,950,000 above the request. 
Given the importance of special-use permitting activities to 
users of our National Forests, $2,500,000 in additional funding 
is made available to spur processing of special-use permits. 
The Service is directed to use these additional funds to 
increase the pace of evaluation of special-use permits in high 
demand regions, such as Regions 6 and 10.
    Law Enforcement.--The bill provides $129,153,000 for Law 
Enforcement activities equal to the enacted level. The 
Committee is deeply concerned by reports of significant illegal 
marijuana grows on public lands, particularly those linked to 
transnational criminal organizations. The Committee directs 
Forest Service Law Enforcement to prioritize working more 
closely with local law enforcement to identify, eradicate, and 
clean up illegal marijuana grows on public lands, particularly 
in those states that have legalized recreational marijuana.

                  CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT AND MAINTENANCE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $449,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      94,708,000
Committee recommendation................................     449,000,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $449,000,000 for 
Capital Improvement and Maintenance programs, equal to the 
enacted level and $354,292,000 above the request. As in 
previous years, this amount is offset with a $15,000,000 
scoring credit related to the Roads and Trails Fund.
    Facilities.--The bill provides $151,000,000 for Facilities, 
equal to the enacted level and $139,838,000 above the request.
    Roads.--The bill provides $218,000,000 for Roads, and 
includes funding for Legacy Road remediation activities.
    Trails.--The bill provides $80,000,000 for Trails, and 
includes funding for Legacy Trail remediation activities.
    Legacy Roads and Trails.--The Committee appreciates the 
need for remediation of Legacy Roads and Trails and believes 
funding provided for these activities should compete from 
within the broader Capital Improvement and Maintenance program. 
The Service is directed to prioritize the highest priority road 
and trail projects, without a set-aside for Legacy Roads and 
Trails, and provide information to the Committee where these 
projects rank within the overall need for roads and trails 
construction and maintenance. The Service is further directed 
to continue to track Legacy Roads and Trails accomplishments, 
including miles of roads and trails improved, miles of streams 
restored, number of bridges and culverts constructed, and miles 
of road decommissioned.
    Smokejumper Bases.--The Committee finds that repairs, 
maintenance, and upgrades are needed for the smokejumper bases 
operated by the Forest Service. Funds are provided within 
capital improvement and maintenance to address the backlog of 
repairs, maintenance, and needed upgrades of its smokejumper 
bases, in order to help keep bases in operational status.

                            LAND ACQUISITION

                    (INCLUDING RESCISSION OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $64,337,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     -17,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   \1\74,099,000

\1\Includes a rescission of $16,028,000 from unobligated balances.

    The bill provides $74,099,000 for land acquisition 
including a rescission of $16,028,000 from unobligated 
balances.
    The Committee has provided $5,000,000 for recreational 
access and the Forest Service is directed to prioritize 
recreational access projects that significantly enhance access 
to existing public lands that have inadequate access for 
hunting, fishing, and other recreational activities. The 
Committee remains concerned about the prioritization of 
projects and the ability to allocate funds once appropriated. 
The Committee strongly encourages the Service to quickly close 
projects once funds have been made available and a willing 
seller has been identified, an appraisal has been completed, 
and a purchase contract has been agreed to. The Service is 
expected to use the Critical Inholdings/Wilderness account to 
acquire high priority lands, such as wilderness and lands of 
significant value in designated conservation units, to 
consolidate Federal ownership.
    The amount provided within this bill is available for the 
following distribution of funds and projects as ranked and 
provided by the administration:

                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                             Budget            Bill
State               Project                 estimate     (Discretionary)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
   MT Beavertail to Bearmouth          ..............            3,800
   UT Wasatch Watersheds               ..............              535
   CA Sierra Nevade Checkerboard       ..............            2,500
   OR Wasson Creek                     ..............            3,422
   MN Minnesota School Trust Lands     ..............            5,000
   OH Appalachian Foothills            ..............            1,800
   CA Trinity Divid-Pacific Crest      ..............            3,200
       National Scenic Trail
   AK Cube Cove                        ..............            5,200
   WA Washington Cascades/Yakima       ..............            4,000
       River Watershed
   MT Swan Range                       ..............            4,000
   VT Rolsten Rest                     ..............            2,700
   SD Spring Creek                     ..............            1,410
   CO Union Park                       ..............            2,000
   AZ Verde River String of Pearls     ..............            3,430
   NC North Carolina Threatened        ..............              750
       Treasures
   TN Tennessee Mountain Trails and    ..............              850
       Waters
   MT Clearwater Backfoot Project      ..............            5,000
   WI Swimming Bear                    ..............            1,000
   VA George Washington and Jefferson  ..............            1,000
       National Forest
   CA Sanhedrin                        ..............            3,900
   SC South Carolina Promise of the    ..............            2,000
       Piedmont
   AL Alabama's Wild Wonders           ..............            2,000
 
      Acquisition Management           ..............            7,352
      Recreational Access              ..............            5,000
      Critical Inholdings/Wilderness   ..............            2,000
      Cash Equalization                ..............              250
      Rescission                              -17,000          -16,028
                                      ----------------------------------
            Total, Land Acquisition    ..............           58,071
------------------------------------------------------------------------


    International Forestry.--The bill provides $9,000,000 for 
international forestry activities, equal to the enacted level.

        ACQUISITION OF LANDS FOR NATIONAL FORESTS, SPECIAL ACTS

Appropriations, 2018....................................        $850,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................         700,000
Committee recommendation................................         700,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $700,000, an amount 
$150,000 below the enacted level, and equal to the request. 
This amount is derived from funds deposited by State, county, 
and municipal governments or public school authorities pursuant 
to the act of December 4, 1967, as amended (16 U.S.C. 484a).

            ACQUISITION OF LANDS TO COMPLETE LAND EXCHANGES

Appropriations, 2018....................................        $192,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................         150,000
Committee recommendation................................         150,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $150,000, an amount 
$42,000 below the enacted level, and equal to the request. This 
amount is derived from funds deposited by State, county, and 
municipal governments or public school authorities pursuant to 
the act of December 4, 1967, as amended (16 U.S.C. 484a).

                         RANGE BETTERMENT FUND

Appropriations, 2018....................................      $2,065,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       1,700,000
Committee recommendation................................       1,700,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $1,700,000, an amount 
$365,000 below the enacted level, and equal to the request. 
This amount is for range rehabilitation, protection, and 
improvement, and is derived from fees received for livestock 
grazing on national forests pursuant to section 401(b)(1) of 
Public Law 94-579, as amended.

    GIFTS, DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS FOR FOREST AND RANGELAND RESEARCH

Appropriations, 2018....................................         $45,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................          45,000
Committee recommendation................................          45,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $45,000, which is 
equal to the enacted level, and the request. This amount is 
derived from the fund established under 16 U.S.C. 1643(b).

        MANAGEMENT OF NATIONAL FOREST LANDS FOR SUBSISTENCE USES

Appropriations, 2018....................................      $2,500,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       1,850,000
Committee recommendation................................       2,500,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $2,500,000, equal to 
the enacted level and $650,000 above the request. This account 
provides for carrying out the Service's responsibilities for 
subsistence under the Alaska National Interest Lands 
Conservation Act.

                        WILDLAND FIRE MANAGEMENT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $2,880,338,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   2,439,986,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,229,620,000

    Fire Operations.--The bill provides $3,229,620,000 for 
Wildfire Preparedness and Suppression, $349,282,000 above the 
enacted level and $789,634,000 above the request. Of the funds 
provided, $1,890,000,000 is for suppression, including 
$724,634,000 in additional funding above the 10-year average in 
the event the 10-year average is insufficient to cover 
suppression needs. $1,339,620,000 is for Preparedness.
    Of the funds provided, $2,700,000 is for the Southwest 
Ecological Restoration Institutes to continue to enhance the 
Forest Service's capacity to execute science-based forest 
restoration treatments to reduce the risk of wildfires and 
improve the health of dry forest ecosystems.
    Aviation Assets.--The Committee supports the Service in its 
decision to forgo taking ownership of the remaining U.S. Coast 
Guard HC-130s, that have yet to be modified for wildfire 
suppression operations missions, as originally required by 
Public Law 113-66.
    Unmanned Aircraft for Wildfire Firefighting and Safety.--
The Committee recognizes the potential of safely integrating 
commercial Unmanned Aircraft Systems into wildland firefighting 
to aid decisionmaking and provide an additional mechanism to 
ensure the safety of firefighters.
    The severity of the most recent fire season demonstrates 
the need to further integrate technological advances into 
combating wildland fire. Programs such as AlertTahoe, which 
employs emerging technologies such as fire cameras, can 
increase the likelihood of early detection and controlling a 
wildfire, and can serve as a model for integrating technology 
into wildfire suppression. Of the funds provided for 
preparedness, no less than $2,000,000 is to collaborate with 
AlertTahoe, and any other similar initiatives, to demonstrate 
if widespread expansion and deployment of such technology would 
enhance the agency's ability to effectively fight fire, 
increase safety for firefighting personnel, and reduce the cost 
of fire suppression.

                       Administrative Provisions


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    The bill continues several administrative provisions from 
previous years.

                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES


                         Indian Health Service

    The Indian Health Service [IHS] is the agency within the 
Department of Health and Human Services that has responsibility 
for providing Federal health services to approximately 2.2 
million American Indians and Alaska Natives. The provision of 
health services to Tribes grew out of the special relationship 
between the Federal Government and Indian Tribes that was 
established in 1787, based on article I, section 8 of the 
Constitution, and given form and substance by numerous 
treaties, laws, Supreme Court decisions, and Executive orders 
that followed. Most notable among these is the Snyder Act of 
1921, which provides the basic authority for most Indian health 
services provided by the Federal Government to Native Americans 
and Alaska Natives.
    IHS services are provided directly and through tribally 
contracted and operated programs in over 600 healthcare 
facilities located throughout the United States, primarily in 
rural and isolated areas. Healthcare is also purchased from 
more than 9,000 private providers annually. The Federal system 
consists of 28 hospitals, 61 health centers, and 34 health 
stations. Through Public Law 93-638, the Indian Self-
Determination and Education Act, Tribes and Tribal 
organizations compact and contract health programs to manage 17 
hospitals, 249 health centers and 70 health stations. In 
addition, grants to 34 nonprofit urban Indian health 
organizations provide a variety of health and referral 
services.

                         INDIAN HEALTH SERVICES

Appropriations, 2018....................................  $3,952,290,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................   3,945,975,000
Committee recommendation................................   4,072,385,000

    The Committee recommend $4,072,385,000 for Indian Health 
Services which is $126,410,000 above the request. Program 
changes are detailed below and in the table that accompanies 
the report.
    The Committee recommends $3,718,161,000 for clinical 
services programs of the Indian Health Service. This is an 
increase of $115,087,000 above the enacted level and 
$29,278,000 above the budget request. Program changes are 
detailed below and in the table that accompanies the Committee 
report.
    The Committee has a longstanding policy of providing 
sufficient staffing funds for all facilities that are expected 
to open during the fiscal year. Without such a policy, the 
Service could not fulfill its commitments to Tribes that have 
newly constructed facilities, including tribally constructed 
facilities through the joint venture partnership program. The 
Committee notes that in fiscal year 2018 the initial estimates 
for these costs were significantly underestimated in the budget 
request. The Committee has worked with the Service to remedy 
this problem and has provided the latest and best estimate for 
these costs of $115,233,000, which has been allocated across 
the Services and Facilities appropriations accounts. However, 
the given the uncertainty surrounding these estimates which are 
based on the predicted opening of facilities the Committee 
expects the Service to communicate regularly concerning these 
costs and keep the Committee apprised of any changes that may 
affect the amount necessary to fully fund new staffing needs.
    Funds for the staffing of new facilities are provided 
solely to support facilities on the Health Care Facilities 
Construction Priority System and Joint Venture construction 
projects that have opened in fiscal year 2018 or will open in 
fiscal year 2019. None of these funds may be allocated to a 
facility until such facility has achieved beneficial occupancy 
status.
    Hospitals and Health Clinics.--The recommendation includes 
$2,198,623,000 for hospitals and health clinics, an increase of 
$153,495,000 above the enacted level and $8,935,000 above the 
budget request. The increase above the enacted level includes 
$75,246,000 for staffing packages noted above. Proposed 
reductions are restored and unless otherwise noted, programs 
shall be maintained at current levels. The recommendation 
includes $15,000,000 for the village built clinics leasing 
program which is a $4,000,000 increase above the enacted level, 
and maintains the $4,000,000 increase for the domestic violence 
prevention initiative provided in fiscal year 2018.
    The recommendation includes $1,969,000 for new Tribes as 
requested. The Committee has recently been made aware of 
ongoing litigation between the Cherokee Nation and the United 
Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians [UKB], which could be 
influenced by congressional action on $99,000 for UKB included 
in the budget request. The Committee is neutral on the matter, 
and will consult with all parties involved before taking final 
congressional action on the fiscal year 2019 budget.
    Village Built Clinics.--The Committee has provided 
additional resources for village built clinics [VBCs] leasing 
costs. The Service testified before the Committee that these 
resources are now being used not only to pay for the 
traditional VBCs but also for new costs relating to litigation 
which requires that section 105(l) of the Indian Self-
Determination Act mandates payment of leasing costs when Tribal 
facilities are used to operate IHS programs. The agency 
indicated that these costs may grow exponentially over time. 
While the Committee has not included proposed language in the 
budget request to overturn this decision it is concerned with 
the budgetary impacts of this case moving forward. Within 90 
days of enactment of this act, the Service shall submit a 
report which indicates the current number of Tribes pursuing 
105(l) leasing arrangements, where these Tribes are located by 
State, the associated costs, and proposals for addressing this 
issue in the budget beyond simply overturning a court decision. 
The Committee believes these costs should be included 
separately in the budget request from those funds needed for 
village built clinics.
    The Committee has maintained funding for accreditation 
emergencies at the fiscal year 2018 level of $58,000,000. The 
Committee remains extremely concerned with the potential loss 
of Medicare or Medicaid agreements with the Centers for 
Medicare and Medicaid Services at any facility. This has been a 
particular problem in the Great Plains region and has also 
occurred in other regions. The Committee expects the Service to 
use these funds in order to correct problems at those 
facilities and to keep the Committee apprised of its progress.
    The Committee remains concerned about deficiencies 
identified at Gallup Indian Medical Center [GIMC] in New Mexico 
by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services [CMS], 
including Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act [EMTALA] 
violations and a lack of compliance with the Medicare 
Conditions of Participation related to governing body, quality 
assurance and performance improvement and infection control 
that were identified in a May 2018 survey. It is imperative 
that the Service take all needed steps to come under compliance 
and ensure that GIMC does not lose access to third party 
reimbursements, which account for the majority of the 
facility's funding. In addition to the report directed by the 
fiscal year 2018 Consolidated Appropriations Act (Public Law 
115-141) regarding GIMC accreditation, the Service is also 
directed to provide a supplemental report to the Committee 
within 90 days of enactment that details all actions taken to 
address the deficiencies identified by CMS and a list of any 
outstanding recommendations that require future action by GIMC 
or the Service to implement. The Service is expected to include 
its corrective action plans submitted to CMS as part of this 
report.
    Dental Health.--The recommendation includes $203,872,000 
for dental health, an increase of $8,589,000 above the enacted 
level. The increase is for staffing costs. The Service is 
encouraged to coordinate with the Bureau of Indian Education 
[BIE] to integrate preventive dental care at schools within the 
BIE system.
    Mental Health.--The recommendation includes $105,281,000 
for mental health programs, an increase of $5,381,000 above the 
enacted level. The increase is for staffing costs. The 
increases provided in fiscal year 2018 of $6,946,000 for the 
behavioral health integration Initiative to better integrate 
treatment programs for mental health and substance abuse 
problems and $3,600,000 for the suicide prevention initiative 
are maintained.
    Alcohol and Substance Abuse.--The recommendation includes 
$245,566,000 for alcohol and substance abuse programs, an 
increase of $17,778,000 above the enacted level. The increase 
is for staffing costs of $7,778,000 and $10,000,000 for 
addressing opioid abuse as described below. The bill retains 
increases provided in fiscal year 2018 of $6,500,000 for the 
Generation Indigenous initiative; $1,800,000 for the youth 
pilot project; and $2,000,000 to fund essential detoxification 
related services as provided herein. The Committee has 
continued bill language which allocates $2,000,000 to continue 
funding for essential detoxification and related services 
provided by the Service's public and private partners to IHS 
beneficiaries and expects these funds to be allocated in a 
manner consistent with previous years. The Service is directed 
to report to the Committees within 60 days of enactment of this 
Act regarding distribution of these funds. The Service shall 
continue its partnership with Na'Nizhoozhi Center in Gallup, 
N.M., and work with the Center and other Federal, State, local 
and Tribal partners to develop a sustainable model for clinical 
capacity, as provided by the statement to accompany Public Law 
115-31.
    The Committee is concerned that alcohol and opioid use 
disorders continue to be some of the most severe public health 
and safety problems facing American Indian and Alaska Native 
[AI/AN] individuals, families, and communities. To address this 
problem, the Committee directs IHS to increase its support for 
culturally competent preventive, educational, and treatment 
services programs and partner with academic institutions with 
established AI/AN training and health professions programs to 
research and promote culturally responsive Care. Additionally, 
the Committee encourages the IHS to employ the full spectrum of 
medication assisted treatments for alcohol and opioid use 
disorders, including non-narcotic treatment options that are 
less subject to diversion combined with counseling services.
    Opioid Grants.--To better combat the opioid epidemic, the 
Committee has included an increase of $10,000,000 and instructs 
the Service, in coordination with the Assistant Secretary for 
Mental Health and Substance Abuse, to use the additional funds 
provided above the fiscal year 2018 level to create a Special 
Behavioral Health Pilot Program modeled after the Special 
Diabetes Program for Indians. This Special Behavioral Health 
Pilot Program for Indians should support the development, 
documentation, and sharing of more locally-designed and 
culturally appropriate prevention and treatment interventions 
for mental health and substance use disorders in Tribal and 
urban Indian communities, The Director of the Indian Health 
Service, in coordination with the Assistant Secretary for 
Mental Health and Substance Use, shall award grants for 
providing services, provide technical assistance to grantees 
under this section collect, and evaluate performance of the 
program.
    Purchased/Referred Care.--The recommendation includes 
$964,819,000 for purchased/referred care, an increase of 
$2,124,000 above the enacted level. The increase is for 
staffing costs.
    Public Health Nursing.--The recommendation includes 
$89,159,000 for public health nursing, an increase of 
$1,980,000 above the enacted level. The increase is for 
staffing costs.
    Health Education.--The bill does not agree to the proposal 
to terminate the health education program. The recommendation 
includes $20,568,000 for health education, an increase of 
$697,000 above the enacted level for staffing costs.
    Community Health Representatives.--The bill does not agree 
to the proposal to terminate the community health 
representatives program. The recommendation includes 
$62,888,000 for the community health representatives program, 
equal to the fiscal year 2018 level.
    Urban Indian Health.--The recommendation includes 
$49,315,000 for the Urban Indian Health program, $2,893,000 
above the request and equal to the enacted level. The Committee 
strongly supports this program and does not concur with the 
proposal to reduce the program.
    Indian Health Professions.--The recommendation includes 
$49,558,000 for the Indian Health Professions program, an 
increase of $6,164,000 above the request and equal to the 
enacted level. The Committee believes this is a critical 
program and the recommendation has restored the program to its 
fiscal year 2018 funding level and provided an additional 
increase of $195,000 to expand the Indians into Medicine 
program to four sites. Within funds, the recommendation also 
includes funding for the Quentin N. Burdick American Indians 
into Nursing Program, and American Indians into Psychology 
Program at no less than fiscal year 2018 levels.
    Quality of Care.--The Committee finds that structural 
reforms are needed at the Indian Health Service, and directs 
IHS to work with the Committee to improve access to care and 
quality of services. The Committee also directs Indian Health 
Service to establish measurements for tracking the improvement 
of patient health, rather than defining increased funding alone 
as a metric for measuring improvements.
    First Aid Kit Enhancements.--The Committee is aware that 
first aid products endorsed by the Department of Defense's 
Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care [CoTCCC] help to 
reduce death or trauma as a result of bleeding. The Committee 
believe these products could help the agency save lives, 
especially in rural areas where it might take significant time 
to transport a patient to a hospital and/or healthcare facility 
for appropriate treatment. Accordingly, the Committee 
encourages the Agency to analyze incorporating CoTCCC's 
hemostatic dressing of choice in healthcare facilities and 
vehicles and provide a report to the Committee within 90 days 
of enactment.
    Prescription Drug Monitoring.--The Committee is concerned 
that IHS and tribally operated health facilities are not 
participating in State Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs 
and emergency department information exchanges. The Committee 
strongly encourages these facilities to participate in these 
programs. Accordingly, within 90 days of enactment of this act, 
the Service shall provide the Committee with a report outlining 
by State such facilities that are participating and those that 
are not, and any issues preventing facilities from uploading 
data to these programs or exchanges.

                         CONTRACT SUPPORT COSTS

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $717,970,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     822,227,000
Committee recommendation................................     822,227,000

    The Committee has continued language from fiscal year 2018 
establishing an indefinite appropriation for contract support 
costs estimated to be $822,227,000, which is equal to the 
request and $104,257,000 above the enacted level. By retaining 
an indefinite appropriation for this account additional funds 
may be provided by the Agency if its budget estimate proves to 
be lower than necessary to meet the legal obligation to pay the 
full amount due to Tribes. The Committee believes fully funding 
these costs will ensure Tribes have the necessary resources 
they need to deliver program services efficiently and 
effectively.

                        INDIAN HEALTH FACILITIES

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $867,504,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     505,281,000
Committee recommendation................................     877,504,000

    The Committee recommends $877,504,000 for health facilities 
operations of the Indian Health Service. This amount is 
$10,000,000 above the enacted level and $371,863,000 above the 
budget request.
    Program changes are detailed below and in the table that 
accompanies the report. Changes from the enacted level include 
$11,302,000 for the staffing of new facilities; a total of 
$6,500,000 for staffing quarters; and $5,000,000 for healthcare 
facilities construction for the Service to enter into contracts 
with tribes or tribal organizations to carry out demonstration 
projects as authorized under the Indian Health Care Improvement 
Act for construction, and renovation of hospitals, and health 
centers. Of the funds provided $15,000,000 is for the small 
ambulatory clinic program, equal to the enacted level. The 
Committee expects the Service to continue following its 
existing interpretation of criteria for the funding of new, 
improved, or replacement sanitation facilities.
    The Committee believes that additional funds for quarters 
is essential to help resolve the widespread housing shortages 
which have contributed to high vacancy rates for medical 
personnel throughout the system, particularly in rural areas. 
These funds have been used in areas with chronic housing 
shortages like Alaska and the Great Plains in order to 
ameliorate these problems. The Committee expects a report from 
the Service within 60 days of enactment of this act on the 
distribution of funds.
    The Committee notes its strong support for the small 
ambulatory clinic program. As the Service testified before the 
Committee, this program provides another critical tool for 
addressing facilities maintenance and construction backlogs 
throughout the nation. The stipulations included in the Indian 
Health Services account regarding the allocation of funds for 
the staffing of new facilities pertain to the funds in this 
account as well.

                     National Institutes of Health


          NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES

    The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, an 
agency within the National Institutes of Health, was authorized 
in section 311(a) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended, to conduct 
multidisciplinary research and training activities associated 
with the Nation's Hazardous Substance Superfund program, and in 
section 126(g) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization 
Act of 1968, to conduct training and education of workers who 
are or may be engaged in activities related to hazardous waste 
removal or containment or emergency response.

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $77,349,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      53,967,000
Committee recommendation................................      78,349,000

    The bill provides $78,349,000 for the operations of the 
``National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences'' 
account. This amount is $1,000,000 above the enacted level to 
help meet the demands of the Superfund Research Program.

            Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry 
[ATSDR], an agency of the Public Health Service, was created in 
section 104(i) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980. The ATSDR's primary 
mission is to conduct surveys and screening programs to 
determine relationships between exposure to toxic substances 
and illness. Other activities include the maintenance and 
annual update of a list of hazardous substances most commonly 
found at Superfund sites, the preparation of toxicological 
profiles on each such hazardous substance, consultations on 
health issues relating to exposure to hazardous or toxic 
substances, and the development and implementation of certain 
research activities related to ATSDR's mission.

            TOXIC SUBSTANCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $74,691,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      62,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      74,691,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $74,691,000 for 
the operations of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease 
Registry account. This amount is equal to the enacted level.
    Birth Cohort Study.--The bill provides funding for 
continuation of the birth cohort study on the Navajo Nation. 
The Committee supports the study to better understand the 
relationship between uranium exposures, birth outcomes, and 
early developmental delays on the Navajo Nation.
    Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances [PFAS].--The Committee 
recognizes the importance of making information available on 
per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances [PFAS] to understand and 
address the needs of communities exposed to these chemicals, 
and is disappointed that the Agency for Toxic Substances and 
Disease Registry [ATSDR] toxological profile for four PFAS 
substances prepared pursuant to 42 U.S.C. 9604(i)(2) has not 
been released. This information is critically important to 
Federal and State efforts to respond and strengthen the 
effectiveness of drinking water advisories or standards for 
these materials. Therefore, ATSDR is directed to publish to the 
Federal Register, within 15 days of enactment, the proposed 
toxicological profile which includes the chemicals 
perfluorooctanoic acid [PFOA], perfluorooctane sulfonic acid 
[PFOS], perfluorononanoic acid [PFNA] and perfluorohexane 
sulfonic acid [PFHxS]. Furthermore, within 15 days of enactment 
of this act, ATSDR is directed to work with the appropriate 
Federal partners to submit a report to the Committee 
identifying any changes made after January 30, 2018, to the 
toxicology profile of the PFAS substances and include ATSDR's 
recommendations for next steps for addressing health concerns 
related to PFAS.

                         OTHER RELATED AGENCIES


                   Executive Office of the President


  COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

    The Council on Environmental Quality [CEQ] and the Office 
of Environmental Quality were established by the National 
Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Environmental Quality 
Improvement Act of 1970, respectively. The Council serves as a 
source of environmental expertise and policy analysis for the 
White House, Executive Office of the President, and other 
Federal agencies. CEQ promulgates regulations binding on all 
Federal agencies to implement the procedural provisions of the 
National Environmental Policy Act and resolves interagency 
environmental disputes informally and through issuance of 
findings and recommendations.

Appropriations, 2018....................................      $3,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       2,994,000
Committee recommendation................................       3,005,000

    The bill provides $3,005,000 for the operations of the 
Council on Environmental Quality and Office of Environmental 
Quality account. This amount is an increase of $5,000 above the 
enacted level.

             Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board

    The Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board was 
authorized by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 to 
investigate accidental releases of certain chemicals substances 
that result in, or may cause, serious injury, death, 
substantial property damage, or serious adverse effects on 
human health. It became operational in fiscal year 1998.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $11,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       9,500,000
Committee recommendation................................      11,000,000

    The bill provides $11,000,000 for salaries and expenses of 
the Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board, equal to 
the fiscal year 2018 level. The Board has the important 
responsibility of independently investigating industrial 
chemical accidents and collaborating with industry and 
professional organizations to share safety lessons that can 
prevent catastrophic incidents and the Committee expects this 
work to continue.

              Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation

    The Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation [ONHIR] was 
established by Public Law 93-531. The Office is charged with 
planning and conducting relocation activities associated with 
the settlement of land disputes between the Navajo Nation and 
Hopi Tribe.

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $15,431,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       4,400,000
Committee recommendation................................       7,400,000

    The bill provides $7,400,000 for the Office of Navajo and 
Hopi Indian Relocation, a decrease of $8,031,000 below the 
fiscal year 2018 enacted level.
    The Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation was 
established by Public Law 93-531. The Office is charged with 
planning and conducting relocation activities associated with 
the settlement of land disputes between the Navajo Nation and 
Hopi Tribe. The Committee supports efforts to close the Office 
because its primary relocation function has reached its 
conclusion.
    The Committee recommends $7,400,000 for the ONHIR. The 
Committee does not approve the budget request to fund 
relocation activities through the Office of Special Trustee 
[OST] under this heading without a more complete explanation on 
plans to transfer outstanding services, records, and rangeland 
improvement activities to other Federal Government agencies. 
The Committee continues to be concerned about the lack of 
meaningful Tribal consultation on matters related to the 
closure and transition and directs the ONHIR to work with the 
OST and Bureau of Indian Affairs to immediately facilitate 
Tribal consultation with affected Tribes. The Committee urges 
the ONHIR to work with the appropriate congressional 
authorizing committee to develop legislation as necessary to 
affect its closure upon consultation.

    Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and Arts 
                              Development

    The Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture 
and Arts Development [IAIA] was originally founded in 1962 as a 
Bureau of Indian Affairs high school. The Institute was moved 
out of the BIA in 1988 to become a federally chartered 4-year 
college governed by a board of trustees appointed by the 
President of the United States and confirmed by the Senate. Its 
mission is to serve as the national center of research, 
training, language, and scholarship for Native Americans and 
Alaska Natives through the dedicated study, creative 
application, preservation, and care of Native cultures and 
arts. In addition to its academic programs, the IAIA houses the 
National Collection of Contemporary Indian Art and carries the 
designation as the National Repository for Native Languages. 
The IAIA's operations are funded by direct Federal support and 
a diversified private sector approach to foundations, 
corporations, Tribes, and individual donors.

                        payment to the institute

Appropriations, 2018....................................      $9,835,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       9,960,000
Committee recommendation................................       9,960,000

    The recommendation provides $9,960,000 for the Institute of 
American Indian Arts, an increase of $125,000 above the enacted 
level.

                        Smithsonian Institution

    Congress established the Smithsonian Institution in 1846 to 
administer a large bequest left to the United States by James 
Smithson, an English scientist, for the purpose of establishing 
in Washington, DC, an institution ``. . . for the increase and 
diffusion of knowledge among men.'' The act establishing the 
Smithsonian provided for the administration of the trust, 
independent of the Government itself, by a Board of Regents and 
a Secretary, who were given broad discretion in the use of 
these funds. The board was to be composed of both private 
citizens and members of all three branches of the Federal 
Government in order to ensure ``the wise and faithful use'' of 
the Institution's funds. The trust funds were permanently 
loaned to the U.S. Treasury to be maintained in a separate 
account, with the interest from that money used for the 
operation of the Institution. Construction of the Smithsonian 
Castle was completed in 1855 and collections that the 
Government had accepted on behalf of the Institution were moved 
into the building. Today, the Smithsonian Institution is the 
world's largest museum and research complex, housing 
approximately 144 million objects and specimens, and receiving 
an estimated 25 million visitors annually.
    Its facilities include 19 museums and galleries, the 
National Zoo, and nine research facilities--most located in or 
near Washington, DC, with others in Massachusetts, New York, 
Florida, Arizona, Hawaii, and the Republic of Panama. The 
Smithsonian's growth continues as construction proceeds on the 
National Museum of African American History and Culture, 
authorized by Congress in 2003 and scheduled to open to the 
public in 2018.

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $731,444,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     737,944,000
Committee recommendation................................     739,894,000

    The bill provides $739,894,000 for salaries and expenses of 
the Smithsonian Institution, an increase of $8,450,000 above 
the 2018 enacted level. Unless otherwise provided, increases 
above the fiscal year 2018 level account for fixed costs for 
the Institution's programs.
    The Committee understands the role the Institution has 
played as a source of learning and inspiration, and appreciates 
the challenges the Institution must overcome to keep the 
museums open and available to the public. The Committee also 
understands the importance of collaboration and partnerships 
and strongly encourages areas, such as the National Zoological 
Park, to work with external sources to provide support in 
pathological research, services, and training to augment the 
existing needs of the National Zoo.
    The Committee provides a total of $310,449,000 for 
Facilities Services, of which $82,045,000 is for Facilities 
Maintenance and $228,404,000 is for Facilities Operations, 
Security and Support. Within the amounts provided for salaries 
and expenses, the National Museum of African American History 
and Culture is fully funded.
    The creation of a Museum of the American Latino within the 
Smithsonian Institution at some future date continues to be a 
strongly supported priority. Until such time, the Smithsonian 
Latino Center, which was formed in 1997 with the goal of 
promoting the inclusion of Latino contributions in the 
Institution's exhibitions, collections and public outreach 
programs, should continue this important work. In accordance 
with the recommendations provided to Congress and the President 
of the United States in the May 2011 report by the National 
Museum of the American Latino Commission (created by Public Law 
110-229), the Committee continues to urge collaboration between 
the Smithsonian and appropriate Federal and local organizations 
for Latino programming, exhibitions, collections, and outreach 
at the Institution. The 2018 Consolidated Appropriations Act, 
Public Law 115-141, provided additional funding for the Latino 
and Asian Pacific initiatives as well as the new Women's 
Initiative. Within the funds provided, the Committee expects 
these initiatives to continue at the enacted levels and 
strongly encourages the Institution to find innovative ways to 
share the contributions these individuals have contributed to 
the American experience.

                           facilities capital

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $311,903,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     219,500,000
Committee recommendation................................     303,503,000

    The bill includes $303,503,000 for the Smithsonian 
Institution's Facilities Capital program, $8,400,000 below 
current year enacted level. Within these funds, $280,503,000 is 
provided for revitalization efforts with $23,000,000 designated 
for planning and design efforts. Funding has been continued for 
the National Air and Space Museum [NASM] and other high 
priority revitalization projects.
    The Committee understands the Institution is in the process 
of a multi-year, multi-phase renovation project for the 
National Air and Space Museum, including the necessary 
replacement of the building's facade. The Committee has 
included $200,000,000 for the NASM's renovation and with this 
funding the Committee has provided $450,000,000 out of the 
$650,000,000 requested for the renovation. The Committee 
recognizes NASM is a popular stop for visitors and it is 
important to ensure the public has access to the collection of 
artifacts; however, the Committee remains concerned about the 
estimated cost of the renovations while also keeping pace with 
salary and expense increases. The fiscal year 2018 Consolidated 
Appropriations Act contained a directive requesting the 
Institution report back to the Committee about the scope, 
scheduling, phasing, and overall projected costs for the 
Committees and requested the GAO review and analyze estimates. 
The Committee is concerned this report has not been completed 
and received; therefore, encourages the Institution to compile 
this information for review as quickly as possible to determine 
whether the estimates are comprehensive, accurate, and 
credible.

                        National Gallery of Art

    The National Gallery of Art was created in 1937 by a joint 
resolution of Congress accepting Andrew W. Mellon's gift to the 
Nation of his art collection. The generosity of the Mellon 
family also provided the funds to construct the Gallery's two 
landmark buildings, the West Building, designed by Alexander 
Pope and completed in 1941, and the East Building, designed by 
I.M. Pei and completed in 1978. In 1999, an outdoor sculpture 
garden was created with funding from the Cafritz Foundation. 
Today, these two buildings and the Sculpture Garden form a 
museum complex that houses one of the world's premier art 
collections. Since the Gallery's founding, Federal funds have 
been appropriated to ensure the operation, maintenance, 
protection, and care of its collection. Private contributions 
are used by the Gallery for art acquisition and conservation, 
scholarly and scientific research, exhibitions, and educational 
outreach programs.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $141,790,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................     138,724,000
Committee recommendation................................     144,202,000

    The bill provides $144,202,000 for salaries and expenses of 
the National Gallery of Art. This amount is $2,412,000 above 
the fiscal year 2018 enacted level and $5,478,000 above the 
request. The distribution of funds among the Gallery's various 
activities is displayed in the table that accompanies this 
report. The Committee is aware of the guard to gallery ratio at 
the Gallery compared with the ratio necessary meet industry 
gallery protection standards. The Committee directs the Gallery 
to provide a report within 90 days of enactment of the act, 
detailing what additional costs would be incurred to meet 
industry gallery protection standards.

            REPAIR, RESTORATION, AND RENOVATION OF BUILDINGS

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $24,203,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       8,176,000
Committee recommendation................................      23,000,000

    The bill provides $23,000,000 for major repairs, 
restoration and renovation of the Gallery's buildings. This 
amount is $1,203,000 below the enacted level and $14,824,000 
above the request.

             John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

    Originally established in 1958 as the National Cultural 
Center, an independently administered bureau of the Smithsonian 
Institution, the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts 
was designated as a living memorial to President Kennedy in 
1964. The Kennedy Center building was constructed with a 
combination of private contributions, Federal matching funds 
and long-term revenue bonds held by the U.S. Department of the 
Treasury. Since 1972, Congress has provided funds for the 
operations and repair of the presidential monument, initially 
through the National Park Service and since 1995 to the Kennedy 
Center Board of Trustees. Approximately 87 percent of the 
Center's total annual operating budget is derived from 
nonappropriated funds such as ticket sales, auxiliary income, 
investment income and private contributions that support 
performing arts programming and administrative activities.

                       operations and maintenance

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $23,740,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      24,490,000
Committee recommendation................................      24,490,000

    The bill provides $24,490,000 for the operations and 
maintenance of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing 
Arts, the same amount as the administration's fiscal year 2019 
request.

                     CAPITAL REPAIR AND RESTORATION

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $16,775,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      13,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      16,800,000

    The bill provides $16,800,000 for the Kennedy Center's 
capital repair and restoration program. Funds provided above 
the request are to address critical safety, security, and 
capital repair and restoration needs.

            Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

    The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars is the 
living national memorial to President Wilson established by 
Congress in 1968 and headquartered in Washington, DC. Its 
mission is to commemorate the ideals and concerns of the former 
president by providing a link between the world of ideas and 
the world of policy; and by fostering research, study, 
discussion, and collaboration among a full spectrum of 
individuals concerned with policy and scholarship in national 
and world affairs. The Woodrow Wilson Center is a nonpartisan 
institution that is supported by a combination of public and 
private funds.

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $12,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       7,474,000
Committee recommendation................................      12,000,000

    The bill provides $12,000,000 for salaries and expenses of 
the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the same 
amount as the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. The Committee 
does not concur with the administration's proposal to end the 
Federal commitment to the Center and expects operations to be 
maintained as in previous years. The Committee believes the 
Center provides an important mission that serves U.S. policy 
makers.

           National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities


                    National Endowment for the Arts

    Established in 1965 as an independent agency of the Federal 
Government, the National Endowment for the Arts [NEA] is the 
official arts organization of the United States Government. As 
the largest annual funder of the arts in the United States, the 
NEA has helped to create regional theater, opera, ballet, 
symphony orchestras, museums and other arts organizations that 
Americans now enjoy. Since its founding, the National Endowment 
for the Arts has awarded more than 120,000 grants that have 
brought the arts to Americans in communities both large and 
small. The NEA, through its competitive, peer-reviewed grants 
process, uses the majority of its annual operating funds to 
award grants to nonprofit organizations for arts education, 
arts outreach, artistic excellence and partnership agreements. 
In addition to those activities, State and jurisdictional arts 
agencies are awarded 40 percent of the Endowment's funds.

                       grants and administration

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $152,849,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      28,949,000
Committee recommendation................................     155,000,000

    The bill provides $155,000,000 for grants and 
administration of the National Endowment for the Arts, an 
increase of $2,151,000 to the fiscal year enacted level. The 
NEA is to be commended for its efforts related to Creative 
Forces: NEA Military Healing Arts Network, to serve unique 
needs of patients and families of military and veterans 
diagnosed with Traumatic Brain Injuries and associated 
psychological health conditions. The Committee supports the 
NEA's continued efforts to expand upon this successful program 
to embed Creative Arts Therapies at the core of integrative 
care efforts in clinical settings, advance collaboration among 
clinical and community arts providers to support wellness and 
reintegration efforts for affected families, and advance 
research to improve our understanding of impacts of these 
interventions in both clinical and community settings. The 
Committee also encourages State arts agencies to explore how 
they can contribute to expanding arts programs for service 
members and their families at the local level. The distribution 
of funds among the agency's various activities is displayed in 
the table that accompanies this statement.

                 National Endowment for the Humanities

    The National Endowment for the Humanities [NEH] was 
established by the 1965 National Foundation on the Arts and 
Humanities Act as an independent Federal agency of the United 
States Government dedicated to supporting research, education, 
preservation, and public programs in the humanities. Today, it 
is the largest funder of humanities programs in the Nation. 
NEH's longstanding tradition of a peer-reviewed competitive 
grant process is designed to ensure that the most meritorious 
projects are funded. Typically, NEH grants are used to support 
cultural institutions, such as museums, archives, libraries, 
colleges, universities, public television and radio, and 
individual scholars. The NEH, through its State-Federal 
partnership, also provides grants to State humanities councils 
in all 50 States and the 6 territories.

                       grants and administration

Appropriations, 2018....................................    $152,848,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      28,770,000
Committee recommendation................................     155,000,000

    The bill provides $155,000,000 for grants and 
administration of the National Endowment for the Humanities, an 
increase of $2,152,000 to the fiscal year 2018 enacted level. 
The Committee understands the NEH has continued two components 
of the popular ``We the People'' initiative grant 
opportunities, the National Digital Newspapers Program and the 
Landmarks of American History and Culture workshops. The 
Committee encourages NEH to continue providing support to 
projects that focus on our Nation's history and culture. The 
distribution of funds among the agency's various activities is 
displayed in the table that accompanies this statement.

                        Commission of Fine Arts

    The Commission of Fine Arts was established in 1910 to fill 
the need for a permanent agency whose members would be 
qualified to make available to the Government expert opinion on 
questions of art and architecture. The Commission's mission, as 
design proposals are brought before it, is to safeguard and 
improve the appearance and symbolic significance of the city as 
a capital. The Commission provides knowledgeable advice on 
matters pertaining to architecture, landscape architecture, 
sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts to all branches 
and departments of the Federal and District of Columbia 
governments when such matters affect the National Capital. The 
Commission also must approve of the site and design of all 
commemorative works and memorials erected in the District. The 
Commission advises on the design of circulating and 
commemorative coinage and must approve the siting and design 
for national memorials, both in the United States and on 
foreign soil, in accordance with the American Battle Monuments 
Act and the Commemorative Works Act.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2018....................................      $2,762,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       2,771,000
Committee recommendation................................       2,771,000

    The bill provides $2,771,000 for salaries and expenses of 
the Commission of Fine Arts, $9,000 above the fiscal year 2018 
enacted level and equal to the request.

               National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs

    The National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs program was 
established by Public Law 99-190 to provide grants for general 
operating support to District of Columbia nonprofit arts and 
other cultural organizations. In fiscal year 1988, 
administrative responsibility for the program was transferred 
from the National Endowment for the Humanities to the 
Commission of Fine Arts. Currently, this program helps support 
more than 20 nationally renowned organizations in the Nation's 
Capital by providing funding for operating expenses, jobs, 
exhibits, and performances that might not have been possible 
otherwise.

Appropriations, 2018....................................      $2,750,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................................
Committee recommendation................................       2,750,000

    The bill provides $2,750,000, equal to the enacted level, 
to continue support for the National Capital Arts and Cultural 
Affairs program administered by the Commission of Fine Arts. 
Grant funds should be distributed consistent with the 
established formula and eligibility requirements used in fiscal 
year 2018.

               Advisory Council on Historic Preservation

    The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 established 
the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation as an independent 
Federal agency. The Council's mission is to promote the 
preservation, enhancement, and productive use of our Nation's 
historic resources, and advise the President and Congress on 
national historic preservation policy. It also provides a forum 
for discussion of Federal activities, programs, and policies 
that affect historic properties. One of the principal 
responsibilities of the Council is to implement Section 106 of 
the National Historic Preservation Act, which requires that the 
Council be given an opportunity to comment on the impacts of 
projects or actions undertaken by other Federal agencies on 
sites or structures eligible for inclusion in the National 
Register of Historic Places.

Appropriations, 2018....................................      $6,400,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       6,440,000
Committee recommendation................................       6,440,000

    The bill provides $6,440,000 for the Advisory Council on 
Historic Preservation, an increase of $40,000 above the enacted 
level.

                  National Capital Planning Commission

    The National Capital Planning Commission [NCPC] was 
established in 1924 as a park planning agency. Two years later, 
the agency's role was expanded to included more comprehensive 
planning. The National Capital Planning Act of 1952 designated 
the NCPC as the central planning agency for the Federal 
Government in the National Capital Region. Today, major 
functions and responsibilities of the NCPC include 
comprehensive and coordinated planning for the Nation's 
Capital; an annual assessment of all proposed Federal capital 
improvements in the National Capital region; the review of 
proposed Federal development projects; and representation of 
the Federal interest in local and regional planning 
initiatives.

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2018....................................      $8,099,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       7,948,000
Committee recommendation................................       7,948,000

    The bill provides $7,948,000 for salaries and expenses of 
the National Capital Planning Commission, $151,000 below the 
enacted level.

                United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

    The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum was created by 
Congress in 1980 through Public Law 96-388 with the mandate to 
operate and maintain a permanent living memorial museum to the 
victims of the Holocaust; provide appropriate ways for the 
Nation to commemorate the victims of the Holocaust through the 
annual national civic observances known as the Days of 
Remembrance; and carry out the recommendations of the 
President's Commission on the Holocaust. The building that 
houses the museum was constructed with private funds and opened 
to the public in 1993. Since that time, the museum has 
attracted four to five times the number of expected visitors 
and has been highly successful in its fundraising efforts. With 
private contributions comprising nearly 50 percent of its 
annual operating budget, the Holocaust Memorial Museum serves 
as a model for the public-private partnership.

                       HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL MUSEUM

Appropriations, 2018....................................     $59,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................      56,602,000
Committee recommendation................................      59,500,000

    The bill provides $59,500,000 for operations of the United 
States Holocaust Memorial Museum, $500,000 above the enacted 
level and $2,398,000,000 above the request.

                Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2018....................................      $1,800,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       1,800,000
Committee recommendation................................       1,800,000

    The bill provides $1,800,000 for salaries and expenses of 
the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission, equal to the 
enacted level.

                 Women's Suffrage Centennial Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2018....................................      $1,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................................
Committee recommendation................................       1,000,000

    The bill includes $1,000,000 for the Women's Suffrage 
Centennial Commission, as authorized by title VII of Public Law 
115-31. The Commission shall plan, execute and coordinate 
programs and activities in honor of the 100th anniversary of 
the passage and ratification the Nineteenth Amendment to the 
U.S. Constitution, which guaranteed women the right to vote.

                   WORLD WAR I CENTENNIAL COMMISSION

    The U.S. World War I Centennial Commission was created by 
an Act of Congress in 2013 as an independent agency of the 
Legislative Branch of the United States Government. Members of 
the 12-member Commission were appointed by the President and 
the leaders of the Senate and the House of Representatives, as 
well as the American Legion, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, and 
the National World War I Museum. The Commission's mission is to 
plan, develop, and execute programs, projects and activities to 
commemorate the Centennial of World War I.

Appropriations, 2018....................................      $7,000,000
Budget estimate, 2019...................................       6,000,000
Committee recommendation................................       7,000,000

    The bill provides $7,000,000 for salaries and expenses of 
the World War I Centennial Commission, equal to the enacted 
level and an increase of $1,000,000 above the request. The 
Committee supports the construction of the national World War I 
Memorial at Pershing Park as a long, overdue tribute to those 
who sacrificed for freedom in the Great War. World War I 
Memorial efforts have been in the works since 1960, and 
Congress has affirmed on several occasions a desire to pay 
tribute to veterans of World War I. The Committee is hopeful 
necessary approvals for the Memorial will be granted soon, so 
construction can commence. The Committee urges other Federal 
agencies, as appropriate, to robustly support and participate 
in World War I Centennial Commission commemoration activities, 
particularly in honor of the 100th anniversary of Armistice 
Day.

                                TITLE IV

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

                     (Including Transfers of Funds)

    Title IV of the bill includes the following general 
provisions:
    Sec. 401. Provides that appropriations available in the 
bill shall not be used to produce literature or otherwise 
promote public support of a legislative proposal or regulation 
on which action is not complete or for publicity or propaganda 
purposes in support of administration policies except to the 
executive branch or Congress.
    Sec. 402. Continues a provision providing for annual 
appropriations unless expressly provided otherwise in this act.
    Sec. 403. Continues a provision providing restrictions on 
departmental assessments unless approved by the Committees on 
Appropriations.
    Sec. 404. Retains the mining patent moratorium carried in 
previous years.
    Sec. 405. Continues a provision regarding the payment of 
contract support costs.
    Sec. 406. Provides that only certain amounts provided in 
this act may be used to fund contract support costs.
    Sec. 407. Continues a provision providing that the 
Secretary of Agriculture shall not be considered in violation 
of certain provisions of the Forest and Rangeland Renewable 
Resources Planning Act solely because more than 15 years have 
passed without revision of a forest plan, provided that the 
Secretary is working in good faith to complete the plan 
revision within available funds.
    Sec. 408. Prohibits oil, natural gas, and mining-related 
activities within current national monument boundaries, except 
where such activities are allowed under the presidential 
proclamation establishing the monument.
    Sec. 409. Restricts funding appropriated for acquisition of 
land or interests in land from being used for declarations of 
taking or complaints in condemnation.
    Sec. 410. Addresses timber sales involving Alaska western 
red and yellow cedar.
    Sec. 411. Restricts awards of no-bid contracts.
    Sec. 412. Requires the public disclosure of certain 
reports.
    Sec. 413. Continues a provision which delineates the grant 
guidelines for the National Endowment for the Arts.
    Sec. 414. Continues a provision which delineates the 
program priorities for the National Endowment for the Arts.
    Sec. 415. Retains certain reporting requirements regarding 
the status of appropriations balances.
    Sec. 416. Continues prohibition of any rules that would 
require the regulation of emissions from livestock.
    Sec. 417. Continues prohibition on EPA using funds to 
implement a mandatory greenhouse gas reporting system for 
manure management systems.
    Sec. 418. Continues prohibition on regulation of fishing 
tackle and ammunition under the Toxic Substances Control Act.
    Sec. 419. Continues a provision authorizing the Secretary 
of Interior and the Secretary of Agriculture to consider local 
contractors when awarding contracts for certain activities on 
public lands.
    Sec. 420. Continues provision regarding grazing permits on 
Forest Service lands.
    Sec. 421. Prohibits the use of funds to maintain or 
establish a computer network unless such network blocks the 
viewing, downloading, and exchanging of pornography.
    Sec. 422. Extends authorities relating to disposal of 
Forest Service facilities.
    Sec. 423. Continues standards for the use of American iron 
and steel for certain infrastructure projects.
    Sec. 424. Prohibits destruction of certain structures on 
Midway Island.
    Sec. 425. John F. Kennedy Center 1 year reauthorization.
    Sec. 426. Provides authority for the Secretary of the 
Interior to enter into training agreements and to transfer 
excess equipment and supplies for wildfires.
    Sec. 427. Makes additional investments in water 
infrastructure priorities and superfund emergency response, 
removal, and long-term cleanup remedies.
    Sec. 428. Addresses carbon emissions from forest biomass.
    Sec. 429. Addresses section of the Federal Water Pollution 
Control Act.
    Sec. 430. Addresses the use of small, remote incinerators 
in the State of Alaska.
    Sec. 431. Extends existing authority to collect recreation 
fees.
    Sec. 432. Prohibits the acquisition of certain 
telecommunications equipment.

  COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Rule XVI, paragraph 7 requires that every report on a 
general appropriation bill filed by the Committee must identify 
each recommended amendment which proposes an item of 
appropriation which is not made to carry out the provisions of 
an existing law, a treaty stipulation, or an act or resolution 
previously passed by the Senate during that session.
    Those items are as follows:
  --Sums provided to the Bureau of Land Management for 
        management of lands and resources, land acquisition, 
        construction and maintenance, and loans to States.
  --Sums provided to the Bureau of Land Management to 
        inventory, manage, and improve rangelands for domestic 
        livestock grazing pursuant to Public Law 95-514, the 
        Public Rangeland Improvement Act of 1978.
  --$250,017,000 for the endangered species program, U.S. Fish 
        and Wildlife Service.
  --Sums provided to the Fish and Wildlife service for coastal 
        wetlands planning, protection, and restoration.
  --Sums provided for the Yukon River Restoration and 
        Enhancement Fund, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 
        pursuant to the Fisheries Act of 1995.
  --Sums provided to the Fish and Wildlife Service for the 
        conservation and protection of marine mammals pursuant 
        to Public Law 103-238, the Marine Mammal Protection Act 
        Amendments of 1994.
  --Sums provided for Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration 
        grants.
  --Sums provided to the Fish and Wildlife Service pursuant to 
        the Klamath River Basin Fishery Resources Restoration 
        Act; Fisheries Restoration Irrigation Mitigation Act; 
        and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation 
        Establishment Act.
  --Sums provided to the U.S. Geological Survey for the 
        National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program.
  --Sums provided to the Bureau of Indian Affairs pursuant to 
        The Tribal Colleges or Universities Assistance Act of 
        1978; The Indian Tribal Justice Act; Indian Child 
        Protection and Family Violence Act; and The No Child 
        Left Behind Act.
  --$1,134,947,000 for the Hazardous Substance Superfund.
  --$25,000,000 for State and Tribal assistance grants: Alaska 
        Native Villages.
  --$1,694,000,000 for State and Tribal assistance grants: 
        Clean Water SRF.
  --$1,164,000,000 for State and Tribal assistance grants: 
        Drinking Water SRF.
  --Sums provided pursuant to the Clean Air Act, Radon 
        Abatement Act, Clean Water Act, BEACH Act, Safe 
        Drinking Water Act, Solid Waste Disposal Act [RCRA], 
        Toxic Substances Control Act, Pollution Prevention Act, 
        and the Indian Environmental General Assistance Program 
        Act.
  --$3,000,000 for matching funds for projects of the National 
        Forest Foundation, U.S. Forest Service.
  --$155,000,000 for the National Endowment for the Arts.
  --$155,000,000 for the National Endowment for the Humanities.

COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(c), RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, on June 14, 2018, 
the Committee ordered favorably reported an original bill (S. 
3073) making appropriations for the Department of the Interior, 
environment, and related agencies for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 2019, and for other purposes, provided, that the 
bill be subject to amendment and that the bill be consistent 
with its budget allocation, and provided that the Chairman of 
the Committee or his designee be authorized to offer the 
substance of the original bill as a Committee amendment in the 
nature of a substitute to the House companion measure, by a 
recorded vote of 31-0, a quorum being present. The vote was as 
follows:
        Yeas                          Nays
Chairman Shelby
Mr. McConnell
Mr. Alexander
Ms. Collins
Ms. Murkowski
Mr. Graham
Mr. Blunt
Mr. Moran
Mr. Hoeven
Mr. Boozman
Mrs. Capito
Mr. Lankford
Mr. Daines
Mr. Kennedy
Mr. Rubio
Mrs. Hyde-Smith
Mr. Leahy
Mrs. Murray
Mrs. Feinstein
Mr. Durbin
Mr. Reed
Mr. Tester
Mr. Udall
Mrs. Shaheen
Mr. Merkley
Mr. Coons
Mr. Schatz
Ms. Baldwin
Mr. Murphy
Mr. Manchin
Mr. Van Hollen

 COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 12 of rule XXVI requires that Committee reports 
on a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any statute 
or part of any statute include ``(a) the text of the statute or 
part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and (b) a 
comparative print of that part of the bill or joint resolution 
making the amendment and of the statute or part thereof 
proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through type and 
italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate typographical 
devices the omissions and insertions which would be made by the 
bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form recommended by 
the committee.''
    In compliance with this rule, the following changes in 
existing law proposed to be made by the bill are shown as 
follows: existing law to be omitted is enclosed in black 
brackets; new matter is printed in italic; and existing law in 
which no change is proposed is shown in roman.

                         TITLE 16--CONSERVATION


     Chapter 3--Forests; Forest Service; Reforestation; Management


                    Subchapter I--General Provisions


Sec. 580d. Use of Forest Service structures or improvements and land by 
                    public and private agencies, etc.; terms

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


          Forest Service Facility Realignment and Enhancement


``SEC. 503. AUTHORIZATION FOR CONVEYANCE OF FOREST SERVICE 
                    ADMINISTRATIVE SITES.

            ``(f) Duration of Authority.--The authority of the 
        Secretary to initiate the conveyance of an 
        administrative site under this title expires on 
        September 30, [2018] 2019.
                                ------                                


                          TITLE 20--EDUCATION


 Chapter 3--Smithsonian Institution, National Museums and Art Galleries


      Subchapter V--John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts


Sec. 76r. Authorization of appropriations

[(a) Maintenance, repair, and security

    [There is authorized to be appropriated to the Board to 
carry out section 76j(a)(1)(H) of this title, $23,740,000 for 
fiscal year 2018.

[(b) Capital projects

    [There is authorized to be appropriated to the Board to 
carry out subparagraphs (F) and (G) of section 76j(a)(1) of 
this title, $16,775,000 for fiscal year 2018.]

    (a) Maintenance, Repair, and Security.--There is authorized 
to be appropriated to the Board to carry out section 
4(a)(1)(H), $24,490,000 for fiscal year 2019.

    (b) Capital Projects.--There is authorized to be 
appropriated to the Board to carry out subparagraphs (F) and 
(G) of section 4(a)(1), $16,800,000 for fiscal year 2019.
                                ------                                


                      TITLE 31--MONEY AND FINANCE


             SUBTITLE V--GENERAL ASSISTANCE ADMINISTRATION


                Chapter 69--Payment for Entitlement Land


Sec. 6906. Funding

    For [fiscal year 2018] fiscal year 2019--
          (1) each county or other eligible unit of local 
        government shall be entitled to payment under this 
        chapter; and
          (2) sums shall be made available to the Secretary of 
        the Interior for obligation or expenditure in 
        accordance with this chapter.
                                ------                                


 OMNIBUS PARKS AND PUBLIC LANDS MANAGEMENT ACT OF 1996, PUBLIC LAW 104-
                                  333


                              DIVISION II


              TITLE II--TENNESSEE CIVIL WAR HERITAGE AREA


SEC. 208. SUNSET.

    The Secretary may not make any grant or provide any 
assistance under this title after September 30, [2017] 2019.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


            TITLE III--AUGUSTA CANAL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA


SEC. 310. SUNSET.

    The Secretary may not make any grant or provide any 
assistance under this title after September 30, [2017] 2019.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


          TITLE VI--SOUTH CAROLINA NATIONAL HERITAGE CORRIDOR


SEC. 607. SUNSET.

    The Secretary may not make any grant or provide any 
assistance under this title after September 30, [2017] 2019.
                                ------                                


        CONSOLIDATED APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2012, PUBLIC LAW 112-74


   DIVISION E--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, ENVIRONMENT, AND RELATED 
                   AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2012


                                TITLE IV


                           GENERAL PROVISIONS


                        CONTRACTING AUTHORITIES

    Sec. 412. In awarding a Federal contract with funds made 
available by this Act, notwithstanding Federal Government 
procurement and contracting laws, the Secretary of Agriculture 
and the Secretary of the Interior (the ``Secretaries'') may, in 
evaluating bids and proposals, through [fiscal year 2019] 
fiscal year 2020, give consideration to local contractors who 
are from, and who provide employment and training for, 
dislocated and displaced workers in an economically 
disadvantaged rural community, including those historically 
timber-dependent areas that have been affected by reduced 
timber harvesting on Federal lands and other forest-dependent 
rural communities isolated from significant alternative 
employment opportunities: * * *

                        BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL


  PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS
                                                     AMENDED
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               Budget authority                 Outlays
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee    Amount  in     Committee    Amount  in
                                                           allocation       bill       allocation       bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with the subcommittee
 allocation for 2019: Subcommittee on Department of the
 Interior, environment, and related agencies:
    Mandatory...........................................           62            62            62         \1\62
    Discretionary.......................................       35,853        35,853        35,320     \1\35,320
        Security........................................  ............  ............           NA            NA
        Nonsecurity.....................................       35,853        35,853            NA            NA
Projections of outlays associated with the
 recommendation:
    2019................................................  ............  ............  ............    \2\23,563
    2020................................................  ............  ............  ............        7,706
    2021................................................  ............  ............  ............        3,166
    2022................................................  ............  ............  ............        1,058
    2023 and future years...............................  ............  ............  ............          293
Financial assistance to State and local governments for            NA         6,814            NA      \2\2,330
 2019...................................................
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
\2\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
 
NA: Not applicable.

        

  COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET (OBLIGATIONAL) AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2018 AND BUDGET ESTIMATES AND AMOUNTS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL FOR FISCAL
                                                                        YEAR 2019
                                                                [In thousands of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                       Committee recommendation compared
                                                                                                                                 with (+ or -)
                             Item                                     2018         Budget estimate      Committee    -----------------------------------
                                                                  appropriation                      recommendation         2018
                                                                                                                        appropriation    Budget estimate
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
 
                   BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT
 
               Management of Lands and Resources
 
Land Resources:
    Soil, water and air management............................           43,609   ................  ................          -43,609   ................
    Rangeland management......................................           81,000            82,116           103,921           +22,921           +21,805
    Forestry management.......................................           10,135             9,527            10,135   ................             +608
    Riparian management.......................................           21,321   ................  ................          -21,321   ................
    Cultural resources management.............................           17,131            15,383            17,131   ................           +1,748
    Wild horse and burro management...........................           75,000            66,719            80,555            +5,555           +13,836
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          248,196           173,745           211,742           -36,454           +37,997
 
Wildlife and Fisheries:
    Wildlife management.......................................          103,281   ................  ................         -103,281   ................
    Fisheries management......................................           12,530   ................  ................          -12,530   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          115,811   ................  ................         -115,811   ................
 
Threatened and endangered species.............................           21,567   ................  ................          -21,567   ................
 
Wildlife and Aquatic Habitat Management:
    Wildlife habitat management...............................  ................           81,753           126,848          +126,848           +45,095
        Threatened and endangered species.....................  ................  ................          (21,567)         (+21,567)         (+21,567)
    Aquatic habitat management................................  ................           37,664            55,656           +55,656           +17,992
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................  ................          119,417           182,504          +182,504           +63,087
 
Recreation Management:
    Wilderness management.....................................           18,264            11,871            18,264   ................           +6,393
    Recreation resources management...........................           54,465            53,234            58,465            +4,000            +5,231
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           72,729            65,105            76,729            +4,000           +11,624
 
Energy and Minerals:
    Oil and gas management....................................           85,947            83,101            88,947            +3,000            +5,846
    Oil and gas permit processing.............................            7,365             5,737             7,365   ................           +1,628
    Oil and gas inspection and enforcement....................           48,385            48,385            48,385   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Oil and gas...................................          141,697           137,223           144,697            +3,000            +7,474
 
    Coal management...........................................           11,868            19,533            14,868            +3,000            -4,665
    Other mineral resources...................................           12,043            12,167            12,167              +124   ................
    Renewable energy..........................................           28,320            16,043            24,320            -4,000            +8,277
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Energy and Minerals...........................          193,928           184,966           196,052            +2,124           +11,086
 
Realty and Ownership Management:
    Alaska conveyance.........................................           22,000            13,580            22,000   ................           +8,420
    Cadastral, lands, and realty management...................           52,480            48,290            52,480   ................           +4,190
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           74,480            61,870            74,480   ................          +12,610
 
Resource Protection and Maintenance:
    Resource management planning..............................           60,125            36,131            65,125            +5,000           +28,994
    Abandoned mine lands......................................           20,036   ................  ................          -20,036   ................
    Resource protection and law enforcement...................           27,616            24,166            27,616   ................           +3,450
    Hazardous materials management............................           15,463   ................  ................          -15,463   ................
    Abandoned minelands and hazardous materials management....  ................           13,260            40,499           +40,499           +27,239
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          123,240            73,557           133,240           +10,000           +59,683
 
Transportation and Facilities Maintenance:
    Annual maintenance........................................           39,125            33,613            39,125   ................           +5,512
    Deferred maintenance......................................           79,201            24,886            59,201           -20,000           +34,315
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          118,326            58,499            98,326           -20,000           +39,827
 
Workforce and Organizational Support:
    Administrative support....................................           58,694            47,072            58,694   ................          +11,622
    Bureauwide fixed costs....................................           93,176            96,480            96,480            +3,304   ................
    Information technology management.........................           26,077            23,653            26,077   ................           +2,424
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          177,947           167,205           181,251            +3,304           +14,046
 
National landscape conservation system, base program..........           36,819            26,260            41,819            +5,000           +15,559
Communication site management.................................            2,000             2,000             2,000   ................  ................
Offsetting collections........................................           -2,000            -2,000            -2,000   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Management of lands and resources.............        1,183,043           930,624         1,196,143           +13,100          +265,519
 
Mining Law Administration:
    Administration............................................           39,696            39,696            39,696   ................  ................
    Offsetting collections....................................          -56,696           -59,000           -59,000            -2,304   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Mining Law Administration.....................          -17,000           -19,304           -19,304            -2,304   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Management of Lands and Resources................        1,166,043           911,320         1,176,839           +10,796          +265,519
                                                               =========================================================================================
                         Construction
 
Rescission....................................................  ................           -5,465   ................  ................           +5,465
 
                       Land Acquisition
 
Acquisitions..................................................           13,300   ................           13,400              +100           +13,400
Acquisition management........................................            2,000             1,996             2,000   ................               +4
Recreational access...........................................            8,000   ................            9,000            +1,000            +9,000
Emergencies, hardships, and inholdings........................            1,616             1,396             1,616   ................             +220
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           24,916             3,392            26,016            +1,100           +22,624
 
Rescission....................................................  ................          -10,000   ................  ................          +10,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Land Acquisition.................................           24,916            -6,608            26,016            +1,100           +32,624
                                                               =========================================================================================
               Oregon and California Grant Lands
 
Western Oregon resources management...........................           94,445   ................           94,445   ................          +94,445
Oregon and California grant lands management..................  ................           82,222   ................  ................          -82,222
Western Oregon information and resource data systems..........            1,798             1,327             1,327              -471   ................
Western Oregon transportation & facilities maintenance........            9,628             6,118             9,628   ................           +3,510
Western Oregon construction and acquisition...................              335               364               364               +29   ................
Western Oregon national monument..............................              779   ................              779   ................             +779
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Oregon and California Grant Lands................          106,985            90,031           106,543              -442           +16,512
                                                               =========================================================================================
                      Range Improvements
 
Current appropriations........................................           10,000            10,000            10,000   ................  ................
 
          Service Charges, Deposits, and Forfeitures
 
Service charges, deposits, and forfeitures....................           24,595            25,850            25,850            +1,255   ................
Offsetting fees...............................................          -24,595           -25,850           -25,850            -1,255   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Service Charges, Deposits & Forfeitures..........  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
    Miscellaneous Trust Funds and Permanent Operating Funds
 
Current appropriations........................................           24,000            24,000            24,000   ................  ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT........................        1,331,944         1,023,278         1,343,398           +11,454          +320,120
                                                               =========================================================================================
            UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE
 
                      Resource Management
 
Ecological Services:
    Listing...................................................           18,818            10,941            17,818            -1,000            +6,877
    Planning and consultation.................................          105,579            98,828           106,079              +500            +7,251
    Conservation and restoration..............................           32,396            21,187            32,396   ................          +11,209
        (National Wetlands Inventory).........................           (3,471)           (3,447)           (3,471)  ................             (+24)
        (Coastal Barrier Resources Act).......................           (1,390)           (1,381)           (1,390)  ................              (+9)
    Recovery..................................................           91,032            80,820            93,724            +2,692           +12,904
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          247,825           211,776           250,017            +2,192           +38,241
 
Habitat conservation:
    Partners for fish and wildlife............................           51,633            35,765            51,633   ................          +15,868
    Coastal programs..........................................           13,375             6,512            13,375   ................           +6,863
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           65,008            42,277            65,008   ................          +22,731
 
National Wildlife Refuge System:
    Wildlife and habitat management...........................          233,392           228,332           237,467            +4,075            +9,135
    Visitor services..........................................           73,319            71,267            73,319   ................           +2,052
    Refuge law enforcement....................................           38,054            37,983            37,983               -71   ................
    Conservation planning.....................................            2,523   ................            2,523   ................           +2,523
    Refuge maintenance........................................          139,469           135,487           139,888              +419            +4,401
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          486,757           473,069           491,180            +4,423           +18,111
 
Conservation and Enforcement:
    Migratory bird management.................................           48,421            46,290            49,660            +1,239            +3,370
    Law enforcement...........................................           77,053            69,453            80,053            +3,000           +10,600
    International affairs.....................................           15,816            14,484            17,194            +1,378            +2,710
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          141,290           130,227           146,907            +5,617           +16,680
 
Fish and Aquatic Conservation:
    National fish hatchery system operations..................           55,822            49,979            55,822   ................           +5,843
    Maintenance and equipment.................................           22,920            19,808            22,920   ................           +3,112
    Aquatic habitat and species conservation..................           85,885            64,106            86,485              +600           +22,379
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          164,627           133,893           165,227              +600           +31,334
 
Cooperative landscape conservation............................           12,988   ................           12,988   ................          +12,988
 
Science Support:
    Adaptive science..........................................           10,517   ................            9,517            -1,000            +9,517
    Service science...........................................            6,750   ................            6,750   ................           +6,750
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           17,267   ................           16,267            -1,000           +16,267
 
General Operations:
    Central office operations.................................           36,965            43,049            43,049            +6,084   ................
    Regional office operations................................           33,574            32,860            32,860              -714   ................
    Servicewide bill paying...................................           36,365            36,528            36,528              +163   ................
    National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.....................            7,022             5,009             7,022   ................           +2,013
    National Conservation Training Center.....................           29,314            21,956            25,014            -4,300            +3,058
    Aviation Management.......................................  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          143,240           139,402           144,473            +1,233            +5,071
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Resource Management..............................        1,279,002         1,130,644         1,292,067           +13,065          +161,423
                                                               =========================================================================================
                         Construction
 
Construction and rehabilitation:
    Line item construction projects...........................            9,093             9,093             9,093   ................  ................
    Bridge and dam safety programs............................            1,972             1,232             1,972   ................             +740
    Nationwide engineering service............................            5,475             5,421             5,475   ................              +54
    Deferred maintenance......................................           50,000   ................           33,873           -16,127           +33,873
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           66,540            15,746            50,413           -16,127           +34,667
 
    Rescission................................................  ................           -2,000   ................  ................           +2,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Construction.....................................           66,540            13,746            50,413           -16,127           +36,667
                                                               =========================================================================================
                       Land Acquisition
 
Acquisitions..................................................           31,250   ................           22,100            -9,150           +22,100
Acquisition management........................................           12,773             9,615            12,773   ................           +3,158
Recreational access...........................................            2,500   ................            3,000              +500            +3,000
Emergencies, hardships, and inholdings........................            5,351             1,641             5,351   ................           +3,710
Exchanges.....................................................            1,500               697             1,500   ................             +803
Land protection planning......................................              465   ................              465   ................             +465
Highlands Conservation Act Grants.............................           10,000   ................  ................          -10,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           63,839            11,953            45,189           -18,650           +33,236
 
Rescission....................................................  ................           -5,000   ................  ................           +5,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Land Acquisition.................................           63,839             6,953            45,189           -18,650           +38,236
                                                               =========================================================================================
       Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund
 
Grants and administration:
    Conservation grants.......................................           12,508   ................           10,508            -2,000           +10,508
    HCP assistance grants.....................................            7,485   ................            5,485            -2,000            +5,485
    Administration............................................            2,702   ................            2,702   ................           +2,702
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           22,695   ................           18,695            -4,000           +18,695
 
Land acquisition:
    Species recovery land acquisition.........................           11,162   ................           11,162   ................          +11,162
    HCP land acquisition grants to states.....................           19,638   ................           19,638   ................          +19,638
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           30,800   ................           30,800   ................          +30,800
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Cooperatiave Endangered Species Conservation Fund           53,495   ................           49,495            -4,000           +49,495
                                                               =========================================================================================
                 National Wildlife Refuge Fund
 
Payments in lieu of taxes.....................................           13,228   ................           13,228   ................          +13,228
 
           North American Wetlands Conservation Fund
 
North American Wetlands Conservation Fund.....................           40,000            33,600            43,000            +3,000            +9,400
 
            Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation
 
Migratory bird grants.........................................            3,910             3,900             3,910   ................              +10
 
            Multinational Species Conservation Fund
 
African elephant conservation fund............................            2,582             1,401             2,782              +200            +1,381
Asian elephant conservation fund..............................            1,557               845             1,757              +200              +912
Rhinoceros and tiger conservation fund........................            3,440             1,865             3,640              +200            +1,775
Great ape conservation fund...................................            1,975             1,071             2,175              +200            +1,104
Marine turtle conservation fund...............................            1,507               818             1,707              +200              +889
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Multinational Species Conservation Fund..........           11,061             6,000            12,061            +1,000            +6,061
                                                               =========================================================================================
               State and Tribal Wildlife Grants
 
State wildlife grants (formula)...............................           53,000            31,286            55,000            +2,000           +23,714
State wildlife grants (competitive)...........................            6,362   ................            6,362   ................           +6,362
Tribal wildlife grants........................................            4,209   ................            4,209   ................           +4,209
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, State and tribal wildlife grants.................           63,571            31,286            65,571            +2,000           +34,285
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE...................        1,594,646         1,226,129         1,574,934           -19,712          +348,805
                                                               =========================================================================================
                     NATIONAL PARK SERVICE
 
             Operation of the National Park System
 
Park Management:
    Resource stewardship......................................          334,437           327,223           334,437   ................           +7,214
    Visitor services..........................................          255,683           258,115           255,683   ................           -2,432
    Park protection...........................................          362,226           365,766           357,226            -5,000            -8,540
    Facility operations and maintenance.......................          810,019           781,963           825,019           +15,000           +43,056
    Park support..............................................          536,032           506,617           548,432           +12,400           +41,815
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................        2,298,397         2,239,684         2,320,797           +22,400           +81,113
 
External administrative costs.................................          179,572           185,433           179,572   ................           -5,861
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Operation of the National Park System............        2,477,969         2,425,117         2,500,369           +22,400           +75,252
                                                               =========================================================================================
             National Recreation and Preservation
 
Natural programs..............................................           14,170            11,139            14,170   ................           +3,031
Cultural programs.............................................           25,062            19,333            25,562              +500            +6,229
International park affairs....................................            1,648               970             1,648   ................             +678
Environmental and compliance review...........................              433               387               433   ................              +46
Grant administration..........................................            2,004   ................            2,004   ................           +2,004
Heritage Partnership Programs.................................           20,321               370            20,321   ................          +19,951
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Recreation and Preservation.............           63,638            32,199            64,138              +500           +31,939
                                                               =========================================================================================
                  Historic Preservation Fund
 
State historic preservation offices...........................           48,925            26,934            48,925   ................          +21,991
Tribal grants.................................................           11,485             5,738            11,485   ................           +5,747
Competitive grants............................................           13,500   ................           13,500   ................          +13,500
Save America's Treasures grants...............................           13,000   ................            5,000            -8,000            +5,000
Historic Revitalization grants................................            5,000   ................            5,000   ................           +5,000
Grants to Historically Black Colleges and Universities........            5,000   ................            5,000   ................           +5,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Historic Preservation Fund.......................           96,910            32,672            88,910            -8,000           +56,238
                                                               =========================================================================================
                         Construction
 
General Program:
    Line item construction and maintenance....................          137,011           157,011           157,011           +20,000   ................
    Emergency and unscheduled.................................            3,848             3,829             3,829               -19   ................
    Housing...................................................            2,200             2,187             2,187               -13   ................
    Dam safety................................................            1,247             1,240             1,240                -7   ................
    Equipment replacement.....................................           13,474             8,408             8,408            -5,066   ................
    Planning, construction....................................           12,711            17,453            17,453            +4,742   ................
    Construction program management...........................           38,713            41,000            41,000            +2,287   ................
    General management plans..................................           12,500            10,205            10,205            -2,295   ................
    General program increase..................................          138,000   ................          123,371           -14,629          +123,371
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Construction.....................................          359,704           241,333           364,704            +5,000          +123,371
                                                               =========================================================================================
Land and Water Conservation Fund (rescission of contract        ................          -28,140   ................  ................          +28,140
 authority)...................................................
 
             Land Acquisition and State Assistance
 
Assistance to States:
    State conservation grants (formula).......................          100,000   ................          100,000   ................         +100,000
    State conservation grants (competitive)...................           20,000   ................           20,000   ................          +20,000
    Administrative expenses...................................            4,006   ................            4,006   ................           +4,006
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          124,006   ................          124,006   ................         +124,006
 
National Park Service:
    Acquisitions..............................................           26,400   ................           13,903           -12,497           +13,903
    Acquisition management....................................            9,679             8,788             9,679   ................             +891
    Recreational access.......................................            2,000   ................            3,000            +1,000            +3,000
    Emergencies, hardships, relocations, and deficiencies.....            3,928   ................            3,928   ................           +3,928
    Inholdings, donations, and exchanges......................            4,928   ................            4,928   ................           +4,928
    American Battlefield Protection Program...................           10,000   ................           15,000            +5,000           +15,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           56,935             8,788            50,438            -6,497           +41,650
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Land Acquisition and State Assistance.........          180,941             8,788           174,444            -6,497          +165,656
 
Rescission....................................................  ................          -10,000   ................  ................          +10,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Land Acquisition and State Assistance............          180,941            -1,212           174,444            -6,497          +175,656
                                                               =========================================================================================
Centennial Challenge..........................................           23,000   ................           23,000   ................          +23,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, NATIONAL PARK SERVICE............................        3,202,162         2,701,969         3,215,565           +13,403          +513,596
                                                               =========================================================================================
                UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
 
             Surveys, Investigations, and Research
 
Ecosystems:
    Status and trends.........................................           20,473            11,325            20,473   ................           +9,148
    Fisheries: Aquatic and endangered resources...............           20,136             9,701            20,136   ................          +10,435
    Wildlife: Terrestrial and endangered resources............           46,007            33,440            46,257              +250           +12,817
    Terrestrial, Freshwater and marine environments...........           36,415            24,569            36,415   ................          +11,846
    Invasive species..........................................           17,330            17,096            17,330   ................             +234
    Cooperative research units................................           17,371   ................           17,621              +250           +17,621
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Ecosystems.......................................          157,732            96,131           158,232              +500           +62,101
                                                               =========================================================================================
Land Resources:
    National Land Imaging.....................................           93,094            75,514            98,894            +5,800           +23,380
    Land change science.......................................           34,070            14,739            34,070   ................          +19,331
    National and regional climate adaptation science centers..           25,335            12,989            25,335   ................          +12,346
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Land Resources...................................          152,499           103,242           158,299            +5,800           +55,057
                                                               =========================================================================================
Energy, Minerals, and Environmental Health:
    Mineral and Energy Resources:
    Minerals resources........................................           49,371            58,226            56,371            +7,000            -1,855
    Energy resources..........................................           30,872            25,879            34,672            +3,800            +8,793
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           80,243            84,105            91,043           +10,800            +6,938
 
    Environmental Health:
    Contaminant biology.......................................           10,197   ................           10,197   ................          +10,197
    Toxic substances hydrology................................           12,398   ................           12,398   ................          +12,398
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           22,595   ................           22,595   ................          +22,595
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Energy, Minerals, and Environmental Health.......          102,838            84,105           113,638           +10,800           +29,533
                                                               =========================================================================================
Natural Hazards:
    Earthquake hazards........................................           83,403            50,999            74,003            -9,400           +23,004
    Volcano hazards...........................................           42,621            22,306            30,661           -11,960            +8,355
    Landslide hazards.........................................            3,538             3,511             3,538   ................              +27
    Global seismographic network..............................            6,653             4,937             6,653   ................           +1,716
    Geomagnetism..............................................            1,888   ................            1,888   ................           +1,888
    Coastal/Marine Hazards and Resources......................           40,510            35,549            40,510   ................           +4,961
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Natural Hazards..................................          178,613           117,302           157,253           -21,360           +39,951
                                                               =========================================================================================
Water Resources:
    Water Availability and Use Science Program................           46,052            30,351            46,052   ................          +15,701
    Groundwater and Streamflow Information Program............           74,173            64,915            76,673            +2,500           +11,758
    National Water Quality Program............................           90,829            69,656            90,829   ................          +21,173
    Water Resources Research Act Program......................            6,500   ................            6,500   ................           +6,500
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Water Resources..................................          217,554           164,922           220,054            +2,500           +55,132
                                                               =========================================================================================
Core Science Systems:
    Science, synthesis, analysis, and research................           24,051            19,010            24,051   ................           +5,041
    National cooperative geological mapping...................           24,397            22,390            24,397   ................           +2,007
    National Geospatial Program...............................           67,854            50,878            69,614            +1,760           +18,736
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Core Science Systems.............................          116,302            92,278           118,062            +1,760           +25,784
                                                               =========================================================================================
Science Support:
    Administration and management.............................           80,881            69,534            80,881   ................          +11,347
    Information services......................................           21,947            19,716            21,947   ................           +2,231
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Science Support..................................          102,828            89,250           102,828   ................          +13,578
                                                               =========================================================================================
Facilities:
    Rental payments and operations & maintenance..............          104,927           105,219           104,927   ................             -292
    Deferred maintenance and capital improvement..............           15,164             7,231            15,164   ................           +7,933
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Facilities.......................................          120,091           112,450           120,091   ................           +7,641
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY..................        1,148,457           859,680         1,148,457   ................         +288,777
                                                               =========================================================================================
               BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT
 
                    Ocean Energy Management
 
Renewable energy..............................................           21,676            20,720            20,720              -956   ................
Conventional energy...........................................           58,123            61,799            61,799            +3,676   ................
Environmental assessment......................................           73,834            79,774            79,774            +5,940   ................
Executive direction...........................................           17,367            16,973            16,973              -394   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          171,000           179,266           179,266            +8,266   ................
 
Offsetting rental receipts....................................          -55,374           -47,455           -47,455            +7,919   ................
Cost recovery fees............................................           -1,460            -2,361            -2,361              -901   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, offsetting collections........................          -56,834           -49,816           -49,816            +7,018   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT................          114,166           129,450           129,450           +15,284   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
        BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT
 
         Offshore Safety and Environmental Enforcement
 
Environmental enforcement.....................................            4,453             4,674             4,674              +221   ................
Operations, safety and regulation.............................          148,454           146,340           146,340            -2,114   ................
Administrative operations.....................................           16,768            18,129            18,129            +1,361   ................
Executive direction...........................................           16,736            18,097            18,097            +1,361   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          186,411           187,240           187,240              +829   ................
 
Offsetting rental receipts....................................          -23,732           -20,338           -20,338            +3,394   ................
Inspection fees...............................................          -50,000           -43,765           -41,765            +8,235            +2,000
Cost recovery fees............................................           -4,139            -3,786            -3,786              +353   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, offsetting collections........................          -77,871           -67,889           -65,889           +11,982            +2,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Offshore Safety and Environmental Enforcement....          108,540           119,351           121,351           +12,811            +2,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
                      Oil Spill Research
 
Oil spill research............................................           14,899            12,700            12,700            -2,199   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT...          123,439           132,051           134,051           +10,612            +2,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
     OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT
 
                   Regulation and Technology
 
Environmental protection......................................           88,562            73,877            87,910              -652           +14,033
    Permit fees...............................................               40                40                40   ................  ................
    Offsetting collections....................................              -40               -40               -40   ................  ................
Technology development and transfer...........................           12,801            13,232            12,801   ................             -431
Financial management..........................................              505               495               495               -10   ................
Executive direction...........................................           13,936            13,694            13,694              -242   ................
Civil penalties (indefinite)..................................              100               100               100   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          115,904           101,398           115,000              -904           +13,602
 
Civil penalties (offsetting collections)......................             -100              -100              -100   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Regulation and Technology........................          115,804           101,298           114,900              -904           +13,602
                                                               =========================================================================================
                Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fund
 
Environmental restoration.....................................            9,480             6,383             8,834              -646            +2,451
Technology development and transfer...........................            3,544             2,508             2,508            -1,036   ................
Financial management..........................................            5,182             5,144             5,144               -38   ................
Executive direction...........................................            6,466             6,340             6,466   ................             +126
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           24,672            20,375            22,952            -1,720            +2,577
 
State grants..................................................          115,000   ................          115,000   ................         +115,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fund..................          139,672            20,375           137,952            -1,720          +117,577
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND                   255,476           121,673           252,852            -2,624          +131,179
       ENFORCEMENT............................................
                                                               =========================================================================================
    BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS AND BUREAU OF INDIAN EDUCATION
 
                 Operation of Indian Programs
 
Tribal Government:
    Aid to tribal government..................................           28,698            24,326            28,902              +204            +4,576
    Consolidated tribal government program....................           75,429            72,634            75,839              +410            +3,205
    Self governance compacts..................................          165,069           157,790           166,225            +1,156            +8,435
    New tribes................................................            1,120             1,120             1,120   ................  ................
    Small and needy tribes....................................            4,448   ................            4,448   ................           +4,448
    Road maintenance..........................................           34,653            28,318            34,823              +170            +6,505
    Tribal government program oversight.......................            8,550             7,326             8,616               +66            +1,290
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          317,967           291,514           319,973            +2,006           +28,459
 
Human Services:
    Social services...........................................           52,832            32,864            53,084              +252           +20,220
    Welfare assistance........................................           76,000            65,794            76,000   ................          +10,206
    Indian child welfare act..................................           19,080            13,696            19,154               +74            +5,458
    Housing improvement program...............................            9,708   ................            9,708   ................           +9,708
    Human services tribal design..............................              263               259               270                +7               +11
    Human services program oversight..........................            3,180             2,745             3,200               +20              +455
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          161,063           115,358           161,416              +353           +46,058
 
Trust--Natural Resources Management:
    Natural resources, general................................            4,882             4,866             4,919               +37               +53
    Irrigation operations and maintenance.....................           14,009             9,134            14,023               +14            +4,889
    Rights protection implementation..........................           40,161            24,737            40,273              +112           +15,536
    Tribal management/development program.....................           11,652             8,660            12,036              +384            +3,376
    Endangered species........................................            2,693             1,306             2,697                +4            +1,391
    Cooperative landscape conservation........................            9,956   ................            9,956   ................           +9,956
    Integrated resource information program...................            2,971             2,576             2,974                +3              +398
    Agriculture and range.....................................           31,096            27,977            31,251              +155            +3,274
    Forestry..................................................           54,877            48,872            54,736              -141            +5,864
    Water resources...........................................           10,581             8,567            10,614               +33            +2,047
    Fish, wildlife and parks..................................           15,260            11,436            15,287               +27            +3,851
    Resource management program oversight.....................            6,064             5,293             6,104               +40              +811
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          204,202           153,424           204,870              +668           +51,446
 
Trust--Real Estate Services...................................          129,841           105,484           130,680              +839           +25,196
 
Education:
    Elementary and secondary programs (forward funded):
        ISEP formula funds....................................          402,906           378,055           404,165            +1,259           +26,110
        ISEP program adjustments..............................            5,457             2,617             5,479               +22            +2,862
        Education program enhancements........................           12,248             6,341            12,278               +30            +5,937
        Tribal education departments..........................            2,500   ................            2,500   ................           +2,500
        Student transportation................................           56,285            50,802            56,413              +128            +5,611
        Early child and family development....................           18,810   ................           18,810   ................          +18,810
        Tribal grant support costs............................           81,036            73,973            81,036   ................           +7,063
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal..............................................          579,242           511,788           580,681            +1,439           +68,893
 
    Post secondary programs (forward funded):
        Tribal colleges and universities......................           69,793            65,664            69,793   ................           +4,129
        Tribal technical colleges.............................            7,505             6,464             7,505   ................           +1,041
        Haskell & SIPI........................................           16,885   ................           22,694            +5,809           +22,694
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal..............................................           94,183            72,128            99,992            +5,809           +27,864
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal, forward funded education....................          673,425           583,916           680,673            +7,248           +96,757
 
    Elementary and secondary programs:
        Facilities operations.................................           66,608            60,405            66,795              +187            +6,390
        Facilities maintenance................................           59,552            53,723            59,774              +222            +6,051
        Juvenile detention center education...................              500   ................              500   ................             +500
        Johnson O'Malley assistance grants....................           14,903   ................           14,903   ................          +14,903
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal..............................................          141,563           114,128           141,972              +409           +27,844
 
    Post secondary programs:
    Haskell & SIPI............................................           22,513            19,376   ................          -22,513           -19,376
    Tribal colleges and universities supplements..............            1,220             1,148             1,220   ................              +72
    Scholarships & adult education............................           34,996   ................           34,996   ................          +34,996
    Special higher education scholarships.....................            2,992   ................            2,992   ................           +2,992
    Science post graduate scholarship fund....................            2,450   ................            2,450   ................           +2,450
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal..............................................           64,171            20,524            41,658           -22,513           +21,134
 
    Education management:
        Education program management..........................           24,957            15,575            25,053               +96            +9,478
        Education IT..........................................           10,297             7,707            10,302                +5            +2,595
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal..............................................           35,254            23,282            35,355              +101           +12,073
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Education...................................          914,413           741,850           899,658           -14,755          +157,808
 
Public Safety and Justice:
    Law enforcement:
        Criminal investigations and police services...........          211,632           190,753           212,559              +927           +21,806
        Detention/corrections.................................          100,456            94,027           100,982              +526            +6,955
        Inspections/internal affairs..........................            3,510             3,335             3,528               +18              +193
        Law enforcement special initiatives...................           10,368             8,659            10,412               +44            +1,753
        Indian police academy.................................            4,902             4,665             4,925               +23              +260
        Tribal justice support................................           22,264             7,233            22,271                +7           +15,038
            VAWA..............................................           (2,000)  ................           (2,000)  ................          (+2,000)
            PL 280 courts.....................................          (13,000)  ................          (13,000)  ................         (+13,000)
        Law enforcement program management....................            6,530             5,381             6,555               +25            +1,174
        Facilities operations and maintenance.................           13,657            12,596            13,701               +44            +1,105
    Tribal courts.............................................           30,618            22,110            30,744              +126            +8,634
    Fire protection...........................................            1,583             1,372             1,590                +7              +218
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal..............................................          405,520           350,131           407,267            +1,747           +57,136
 
Community and economic development............................           46,447            35,826            46,579              +132           +10,753
Executive direction and administrative services...............          231,747           209,409           233,447            +1,700           +24,038
(Amounts available until expended, account-wide)..............          (53,991)          (35,598)          (53,991)  ................         (+18,393)
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Operation of Indian Programs.....................        2,411,200         2,002,996         2,403,890            -7,310          +400,894
                                                               =========================================================================================
                    Contract Support Costs
 
Contract support costs........................................          236,600           242,000           242,000            +5,400   ................
Indian self-determination fund................................            5,000             5,000             5,000   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Contract Support Costs...........................          241,600           247,000           247,000            +5,400   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
                         Construction
 
Education.....................................................          238,245            72,851           238,250                +5          +165,399
Public safety and justice.....................................           35,309            10,421            35,310                +1           +24,889
Resources management..........................................           67,192            38,026            72,231            +5,039           +34,205
General administration........................................           13,367            11,990            13,628              +261            +1,638
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          354,113           133,288           359,419            +5,306          +226,131
 
Rescission....................................................  ................          -21,367   ................  ................          +21,367
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Construction.....................................          354,113           111,921           359,419            +5,306          +247,498
                                                               =========================================================================================
   Indian Land and Water Claim Settlements and Miscellaneous
                      Payments to Indians
 
Land Settlements:
    White Earth Land Settlement Act (Admin) (Public Law99-264)              625   ................  ................             -625   ................
    Hoopa-Yurok Settlement Act (Public Law100-580)............              250   ................  ................             -250   ................
 
Water Settlements:
    Pyramid Lake Water Rights Settlement (Public Law101-618)..              142   ................  ................             -142   ................
    Navajo Water Resources Development Trust Fund (Public                 4,011   ................  ................           -4,011   ................
     Law111-11)...............................................
    Navajo-Gallup Water Supply Project (Public Law111-11).....           21,720   ................  ................          -21,720   ................
    Pechanga Band of Luiseno Mission Indians Water Rights                 9,192   ................  ................           -9,192   ................
     Settlement Act (Public Law114-322).......................
    Blackfeet Water Rights Settlement (Public Law 114-322)....           19,517   ................  ................          -19,517   ................
Unallocated...................................................  ................           45,644            55,457           +55,457            +9,813
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Indian Land and Water Claim Settlements and                 55,457            45,644            55,457   ................           +9,813
       Miscellaneous Payments to Indians......................
                                                               =========================================================================================
            Indian Guaranteed Loan Program Account
 
Indian guaranteed loan program account........................            9,272             6,699             9,279                +7            +2,580
 
                   Administrative Provisions
 
Rescission....................................................           -8,000   ................  ................           +8,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS AND BUREAU OF INDIAN            3,063,642         2,414,260         3,075,045           +11,403          +660,785
       EDUCATION..............................................
                                                               =========================================================================================
                     DEPARTMENTAL OFFICES
 
                    Office of the Secretary
 
Leadership and administration.................................          105,405           107,368           107,368            +1,963   ................
Management services...........................................           18,777            27,305            27,305            +8,528   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of the Secretary..........................          124,182           134,673           134,673           +10,491   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
                        Insular Affairs
 
                   Assistance to Territories
 
Territorial Assistance:
    Office of Insular Affairs.................................            9,448             9,430             9,448   ................              +18
    Technical assistance......................................           18,000            14,671            20,800            +2,800            +6,129
    Maintenance assistance fund...............................            4,000             1,023             4,000   ................           +2,977
    Brown tree snake..........................................            3,500             2,837             3,500   ................             +663
    Coral reef initiative and Natural Resources...............            2,200               946             2,500              +300            +1,554
    Empowering Insular Communities............................            5,000             2,811             5,000   ................           +2,189
    Compact impact............................................            4,000   ................            4,000   ................           +4,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Territorial Assistance........................           46,148            31,718            49,248            +3,100           +17,530
 
American Samoa operations grants..............................           23,002            21,529            23,720              +718            +2,191
Northern Marianas covenant grants.............................           27,720            27,720            27,720   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Assistance to Territories........................           96,870            80,967           100,688            +3,818           +19,721
                                                               =========================================================================================
                  Compact of Free Association
 
Compact of Free Association--Federal services.................            2,813             2,636             2,813   ................             +177
Enewetak support..............................................              550               473               750              +200              +277
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Compact of Free Association...................            3,363             3,109             3,563              +200              +454
 
Compact payments, Palau (Title I, General Provision)..........          123,824   ................  ................         -123,824   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Compact of Free Association......................          127,187             3,109             3,563          -123,624              +454
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, Insular Affairs..................................          224,057            84,076           104,251          -119,806           +20,175
                                                               =========================================================================================
                    Office of the Solicitor
 
Legal services................................................           59,951            58,996            58,996              -955   ................
General administration........................................            4,982             4,940             4,940               -42   ................
Ethics........................................................            1,742             1,738             1,738                -4   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of the Solicitor..........................           66,675            65,674            65,674            -1,001   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
                  Office of Inspector General
 
Audit and investigations......................................           38,538            39,522            39,522              +984   ................
Administrative services and information management............           12,485            12,964            12,964              +479   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of Inspector General......................           51,023            52,486            52,486            +1,463   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
        Office of Special Trustee for American Indians
 
                    Federal Trust Programs
 
Program operations, support, and improvements.................          117,712           102,370           110,692            -7,020            +8,322
    (Office of Historical Accounting).........................          (18,990)  ................          (19,016)             (+26)         (+19,016)
Executive direction...........................................            1,688             1,697             1,688   ................               -9
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Trust Programs...........................          119,400           104,067           112,380            -7,020            +8,313
                                                               =========================================================================================
               Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation
 
Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation.............................  ................            3,000   ................  ................           -3,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of Special Trustee for American Indians...          119,400           107,067           112,380            -7,020            +5,313
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, DEPARTMENTAL OFFICES.............................          585,337           443,976           469,464          -115,873           +25,488
                                                               =========================================================================================
                   DEPARTMENT-WIDE PROGRAMS
 
                   Wildland Fire Management
 
Fire Operations:
    Preparedness..............................................          332,784           322,179           322,179           -10,605   ................
    Fire suppression..........................................          389,406           388,135           388,135            -1,271   ................
        Additional suppression funding........................  ................  ................          175,865          +175,865          +175,865
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Fire operations.............................          722,190           710,314           886,179          +163,989          +175,865
 
Other Operations:
    Fuels management..........................................          184,000           150,603           188,000            +4,000           +37,397
    Burned area rehabilitation................................           20,470             9,467            20,470   ................          +11,003
    Fire facilities...........................................           18,427   ................           18,427   ................          +18,427
    Joint fire science........................................            3,000   ................            3,000   ................           +3,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Other operations..............................          225,897           160,070           229,897            +4,000           +69,827
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Wildland fire management.........................          948,087           870,384         1,116,076          +167,989          +245,692
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, All Wildland Fire Accounts.......................          948,087           870,384         1,116,076          +167,989          +245,692
                                                               =========================================================================================
               Central Hazardous Materials Fund
 
Central hazardous materials fund..............................           10,010             2,000            10,010   ................           +8,010
 
            Natural Resource Damage Assessment Fund
 
Damage assessments............................................            2,000             1,500             2,000   ................             +500
Program management............................................            2,192             1,000             2,192   ................           +1,192
Restoration support...........................................            2,575             1,900             2,575   ................             +675
Oil Spill Preparedness........................................            1,000               200             1,000   ................             +800
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Natural Resource Damage Assessment Fund..........            7,767             4,600             7,767   ................           +3,167
                                                               =========================================================================================
Working Capital Fund..........................................           62,370            56,735            56,735            -5,635   ................
 
              Office of Natural Resources Revenue
 
Natural Resources Revenue.....................................          137,757           137,505           137,505              -252   ................
 
                   Payment in Lieu of Taxes
 
Payments to local governments in lieu of taxes................  ................          465,000   ................  ................         -465,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, DEPARTMENT-WIDE PROGRAMS.........................        1,165,991         1,536,224         1,328,093          +162,102          -208,131
                                                               =========================================================================================
                      GENERAL PROVISIONS
 
Payments to local governments in lieu of taxes (PILT) (Sec.             530,000   ................          500,000           -30,000          +500,000
 XXX).........................................................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, TITLE I, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR..............       13,115,260        10,588,690        13,171,309           +56,049        +2,582,619
          Appropriations......................................      (13,123,260)      (10,670,662)      (13,171,309)         (+48,049)      (+2,500,647)
          Rescissions.........................................          (-8,000)         (-53,832)  ................          (+8,000)         (+53,832)
          Rescissions of contract authority...................  ................         (-28,140)  ................  ................         (+28,140)
                                                               =========================================================================================
           TITLE II--ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
 
                    Science and Technology
 
Clean Air.....................................................          116,541            84,905           116,541   ................          +31,636
    (Atmospheric Protection Program)..........................           (8,018)  ................           (8,018)  ................          (+8,018)
Enforcement...................................................           13,669            10,486            13,669   ................           +3,183
Homeland security.............................................           33,122            28,177            33,122   ................           +4,945
Indoor air and Radiation......................................            5,997             4,666             5,997   ................           +1,331
IT/Data management/Security...................................            3,089             2,725             3,089   ................             +364
Operations and administration.................................           68,339            74,828            68,339   ................           -6,489
Pesticide licensing...........................................            6,027             5,058             6,027   ................             +969
Research: Air and energy......................................           91,906            30,711            94,906            +3,000           +64,195
Research: Chemical safety and sustainability..................          126,930            84,004           126,930   ................          +42,926
    (Research: Computational toxicology)......................          (21,409)          (17,213)          (21,409)  ................          (+4,196)
    (Research: Endocrine disruptor)...........................          (16,253)          (10,006)          (16,253)  ................          (+6,247)
Research: National priorities.................................            4,100   ................            5,000              +900            +5,000
Research: Safe and sustainable water resources................          106,257            67,261           106,257   ................          +38,996
Research: Sustainable and healthy communities.................          134,327            52,549           134,327   ................          +81,778
Water: Human health protection................................            3,519             3,595             3,519   ................              -76
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Science and Technology........................          713,823           448,965           717,723            +3,900          +268,758
 
Rescission....................................................           -7,350   ................          -11,250            -3,900           -11,250
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Science and Technology...........................          706,473           448,965           706,473   ................         +257,508
      (By transfer from Hazardous Substance Superfund)........          (15,496)          (17,398)          (17,398)          (+1,902)  ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
             Environmental Programs and Management
 
Brownfields...................................................           25,593            16,082            25,593   ................           +9,511
Clean air.....................................................          273,108           142,901           273,108   ................         +130,207
    (Atmospheric Protection Program)..........................          (95,436)          (13,542)          (95,436)  ................         (+81,894)
Compliance....................................................          101,665            86,374           101,665   ................          +15,291
Enforcement...................................................          240,637           197,280           240,637   ................          +43,357
    (Environmental justice)...................................           (6,737)           (2,000)           (6,737)  ................          (+4,737)
Environmental protection: National priorities.................           12,700   ................           15,000            +2,300           +15,000
 
Geographic programs:
    Great Lakes Restoration Initiative........................          300,000            30,000           300,000   ................         +270,000
    Chesapeake Bay............................................           73,000             7,300            73,000   ................          +65,700
    San Franciso Bay..........................................            4,819   ................            4,819   ................           +4,819
    Puget Sound...............................................           28,000   ................           28,000   ................          +28,000
    Long Island Sound.........................................           12,000   ................           12,000   ................          +12,000
    Gulf of Mexico............................................           12,542   ................           14,542            +2,000           +14,542
    South Florida.............................................            1,704   ................            3,204            +1,500            +3,204
    Lake Champlain............................................            8,399   ................           11,000            +2,601           +11,000
    Lake Pontchartrain........................................              948   ................              948   ................             +948
    Southern New England Estuaries............................            5,000   ................            5,000   ................           +5,000
    Columbia River Basin......................................  ................  ................            1,000            +1,000            +1,000
    Other geographic activities...............................            1,445   ................            1,445   ................           +1,445
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          447,857            37,300           454,958            +7,101          +417,658
 
Homeland security.............................................           10,195             9,760            10,195   ................             +435
Indoor air and radiation......................................           27,637             4,221            27,637   ................          +23,416
Information exchange/Outreach.................................          126,538            85,586           126,538   ................          +40,952
    (Children and other sensitive populations: Agency                    (6,548)           (2,018)           (6,548)  ................          (+4,530)
     coordination)............................................
    (Environmental education).................................           (8,702)  ................           (8,702)  ................          (+8,702)
International programs........................................           15,400             4,188            15,400   ................          +11,212
IT/Data management/Security...................................           90,536            83,019            94,511            +3,975           +11,492
Legal/science/regulatory/economic review......................          111,414           100,652           111,414   ................          +10,762
Operations and administration.................................          480,751           480,206           480,751   ................             +545
Pesticide licensing...........................................          109,363            79,760           109,363   ................          +29,603
Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).................          109,377            73,851           112,377            +3,000           +38,526
Toxics risk review and prevention.............................           92,521            58,626            92,521   ................          +33,895
    (Endocrine disruptors)....................................           (7,553)  ................           (7,553)  ................          (+7,553)
Underground storage tanks (LUST/UST)..........................           11,295             5,615            11,295   ................           +5,680
 
Water: Ecosystems:
    National estuary program / Coastal waterways..............           26,723   ................           26,723   ................          +26,723
    Wetlands..................................................           21,065            17,913            21,065   ................           +3,152
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           47,788            17,913            47,788   ................          +29,875
 
Water: Human health protection................................           98,507            80,543            98,507   ................          +17,964
Water quality protection......................................          210,417           174,975           210,417   ................          +35,442
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Environmental Programs and Management.........        2,643,299         1,738,852         2,659,675           +16,376          +920,823
 
Energy Star (legislative proposal)............................  ................           46,000   ................  ................          -46,000
Offsetting collections, Energy Star (legislative proposal)....  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................
Rescission....................................................          -45,300   ................          -61,676           -16,376           -61,676
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Environmental Programs and Management............        2,597,999         1,784,852         2,597,999   ................         +813,147
                                                               =========================================================================================
        Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest System Fund
 
E-Manifest System Fund........................................            3,674   ................  ................           -3,674   ................
Offsetting Collections........................................           -3,674   ................  ................           +3,674   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest System Fund..  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
                  Office of Inspector General
 
Audits, evaluations, and investigations.......................           41,489            37,475            41,489   ................           +4,014
(by transfer from Hazardous Substance Superfund)..............           (8,778)           (8,718)           (8,718)             (-60)  ................
 
                   Buildings and Facilities
 
Homeland security: Protection of EPA personnel and                        6,676             6,176             6,676   ................             +500
 infrastructure...............................................
Operations and administration.................................           27,791            33,377            27,791   ................           -5,586
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Buildings and Facilities.........................           34,467            39,553            34,467   ................           -5,086
                                                               =========================================================================================
                 Hazardous Substance Superfund
 
Audits, evaluations, and investigations.......................            8,778             8,718             8,778   ................              +60
Compliance....................................................              995               988               995   ................               +7
Enforcement...................................................          166,375           164,691           166,375   ................           +1,684
Homeland security.............................................           32,616            32,686            32,616   ................              -70
Indoor air and radiation......................................            1,985             1,972             1,985   ................              +13
Information exchange/Outreach.................................            1,328             1,319             1,328   ................               +9
IT/data management/security...................................           14,485            18,906            14,485   ................           -4,421
Legal/science/regulatory/economic review......................            1,253               577             1,253   ................             +676
Operations and administration.................................          128,105           124,700           128,105   ................           +3,405
Research: Chemical safety and sustainability..................            2,824             5,021             2,824   ................           -2,197
Research: Sustainable communities.............................           11,463            10,885            11,463   ................             +578
 
Superfund cleanup:
    Superfund: Emergency response and removal.................          181,306           181,306           181,306   ................  ................
    Superfund: Emergency preparedness.........................            7,636             7,584             7,636   ................              +52
    Superfund: Federal facilities.............................           21,125            20,982            21,125   ................             +143
    Superfund: Remedial.......................................          511,673           508,495           511,673   ................           +3,178
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          721,740           718,367           721,740   ................           +3,373
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Hazardous Substance Superfund....................        1,091,947         1,088,830         1,091,947   ................           +3,117
      (Transfer out to Inspector General).....................          (-8,778)          (-8,718)          (-8,718)             (+60)  ................
      (Transfer out to Science and Technology)................         (-15,496)         (-17,398)         (-17,398)          (-1,902)  ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund [LUST]
 
Enforcement...................................................              620               589               620   ................              +31
Operations and administration.................................            1,352             1,331             1,352   ................              +21
Research: Sustainable communities.............................              320               320               320   ................  ................
Underground storage tanks (LUST/UST)..........................           89,649            45,292            89,649   ................          +44,357
    (LUST/UST)................................................           (9,240)           (6,452)           (9,240)  ................          (+2,788)
    (LUST cooperative agreements).............................          (55,040)          (38,840)          (55,040)  ................         (+16,200)
    (Energy Policy Act grants)................................          (25,369)  ................          (25,369)  ................         (+25,369)
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund......           91,941            47,532            91,941   ................          +44,409
                                                               =========================================================================================
                   Inland Oil Spill Program
 
Compliance....................................................              139   ................              139   ................             +139
Enforcement...................................................            2,413             2,219             2,413   ................             +194
Oil...........................................................           14,409            12,273            14,409   ................           +2,136
Operations and administration.................................              584               665               584   ................              -81
Research: Sustainable communities.............................              664               516               664   ................             +148
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Inland Oil Spill Program.........................           18,209            15,673            18,209   ................           +2,536
                                                               =========================================================================================
           State and Tribal Assistance Grants [STAG]
 
Alaska Native villages........................................           20,000             3,000            25,000            +5,000           +22,000
Brownfields projects..........................................           80,000            62,000            80,000   ................          +18,000
Clean water state revolving fund [SRF]........................        1,393,887         1,393,887         1,394,000              +113              +113
Diesel emissions grants.......................................           75,000            10,000            50,000           -25,000           +40,000
Drinking water state revolving fund [SRF].....................          863,233           863,233           864,000              +767              +767
Mexico border.................................................           10,000   ................           15,000            +5,000           +15,000
Targeted airshed grants.......................................           40,000   ................           50,000           +10,000           +50,000
Water quality monitoring (Public Law 114-322).................            4,000   ................            4,000   ................           +4,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Infrastructure assistance grants..............        2,486,120         2,332,120         2,482,000            -4,120          +149,880
 
Categorical grants:
    Beaches protection........................................            9,549   ................            9,549   ................           +9,549
    Brownfields...............................................           47,745            31,791            47,745   ................          +15,954
    Environmental information.................................            9,646             6,422             9,646   ................           +3,224
    Hazardous waste financial assistance......................           99,693            66,381            99,693   ................          +33,312
    Lead......................................................           14,049   ................           14,049   ................          +14,049
    Nonpoint source (Sec. 319)................................          170,915   ................          170,915   ................         +170,915
    Pesticides enforcement....................................           18,050            10,531            18,050   ................           +7,519
    Pesticides program implementation.........................           12,701             8,457            12,701   ................           +4,244
    Pollution control (Sec. 106)..............................          230,806           153,683           230,806   ................          +77,123
    (Water quality monitoring)................................          (17,848)          (11,884)          (17,848)  ................          (+5,964)
    Pollution prevention......................................            4,765   ................            4,765   ................           +4,765
    Public water system supervision...........................          101,963            67,892           101,963   ................          +34,071
    Radon.....................................................            8,051   ................            8,051   ................           +8,051
    State and local air quality management....................          228,219           151,961           228,219   ................          +76,258
    Toxics substances compliance..............................            4,919             3,276             4,919   ................           +1,643
    Tribal air quality management.............................           12,829             8,963            12,829   ................           +3,866
    Tribal general assistance program.........................           65,476            44,233            65,476   ................          +21,243
    Underground injection control (UIC).......................           10,506             6,995            10,506   ................           +3,511
    Underground storage tanks.................................            1,498   ................            1,498   ................           +1,498
    Wetlands program development..............................           14,661             9,762            14,661   ................           +4,899
    Multipurpose grants.......................................           10,000            27,000            27,000           +17,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Categorical grants............................        1,076,041           597,347         1,093,041           +17,000          +495,694
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, State and Tribal Assistance Grants...............        3,562,161         2,929,467         3,575,041           +12,880          +645,574
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Program
 
Administrative Expenses.......................................            5,000             3,000             5,000   ................           +2,000
Direct Loan Subsidy...........................................            5,000            17,000             5,000   ................          -12,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation                 10,000            20,000            10,000   ................          -10,000
       Program................................................
                                                               =========================================================================================
                   Administrative Provisions
 
E-Manifest System Fund........................................  ................            8,000             8,000            +8,000   ................
Offsetting Collections........................................  ................           -8,000            -8,000            -8,000   ................
Rescission....................................................          -96,198          -220,460          -109,078           -12,880          +111,382
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Administrative Provisions.....................          -96,198          -220,460          -109,078           -12,880          +111,382
      TOTAL, TITLE II, ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY........        8,058,488         6,191,887         8,058,488   ................       +1,866,601
          Appropriations......................................       (8,207,336)       (6,412,347)       (8,240,492)         (+33,156)      (+1,828,145)
          Rescissions.........................................        (-148,848)        (-220,460)        (-182,004)         (-33,156)         (+38,456)
      (By transfer)...........................................          (24,274)          (26,116)          (26,116)          (+1,842)  ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
                  TITLE III--RELATED AGENCIES
 
                   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
 
Under Secretary for Natural Resources and the Environment.....              875               875               875   ................  ................
 
                        FOREST SERVICE
 
                 Forest and Rangeland Research
 
Forest inventory and analysis.................................           77,000            75,000            77,000   ................           +2,000
Research and development programs.............................          220,000           171,050           223,000            +3,000           +51,950
Fire plan research and development............................  ................           14,750   ................  ................          -14,750
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Forest and Rangeland Research.................          297,000           260,800           300,000            +3,000           +39,200
 
Unobligated balances (rescission).............................  ................           -2,000   ................  ................           +2,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Forest and rangeland research....................          297,000           258,800           300,000            +3,000           +41,200
                                                               =========================================================================================
                  State and Private Forestry
 
Landscape scale restoration...................................           14,000   ................           14,000   ................          +14,000
 
Forest Health Management:
    Federal lands forest health management....................           55,500            51,495            55,500   ................           +4,005
    Cooperative lands forest health management................           41,000            34,376            41,000   ................           +6,624
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           96,500            85,871            96,500   ................          +10,629
 
Cooperative Fire Assistance:
    State fire assistance (National Fire Capacity)............           80,000            65,930            80,000   ................          +14,070
    Volunteer fire assistance (Rural Fire Capacity)...........           16,000            11,020            16,000   ................           +4,980
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           96,000            76,950            96,000   ................          +19,050
 
Cooperative Forestry:
    Forest stewardship (Working Forest Lands).................           20,500            19,475            20,500   ................           +1,025
    Forest legacy.............................................           67,025   ................           65,490            -1,535           +65,490
    Community forest and open space conservation..............            4,000   ................            4,000   ................           +4,000
    Urban and community forestry..............................           28,500   ................           28,500   ................          +28,500
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          120,025            19,475           118,490            -1,535           +99,015
 
International forestry........................................            9,000   ................            9,000   ................           +9,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, State and Private Forestry....................          335,525           182,296           333,990            -1,535          +151,694
 
Unobligated balances: Forest legacy (rescission)..............           -5,938            -4,000   ................           +5,938            +4,000
Unobligated balances (rescission).............................  ................           -6,000   ................  ................           +6,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           -5,938           -10,000   ................           +5,938           +10,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, State and Private Forestry.......................          329,587           172,296           333,990            +4,403          +161,694
                                                               =========================================================================================
                    National Forest System
 
Land management planning, assessment and monitoring...........          179,263           156,750           180,000              +737           +23,250
Recreation, heritage and wilderness...........................          257,848           240,236           260,000            +2,152           +19,764
Grazing management............................................           56,856            48,070            57,000              +144            +8,930
Hazardous fuels...............................................          430,000           390,000           435,000            +5,000           +45,000
Forest products...............................................          366,000           341,165           368,000            +2,000           +26,835
Vegetation and watershed management...........................          180,000           165,680           180,000   ................          +14,320
Wildlife and fish habitat management..........................          136,430           118,750           137,000              +570           +18,250
Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Fund...............           40,000   ................           40,000   ................          +40,000
Minerals and geology management...............................           74,200            64,600            75,000              +800           +10,400
Landownership management (Land Use Authorization and Access)..           74,000            65,550            76,500            +2,500           +10,950
Law enforcement operations....................................          129,153           129,153           129,153   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Forest System...........................        1,923,750         1,719,954         1,937,653           +13,903          +217,699
                                                               =========================================================================================
              Capital Improvement and Maintenance
 
Facilities....................................................          151,000            11,162           151,000   ................         +139,838
Roads.........................................................          218,000            71,481           218,000   ................         +146,519
Trails........................................................           80,000            12,065            80,000   ................          +67,935
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Capital improvement and maintenance...........          449,000            94,708           449,000   ................         +354,292
 
Deferral of road and trail fund payment.......................          -15,000           -15,000           -15,000   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Capital improvement and maintenance..............          434,000            79,708           434,000   ................         +354,292
                                                               =========================================================================================
                       Land Acquisition
 
Acquisitions..................................................           50,035   ................           59,497            +9,462           +59,497
Acquisition management........................................            7,352   ................            7,352   ................           +7,352
Recreational access...........................................            4,700   ................            5,000              +300            +5,000
Critical inholdings/wilderness................................            2,000   ................            2,000   ................           +2,000
Cash equalization.............................................              250   ................              250   ................             +250
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           64,337   ................           74,099            +9,762           +74,099
 
Unobligated balances (rescission).............................  ................          -17,000           -16,028           -16,028              +972
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Land Acquisition.................................           64,337           -17,000            58,071            -6,266           +75,071
                                                               =========================================================================================
Acquisition of land for national forests, special acts........              850               700               700              -150   ................
Acquisition of lands to complete land exchanges...............              192               150               150               -42   ................
Range betterment fund.........................................            2,065             1,700             1,700              -365   ................
Gifts, donations and bequests for forest and rangeland                       45                45                45   ................  ................
 research.....................................................
Management of national forest lands for subsistence uses......            2,500             1,850             2,500   ................             +650
                   Wildland Fire Management
 
Fire operations:
    Wildland fire preparedness................................        1,323,520         1,339,620         1,339,620           +16,100   ................
    Wildland fire suppression operations......................        1,056,818         1,165,366         1,165,366          +108,548   ................
      Additional suppression funding..........................          500,000   ................          724,634          +224,634          +724,634
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Fire operations...............................        2,880,338         2,504,986         3,229,620          +349,282          +724,634
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Wildland Fire Management......................        2,880,338         2,504,986         3,229,620          +349,282          +724,634
 
Rescission....................................................  ................          -65,000   ................  ................          +65,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, all wildland fire accounts.......................        2,880,338         2,439,986         3,229,620          +349,282          +789,634
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, Forest Service without Wildland Fire Management..        3,054,326         2,218,203         3,068,809           +14,483          +850,606
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, FOREST SERVICE...................................        5,934,664         4,658,189         6,298,429          +363,765        +1,640,240
                                                               =========================================================================================
            DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
 
                     INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE
 
                    Indian Health Services
 
Clinical Services:
    Hospital and health clinics...............................        2,045,128         2,189,688         2,198,623          +153,495            +8,935
    Dental health.............................................          195,283           203,783           203,872            +8,589               +89
    Mental health.............................................           99,900           105,169           105,281            +5,381              +112
    Alcohol and substance abuse...............................          227,788           235,286           245,566           +17,778           +10,280
    Purchased/referred care...................................          962,695           954,957           964,819            +2,124            +9,862
    Indian Health Care Improvement Fund.......................           72,280   ................  ................          -72,280   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................        3,603,074         3,688,883         3,718,161          +115,087           +29,278
 
Preventive Health:
    Public health nursing.....................................           85,043            87,023            89,159            +4,116            +2,136
    Health education..........................................           19,871   ................           20,568              +697           +20,568
    Community health representatives..........................           62,888   ................           62,888   ................          +62,888
    Immunization (Alaska).....................................            2,127             2,035             2,127   ................              +92
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          169,929            89,058           174,742            +4,813           +85,684
 
Other services:
    Urban Indian health.......................................           49,315            46,422            49,315   ................           +2,893
    Indian health professions.................................           49,363            43,394            49,558              +195            +6,164
    Tribal management grant program...........................            2,465   ................            2,465   ................           +2,465
    Direct operations.........................................           72,338            73,431            72,338   ................           -1,093
    Self-governance...........................................            5,806             4,787             5,806   ................           +1,019
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          179,287           168,034           179,482              +195           +11,448
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Indian Health Services...........................        3,952,290         3,945,975         4,072,385          +120,095          +126,410
                                                               =========================================================================================
             Special Diabetes Program for Indians
 
Program costs (legislative proposal)..........................  ................          150,000   ................  ................         -150,000
 
                    Contract Support Costs
 
Contract support..............................................          717,970           822,227           822,227          +104,257   ................
 
                   Indian Health Facilities
 
Maintenance and improvement...................................          167,527            75,745           167,527   ................          +91,782
Sanitation facilities construction............................          192,033           101,772           192,033   ................          +90,261
Health care facilities construction...........................          243,480            79,500           243,480   ................         +163,980
Facilities and environmental health support...................          240,758           228,852           250,758           +10,000           +21,906
Equipment.....................................................           23,706            19,952            23,706   ................           +3,754
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Indian Health Facilities.........................          867,504           505,821           877,504           +10,000          +371,683
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE............................        5,537,764         5,424,023         5,772,116          +234,352          +348,093
                                                               =========================================================================================
                 NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
 
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences...........           77,349            53,967            78,349            +1,000           +24,382
 
       AGENCY FOR TOXIC SUBSTANCES AND DISEASE REGISTRY
 
Toxic substances and environmental public health..............           74,691            62,000            74,691   ................          +12,691
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..........        5,689,804         5,539,990         5,925,156          +235,352          +385,166
                                                               =========================================================================================
                    OTHER RELATED AGENCIES
 
               EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
 
Council on Environmental Quality and Office of Environmental              3,000             2,994             3,005                +5               +11
 Quality......................................................
 
        CHEMICAL SAFETY AND HAZARD INVESTIGATION BOARD
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................           11,000             9,500            11,000   ................           +1,500
 
          OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................           15,431             4,400             7,400            -8,031            +3,000
 
  INSTITUTE OF AMERICAN INDIAN AND ALASKA NATIVE CULTURE AND
                       ARTS DEVELOPMENT
 
Payment to the Institute......................................            9,835             9,960             9,960              +125   ................
 
                    SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION
 
                     Salaries and Expenses
 
Museum and Research Institutes:
    National Air and Space Museum.............................           20,110            20,110            20,110   ................  ................
    Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.....................           24,593            24,593            24,593   ................  ................
    Major scientific instrumentation..........................            4,118             4,118             4,118   ................  ................
    Universe Center...........................................              184               184               184   ................  ................
    National Museum of Natural History........................           49,789            49,789            49,789   ................  ................
    National Zoological Park..................................           27,566            27,566            27,566   ................  ................
    Smithsonian Environmental Research Center.................            4,227             4,227             4,227   ................  ................
    Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute...................           14,486            14,486            14,486   ................  ................
    Biodiversity Center.......................................            1,543             1,543             1,543   ................  ................
    Arthur M. Sackler Gallery/Freer Gallery of Art............            6,273             6,273             6,273   ................  ................
    Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.................            3,084             3,184             3,184              +100   ................
    Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum.....................            5,061             5,086             5,086               +25   ................
    Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.....................            4,687             4,544             4,544              -143   ................
    National Museum of African Art............................            4,654             4,654             4,654   ................  ................
    World Cultures Center.....................................              792               792               792   ................  ................
    Anacostia Community Museum................................            2,355             2,405             2,405               +50   ................
    Archives of American Art..................................            1,933             1,933             1,933   ................  ................
    National Museum of African American History and Culture...           33,079            33,079            33,079   ................  ................
    National Museum of American History.......................           26,504            26,704            26,704              +200   ................
    National Museum of the American Indian....................           32,671            33,242            33,242              +571   ................
    National Portrait Gallery.................................            6,556             6,556             6,556   ................  ................
    Smithsonian American Art Museum...........................           10,239            10,239            10,239   ................  ................
    American Experience Center................................              600               550               600   ................              +50
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Museums and Research Institutes...............          285,104           285,857           285,907              +803               +50
 
Mission enabling:
    Program support and outreach:
        Outreach..............................................            9,333             9,333             9,333   ................  ................
        Communications........................................            2,663             2,839             2,839              +176   ................
        Institution-wide programs.............................           16,784            14,784            16,784   ................           +2,000
        Office of Exhibits Central............................            3,154             3,169             3,169               +15   ................
        Museum Support Center.................................            1,906             1,906             1,906   ................  ................
        Museum Conservation Institute.........................            3,359             3,359             3,359   ................  ................
        Smithsonian Institution Archives......................            2,408             2,423             2,423               +15   ................
        Smithsonian Institution Libraries.....................           11,273            11,373            11,273   ................             -100
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal, Program support and outreach................           50,880            49,186            51,086              +206            +1,900
 
Office of Chief Information Officer...........................           51,967            52,509            52,509              +542   ................
Administration................................................           36,314            36,405            36,405               +91   ................
Inspector General.............................................            3,538             3,538             3,538   ................  ................
 
Facilities services:
    Facilities maintenance....................................           77,045            82,045            82,045            +5,000   ................
    Facilities operations, security and support...............          226,596           228,404           228,404            +1,808   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Facilities services...........................          303,641           310,449           310,449            +6,808   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Mission enabling..............................          446,340           452,087           453,987            +7,647            +1,900
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Salaries and expenses............................          731,444           737,944           739,894            +8,450            +1,950
                                                               =========================================================================================
                      Facilities Capital
 
Revitalization................................................          281,603           202,500           280,503            -1,100           +78,003
Facilities planning and design................................           20,300            17,000            23,000            +2,700            +6,000
Construction..................................................           10,000   ................  ................          -10,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Facilities Capital...............................          311,903           219,500           303,503            -8,400           +84,003
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION..........................        1,043,347           957,444         1,043,397               +50           +85,953
                                                               =========================================================================================
                    NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART
 
                     Salaries and Expenses
 
Care and utilization of art collections.......................           46,368            44,954            47,080              +712            +2,126
Operation and maintenance of buildings and grounds............           35,854            35,091            36,154              +300            +1,063
Protection of buildings, grounds and contents.................           26,558            27,283            26,958              +400              -325
General administration........................................           33,010            31,396            34,010            +1,000            +2,614
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Salaries and Expenses............................          141,790           138,724           144,202            +2,412            +5,478
                                                               =========================================================================================
        Repair, Restoration and Renovation of Buildings
 
Base program..................................................           24,203             8,176            23,000            -1,203           +14,824
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART..........................          165,993           146,900           167,202            +1,209           +20,302
                                                               =========================================================================================
        JOHN F. KENNEDY CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS
 
Operations and maintenance....................................           23,740            24,490            24,490              +750   ................
Capital repair and restoration................................           16,775            13,000            16,800               +25            +3,800
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, JOHN F. KENNEDY CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS...           40,515            37,490            41,290              +775            +3,800
                                                               =========================================================================================
       WOODROW WILSON INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR SCHOLARS
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................           12,000             7,474            12,000   ................           +4,526
 
      NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES
 
                National Endowment for the Arts
 
                   Grants and Administration
 
Grants:
    Direct grants.............................................           64,819   ................           64,819   ................          +64,819
    Challenge America grants..................................            7,600   ................            7,600   ................           +7,600
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           72,419   ................           72,419   ................          +72,419
 
    State partnerships:
    State and regional........................................           37,996   ................           40,000            +2,004           +40,000
    Underserved set-aside.....................................           10,284   ................           10,431              +147           +10,431
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           48,280   ................           50,431            +2,151           +50,431
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Grants........................................          120,699   ................          122,850            +2,151          +122,850
 
Program support...............................................            1,950   ................            1,950   ................           +1,950
Administration................................................           30,200            28,949            30,200   ................           +1,251
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Arts.............................................          152,849            28,949           155,000            +2,151          +126,051
                                                               =========================================================================================
             National Endowment for the Humanities
 
                   Grants and Administration
 
Grants:
    Federal/State partnership.................................           47,200   ................           48,730            +1,530           +48,730
    Preservation and access...................................           19,000   ................           19,000   ................          +19,000
    Public programs...........................................           14,000   ................           14,000   ................          +14,000
    Research programs.........................................           15,000   ................           15,000   ................          +15,000
    Education programs........................................           12,750   ................           12,750   ................          +12,750
    Program development.......................................              850   ................              850   ................             +850
    Digital humanities initiatives............................            4,600   ................            4,600   ................           +4,600
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Grants........................................          113,400   ................          114,930            +1,530          +114,930
 
Matching Grants:
    Treasury funds............................................            2,200   ................            2,200   ................           +2,200
    Challenge grants..........................................            9,100            13,537             9,100   ................           -4,437
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Matching grants...............................           11,300            13,537            11,300   ................           -2,237
 
Administration................................................           28,148            28,770            28,770              +622   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Humanities.......................................          152,848            42,307           155,000            +2,152          +112,693
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE                    305,697            71,256           310,000            +4,303          +238,744
       HUMANITIES.............................................
                                                               =========================================================================================
                    COMMISSION OF FINE ARTS
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................            2,762             2,771             2,771                +9   ................
 
          NATIONAL CAPITAL ARTS AND CULTURAL AFFAIRS
 
Grants........................................................            2,750   ................            2,750   ................           +2,750
 
           ADVISORY COUNCIL ON HISTORIC PRESERVATION
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................            6,400             6,440             6,440               +40   ................
 
             NATIONAL CAPITAL PLANNING COMMISSION
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................            8,099             7,948             7,948              -151   ................
 
            UNITED STATES HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL MUSEUM
 
Holocaust Memorial Museum.....................................           59,000            56,602            59,500              +500            +2,898
 
           DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER MEMORIAL COMMISSION
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................            1,800             1,800             1,800   ................  ................
Construction..................................................           45,000            30,000   ................          -45,000           -30,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER MEMORIAL COMMISSION.........           46,800            31,800             1,800           -45,000           -30,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
            WOMEN'S SUFFRAGE CENTENNIAL COMMISSION
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................            1,000   ................            1,000   ................           +1,000
 
               WORLD WAR I CENTENNIAL COMMISSION
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................            7,000             6,000             7,000   ................           +1,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, TITLE III, RELATED AGENCIES......................       13,365,972        11,558,033        13,918,923          +552,951        +2,360,890
          Appropriations......................................      (13,371,910)      (11,652,033)      (13,934,951)        (+563,041)      (+2,282,918)
          Rescissions.........................................          (-5,938)         (-94,000)         (-16,028)         (-10,090)         (+77,972)
          Emergency appropriations............................  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
                 TITLE IV--GENERAL PROVISIONS
 
Treatment of certain hospitals (Sec. 429).....................            8,000   ................  ................           -8,000   ................
Infrastructure (Sec. 435).....................................          766,000   ................          766,000   ................         +766,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, TITLE IV, GENERAL PROVISIONS.....................          774,000   ................          766,000            -8,000          +766,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
                     OTHER APPROPRIATIONS
 
  ADDITIONAL SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS FOR DISASTER RELIEF
            REQUIREMENTS ACT OF 2017 (P.L. 115-72)
 
                   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
 
                        Forest Service
 
Wildland Fire Management (emergency)..........................          184,500   ................  ................         -184,500   ................
FLAME Wildfire Suppression Reserve Fund (emergency)...........          342,000   ................  ................         -342,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Department of Agriculture........................          526,500   ................  ................         -526,500   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
                  DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
 
                   Department-Wide Programs
 
Wildland Fire Management (emergency)..........................           50,000   ................  ................          -50,000   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, Additional Supplemental Appropriations for                 576,500   ................  ................         -576,500   ................
       Disaster Relief Requirements, 2017.....................
                                                               =========================================================================================
  FURTHER ADDITIONAL SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS FOR DISASTER
                RELIEF ACT, 2018 (P.L. 115-123)
 
                  DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
 
            United States Fish and Wildlife Service
 
Construction (emergency)......................................          210,629   ................  ................         -210,629   ................
 
                     National Park Service
 
Historic Preservation Fund (emergency)........................           50,000   ................  ................          -50,000   ................
Construction (emergency)......................................          207,600   ................  ................         -207,600   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Park Service............................          257,600   ................  ................         -257,600   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
                United States Geological Survey
 
Surveys, Investigations, and Research (emergency).............           42,246   ................  ................          -42,246   ................
 
                     Departmental Offices
 
Insular Affairs:
    Assistance to Territories (emergency).....................            3,000   ................  ................           -3,000   ................
Office of Inspector General (emergency).......................            2,500   ................  ................           -2,500   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Departmental Offices.............................            5,500   ................  ................           -5,500   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, Department of the Interior.......................          515,975   ................  ................         -515,975   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
                Environmental Protection Agency
 
Environmental Programs and Management (emergency).............  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................
Hazardous Substance Superfund (emergency).....................            6,200   ................  ................           -6,200   ................
Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund (emergency).......            7,000   ................  ................           -7,000   ................
State and Tribal Assistance Grants (emergency)................           50,000   ................  ................          -50,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Environmental Protection Agency..................           63,200   ................  ................          -63,200   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
                   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
 
                        Forest Service
 
State and Private Forestry (emergency)........................            7,500   ................  ................           -7,500   ................
National Forest System (emergency)............................           20,652   ................  ................          -20,652   ................
Capital Improvement and Maintenance (emergency)...............           91,600   ................  ................          -91,600   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Department of Agriculture........................          119,752   ................  ................         -119,752   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, Further Additional Supplemental Appropriations             698,927   ................  ................         -698,927   ................
       for Disaster Relief, 2018..............................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, OTHER APPROPRIATIONS.............................        1,275,427   ................  ................       -1,275,427   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      GRAND TOTAL.............................................       36,589,147        28,338,610        35,914,720          -674,427        +7,576,110
          Appropriations......................................      (35,476,506)      (28,735,042)      (36,112,752)        (+636,246)      (+7,377,710)
          Rescissions.........................................        (-162,786)        (-368,292)        (-198,032)         (-35,246)        (+170,260)
          Rescissions of contract authority...................  ................         (-28,140)  ................  ................         (+28,140)
          Emergency appropriations............................       (1,275,427)  ................  ................      (-1,275,427)  ................
(By transfer).................................................          (24,274)          (26,116)          (26,116)          (+1,842)  ................
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